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Sample records for 60hh variant alters

  1. JCL roundtable: Lessons from genetic variants altering lipoprotein metabolism.

    Brown, William Virgil; Ference, Brian A; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2016-01-01

    Because the Human Genome Project reached its first major milestone in completing the full sequence of human DNA, many new discoveries have been made relating genetic variants to disease. The new methodology that allows much more rapid and focused analyses of selected genes and the ability to screen the entire exome of any individual has provided tools to examine literally thousands of individuals for a given study. Genetic analysis has become a large-scale epidemiologic tool for examining variants in gene structure and correlating them with phenotypic markers of human disorders. These genome-wide association studies have been quite revealing about the mechanism of disorders of many types. These tools have been applied to the appearance of clinical atherosclerosis and to the chronic metabolic risk factors for this disease process. We are joined by 2 individuals who have made very significant contributions to this area of research: Dr Brian Ference of Wayne State University School of Medicine and Dr Sekar Kathiresan from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. In our discussion, we are going to focus on genetic variants, which lead to changes in lipoprotein concentrations and those that have an association with earlier onset of clinical vascular disease. This roundtable was recorded during the November 2016 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida. PMID:27206929

  2. A rare myelin protein zero (MPZ variant alters enhancer activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Anthony Antonellis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myelin protein zero (MPZ is a critical structural component of myelin in the peripheral nervous system. The MPZ gene is regulated, in part, by the transcription factors SOX10 and EGR2. Mutations in MPZ, SOX10, and EGR2 have been implicated in demyelinating peripheral neuropathies, suggesting that components of this transcriptional network are candidates for harboring disease-causing mutations (or otherwise functional variants that affect MPZ expression. METHODOLOGY: We utilized a combination of multi-species sequence comparisons, transcription factor-binding site predictions, targeted human DNA re-sequencing, and in vitro and in vivo enhancer assays to study human non-coding MPZ variants. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our efforts revealed a variant within the first intron of MPZ that resides within a previously described SOX10 binding site is associated with decreased enhancer activity, and alters binding of nuclear proteins. Additionally, the genomic segment harboring this variant directs tissue-relevant reporter gene expression in zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first reported MPZ variant within a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element. While we were unable to implicate this variant in disease onset, our data suggests that similar non-coding sequences should be screened for mutations in patients with neurological disease. Furthermore, our multi-faceted approach for examining the functional significance of non-coding variants can be readily generalized to study other loci important for myelin structure and function.

  3. A MYLK variant regulates asthmatic inflammation via alterations in mRNA secondary structure.

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Saadat, Laleh; Garcia, Joe G N

    2015-06-01

    Myosin light-chain kinase (MYLK) is a gene known to be significantly associated with severe asthma in African Americans. Here we further examine the molecular function of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), located in the non-muscle myosin light-chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK), in asthma susceptibility and pathobiology. We identified nmMLCK variant (reference SNP: rs9840993, NM_053025: 721C>T, c.439C>T) with a distinct mRNA secondary structure from the other variants. The nmMLCK variant (721C) secondary structure exhibits increased stability with an elongated half-life in the human endothelial cell, and greater efficiency in protein translation initiation owing to an increased accessibility to translation start site. Finally, nmMLCK expression of 721C- and 721T-containing MYLK transgenes were compared in nmMLCK(-/-) mice and confirmed deleterious effects of nmMLCK expression on asthmatic indices and implicated the augmented influence of MYLK 721C>T (c.439C>T) SNP on asthma severity. The confirmation of the novel mechanism of the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by a MYLK advances knowledge of the genetic basis for asthma disparities, and further suggests the potential of nmMLCK as a therapeutic target. Our study suggests that in addition to altering protein structure and function, non-synonymous SNPs may also lead to phenotypic disparity by altering protein expression. PMID:25271083

  4. Polymorphic Variants of LIGHT (TNF Superfamily-14) Alter Receptor Avidity and Bioavailability1

    Cheung, Timothy C.; Coppieters, Ken; Sanjo, Hideki; Oborne, Lisa M.; Norris, Paula S.; Coddington, Amy; Granger, Steven W.; Elewaut, Dirk; Ware, Carl F.

    2010-01-01

    The TNF superfamily member, LIGHT (TNFSF14) is a key cytokine that activates T cells and dendritic cells, and is implicated as a mediator of inflammatory, metabolic and malignant diseases. LIGHT engages the Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) and herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM, TNFRSF14), but is competitively limited in activating these receptors by soluble decoy receptor-3 (DcR3, TNFRSF6B). Two variants in the human LIGHT alter the protein at E214K (rs344560) in the receptor-binding domain and S...

  5. A classification model for distinguishing copy number variants from cancer-related alterations

    Olshen Adam B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both somatic copy number alterations (CNAs and germline copy number variants (CNVs that are prevalent in healthy individuals can appear as recurrent changes in comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analyses of tumors. In order to identify important cancer genes CNAs and CNVs must be distinguished. Although the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV contains a list of all known CNVs, there is no standard methodology to use the database effectively. Results We develop a prediction model that distinguishes CNVs from CNAs based on the information contained in the DGV and several other variables, including segment's length, height, closeness to a telomere or centromere and occurrence in other patients. The models are fitted on data from glioblastoma and their corresponding normal samples that were collected as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas project and hybridized to Agilent 244 K arrays. Conclusions Using the DGV alone CNVs in the test set can be correctly identified with about 85% accuracy if the outliers are removed before segmentation and with 72% accuracy if the outliers are included, and additional variables improve the prediction by about 2-3% and 12%, respectively. Final models applied to data from ovarian tumors have about 90% accuracy with all the variables and 86% accuracy with the DGV alone.

  6. Variants of Aspergillus alutaceus var. alutaceus (formerly Aspergillus ochraceus) with altered ochratoxin a production

    The present studies, using Asperigillus alutaceus var. alutaceus Berkeley et Curtis (formerly A. ochraceus Wilhelm) NRRL 3174 along with three other wild-type strains, were undertaken in an attempt to understand the effects of irradiation and other treatments on mycotoxin production in grain. Bedford barley was inoculated with spores of NRRL 3174, gamma irradiated, and incubated at 28C and 25% moisture. After 10 days of incubation, two colony types, ocher (parental) and yellow (variant), were isolated from the grain. Further culturing of the yellow variant resulted in the spontaneous appearance of a white variant that exhibited greatly enhanced fluorescence under UV light. In subsequent work, we have also isolated variants producing a soluble red pigment. In addition, in model experiments involving irradiation (1 kGy) of pure cultures, induction frequencies ranging between 2 and 4% (survival basis) were observed for the yellow and red variants. Inoculation of these variants into wheat and incubation for 14 days at 28C and 32% moisture resulted in ochratoxin A production in the relative amounts of 0.09:1:4.6:9.3 for the red, ocher (parental), yellow, and white variants, respectively. Additional characteristics of these isolates are described. Confirmation that the white high-ochratoxin-A-producing variants were derived from the parental strain was demonstrated by obtaining revertant sectors in monoclonal cultures of the variants

  7. Crohn's disease incidence evolution in North-western Greece is not associated with alteration of NOD2/CARD15 variants

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the trends in the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) over 23 years in the same area and to identify genetic factors related to incidence evolution.METHODS: Patients with IBD arising from Northwestern Greece were systematically recorded through the 1983-2005 period. Trends in disease incidence and genetic patterns related to CARD15 variants were documented and correlated.RESULTS: A total of 447 patients with IBD were recorded (23.5% Crohn's disease, 72.7% Ulcerative colitis and 3.8% indeterminate colitis). Mean annual incidence rates of CD and UC were 0.9/100000 (95% CI 0.1-1.7) and 2.7/100000 (95% CI 1.7-4.1) inhabitants,respectively. There was a statistically significant increase of CD incidence (P < 0.01) during the study period, in contrast to the UC incidence. There were no statistical differences in CARD15 variants over the study period.CONCLUSION: The incidence of CD in North-western Greece has risen disproportionately to that of UC in the 21st century. This is not related to alterations of genetic background though.

  8. Genetic Coding Variant in GPR65 Alters Lysosomal pH and Links Lysosomal Dysfunction with Colitis Risk.

    Lassen, Kara G; McKenzie, Craig I; Mari, Muriel; Murano, Tatsuro; Begun, Jakob; Baxt, Leigh A; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J; Kuo, Szu-Yu; Huang, Hailiang; Macia, Laurence; Bhan, Atul K; Batten, Marcel; Daly, Mark J; Reggiori, Fulvio; Mackay, Charles R; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-21

    Although numerous polymorphisms have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), identifying the function of these genetic factors has proved challenging. Here we identified a role for nine genes in IBD susceptibility loci in antibacterial autophagy and characterized a role for one of these genes, GPR65, in maintaining lysosome function. Mice lacking Gpr65, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, showed increased susceptibly to bacteria-induced colitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages lacking GPR65 exhibited impaired clearance of intracellular bacteria and accumulation of aberrant lysosomes. Similarly, IBD patient cells and epithelial cells expressing an IBD-associated missense variant, GPR65 I231L, displayed aberrant lysosomal pH resulting in lysosomal dysfunction, impaired bacterial restriction, and altered lipid droplet formation. The GPR65 I231L polymorphism was sufficient to confer decreased GPR65 signaling. Collectively, these data establish a role for GPR65 in IBD susceptibility and identify lysosomal dysfunction as a potentially causative element in IBD pathogenesis with effects on cellular homeostasis and defense. PMID:27287411

  9. Protease-Activated Receptor 4 Variant p.Tyr157Cys Reduces Platelet Functional Responses and Alters Receptor Trafficking

    Norman, Jane E; Cunningham, Margaret R; Jones, Matthew L.; Walker, Mary E; Westbury, Sarah K; Sessions, Richard B.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Mumford, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4) is a key regulator of platelet reactivity and is encoded by F2RL3, which has abundant rare missense variants. We aimed to provide proof of principle that rare F2LR3 variants potentially affect platelet reactivity and responsiveness to PAR1 antagonist drugs and to explore underlying molecular mechanisms.APPROACH AND RESULTS: We identified 6 rare F2RL3 missense variants in 236 cardiac patients, of which the variant causing a tyrosine 157 to cystei...

  10. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking

    Bowton, E.; C. Saunders; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R. D.; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA...

  11. Altered target site specificity variants of the I-PpoI His-Cys box homing endonuclease

    Eklund, Jennifer L.; Ulge, Umut Y.; Eastberg, Jennifer; Monnat, Raymond J.

    2007-01-01

    We used a yeast one-hybrid assay to isolate and characterize variants of the eukaryotic homing endonuclease I-PpoI that were able to bind a mutant, cleavage-resistant I-PpoI target or ‘homing’ site DNA in vivo. Native I-PpoI recognizes and cleaves a semi-palindromic 15-bp target site with high specificity in vivo and in vitro. This target site is present in the 28S or equivalent large subunit rDNA genes of all eukaryotes. I-PpoI variants able to bind mutant target site DNA had from 1 to 8 ami...

  12. HUMAN LIVER FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN (L-FABP) T94A VARIANT ALTERS STRUCTURE, STABILITY, AND INTERACTION WITH FIBRATES

    Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Although the human L-FABP T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring SNP in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using recombinant human WT T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Non-conse...

  13. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  14. Coeliac disease-associated risk variants in TNFAIP3 and REL implicate altered NF-kappa B signalling

    Trynka, G.; Zhernakova, A.; Romanos, J.; Franke, L.; Hunt, K. A.; Turner, G.; Bruinenberg, M.; Heap, G. A.; Platteel, M.; Ryan, A. W.; de Kovel, C.; Holmes, G. K. T.; Howdle, P. D.; Walters, J. R. F.; Sanders, D. S.; Mulder, C. J. J.; Mearin, M. L.; Verbeek, W. H. M.; Trimble, V.; Stevens, F. M.; Kelleher, D.; Barisani, D.; Bardella, M. T.; McManus, R.; van Heel, D. A.; Wijmenga, C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Our previous coeliac disease genome-wide association study (GWAS) implicated risk variants in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) region and eight novel risk regions. To identify more coeliac disease loci, we selected 458 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that showed more modest associ

  15. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function

    Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Metzger, Michael W.; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stadler, Herbert; Acuña, Matías; Liberman, Ana C.; Senin, Sergio A.; Gerez, Juan; Hoijman, Esteban; Refojo, Damian; Mitkovski, Mišo; Panhuysen, Markus; Stühmer, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln) by arginine (Arg) substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain) has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations. PMID:26986975

  16. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P. W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Charles F Aylsworth; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two ex...

  17. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman; McBain, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure s...

  18. Novel inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Sequence variants of squash seed protease inhibitor with altered protease selectivity

    Novel peptide inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and cathepsin G (CG) were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis of P1 amino acid sequence variants of Curcurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III), a 29-residue peptide found in squash seed. A systematic study of P1 variants indicated that P1, Arg, Lys, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit trypsin; P1, Val, Ile, Gly, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit HLE; P1 Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit CG and chymotrypsin. Variants with P1, Val, Ile, or Gly were selective inhibitors of HLE, while inhibition of trypsin required P1 amino acids with an unbranched β carbon. Studies of Val-5-CMTI-III (P1 Val) inhibition of HLE demonstrated a 1:1 binding stoichiometry with a (Ki)app of 8.7 nM. Inhibition of HLE by Gly-5-CMTI-III indicated a significant role for reactive-site structural moieties other than the P1 side chain. Val-5-CMTI-III inhibited both HLE and human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) proteolysis of surface-bound 125I-labeled fibronectin. Val-5-CMTI-III was more effective at preventing turnover of a peptide p-nitroanilide substrate than halting dissolution of 125I-labeled fibronectin. It was about as effective as human serum α1-proteinase inhibitor in preventing PMN degradation of the connective tissue substrate. In addition to providing interesting candidates for controlling inflammatory cell proteolytic injury, the CMTI-based inhibitors are ideal for studying molecular recognition because of their small size, their ease of preparation, and the availability of sensitive and quantitative assays for intermolecular interactions

  19. Rare variants in calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1 found in early onset Alzheimer's disease patients alter calcium homeostasis.

    Fanny Rubio-Moscardo

    Full Text Available Calcium signaling in the brain is fundamental to the learning and memory process and there is evidence to suggest that its dysfunction is involved in the pathological pathways underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD. Recently, the calcium hypothesis of AD has received support with the identification of the non-selective Ca(2+-permeable channel CALHM1. A genetic polymorphism (p. P86L in CALHM1 reduces plasma membrane Ca(2+ permeability and is associated with an earlier age-at-onset of AD. To investigate the role of CALHM1 variants in early-onset AD (EOAD, we sequenced all CALHM1 coding regions in three independent series comprising 284 EOAD patients and 326 controls. Two missense mutations in patients (p.G330D and p.R154H and one (p.A213T in a control individual were identified. Calcium imaging analyses revealed that while the mutation found in a control (p.A213T behaved as wild-type CALHM1 (CALHM1-WT, a complete abolishment of the Ca(2+ influx was associated with the mutations found in EOAD patients (p.G330D and p.R154H. Notably, the previously reported p. P86L mutation was associated with an intermediate Ca(2+ influx between the CALHM1-WT and the p.G330D and p.R154H mutations. Since neither expression of wild-type nor mutant CALHM1 affected amyloid ß-peptide (Aß production or Aß-mediated cellular toxicity, we conclude that rare genetic variants in CALHM1 lead to Ca(2+ dysregulation and may contribute to the risk of EOAD through a mechanism independent from the classical Aß cascade.

  20. A variant in the carboxyl-terminus of connexin 40 alters GAP junctions and increases risk for tetralogy of Fallot

    Guida, Valentina; Ferese, Rosangela; Rocchetti, Marcella; Bonetti, Monica; Sarkozy, Anna; Cecchetti, Serena; Gelmetti, Vania; Lepri, Francesca; Copetti, Massimiliano; Lamorte, Giuseppe; Cristina Digilio, Maria; Marino, Bruno; Zaza, Antonio; den Hertog, Jeroen; Dallapiccola, Bruno; De Luca, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    GJA5 gene (MIM no. 121013), localized at 1q21.1, encodes for the cardiac gap junction protein connexin 40. In humans, copy number variants of chromosome 1q21.1 have been associated with variable phenotypes comprising congenital heart disease (CHD), including isolated TOF. In mice, the deletion of Gja5 can cause a variety of complex CHDs, in particular of the cardiac outflow tract, corresponding to TOF in many cases. In the present study, we screened for mutations in the GJA5 gene 178 unrelated probands with isolated TOF. A heterozygous nucleotide change (c.793C>T) in exon 2 of the gene leading to the p.Pro265Ser variant at the carboxyl-terminus of the protein was found in two unrelated sporadic patients, one with classic anatomy and one with pulmonary atresia. This GJA5 missense substitution was not observed in 1568 ethnically-matched control chromosomes. Immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy revealed that cells expressing the mutant protein form sparse or no visible gap-junction plaques in the region of cell–cell contact. Moreover, analysis of the transfer of the gap junction permanent tracer lucifer yellow showed that cells expressing the mutant protein have a reduced rate of dye transfer compared with wild-type cells. Finally, use of a zebrafish model revealed that microinjection of the GJA5-p.Pro265Ser mutant disrupts overall morphology of the heart tube in the 37% (22/60) of embryos, compared with the 6% (4/66) of the GJA5 wild-type-injected embryos. These findings implicate GJA5 gene as a novel susceptibility gene for TOF. PMID:22713807

  1. GWAS-identified risk variants for major depressive disorder: Preliminary support for an association with late-life depressive symptoms and brain structural alterations.

    Ryan, Joanne; Artero, Sylvaine; Carrière, Isabelle; Maller, Jerome J; Meslin, Chantal; Ritchie, Karen; Ancelin, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated risk factors for major depressive disorder (MDD), however there has been little attempt to replicate these findings in population-based studies of depressive symptoms. Variants within three genes, BICC1, PCLO and GRM7 were selected for replication in our study based on the following criteria: they were identified in a prior MDD GWAS study; a subsequent study found evidence that they influenced depression risk; and there is a solid biological basis for a role in depression. We firstly investigated whether these variants were associated with depressive symptoms in our population-based cohort of 929 elderly (238 with clinical depressive symptoms and 691 controls), and secondly to investigate associations with structural brain alterations. A number of nominally significant associations were identified, but none reached Bonferroni-corrected significance levels. Common SNPs in BICC1 and PCLO were associated with a 50% and 30% decreased risk of depression, respectively. PCLO rs2522833 was also associated with the volume of grey matter (p=1.6×10(-3)), and to a lesser extent with hippocampal volume and white matter lesions. Among depressed individuals rs9870680 (GRM7) was associated with the volume of grey and white matter (p=10(-4) and 8.3×10(-3), respectively). Our results provide some support for the involvement of BICC1 and PCLO in late-life depressive disorders and preliminary evidence that these genetic variants may also influence brain structural volumes. However effect sizes remain modest and associations did not reach corrected significance levels. Further large imaging studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26391493

  2. The rs340874 PROX1 type 2 diabetes mellitus risk variant is associated with visceral fat accumulation and alterations in postprandial glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Kretowski, Adam; Adamska, Edyta; Maliszewska, Katarzyna; Wawrusiewicz-Kurylonek, Natalia; Citko, Anna; Goscik, Joanna; Bauer, Witold; Wilk, Juliusz; Golonko, Anna; Waszczeniuk, Magdalena; Lipinska, Danuta; Hryniewicka, Justyna; Niemira, Magdalena; Paczkowska, Magdalena; Ciborowski, Michal; Gorska, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies have recently confirmed that the rs340874 single-nucleotide polymorphism in PROX1 gene is associated with fasting glycemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus; however, the mechanism of this link was not well established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the functional/phenotypic differences related to rs340874 PROX1 variants. The study group comprised 945 subjects of Polish origin (including 634 with BMI > 25) without previously known dysglycemia. We analyzed behavioral patterns (diet, physical activity), body fat distribution and glucose/fat metabolism after standardized meals and during the oral glucose tolerance test. We found that the carriers of the rs340874 PROX1 CC genotype had higher nonesterified fatty acids levels after high-fat meal (p = 0.035) and lower glucose oxidation (p = 0.014) after high-carbohydrate meal in comparison with subjects with other PROX1 genotypes. Moreover, in subjects with CC variant, we found higher accumulation of visceral fat (p consumption (p < 0.001). We hypothesize that lipid metabolism alterations in subjects with the PROX1 CC genotype may be a primary cause of higher glucose levels after glucose load, since the fatty acids can inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by decreasing carbohydrate oxidation. Our observations suggest that the PROX1 variants have pleiotropic effect on disease pathways and it seem to be a very interesting goal of research on prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study may help to understand the mechanisms of visceral obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk development. PMID:25601634

  3. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  4. The Small Colony Variant of Listeria monocytogenes Is More Tolerant to Antibiotics and Has Altered Survival in RAW 264.7 Murine Macrophages

    Curtis, Thomas; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard

    2016-01-01

    Small Colony Variant (SCV) cells of bacteria are a slow-growing phenotype that result from specific defects in the electron transport chain. They form pinpoint colonies on agar plates and have a variety of phenotypic characteristics, such as altered carbon metabolism, decreased toxin and lytic en...... the wild type phenotype. The results reported here suggest that the SCV of L. monocytogenes could be of clinical importance and highlight a need for adequate clinical screening for this phenotype, as it could affect antibiotic treatment outcomes....... monocytogenes (strain SCV E18), similar to the high persister mutant phenotype, survived significantly better than the wild type when exposed over a 48-h period to concentrations above Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for most tested antibiotics. SCV E18 survived more poorly than the wildtype in unactivated RAW...

  5. Communication of brain network core connections altered in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia but possibly preserved in early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Mendez, Mario F.; Bartzokis, George; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion imaging and brain connectivity analyses can assess white matter deterioration in the brain, revealing the underlying patterns of how brain structure declines. Fiber tractography methods can infer neural pathways and connectivity patterns, yielding sensitive mathematical metrics of network integrity. Here, we analyzed 1.5-Tesla wholebrain diffusion-weighted images from 64 participants - 15 patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 19 with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD), and 30 healthy elderly controls. Using whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We evaluated the brain's networks focusing on the most highly central and connected regions, also known as hubs, in each diagnostic group - specifically the "high-cost" structural backbone used in global and regional communication. The high-cost backbone of the brain, predicted by fiber density and minimally short pathways between brain regions, accounted for 81-92% of the overall brain communication metric in all diagnostic groups. Furthermore, we found that the set of pathways interconnecting high-cost and high-capacity regions of the brain's communication network are globally and regionally altered in bvFTD, compared to healthy participants; however, the overall organization of the high-cost and high-capacity networks were relatively preserved in EOAD participants, relative to controls. Disruption of the major central hubs that transfer information between brain regions may impair neural communication and functional integrity in characteristic ways typical of each subtype of dementia.

  6. Cloning of an apparent splice variant of the rat N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor NMDAR1 with altered sensitivity to polyamines and activators of protein kinase C.

    Durand, G M; Gregor, P.; X. Zheng; Bennett, M V; Uhl, G. R.; Zukin, R S

    1992-01-01

    Molecular cloning identified complementary DNA species, from a rat ventral midbrain library, encoding apparent splice variants of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NMDAR1 (which we now term NR1a). Sequencing revealed that one variant, NR1b, differs from NR1a by the presence of a 21-amino acid insert near the amino end of the N-terminal domain and by an alternate C-terminal domain in which the last 75 amino acids are replaced by an unrelated sequence of 22 amino acids. NR1b is virtually...

  7. A functional variant at miR-34a binding site in toll-like receptor 4 gene alters susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma in a Chinese Han population.

    Jiang, Zi-Cheng; Tang, Xian-Mei; Zhao, Ying-Ren; Zheng, Lei

    2014-12-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a key role in prompting the innate or immediate response. A growing body of evidence suggests that genetic variants of TLR4 gene were associated with the development of cancers. This study aimed to investigate the relationship of a functional variant (rs1057317) at microRNA-34a (miR-34a) binding site in toll-like receptor 4 gene and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. A single center-based case-control study was conducted. In this study, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing were used to genotype sequence variants of TLR4 in 426 hepatocellular carcinoma cases and 438 controls. The modification of rs1057317 on the binding of hsa-miR-34a to TLR4 messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured by luciferase activity assay. Individuals carrying the AA genotypes for the rs1057317 were associated significantly with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma comparing with those carrying wild-type homozygous CC genotypes (adjusted odds ratio [OR] by sex and age, from 1.116 to 2.452, P = 0.013). The activity of the reporter vector was lower in the reporter vector carrying C allele than the reporter vector carrying A allele. Furthermore, the expression of TLR4 was detected in the peripheral blood mononucleated cell of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, suggesting that mRNA and protein levels of TLR4 might be associated with SNP rs1057317. Collectively, these results suggested that the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was associated with a functional variant at miR-34a binding site in toll-like receptor 4 gene. miR-34a/TLR4 axis may play an important role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25179842

  8. Variants in the DYX2 locus are associated with altered brain activation in reading-related brain regions in subjects with reading disability

    Cope, Natalie; Eicher, John D.; Meng, Haiying; Gibson, Christopher J.; Hager, Karl; Lacadie, Cheryl; Fulbright, Robert K.; Constable, R. Todd; Page, Grier P.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Reading disability (RD) is a complex genetic disorder with unknown etiology. Genes on chromosome 6p22, including DCDC2, KIAA0319, and TTRAP, have been identified as RD associated genes. Imaging studies have shown both functional and structural differences between brains of individuals with and without RD. There are limited association studies performed between RD genes, specifically genes on 6p22, and regional brain activation during reading tasks. Using fourteen variants in DCDC2, KIAA0319, ...

  9. Cellulase variants

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  10. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    Whitcomb, David C; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P; Lerch, Markus M; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; AlKaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 cont...

  11. A C-terminally truncated mouse Best3 splice variant targets and alters the ion balance in lysosome-endosome hybrids and the endoplasmic reticulum

    Lichang Wu; Yu Sun; Liqiao Ma; Jun Zhu; Baoxia Zhang; Qingjie Pan; Yuyin Li; Huanqi Liu; Aipo Diao; Yinchuan Li

    2016-01-01

    The Bestrophin family has been characterized as Cl− channels in mammals and Na+ channels in bacteria, but their exact physiological roles remian unknown. In this study, a natural C-terminally truncated variant of mouse Bestrophin 3 (Best3V2) expression in myoblasts and muscles is demonstrated. Unlike full-length Best3, Best3V2 targets the two important intracellular Ca stores: the lysosome and the ER. Heterologous overexpression leads to lysosome swelling and renders it less acidic. Best3V2 o...

  12. A Functional Variant at the miR-214 Binding Site in the Methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase Gene Alters Susceptibility to Gastric Cancer in a Chinese Han Population

    Qiaoyun Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites, which are located in mRNA 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTRs, were recently found to influence microRNA-target interactions. Specifically, such polymorphisms can modulatebinding affinity or create or destroy miRNA-binding sites; such variants have also been found to be associated with cancer risk. In this study, we explored the effect of a functional variant at the miR-214 binding site in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (rs114673809 on gastric cancer (GC risk in a hospital-based case-control study in a Chinese Han population. Methods and Results: We genotyped the rs114673809 polymorphism in 345 gastric cancer patients and 376 cancer-free controls using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. The functions of rs114673809 were investigated using a luciferase activity assay and validated by immunoblotting. We found that participants carrying the rs114673809 AA genotype or A allele had a significantly increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 1.667, 95% CI = 1.044-2.660, P = 0.034; OR = 1.261, 95% CI = 1.017-1.563, P = 0.037, respectively compared to those carrying the GG genotype and G allele. In addition, rs114673809 modified the binding of hsa-miR-214 to MTHFR as well as MTHFR protein levels in gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: Our data suggested that rs114673809, which is located at the miR-214 binding site in the 3'-UTR of MTHFR, may play an important role in the development of gastric cancer in a Chinese Han population.

  13. Gene Variants in CYP2C19 Are Associated with Altered In Vivo Bupropion Pharmacokinetics but Not Bupropion-Assisted Smoking Cessation Outcomes

    Zhu, Andy Z.X.; Zhou, Qian; Cox, Lisa Sanderson; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Benowitz, Neal L.; Tyndale, Rachel F.

    2014-01-01

    Bupropion is used clinically to treat depression and to promote smoking cessation. It is metabolized by CYP2B6 to its active metabolite hydroxybupropion, yet alterations in CYP2B6 activity have little impact on bupropion plasma levels. Furthermore, less than 10% of a bupropion dose is excreted as urinary bupropion and its characterized metabolites hydroxybupropion, threohydrobupropion, and erythrohydrobupropion, suggesting that alternative metabolic pathways may exist. In vitro data suggested...

  14. Jeep variants

    de Bondt, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    The jeep problem was first solved by O. Helmer and N.J. Fine. But not much later, C.G. Phipps formulated a more general solution. He formulated a so-called convoy or caravan variant of the jeep problem and reduced the original problem to it. The convoy idea of Phipps was refined in [3]. Here we will apply this refined idea to several variants of the jeep problem.

  15. Migraine Variants in Children

    ... headaches . Home > Migraine Variants in Children Print Email Migraine Variants in Children ACHE Newsletter Sign up for ... newsletter by entering your e-mail address below. Migraine Variants in Children There are several disorders that ...

  16. Term variants in ontologies

    Aguado de Cea, G.; Montiel-Ponsoda, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Uno de los problemas de la representación de conocimiento en terminología es la variación terminológica, ya que los conceptos se pueden lexicalizar mediante unidades terminológicas diferentes. En esta contribución, tras analizar la tipología de las variantes terminológicas propuestas por diferentes autores, nos centramos en cómo se pueden representar las variantes terminológicas con relación a un modelo conceptual. Este enfoque permite atender por un lado a las variantes que apuntan al mismo ...

  17. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  18. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

    Jansen Pascal WTC; Campsteijn Coen; Moosmann Alexandra; Nasrallah Carole; Raasholm Martina; Stunnenberg Henk G; Thompson Eric M

    2011-01-01

    Background: Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results: We s...

  19. Hemoglobin Variants in Mice

    Popp, Raymond A.

    1965-04-22

    Variability among mammalian hemoglobins was observed many years ago (35). The chemical basis for differences among hemoglobins from different species of mammals has been studied by several investigators (5, 11, 18, 48). As well as interspecies differences, hemoglobin variants are frequently found within a species of mammals (2, 3, 7, 16) The inheritance of these intraspecies variants can be studied, and pedigrees indicate that the type of hemoglobin synthesized in an individual is genetically controlled (20). Several of the variant human hemoglobins are f'unctionally deficient (7, 16). Such hemoglobin anomalies are of basic interest to man because of the vital role of hemoglobin for transporting oxygen to all tissues of the body.

  20. Integrated multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays for the detection of alterations in the HEXB, GM2A and SMARCAL1 genes to support the diagnosis of Morbus Sandhoff, M. Tay-Sachs variant AB and Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia in humans.

    Sobek, Anna K U; Evers, Christina; Dekomien, Gabriele

    2013-02-01

    Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays were designed for the genes HEXB (OMIM: 606873), GM2A (OMIM: 613109) and SMARCAL1 (OMIM: 606622) of humans. Two sets of synthetic MLPA probes for these coding exons were tested. Changes in copy numbers were detected as well as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by complementary DNA sequence analyses. The MLPA method was shown to be reliable for mutation detection and identified five published and 12 new mutations. In all cases from a Morbus Sandhoff cohort of patients, exclusively one variation in copy number was observed and linked to a nucleotide alteration called c.1614-14C>A. This deletion comprised exons 1-5. One of these cases is described in detail. Deletions were neither detected in the GM2A nor the SMARCAL1 genes. The MLPA assays complement routine diagnostics for M. Sandhoff (OMIM: 268800), M. Tay-Sachs variant AB (OMIM: 272750) and Schimke immuno-osseous dysplasia (OMIM: 242900). PMID:23010210

  1. Splicing analysis of 14 BRCA1 missense variants classifies nine variants as pathogenic

    Ahlborn, Lise B; Dandanell, Mette; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2015-01-01

    needed to classify whether these uncertain variants are pathogenic or benign. In this study, we investigated 14 BRCA1 variants by in silico splicing analysis and mini-gene splicing assay. All 14 alterations were missense variants located within the BRCT domain of BRCA1 and had previously been examined by...... functional analysis at the protein level. Results from a validated mini-gene splicing assay indicated that nine BRCA1 variants resulted in splicing aberrations leading to truncated transcripts and thus can be considered pathogenic (c.4987A>T/p.Met1663Leu, c.4988T>A/p.Met1663Lys, c.5072C>T/p.Thr1691Ile, c...... have no or an uncertain effect on the protein level, whereas one variant (c.5072C>T/p.Thr1691Ile) were shown to have a strong effect on the protein level as well. In conclusion, our study emphasizes that in silico splicing prediction and mini-gene splicing analysis are important for the classification...

  2. Antigenic variants of rabies virus

    Wiktor, TJ; Koprowski, H

    1980-01-01

    Antigenic variants of CVS-11 strain of rabies virus were selected after treatment of virus populations with monoclonal antibodies directed against the glycoprotein antigen of the virus. These variants resisted neutralization by the hybridoma antibody used for their selection. Two independently mutating antigenic sites could be distinguished when five variants were tested with nine hybridoma antibodies. The frequency of single epitope variants in a cloned rabies virus seed was approximately 1:...

  3. Integrated analysis of germline and somatic variants in ovarian cancer.

    Kanchi, Krishna L; Johnson, Kimberly J; Lu, Charles; McLellan, Michael D; Leiserson, Mark D M; Wendl, Michael C; Zhang, Qunyuan; Koboldt, Daniel C; Xie, Mingchao; Kandoth, Cyriac; McMichael, Joshua F; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Larson, David E; Schmidt, Heather K; Miller, Christopher A; Fulton, Robert S; Spellman, Paul T; Mardis, Elaine R; Druley, Todd E; Graubert, Timothy A; Goodfellow, Paul J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Wilson, Richard K; Ding, Li

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large-scale exome-wide analysis of the combined germline-somatic landscape in ovarian cancer. Here we analyse germline and somatic alterations in 429 ovarian carcinoma cases and 557 controls. We identify 3,635 high confidence, rare truncation and 22,953 missense variants with predicted functional impact. We find germline truncation variants and large deletions across Fanconi pathway genes in 20% of cases. Enrichment of rare truncations is shown in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. In addition, we observe germline truncation variants in genes not previously associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility (NF1, MAP3K4, CDKN2B and MLL3). Evidence for loss of heterozygosity was found in 100 and 76% of cases with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 truncations, respectively. Germline-somatic interaction analysis combined with extensive bioinformatics annotation identifies 222 candidate functional germline truncation and missense variants, including two pathogenic BRCA1 and 1 TP53 deleterious variants. Finally, integrated analyses of germline and somatic variants identify significantly altered pathways, including the Fanconi, MAPK and MLL pathways. PMID:24448499

  4. Deep resequencing of GWAS loci identifies independent rare variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Rivas, Manuel A; Beaudoin, Melissa; Gardet, Agnes; Stevens, Christine; Sharma, Yashoda; Zhang, Clarence K.; Boucher, Gabrielle; Ripke, Stephan; Ellinghaus, David; Burtt, Noel; Fennell, Tim; Kirby, Andrew; Latiano, Anna; Goyette, Philippe; Green, Todd

    2012-01-01

    More than 1,000 susceptibility loci have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common variants; however, the specific genes and full allelic spectrum of causal variants underlying these findings have not yet been defined. Here we used pooled next-generation sequencing to study 56 genes from regions associated with Crohn's disease in 350 cases and 350 controls. Through follow-up genotyping of 70 rare and low-frequency protein-altering variants in nine independent ca...

  5. Radioimmunological activity of 22K variant of human growth hormone

    From a preparation of human growth hormone its integral variant (hGH-22K) was isolated by isoelectric focusing, having a pI of 5,20 and relative mobility (Rm) of 0,621 in the polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Several experiments for the characterization of the isolated variant were carried out. The immunological properties was tested by radioimmunoassay (RIE), in which the activity of the isolated variant and the activity of the total preparation were compared. The dose response-curves obtained by RIE were found to be considered parallels (p < 0,01). It was checked using the F test between the slope of the two curves. The parallelism shown the immunochemical identity of the two preparation and indicates that the separation process developed does not produce alterations in the immunological properties of the variant. (Author)

  6. Expression defect size among unclassified MLH1 variants determines pathogenicity in Lynch syndrome diagnosis

    Hinrichsen, Inga; Brieger, Angela; Trojan, Jörg; Zeuzem, Stefan; Nilbert, Mef; Plotz, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by a germline mutation in a mismatch repair gene, most commonly the MLH1 gene. However, one third of the identified alterations are missense variants with unclear clinical significance. The functionality of these variants can be tested in the laboratory, but the results c...

  7. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  8. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  9. The Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor.

    McLaren, William; Gil, Laurent; Hunt, Sarah E; Riat, Harpreet Singh; Ritchie, Graham R S; Thormann, Anja; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor is a powerful toolset for the analysis, annotation, and prioritization of genomic variants in coding and non-coding regions. It provides access to an extensive collection of genomic annotation, with a variety of interfaces to suit different requirements, and simple options for configuring and extending analysis. It is open source, free to use, and supports full reproducibility of results. The Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor can simplify and accelerate variant interpretation in a wide range of study designs. PMID:27268795

  10. Integrated Analysis of Germline and Somatic Variants in Ovarian Cancer

    Kanchi, Krishna L.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Lu, Charles; McLellan, Michael D; Mark D M Leiserson; Wendl, Michael C; Zhang, Qunyuan; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Xie, Mingchao; Kandoth, Cyriac; McMichael, Joshua F.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Larson, David E.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Christopher A Miller

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large-scale exome-wide analysis of the combined germline-somatic landscape in ovarian cancer. Here we analyze germline and somatic alterations in 429 ovarian carcinoma cases and 557 controls. We identify 3,635 high confidence, rare truncation and 22,953 missense variants with predicted functional impact. We find germline truncation variants and large deletions across Fanconi pathway genes in 20% of cases. Enrichment of rare truncations is shown in BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2. ...

  11. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration. PMID:27159990

  12. A KRAS-variant is a Biomarker of Poor Outcome, Platinum Chemotherapy Resistance and a Potential Target for Therapy in Ovarian Cancer

    Ratner, Elena S.; Keane, Florence K.; Lindner, Robert; Tassi, Renata A.; Paranjape, Trupti; Glasgow, Michelle; Nallur, Sunitha; Deng, Yanhong; Lu, Lingeng; Steele, Linda; Sand, Sharon; Muller, Roman-Ulrich; Bignotti, Eliana; Bellone, Stefania; Boeke, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line variants in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of cancer genes disrupting microRNA (miRNA) regulation have recently been associated with cancer risk. A variant in the 3′UTR of the KRAS oncogene, referred to as the KRAS-variant, is associated with both cancer risk and altered tumor biology. Here we test the hypothesis that the KRAS-variant can act as a biomarker of outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), and investigate the cause of altered outcome in KRAS-variant positive EOC pa...

  13. Three functional variants of IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) define risk and protective haplotypes for human lupus

    Graham, Robert R.; Kyogoku, Chieko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Vlasova, Irina A.; Davies, Leela R. L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Plenge, Robert M.; Koeuth, Thearith; Ortmann, Ward A.; Hom, Geoffrey; Bauer, Jason W.; Gillett, Clarence; Burtt, Noel; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Onofrio, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gregersen, Peter K.; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Daly, Mark J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Altshuler, David

    2007-01-01

    Systematic genome-wide studies to map genomic regions associated with human diseases are becoming more practical. Increasingly, efforts will be focused on the identification of the specific functional variants responsible for the disease. The challenges of identifying causal variants include the need for complete ascertainment of genetic variants and the need to consider the possibility of multiple causal alleles. We recently reported that risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly associated with a common SNP in IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and that this variant altered spicing in a way that might provide a functional explanation for the reproducible association to SLE risk. Here, by resequencing and genotyping in patients with SLE, we find evidence for three functional alleles of IRF5: the previously described exon 1B splice site variant, a 30-bp in-frame insertion/deletion variant of exon 6 that alters a proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain region, and a variant in a conserved polyA+ signal sequence that alters the length of the 3′ UTR and stability of IRF5 mRNAs. Haplotypes of these three variants define at least three distinct levels of risk to SLE. Understanding how combinations of variants influence IRF5 function may offer etiological and therapeutic insights in SLE; more generally, IRF5 and SLE illustrates how multiple common variants of the same gene can together influence risk of common disease. PMID:17412832

  14. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

    Jansen Pascal WTC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results We show that a histone complement of 47 gene loci encodes 31 histone variants, grouped in distinct sets of developmental expression profiles throughout the life cycle. A particularly diverse array of 15 male-specific histone variants was uncovered, including a testes-specific H4t, the first metazoan H4 sequence variant reported. Universal histone variants H3.3, CenH3, and H2A.Z are present but O. dioica lacks homologs of macroH2A and H2AX. The genome encodes many H2A and H2B variants and the repertoire of H2A.Z isoforms is expanded through alternative splicing, incrementally regulating the number of acetylatable lysine residues in the functionally important N-terminal "charge patch". Mass spectrometry identified 40 acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation posttranslational modifications (PTMs and showed that hallmark PTMs of "active" and "repressive" chromatin were present in O. dioica. No obvious reduction in silent heterochromatic marks was observed despite high gene density in this extraordinarily compacted chordate genome. Conclusions These results show that histone gene complements and their organization differ considerably even over modest phylogenetic distances. Substantial innovation among all core and linker histone variants has evolved in concert with adaptation of specific life history traits in this rapidly evolving chordate lineage.

  15. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation, and tumor characteristics.

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Brown, Melissa A; Tavtigian, Sean V; Goldgar, David E; Young, Joanne P; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2009-05-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened for splicing aberrations. Tumors of variant carriers were tested for microsatellite instability and MMR protein expression. Variant segregation in families was assessed using Bayes factor causality analysis. Amino acid alterations were examined for evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Splicing aberrations were detected for 10 variants, including a frameshift as a minor cDNA product, and altered ratio of known alternate splice products. Loss of splice sites was well predicted by splice-site prediction programs SpliceSiteFinder (90%) and NNSPLICE (90%), but consequence of splice site loss was less accurately predicted. No aberrations correlated with ESE predictions for the nine exonic variants studied. Seven of eight missense variants had normal splicing (88%), but only one was a substitution considered neutral from evolutionary/physicochemical analysis. Combined with information from tumor and segregation analysis, and literature review, 16 of 19 variants were considered clinically relevant. Bioinformatic tools for prediction of splicing aberrations need improvement before use without supporting studies to assess variant pathogenicity. Classification of mismatch repair gene variants is assisted by a comprehensive approach that includes in vitro, tumor pathology, clinical, and evolutionary conservation data. PMID:19267393

  16. Smectite alteration

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  17. Two Functional Lupus-Associated BLK Promoter Variants Control Cell-Type- and Developmental-Stage-Specific Transcription

    Guthridge, Joel M.; Lu, Rufei; Sun, Harry; Sun, Celi; Wiley, Graham B.; Dominguez, Nicolas; Macwana, Susan R.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Kim-Howard, Xana; Cobb, Beth L.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Adler, Adam J.; Harley, Isaac T.W.; Merrill, Joan T.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Edberg, Jeffery C.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Freedman, Barry I.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Tim J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Choi, Jiyoung; Joo, Young Bin; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Shen, Nan; Qian, Xiaoxia; Tsao, Betty P.; Scofield, R. Hal; Harley, John B.; Webb, Carol F.; Wakeland, Edward K.; James, Judith A.; Nath, Swapan K.; Graham, Robert R.; Gaffney, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to identify lupus-associated causal variants in the FAM167A/BLK locus on 8p21 are hampered by highly associated noncausal variants. In this report, we used a trans-population mapping and sequencing strategy to identify a common variant (rs922483) in the proximal BLK promoter and a tri-allelic variant (rs1382568) in the upstream alternative BLK promoter as putative causal variants for association with systemic lupus erythematosus. The risk allele (T) at rs922483 reduced proximal promoter activity and modulated alternative promoter usage. Allelic differences at rs1382568 resulted in altered promoter activity in B progenitor cell lines. Thus, our results demonstrated that both lupus-associated functional variants contribute to the autoimmune disease association by modulating transcription of BLK in B cells and thus potentially altering immune responses. PMID:24702955

  18. C-Reactive protein gene variants are associated with postoperative C-reactive protein levels after coronary artery bypass surgery

    Collard Charles D; Fox Amanda A; Liu Kuang-Yu; Muehlschlegel Jochen D; Perry Tjörvi E; Body Simon C; Shernan Stanton K

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Elevated baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are associated with increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Several CRP gene variants have been associated with altered baseline CRP levels in ambulatory populations. However, the influence of CRP gene variants on CRP levels during inflammatory states, such as surgery, is largely unexplored. We describe the association between candidate CRP gene variants and postoperative plasma CRP levels in patients undergoi...

  19. A PYY Q62P variant linked to human obesity

    Ahituv, Nadav; Kavaslar, Nihan; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska,Anna; Collier, John Michael; Hebert, Sybil; Doelle, Heather; Dent,Robert; Pennacchio, Len A.; McPherson, Ruth

    2005-06-27

    Members of the pancreatic polypeptide family and the irreceptors have been implicated in the control of food intake in rodents and humans. To investigate whether nucleotide changes in these candidate genes result in abnormal weight in humans, we sequenced the coding exons and splice sites of seven family members (NPY, PYY, PPY, NPY1R, NPY2R, NPY4R, and NPY5R) in a large cohort of extremely obese (n=379) and lean (n=378) individuals. In total we found eleven rare non-synonymous variants, four of which exhibited familial segregation, NPY1R L53P and PPY P63L with leanness and NPY2R D42G and PYY Q62P with obesity. Functional analysis of the obese variants revealed NPY2R D42G to have reduced cell surface expression, while previous cell culture based studies indicated variant PYY Q62P to have altered receptor binding selectivity and we show that it fails to reduce food intake through mouse peptide injection experiments. These results support that rare non-synonymous variants within these genes can alter susceptibility to human body mass index extremes.

  20. A large genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration highlights contributions of rare and common variants

    L.G. Fritsche (Lars G.); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.N.C. Bailey (Jessica N. Cooke); F. Grassmann (Felix); S. Sengupta (Sebanti); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn); S.J. Hebbring (Scott J.); C. Wen (Cindy); M. Gorski (Mathias); I.K. Kim (Ivana K.); D. Cho (David); D.J. Zack (Donald); E.H. Souied (Eric); H.P.N. Scholl (Hendrik); E. Bala (Elisa); K. ELee (Kristine); D.J. Hunter (David J.); R.J. Sardell (Rebecca J.); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.E. Merriam (Joanna E.); F. Cipriani (Francesco); J.D. Hoffman (Joshua D.); T. Schick (Tina); Y.T.E. Lechanteur (Yara T.E.); R.H. Guymer (Robyn); M.P. Johnson (Matthew); Y. Jiang (Yingda); C.M. Stanton (Chloe M.); G.H.S. Buitendijk (Gabrielle); X. Zhan (Xiaowei); A.M. Kwong (Alan M.); A. Boleda (Alexis); M. Brooks (Matthew); L. Gieser (Linn); R. Ratna Priya (Rinki); K.E. Branham (Kari E.); J.R. Foerster (Johanna R.); J.R. Heckenlively (John R.); M.I. Othman (Mohammad I.); B.J. Vote (Brendan J.); H.H. Liang (Helena Hai); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); I.L. McAllister (Ian L.); T. Isaacs (Timothy); J. Hall (Janette); S. Lake (Stewart); D.A. Mackey (David A.); I.J. Constable (Ian J.); J.E. Craig (Jamie E.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); Z. Yang (Zhenglin); Z. Su (Zhiguang); H. Luo (Hongrong); D. Chen (Daniel); H. Ouyang (Hong); K. Flagg (Ken); D. Lin (Danni); G. Mao (Guanping); H.A. Ferreyra (Henry); K. Stark (Klaus); C. von Strachwitz (Claudia); A. Wolf (Armin); C. Brandl (Caroline); G. Rudolph (Guenther); M. Olden (Matthias); M.A. Morrison (Margaux A.); D.J. Morgan (Denise); M. Schu (Matthew); J. Ahn (Jeeyun); G. Silvestri (Giuliana); E. ETsironi (Evangelia); K.H. Park (Kyu Hyung); L.A. Farrer (Lindsay); A. Orlin (Anton); A. Brucker (Alexander); M. Li (Mingyao); C.A. Curcio (Christine A.); S. Mohand-Sa'd (Saddek); J.-A. Sahel (José-Alain); I. Audo (Isabelle); M. Benchaboune (Mustapha); A.J. Cree (Angela); C.A. Rennie (Christina A.); S.V. Goverdhan (Srinivas V.); M. Grunin (Michelle); S. Hagbi-Levi (Shira); P. Campochiaro (Peter); N. Katsanis (Nicholas); F.G. Holz (Frank G.); F. Blond (Frédéric); H. Blanché (Hél'ne); J.-F. Deleuze (Jean-Fran'ois); R.P. Igo Jr. (Robert); B.J. Truitt (Barbara); N.S. Peachey (Neal S.); S.M. Meuer (Stacy M.); C.E. Myers (Chelsea E.); E.L. Moore (Emily L.); R. Klein (Ronald); M.A. Hauser (Michael A.); E.A. Postel (Eric A.); M.D. Courtenay (Monique D.); S.M. Schwartz (Stephen); J.L. Kovach (Jaclyn); W.K. Scott (William); G. Liew (Gerald); A.G. Tan (Ava G.); B. Gopinath (Bamini); J.C. Merriam (John C.); R.T. Smith (R Theodore); J.C. Khan (Jane C.); M. Shahid (Mohammad); A.T. Moore (Anthony T.); J.A. McGrath (J Allie); R. Laux (Reneé); M.A. Brantley (Milam A.); A. Agarwal (Anita); L. Ersoy (Lebriz); A. Caramoy (Albert); T. Langmann (Thomas); N.T.M. Saksens (Nicole T.); E.K. Jong (Eiko Kde); C.B. Hoyng (Carel B.); M.S. Cain (Melinda S.); A.J. Richardson (Andrea J.); T.M. Martin (Tammy M.); J. Blangero (John); D.E. Weeks (Daniel E.); B. Dhillon (Bal); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia M.); K.F. Doheny (Kimberly F.); J. Romm (Jane); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); C. Hayward (Caroline); M.B. Gorin (Michael B.); M.L. Klein (Michael); P.N. Baird (Paul N.); A.I. Den Hollander (Anneke I.); S. Fauser (Sascha); J.R. WYates (John R.); R. Allikmets (Rando); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); D.A. Schaumberg (Debra A.); B.E.K. Klein (Barbara); S.A. Hagstrom (Stephanie A.); Y. Chowers (Yehuda); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); T. Léveillard (Thierry); K. Zhang (Kang); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); A.W. Hewit (Alex); A. Swaroop (Anand); E.Y. Chew (Emily Y.); M.A. Pericak-Vance (Margaret); M.M. DeAngelis (Margaret); D. Stambolian (Dwight); J.L. Haines (Jonathan L.); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha K.); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); G.R. Abecasis (Gon'alo R.); I.M. Heid (Iris)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, with limited therapeutic options. Here we report on a study of >12 million variants, including 163,714 directly genotyped, mostly rare, protein-altering variants. Analyzing 16,144 patients a

  1. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from...

  2. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magn...

  3. Role of genetic variants in ADIPOQ in human eating behavior

    Rohde, Kerstin; Keller, Maria; Horstmann, Annette; Liu, Xuanshi; Eichelmann, Fabian; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Böttcher, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of adiponectin and its negative correlation with BMI are well described. Adiponectin serum levels are altered in eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating. Here, we tested the hypothesis that (1) adiponectin serum levels correlate with human eating behavior factors and (2) that genetic variants of the ADIPOQ locus influence both serum levels and eating behavior. We analyzed 11 SNPs within ADIPOQ and in the 5′ UTR and measured serum adipo...

  4. A Specificity Switch in Selected Cre Recombinase Variants Is Mediated by Macromolecular Plasticity and Water

    Baldwin, Enoch P.; Martin, Shelley S.; Abel, Jonas; Gelato, Kathy A.; Kim, Hanseong; Schultz, Peter G.; Santoro, Stephen W

    2003-01-01

    The basis for the altered DNA specificities of two Cre recombinase variants, obtained by mutation and selection, was revealed by their cocrystal structures. The proteins share similar substitutions but differ in their preferences for the natural LoxP substrate and an engineered substrate that is inactive with wild-type Cre, LoxM7. One variant preferentially recombines LoxM7 and contacts the substituted bases through a hydrated network of novel interlocking protein-DNA contacts. The other vari...

  5. Analysis of coding variants in the betacellulin gene in type 2 diabetes and insulin secretion in African American subjects

    Karim Mohammad A

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Betacellulin is a member of the epidermal growth factor family, expressed at the highest levels predominantly in the pancreas and thought to be involved in islet neogenesis and regeneration. Nonsynonymous coding variants were reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in African American subjects. We tested the hypotheses that these previously identified variants were associated with type 2 diabetes in African Americans ascertained in Arkansas and that they altered insulin secretion in glucose tolerant African American subjects. Methods We typed three variants, exon1 Cys7Gly (C7G, exon 2 Leu44Phe (L44F, and exon 4 Leu124Met (L124M, in 188 control subjects and 364 subjects with type 2 diabetes. We tested for altered insulin secretion in 107 subjects who had undergone intravenous glucose tolerance tests to assess insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion. Results No variant was associated with type 2 diabetes, and no variant altered insulin secretion or insulin sensitivity. However, an effect on lipids was observed for all 3 variants, and variant L124M was associated with obesity measures. Conclusion We were unable to confirm a role for nonsynonymous variants of betacellulin in the propensity to type 2 diabetes or to impaired insulin secretion.

  6. Data-variant kernel analysis

    Motai, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Describes and discusses the variants of kernel analysis methods for data types that have been intensely studied in recent years This book covers kernel analysis topics ranging from the fundamental theory of kernel functions to its applications. The book surveys the current status, popular trends, and developments in kernel analysis studies. The author discusses multiple kernel learning algorithms and how to choose the appropriate kernels during the learning phase. Data-Variant Kernel Analysis is a new pattern analysis framework for different types of data configurations. The chapters include

  7. ARLTS1 germline variants and the risk for breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer

    Siltanen, Sanna; Syrjäkoski, Kirsi; Fagerholm, Rainer; Ikonen, Tarja; Lipman, Peter; Mallott, Jacob; Holli, Kaija; Tammela, Teuvo LJ; Järvinen, Heikki J.; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aaltonen, Lauri A.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a nonsense alteration Trp149Stop in the ARLTS1 gene was found more frequently in familial cancer cases vs. sporadic cancer patients and healthy controls. Here, the role of Trp149Stop or any other ARLTS1 germline variant was evaluated on breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer risk. The whole gene was screened for germline alterations in 855 familial cancer patients. The five observed variants were further screened in 1169 non-familial cancer patients as well as in 809 healthy popula...

  8. Variant supercurrents and linearized supergravity

    Zheng Sibo [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Huang Jiahui, E-mail: sibozheng.zju@gmail.com [Center of Mathematical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2011-04-07

    In this paper, the variant supercurrents based on consistency and completion in off-shell N=1 supergravity are studied. We formulate the embedding relations for supersymmetric current and energy tensor into a supercurrent multiplet. Corresponding linearized supergravity is obtained with an appropriate choice of the Wess-Zumino gauge in each gravity supermultiplet.

  9. Variant supercurrents and linearized supergravity

    In this paper, the variant supercurrents based on consistency and completion in off-shell N=1 supergravity are studied. We formulate the embedding relations for supersymmetric current and energy tensor into a supercurrent multiplet. Corresponding linearized supergravity is obtained with an appropriate choice of the Wess-Zumino gauge in each gravity supermultiplet.

  10. Variant Supercurrents and Linearized Supergravity

    Zheng, Sibo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the variant supercurrents based on consistency and completion in off-shell $N=1$ supergravity are studied. We formulate the embedding relations for supersymmetric current and energy tensor into supercurrent multiplet. Corresponding linearized supergravity is obtained with appropriate choice of Wess-Zumino gauge in each gravity supermultiplet.

  11. Variant Supercurrents and Linearized Supergravity

    Zheng, Sibo; Huang, Jia-Hui

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the variant supercurrents based on consistency and completion in off-shell N=1 supergravity are studied. We formulate the embedding relations for supersymmetric current and energy tensor into supercurrent multiplet. Corresponding linearized supergravity is obtained with appropriate choice of Wess-Zumino gauge in each gravity supermultiplet.

  12. GCPII Variants, Paralogs and Orthologs

    Hlouchová, Klára; Navrátil, Václav; Tykvart, Jan; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2012), s. 1316-1322. ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : PSMA * GCPIII * NAALADase L * splice variants * homologs * PSMAL Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2012

  13. Protamine alterations in human spermatozoa.

    Jodar, Meritxell; Oliva, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Protamines are the major nuclear proteins in sperm cells, having a crucial role in the correct packaging of the paternal DNA. The fact that protamine haploinsufficiency in mice resulted in abnormal chromatin packaging and male infertility suggested that the protamines could also be important candidates in explaining some of the idiopathic male infertility cases in humans. The first clinical studies focused on analyzing protamines at the protein level. Various studies have found the presence of an altered amount of protamines in some infertile patients, in contrast to the normal situation in fertile individuals where the two protamines, protamine 1 and protamine 2, are both present in approximately equal quantities. Subsequently, the protamine genes were the subject of various mutational genetic screening studies in search of variants that could be associated with deregulation in the protamine expression observed. The results of these protamine mutational studies showed that the presence of high penetrant mutations is a very rare cause of male infertility. However, some variants and some haplotypes described may behave as risk factors for male infertility. More recently, the presence of RNA in the mature sperm cell has also been investigated. The present chapter will introduce the basic aspects of protamine evolution and function and review the various articles published to date on the relationship between the protamines studied at the DNA, RNA, and protein levels and male infertility. PMID:23955674

  14. Novel genetic variants in miR-191 gene and familial ovarian cancer

    Half of the familial aggregation of ovarian cancer can't be explained by any known risk genes, suggesting the existence of other genetic risk factors. Some of these unknown factors may not be traditional protein encoding genes. MicroRNA (miRNA) plays a critical role in tumorigenesis, but it is still unknown if variants in miRNA genes lead to predisposition to cancer. Considering the fact that miRNA regulates a number of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) and oncogenes, genetic variations in miRNA genes could affect the levels of expression of TSGs or oncogenes and, thereby, cancer risk. To test this hypothesis in familial ovarian cancer, we screened for genetic variants in thirty selected miRNA genes, which are predicted to regulate key ovarian cancer genes and are reported to be misexpressed in ovarian tumor tissues, in eighty-three patients with familial ovarian cancer. All of the patients are non-carriers of any known BRCA1/2 or mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Seven novel genetic variants were observed in four primary or precursor miRNA genes. Among them, three rare variants were found in the precursor or primary precursor of the miR-191 gene. In functional assays, the one variant located in the precursor of miR-191 resulted in conformational changes in the predicted secondary structures, and consequently altered the expression of mature miR-191. In further analysis, we found that this particular variant exists in five family members who had ovarian cancer. Our findings suggest that there are novel genetic variants in miRNA genes, and those certain genetic variants in miRNA genes can affect the expression of mature miRNAs and, consequently, might alter the regulation of TSGs or oncogenes. Additionally, the variant might be potentially associated with the development of familial ovarian cancer

  15. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    ... Past Newsletters Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Background Reporting Additional Information Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses (Swine Origin Influenza Viruses ...

  16. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    ... Documents (General) Workers Employed at Commercial Swine Farms Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Information on Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses Language: English Español Recommend ...

  17. An Obesity-Predisposing Variant of the FTO Gene Regulates D2R-Dependent Reward Learning.

    Sevgi, Meltem; Rigoux, Lionel; Kühn, Anne B; Mauer, Jan; Schilbach, Leonhard; Hess, Martin E; Gruendler, Theo O J; Ullsperger, Markus; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Brüning, Jens C; Tittgemeyer, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are linked to obesity. However, the underlying neurobiological mechanisms by which these genetic variants influence obesity, behavior, and brain are unknown. Given that Fto regulates D2/3R signaling in mice, we tested in humans whether variants in FTO would interact with a variant in the ANKK1 gene, which alters D2R signaling and is also associated with obesity. In a behavioral and fMRI study, we demonstrate that gene variants of FTO affect dopamine (D2)-dependent midbrain brain responses to reward learning and behavioral responses associated with learning from negative outcome in humans. Furthermore, dynamic causal modeling confirmed that FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic predisposition alters reward processing not only in obesity, but also in other disorders with altered D2R-dependent impulse control, such as addiction. Significance statement: Variations in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with obesity. Here we demonstrate that variants of FTO affect dopamine-dependent midbrain brain responses and learning from negative outcomes in humans during a reward learning task. Furthermore, FTO variants modulate the connectivity in a basic reward circuit of meso-striato-prefrontal regions, suggesting a mechanism by which genetic vulnerability in reward processing can increase predisposition to obesity. PMID:26354923

  18. Variants of lumbosacral elastic band.

    Carlos Cesar Santín Alfaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is made an intervention research, qualitative and quantitative of two variants of lumbosacral elastic bands used in Provincial Laboratory of Technical Orthopedics in Sancti Spiritus Province, taking into account the high demand for this device and that the laboratory do not often count with the raw material needed for the original lumbosacral belt made by denim cloth which is the conventional belt. The main goal of this research is to explain the technological process and to compare the cost of production of both elastic variants with lumbosacral belt made by cloth which are offer to patients who look for this service , giving them a rapid solution so that they can feel comfortable.

  19. BACH1 Ser919Pro variant and breast cancer risk

    BACH1 (BRCA1-associated C-terminal helicase 1; also known as BRCA1-interacting protein 1, BRIP1) is a helicase protein that interacts in vivo with BRCA1, the protein product of one of the major genes for hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. Previously, two BACH1 germ line missense mutations have been identified in early-onset breast cancer patients with and without family history of breast and ovarian cancer. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether there are BACH1 genetic variants that contribute to breast cancer risk in Finland. The BACH1 gene was screened for germ line alterations among probands from 43 Finnish BRCA1/2 negative breast cancer families. Recently, one of the observed common variants, Ser-allele of the Ser919Pro polymorphism, was suggested to associate with an increased breast cancer risk, and was here evaluated in an independent, large series of 888 unselected breast cancer patients and in 736 healthy controls. Six BACH1 germ line alterations were observed in the mutation analysis, but none of these were found to associate with the cancer phenotype. The Val193Ile variant that was seen in only one family was further screened in an independent series of 346 familial breast cancer cases and 183 healthy controls, but no additional carriers were observed. Individuals with the BACH1 Ser919-allele were not found to have an increased breast cancer risk when the Pro/Ser heterozygotes (OR 0.90; 95% CI 0.70–1.16; p = 0.427) or Ser/Ser homozygotes (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.76–1.35; p = 0.91) were compared to Pro/Pro homozygotes, and there was no association of the variant with any breast tumor characteristics, age at cancer diagnosis, family history of cancer, or survival. Our results suggest that the BACH1 Ser919 is not a breast cancer predisposition allele in the Finnish study population. Together with previous studies, our results also indicate that although some rare germ line variants in BACH1 may contribute to breast cancer development, the

  20. Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height

    Lango Allen, Hana; Estrada, Karol; Lettre, Guillaume; Berndt, Sonja I.; Weedon, Michael N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Willer, Cristen J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ferreira, Teresa; Wood, Andrew R.; Weyant, Robert J.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Soranzo, Nicole; Park, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Jian; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Randall, Joshua C.; Qi, Lu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Mägi, Reedik; Pastinen, Tomi; Liang, Liming; Heid, Iris M.; Luan, Jian'an; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Winkler, Thomas W.; Goddard, Michael E.; Lo, Ken Sin; Palmer, Cameron; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Johansson, Åsa; Zillikens, M.Carola; Feitosa, Mary F.; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Kraft, Peter; Mangino, Massimo; Prokopenko, Inga; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Ernst, Florian; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Monda, Keri L.; Polasek, Ozren; Preuss, Michael; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Perry, John R.B.; Surakka, Ida; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Altmaier, Elizabeth L.; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bhangale, Tushar; Boucher, Gabrielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Constance; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew N.; Dixon, Anna L.; Gibson, Quince; Grundberg, Elin; Hao, Ke; Junttila, M. Juhani; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kettunen, Johannes; König, Inke R.; Kwan, Tony; Lawrence, Robert W.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lorentzon, Mattias; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Martina; Ngwa, Julius Suh; Purcell, Shaun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Salem, Rany M.; Salvi, Erika; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Jianxin; Sovio, Ulla; Thompson, John R.; Turchin, Michael C.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Verlaan, Dominique J.; Vitart, Veronique; White, Charles C.; Ziegler, Andreas; Almgren, Peter; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Campbell, Harry; Citterio, Lorena; De Grandi, Alessandro; Dominiczak, Anna; Duan, Jubao; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eriksson, Johan G.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Glorioso, Nicola; Haiqing, Shen; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Illig, Thomas; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Koiranen, Markku; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Laitinen, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Marusic, Ana; Maschio, Andrea; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Petersmann, Astrid; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H.; Stringham, Heather M.; Walters, G.Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zagato, Laura; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Alavere, Helene; Farrall, Martin; McArdle, Wendy L.; Nelis, Mari; Peters, Marjolein J.; Ripatti, Samuli; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Aben, Katja K.; Ardlie, Kristin G; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Collins, Francis S.; Cusi, Daniele; den Heijer, Martin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gejman, Pablo V.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Iribarren, Carlos; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Melander, Olle; Mosley, Tom H.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Oostra, Ben; Palmer, Lyle J.; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rissanen, Aila; Rivolta, Carlo; Schunkert, Heribert; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Viikari, Jorma; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Province, Michael A.; Kayser, Manfred; Arnold, Alice M.; Atwood, Larry D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chanock, Stephen J.; Deloukas, Panos; Gieger, Christian; Grönberg, Henrik; Hall, Per; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Lathrop, G.Mark; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Uda, Manuela; Waterworth, Dawn; Wright, Alan F.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Hofman, Albert; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Cupples, L.Adrienne; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fox, Caroline S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayes, Richard B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rudan, Igor; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Völzke, Henry; Watkins, Hugh; Wilson, James F.; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunians, Talin; Hu, Frank B.; Kaplan, Robert C.; Metspalu, Andres; North, Kari E.; Schlessinger, David; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Hunter, David J.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Strachan, David P.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Borecki, Ingrid B.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Schadt, Eric E.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Peltonen, Leena; Uitterlinden, André; Visscher, Peter M.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Stefansson, Kari; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2010-01-01

    Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified >600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the utility of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P=0.016), and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants, and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented amongst variants that alter amino acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain ∼10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to ∼16% of phenotypic variation (∼20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to fully dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that

  1. Detachment variants of Chinese hamster cells. Hyaluronic acid as a modulator of cell detachment

    Barnhart, B.J.; Cox, S.H.; Kraemer, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Variants of the Chinese hamster cell line CHO have been isolated and characterized with respect to attachment and trypsin- or EGTA-mediated detachment kinetics, cell morphologies, and the complex carbohydrates (labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine) of the cell surface. The variant which was more readily detached from the substratum exhibited a more rounded cell shape and had three times more label as hyaluronic acid on the cell surface than the parental cell. The slowly detaching variant had a morphology similar to the parental cell but only half the radioactivity ascribable to hyaluronic acid. Endogenous levels of cAMP were unaltered in the variants. Exogenous db-cAMP caused the cells to elongate and flatten but did not alter the characteristic detachment kinetics. The role of hyaluronic acid as a modulator of the cell substratum interface is discussed.

  2. Prevalence of human papillomavirus type 16 variants in the Federal District, Central Brazil

    Márcio R Cruz

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available We report the prevalence of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 variants in women with cervical lesions from the Federal District, Central Brazil. We analyzed 34 HPV-16 samples, identifying the sequence variations of E6 and L1 genes and correlating variant frequency with disease status. The most prevalent HPV-16 variant was the European (50%, followed by Asian-American (41.2%, African-1 (5.9%, and African-2 (2.9%. European and non-European variants appeared in equal frequencies among the cytological types of lesions - atypical squamous or glandular cells of undetermined significance, cytological alterations suggesting HPV infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasias, squamous cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma.

  3. A protein-truncating R179X variant in RNF186 confers protection against ulcerative colitis.

    Rivas, Manuel A; Graham, Daniel; Sulem, Patrick; Stevens, Christine; Desch, A Nicole; Goyette, Philippe; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Degenhardt, Frauke; Mucha, Sören; Kurki, Mitja I; Li, Dalin; D'Amato, Mauro; Annese, Vito; Vermeire, Severine; Weersma, Rinse K; Halfvarson, Jonas; Paavola-Sakki, Paulina; Lappalainen, Maarit; Lek, Monkol; Cummings, Beryl; Tukiainen, Taru; Haritunians, Talin; Halme, Leena; Koskinen, Lotta L E; Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Luo, Yang; Heap, Graham A; Visschedijk, Marijn C; MacArthur, Daniel G; Neale, Benjamin M; Ahmad, Tariq; Anderson, Carl A; Brant, Steven R; Duerr, Richard H; Silverberg, Mark S; Cho, Judy H; Palotie, Aarno; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kontula, Kimmo; Färkkilä, Martti; McGovern, Dermot P B; Franke, Andre; Stefansson, Kari; Rioux, John D; Xavier, Ramnik J; Daly, Mark J; Barrett, J; de Lane, K; Edwards, C; Hart, A; Hawkey, C; Jostins, L; Kennedy, N; Lamb, C; Lee, J; Lees, C; Mansfield, J; Mathew, C; Mowatt, C; Newman, B; Nimmo, E; Parkes, M; Pollard, M; Prescott, N; Randall, J; Rice, D; Satsangi, J; Simmons, A; Tremelling, M; Uhlig, H; Wilson, D; Abraham, C; Achkar, J P; Bitton, A; Boucher, G; Croitoru, K; Fleshner, P; Glas, J; Kugathasan, S; Limbergen, J V; Milgrom, R; Proctor, D; Regueiro, M; Schumm, P L; Sharma, Y; Stempak, J M; Targan, S R; Wang, M H

    2016-01-01

    Protein-truncating variants protective against human disease provide in vivo validation of therapeutic targets. Here we used targeted sequencing to conduct a search for protein-truncating variants conferring protection against inflammatory bowel disease exploiting knowledge of common variants associated with the same disease. Through replication genotyping and imputation we found that a predicted protein-truncating variant (rs36095412, p.R179X, genotyped in 11,148 ulcerative colitis patients and 295,446 controls, MAF=up to 0.78%) in RNF186, a single-exon ring finger E3 ligase with strong colonic expression, protects against ulcerative colitis (overall P=6.89 × 10(-7), odds ratio=0.30). We further demonstrate that the truncated protein exhibits reduced expression and altered subcellular localization, suggesting the protective mechanism may reside in the loss of an interaction or function via mislocalization and/or loss of an essential transmembrane domain. PMID:27503255

  4. Association of genetic variants of the incretin-related genes with quantitative traits and occurrence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese

    Mayumi Enya

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Rare variants of GIPR may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes, possibly through insulin secretory defects. Furthermore, the genetic variant of PCSK1 might influence glucose homeostasis by altered insulin resistance independently of BMI, incretin level or proinsulin conversion, and may be associated with the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese.

  5. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia.

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-05-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  6. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia

    Vemula, Satya R; Xiao, Jianfeng; Zhao, Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel S; Racette, Brad A; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana; Jinnah, Hyder A; Frei, Karen; Pfeiffer, Ronald F; LeDoux, Mark S

    2014-01-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P A variant was associated with an elevated ratio of Isoform 1 (NM_018105) to Isoform 2 (NM_199003) in leukocytes. In silico and minigene analyses indicated that c.71+9C>A alters THAP1 splicing. Lymphoblastoid cells harboring the c.71+9C>A variant showed extensive apoptosis with relatively fewer cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Differentially expressed genes from lymphoblastoid cells revealed that the c.71+9C>A variant exerts effects on DNA synthesis, cell growth and proliferation, cell survival, and cytotoxicity. In aggregate, these data indicate that THAP1 c.71+9C>A is a risk factor for adult-onset primary dystonia. PMID:24936516

  7. Combinatorial effects of multiple enhancer variants in linkage disequilibrium dictate levels of gene expression to confer susceptibility to common traits.

    Corradin, Olivia; Saiakhova, Alina; Akhtar-Zaidi, Batool; Myeroff, Lois; Willis, Joseph; Cowper-Sal lari, Richard; Lupien, Mathieu; Markowitz, Sanford; Scacheri, Peter C

    2014-01-01

    DNA variants (SNPs) that predispose to common traits often localize within noncoding regulatory elements such as enhancers. Moreover, loci identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often contain multiple SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD), any of which may be causal. Thus, determining the effect of these multiple variant SNPs on target transcript levels has been a major challenge. Here, we provide evidence that for six common autoimmune disorders (rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and ulcerative colitis), the GWAS association arises from multiple polymorphisms in LD that map to clusters of enhancer elements active in the same cell type. This finding suggests a "multiple enhancer variant" hypothesis for common traits, where several variants in LD impact multiple enhancers and cooperatively affect gene expression. Using a novel method to delineate enhancer-gene interactions, we show that multiple enhancer variants within a given locus typically target the same gene. Using available data from HapMap and B lymphoblasts as a model system, we provide evidence at numerous loci that multiple enhancer variants cooperatively contribute to altered expression of their gene targets. The effects on target transcript levels tend to be modest and can be either gain- or loss-of-function. Additionally, the genes associated with multiple enhancer variants encode proteins that are often functionally related and enriched in common pathways. Overall, the multiple enhancer variant hypothesis offers a new paradigm by which noncoding variants can confer susceptibility to common traits. PMID:24196873

  8. AXIN1 and AXIN2 variants in gastrointestinal cancers.

    Mazzoni, Serina M; Fearon, Eric R

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene, which encodes a multi-functional protein with a well-defined role in the canonical Wnt pathway, underlie familial adenomatous polypsosis, a rare, inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC) and contribute to the majority of sporadic CRCs. However, not all sporadic and familial CRCs can be explained by mutations in APC or other genes with well-established roles in CRC. The AXIN1 and AXIN2 proteins function in the canonical Wnt pathway, and AXIN1/2 alterations have been proposed as key defects in some cancers. Here, we review AXIN1 and AXIN2 sequence alterations reported in gastrointestinal cancers, with the goal of vetting the evidence that some of the variants may have key functional roles in cancer development. PMID:25236910

  9. You stole my food! Eating alterations in frontotemporal dementia.

    Aiello, Marilena; Silani, Vincenzo; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2016-08-01

    Patients with different types of dementia may exhibit pathological eating habits, including food fads, hyperphagia, or even ingestion of inanimate objects. Several findings reveal that such eating alterations are more common in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) than other types of dementia. Moreover, eating alterations may differ between the two variants of the disease, namely the behavioral variant and semantic dementia (SD). In this review, we summarized evidences regarding four areas: eating and body weight alterations in FTD, the most common assessment methods, anatomical correlates of eating disorders, and finally, proposed underlying mechanisms. An increasing understanding of the factors that contribute to eating abnormalities may allow first, a better comprehension of the clinical features of the disease and second, shed light on the mechanism underlying eating behaviors in the normal population. PMID:27327171

  10. A novel epidermal growth factor receptor variant lacking multiple domains directly activates transcription and is overexpressed in tumors

    Piccione, EC; Lieu, TJ; Gentile, CF; Williams, TR; Connolly, AJ; Godwin, AK; Koong, AC; Wong, AJ

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is essential to multiple physiological and neoplastic processes via signaling by its tyrosine kinase domain and subsequent activation of transcription factors. EGFR overexpression and alteration, including point mutations and structural variants, contribute to oncogenesis in many tumor types. In this study, we identified an in-frame splice variant of the EGFR called mini-LEEK (mLEEK) that is more broadly expressed than the EGFR and is overexpressed ...

  11. CT skull base & calvarium normal variant pitfalls

    Lockwood, P

    2013-01-01

    Intended learning outcomes - To recognise the varied neurological appearances of skull based normal variants with the brain. Highlighting the importance of differentiation of normal and variant anatomy from the pitfalls of misdiagnosing a pathological condition Content of Presentation -Pictorial review of 12 common examples of neuroradiological normal variant conditions of skull base and calvarium anatomical areas of the brain, including sutures, asymmetry of bones, benign growths, thicken...

  12. Annotating Cancer Variants and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics in Reactome

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of “cancer” pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics

  13. Mitochondrial DNA variants in obesity.

    Nadja Knoll

    Full Text Available Heritability estimates for body mass index (BMI variation are high. For mothers and their offspring higher BMI correlations have been described than for fathers. Variation(s in the exclusively maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA might contribute to this parental effect. Thirty-two to 40 mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were available from genome-wide association study SNP arrays (Affymetrix 6.0. For discovery, we analyzed association in a case-control (CC sample of 1,158 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls. For independent confirmation, 7,014 population-based adults were analyzed as CC sample of n = 1,697 obese cases (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and n = 2,373 normal weight and lean controls (BMI<25 kg/m2. SNPs were analyzed as single SNPs and haplogroups determined by HaploGrep. Fisher's two-sided exact test was used for association testing. Moreover, the D-loop was re-sequenced (Sanger in 192 extremely obese children and adolescents and 192 lean adult controls. Association testing of detected variants was performed using Fisher's two-sided exact test. For discovery, nominal association with obesity was found for the frequent allele G of m.8994G/A (rs28358887, p = 0.002 located in ATP6. Haplogroup W was nominally overrepresented in the controls (p = 0.039. These findings could not be confirmed independently. For two of the 252 identified D-loop variants nominal association was detected (m.16292C/T, p = 0.007, m.16189T/C, p = 0.048. Only eight controls carried the m.16292T allele, five of whom belonged to haplogroup W that was initially enriched among these controls. m.16189T/C might create an uninterrupted poly-C tract located near a regulatory element involved in replication of mtDNA. Though follow-up of some D-loop variants still is conceivable, our hypothesis of a contribution of variation in the exclusively maternally inherited mtDNA to the observed larger correlations for BMI between mothers and

  14. Functional and structural analysis of C-terminal BRCA1 missense variants.

    Francisco Quiles

    Full Text Available Germline inactivating mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are responsible for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome (HBOCS. Genetic testing of these genes is available, although approximately 15% of tests identify variants of uncertain significance (VUS. Classification of these variants into pathogenic or non-pathogenic type is an important challenge in genetic diagnosis and counseling. The aim of the present study is to functionally assess a set of 7 missense VUS (Q1409L, S1473P, E1586G, R1589H, Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V located in the C-terminal region of BRCA1 by combining in silico prediction tools and structural analysis with a transcription activation (TA assay. The in silico prediction programs gave discrepant results making its interpretation difficult. Structural analysis of the three variants located in the BRCT domains (Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V reveals significant alterations of BRCT structure. The TA assay shows that variants Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V dramatically compromise the transcriptional activity of BRCA1, while variants Q1409L, S1473P, E1586G and R1589H behave like wild-type BRCA1. In conclusion, our results suggest that variants Y1703S, W1718L and G1770V can be classified as likely pathogenic BRCA1 mutations.

  15. Gene duplication and hypermutation of the pathogen Resistance gene SNC1 in the Arabidopsis bal variant.

    Yi, Hankuil; Richards, Eric J

    2009-12-01

    The bal defect in the Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia strain was spontaneously generated in an inbred ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation 1) mutant background in which various genetic and epigenetic alterations accumulate. The bal variant displays short stature and curled leaves due to the constitutive activation of defense signaling. These bal phenotypes are metastable and phenotypic suppression is evident in more than one-third of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated bal M(1) plants. The semidominant bal allele maps to the RPP5 (recognition of Peronospora parasitica 5) locus, which includes a cluster of disease Resistance (R) genes, many of which show an increase in steady-state expression levels in the bal variant. Here, we report that activation of RPP5 locus R genes and dwarfing in the bal variant are caused by a 55-kb duplication within the RPP5 locus. Although many RPP5 locus R genes are duplicated in the bal variant, the duplication of SNC1 alone is necessary and sufficient for the phenotypic changes in the bal variant. Missense mutations in the SNC1 gene were identified in all three phenotypically suppressed EMS-treated bal lines investigated, indicating that the high-frequency phenotypic instability induced by EMS treatment is caused by a genetic mechanism. We propose that the high degree of variation in SNC1-related sequences among Arabidopsis natural accessions follows the two-step mechanism observed in the bal variant: gene duplication followed by hypermutation. PMID:19797048

  16. A KRAS-variant in Ovarian Cancer Acts as a Genetic Marker of Cancer Risk

    Ratner, Elena; Lu, Lingeng; Boeke, Marta; Barnett, Rachel; Nallur, Sunitha; Chin, Lena J; Pelletier, Cory; Blitzblau, Rachel; Tassi, Renata; Paranjape, Trupti; Hui, Pei; Andrew K Godwin; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey; Rutherford, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the single most deadly form of women’s cancer, typically presenting as an advanced disease at diagnosis in part due to a lack of known risk factors or genetic markers of risk. The KRAS oncogene and altered levels of the microRNA let-7 are associated with an increased risk of developing solid tumors. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized association between an increased risk of ovarian cancer and a variant allele of KRAS at rs61764370, referred to as the KRAS-variant,...

  17. Novel and recurrent CIB2 variants, associated with nonsyndromic deafness, do not affect calcium buffering and localization in hair cells.

    Seco, Celia Zazo; Giese, Arnaud P; Shafique, Sobia; Schraders, Margit; Oonk, Anne M M; Grossheim, Mike; Oostrik, Jaap; Strom, Tim; Hegde, Rashmi; van Wijk, Erwin; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Azam, Maleeha; Yntema, Helger G; Free, Rolien H; Riazuddin, Saima; Verheij, Joke B G M; Admiraal, Ronald J; Qamar, Raheel; Ahmed, Zubair M; Kremer, Hannie

    2016-04-01

    Variants in CIB2 can underlie either Usher syndrome type I (USH1J) or nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) (DFNB48). Here, a novel homozygous missense variant c.196C>T and compound heterozygous variants, c.[97C>T];[196C>T], were found, respectively, in two unrelated families of Dutch origin. Besides, the previously reported c.272 T>C functional missense variant in CIB2 was identified in two families of Pakistani origin. The missense variants are demonstrated not to affect subcellular localization of CIB2 in vestibular hair cells in ex vivo expression experiments. Furthermore, these variants do not affect the ATP-induced calcium responses in COS-7 cells. However, based on the residues affected, the variants are suggested to alter αIIβ integrin binding. HI was nonsyndromic in all four families. However, deafness segregating with the c.272T>C variant in one Pakistani family is remarkably less severe than that in all other families with this mutation. Our results contribute to the insight in genotype-phenotype correlations of CIB2 mutations. PMID:26173970

  18. ATM variants and cancer risk in breast cancer patients from Southern Finland

    Aittomäki Kristiina

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals heterozygous for germline ATM mutations have been reported to have an increased risk for breast cancer but the role for ATM genetic variants for breast cancer risk has remained unclear. Recently, a common ATM variant, ATMivs38 -8T>C in cis with the ATMex39 5557G>A (D1853N variant, was suggested to associate with bilateral breast cancer among familial breast cancer patients from Northern Finland. We have here evaluated the 5557G>A and ivs38-8T>C variants in an extensive case-control association analysis. We also aimed to investigate whether there are other ATM mutations or variants contributing to breast cancer risk in our population. Methods Two common ATM variants, 5557G>A and ivs38-8T>C, previously suggested to associate with bilateral breast cancer, were genotyped in an extensive set of 786 familial and 884 unselected breast cancer cases as well as 708 healthy controls. We also screened the entire coding region and exon-intron boundaries of the ATM gene in 47 familial breast cancer patients and constructed haplotypes of the patients. The identified variants were also evaluated for increased breast cancer risk among additional breast cancer cases and controls. Results Neither of the two common variants, 5557G>A and ivs38-8T>C, nor any haplotype containing them, was significantly associated with breast cancer risk, bilateral breast cancer or multiple primary cancers in any of the patient groups or subgoups. Three rare missense alterations and one intronic change were each found in only one patient of over 250 familial patients studied and not among controls. The fourth missense alteration studied further was found with closely similar frequencies in over 600 familial cases and controls. Conclusion Altogether, our results suggest very minor effect, if any, of ATM genetic variants on familial breast cancer in Southern Finland. Our results do not support association of the 5557G>A or ivs38-8T>C variant with

  19. Local binary patterns new variants and applications

    Jain, Lakhmi; Nanni, Loris; Lumini, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    This book introduces Local Binary Patterns (LBP), arguably one of the most powerful texture descriptors, and LBP variants. This volume provides the latest reviews of the literature and a presentation of some of the best LBP variants by researchers at the forefront of textual analysis research and research on LBP descriptors and variants. The value of LBP variants is illustrated with reported experiments using many databases representing a diversity of computer vision applications in medicine, biometrics, and other areas. There is also a chapter that provides an excellent theoretical foundation for texture analysis and LBP in particular. A special section focuses on LBP and LBP variants in the area of face recognition, including thermal face recognition. This book will be of value to anyone already in the field as well as to those interested in learning more about this powerful family of texture descriptors.

  20. Rare Variants of the Serotonin Transporter Are Associated With Psychiatric Comorbidity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    Kohen, Ruth; Tracy, Julia H; Haugen, Eric; Cain, Kevin C; Jarrett, Monica E; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in serotonin signaling are suspected in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). By modulating the extracellular reuptake of serotonin, the serotonin transporter (SERT) acts as a key regulator of the bioavailability of serotonin. This study is the first to investigate the impact of rare SERT variants (i.e., those with a minor allele frequency of gastrointestinal (GI) symptom level, response to cognitive-behavioral treatment, and psychiatric comorbidity. We sequenced a 0.19 megabase chromosomal stretch containing the SERT gene and surrounding regions in a community sample of 304 IBS patients and 83 controls. We found no significant associations between rare variants in and around the SERT gene and IBS risk, GI symptom profile, or response to treatment. We found preliminary evidence, however, that IBS subjects with a history of either depression or anxiety were significantly more likely to carry multiple rare likely functional variant alleles than IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:26912503

  1. Innate immune activity conditions the effect of regulatory variants upon monocyte gene expression.

    Fairfax, Benjamin P; Humburg, Peter; Makino, Seiko; Naranbhai, Vivek; Wong, Daniel; Lau, Evelyn; Jostins, Luke; Plant, Katharine; Andrews, Robert; McGee, Chris; Knight, Julian C

    2014-03-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTLs including the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), coding variants altering enzyme and receptor function, an IFN-β cytokine network showing temporal specificity, and an interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) transcription factor-modulated network. Induced eQTL are significantly enriched for genome-wide association study loci, identifying context-specific associations to putative causal genes including CARD9, ATM, and IRF8. Thus, applying pathophysiologically relevant immune stimuli assists resolution of functional genetic variants. PMID:24604202

  2. A specificity switch in selected cre recombinase variants is mediated by macromolecular plasticity and water.

    Baldwin, Enoch P; Martin, Shelley S; Abel, Jonas; Gelato, Kathy A; Kim, Hanseong; Schultz, Peter G; Santoro, Stephen W

    2003-11-01

    The basis for the altered DNA specificities of two Cre recombinase variants, obtained by mutation and selection, was revealed by their cocrystal structures. The proteins share similar substitutions but differ in their preferences for the natural LoxP substrate and an engineered substrate that is inactive with wild-type Cre, LoxM7. One variant preferentially recombines LoxM7 and contacts the substituted bases through a hydrated network of novel interlocking protein-DNA contacts. The other variant recognizes both LoxP and LoxM7 utilizing the same DNA backbone contact but different base contacts, facilitated by an unexpected DNA shift. Assisted by water, novel interaction networks can arise from few protein substitutions, suggesting how new DNA binding specificities might evolve. The contributions of macromolecular plasticity and water networks in specific DNA recognition observed here present a challenge for predictive schemes. PMID:14652076

  3. Genetic variants in adult liver diseases.

    Dröge, C; Häussinger, D; Keitel, V

    2015-12-01

    In the last decades, understanding of genetic variants contributing to liver disease development has considerably improved through novel genotyping techniques. Genetic variants of single genes are known to be decisive for the development of monogenetic liver diseases of varying severity. Identification of genetic variants is an important part of the diagnostic process, e. g. the majority of patients with high iron [Fe] (HFE)-associated hemochromatosis carry the homozygous mutation p.C282Y. Detection of mutations in genes encoding hepatobiliary transport proteins like familial intrahepatic cholestasis 1 (FIC1), bile salt export pump (BSEP), or multidrug resistance protein 3 (MDR3) is the basis to differentiate various forms of intrahepatic cholestasis. Moreover, genetic variants in a variety of genes are known to act as disease modifiers and represent risk factors for disease progression and the development of cirrhosis or even hepatocellular carcinoma. Success of drug treatment or appearance of severe side effects can also be influenced by specific genetic variants. All these aspects underscore the increasing importance of genetic variants, which in the future may help to identify patients at risk for disease progression or help to guide treatment decisions. In the present overview, specific frequent genetic variants are summarized that play roles in monogenetic liver diseases, forms of intrahepatic cholestasis, gallstone development, fatty liver disease, drug-induced liver injury, and liver disease progression as well as hepatocellular carcinoma development. PMID:26666282

  4. Different Variants of Fundamental Portfolio

    Tarczyński Waldemar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes the fundamental portfolio of securities. This portfolio is an alternative for the classic Markowitz model, which combines fundamental analysis with portfolio analysis. The method’s main idea is based on the use of the TMAI1 synthetic measure and, in limiting conditions, the use of risk and the portfolio’s rate of return in the objective function. Different variants of fundamental portfolio have been considered under an empirical study. The effectiveness of the proposed solutions has been related to the classic portfolio constructed with the help of the Markowitz model and the WIG20 market index’s rate of return. All portfolios were constructed with data on rates of return for 2005. Their effectiveness in 2006- 2013 was then evaluated. The studied period comprises the end of the bull market, the 2007-2009 crisis, the 2010 bull market and the 2011 crisis. This allows for the evaluation of the solutions’ flexibility in various extreme situations. For the construction of the fundamental portfolio’s objective function and the TMAI, the study made use of financial and economic data on selected indicators retrieved from Notoria Serwis for 2005.

  5. [Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: origin and variants].

    Aronov, D M

    2008-01-01

    This literature review is devoted to the " tako-tsubo " cardiomyopathy - rare type of cardiomyopathy characterized by transient myocardial stunning. In acute phase the disease resembles myocardial infarction. However no involvement of coronary arteries is found at angiography. Echocardiography and ventriculography reveal a- or - hypokinesia of various parts of the left ventricle. Classic (initial) variant of the disease is associated with concomitant apical akinesia and hyperkinesis of basal segments. The heart acquires a distinctive configuration with ballooning apex which resembles device used to trap octopus. The author refers to described by him 11 cases of myocardial damage with infarct-like clinic without changes of coronary arteries in healthy men younger than 35 years (D.M.Aronow, 1968, 1974). These cases occurred during severe physical stress and had in their basis hypercatecholaminemia which led to reversible myocardial damage of the myocardium which corresponded to modern concept of myocardial stunning. During exercise tests these patients had 3 times greater increase of urinal epinephrine excretion compared with 61 patients of the same age with atherosclerotic heart disease. PMID:18991836

  6. Functional assessment of disease-associated regulatory variants in vivo using a versatile dual colour transgenesis strategy in zebrafish.

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T; Foster, Robert G; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2015-06-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  7. Alterations in HIV-1 LTR promoter activity during AIDS progression

    HIV-1 variants evolving in AIDS patients frequently show increased replicative capacity compared to those present during early asymptomatic infection. It is known that late stage HIV-1 variants often show an expanded coreceptor tropism and altered Nef function. In the present study we investigated whether enhanced HIV-1 LTR promoter activity might also evolve during disease progression. Our results demonstrate increased LTR promoter activity after AIDS progression in 3 of 12 HIV-1-infected individuals studied. Further analysis revealed that multiple alterations in the U3 core-enhancer and in the transactivation-response (TAR) region seem to be responsible for the enhanced functional activity. Our findings show that in a subset of HIV-1-infected individuals enhanced LTR transcription contributes to the increased replicative potential of late stage virus isolates and might accelerate disease progression

  8. Variante N-621 Potes y Ojedo

    Larrea Gómez, Aitor

    2015-01-01

    RESUMEN: El proyecto que se presenta es una variante de carretera nacional realizada en la Comarca de Liébana, dando servicio a las localidades de Potes y Ojedo y al tráfico circulante entre León y Cantabria a través de la N-621. Se realiza entre los P.K. 147 y 150 enlazándose a esta mediante dos glorietas de dos carriles. El objetivo primordial de esta variante es evitar que el tráfico mencionado circule a través de estas poblaciones y, por tanto, reducir su peligrosidad. La variante pro...

  9. Characterization of form variants of Xenorhabdus luminescens.

    Gerritsen, L.J.M.; Raay, van, C.; Smits, P H

    1992-01-01

    From Xenorhabdus luminescens XE-87.3 four variants were isolated. One, which produced a red pigment and antibiotics, was luminescent, and could take up dye from culture media, was considered the primary form (XE-red). A pink-pigmented variant (XE-pink) differed from the primary form only in pigmentation and uptake of dye. Of the two other variants, one produced a yellow pigment and fewer antibiotics (XE-yellow), while the other did not produce a pigment or antibiotics (XE-white). Both were le...

  10. Vcfanno: fast, flexible annotation of genetic variants.

    Pedersen, Brent S; Layer, Ryan M; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    The integration of genome annotations is critical to the identification of genetic variants that are relevant to studies of disease or other traits. However, comprehensive variant annotation with diverse file formats is difficult with existing methods. Here we describe vcfanno, which flexibly extracts and summarizes attributes from multiple annotation files and integrates the annotations within the INFO column of the original VCF file. By leveraging a parallel "chromosome sweeping" algorithm, we demonstrate substantial performance gains by annotating ~85,000 variants per second with 50 attributes from 17 commonly used genome annotation resources. Vcfanno is available at https://github.com/brentp/vcfanno under the MIT license. PMID:27250555

  11. Rare FOXC1 variants in congenital glaucoma: identification of translation regulatory sequences.

    Medina-Trillo, Cristina; Aroca-Aguilar, José-Daniel; Méndez-Hernández, Carmen-Dora; Morales, Laura; García-Antón, Maite; García-Feijoo, Julián; Escribano, Julio

    2016-05-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is the cause of a significant proportion of inherited visual loss in children, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the relationship between PCG and FOXC1 variants by Sanger sequencing the proximal promoter and transcribed sequence of FOXC1 from a cohort of 133 PCG families with no known CYP1B1 or MYOC mutations. The pathogenicity of the identified variants was evaluated by functional analyses. Ten patients (7.5%) with no family history of glaucoma carried five different rare heterozygous FOXC1 variants with both increased (rs77888940:C>G, c.-429C>G, rs730882054:c.1134_144del(CGGCGGCGCGG), p.(G380Rfs*144) and rs35717904:A>T, c.*734A>T) and decreased (rs185790394: C>T, c.-244C>T and rs79691946:C>T, p.(P297S)) transactivation, ranging from 50 to 180% of the wild-type activity. The five variants did not show monogenic segregation, and four of them were absent in a control group (n=233). To the best of our knowledge, one of these variants (p.(G380Rfs*144)) has not previously been described. One of the FOXC1 variant carriers (p.(P297S)) also coinherited a functionally altered rare PITX2 heterozygous variant (rs6533526:C>T, c.*454C>T). Bioinformatics and functional analyses provided novel information on three of these variants. c.-429C>G potentially disrupts a consensus sequence for a terminal oligopyrimidine tract, whereas c.-244C>T may alter the RNA secondary structure in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) that affects mRNA translation. In addition, p.(G380Rfs*144) led to increased protein stability. In summary, these data reveal the presence of translation regulatory sequences in the UTRs of FOXC1 and provide evidence for a possible role of rare FOXC1 variants as modifying factors of goniodysgenesis in PCG. PMID:26220699

  12. Alternative splicing modulated by genetic variants demonstrates accelerated evolution regulated by highly conserved proteins.

    Hsiao, Yun-Hua Esther; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lin, Xianzhi; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wang, Rena; Xiao, Xinshu

    2016-04-01

    Identification of functional genetic variants and elucidation of their regulatory mechanisms represent significant challenges of the post-genomic era. A poorly understood topic is the involvement of genetic variants in mediating post-transcriptional RNA processing, including alternative splicing. Thus far, little is known about the genomic, evolutionary, and regulatory features of genetically modulated alternative splicing (GMAS). Here, we systematically identified intronic tag variants for genetic modulation of alternative splicing using RNA-seq data specific to cellular compartments. Combined with our previous method that identifies exonic tags for GMAS, this study yielded 622 GMAS exons. We observed that GMAS events are highly cell type independent, indicating that splicing-altering genetic variants could have widespread function across cell types. Interestingly, GMAS genes, exons, and single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) all demonstrated positive selection or accelerated evolution in primates. We predicted that GMAS SNVs often alter binding of splicing factors, with SRSF1 affecting the most GMAS events and demonstrating global allelic binding bias. However, in contrast to their GMAS targets, the predicted splicing factors are more conserved than expected, suggesting thatcis-regulatory variation is the major driving force of splicing evolution. Moreover, GMAS-related splicing factors had stronger consensus motifs than expected, consistent with their susceptibility to SNV disruption. Intriguingly, GMAS SNVs in general do not alter the strongest consensus position of the splicing factor motif, except the more than 100 GMAS SNVs in linkage disequilibrium with polymorphisms reported by genome-wide association studies. Our study reports many GMAS events and enables a better understanding of the evolutionary and regulatory features of this phenomenon. PMID:26888265

  13. Phenomenological and neuropsychological profile across motor variants of delirium in a palliative care unit

    Leonard, Maeve

    2011-01-01

    Studies using composite measurement of cognition suggest that cognitive performance is similar across motor variants of delirium. The authors assessed neuropsychological and symptom profiles in 100 consecutive cases of DSM-IV delirium allocated to motor subtypes in a palliative-care unit: Hypoactive (N=33), Hyperactive (N=18), Mixed (N=26), and No-Alteration motor groups (N=23). The Mixed group had more severe delirium, with highest scores for DRS-R-98 sleep-wake cycle disturbance, hallucinations, delusions, and language abnormalities. Neither the total Cognitive Test for Delirium nor its five neuropsychological domains differed across Hyperactive, Mixed, and Hypoactive motor groups. Most patients (70%) with no motor alteration had DRS-R-98 scores in the mild or subsyndromal range even though they met DSM-IV criteria. Motor variants in delirium have similar cognitive profiles, but mixed cases differ in expression of several noncognitive features.

  14. Characterizing genomic alterations in cancer by complementary functional associations.

    Kim, Jong Wook; Botvinnik, Olga B; Abudayyeh, Omar; Birger, Chet; Rosenbluh, Joseph; Shrestha, Yashaswi; Abazeed, Mohamed E; Hammerman, Peter S; DiCara, Daniel; Konieczkowski, David J; Johannessen, Cory M; Liberzon, Arthur; Alizad-Rahvar, Amir Reza; Alexe, Gabriela; Aguirre, Andrew; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Greulich, Heidi; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Tsherniak, Aviad; Shao, Diane D; Zack, Travis I; Noble, Michael; Getz, Gad; Beroukhim, Rameen; Garraway, Levi A; Ardakani, Masoud; Romualdi, Chiara; Sales, Gabriele; Barbie, David A; Boehm, Jesse S; Hahn, William C; Mesirov, Jill P; Tamayo, Pablo

    2016-05-01

    Systematic efforts to sequence the cancer genome have identified large numbers of mutations and copy number alterations in human cancers. However, elucidating the functional consequences of these variants, and their interactions to drive or maintain oncogenic states, remains a challenge in cancer research. We developed REVEALER, a computational method that identifies combinations of mutually exclusive genomic alterations correlated with functional phenotypes, such as the activation or gene dependency of oncogenic pathways or sensitivity to a drug treatment. We used REVEALER to uncover complementary genomic alterations associated with the transcriptional activation of β-catenin and NRF2, MEK-inhibitor sensitivity, and KRAS dependency. REVEALER successfully identified both known and new associations, demonstrating the power of combining functional profiles with extensive characterization of genomic alterations in cancer genomes. PMID:27088724

  15. TCM Differential Treatment of Cough Variant Asthma

    ZHANG Zhong-de; DENG Yi-qi; ZHANG Yu; HAN Yun; LIN Lin; CHAO En-xiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ Cough variant asthma (CVA), also called latent asthma or cough asthma, is a special type of asthma. With gradually deepened understanding of CVA in recent years, good curative effect has been achieved in TCM treatment of CVA.

  16. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila;

    2015-01-01

    (90%) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing......RNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa) synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP) and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1) of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human...... variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation....

  17. Molecular Cloning, Carbohydrate Specificity and the Crystal Structure of Two Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Variants

    Vassiliki I. Peppa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SRL is a cell wall associated developmental-stage specific lectin secreted by Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-born pathogenic fungus. SRL displays specificity for TF antigen (Galβ1→3GalNAc-α-Ser//Thr expressed in all cancer types and has tumour suppressing effects in vivo. Considering the immense potential of SRL in cancer research, we have generated two variant gene constructs of SRL and expressed in E. coli to refine the sugar specificity and solubility by altering the surface charge. SSR1 and SSR2 are two different recombinant variants of SRL, both of which recognize TF antigen but only SSR1 binds to Tn antigen (GalNAcα-Ser/Thr. The glycan array analysis of the variants demonstrated that SSR1 recognizes TF antigen and their derivative with high affinity similar to SRL but showed highest affinity towards the sialylated Tn antigen, unlike SRL. The carbohydrate binding property of SSR2 remains unaltered compared to SRL. The crystal structures of the two variants were determined in free form and in complex with N-acetylglucosamine at 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis highlighted the structural basis of the fine carbohydrate specificity of the two SRL variants and results are in agreement with glycan array analysis.

  18. Molecular Cloning, Carbohydrate Specificity and the Crystal Structure of Two Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Variants.

    Peppa, Vassiliki I; Venkat, Hemalatha; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Bhat, Ganapati G; Eligar, Sachin; Shivanand, Anupama; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Satisha, Gonchigar J; Swamy, Bale M; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Zographos, Spyridon E; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-01-01

    SRL is a cell wall associated developmental-stage specific lectin secreted by Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-born pathogenic fungus. SRL displays specificity for TF antigen (Galβ1→3GalNAc-α-Ser//Thr) expressed in all cancer types and has tumour suppressing effects in vivo. Considering the immense potential of SRL in cancer research, we have generated two variant gene constructs of SRL and expressed in E. coli to refine the sugar specificity and solubility by altering the surface charge. SSR1 and SSR2 are two different recombinant variants of SRL, both of which recognize TF antigen but only SSR1 binds to Tn antigen (GalNAcα-Ser/Thr). The glycan array analysis of the variants demonstrated that SSR1 recognizes TF antigen and their derivative with high affinity similar to SRL but showed highest affinity towards the sialylated Tn antigen, unlike SRL. The carbohydrate binding property of SSR2 remains unaltered compared to SRL. The crystal structures of the two variants were determined in free form and in complex with N-acetylglucosamine at 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis highlighted the structural basis of the fine carbohydrate specificity of the two SRL variants and results are in agreement with glycan array analysis. PMID:26076107

  19. The Variant p.(Arg183Trp) in SPTLC2 Causes Late-Onset Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy.

    Suriyanarayanan, Saranya; Auranen, Mari; Toppila, Jussi; Paetau, Anders; Shcherbii, Maria; Palin, Eino; Wei, Yu; Lohioja, Tarja; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Schön, Ulrike; Abicht, Angela; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Tyynismaa, Henna; Walter, Maggie C; Hornemann, Thorsten; Ylikallio, Emil

    2016-03-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 1 (HSAN1) is an autosomal dominant disorder that can be caused by variants in SPTLC1 or SPTLC2, encoding subunits of serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase. Disease variants alter the enzyme's substrate specificity and lead to accumulation of neurotoxic 1-deoxysphingolipids. We describe two families with autosomal dominant HSAN1C caused by a new variant in SPTLC2, c.547C>T, p.(Arg183Trp). The variant changed a conserved amino acid and was not found in public variant databases. All patients had a relatively mild progressive distal sensory impairment, with onset after age 50. Small fibers were affected early, leading to abnormalities on quantitative sensory testing. Sural biopsy revealed a severe chronic axonal neuropathy with subtotal loss of myelinated axons, relatively preserved number of non-myelinated fibers and no signs for regeneration. Skin biopsy with PGP9.5 labeling showed lack of intraepidermal nerve endings early in the disease. Motor manifestations developed later in the disease course, but there was no evidence of autonomic involvement. Patients had elevated serum 1-deoxysphingolipids, and the variant protein produced elevated amounts of 1-deoxysphingolipids in vitro, which proved the pathogenicity of the variant. Our results expand the genetic spectrum of HSAN1C and provide further detail about the clinical characteristics. Sequencing of SPTLC2 should be considered in all patients presenting with mild late-onset sensory-predominant small or large fiber neuropathy. PMID:26573920

  20. A KRAS-variant in ovarian cancer acts as a genetic marker of cancer risk.

    Ratner, Elena; Lu, Lingeng; Boeke, Marta; Barnett, Rachel; Nallur, Sunitha; Chin, Lena J; Pelletier, Cory; Blitzblau, Rachel; Tassi, Renata; Paranjape, Trupti; Hui, Pei; Godwin, Andrew K; Yu, Herbert; Risch, Harvey; Rutherford, Thomas; Schwartz, Peter; Santin, Alessandro; Matloff, Ellen; Zelterman, Daniel; Slack, Frank J; Weidhaas, Joanne B

    2010-08-15

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the single most deadly form of women's cancer, typically presenting as an advanced disease at diagnosis in part due to a lack of known risk factors or genetic markers of risk. The KRAS oncogene and altered levels of the microRNA (miRNA) let-7 are associated with an increased risk of developing solid tumors. In this study, we investigated a hypothesized association between an increased risk of OC and a variant allele of KRAS at rs61764370, referred to as the KRAS-variant, which disrupts a let-7 miRNA binding site in this oncogene. Specimens obtained were tested for the presence of the KRAS-variant from nonselected OC patients in three independent cohorts, two independent ovarian case-control studies, and OC patients with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) as well as their family members. Our results indicate that the KRAS-variant is associated with more than 25% of nonselected OC cases. Further, we found that it is a marker for a significant increased risk of developing OC, as confirmed by two independent case-control analyses. Lastly, we determined that the KRAS-variant was present in 61% of HBOC patients without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, previously considered uninformative, as well as in their family members with cancer. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that the KRAS-variant is a genetic marker for increased risk of developing OC, and they suggest that the KRAS-variant may be a new genetic marker of cancer risk for HBOC families without other known genetic abnormalities. PMID:20647319

  1. The VHL short variant involves in protein quality control.

    Liu, Yanbin; Yang, Haixia; Zuo, Feifei; Chen, Liang

    2016-09-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is the most important and frequently mutated gene in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In contrast to its long counterpart, the internal translational variant of VHL protein (VHLs) is evolutionarily conserved. Herein we present evidence that VHLs associates with ribosome complex via interaction with the large subunit 6 (RPL6). Manipulation of VHLs expression significantly alters protein synthesis, cell size and mitochondrial mass. VHLs deficiency leads to remarkable sensitivity to drug treatments eliciting nascent protein mis-folding and translational errors. The ubiquitination of nascent peptides are dramatically increased upon the ectopic over-expression of VHLs, which simultaneously co-localizes with proteasome and thus may facilitate the ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. In summary, VHLs contributes to protein quality control in addition to its canonical function in maintaining homeostasis of hypoxia-induced factors alpha subunit (HIFα) in response to environmental oxygen supply. PMID:27196060

  2. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C.; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette L.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Rowley, Anne H.; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5′ untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 × 10−8 in the Japanese and P = 3.7 × 10−3 in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD. PMID:20423928

  3. Identification of rare intronic variants defining novel BRCA haplotypes

    Anca Negura

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Sanger DNA sequencing is widely used nowadays to identify germ-line alterations of cancerpredisposition genes. Molecular diagnosis of hereditary risk of breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC is mainly targetingBRCA1 and BRCA2, as carriers of deleterious mutations in any of these genes are at significantly higher risk ofdeveloping cancer than general population. Usual diagnosis performs a pre-screening step, followed by systematicsequencing of exons and exon/intron boundaries. Unfortunately, not all sequence variations found by sequencing arepathogenic. About one half of identified variants are of unclear clinical significance. Common single nucleotidepolymorphisms (SNPs are also usually detected, either heterozygous or homozygous. When systematically detected,SNPs can be used to define haplotypes, which are particularly useful in population disease studies or ethnogenomics.Frequent BRCA1 SNPs are well known, as well as associated haplotypes. Here we present some rare intronic variantsdefining novel BRCA1 haplotypes.

  4. Conditionally replicating HIV and SIV variants.

    Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Conditionally replicating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) variants that can be switched on and off at will are attractive tools for HIV and SIV research. We constructed HIV and SIV variants in which the natural transcription control mechanism was replaced by the doxycycline (dox)-inducible Tet-On gene expression mechanism. These HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA variants are fully replication-competent, but replication is critically dependent on dox administration. We here describe how the dox-dependent virus variants may improve the safety of live-attenuated virus vaccines and how they can be used to study the immune responses that correlate with vaccine-induced protection. Furthermore, we review how these variants were initially designed and subsequently optimized by spontaneous viral evolution. These efforts yielded efficiently replicating and tightly dox-controlled HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA variants that replicate in a variety of cell and tissue culture systems, and in human immune system (HIS) mice and macaques, respectively. These viruses can be used as a tool in HIV and SIV biology studies and in vaccine research. We review how HIV-rtTA and SIV-rtTA were used to study the role of the viral TAR and Tat elements in virus replication. PMID:25982510

  5. Discovery of rare variants for complex phenotypes.

    Kosmicki, Jack A; Churchhouse, Claire L; Rivas, Manuel A; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    With the rise of sequencing technologies, it is now feasible to assess the role rare variants play in the genetic contribution to complex trait variation. While some of the earlier targeted sequencing studies successfully identified rare variants of large effect, unbiased gene discovery using exome sequencing has experienced limited success for complex traits. Nevertheless, rare variant association studies have demonstrated that rare variants do contribute to phenotypic variability, but sample sizes will likely have to be even larger than those of common variant association studies to be powered for the detection of genes and loci. Large-scale sequencing efforts of tens of thousands of individuals, such as the UK10K Project and aggregation efforts such as the Exome Aggregation Consortium, have made great strides in advancing our knowledge of the landscape of rare variation, but there remain many considerations when studying rare variation in the context of complex traits. We discuss these considerations in this review, presenting a broad range of topics at a high level as an introduction to rare variant analysis in complex traits including the issues of power, study design, sample ascertainment, de novo variation, and statistical testing approaches. Ultimately, as sequencing costs continue to decline, larger sequencing studies will yield clearer insights into the biological consequence of rare mutations and may reveal which genes play a role in the etiology of complex traits. PMID:27221085

  6. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium.

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J Willem L; Williams, Katie M; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Howe, Laura D; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M; Timpson, Nicholas J; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Paterson, Andrew D; Klaver, Caroline C W; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J; Mackey, David A; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2016-01-01

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7-15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E-08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E-21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E-04). PMID:27174397

  7. Childhood gene-environment interactions and age-dependent effects of genetic variants associated with refractive error and myopia: The CREAM Consortium

    Fan, Qiao; Guo, Xiaobo; Tideman, J. Willem L.; Williams, Katie M.; Yazar, Seyhan; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Howe, Laura D.; Pourcain, Beaté St; Evans, David M.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; McMahon, George; Hysi, Pirro G.; Krapohl, Eva; Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B.; Baird, Paul Nigel; Wang, Jie Jin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Teo, Yik-Ying; Wong, Tien-Yin; Ding, Xiaohu; Wojciechowski, Robert; Young, Terri L.; Pärssinen, Olavi; Oexle, Konrad; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Plomin, Robert; Hammond, Christopher J.; Mackey, David A.; He, Mingguang; Saw, Seang-Mei; Williams, Cathy; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Meguro, Akira; Wright, Alan F.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Young, Alvin L.; Veluchamy, Amutha Barathi; Metspalu, Andres; Paterson, Andrew D.; Döring, Angela; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Klein, Barbara E.; Pourcain, Beate St; Fleck, Brian; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Hayward, Caroline; Williams, Cathy; Delcourt, Cécile; Pang, Chi Pui; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Gieger, Christian; Hammond, Christopher J.; Simpson, Claire L.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Mackey, David A.; Evans, David M.; Stambolian, Dwight; Chew, Emily; Tai, E-Shyong; Krapohl, Eva; Mihailov, Evelin; Smith, George Davey; McMahon, George; Biino, Ginevra; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Seppälä, Ilkka; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F.; Craig, Jamie E.; Tideman, J. Willem L.; Ried, Janina S.; Korobelnik, Jean-François; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Wang, Jie Jin; Liao, Jiemin; Zhao, Jing Hua; Xie, Jing; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Kemp, John P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Jonas, Jost B.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Wedenoja, Juho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Williams, Katie M; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Yamashiro, Kenji; Oexle, Konrad; Howe, Laura D.; Chen, Li Jia; Xu, Liang; Farrer, Lindsay; Ikram, M. Kamran; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Schache, Maria; Pirastu, Mario; Miyake, Masahiro; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Fossarello, Maurizio; Kähönen, Mika; Tedja, Milly S.; He, Mingguang; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Wareham, Nick J.; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Pärssinen, Olavi; Raitakari, Olli; Polasek, Ozren; Tam, Pancy O.; Foster, Paul J.; Mitchell, Paul; Baird, Paul Nigel; Chen, Peng; Hysi, Pirro G.; Cumberland, Phillippa; Gharahkhani, Puya; Fan, Qiao; Höhn, René; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Luben, Robert N.; Igo Jr, Robert P.; Plomin, Robert; Wojciechowski, Robert; Klein, Ronald; Mohsen Hosseini, S.; Janmahasatian, Sarayut; Saw, Seang-Mei; Yazar, Seyhan; Ping Yip, Shea; Feng, Sheng; Vaccargiu, Simona; Panda-Jonas, Songhomitra; MacGregor, Stuart; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Rantanen, Taina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Young, Terri L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Wong, Tien-Yin; Aung, Tin; Haller, Toomas; Vitart, Veronique; Nangia, Vinay; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Jhanji, Vishal; Zhao, Wanting; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Xiangtian; Guo, Xiaobo; Ding, Xiaohu; Wang, Ya Xing; Lu, Yi; Teo, Yik-Ying; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Myopia, currently at epidemic levels in East Asia, is a leading cause of untreatable visual impairment. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in adults have identified 39 loci associated with refractive error and myopia. Here, the age-of-onset of association between genetic variants at these 39 loci and refractive error was investigated in 5200 children assessed longitudinally across ages 7–15 years, along with gene-environment interactions involving the major environmental risk-factors, nearwork and time outdoors. Specific variants could be categorized as showing evidence of: (a) early-onset effects remaining stable through childhood, (b) early-onset effects that progressed further with increasing age, or (c) onset later in childhood (N = 10, 5 and 11 variants, respectively). A genetic risk score (GRS) for all 39 variants explained 0.6% (P = 6.6E–08) and 2.3% (P = 6.9E–21) of the variance in refractive error at ages 7 and 15, respectively, supporting increased effects from these genetic variants at older ages. Replication in multi-ancestry samples (combined N = 5599) yielded evidence of childhood onset for 6 of 12 variants present in both Asians and Europeans. There was no indication that variant or GRS effects altered depending on time outdoors, however 5 variants showed nominal evidence of interactions with nearwork (top variant, rs7829127 in ZMAT4; P = 6.3E–04). PMID:27174397

  8. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  9. Modelling Families of Business Process Variants: A Decomposition Driven Method

    Milani, Fredrik; Dumas, Marlon; Ahmed, Naved; Matulevičius, Raimundas

    2013-01-01

    Business processes usually do not exist as singular entities that can be managed in isolation, but rather as families of business process variants. When modelling such families of variants, analysts are confronted with the choice between modelling each variant separately, or modelling multiple or all variants in a single model. Modelling each variant separately leads to a proliferation of models that share common parts, resulting in redundancies and inconsistencies. Meanwhile, modelling all v...

  10. Sequence Variant Descriptions: HGVS Nomenclature and Mutalyzer.

    den Dunnen, Johan T

    2016-01-01

    Consistent and unambiguous description of sequence variants is essential to report and exchange information on the analysis of a genome, in particular in DNA diagnostics. The HGVS nomenclature-recommendations for the description of sequence variants as originally proposed by the Human Genome Variation Society-has gradually been accepted as the international standard for variant description. In this unit, we describe the current recommendations (HGVS version 15.11) regarding how to describe variants at the DNA, RNA, and protein level. We explain the rationale and give example descriptions for all variant types: substitution, deletion, duplication, insertion, inversion, conversion, and complex, as well as special types occurring only on the RNA (splicing) or protein level (nonsense, frame shift, extension). Finally, we point users to available support tools and give examples for the use of the freely available Mutalyzer suite. An extensive version of the HGVS recommendations is available online at http://varnomen.hgvs.org/. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367167

  11. Word Variant Identification in Old French

    Peter Willett

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of historical texts are available in machine-readable form, which retain the original spelling, which can be very different from the modern-day equivalents due to the natural evolution of a language, and because the concept of standardisation in spelling is comparatively modern. Among medieval vernacular writers, the same word could be spelled in different ways and the same author (or scribe might even use several alternative spellings in the same passage. Thus, we do not know,a priori, how many variant forms of a particular word there are in such texts, let alone what these variants might be. Searching on the modern equivalent, or even the commonest historical variant, of a particular word may thus fail to retrieve an appreciable number of occurrences unless the searcher already has an extensive knowledge of the language of the documents. Moreover, even specialist scholars may be unaware of some idiosyncratic variants. Here, we consider the use of computer methods to retrieve variant historical spellings.

  12. Nuclear receptor variants in liver disease.

    Zimmer, Vincent; Liebe, Roman; Lammert, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This snapshot reviews the current state of knowledge on genetic variants of nuclear receptors (NRs) involved in regulating various aspects of liver metabolism. Interindividual differences in responses to diet and other 'in-' and environmental stressors can be caused by variants in components of the NR regulatory gene network. We recapitulate recent evidence for the application of NRs in genetic diagnosis of monogenic liver disease. Genetic analysis of multifactorial liver diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and diabetes mellitus, pinpoints key players in disease predisposition and progression. In particular, NR1H4 variants have been associated with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy and gallstone disease. Other examples include studies of NR1I2 and NR1I3 polymorphisms in patients with drug-induced liver injury and NR5A2 variation in cholangiocarcinoma. Associations of NR gene variants have been identified in patients with dyslipidemia and other metabolic syndrome-associated traits by genome-wide studies. Evidence from these analyses confirms a role for NR variation in common diseases, linking regulatory networks to complex and variable phenotypes. These new insights into the impact of NR variants offer perspectives for their future use in diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. PMID:26045277

  13. Analysis of mtDNA sequence variants in colorectal adenomatous polyps

    Grizzle William

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal tumors mostly arise from sporadic adenomatous polyps. Polyps are defined as a mass of cells that protrudes into the lumen of the colon. Adenomatous polyps are benign neoplasms that, by definition display some characteristics of dysplasia. It has been shown that polyps were benign tumors which may undergo malignant transformation. Adenomatous polyps have been classified into three histologic types; tubular, tubulovillous, and villous with increasing malignant potential. The ability to differentially diagnose these colorectal adenomatous polyps is important for therapeutic intervention. To date, little efforts have been directed to identifying genetic changes involved in adenomatous polyps. This study was designed to examine the relevance of mitochondrial genome alterations in the three adenomatous polyps. Using high resolution restriction endonucleases and PCR-based sequencing, fifty-seven primary fresh frozen tissues of adenomatous polyps (37 tumors and 20 matched surrounding normal tissues obtained from the southern regional Cooperative Human Tissue Network (CHTN and Grady Memorial Hospital at Atlanta were screened with three mtDNA regional primer pairs that spanned 5.9 kbp. Results from our data analyses revealed the presence of forty-four variants in some of these mitochondrial genes that the primers spanned; COX I, II, III, ATP 6, 8, CYT b, ND 5, 6 and tRNAs. Based on the MITODAT database as a sequence reference, 25 of the 44 (57% variants observed were unreported. Notably, a heteroplasmic variant C8515G/T in the MT-ATP 8 gene and a germline variant 8327delA in the tRNAlys was observed in all the tissue samples of the three adenomatous polyps in comparison to the referenced database sequence. A germline variant G9055A in the MT-ATP 6 gene had a frequency of 100% (17/17 in tubular and 57% (13/23 in villous adenomas; no corresponding variant was in tubulovillous adenomas. Furthermore, A9006G variant at MT-ATP 6 gene was

  14. Attention Alters Perceived Attractiveness.

    Störmer, Viola S; Alvarez, George A

    2016-04-01

    Can attention alter the impression of a face? Previous studies showed that attention modulates the appearance of lower-level visual features. For instance, attention can make a simple stimulus appear to have higher contrast than it actually does. We tested whether attention can also alter the perception of a higher-order property-namely, facial attractiveness. We asked participants to judge the relative attractiveness of two faces after summoning their attention to one of the faces using a briefly presented visual cue. Across trials, participants judged the attended face to be more attractive than the same face when it was unattended. This effect was not due to decision or response biases, but rather was due to changes in perceptual processing of the faces. These results show that attention alters perceived facial attractiveness, and broadly demonstrate that attention can influence higher-level perception and may affect people's initial impressions of one another. PMID:26966228

  15. Fundamental Characteristics of Industrial Variant Specification Systems

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer; Hvam, Lars

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the operational task of creating customised variants of industrial specifications (e.g. drawings, routings and bill-of-materials). Rooted in a lack of existing literature on the subject the paper describes the nature of variant specification systems. It introduces some...... a set of situational variables (e.g. frequency of orders [low ¡ê high]), a set of functionality variables (e.g. lead time [low ¡ê high]) and a set of structure variables (e.g. level of IT-automation [manual ¡ê IT-automated]) are proposed. Finally, the presented concepts are illustrated through two...... examples. In general the paper discusses an important focus area within mass customization and build-to-order production: the nature of industrial variant specification systems....

  16. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  17. Phenotypic extremes in rare variant study designs.

    Peloso, Gina M; Rader, Daniel J; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Currently, next-generation sequencing studies aim to identify rare and low-frequency variation that may contribute to disease. For a given effect size, as the allele frequency decreases, the power to detect genes or variants of interest also decreases. Although many methods have been proposed for the analysis of such data, study design and analytic issues still persist in data interpretation. In this study we present sequencing data for ABCA1 that has known rare variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We contrast empirical findings from two study designs: a phenotypic extreme sample and a population-based random sample. We found differing strengths of association with HDL-C across the two study designs (P=0.0006 with n=701 phenotypic extremes vs P=0.03 with n=1600 randomly sampled individuals). To explore this apparent difference in evidence for association, we performed a simulation study focused on the impact of phenotypic selection on power. We demonstrate that the power gain for an extreme phenotypic selection study design is much greater in rare variant studies than for studies of common variants. Our study confirms that studying phenotypic extremes is critical in rare variant studies because it boosts power in two ways: the typical increases from extreme sampling and increasing the proportion of relevant functional variants ascertained and thereby tested for association. Furthermore, we show that when combining statistical evidence through meta-analysis from an extreme-selected sample and a second separate population-based random sample, power is lower when a traditional sample size weighting is used compared with weighting by the noncentrality parameter. PMID:26350511

  18. Charge variants in IgG1

    Goswami, Sirj; Hutchinson, Ryan; Kwong, Zephania W; Yang, Jihong; Wang, Xiangdan; Yao, Zhenling; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Cano, Tony; Tesar, Devin; Nijem, Ihsan; Allison, David E; Wong, Pin Yee; Kao, Yung-Hsiang; Quan, Cynthia; Joshi, Amita; Harris, Reed J; Motchnik, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Antibody charge variants have gained considerable attention in the biotechnology industry due to their potential influence on stability and biological activity. Subtle differences in the relative proportions of charge variants are often observed during routine biomanufacture or process changes and pose a challenge to demonstrating product comparability. To gain further insights into the impact on biological activity and pharmacokinetics (PK) of monoclonal antibody (mAb) charge heterogeneity, we isolated the major charge forms of a recombinant humanized IgG1 and compared their in vitro properties and in vivo PK. The mAb starting material had a pI range of 8.7–9.1 and was composed of about 20% acidic variants, 12% basic variants and 68% main peak. Cation exchange displacement chromatography was used to isolate the acidic, basic and main peak fractions for animal studies. Detailed analyses were performed on the isolated fractions to identify specific chemical modification contributing to the charge differences and were also characterized for purity and in vitro potency prior to being administered either subcutaneously (SC) or intravenously (IV) in rats. All isolated materials had similar potency and rat FcRn binding relative to the starting material. Following IV or SC administration (10 mg/kg) in rats, no difference in serum PK was observed, indicating that physiochemical modifications and pI differences among charge variants were not sufficient to result in PK changes. Thus, these results provided meaningful information for the comparative evaluation of charge-related heterogeneity of mAbs and suggested that charge variants of IgGs do not affect the in vitro potency, FcRn binding affinity or the PK properties in rats. PMID:20818176

  19. Biophysical analysis of apolipoprotein E3 variants linked with development of type III hyperlipoproteinemia.

    Dimitra Georgiadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein E (apoE is a major protein of the lipoprotein transport system that plays important roles in lipid homeostasis and protection from atherosclerosis. ApoE is characterized by structural plasticity and thermodynamic instability and can undergo significant structural rearrangements as part of its biological function. Mutations in the 136-150 region of the N-terminal domain of apoE, reduce its low density lipoprotein (LDL receptor binding capacity and have been linked with lipoprotein disorders, such as type III hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP in humans. However, the LDL-receptor binding defects for these apoE variants do not correlate well with the severity of dyslipidemia, indicating that these variants may carry additional properties that contribute to their pathogenic potential. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we examined whether three type III HLP predisposing apoE3 variants, namely R136S, R145C and K146E affect the biophysical properties of the protein. Circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy revealed that these mutations do not significantly alter the secondary structure of the protein. Thermal and chemical unfolding analysis revealed small thermodynamic alterations in each variant compared to wild-type apoE3, as well as effects in the reversibility of the unfolding transition. All variants were able to remodel multillamelar 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC vesicles, but R136S and R145C had reduced kinetics. Dynamic light scattering analysis indicated that the variant R136S exists in a higher-order oligomerization state in solution. Finally, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding suggested that the variant R145C exposes a larger amount of hydrophobic surface to the solvent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our findings suggest that single amino acid changes in the functionally important region 136-150 of apoE3 can affect the molecule's stability and conformation in solution and may

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  1. Xeroderma pigmentosum variants have a slow recovery of DNA synthesis after irradiation with ultraviolet light

    Human cells (normal and xeroderma pigmentosum variant) irradiated with ultraviolet light and pulse-labelled with [3H]thymidine underwent transient decline and recovery of molecular weights of newly synthesized DNA and rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation. The ability of synthesize normal-sized DNA recovered more rapidly in both cell types than thymidine incorporation. During recovery cells steadily increased in their ability to replicate normalsized DNA on damaged templates. The molecular weight versus time curves fitted exponential functions with similar rate constants in normal and heterozygous xeroderma pigmentosum cells, but with a slower rate in two xeroderma pigmentosum variant cell lines. Caffeine added during the post-irradiation period eliminated the recovery of molecular weights in xeroderma pigmentsoum variant but not in normal cells. The recovery of the ability to synthesize normal-sized DNA represents a combination of a number of cellular regulatory processes, some of which are constitutive, and one of which is altered in the xeroderma pigmentosum variant such that recovery becomes slow and caffeine sensitive. (Auth.)

  2. Human microsomal epoxide hydrolase: genetic polymorphism and functional expression in vitro of amino acid variants

    Hassett, Christopher; Aicher, Lauri; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.

    2016-01-01

    Human microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a biotransformation enzyme that metabolizes reactive epoxide intermediates to more water-soluble trans-dihydrodiol derivatives. We compared protein-coding sequences from six full-length human mEH DNA clones and assessed potential amino acid variation at seven positions. The prevalence of these variants was assessed in at least 37 unrelated individuals using polymerase chain reaction experiments. Only Tyr/His 113 (exon 3) and His/Arg 139 (exon 4) variants were observed. The genotype frequencies determined for residue 113 alleles indicate that this locus may not be in Hardy – Weinberg equilibrium, whereas frequencies observed for residue 139 alleles were similar to expected values. Nucleotide sequences coding for the variant amino acids were constructed in an mEH cDNA using site-directed mutagenesis, and each was expressed in vitro by transient transfection of COS-1 cells. Epoxide hydrolase mRNA level, catalytic activity, and immunoreactive protein were evaluated for each construct. The results of these analyses demonstrated relatively uniform levels of mEH RNA expression between the constructs. mEH enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein were strongly correlated, indicating that mEH specific activity was similar for each variant. However, marked differences were noted in the relative amounts of immunoreactive protein and enzymatic activity resulting from the amino acid substitutions. These data suggest that common human mEH amino acid polymorphisms may alter enzymatic function, possibly by modifying protein stability. PMID:7516776

  3. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  4. Is cumulative frequency of mitochondrial DNA variants a biomarker for colorectal tumor progression?

    Okoli Joel

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To examine the relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA alterations and colorectal tumorigenesis, we used high-resolution restriction endonucleases and sequencing to assess the mitochondrial genome from three histologic subtypes of colorectal adenomas (tubular = 8; tubulovillous = 9; and villous = 8, colorectal cancer (CRC tissues = 27, and their matched surrounding normal tissue (MSNT = 52. The mitochondrial genomes were amplified using 9 pairs of overlapping primers and systematically analyzed by means of high-resolution analysis. DNA fragments showing a shift in banding patterns between the three adenomas, CRC, in comparison to the MSNT were sequenced to identify the mtDNA alterations. A total of thirty-eight germ-line mtDNA variants were observed in this study. Twenty-two of the thirty-eight were identified as mutations and 59% (13 of 22 were silent mutations and one was a 1-bp insertion. Sixteen of thirty-eight were distinct SNPs in flanking regions of the restriction sites and, 6 of the 16 (37% SNPs were not previously reported. Most of these mutations/SNPs were homoplasmic and distributed in various regions of mitochondrial genes including the 16S and 12S rRNA. Based on our results, mtDNA germline variants increased in prevalence with adenoma CRC progression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to show an increased prevalence of mitochondrial gene variants in CRC tumorigenesis.

  5. Report of a rare anatomic variant

    De Brucker, Y; Ilsen, B; Muylaert, C;

    2015-01-01

    We report the CT findings in a case of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) from the left upper lobe in an adult. PAPVR is an anatomic variant in which one to three pulmonary veins drain into the right atrium or its tributaries, rather than into the left atrium. This results in a lef...

  6. Magnetic resonance angiography: infrequent anatomic variants

    We studied through RM angiography (3D TOF) with high magnetic field equipment (1.5 T) different infrequent intracerebral vascular anatomic variants. For their detection we emphasise the value of post-processed images obtained after conventional angiographic sequences. These post-processed images should be included in routine protocols for evaluation of the intracerebral vascular structures. (author)

  7. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  8. Cellobiohydrolase I gene and improved variants

    Adney, William S.; Decker, Stephen R.; Mc Carter, Suzanne; Baker, John O.; Nieves, Raphael; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd B.

    2008-05-20

    The disclosure provides a method for preparing an active exoglucanase in a heterologous host of eukaryotic origin. The method includes mutagenesis to reduce glycosylation of the exoglucanase when expressed in a heterologous host. It is further disclosed a method to produce variant cellobiohydrolase that is stable at high temperature through mutagenesis.

  9. Truncated variants of apolipoprotein B cause hypobetalipoproteinaemia

    Collins, D.R.; Knott, T.J.; Pease, R.J.; Powell, L.M.; Wallis, S.C.; Robertson, S.; Pullinger, C.R.; Lloyd, K.; Miller, N.E.; Muller, D.; Scott, J. (MRC Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England)); Humphries, S.E.; Talmud, P.J. (Charing Cross Sunley Research Centre, London (England)); Milne, R.W.; Marcel, Y.L. (Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1988-09-12

    Familial hypobetalipoproteinaemia is a rare autosomal dominant disorder in which levels of apo-B-containing plasma lipoproteins are approximately half-normal in heterozygotes and virtually absent in homozygotes. Here the authors describe mutations of the apo-B gene that cause two different truncated variants of apo-B in unrelated individuals with hypobetalipoproteinaemia. One variant is predicted to be 1,799 amino acids long and arises from deletion of a single nucleotide (G) from leucine codon 1,794. This protein was found at low levels in very low density and low density lipoprotein fractions in the blood. The second, shorter variant is caused by mutation of a CpG dinucleotide in arginine codon 1,306 converting it to a stop codon and predicting a protein of 1,305 residues. The differences in size and behavior of these two variants compared to apo-B100 or apo-B48 point to domains that may be important for the assembly, secretion or stability of apo-B-containing lipoproteins.

  10. Progress in methods for rare variant association.

    Santorico, Stephanie A; Hendricks, Audrey E

    2016-01-01

    Empirical studies and evolutionary theory support a role for rare variants in the etiology of complex traits. Given this motivation and increasing affordability of whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing, methods for rare variant association have been an active area of research for the past decade. Here, we provide a survey of the current literature and developments from the Genetics Analysis Workshop 19 (GAW19) Collapsing Rare Variants working group. In particular, we present the generalized linear regression framework and associated score statistic for the 2 major types of methods: burden and variance components methods. We further show that by simply modifying weights within these frameworks we arrive at many of the popular existing methods, for example, the cohort allelic sums test and sequence kernel association test. Meta-analysis techniques are also described. Next, we describe the 6 contributions from the GAW19 Collapsing Rare Variants working group. These included development of new methods, such as a retrospective likelihood for family data, a method using genomic structure to compare cases and controls, a haplotype-based meta-analysis, and a permutation-based method for combining different statistical tests. In addition, one contribution compared a mega-analysis of family-based and population-based data to meta-analysis. Finally, the power of existing family-based methods for binary traits was compared. We conclude with suggestions for open research questions. PMID:26866487

  11. A rare variant of common arterial trunk.

    Rubay, J E; Macartney, F J; Anderson, R H

    1987-01-01

    A 13 day old baby was admitted to hospital with multiple abnormalities, increasing cyanosis, and cardiac failure. Cardiac catheterisation was performed on the day of admission and he died shortly after the procedure. A rare variant of common arterial trunk, in which the pulmonary arteries arose directly from the underside of the aortic arch, was found at necropsy.

  12. XVCL: XML-based Variant Configuration Language

    Jarzabek, Stan; Basset, Paul; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Weishan

    XVCL (XML-based Variant Configuration Language) is a meta-programming technique and tool that provides effective reuse mechanisms. XVCL is an open source software developed at the National University of Singapore. Being a modern and versatile version of Bassett's frames, a technology that has...

  13. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    Knud Larsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, idiopathic and familial, is characterized by degradation of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of Lewy bodies (LB in the substantia nigra. LBs contain aggregated proteins of which α-synuclein is the major component. The protein synphilin-1 interacts and colocalizes with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA was investigated by RNAseq. The presented work reports the molecular cloning and characterization of the porcine (Sus scrofa synphilin-1 cDNA (SNCAIP and three splice variants hereof. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA codes for a protein (synphilin-1 of 919 amino acids which shows a high similarity to human (90% and to mouse (84% synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation.

  14. Novel compound heterozygous NMNAT1 variants associated with Leber congenital amaurosis

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; van Genderen, Maria M; Bertelsen, Mette; Zobor, Ditta; Rohrschneider, Klaus; van Huet, Ramon A C; Nurohmah, Siska; Klevering, B Jeroen; Kohl, Susanne; Faradz, Sultana M H; Rosenberg, Thomas; den Hollander, Anneke I; Collin, Rob W J; Cremers, Frans P M

    2014-01-01

    , were screened in 532 additional patients with retinal dystrophies. This cohort encompassed 108 persons with isolated or autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), 271 with isolated or autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and 49 with autosomal dominant RP, as well as 104 persons with LCA in...... whom the causative mutation was previously identified. RESULTS: Compound heterozygous alterations were found in six patients with LCA and in one person with early-onset RP. All except one carried the common p.E257K variant on one allele. Macular atrophy was absent in one patient, who carried this......: Although macular atrophy can occur in LCA and CRD, no NMNAT1 mutations were found in the latter cohort. NMNAT1 variants were also not found in a large group of patients with sporadic or autosomal recessive RP. The enrichment of p.E257K ina heterozygous state in patients with LCA versus controls suggests...

  15. Mitochondrial DNA variants and risk of familial breast cancer: an exploratory study.

    Tommasi, Stefania; Favia, Paola; Weigl, Stefania; Bianco, Angelica; Pilato, Brunella; Russo, Luciana; Paradiso, Angelo; Petruzzella, Vittoria

    2014-05-01

    To assess if mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants are associated with mutations in BRCA susceptibility genes and to investigate the possible role of mitochondrial alterations as susceptibility markers in familial breast cancer (BC), 22 patients with or without BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, 14 sporadic BC patients and 20 healthy subjects were analyzed. In the D-loop and in the MTND4 region, variants significantly associated with BRCA1 carriers were identified. Moreover, examination of mitochondrial haplogroups revealed X as the most significantly frequent haplogroup in BRCA1 carriers (P=0.005), and H as significantly linked to BRCA2 carriers (P=0.05). Our data suggest the involvement of the mitochondrial genome in the pathogenetic and molecular mechanism of familial BC disease. PMID:24603941

  16. Homozygous FIBP nonsense variant responsible of syndromic overgrowth, with overgrowth, macrocephaly, retinal coloboma and learning disabilities.

    Thauvin-Robinet, C; Duplomb-Jego, L; Limoge, F; Picot, D; Masurel, A; Terriat, B; Champilou, C; Minot, D; St-Onge, J; Kuentz, P; Duffourd, Y; Thevenon, J; Rivière, J-B; Faivre, L

    2016-05-01

    The acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) intracellular binding protein (FIBP) interacts directly with the fibroblast growth factor FGF1. Although FIBP is known to be implicated in the FGF signaling pathway, its precise function remains unclear. Gain-of-function variants in several FGF receptors (FGFRs) are implicated in a wide spectrum of growth disorders from achondroplasia to overgrowth syndromes. In a unique case from a consanguineous union presenting with overgrowth, macrocephaly, retinal coloboma, large thumbs, severe varicose veins and learning disabilities, exome sequencing identified a homozygous nonsense FIBP variant. The patient's fibroblasts exhibit FIBP cDNA degradation and an increased proliferation capacity compared with controls. The phenotype defines a new multiple congenital abnormalities (MCA) syndrome, overlapping with the heterogeneous group of overgrowth syndromes with macrocephaly. The different clinical features can be explained by the alteration of the FGFR pathway. Taken together, these results suggest the implication of FIBP in a new autosomal recessive MCA. PMID:26660953

  17. Combined analyses of 20 common obesity susceptibility variants

    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Sparsø, Thomas; Grarup, Niels; Albrechtsen, Anders; Almind, Katrine; Hansen, Lars; Toft, Ulla; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes.......Genome-wide association studies and linkage studies have identified 20 validated genetic variants associated with obesity and/or related phenotypes. The variants are common, and they individually exhibit small-to-modest effect sizes....

  18. The Structural Determinants behind the Epigenetic Role of Histone Variants

    Manjinder S. Cheema; Juan Ausió

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants are an important part of the histone contribution to chromatin epigenetics. In this review, we describe how the known structural differences of these variants from their canonical histone counterparts impart a chromatin signature ultimately responsible for their epigenetic contribution. In terms of the core histones, H2A histone variants are major players while H3 variant CenH3, with a controversial role in the nucleosome conformation, remains the genuine epigenetic histone v...

  19. Managing Process Variants in the Process Life Cycle

    Hallerbach, A.; Bauer, Th.; Reichert, M.U.

    2007-01-01

    When designing process-aware information systems, often variants of the same process have to be specified. Each variant then constitutes an adjustment of a particular process to specific requirements building the process context. Current Business Process Management (BPM) tools do not adequately support the management of process variants. Usually, the variants have to be kept in separate process models. This leads to huge modeling and maintenance efforts. In particular, more fundamental proces...

  20. Variant at position 10,055 in mitochondrial tRNA(Gly) gene has a negative association with aplastic anemia.

    Jiang, Zhongxing; Wu, Xinai; Zhu, Yanan

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a growing number of reports had shown the association between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variants and aplastic anemia (AA). Owing to its high mutation rate, mtDNA variant had become biomarker for clinical and molecular diagnosis for AA. However, the relationship between mtDNA variant and AA was largely unknown. In this study, we reanalyzed the possible association between a "pathogenic" mutation A10055G in mt-tRNA(Gly) gene and AA, through the application of bioinformatics tool, we found that this mutation did not alter the secondary structure of tRNA(Gly), the pathogenicity scoring system indicated that the score of this mutation was only two points and belonged to a "neutral polymorphism", suggested that the role of A10055G mutation in clinical expression in AA needed to be further experimentally addressed. PMID:25629498

  1. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of variants of monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger

    Crystals of A. niger monoamine oxidase variants display P21 or P41212/P43212 symmetry, with eight or two molecules in the asymmetric unit, respectively. Monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger (MAO-N) is an FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyses the conversion of terminal amines to their corresponding aldehydes. Variants of MAO-N produced by directed evolution have been shown to possess altered substrate specificity. Crystals of two of these variants (MAO-N-3 and MAO-N-5) have been obtained; the former displays P21 symmetry with eight molecules per asymmetric unit and the latter has P41212 or P43212 symmetry and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Solution of these structures will help shed light on the molecular determinants of improved activity and high enantioselectivity towards a broad range of substrates

  2. Effects of eccentric cycling exercise on IGF-I splice variant expression in the muscles of young and elderly people

    Hameed, M.; Toft, A.D.; Harridge, S.D.;

    2008-01-01

    Recovery from micro damage resulting from intensive exercise has been shown to take longer in older muscles. To investigate the factors that may contribute to muscle repair, we have studied the expression of two splice variants of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene. IGF-IEa and mechano....... No difference was observed between the baseline levels of the two splice variants between the two subject groups. Eccentric cycling exercise resulted in a significant increase in the mean MGF mRNA in both young and old subjects but did not alter IGF-IEa mRNA levels in either age group. As reported...... previously (Toft et al., 2002), the levels of serum creatine kinase and myoglobin, markers of muscle damage, were increased significantly from baseline and to 5 days after exercise in both young and old subjects. This supports previous research in suggesting that the MGF splice variant is sensitive to muscle...

  3. Identifying causal variants at loci with multiple signals of association.

    Hormozdiari, Farhad; Kostem, Emrah; Kang, Eun Yong; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-10-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have successfully identified thousands of risk loci for complex traits, only a handful of the biologically causal variants, responsible for association at these loci, have been successfully identified. Current statistical methods for identifying causal variants at risk loci either use the strength of the association signal in an iterative conditioning framework or estimate probabilities for variants to be causal. A main drawback of existing methods is that they rely on the simplifying assumption of a single causal variant at each risk locus, which is typically invalid at many risk loci. In this work, we propose a new statistical framework that allows for the possibility of an arbitrary number of causal variants when estimating the posterior probability of a variant being causal. A direct benefit of our approach is that we predict a set of variants for each locus that under reasonable assumptions will contain all of the true causal variants with a high confidence level (e.g., 95%) even when the locus contains multiple causal variants. We use simulations to show that our approach provides 20-50% improvement in our ability to identify the causal variants compared to the existing methods at loci harboring multiple causal variants. We validate our approach using empirical data from an expression QTL study of CHI3L2 to identify new causal variants that affect gene expression at this locus. CAVIAR is publicly available online at http://genetics.cs.ucla.edu/caviar/. PMID:25104515

  4. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt;

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. AIMS: In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have...... the general Rett population, suggesting a specific behavioral and cardiorespiratory phenotype of the RTT the Hanefeld variant....

  5. Genetics Home Reference: GM2-gangliosidosis, AB variant

    ... of GM2-gangliosidosis, AB variant: Genetic Testing Registry: Tay-Sachs disease, variant AB These resources from MedlinePlus offer ... AB variant Activator Deficiency/GM2 Gangliosidosis Activator-deficient Tay-Sachs disease GM2 Activator Deficiency Disease GM2 gangliosidosis, type ...

  6. Investigating alpha-globin structural variants: a retrospective review of 135,000 Brazilian individuals

    Elza Miyuki Kimura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brazil has a multiethnic population with a high diversity of hemoglobinopathies. While screenings for beta-globin mutations are far more common, alterations affecting alpha-globin genes are usually more silent and less well known. The aim of this study was to describe the results of a screening program for alpha-globin gene mutations in a representative sample of the Southeastern Brazilian population. Methods: A total of 135,000 individuals, including patients with clinical suspicion of hemoglobinopathies and their family members, randomly chosen individuals submitted to blood tests and blood donors who were abnormal hemoglobin carriers were analyzed. The variants were screened by alkaline and acid electrophoreses, isoelectric focusing and cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and the abnormal chains were investigated by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. Mutations were identified by molecular analyses, and the oxygen affinity, heme-heme cooperativity and Bohr effect of the variants were evaluated by functional tests. Results: Four new and 22 rare variants were detected in 98 families. Some of these variants were found in co-inheritance with other hemoglobinopathies. Of the rare hemoglobins, Hasharon, Stanleyville II and J-Rovigo were the most common, the first two being S-like and associated with alpha-thalassemia. Conclusion: The variability of alpha-globin alterations reflects the high degree of racial miscegenation and an intense internal migratory flow between different Brazilian regions. This diversity highlights the importance of programs for diagnosing hemoglobinopathies and preventing combinations that may lead to important clinical manifestations in multiethnic populations.

  7. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R.; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M.; Kaftan, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  8. Neuronal Calcium Sensor 1 Has Two Variants with Distinct Calcium Binding Characteristics.

    Wang, Baisheng; Boeckel, Göran R; Huynh, Larry; Nguyen, Lien; Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M; Kaftan, Edward J; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1 Var1) is a calcium-binding protein expressed in most tissues. We examined a poorly characterized variant of NCS-1 (Var2), identified only in humans where the N-terminal 22 amino acid residues of native NCS-1(MGKSNSKLKPEVVEELTRKTY) were replaced with 4 different residues (MATI). Because alterations in the level of expression of NCS-1 Var1 and the expression of NCS-1 variants have been correlated with several neurological diseases, the relative expression and functional role of NCS-1 Var2 was examined. We found that NCS-1 Var2 mRNA levels are not found in mouse tissues and are expressed at levels ~1000-fold lower than NCS-1 Var1 in three different human cell lines (SHSY5Y, HEK293, MB231). Protein expression of both variants was only identified in cell lines overexpressing exogenous NCS-1 Var2. The calcium binding affinity is ~100 times weaker in purified NCS-1 Var2 than NCS-1 Var1. Because truncation of NCS-1 Var1 has been linked to functional changes in neurons, we determined whether the differing properties of the NCS-1 variants could potentially contribute to the altered cell function. In contrast to previous reports showing that overexpression of NCS-1 Var1 increases calcium-dependent processes, functional differences in cells overexpressing NCS-1 Var2 were undetectable in assays for cell growth, cell death and drug (paclitaxel) potency. Our results suggest that NCS-1 Var1 is the primary functional version of NCS-1. PMID:27575489

  9. Variant alleles of the CYP1B1 gene are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility

    CYP1B1 is a P450 enzyme which is involved in the activation of pro-carcinogens to carcinogens as well as sex hormone metabolism. Because differences in the activity of the enzyme have been correlated with variant alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), it represents an attractive candidate gene for studies into colorectal cancer susceptibility. We genotyped 597 cancer patients and 597controls for three CYP1B1 SNPs, which have previously been shown to be associated with altered enzymatic activity. Using the three SNPs, eight different haplotypes were constructed. The haplotype frequencies were estimated in cases and controls and then compared. The odds ratio for each tumour type, associated with each haplotype was estimated, with reference to the most common haplotype observed in the controls. The three SNPs rs10012, rs1056827 and rs1056836 alone did not provide any significant evidence of association with colorectal cancer risk. Haplotypes of rs1056827 and rs10012 or rs1056827 and rs1056836 revealed an association with colorectal cancer which was significantly stronger in the homozygous carriers. One haplotype was under represented in the colorectal cancer patient group compared to the control population suggesting a protective effect. Genetic variants within the CYP1B1 that are associated with altered function appear to influence susceptibility to a colorectal cancer in Poland. Three haplotypes were associated with altered cancer risk; one conferred protection and two were associated with an increased risk of disease. These observations should be confirmed in other populations

  10. Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases with altered PAM specificities

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P.; Prew, Michelle S.; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Topkar, Ved; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Zheng, Zongli; Gonzales, Andrew P.W.; Li, Zhuyun; Peterson, Randall T.; Yeh, Jing-Ruey Joanna; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2015-01-01

    Although CRISPR-Cas9 nucleases are widely used for genome editing1, 2, the range of sequences that Cas9 can recognize is constrained by the need for a specific protospacer adjacent motif (PAM)3–6. As a result, it can often be difficult to target double-stranded breaks (DSBs) with the precision that is necessary for various genome editing applications. The ability to engineer Cas9 derivatives with purposefully altered PAM specificities would address this limitation. Here we show that the commonly used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) can be modified to recognize alternative PAM sequences using structural information, bacterial selection-based directed evolution, and combinatorial design. These altered PAM specificity variants enable robust editing of endogenous gene sites in zebrafish and human cells not currently targetable by wild-type SpCas9, and their genome-wide specificities are comparable to wild-type SpCas9 as judged by GUIDE-Seq analysis7. In addition, we identified and characterized another SpCas9 variant that exhibits improved specificity in human cells, possessing better discrimination against off-target sites with non-canonical NAG and NGA PAMs and/or mismatched spacers. We also found that two smaller-size Cas9 orthologues, Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (St1Cas9) and Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), function efficiently in the bacterial selection systems and in human cells, suggesting that our engineering strategies could be extended to Cas9s from other species. Our findings provide broadly useful SpCas9 variants and, more importantly, establish the feasibility of engineering a wide range of Cas9s with altered and improved PAM specificities. PMID:26098369

  11. Angiography of histopathologic variants of synovial sarcoma

    Synovial sarcomas are rare soft tissue tumors which histopathologically can be divided into monophasic, biphasic and mixed variants. As part of a protocol for intra-arterial chemotherapy 12 patients with biopsy proven synovial sarcoma underwent angiography. The angiograms on these patients were reviewed to determine whether synovial sarcomas and their variants demonstrated a characteristic angiographic appearance. Synovial sarcomas appeared angiographically as soft tissue masses which showed a fine network of tumor vessels with an inhomogeneous capillary blush. Their degree of vascularity varied according to their histopathology. Monophasic synovial sarcomas demonstrated in general a higher degree of neovascularity than the biphasic form. This finding was also suggested by histopathologic analysis of the vessels in the tumor. Although angiography did not show a distinctive vascular pattern it may be useful to evaluate tumor size and vascularity. (orig.)

  12. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer.

    Sheppard, Travis K; Hitz, Benjamin C; Engel, Stacia R; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C; Dalusag, Kyla S; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Paskov, Kelley M; Skrzypek, Marek S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source web application for the visualization of genomic and proteomic differences. Multiple sequence alignments have been constructed across high quality genome sequences from 11 different S. cerevisiae strains and stored in the SGD. The alignments and summaries are encoded in JSON and used to create a two-tiered dynamic view of the budding yeast pan-genome, available at http://www.yeastgenome.org/variant-viewer. PMID:26578556

  13. Development of industrial variant specification systems

    Hansen, Benjamin Loer

    With globalisation and increased competition industrial companies must be prepared to satisfy individual customer needs and still stay competitive with regards to lead times, quality, and prices. These factors require companies to be better prepared to handle specification activities during order...... developed from a holistic and strategically anchored point of view. Another assumption is that this is a challenge for many industrial companies. Even though the literature presents many considerations on general issues covering new information technology, little work is found on the business perspectives...... and the challenge of understanding the variant specification tasks and the connections between variant specification, product development, sales, manufacturing, and information technology. The present thesis seeks to meet this challenge with a procedure, concepts and tools. This is done through an...

  14. Wham: Identifying Structural Variants of Biological Consequence.

    Zev N Kronenberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Existing methods for identifying structural variants (SVs from short read datasets are inaccurate. This complicates disease-gene identification and efforts to understand the consequences of genetic variation. In response, we have created Wham (Whole-genome Alignment Metrics to provide a single, integrated framework for both structural variant calling and association testing, thereby bypassing many of the difficulties that currently frustrate attempts to employ SVs in association testing. Here we describe Wham, benchmark it against three other widely used SV identification tools-Lumpy, Delly and SoftSearch-and demonstrate Wham's ability to identify and associate SVs with phenotypes using data from humans, domestic pigeons, and vaccinia virus. Wham and all associated software are covered under the MIT License and can be freely downloaded from github (https://github.com/zeeev/wham, with documentation on a wiki (http://zeeev.github.io/wham/. For community support please post questions to https://www.biostars.org/.

  15. Cytokines and tumor metastasis gene variants in oral cancer and precancer in Puerto Rico.

    Esther Erdei

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: A cross-sectional epidemiological study explored genetic susceptibility to oral precancer and cancer in Puerto Rico (PR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred three individuals with a benign oral condition, oral precancer (oral epithelial hyperplasia/hyperkeratosis, oral epithelial dysplasia, or oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA were identified via PR pathology laboratories. A standardized, structured questionnaire obtained information on epidemiological variables; buccal cells were collected for genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed using Taqman® assays. Allelic frequencies of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were evaluated in cytokine genes and genes influencing tumor metastasis. Risk estimates for a diagnosis of oral precancer or SCCA while having a variant allele were generated using logistic regression. Adjusted models controlled for age, gender, ancestry, education, smoking and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Relative to persons with a benign oral lesion, individuals with homozygous recessive allelic variants of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α -238 A/G SNP had a reduced odds of having an oral precancer (ORadjusted = 0.15; 95% CI 0.03-0.70. The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFβ-1 -509 C/T polymorphism was inversely associated with having an oral SCCA among persons homozygous for the recessive variant (ORcrude = 0.27; 95% CI 0.09-0.79. The matrix metalloproteinase gene (MMP-1 variant, rs5854, was associated with oral SCCA; participants with even one variant allele were more likely to have oral SCCA (ORadjusted = 2.62, 95% CI 1.05-6.53 compared to people with ancestral alleles. CONCLUSION: Our exploratory analyses suggest that genetic alterations in immune system genes and genes with metastatic potential are associated with oral precancer and SCCA risk in PR.

  16. A common variant associated with dyslexia reduces expression of the KIAA0319 gene.

    Megan Y Dennis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous genetic association studies have implicated the KIAA0319 gene on human chromosome 6p22 in dyslexia susceptibility. The causative variant(s remains unknown but may modulate gene expression, given that (1 a dyslexia-associated haplotype has been implicated in the reduced expression of KIAA0319, and (2 the strongest association has been found for the region spanning exon 1 of KIAA0319. Here, we test the hypothesis that variant(s responsible for reduced KIAA0319 expression resides on the risk haplotype close to the gene's transcription start site. We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms on the risk haplotype immediately upstream of KIAA0319 and determined that three of these are strongly associated with multiple reading-related traits. Using luciferase-expressing constructs containing the KIAA0319 upstream region, we characterized the minimal promoter and additional putative transcriptional regulator regions. This revealed that the minor allele of rs9461045, which shows the strongest association with dyslexia in our sample (max p-value = 0.0001, confers reduced luciferase expression in both neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Additionally, we found that the presence of this rs9461045 dyslexia-associated allele creates a nuclear protein-binding site, likely for the transcriptional silencer OCT-1. Knocking down OCT-1 expression in the neuronal cell line SHSY5Y using an siRNA restores KIAA0319 expression from the risk haplotype to nearly that seen from the non-risk haplotype. Our study thus pinpoints a common variant as altering the function of a dyslexia candidate gene and provides an illustrative example of the strategic approach needed to dissect the molecular basis of complex genetic traits.

  17. Cough variant asthma and atopic cough

    Magni Chiara; Chellini Elisa; Zanasi Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Chronic cough has been reported to be the fifth most common complaint seen by primary care physicians in the world, the third in Italy. Chronic cough in non-smoking, non-treated with ACE-inhibitor adults with normal chest radiogram could be a symptom of asthma and can be sub-classified into: cough-variant asthma, atopic cough, and eosinophilic bronchitis. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of these three disorders.

  18. A Secure Variant of the Hill Cipher

    Toorani, Mohsen; 10.1109/ISCC.2009.5202241

    2010-01-01

    The Hill cipher is a classical symmetric encryption algorithm that succumbs to the know-plaintext attack. Although its vulnerability to cryptanalysis has rendered it unusable in practice, it still serves an important pedagogical role in cryptology and linear algebra. In this paper, a variant of the Hill cipher is introduced that makes the Hill cipher secure while it retains the efficiency. The proposed scheme includes a ciphering core for which a cryptographic protocol is introduced.

  19. Variant position of the medial plantar nerve

    Astik RB; Dave UH; Gajendra KS

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of variation of position of the medial plantar nerve is important for the forefoot surgeon for plantar reconstruction, local injection therapy and an excision of interdigital neuroma. During routine dissection of 50-year-old female cadaver, we found the medial plantar nerve and vessels variably located between plantar aponeurosis and the muscles of the first layer of the sole of the right foot. Due to this variant position, the medial plantar nerve and vessels lose their protection ...

  20. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer

    Sheppard, Travis K.; Gabdank, Idan; Engel, Stacia R.; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dalusag, Kyla S.; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Paskov, Kelley M.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Weng, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source...

  1. MRI anatomical variants of mammillary bodies.

    Tagliamonte, Micaela; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Gallucci, Massimo; Caulo, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The mammillary bodies (MBs) are classically defined as a pair of small round structures located on the undersurface of the diencephalon. The systematic observation of MR brain images of patients with neurological diseases, but also of healthy subjects enrolled in research protocols, reveals, however, a greater anatomical variability. The aim of the present study was to define the spectrum of such variability using spatial normalized 3D TFE T1-weighted MR images in a group of 151 healthy right-handed young subjects (78 females, age range 16-39 years). The MBs were identified on reformatted coronal and axial images and classified according to morphological, positional and numerical criteria. On the basis of coronal images, MBs were first divided into symmetrical (86.1 %) and asymmetrical (13.9 %), depending on their respective height. Symmetrical MBs were further subdivided into three variants [type A (2.7 %), B (76.2 %), C (7.3 %)] according to the depth of the intermammillary sulcus. Two morphological variants were defined on axial images, depending on whether the MBs were circular (63.6 %) or elliptic (36.4 %). This latter group was further divided in two subgroups, depending on whether the MBs were parallel (21.9 %) or convergent (14.6 %). Finally, two subjects (1.3 %) presented a supernumeral MB. The transverse size of the third ventricle was greater in the type A compared to the type B and C groups. Gender did not significantly affect the frequency of MBs variants, except for the three symmetrical subgroups in which the variants A and C were more frequent in males than in females. These findings suggest the presence of an anatomical variability of the MBs, in contrast to their classical definition. Therefore, atypical presentation of MBs can be the expression of this variability rather than a marker of neurological disorders (i.e. cerebral malformation, mesial temporal sclerosis, Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome). PMID:24072163

  2. Lipoleiomyoma: A rare variant of uterine leiomyoma

    D. Manimaran; Dost Mohamed Khan; Saba Yasmin; Anuradha, S.

    2014-01-01

    Uterine fatty tumors are rare variants of benign leiomyoma. Lipoleiomyoma, lipomyoma, fibromyolipoma are various synonyms for this lesion. They usually occur in the obese perimenopausal and postmenopausal females in the age group 50-70 years and 90% cases occur in patients older than 40 years. There were only few cases reported in the literature. These lesions are interesting due to the occasional diagnostic confusion with sarcomas and the curiosity regarding its histogenesis. We are presenti...

  3. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Reddy, Sita, E-mail: sitaredd@usc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Comai, Lucio, E-mail: comai@usc.edu [Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  4. MR imaging of the ankle: Normal variants

    Thirty asymptomatic ankles were studied with high-resolution surface coil MR imaging. The thirty ankles were reviewed for identification or normal structures. The MR appearance of the deltoid and posterior to talo-fibular ligaments, peroneous brevis and longus tendons, and posterior aspect of the tibial-talar joint demonstrated several normal variants not previously described. These should not be misinterpreted as pathologic processes. The specific findings included (1) cortical irregularity of the posterior tibial-talar joint in 27 of 30 cases which should not be mistaken for osteonecrois; (2) normal posterior talo-fibular ligament with irregular and frayed inhomogeneity, which represents a normal variant in seven of ten cases; and (3) fluid in the shared peroneal tendons sheath which may be confused for a longitudinal tendon tear in three of 30 cases. Ankle imaging with the use of MR is still a relatively new procedure. Further investigation is needed to better define normal anatomy as well as normal variants. The authors described several structures that normally present with variable MR imaging appearances. This is clinically significant in order to maintain a high sensitivity and specificity in MR imaging interpretation

  5. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy

    Saliha; Rizvi; Syed; Tasleem; Raza; Farzana; Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, e NOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Utility of standard pharmacopeial and nonpharmacopeial methods in distinguishing folded, unfolded, and process variant forms of interferon α-2.

    Mark, John K; Dionne, Sophie; Cyr, Terry D; Boucher, Sylvie; Girard, Michel; Hefford, Mary Alice

    2012-10-01

    Standard pharmacopeial test methods for biologics broadly focus on identity (active substance and impurities) and function (activity and toxicity). However, it is less clear which, if any, of the methods can identify a subtle change in protein therapeutics such as misfolding, unusual product-related impurities, or sequence or folding variants that may result from differences in manufacturing processes. In this study, we test the ability of standard pharmacopeia monograph methods and other common physicochemical methods (including circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation, mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis) to differentiate folding variants [purposely denatured interferon (IFN) α-2] and sequence variants (deliberately truncated, or truncated and chemically modified) from the IFN α-2 reference standards. The results show that the standard pharmacopeial methods are of limited utility in detecting alterations in protein structure, even when those alterations include changes in primary structure. None of the pharmacopeial methods were clear probes of higher order structure. The nonpharmacopeial methods were somewhat more successful but not a single method was able to distinguish all variants tested from the authentic standard. Taken together, the data underscore the requirement to use several different and complementary methods and stress conditions to assess primary and higher order structure when assessing the comparability in potential biosimilar protein products. PMID:22828964

  7. Microsatellite Instability Use in Mismatch Repair Gene Sequence Variant Classification

    Bryony A. Thompson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Inherited mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR can cause MMR deficiency and increased susceptibility to colorectal and endometrial cancer. Microsatellite instability (MSI is the defining molecular signature of MMR deficiency. The clinical classification of identified MMR gene sequence variants has a direct impact on the management of patients and their families. For a significant proportion of cases sequence variants of uncertain clinical significance (also known as unclassified variants are identified, constituting a challenge for genetic counselling and clinical management of families. The effect on protein function of these variants is difficult to interpret. The presence or absence of MSI in tumours can aid in determining the pathogenicity of associated unclassified MMR gene variants. However, there are some considerations that need to be taken into account when using MSI for variant interpretation. The use of MSI and other tumour characteristics in MMR gene sequence variant classification will be explored in this review.

  8. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  9. Common variants of the vitamin D binding protein gene and adverse health outcomes

    Malik, Suneil; Fu, Lei; Juras, David James; Karmali, Mohamed; Wong, Betty Y. L.; Gozdzik, Agnes; Cole, David E.C.

    2013-01-01

    The vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is the major plasma carrier for vitamin D and its metabolites, but it is also an actin scavenger, and is the precursor to the immunomodulatory protein, Gc-MAF. Two missense variants of the DBP gene – rs7041 encoding Asp432Glu and rs4588 encoding Thr436Lys – change the amino acid sequence and alter the protein function. They are common enough to generate population-wide constitutive differences in vitamin D status, based on assay of the serum metabolite, 25-...

  10. Molecular Cloning, Carbohydrate Specificity and the Crystal Structure of Two Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Variants

    Vassiliki I. Peppa; Hemalatha Venkat; Anastassia L. Kantsadi; Shashikala R. Inamdar; Ganapati G. Bhat; Sachin Eligar; Anupama Shivanand; Chachadi, Vishwanath B.; Gonchigar J. Satisha; Bale M Swamy; Vassiliki T. Skamnaki; Zographos, Spyridon E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.

    2015-01-01

    SRL is a cell wall associated developmental-stage specific lectin secreted by Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-born pathogenic fungus. SRL displays specificity for TF antigen (Galβ1→3GalNAc-α-Ser//Thr) expressed in all cancer types and has tumour suppressing effects in vivo. Considering the immense potential of SRL in cancer research, we have generated two variant gene constructs of SRL and expressed in E. coli to refine the sugar specificity and solubility by altering the surface charge. SSR1 and ...

  11. Major contribution from recurrent alterations and MSH6 mutations in the Danish Lynch syndrome population

    Wikman, Friedrik P; Hansen, Thomas V O; Krarup, Henrik B; Orntoft, Torben F; Nielsen, Finn C; Bisgaard, Søs Marie Luise; Nilbert, Mef; Wikman, Friedrik; Hansen, Thomas; Krarup, Henrik; Orntoft, Torben; Nielsen, Finn; Sunde, Lone; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Cruger, Dorthe; Timshel, Susanne; Bisgaard, Marie-Louise; Bernstein, Inge; Okkels, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of mismatch-repair (MMR) gene mutations have been identified in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. This study presents the population-based Danish MMR gene mutation profile, which contains 138 different MMR gene alterations. Among these, 88...... mutations in 164 families are considered pathogenic and an additional 50 variants from 76 families are considered to represent variants of unknown pathogenicity. The different MMR genes contribute to 40% (MSH2), 29% (MLH1), and 22% (MSH6) of the mutations and the Danish population thus shows a considerably...

  12. Joint Analysis of Multiple Traits in Rare Variant Association Studies.

    Wang, Zhenchuan; Wang, Xuexia; Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2016-05-01

    The joint analysis of multiple traits has recently become popular since it can increase statistical power to detect genetic variants and there is increasing evidence showing that pleiotropy is a widespread phenomenon in complex diseases. Currently, the majority of existing methods for the joint analysis of multiple traits test association between one common variant and multiple traits. However, the variant-by-variant methods for common variant association studies may not be optimal for rare variant association studies due to the allelic heterogeneity as well as the extreme rarity of individual variants. Current statistical methods for rare variant association studies are for one single trait only. In this paper, we propose an adaptive weighting reverse regression (AWRR) method to test association between multiple traits and rare variants in a genomic region. AWRR is robust to the directions of effects of causal variants and is also robust to the directions of association of traits. Using extensive simulation studies, we compare the performance of AWRR with canonical correlation analysis (CCA), Single-TOW, and the weighted sum reverse regression (WSRR). Our results show that, in all of the simulation scenarios, AWRR is consistently more powerful than CCA. In most scenarios, AWRR is more powerful than Single-TOW and WSRR. PMID:26990300

  13. Space-variant polarized Airy beam

    Chen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally generate an Airy beam with polarization structure while keeping its original amplitude and phase profile intact. This class of Airy beam preserves the acceleration properties. By monitoring their initial polarization structure we have provided insight concerning the self-healing mechanism of Airy beams. We investigate both theoretically and experimentally the self-healing polarization properties of the space-variant polarized Airy beams. Amplitude as well as the polarization structure tends to reform during propagation in spite of the severe truncation of the beam by finite apertures.

  14. Variant position of the medial plantar nerve

    Astik RB

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variation of position of the medial plantar nerve is important for the forefoot surgeon for plantar reconstruction, local injection therapy and an excision of interdigital neuroma. During routine dissection of 50-year-old female cadaver, we found the medial plantar nerve and vessels variably located between plantar aponeurosis and the muscles of the first layer of the sole of the right foot. Due to this variant position, the medial plantar nerve and vessels lose their protection from the muscles of the first layer of the sole of the foot and became vulnerable for compression.

  15. Genetic variants associated with lung function

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wojczynski, Mary; Minster, Ryan L;

    2014-01-01

    with exceptional longevity have not been identified. METHOD: We conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants associated with lung function in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) (n = 3,899). Replication was performed using data from the CHARGE/SpiroMeta consortia....... The association between SNPs and FEV1 and FEV1/FVC was analyzed using a linear mixed effects model adjusted for age, age2, sex, height, field center, ancestry principal components and kinship structure to adjust for family relationships separately for ever smokers and never smokers. In the linkage...

  16. Performance comparison of various time variant filters

    Kuwata, M. [JEOL Engineering Co. Ltd., Akishima, Tokyo (Japan); Husimi, K.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes the advantage of the trapezoidal filter used in semiconductor detector system comparing with the other time variant filters. The trapezoidal filter is the compose of a rectangular pre-filter and a gated integrator. We indicate that the best performance is obtained by the differential-integral summing type rectangular pre-filter. This filter is not only superior in performance, but also has the useful feature that the rising edge of the output waveform is linear. We introduce an example of this feature used in a high-energy experiment. (author)

  17. Research progress of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Xiao-hua GU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no epidemiological data of frontotemporal dementia (FTD in China. The application of updated diagnostic criteria, publishing of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD consensus in China, development of multimodal imaging and biomarkers promote the clinical understanding on behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD. There is still no drugs treating FTD approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Multidisciplinary intervention may delay the progression of bvFTD. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.07.006

  18. Space phobia: syndrome or agoraphobic variant?

    Marks, I; Bebbington, P

    1976-08-01

    Four elderly women had intense fears of falling when there was no visible support at hand or on seeing space cues while driving. Two patients had cervical spondylosis. The mean age at onset of the fear was 54--thirty years later than that for agoraphobia. Fear of public places and of heights was not prominent, nor was depersonalisation or depression. These "space phobias" might be a hitherto unrecognised syndrome or an unusual variant of agoraphobia. The visuospatial reflexes involved might illuminate the pathogenesis of certain fears. PMID:947417

  19. Oral fibrolipoma: A rare histological variant

    Treville Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipomas are benign soft tissue mesenchymal neoplasms. Fibrolipoma is a histological variant of lipoma that mostly affects the buccal mucosa and causes functional and cosmetic disabilities. The diagnosis and differentiation of fibrolipoma with clinically similar lesions such as fibroma and pleomorphic adenoma is very essential for a correct treatment plan and complete follow-up. This article presents a case of a 35-year-old female with a fibrolipoma on the lingual marginal gingiva of the mandibular left third molar.

  20. Variants of P Systems with Toxic Objects

    Alhazov, Artiom; Freund, Rudolf; Ivanov, Sergiu; Research Group on Natural Computing (Universidad de Sevilla) (Coordinador)

    2015-01-01

    Toxic objects have been introduced to avoid trap rules, especially in (purely) catalytic P systems. No toxic object is allowed to stay idle during a valid derivation in a P system with toxic objects. In this paper we consider special variants of toxic P systems where the set of toxic objects is prede ned { either by requiring all objects to be toxic or all catalysts to be toxic or all objects except the catalysts to be toxic. With all objects staying inside and being toxic, pur...

  1. Altered fingerprints: analysis and detection.

    Yoon, Soweon; Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2012-03-01

    The widespread deployment of Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) in law enforcement and border control applications has heightened the need for ensuring that these systems are not compromised. While several issues related to fingerprint system security have been investigated, including the use of fake fingerprints for masquerading identity, the problem of fingerprint alteration or obfuscation has received very little attention. Fingerprint obfuscation refers to the deliberate alteration of the fingerprint pattern by an individual for the purpose of masking his identity. Several cases of fingerprint obfuscation have been reported in the press. Fingerprint image quality assessment software (e.g., NFIQ) cannot always detect altered fingerprints since the implicit image quality due to alteration may not change significantly. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) compiling case studies of incidents where individuals were found to have altered their fingerprints for circumventing AFIS, 2) investigating the impact of fingerprint alteration on the accuracy of a commercial fingerprint matcher, 3) classifying the alterations into three major categories and suggesting possible countermeasures, 4) developing a technique to automatically detect altered fingerprints based on analyzing orientation field and minutiae distribution, and 5) evaluating the proposed technique and the NFIQ algorithm on a large database of altered fingerprints provided by a law enforcement agency. Experimental results show the feasibility of the proposed approach in detecting altered fingerprints and highlight the need to further pursue this problem. PMID:21808092

  2. ATM sequence variants are predictive of adverse radiotherapy response among patients treated for prostate cancer

    Purpose: To examine whether the presence of sequence variants in the ATM (mutated in ataxia-telangiectasia) gene is predictive for the development of radiation-induced adverse responses resulting from 125I prostate brachytherapy for early-stage prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients with a minimum of 1-year follow-up who underwent 125I prostate brachytherapy of early-stage prostate cancer were screened for DNA sequence variations in all 62 coding exons of the ATM gene using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. The clinical course and postimplant dosimetry for each genetically characterized patient were obtained from a database of 2,020 patients implanted at Mount Sinai Hospital after 1990. Results: Twenty-one ATM sequence alterations located within exons, or in short intronic regions flanking each exon, were found in 16 of the 37 patients screened. For this group, 10 of 16 (63%) exhibited at least one form of adverse response. In contrast, of the 21 patients who did not harbor an ATM sequence variation, only 3 of 21 (14%) manifested radiation-induced adverse responses (p = 0.005). Nine of the patients with sequence alterations specifically possessed missense mutations, which encode for amino acid substitutions and are therefore more likely to possess functional importance. For this group, 7 of 9 (78%) exhibited at least one form of adverse response. In contrast, of the 28 patients who did not have a missense alteration, only 6 of 28 (21%) manifested any form of adverse response to the radiotherapy (p = 0.004). Of the patients with missense variants, 5 of 9 (56%) exhibited late rectal bleeding vs. 1 of 28 (4%) without such alterations (p = 0.002). Of those patients who were at risk for developing erectile dysfunction, 5 of 8 (63%) patients with missense mutations developed prospectively evaluated erectile dysfunction as opposed to 2 of 20 (10%) without these sequence alterations (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Possession of sequence

  3. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  4. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    Marshall, Christian R.; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W.; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the “foetal cardiac gene programme” which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  5. Personality factors and profiles in variants of irritable bowel syndrome

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) variants (constipation, diarrhea, or both)and personality traits in non-psychiatric patients.METHODS: IBS was diagnosed using the Rome Ⅱ diagnostic criteria after exclusion of organic bowel pathology. The entry of each patient was confirmed following a psychiatric interview. Personality traits and the score of each factor were evaluated using the NEO Five Factor Inventory.RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were studied.The mean age (±SD) was 33.4 (±11.0) year (62% female). Subjects scored higher in neuroticism (26.25±7.80 vs 22.92±9.54, P < 0.0005), openness (26.25±5.22 vs 27.94±4.87, P < 0.0005) and conscientiousness (32.90 ±7.80 vs 31.62±5.64, P < 0.01) compared to our general population derived from universities of Iran. Our studied population consisted of 71 patients with Diarrhea dominant-IBS, 33 with Constipation dominant-IBS and 46 with Altering type-IBS. Scores of conscientiousness and neuroticism were significantly higher in C-IBS compared to D-IBS and A-IBS (35.79±5.65 vs 31.95±6.80,P = 0.035 and 31.97±9.87, P = 0.043, respectively).Conscientiousness was the highest dimension of personality in each of the variants. Patients with C-IBS had almost similar personality profiles, composed of higher scores for neuroticism and conscientiousness, with low levels of agreeableness, openness and extraversion that were close to those of the general population.CONCLUSION: Differences were observed between IBS patients and the general population, as well as between IBS subtypes, in terms of personality factors.Patients with constipation-predominant IBS showed similar personality profiles. Patients with each subtype of IBS may benefit from psychological interventions, which can be focused considering the characteristics of each subtype.

  6. Music alters visual perception.

    Jacob Jolij

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual perception is not a passive process: in order to efficiently process visual input, the brain actively uses previous knowledge (e.g., memory and expectations about what the world should look like. However, perception is not only influenced by previous knowledge. Especially the perception of emotional stimuli is influenced by the emotional state of the observer. In other words, how we perceive the world does not only depend on what we know of the world, but also by how we feel. In this study, we further investigated the relation between mood and perception. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We let observers do a difficult stimulus detection task, in which they had to detect schematic happy and sad faces embedded in noise. Mood was manipulated by means of music. We found that observers were more accurate in detecting faces congruent with their mood, corroborating earlier research. However, in trials in which no actual face was presented, observers made a significant number of false alarms. The content of these false alarms, or illusory percepts, was strongly influenced by the observers' mood. CONCLUSIONS: As illusory percepts are believed to reflect the content of internal representations that are employed by the brain during top-down processing of visual input, we conclude that top-down modulation of visual processing is not purely predictive in nature: mood, in this case manipulated by music, may also directly alter the way we perceive the world.

  7. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  8. Clinical relevance of hepatitis B virus variants

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a global public health problem with more than 240 million people chronicallyinfected worldwide, who are at risk for end-stage liverdisease and hepatocellular carcinoma. There are anestimated 600000 deaths annually from complications ofHBV-related liver disease. Antiviral therapy with nucleos/tide analogs (NA) targeting the HBV polymerase (P) caninhibit disease progression by long-term suppression ofHBV replication. However, treatment may fail with firstgeneration NA therapy due to the emergence of drugresistantmutants, as well as incomplete medicationadherence. The HBV replicates via an error-prone reversetranscriptase leading to quasispecies. Due to overlappingopen reading frames mutations within the HBV P cancause concomitant changes in the HBV surface gene (S )and vice versa. HBV quasispecies diversity is associatedwith response to antiviral therapy, disease severity andlong-term clinical outcomes. Specific mutants havebeen associated with antiviral drug resistance, immuneescape, liver fibrosis development and tumorgenesis.An understanding of HBV variants and their clinicalrelevance may be important for monitoring chronichepatitis B disease progression and treatment response.In this review, we will discuss HBV molecular virology,mechanism of variant development, and their potentialclinical impact.

  9. Gene Expression Profiles are Altered in Human Papillomavirus-16 E6 D25E-Expressing Cell Lines

    Jang Dai-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 E6 D25E is the most prevalent variant in Korean women at high risk for cervical cancers. Several studies have identified an association between the increased frequency of this variant and the elevated risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical carcinoma. To investigate whether the HPV-16 E6 D25E variant might influence cervical cancer progression, we used an oligonucleotide microarray approach to identify transcriptionally altered gene expression patterns in recombinant wild-type E6 or E6 D25E variant-expressing HPV-negative cancer cells. We found that 211 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated (at least 1.5-fold, p

  10. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; van Heel, David A; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Núñez, Concepcion; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M; Ivarsson, Anneli; Boezen, H Marieke; Liu, Edwin; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible variants to common HLA testing. Design We developed an average weighted genetic risk score with 10, 26 and 57 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 2675 cases and 2815 controls and assessed the improvement in risk prediction provided by the non-HLA SNP. Moreover, we assessed the transferability of the genetic risk model with 26 non-HLA variants to a nested case–control population (n=1709) and a prospective cohort (n=1245) and then tested how well this model predicted CD outcome for 985 independent individuals. Results Adding 57 non-HLA variants to HLA testing showed a statistically significant improvement compared to scores from models based on HLA only, HLA plus 10 SNP and HLA plus 26 SNP. With 57 non-HLA variants, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve reached 0.854 compared to 0.823 for HLA only, and 11.1% of individuals were reclassified to a more accurate risk group. We show that the risk model with HLA plus 26 SNP is useful in independent populations. Conclusions Predicting risk with 57 additional non-HLA variants improved the identification of potential CD patients. This demonstrates a possible role for combined HLA and non-HLA genetic testing in diagnostic work for CD. PMID:23704318

  11. Maternal Inheritance and Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Familial Parkinson's Disease

    Pfeiffer Ronald F; Rudolph Alice; Halter Cheryl A; Pauciulo Michael W; Kissell Diane K; Pankratz Nathan; Simon David K; Nichols William C; Foroud Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD) and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to t...

  12. Rare autism-associated variants implicate syntaxin 1 (STX1 R26Q) phosphorylation and the dopamine transporter (hDAT R51W) in dopamine neurotransmission and behaviors

    Cartier, Etienne; Hamilton, Peter J; Belovich, Andrea N;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Syntaxin 1 (STX1) is a presynaptic plasma membrane protein that coordinates synaptic vesicle fusion. STX1 also regulates the function of neurotransmitter transporters, including the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT). The DAT is a membrane protein that controls DA homeostasis through the...... these variants with the intent of defining DA dysfunction and associated behaviors as possible complications of ASD.......: Here, we characterize two independent autism-associated variants in the genes that encode STX1 and the DAT. We demonstrate that each variant dramatically alters DAT function. We identify molecular mechanisms that converge to inhibit reverse transport of DA and DA-associated behaviors. These mechanisms...

  13. Enhanced Acid Tolerance in Bifidobacterium longum by Adaptive Evolution: Comparison of the Genes between the Acid-Resistant Variant and Wild-Type Strain.

    Jiang, Yunyun; Ren, Fazheng; Liu, Songling; Zhao, Liang; Guo, Huiyuan; Hou, Caiyun

    2016-03-28

    Acid stress can affect the viability of probiotics, especially Bifidobacterium. This study aimed to improve the acid tolerance of Bifidobacterium longum BBMN68 using adaptive evolution. The stress response, and genomic differences of the parental strain and the variant strain were compared by acid stress. The highest acid-resistant mutant strain (BBMN68m) was isolated from more than 100 asexual lines, which were adaptive to the acid stress for 10(th), 20(th), 30(th), 40(th), and 50(th) repeats, respectively. The variant strain showed a significant increase in acid tolerance under conditions of pH 2.5 for 2 h (from 7.92 to 4.44 log CFU/ml) compared with the wildtype strain (WT, from 7.87 to 0 log CFU/ml). The surface of the variant strain was also smoother. Comparative whole-genome analysis showed that the galactosyl transferase D gene (cpsD, bbmn68_1012), a key gene involved in exopolysaccharide (EPS) synthesis, was altered by two nucleotides in the mutant, causing alteration in amino acids, pI (from 8.94 to 9.19), and predicted protein structure. Meanwhile, cpsD expression and EPS production were also reduced in the variant strain (p < 0.05) compared with WT, and the exogenous WT-EPS in the variant strain reduced its acid-resistant ability. These results suggested EPS was related to acid responses of BBMN68. PMID:26608165

  14. A gain-of-function variant in DIAPH1 causes dominant macrothrombocytopenia and hearing loss.

    Stritt, Simon; Nurden, Paquita; Turro, Ernest; Greene, Daniel; Jansen, Sjoert B; Westbury, Sarah K; Petersen, Romina; Astle, William J; Marlin, Sandrine; Bariana, Tadbir K; Kostadima, Myrto; Lentaigne, Claire; Maiwald, Stephanie; Papadia, Sofia; Kelly, Anne M; Stephens, Jonathan C; Penkett, Christopher J; Ashford, Sofie; Tuna, Salih; Austin, Steve; Bakchoul, Tamam; Collins, Peter; Favier, Rémi; Lambert, Michele P; Mathias, Mary; Millar, Carolyn M; Mapeta, Rutendo; Perry, David J; Schulman, Sol; Simeoni, Ilenia; Thys, Chantal; Gomez, Keith; Erber, Wendy N; Stirrups, Kathleen; Rendon, Augusto; Bradley, John R; van Geet, Chris; Raymond, F Lucy; Laffan, Michael A; Nurden, Alan T; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Richardson, Sylvia; Freson, Kathleen; Ouwehand, Willem H; Mumford, Andrew D

    2016-06-01

    Macrothrombocytopenia (MTP) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by enlarged and reduced numbers of circulating platelets, sometimes resulting in abnormal bleeding. In most MTP, this phenotype arises because of altered regulation of platelet formation from megakaryocytes (MKs). We report the identification of DIAPH1, which encodes the Rho-effector diaphanous-related formin 1 (DIAPH1), as a candidate gene for MTP using exome sequencing, ontological phenotyping, and similarity regression. We describe 2 unrelated pedigrees with MTP and sensorineural hearing loss that segregate with a DIAPH1 R1213* variant predicting partial truncation of the DIAPH1 diaphanous autoregulatory domain. The R1213* variant was linked to reduced proplatelet formation from cultured MKs, cell clustering, and abnormal cortical filamentous actin. Similarly, in platelets, there was increased filamentous actin and stable microtubules, indicating constitutive activation of DIAPH1. Overexpression of DIAPH1 R1213* in cells reproduced the cytoskeletal alterations found in platelets. Our description of a novel disorder of platelet formation and hearing loss extends the repertoire of DIAPH1-related disease and provides new insight into the autoregulation of DIAPH1 activity. PMID:26912466

  15. Behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia with dominant gait disturbances - case report.

    Wojciech Guenter

    2016-04-01

    Presented case emphasises the significance of accurately gathered anamnesis with patient and his family. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia should be considered in cases of unexplained gait abnormalities.

  16. The ARMA alphabet soup: A tour of ARMA model variants

    Scott H. Holan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoregressive moving-average (ARMA difference equations are ubiquitous models for short memory time series and have parsimoniously described many stationary series. Variants of ARMA models have been proposed to describe more exotic series features such as long memory autocovariances, periodic autocovariances, and count support set structures. This review paper enumerates, compares, and contrasts the common variants of ARMA models in today’s literature. After the basic properties of ARMA models are reviewed, we tour ARMA variants that describe seasonal features, long memory behavior, multivariate series, changing variances (stochastic volatility and integer counts. A list of ARMA variant acronyms is provided.

  17. Population structure analysis using rare and common functional variants

    Ding Lili

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Next-generation sequencing technologies now make it possible to genotype and measure hundreds of thousands of rare genetic variations in individuals across the genome. Characterization of high-density genetic variation facilitates control of population genetic structure on a finer scale before large-scale genotyping in disease genetics studies. Population structure is a well-known, prevalent, and important factor in common variant genetic studies, but its relevance in rare variants is unclear. We perform an extensive population structure analysis using common and rare functional variants from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 mini-exome sequence. The analysis based on common functional variants required 388 principal components to account for 90% of the variation in population structure. However, an analysis based on rare variants required 532 significant principal components to account for similar levels of variation. Using rare variants, we detected fine-scale substructure beyond the population structure identified using common functional variants. Our results show that the level of population structure embedded in rare variant data is different from the level embedded in common variant data and that correcting for population structure is only as good as the level one wishes to correct.

  18. A unified phylogeny-based nomenclature for histone variants

    Talbert Paul B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone variants are non-allelic protein isoforms that play key roles in diversifying chromatin structure. The known number of such variants has greatly increased in recent years, but the lack of naming conventions for them has led to a variety of naming styles, multiple synonyms and misleading homographs that obscure variant relationships and complicate database searches. We propose here a unified nomenclature for variants of all five classes of histones that uses consistent but flexible naming conventions to produce names that are informative and readily searchable. The nomenclature builds on historical usage and incorporates phylogenetic relationships, which are strong predictors of structure and function. A key feature is the consistent use of punctuation to represent phylogenetic divergence, making explicit the relationships among variant subtypes that have previously been implicit or unclear. We recommend that by default new histone variants be named with organism-specific paralog-number suffixes that lack phylogenetic implication, while letter suffixes be reserved for structurally distinct clades of variants. For clarity and searchability, we encourage the use of descriptors that are separate from the phylogeny-based variant name to indicate developmental and other properties of variants that may be independent of structure.

  19. Determination of uranium by luminescent method (tablet variant)

    A new tablet variant of luminescent determination of uranium in rocks is developed. The analytical process includes the following operations: sample decomposition, uranium separation from luminescence quencher impurities, preparation of luminescent sample (tablet), photometry of the tablet. The method has two variants developed: the first one is characterized by a more hard decomposition, sample mass being 0.2 g; the second variant has a better detection limit (5x10-6%), the sample mass being 0.2-1 g. Procedures of the sample preparation for both variants of analysis are described

  20. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    Hudler Petra

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC. Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Methods Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. Results The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Conclusion Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene.

  1. Assessing pathogenicity of MLH1 variants by co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 genes in yeast

    Loss of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in humans, mainly due to mutations in the hMLH1 gene, is linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Because not all MLH1 alterations result in loss of MMR function, accurate characterization of variants and their classification in terms of their effect on MMR function is essential for reliable genetic testing and effective treatment. To date, in vivo assays for functional characterization of MLH1 mutations performed in various model systems have used episomal expression of the modified MMR genes. We describe here a novel approach to determine accurately the functional significance of hMLH1 mutations in vivo, based on co-expression of human MLH1 and PMS2 in yeast cells. Yeast MLH1 and PMS1 genes, whose protein products form the MutLα complex, were replaced by human orthologs directly on yeast chromosomes by homologous recombination, and the resulting MMR activity was tested. The yeast strain co-expressing hMLH1 and hPMS2 exhibited the same mutation rate as the wild-type. Eight cancer-related MLH1 variants were introduced, using the same approach, into the prepared yeast model, and their effect on MMR function was determined. Five variants (A92P, S93G, I219V, K618R and K618T) were classified as non-pathogenic, whereas variants T117M, Y646C and R659Q were characterized as pathogenic. Results of our in vivo yeast-based approach correlate well with clinical data in five out of seven hMLH1 variants and the described model was thus shown to be useful for functional characterization of MLH1 variants in cancer patients found throughout the entire coding region of the gene

  2. Detecting Association of Rare Variants by Testing an Optimally Weighted Combination of Variants for Quantitative Traits in General Families

    Fang, Shurong; Zhang, Shuanglin; Sha, Qiuying

    2013-01-01

    Although next-generation sequencing technology allows sequencing the whole genome of large groups of individuals, the development of powerful statistical methods for rare variant association studies is still underway. Even though many statistical methods have been developed for mapping rare variants, most of these methods are for unrelated individuals only, whereas family data have been shown to improve power to detect rare variants. The majority of the existing methods for unrelated individu...

  3. Detecting association of rare and common variants by testing an optimally weighted combination of variants with longitudinal data

    Wang, Shuaicheng; Fang, Shurong; Sha, Qiuying; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that complex diseases are caused by both common and rare variants. Recently, several statistical methods for detecting associations of rare variants have been developed, including the test for testing the effect of an optimally weighted combination of variants (TOW) developed by our group in 2012. These methodologies consider phenotype measurement at only one time point. Because many sequence data have been developed on population cohorts that contain phenotype measu...

  4. Some variants of SAT and their properties

    2002-01-01

    A new model for the well-known problem, the satisfiablility problem of boolean formula (SAT), is introduced. Based on this model, some variants of SAT and their properties are presented. Denote by NP the class of all languages which can be decided by a non-deterministic polynomial Turing machine and by P the class of all languages which can be decided by a deterministic polynomial-time Turing machine. This model also allows us to give another candidate for the natural problems in ((NP-NPC)-P), denoted as NPI, under the assumption P≠NP, where NPC represents NP-complete. It is proven that this candidate is not in NPC under P≠NP. While, it is indeed in NPI under some stronger but reasonable assumption, specifically, under the Exponential-Time Hypothesis (ETH). Thus we can partially solve this long standing important open problem.

  5. Genetic variants in periodontal health and disease

    Dumitrescu, Alexandrina L. [Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Dentistry; Kobayashi, Junya [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Genome Repair Dynamics

    2010-07-01

    Periodontitis is a complex, multifactorial disease and its susceptibility is genetically determined. The present book systematically reviews the evidence of the association between the genetic variants and periodontitis progression and/or treatment outcomes. Genetic syndromes known to be associated with periodontal disease, the candidate gene polymorphisms investigated in relation to periodontitis, the heritability of chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as common guidelines for association studies are described. This growing understanding of the role of genetic variation in inflammation and periodontal chronic disease presents opportunities to identify healthy persons who are at increased risk of disease and to potentially modify the trajectory of disease to prolong healthy aging. The book represents a new concept in periodontology with its pronounced focus on understanding through knowledge rather than presenting the presently valid answers. Connections between genetics and periodontology are systematically reviewed and covered in detail. (orig.)

  6. Current conveyors variants, applications and hardware implementations

    Senani, Raj; Singh, A K

    2015-01-01

    This book serves as a single-source reference to Current Conveyors and their use in modern Analog Circuit Design. The authors describe the various types of current conveyors discovered over the past 45 years, details of all currently available, off-the-shelf integrated circuit current conveyors, and implementations of current conveyors using other, off-the-shelf IC building blocks. Coverage includes prominent bipolar/CMOS/Bi-CMOS architectures of current conveyors, as well as all varieties of starting from third generation current conveyors to universal current conveyors, their implementations and applications. •Describes all commercially available off-the-shelf IC current conveyors, as well as hardware implementations of current conveyors using other off-the-shelf ICs; • Describes numerous variants of current conveyors evolved over the past forty five years; • Describes a number of Bipolar/CMOS/Bi-CMOS architectures of current conveyors, along with their characteristic features; • Includes a comprehe...

  7. A look-ahead variant of TFQMR

    Freund, R.W. [AT& T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Nachtigal, N.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Recently, Freund proposed a Krylov subspace iteration, the transpose-free quasi-minimal residual method (TFQMR), for solving general nonsingular non-Hermitian linear systems. The algorithm relies on a version of the squared Lanczos process to generate the basis vectors for the underlying Krylov subspace. It then constructs iterates defined by a quasi-minimization property, which leads to a smooth and nearly monotone convergence behavior. The authors investigate a variant of TFQMR that uses look-ahead to avoid some of the problems associated with breakdowns in the underlying squared Lanczos procedure. They also present some numerical examples that illustrate the properties of the new method, as compared to the original TFQMR algorithm.

  8. Lipoleiomyoma: A rare variant of uterine leiomyoma

    D Manimaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine fatty tumors are rare variants of benign leiomyoma. Lipoleiomyoma, lipomyoma, fibromyolipoma are various synonyms for this lesion. They usually occur in the obese perimenopausal and postmenopausal females in the age group 50-70 years and 90% cases occur in patients older than 40 years. There were only few cases reported in the literature. These lesions are interesting due to the occasional diagnostic confusion with sarcomas and the curiosity regarding its histogenesis. We are presenting three cases of lipoleiomyoma whose age ranged from 40 to 50 years with clinical, radiologic and pathologic correlation. All three cases came with complaints of abnormal vaginal bleeding and found to have intramural heteroechoic nodule in the ultrasonogram.

  9. Possible new variant of Nijmegen breakage syndrome

    Der Kaloustian, V.M.; Booth, A.; Elliott, A.M. [Montreal Children`s Hospital and McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1996-10-02

    We report on a child with microcephaly, small facial and body size, and immune deficiency. The phenotype is consistent with Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), with additional clinical manifestations and laboratory findings not reported heretofore. Most investigations, including the results of radiation-resistant DNA synthesis, concurred with the diagnosis of NBS. Cytogenetic analysis documented abnormalities in virtually all cells examined. Along with the high frequency of breaks and rearrangements of chromosomes 7 and 14, we found breakage and monosomies involving numerous other chromosomes. Because of some variation in the clinical presentation and some unusual cytogenetic findings, we suggest that our patient may represent a new variant of Nijmegen breakage syndrome. 34 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. A double mutation in exon 6 of the [beta]-hexosaminidase [alpha] subunit in a patient with the B1 variant of Tay-Sachs disease

    Ainsworth, P.J. (Univ. of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada) Child Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada)); Coulter-Mackie, M.B. (Univ. of Western Ontario, Ontario (Canada) Child Health Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada) Children' s Psychiatric Research Institute, London, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-10-01

    The B1 variant form of Tay-Sachs disease is enzymologically unique in that the causative mutation(s) appear to affect the active site in the [alpha] subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A without altering its ability to associate with the [beta] subunit. Most previously reported B1 variant mutations were found in exon 5 within codon 178. The coding sequence of the [alpha] subunit gene of a patient with the B1 variant form was examined with a combination of reverse transcription of mRNA to cDNA, PCR, and dideoxy sequencing. A double mutation in exon 6 has been identified: a G[sub 574][yields]C transversion causing a val[sub 192][yields]leu change and a G[sub 598][yields] A transition resulting in a val[sub 200][yields]met alteration. The amplified cDNAs were otherwise normal throughout their sequence. The 574 and 598 alterations have been confirmed by amplification directly from genomic DNA from the patient and her mother. Transient-expression studies of the two exon 6 mutations (singly or together) in COS-1 cells show that the G[sub 574][yields]C change is sufficient to cause the loss of enzyme activity. The biochemical phenotype of the 574 alteration in transfection studies is consistent with that expected for a B1 variant mutation. As such, this mutation differs from previously reported B1 variant mutations, all of which occur in exon 5. 31 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Glycolipid binding preferences of Shiga toxin variants.

    Sayali S Karve

    Full Text Available The major virulence factor of Shiga toxin producing E. coli, is Shiga toxin (Stx, an AB5 toxin that consists of a ribosomal RNA-cleaving A-subunit surrounded by a pentamer of receptor-binding B subunits. The two major isoforms, Stx1 and Stx2, and Stx2 variants (Stx2a-h significantly differ in toxicity. The exact reason for this toxicity difference is unknown, however different receptor binding preferences are speculated to play a role. Previous studies used enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to study binding of Stx1 and Stx2a toxoids to glycolipid receptors. Here, we studied binding of holotoxin and B-subunits of Stx1, Stx2a, Stx2b, Stx2c and Stx2d to glycolipid receptors globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4 in the presence of cell membrane components such as phosphatidylcholine (PC, cholesterol (Ch and other neutral glycolipids. In the absence of PC and Ch, holotoxins of Stx2 variants bound to mixtures of Gb3 with other glycolipids but not to Gb3 or Gb4 alone. Binding of all Stx holotoxins significantly increased in the presence of PC and Ch. Previously, Stx2a has been shown to form a less stable B-pentamer compared to Stx1. However, its effect on glycolipid receptor binding is unknown. In this study, we showed that even in the absence of the A-subunit, the B-subunits of both Stx1 and Stx2a were able to bind to the glycolipids and the more stable B-pentamer formed by Stx1 bound better than the less stable pentamer of Stx2a. B-subunit mutant of Stx1 L41Q, which shows similar stability as Stx2a B-subunits, lacked glycolipid binding, suggesting that pentamerization is more critical for binding of Stx1 than Stx2a.

  12. Role of genetic variants in ADIPOQ in human eating behavior.

    Rohde, Kerstin; Keller, Maria; Horstmann, Annette; Liu, Xuanshi; Eichelmann, Fabian; Stumvoll, Michael; Villringer, Arno; Kovacs, Peter; Tönjes, Anke; Böttcher, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of adiponectin and its negative correlation with BMI are well described. Adiponectin serum levels are altered in eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating. Here, we tested the hypothesis that (1) adiponectin serum levels correlate with human eating behavior factors and (2) that genetic variants of the ADIPOQ locus influence both serum levels and eating behavior. We analyzed 11 SNPs within ADIPOQ and in the 5' UTR and measured serum adiponectin levels in 1,036 individuals from the German Sorbs population. The German version of the three-factor eating questionnaire (FEV) was completed by 548 Sorbs. For replication purposes, we included an independent replication cohort from Germany (N = 350). In the Sorbs, we observed positive correlations of restraint with adiponectin serum levels (P = 0.001; r = 0.148) which, however, did not withstand adjustment for covariates (P = 0.083; r = 0.077). In addition, four SNPs were nominally associated with serum adiponectin levels (all P  9.3 × 10(-4)). In our replication cohort, we observed similar effect directions at rs1501229 for disinhibition and hunger. A meta-analysis resulted in nominal statistical significance P = 0.036 (Z score 2.086) and P = 0.017 (Z score 2.366), respectively. Given the observed relationship of the SNPs with adiponectin levels and eating behavior, our data support a potential role of adiponectin in human eating behavior. Whether the relationship with eating behavior is mediated by the effects of circulating adiponectin warrants further investigations. PMID:25542302

  13. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    Jessica LaRusch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF, a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002. Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005 and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001. WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in

  14. Fitness alteration of foot-and-mouth disease virus mutants: measurement of adaptability of viral quasispecies.

    Martínez, M A; Carrillo, C; González-candelas, F; Moya, A.; Domingo, E; Sobrino, F

    1991-01-01

    We document the rapid alteration of fitness of two foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) mutants resistant to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. Both mutants showed a selective disadvantage in BHK-21 cells when passaged in competition with their parental FMDV. Upon repeated replication of the mutants alone, they acquired a selective advantage over the parental FMDV and fixed additional genomic substitutions without reversion of the monoclonal antibody-resistant phenotype. Thus, variants that w...

  15. Association analysis identifies ZNF750 regulatory variants in psoriasis

    Birnbaum Ramon Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the ZNF750 promoter and coding regions have been previously associated with Mendelian forms of psoriasis and psoriasiform dermatitis. ZNF750 encodes a putative zinc finger transcription factor that is highly expressed in keratinocytes and represents a candidate psoriasis gene. Methods We examined whether ZNF750 variants were associated with psoriasis in a large case-control population. We sequenced the promoter and exon regions of ZNF750 in 716 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 397 Caucasian controls. Results We identified a total of 47 variants, including 38 rare variants of which 35 were novel. Association testing identified two ZNF750 haplotypes associated with psoriasis (p ZNF750 promoter and 5' UTR variants displayed a 35-55% reduction of ZNF750 promoter activity, consistent with the promoter activity reduction seen in a Mendelian psoriasis family with a ZNF750 promoter variant. However, the rare promoter and 5' UTR variants identified in this study did not strictly segregate with the psoriasis phenotype within families. Conclusions Two haplotypes of ZNF750 and rare 5' regulatory variants of ZNF750 were found to be associated with psoriasis. These rare 5' regulatory variants, though not causal, might serve as a genetic modifier of psoriasis.

  16. Schizophrenia genetic variants are not associated with intelligence

    Van Scheltinga, A.F.T.; Bakker, S.C.; Van Haren, N.E.M.;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is associated with lower pre-morbid intelligence (IQ) in addition to (pre-morbid) cognitive decline. Both schizophrenia and IQ are highly heritable traits. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic variants associated with schizophrenia, including copy number variants (CNV...

  17. The Structural Determinants behind the Epigenetic Role of Histone Variants.

    Cheema, Manjinder S; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants are an important part of the histone contribution to chromatin epigenetics. In this review, we describe how the known structural differences of these variants from their canonical histone counterparts impart a chromatin signature ultimately responsible for their epigenetic contribution. In terms of the core histones, H2A histone variants are major players while H3 variant CenH3, with a controversial role in the nucleosome conformation, remains the genuine epigenetic histone variant. Linker histone variants (histone H1 family) haven't often been studied for their role in epigenetics. However, the micro-heterogeneity of the somatic canonical forms of linker histones appears to play an important role in maintaining the cell-differentiated states, while the cell cycle independent linker histone variants are involved in development. A picture starts to emerge in which histone H2A variants, in addition to their individual specific contributions to the nucleosome structure and dynamics, globally impair the accessibility of linker histones to defined chromatin locations and may have important consequences for determining different states of chromatin metabolism. PMID:26213973

  18. The Structural Determinants behind the Epigenetic Role of Histone Variants

    Manjinder S. Cheema

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Histone variants are an important part of the histone contribution to chromatin epigenetics. In this review, we describe how the known structural differences of these variants from their canonical histone counterparts impart a chromatin signature ultimately responsible for their epigenetic contribution. In terms of the core histones, H2A histone variants are major players while H3 variant CenH3, with a controversial role in the nucleosome conformation, remains the genuine epigenetic histone variant. Linker histone variants (histone H1 family haven’t often been studied for their role in epigenetics. However, the micro-heterogeneity of the somatic canonical forms of linker histones appears to play an important role in maintaining the cell-differentiated states, while the cell cycle independent linker histone variants are involved in development. A picture starts to emerge in which histone H2A variants, in addition to their individual specific contributions to the nucleosome structure and dynamics, globally impair the accessibility of linker histones to defined chromatin locations and may have important consequences for determining different states of chromatin metabolism.

  19. Foodborne Outbreak and Nonmotile Salmonella enterica Variant, France

    Le Hello, Simon; Brisabois, Anne; Accou-Demartin, Marie; Josse, Adeline; Marault, Muriel; Francart, Sylvie; Nathalie, Jourdan-Da Silva; Weill, François-Xavier

    2012-01-01

    We report a food-related outbreak of salmonellosis in humans caused by a nonmotile variant of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium in France in 2009. This nonmotile variant had been circulating in laying hens but was not considered as Typhimurium and consequently escaped European poultry fl ock regulations.

  20. Detecting rare variants in case-parents association studies.

    Kuang-Fu Cheng

    Full Text Available Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs in detecting common variants (minor allele frequency ≥0.05 many suggested that rare variants also contribute to the genetic architecture of diseases. Recently, researchers demonstrated that rare variants can show a strong stratification which may not be corrected by using existing methods. In this paper, we focus on a case-parents study and consider methods for testing group-wise association between multiple rare (and common variants in a gene region and a disease. All tests depend on the numbers of transmitted mutant alleles from parents to their diseased children across variants and hence they are robust to the effect of population stratification. We use extensive simulation studies to compare the performance of four competing tests: the largest single-variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT, multivariable test, combined TDT, and a likelihood ratio test based on a random-effects model. We find that the likelihood ratio test is most powerful in a wide range of settings and there is no negative impact to its power performance when common variants are also included in the analysis. If deleterious and protective variants are simultaneously analyzed, the likelihood ratio test was generally insensitive to the effect directionality, unless the effects are extremely inconsistent in one direction.

  1. CBH1 homologs and variant CBH1 cellulases

    Goedegebuur, Frits (Rozenlaan, NL); Gualfetti, Peter (San Francisco, CA); Mitchinson, Colin (Half Moon Bay, CA); Neefe, Paulien (Zoetermeer, NL)

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are a number of homologs and variants of Hypocrea jecorina Cel7A (formerly Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I or CBH1), nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The homologs and variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted and/or deleted.

  2. Search for new loci and low-frequency variants influencing glioma risk by exome-array analysis.

    Kinnersley, Ben; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Labussière, Marianne; Wang, Yufei; Galan, Pilar; Mokhtari, Karima; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Gousias, Konstantinos; Schramm, Johannes; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony; Fleming, Sarah J; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann, Stefanie; Nöthen, Markus M; Simon, Matthias; Sanson, Marc; Lathrop, Mark; Houlston, Richard S

    2016-05-01

    To identify protein-altering variants (PAVs) for glioma, we analysed Illumina HumanExome BeadChip exome-array data on 1882 glioma cases and 8079 controls from three independent European populations. In addition to single-variant tests we incorporated information on the predicted functional consequences of PAVs and analysed sets of genes with a higher likelihood of having a role in glioma on the basis of the profile of somatic mutations documented by large-scale sequencing initiatives. Globally there was a strong relationship between effect size and PAVs predicted to be damaging (P=2.29 × 10(-49)); however, these variants which are most likely to impact on risk, are rare (MAFT, p.(Lys3326Ter), which has been shown to influence breast and lung cancer risk (odds ratio (OR)=2.3, P=4.00 × 10(-4) for glioblastoma (GBM)) and IDH2:c.782G>A, p.(Arg261His) (OR=3.21, P=7.67 × 10(-3), for non-GBM). Additionally, gene burden tests revealed a statistically significant association for HARS2 and risk of GBM (P=2.20 × 10(-6)). Genome scans of low-frequency PAVs represent a complementary strategy to identify disease-causing variants compared with scans based on tagSNPs. Strategies to lessen the multiple testing burden by restricting analysis to PAVs with higher priors affords an opportunity to maximise study power. PMID:26264438

  3. A common variant of PNPLA3 (p.I148M is not associated with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

    Jonas Rosendahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pancreatitis (CP is an inflammatory disease that in some patients leads to exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. In industrialized countries the most common aetiology is chronic alcohol abuse. Descriptions of associated genetic alterations in alcoholic CP are rare. However, a common PNPLA3 variant (p.I148M is associated with the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC. Since, alcoholic CP and ALC share the same aetiology PNPLA3 variant (p.I148M possibly influences the development of alcoholic CP. METHODS: Using melting curve analysis we genotyped the variant in 1510 patients with pancreatitis or liver disease (961 German and Dutch alcoholic CP patients, 414 German patients with idiopathic or hereditary CP, and 135 patients with ALC. In addition, we included in total 2781 healthy controls in the study. RESULTS: The previously published overrepresentation of GG-genotype was replicated in our cohort of ALC (p-value <0.0001, OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6-3.3. Distributions of genotype and allele frequencies of the p.I148M variant were comparable in patients with alcoholic CP, idiopathic and hereditary CP and in healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of an association of PNPLA3 p.I148M with alcoholic CP seems not to point to a common pathway in the development of alcoholic CP and alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

  4. Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy (mdg4): structural and functional differences, and distribution in fly stocks.

    Lyubomirskaya, N V; Smirnova, J B; Razorenova, O V; Karpova, N N; Surkov, S A; Avedisov, S N; Kim, A I; Ilyin, Y V

    2001-04-01

    Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy were subjected to detailed structural and functional analysis. A series of hybrid constructs containing various combinations of "active" and "inactive" gypsy copies were tested for their ability to produce new DNA copies in cultured cells by means of reverse transcription. It was shown that the previously demonstrated variations in retrotranspositional activity are associated with either one or both of two amino acid substitutions at the beginning of ORF2. The first substitution is located at the boundary between the putative protease and reverse transcriptase domains and, hence, may influence the processing of the polyprotein. The other substitution may alter reverse transcriptase activity since it is located in the second of the seven conserved domains of the RT gene. To address the question of the evolutionary relationship between the two gypsy variants, their distribution was analyzed in among various fly stocks. Southern analysis revealed that all D. melanogaster strains studied so far contain the "inactive" gypsy variant, while the "active" copies are present only in some strains; most of the latter were established from flies recently isolated from natural populations. Finally, in stocks carrying the flamenco mutation the "active" gypsy variant is much more abundant than the "inactive" form. Possible scenarios for the orgin of the "active" form of gypsy are discussed. PMID:11361349

  5. A novel AXIN2 germline variant associated with attenuated FAP without signs of oligondontia or ectodermal dysplasia.

    Rivera, B; Perea, J; Sánchez, E; Villapún, M; Sánchez-Tomé, E; Mercadillo, F; Robledo, M; Benítez, J; Urioste, M

    2014-03-01

    Truncating mutations in the AXIN2 gene, a key regulator of β-catenin degradation in the Wnt pathway, have been reported in three families with gastrointestinal adenomatous polyposis and features of ectodermal dysplasia. However, the role of AXIN2 in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome is not completely understood. We performed an in-depth study of APC and MUTYH, and ruled out their implication in 23 FAP families. We then investigated the role of other genes involved in the Wnt pathway, including AXIN2, and identified a novel missense variant in AXIN2 in one family with attenuated FAP. Carriers of the variant exhibited a variable number of polyps but none showed any sign of ectodermal dysplasia. We have demonstrated the pathogenicity of this novel variant by establishing its low frequency in controls as well as by LOH analysis, a segregation study, and immunofluorescent staining of AXIN2 and β-catenin proteins. This report expands the phenotype known to be related to AXIN2 alterations and raises the question of whether to screen AXIN2 in FAP cases negative for alterations in APC and MUTYH. PMID:23838596

  6. Gene Variant Databases and Sharing: Creating a Global Genomic Variant Database for Personalized Medicine.

    Bean, Lora J H; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2016-06-01

    Revolutionary changes in sequencing technology and the desire to develop therapeutics for rare diseases have led to the generation of an enormous amount of genomic data in the last 5 years. Large-scale sequencing done in both research and diagnostic laboratories has linked many new genes to rare diseases, but has also generated a number of variants that we cannot interpret today. It is clear that we remain a long way from a complete understanding of the genomic variation in the human genome and its association with human health and disease. Recent studies identified susceptibility markers to infectious diseases and also the contribution of rare variants to complex diseases in different populations. The sequencing revolution has also led to the creation of a large number of databases that act as "keepers" of data, and in many cases give an interpretation of the effect of the variant. This interpretation is based on reports in the literature, prediction models, and in some cases is accompanied by functional evidence. As we move toward the practice of genomic medicine, and consider its place in "personalized medicine," it is time to ask ourselves how we can aggregate this wealth of data into a single database for multiple users with different goals. PMID:26931283

  7. Spontaneous loss and alteration of antigen receptor expression in mature CD4+ T cells

    The T-cell receptor CD3 (TCR/CD3) complex plays a central role in antigen recognition and activation of mature T cells, and therefore abnormalities in the expression of the complex should induce unresponsiveness of T cells to antigen stimulus. Using flow cytometry, we detected and enumerated variant cells with loss or alteration of surface TCR/CD3 expression among human mature CD4+ T cells. The presence of variant CD4+ T cells was demonstrated by isolating and cloning them from peripheral blood, and their abnormalities can be accounted for by alterations in TCR expression such as defects of protein expression and partial protein deletion. The variant frequency in peripheral blood increased with aging in normal donors and was highly elevated in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an autosomal recessive inherited disease with defective DNA repair and variable T-cell immunodeficiency. These findings suggest that such alterations in TCR expression are induced by somatic mutagenesis of TCR genes and can be important factors related to age-dependent and genetic disease-associated T-cell dysfunction. (author)

  8. Electrophoretic variants of blood proteins in Japanese, 7

    A total of 16,835 children, of whom 11,737 are unrelated, from Hiroshima and Nagasaki were examined for erythrocyte cytoplasmic glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT1) by starch gel electrophoresis. A variant allele named GOT1*2HR1 which seems to be identical with GOT1*2 was encountered in polymorphic frequency. Five kinds of rare variants, 3NG1, 4NG1, 5NG1, 6HR1, and 7NG1 were encountered in a total of 109 children. Except for 7NG1 for which complete family study was unable, family studies confirmed the genetic nature of these rare variants, since for all instances in which both parents could be examined, one of the parents exhibited the same variant as that of their child. Thermostability profiles of these six variants were normal. The enzyme activities of five were decreased, while the value of one was normal compared to that of GOT1 1. (author)

  9. Clinical and laboratory update on the DEL variant.

    Nuchnoi, Pornlada; Thongbus, Jairak; Srisarin, Apapan; Kerdpin, Usanee; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    Serological assays for the RhD blood group are based on detection of the RhD antigen on human red blood cells using a specific anti-D antibody. The weak expression of the RhD antigen in the DEL variant hinders the sensitivity of conventional serological assays. Evidence of anti-D immunization in patients with D-negativity who have received DEL-variant blood units has been reported in various populations. This observation has prompted the need for genetic epidemiological and clinical data on the DEL variant in the development of DEL molecular diagnostic testing. This review highlights the molecular features of the DEL variant, the clinical consequences of DEL-blood transfusion, and current approaches for detection of the DEL-variant for donor screening and transfusion. PMID:25316658

  10. Genetic variants in Alzheimer disease - molecular and brain network approaches.

    Gaiteri, Chris; Mostafavi, Sara; Honey, Christopher J; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2016-07-01

    Genetic studies in late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) are aimed at identifying core disease mechanisms and providing potential biomarkers and drug candidates to improve clinical care of AD. However, owing to the complexity of LOAD, including pathological heterogeneity and disease polygenicity, extraction of actionable guidance from LOAD genetics has been challenging. Past attempts to summarize the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants have used pathway analysis and collections of small-scale experiments to hypothesize functional convergence across several variants. In this Review, we discuss how the study of molecular, cellular and brain networks provides additional information on the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants. We then discuss emerging combinations of these omic data sets into multiscale models, which provide a more comprehensive representation of the effects of LOAD-associated genetic variants at multiple biophysical scales. Furthermore, we highlight the clinical potential of mechanistically coupling genetic variants and disease phenotypes with multiscale brain models. PMID:27282653

  11. Bayesian detection of causal rare variants under posterior consistency.

    Liang, Faming

    2013-07-26

    Identification of causal rare variants that are associated with complex traits poses a central challenge on genome-wide association studies. However, most current research focuses only on testing the global association whether the rare variants in a given genomic region are collectively associated with the trait. Although some recent work, e.g., the Bayesian risk index method, have tried to address this problem, it is unclear whether the causal rare variants can be consistently identified by them in the small-n-large-P situation. We develop a new Bayesian method, the so-called Bayesian Rare Variant Detector (BRVD), to tackle this problem. The new method simultaneously addresses two issues: (i) (Global association test) Are there any of the variants associated with the disease, and (ii) (Causal variant detection) Which variants, if any, are driving the association. The BRVD ensures the causal rare variants to be consistently identified in the small-n-large-P situation by imposing some appropriate prior distributions on the model and model specific parameters. The numerical results indicate that the BRVD is more powerful for testing the global association than the existing methods, such as the combined multivariate and collapsing test, weighted sum statistic test, RARECOVER, sequence kernel association test, and Bayesian risk index, and also more powerful for identification of causal rare variants than the Bayesian risk index method. The BRVD has also been successfully applied to the Early-Onset Myocardial Infarction (EOMI) Exome Sequence Data. It identified a few causal rare variants that have been verified in the literature.

  12. Bayesian detection of causal rare variants under posterior consistency.

    Faming Liang

    Full Text Available Identification of causal rare variants that are associated with complex traits poses a central challenge on genome-wide association studies. However, most current research focuses only on testing the global association whether the rare variants in a given genomic region are collectively associated with the trait. Although some recent work, e.g., the Bayesian risk index method, have tried to address this problem, it is unclear whether the causal rare variants can be consistently identified by them in the small-n-large-P situation. We develop a new Bayesian method, the so-called Bayesian Rare Variant Detector (BRVD, to tackle this problem. The new method simultaneously addresses two issues: (i (Global association test Are there any of the variants associated with the disease, and (ii (Causal variant detection Which variants, if any, are driving the association. The BRVD ensures the causal rare variants to be consistently identified in the small-n-large-P situation by imposing some appropriate prior distributions on the model and model specific parameters. The numerical results indicate that the BRVD is more powerful for testing the global association than the existing methods, such as the combined multivariate and collapsing test, weighted sum statistic test, RARECOVER, sequence kernel association test, and Bayesian risk index, and also more powerful for identification of causal rare variants than the Bayesian risk index method. The BRVD has also been successfully applied to the Early-Onset Myocardial Infarction (EOMI Exome Sequence Data. It identified a few causal rare variants that have been verified in the literature.

  13. Epigenetic alterations in gastric carcinogenesis

    In-Seon CHOI; Tsung-Teh WU

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is believed to result in part from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations leading to oncogene overexpression and tumor suppressor loss. Epigenetic alterations as a distinct and crucial mechanism to silence a variety of methylated tissue-specific and imprinted genes, have been extensively studied in gastric carcinoma and play important roles in gastric carcinogenesis. This review will briefly discuss the basic aspects of DNA methylation and CpG island methylation, in particular the epigenetic alterations of certain critical genes implicated in gastric carcinogenesis and its relevance of clinical implications.

  14. Pulmonary alterations in Behcet's disease

    Purpose: This study aims to demonstrate pulmonary alterations (PA) in patients with Behcet's disease by using CT. Materials and methods: CTs of 50 patients with Behcet's disease and 20 others in a control group have been evaluated retrospectively for PA (septal, reticular, nodular, atelectatic opacities). Results: Eight out of 50 patients (16%) with Behcet's disease showed PA. Three out of 20 (15%) in the control group showed PA. No differences were observed between Behcet's disease patients and the control group regarding pulmonary alterations (p = 0.917). No differences were observed in the disease duration, ages and sex in either group in those with and without PA. Conclusion: Pulmonary alterations can be seen in patients with Behcet's disease, but these alterations are not significant.

  15. Non-progressive juvenile spinal muscular atrophy of the distal upper limb (Hirayama's disease: a clinical variant of the benign monomelic amyotrophy

    NASCIMENTO OSVALDO J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama's disease (HD is frequently found in Asia, and is rarely referred among westerners. It affects young people with higher incidence in males. It is a focal distal amyotrophy with unilateral or asymmetric bilateral involvement of C7, C8 and T1 innervated muscles. HD appears sporadically and has a benign evolution with clinical stabilization in around one year. We report four young male patients with clinical and electrophysiological alterations described in HD, which were followed-up during 5 years. Electromyographic findings were indicative of lower motor neuron involvement. We analyzed cervical MRI aiming at understanding if a questionable spinal cord compression could be implicated in the pathogenesis, but no abnormality was verified. In view of its clinical, and EMG characteristics, HD is no more than a benign monomelic amyotrophy (BMA clinical variant, and not a specific disease. This eponym could be considered only for the distal upper limb variant (Hirayama's variant of the BMA.

  16. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Christian M Hagen

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446 variants. After elimination of 312 (69.9% non-coding and synonymous variants, a further 109 (24.4% with a global prevalence > 0.1%, three (0.7% haplogroup associated and 19 (2.0% variants with a low predicted in silico likelihood of pathogenicity, three variants: MT-TC: m.5772G>A, MT-TF: m.644A>G, and MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM.

  17. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance

  18. The Clinical Significance of Unknown Sequence Variants in BRCA Genes

    Calò, Valentina; Bruno, Loredana; Paglia, Laura La; Perez, Marco; Margarese, Naomi [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy); Gaudio, Francesca Di [Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Legal Medicine, University of Palermo, Palermo (Italy); Russo, Antonio, E-mail: lab-oncobiologia@usa.net [Department of Surgery and Oncology, Regional Reference Center for the Biomolecular Characterization and Genetic Screening of Hereditary Tumors, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)

    2010-09-10

    Germline mutations in BRCA1/2 genes are responsible for a large proportion of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancers. Many highly penetrant predisposition alleles have been identified and include frameshift or nonsense mutations that lead to the translation of a truncated protein. Other alleles contain missense mutations, which result in amino acid substitution and intronic variants with splicing effect. The discovery of variants of uncertain/unclassified significance (VUS) is a result that can complicate rather than improve the risk assessment process. VUSs are mainly missense mutations, but also include a number of intronic variants and in-frame deletions and insertions. Over 2,000 unique BRCA1 and BRCA2 missense variants have been identified, located throughout the whole gene (Breast Cancer Information Core Database (BIC database)). Up to 10–20% of the BRCA tests report the identification of a variant of uncertain significance. There are many methods to discriminate deleterious/high-risk from neutral/low-risk unclassified variants (i.e., analysis of the cosegregation in families of the VUS, measure of the influence of the VUSs on the wild-type protein activity, comparison of sequence conservation across multiple species), but only an integrated analysis of these methods can contribute to a real interpretation of the functional and clinical role of the discussed variants. The aim of our manuscript is to review the studies on BRCA VUS in order to clarify their clinical relevance.

  19. VCF-Miner: GUI-based application for mining variants and annotations stored in VCF files

    Steven N Hart; Duffy, Patrick; Quest, Daniel J.; Hossain, Asif; Meiners, Mike A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing platforms are widely used to discover variants associated with disease. The processing of sequencing data involves read alignment, variant calling, variant annotation and variant filtering. The standard file format to hold variant calls is the variant call format (VCF) file. According to the format specifications, any arbitrary annotation can be added to the VCF file for downstream processing. However, most downstream analysis programs disregard annotations already ...

  20. Identification of copy number variants in horses

    Doan, R.

    2012-03-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) represent a substantial source of genetic variation in mammals. However, the occurrence of CNVs in horses and their subsequent impact on phenotypic variation is unknown. We performed a study to identify CNVs in 16 horses representing 15 distinct breeds (Equus caballus) and an individual gray donkey (Equus asinus) using a whole-exome tiling array and the array comparative genomic hybridization methodology. We identified 2368 CNVs ranging in size from 197 bp to 3.5 Mb. Merging identical CNVs from each animal yielded 775 CNV regions (CNVRs), involving 1707 protein- and RNA-coding genes. The number of CNVs per animal ranged from 55 to 347, with median and mean sizes of CNVs of 5.3 kb and 99.4 kb, respectively. Approximately 6% of the genes investigated were affected by a CNV. Biological process enrichment analysis indicated CNVs primarily affected genes involved in sensory perception, signal transduction, and metabolism. CNVs also were identified in genes regulating blood group antigens, coat color, fecundity, lactation, keratin formation, neuronal homeostasis, and height in other species. Collectively, these data are the first report of copy number variation in horses and suggest that CNVs are common in the horse genome and may modulate biological processes underlying different traits observed among horses and horse breeds.

  1. CRY2 genetic variants associate with dysthymia.

    Leena Kovanen

    Full Text Available People with mood disorders often have disruptions in their circadian rhythms. Recent molecular genetics has linked circadian clock genes to mood disorders. Our objective was to study two core circadian clock genes, CRY1 and CRY2 as well as TTC1 that interacts with CRY2, in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. Of these three genes, 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose selection was based on the linkage disequilibrium and potential functionality were genotyped in 5910 individuals from a nationwide population-based sample. The diagnoses of major depressive disorder, dysthymia and anxiety disorders were assessed with a structured interview (M-CIDI. In addition, the participants filled in self-report questionnaires on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Logistic and linear regression models were used to analyze the associations of the SNPs with the phenotypes. Four CRY2 genetic variants (rs10838524, rs7121611, rs7945565, rs1401419 associated significantly with dysthymia (false discovery rate q<0.05. This finding together with earlier CRY2 associations with winter depression and with bipolar type 1 disorder supports the view that CRY2 gene has a role in mood disorders.

  2. Spatially variant morphological restoration and skeleton representation.

    Bouaynaya, Nidhal; Charif-Chefchaouni, Mohammed; Schonfeld, Dan

    2006-11-01

    The theory of spatially variant (SV) mathematical morphology is used to extend and analyze two important image processing applications: morphological image restoration and skeleton representation of binary images. For morphological image restoration, we propose the SV alternating sequential filters and SV median filters. We establish the relation of SV median filters to the basic SV morphological operators (i.e., SV erosions and SV dilations). For skeleton representation, we present a general framework for the SV morphological skeleton representation of binary images. We study the properties of the SV morphological skeleton representation and derive conditions for its invertibility. We also develop an algorithm for the implementation of the SV morphological skeleton representation of binary images. The latter algorithm is based on the optimal construction of the SV structuring element mapping designed to minimize the cardinality of the SV morphological skeleton representation. Experimental results show the dramatic improvement in the performance of the SV morphological restoration and SV morphological skeleton representation algorithms in comparison to their translation-invariant counterparts. PMID:17076415

  3. Multiple Sodium Channel Variants in the Mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus

    Lin He, Ting Li, Lee Zhang, Nannan Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated sodium channels are the target sites of both DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. The importance of alternative splicing as a key mechanism governing the structural and functional diversity of sodium channels and the resulting development of insecticide and acaricide resistance is widely recognized, as shown by the extensive research on characterizing alternative splicing and variants of sodium channels in medically and agriculturally important insect species. Here we present the first comparative study of multiple variants of the sodium channel transcripts in the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus. The variants were classified into two categories, CxNa-L and CxNa-S based on their distinguishing sequence sizes of ~6.5 kb and ~4.0 kb, respectively, and generated via major extensive alternative splicing with minor small deletions/ insertions in susceptible S-Lab, low resistant HAmCqG0, and highly resistant HAmCqG8 Culex strains. Four alternative Cx-Na-L splice variants were identified, including three full length variants with three optional exons (2, 5, and 21i and one with in-frame-stop codons. Large, multi-exon-alternative splices were identified in the CxNa-S category. All CxNa-S splicing variants in the S-Lab and HAmCqG0 strains contained in-frame stop codons, suggesting that any resulting proteins would be truncated. The ~1000 to ~3000-fold lower expression of these splice variants with stop codons compared with the CxNa-L splicing variants may support the lower importance of these variants in S-Lab and HAmCqG0. Interestingly, two alternative splicing variants of CxNa-S in HAmCqG8 included entire ORFs but lacked exons 5 to18 and these two variants had much higher expression levels in HAmCqG8 than in S-Lab and HAmCqG0. These results provide a functional basis for further characterizing how alternative splicing of a voltage-gated sodium channel contributes to diversity in neuronal signaling in mosquitoes in response to pyrethroids, and

  4. Mitochondrial transfer RNA variants and primary congenital glaucoma.

    Yi, Quan-Yong; Deng, Gang; Zhou, Hong-Jian; Wu, Guo-Hai; Tang, Luosheng

    2016-07-01

    Variants in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are the most important causes for vision loss, the mt-tRNA variants being the largest group among them. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of 15 mt-tRNA variants with primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Based on phylogenetic approach, we found that only half of them were definitely pathogenic with PCG, other mutations were single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in human population. Thus, our study provided novel insight into the pathogenesis of PCG. PMID:25835039

  5. Geometric Structures of Stable Time-Variant State Feedback Systems

    ZHONG Feng-wei; SUN Hua-fei; ZHANG Zhen-ning

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for considering the stabilizing time-variant state feedback gains is proposed from the viewpoint of information geometry. First, parametrization of the set of all stabilizing time-variant state feedback gains is given. Moreover, a diffeomorphic structure between the set of stabilizing time-variant state feedback gains and the Cartesian product of positive definite matrix and skew symmetric matrix satisfying certain algebraic conditions is constructed. Furth ermore, an immersion and some results about the eigenvalue locations of stable state feedback systems are derived.

  6. Variante de Dandy Walker: relato de caso = Dandy Walker variant: a case report

    Khan, Richard Lester et al.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: relatar o caso de um paciente com variante de Dandy Walker, chamando atenção para a importância da suspeita, investigação e manejo das repercussões clínicas. Descrição do caso: é relatado o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino, com quadro clínico e radiológico típico da Variante de Dandy Walker. Durante o pré-natal, através de ecografia obstétrica com 23 semanas e 3 dias, apresentou alterações sugestivas de Síndrome de Dandy Walker. Ao nascimento apresentou exame físico com fenda palatina, criptorquidia à direita, hexodactilia em ambos os pés. Apresentava ainda ecocardiograma com forame oval patente e persistência do canal arterial. O diagnóstico foi estabelecido através da ressonância magnética realizada após o nascimento, que evidenciava hipoplasia do vermis cerebelar, alargamento da fossa posterior e leve dilatação ventricular. Conclusões: este artigo procura caracterizar a variante de Dandy Walker, que é uma malformação congênita do sistema nervoso central e é o tipo mais comum da Síndrome de Dandy Walker. Seu fenótipo é variável, devendo-se sempre pesquisar malformações tanto intra quanto extracranianas, visto que o risco de mortalidade pós-natal aumenta quando existe esta associação. O tratamento envolve equipe multidisciplinar e o prognóstico é reservado, variando conforme o fenótipo.

  7. EPHB2 germline variants in patients with colorectal cancer or hyperplastic polyposis

    Ephrin receptor B2 (EPHB2) has recently been proposed as a novel tumor suppressor gene in colorectal cancer (CRC). Inactivation of the gene has been shown to correlate with progression of colorectal tumorigenesis, and somatic mutations have been reported in both colorectal and prostate tumors. Here we have analyzed the EPHB2 gene for germline alterations in 101 individuals either with 1) CRC and a personal or family history of prostate cancer (PC), or 2) intestinal hyperplastic polyposis (HPP), a condition associated with malignant degeneration such as serrated adenoma and CRC. Four previously unknown missense alterations were observed, which may be associated with the disease phenotype. Two of the changes, I361V and R568W, were identified in Finnish CRC patients, but not in over 300 Finnish familial CRC or PC patients or more than 200 population-matched healthy controls. The third change, D861N, was observed in a UK HPP patient, but not in additional 40 UK HPP patients or in 200 UK healthy controls. The fourth change R80H, originally identified in a Finnish CRC patient, was also found in 1/106 familial CRC patients and in 9/281 healthy controls and is likely to be a neutral polymorphism. We detected novel germline EPHB2 alterations in patients with colorectal tumors. The results suggest a limited role for these EPHB2 variants in colon tumor predisposition. Further studies including functional analyses are needed to confirm this

  8. Germline Heterozygous Variants in SEC23B Are Associated with Cowden Syndrome and Enriched in Apparently Sporadic Thyroid Cancer

    Yehia, Lamis; Niazi, Farshad; Ni, Ying; Ngeow, Joanne; Sankunny, Madhav; Liu, Zhigang; Wei, Wei; Mester, Jessica L.; Keri, Ruth A.; Zhang, Bin; Eng, Charis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-predisposing genes associated with inherited cancer syndromes help explain mechanisms of sporadic carcinogenesis and often inform normal development. Cowden syndrome (CS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by high lifetime risks of epithelial cancers, such that ∼50% of affected individuals are wild-type for known cancer-predisposing genes. Using whole-exome and Sanger sequencing of a multi-generation CS family affected by thyroid and other cancers, we identified a pathogenic missense heterozygous SEC23B variant (c.1781T>G [p.Val594Gly]) that segregates with the phenotype. We also found germline heterozygous SEC23B variants in 3/96 (3%) unrelated mutation-negative CS probands with thyroid cancer and in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), representing apparently sporadic cancers. We note that the TCGA thyroid cancer dataset is enriched with unique germline deleterious SEC23B variants associated with a significantly younger age of onset. SEC23B encodes Sec23 homolog B (S. cerevisiae), a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), which transports proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus. Interestingly, germline homozygous or compound-heterozygous SEC23B mutations cause an unrelated disorder, congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II, and SEC23B-deficient mice suffer from secretory organ degeneration due to ER-stress-associated apoptosis. By characterizing the p.Val594Gly variant in a normal thyroid cell line, we show that it is a functional alteration that results in ER-stress-mediated cell-colony formation and survival, growth, and invasion, which reflect aspects of a cancer phenotype. Our findings suggest a different role for SEC23B, whereby germline heterozygous variants associate with cancer predisposition potentially mediated by ER stress “addiction.” PMID:26522472

  9. Meta-analysis of Gene-Level Associations for Rare Variants Based on Single-Variant Statistics

    Hu, Yi-Juan; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Ganna, Andrea; Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C.; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E.; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Ingelsson, Erik; Hirschhorn, Joel; North, Kari E.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lin, Dan-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has led to the discoveries of many common variants associated with complex human diseases. There is a growing recognition that identifying “causal” rare variants also requires large-scale meta-analysis. The fact that association tests with rare variants are performed at the gene level rather than at the variant level poses unprecedented challenges in the meta-analysis. First, different studies may adopt different gene-level tests, so the results are not compatible. Second, gene-level tests require multivariate statistics (i.e., components of the test statistic and their covariance matrix), which are difficult to obtain. To overcome these challenges, we propose to perform gene-level tests for rare variants by combining the results of single-variant analysis (i.e., p values of association tests and effect estimates) from participating studies. This simple strategy is possible because of an insight that multivariate statistics can be recovered from single-variant statistics, together with the correlation matrix of the single-variant test statistics, which can be estimated from one of the participating studies or from a publicly available database. We show both theoretically and numerically that the proposed meta-analysis approach provides accurate control of the type I error and is as powerful as joint analysis of individual participant data. This approach accommodates any disease phenotype and any study design and produces all commonly used gene-level tests. An application to the GWAS summary results of the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium reveals rare and low-frequency variants associated with human height. The relevant software is freely available. PMID:23891470

  10. Myostatin: genetic variants, therapy and gene doping

    André Katayama Yamada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, myostatin (MSTN has been at the forefront of muscle therapy research because intrinsic mutations or inhibition of this protein, by either pharmacological or genetic means, result in muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In addition to muscle growth, MSTN inhibition potentially disturbs connective tissue, leads to strength modulation, facilitates myoblast transplantation, promotes tissue regeneration, induces adipose tissue thermogenesis and increases muscle oxidative phenotype. It is also known that current advances in gene therapy have an impact on sports because of the illicit use of such methods. However, the adverse effects of these methods, their impact on athletic performance in humans and the means of detecting gene doping are as yet unknown. The aim of the present review is to discuss biosynthesis, genetic variants, pharmacological/genetic manipulation, doping and athletic performance in relation to the MSTN pathway. As will be concluded from the manuscript, MSTN emerges as a promising molecule for combating muscle wasting diseases and for triggering wide-ranging discussion in view of its possible use in gene doping.Desde sua descoberta, a miostatina (MSTN entrou na linha de frente em pesquisas relacionadas às terapias musculares porque mutações intrínsecas ou inibição desta proteína tanto por abordagens farmacológicas como genéticas resultam em hipertrofia muscular e hiperplasia. Além do aumento da massa muscular, a inibição de MSTN potencialmente prejudica o tecido conectivo, modula a força muscular, facilita o transplante de mioblastos, promove regeneração tecidual, induz termogênese no tecido adiposo e aumenta a oxidação na musculatura esquelética. É também sabido que os atuais avanços em terapia gênica têm uma relação com o esporte devido ao uso ilícito de tal método. Os efeitos adversos de tal abordagem, seus efeitos no desempenho de atletas e métodos para detectar doping genético s

  11. [Fragile X syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant: a clinical study of oral and written communicative manifestations].

    Lamônica, Dionísia Aparecida Cusin; Ferraz, Plínio Marcos Duarte Pinto; Ferreira, Amanda Tragueta; Prado, Lívia Maria do; Abramides, Dagma Venturini Marquez; Gejão, Mariana Germano

    2011-01-01

    The Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of inherited intellectual disability. The Dandy-Walker variant is a specific constellation of neuroradiological findings. The present study reports oral and written communication findings in a 15-year-old boy with clinical and molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome and neuroimaging findings consistent with Dandy-Walker variant. The speech-language pathology and audiology evaluation was carried out using the Communicative Behavior Observation, the Phonology assessment of the ABFW - Child Language Test, the Phonological Abilities Profile, the Test of School Performance, and the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities. Stomatognathic system and hearing assessments were also performed. It was observed: phonological, semantic, pragmatic and morphosyntactic deficits in oral language; deficits in psycholinguistic abilities (auditory reception, verbal expression, combination of sounds, auditory and visual sequential memory, auditory closure, auditory and visual association); and morphological and functional alterations in the stomatognathic system. Difficulties in decoding the graphical symbols were observed in reading. In writing, the subject presented omissions, agglutinations and multiple representations with the predominant use of vowels, besides difficulties in visuo-spatial organization. In mathematics, in spite of the numeric recognition, the participant didn't accomplish arithmetic operations. No alterations were observed in the peripheral hearing evaluation. The constellation of behavioral, cognitive, linguistic and perceptual symptoms described for Fragile X syndrome, in addition to the structural central nervous alterations observed in the Dandy-Walker variant, caused outstanding interferences in the development of communicative abilities, in reading and writing learning, and in the individual's social integration. PMID:21829935

  12. Risk variants in BMP4 promoters for nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate in a Chilean population

    Suazo José

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene (BMP4 plays a key role during maxillofacial development, since orofacial clefts are observed in animals when this gene is conditionally inactivated. We recently reported the existence of association between nonsyndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCLP and BMP4 polymorphisms by detecting transmission deviations for haplotypes that include a region containing a BMP4 promoter in case-parent trios. The aim of the present study was to search for possible causal mutations within BMP4 promoters (BMP4.1 and BMP4.2. Methods We analyzed the sequence of BMP4.1 and BMP4.2 in 167 Chilean NSCLP cases and 336 controls. Results We detected three novel variants in BMP4.1 (c.-5514G > A, c.-5365C > T and c.-5049C > T which could be considered as cleft risk factors due to their absence in controls. Additionally, rs2855530 G allele (BMP4.2 carriers showed an increased risk for NSCLP restricted to males (OR = 1.52; 95% C.I. = 1.07-2.15; p = 0.019. For this same SNP the dominant genotype model showed a higher frequency of G/G+G/C and a lower frequency of C/C in cases than controls in the total sample (p = 0.03 and in the male sample (p = 0.003. Bioinformatic prediction analysis showed that all the risk variants detected in this study could create new transcription factor binding motifs. Conclusions The sex-dependent association between rs2855530 and NSCLP could indirectly be related to the differential gene expression observed between sexes in animal models. We concluded that risk variants detected herein could potentially alter BMP4 promoter activity in NSCLP. Further functional and developmental studies are necessary to support this hypothesis.

  13. Prevalence of SHANK3 variants in patients with different subtypes of autism spectrum disorders.

    Boccuto, Luigi; Lauri, Maria; Sarasua, Sara M; Skinner, Cindy D; Buccella, Daniela; Dwivedi, Alka; Orteschi, Daniela; Collins, Julianne S; Zollino, Marcella; Visconti, Paola; Dupont, Barb; Tiziano, Danilo; Schroer, Richard J; Neri, Giovanni; Stevenson, Roger E; Gurrieri, Fiorella; Schwartz, Charles E

    2013-03-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) include three main conditions: autistic disorder (AD), pervasive developmental disorder, not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), and Asperger syndrome. It has been shown that many genes associated with ASDs are involved in the neuroligin-neurexin interaction at the glutamate synapse: NLGN3, NLGN4, NRXN1, CNTNAP2, and SHANK3. We screened this last gene in two cohorts of ASD patients (133 patients from US and 88 from Italy). We found 5/221 (2.3%) cases with pathogenic alterations: a 106 kb deletion encompassing the SHANK3 gene, two frameshift mutations leading to premature stop codons, a missense mutation (p.Pro141Ala), and a splicing mutation (c.1820-4 G>A). Additionally, in 17 patients (7.7%) we detected a c.1304+48C>T transition affecting a methylated cytosine in a CpG island. This variant is reported as SNP rs76224556 and was found in both US and Italian controls, but it results significantly more frequent in our cases than in the control cohorts. The variant is also significantly more common among PDD-NOS cases than in AD cases. We also screened this gene in an independent replication cohort of 104 US patients with ASDs, in which we found a missense mutation (p.Ala1468Ser) in 1 patient (0.9%), and in 8 patients (7.7%) we detected the c.1304+48C>T transition. While SHANK3 variants are present in any ASD subtype, the SNP rs76224556 appears to be significantly associated with PDD-NOS cases. This represents the first evidence of a genotype-phenotype correlation in ASDs and highlights the importance of a detailed clinical-neuropsychiatric evaluation for the effective genetic screening of ASD patients. PMID:22892527

  14. A Unique Hairy Cell Leukemia Variant.

    Jian, Charles; Hsia, Cyrus C

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with easy bruising, left upper quadrant pain, decreased appetite, and weight loss. She had splenomegaly and lymphocytosis (lymphocyte count of 11.6 × 10(9)/l), with remarkably abnormal appearing morphology. Her hemoglobin and platelet counts were normal. Peripheral blood flow cytometry revealed a monoclonal B-cell population expressing CD11c, CD25, CD19, CD20, and CD103. An initial diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) was made, and the patient was treated with a standard 5-day course of cladribine. However, her lymphocytosis improved transiently, with a relapse 4 months later. There was no improvement in her splenomegaly. An HCL variant (HCL-v) was considered based on her resistance to treatment with a purine nucleoside analog. A subsequent splenectomy improved symptoms. Two years after, the patient suffered a relapse and underwent 6 cycles of CHOP-R (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunomycin, oncovin, prednisone, and rituximab), achieving partial remission. While under observation, she progressed with lymphocytosis 6 months later and was treated with pentostatin. There was no significant improvement in her disease, and she died 8 weeks following treatment initiation. HCL-v is a clinically more aggressive mature B-cell lymphoma than HCL with worse splenomegaly, higher lymphocyte counts, and resistance to typical HCL therapy with purine nucleoside analogs. Early recognition of HCL-v in the history, physical examination, and investigations with morphology and flow cytometry is key to patient management. Further, as in our case of HCL-v, cell morphology can be distinctly atypical, with large nucleoli and extremely convoluted nuclei. The distinction between HCL and HCL-v is important as HCL-v patients require more aggressive therapy and closer follow-up. PMID:27462230

  15. Leapfrog variants of iterative methods for linear algebra equations

    Saylor, Paul E.

    1988-01-01

    Two iterative methods are considered, Richardson's method and a general second order method. For both methods, a variant of the method is derived for which only even numbered iterates are computed. The variant is called a leapfrog method. Comparisons between the conventional form of the methods and the leapfrog form are made under the assumption that the number of unknowns is large. In the case of Richardson's method, it is possible to express the final iterate in terms of only the initial approximation, a variant of the iteration called the grand-leap method. In the case of the grand-leap variant, a set of parameters is required. An algorithm is presented to compute these parameters that is related to algorithms to compute the weights and abscissas for Gaussian quadrature. General algorithms to implement the leapfrog and grand-leap methods are presented. Algorithms for the important special case of the Chebyshev method are also given.

  16. Behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia mimicking Huntington's disease

    Nielsen, T Rune; Bruhn, Peter; Nielsen, Jørgen E;

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral changes and cognitive decline are the core clinical manifestations in the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bv-FTD). The behavioral changes may include characteristic stereotypic movements. These movements, although without clear purpose, are not involuntary. Involuntary...

  17. Reversion in variants from a duplication strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    Strains of Aspergillus nidulans with a chromosome segment in duplicate, one in normal position and one translocated to another chromosome, are unstable at mitosis. In addition to variants which result from deletions in either of the duplicate segments, which usually have improved morphology, they produce variants with deteriorated morphology. Three deteriorated variants reverted frequently to parental type morphology, both spontaneously and after ultra-violet treatment. Of six reversions analysed genetically, five were due to suppressors and one was probably due to back mutation. The suppressors segregated as single genes and were not linked to the mutation which they suppress. The instability of these so-called 'deteriorated' variants is discussed in relation to mitotic instability phenomena in A. nidulans. (orig.)

  18. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Variants in Long-Term Carriers

    Chiou, Chien-Shun; Wei, Hsiao-Lun; Mu, Jung-Jung; Liao, Ying-Shu; Liang, Shiu-Yun; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Tsao, Chi-Sen; Wang, Shu-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Long-term typhoid carriers can simultaneously excrete Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi variants with considerable genetic differences, a situation that complicates the interpretation of the subtyping data used in outbreak investigations and disease surveillance.

  19. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    ... Releases News Release Sunday, July 20, 2014 Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism ... genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than ...

  20. Enzyme behavior at surfaces. Site-specific variants of subtilisin BPN' with enhanced surface stability.

    Brode, P F; Erwin, C R; Rauch, D S; Lucas, D S; Rubingh, D N

    1994-09-23

    Enzyme adsorption and inactivation at the solid/liquid interface for subtilisin BPN' show a strong dependence on the nature of the solid surface. Adsorption of BPN' at the solid/liquid interface is considerably greater for a hydrophobic surface than for a hydrophilic one. Likewise, the rate of inactivation of the wild-type BPN' is over five times greater when equilibrated with a hydrophobic surface than with a hydrophilic surface. The rate data from these enzyme inactivation experiments performed at 50 degrees C are best fit by a second-order kinetic equation, suggesting a bimolecular pathway to inactivation. The role of increased surface adsorption on this bimolecular inactivation is discussed in terms of two different mechanisms. Several site-specific variants of subtilisin BPN' have been made in an attempt to alter the surface-inactivation of the wild-type enzyme. The extent of adsorption on the model surfaces is significantly lowered by certain lysine to phenylalanine changes in BPN'. Consequently, the surface autolytic stability shows a 4-fold improvement. The change in surface autolytic stability is achieved even though the basic kinetic parameters (kcat and KM) of the variant enzymes are not significantly different on a soluble substrate. The results provide insights into the use of mutagenesis to probe the mechanism of protein interactions with surfaces. PMID:8089121

  1. wKinMut-2: Identification and Interpretation of Pathogenic Variants in Human Protein Kinases.

    Vazquez, Miguel; Pons, Tirso; Brunak, Søren; Valencia, Alfonso; Izarzugaza, Jose M G

    2016-01-01

    Most genomic alterations are tolerated while only a minor fraction disrupts molecular function sufficiently to drive disease. Protein kinases play a central biological function and the functional consequences of their variants are abundantly characterized. However, this heterogeneous information is often scattered across different sources, which makes the integrative analysis complex and laborious. wKinMut-2 constitutes a solution to facilitate the interpretation of the consequences of human protein kinase variation. Nine methods predict their pathogenicity, including a kinase-specific random forest approach. To understand the biological mechanisms causative of human diseases and cancer, information from pertinent reference knowledge bases and the literature is automatically mined, digested, and homogenized. Variants are visualized in their structural contexts and residues affecting catalytic and drug binding are identified. Known protein-protein interactions are reported. Altogether, this information is intended to assist the generation of new working hypothesis to be corroborated with ulterior experimental work. The wKinMut-2 system, along with a user manual and examples, is freely accessible at http://kinmut2.bioinfo.cnio.es, the code for local installations can be downloaded from https://github.com/Rbbt-Workflows/KinMut2. PMID:26443060

  2. Population structure analysis using rare and common functional variants

    Ding Lili; Baye Tesfaye M; He Hua; Kurowski Brad G; Zhang Xue; Martin Lisa J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Next-generation sequencing technologies now make it possible to genotype and measure hundreds of thousands of rare genetic variations in individuals across the genome. Characterization of high-density genetic variation facilitates control of population genetic structure on a finer scale before large-scale genotyping in disease genetics studies. Population structure is a well-known, prevalent, and important factor in common variant genetic studies, but its relevance in rare variants i...

  3. Digital subtraction angiography of a persistent trigeminal artery variant.

    Temizöz, Osman; Genchellac, Hakan; Unlü, Ercüment; Cağli, Bekir; Ozdemir, Hüseyin; Demir, M Kemal

    2010-09-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery variants are described as cerebellar arteries that directly originate from the precavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. This has been observed in 0.18% of cerebral catheter angiograms. On the other hand, a persistent trigeminal artery variant feeding both the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and the posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory is very rare. We present this uncommon anomalous artery along with digital subtraction angiography findings and discuss its clinical significance in light of the literature. PMID:19821254

  4. Neurophysiologic Effect of GWAS Derived Schizophrenia and Bipolar Risk Variants

    Hall, Mei-Hua; Levy, Deborah L; Salisbury, Dean F.; Haddad, Steve; Gallagher, Patience; Lohan, Mary; Cohen, Bruce; Öngür, Dost; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as disease associated variants for schizophrenia (SCZ), bipolar disorder (BPD), or both. Although these results are statistically robust, the functional effects of these variants and their role in the pathophysiology of SCZ or BPD remain unclear. Dissecting the effects of risk genes on distinct domains of brain function can provide important biological insights into the mechanisms by which t...

  5. Molecular basis for Duarte and Los Angeles variant galactosemia.

    Langley, S D; Lai, K.; Dembure, P P; Hjelm, L. N.; Elsas, L. J.

    1997-01-01

    Human orythrocytes that are homozygous for the Duarte enzyme variant of galactosemia (D/D) have a characteristic isoform on isoelectric focusing and 50% reduction in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) enzyme activity. The Duarte biochemical phenotype has a molecular genotype of N314D/N314D. The characteristic Duarte isoform is also associated with a variant called the "Los Angeles (LA) phenotype," which has increased GALT enzyme activity. We evaluated GALT enzyme activity and scre...

  6. Targeted quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay for human protein variants

    Nedelkov Dobrin; Trenchevska Olgica

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Post-translational modifications and genetic variations give rise to protein variants that significantly increase the complexity of the human proteome. Modified proteins also play an important role in biological processes. While sandwich immunoassays are routinely used to determine protein concentrations, they are oblivious to protein variants that may serve as biomarkers with better sensitivity and specificity than their wild-type proteins. Mass spectrometry, coupled to i...

  7. Variant in oxytocin receptor gene is associated with amygdala volume

    Furman, Daniella J; Chen, Michael C.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2011-01-01

    The oxytocin system plays a significant role in modulating stress responses in animals and humans; perturbations in this system may contribute to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorder. Attempts to identify clinically relevant genetic variants in the oxytocin system have yielded associations between polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene and both autism and major depression. To date, however, little is known about how such variants affect brain structures implicated in these dis...

  8. Comparative analysis of protein structure of common Hb Q variants

    Yadav Amit

    2010-01-01

    Context: Hemoglobin (Hb) Q variant is a group of hemoglobinopathies prevalent in south, south-east and western Asia. The primary structure of all of these molecules is well known. However, very little is known about the secondary and tertiary structures of these molecules. Therefore, a study of their secondary and tertiary structures is needed. Aim: The study was aimed at investigating the secondary and tertiary structures of common Hb Q variants using bioinformatics tool. Settings and Design...

  9. Active Object Recognition with a Space-Variant Retina

    Christopher Kanan

    2013-01-01

    When independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to color natural images, the representation it learns has spatiochromatic properties similar to the responses of neurons in primary visual cortex. Existing models of ICA have only been applied to pixel patches. This does not take into account the space-variant nature of human vision. To address this, we use the space-variant log-polar transformation to acquire samples from color natural images, and then we apply ICA to the acquired samples....

  10. TRAC Variants Associate with IgA Nephropathy

    Li, Ru; Xue, Chao; Li, Caixia; Lou, Tanqi; Tao, Yu; Li, Youji; Huang, Weijun; Zhang, Jun; Leung, Joseph C. K.; Lam, Man F.; Vyse, Tim J.; Kar N. Lai; Wu, Changyou; Wang, Yiming

    2009-01-01

    The T cell receptor alpha constant gene (TRAC) encodes the constant region of the α chain for the T cell receptor, and the association of its gene variants with IgA nephropathy remains controversial. The authors resequenced the gene in 100 patients with IgA nephropathy and 100 controls, tested its linkage disequilibrium pattern, constructed haplotypes, and performed association and functional studies. First, the association between TRAC variants and IgA nephropathy was tested in 704 patients ...

  11. Monovar: single-nucleotide variant detection in single cells.

    Zafar, Hamim; Wang, Yong; Nakhleh, Luay; Navin, Nicholas; Chen, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Current variant callers are not suitable for single-cell DNA sequencing, as they do not account for allelic dropout, false-positive errors and coverage nonuniformity. We developed Monovar (https://bitbucket.org/hamimzafar/monovar), a statistical method for detecting and genotyping single-nucleotide variants in single-cell data. Monovar exhibited superior performance over standard algorithms on benchmarks and in identifying driver mutations and delineating clonal substructure in three different human tumor data sets. PMID:27088313

  12. Variants at the 9p21 locus and melanoma risk

    The influence of variants at the 9p21 locus on melanoma risk has been reported through investigation of CDKN2A variants through candidate gene approach as well as by genome wide association studies (GWAS). In the present study we genotyped, 25 SNPs that tag 273 variants on chromosome 9p21 in 837 melanoma cases and 1154 controls from Spain. Ten SNPs were selected based on previous associations, reported in GWAS, with either melanocytic nevi or melanoma risk or both. The other 15 SNPs were selected to fine map the CDKN2A gene region. All the 10 variants selected from the GWAS showed statistically significant association with melanoma risk. Statistically significant association with melanoma risk was also observed for the carriers of the variant T-allele of rs3088440 (540 C>T) at the 3’ UTR of CDKN2A gene with an OR 1.52 (95% CI 1.14-2.04). Interaction analysis between risk associated polymorphisms and previously genotyped MC1R variants, in the present study, did not show any statistically significant association. Statistical significant association was observed for the interaction between phototypes and the rs10811629 (located in intron 5 of MTAP). The strongest association was observed between the homozygous carrier of the A–allele and phototype II with an OR of 15.93 (95% CI 5.34-47.54). Our data confirmed the association of different variants at chromosome 9p21 with melanoma risk and we also found an association of a variant with skin phototypes

  13. PIGMENTED BASAL CELL CARCINOMA: A RARE CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL VARIANT

    Chandralekha; Vijaya Bhaskar; Bhagyalakshmi; Sudhakar; Sumanlatha

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumour of skin , commonly referred to as „rodent ulcer‟. It is common in the head and neck region. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits inc reased pigmentation. It is a rare variant that can clinically mimic malignant melanoma. It is more common in males than females. Herein , we are...

  14. The MKK7 p.Glu116Lys Rare Variant Serves as a Predictor for Lung Cancer Risk and Prognosis in Chinese.

    Fuman Qiu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated evidence indicates that rare variants exert a vital role on predisposition and progression of human diseases, which provides neoteric insights into disease etiology. In the current study, based on three independently retrospective studies of 5,016 lung cancer patients and 5,181 controls, we analyzed the associations between five rare polymorphisms (i.e., p.Glu116Lys, p.Asn118Ser, p.Arg138Cys, p.Ala195Thr and p.Leu259Phe in MKK7 and lung cancer risk and prognosis. To decipher the precise mechanisms of MKK7 rare variants on lung cancer, a series of biological experiments was further performed. We found that the MKK7 p.Glu116Lys rare polymorphism was significantly associated with lung cancer risk, progression and prognosis. Compared with Glu/Glu common genotype, the 116Lys rare variants (Lys/Glu/+ Lys/Lys presented an adverse effect on lung cancer susceptibility (odds ratio [OR] = 3.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.70-4.01. These rare variants strengthened patients' clinical progression that patients with 116Lys variants had a significantly higher metastasis rate and advanced N, M stages at diagnosis. In addition, the patients with 116Lys variants also contributed to worse cancer prognosis than those carriers with Glu/Glu genotype (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.32-1.78. Functional experiments further verified that the MKK7 p.116Lys variants altered the expression of several cancer-related genes and thus affected lung cancer cells proliferation, tumor growth and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, our findings proposed that the MKK7 p.Glu116Lys rare polymorphism incurred a pernicious impact on lung cancer risk and prognosis through modulating expressions of a serial of cancer-related genes.

  15. The MKK7 p.Glu116Lys Rare Variant Serves as a Predictor for Lung Cancer Risk and Prognosis in Chinese

    Lu, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Jiansong; Wu, Di; Wei, Yongfang; Nong, Qingqing; Zhang, Lisha; Fang, Wenxiang; Chen, Xiaoliang; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Yang, Binyao; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Yifeng; Lu, Jiachun

    2016-01-01

    Accumulated evidence indicates that rare variants exert a vital role on predisposition and progression of human diseases, which provides neoteric insights into disease etiology. In the current study, based on three independently retrospective studies of 5,016 lung cancer patients and 5,181 controls, we analyzed the associations between five rare polymorphisms (i.e., p.Glu116Lys, p.Asn118Ser, p.Arg138Cys, p.Ala195Thr and p.Leu259Phe) in MKK7 and lung cancer risk and prognosis. To decipher the precise mechanisms of MKK7 rare variants on lung cancer, a series of biological experiments was further performed. We found that the MKK7 p.Glu116Lys rare polymorphism was significantly associated with lung cancer risk, progression and prognosis. Compared with Glu/Glu common genotype, the 116Lys rare variants (Lys/Glu/+ Lys/Lys) presented an adverse effect on lung cancer susceptibility (odds ratio [OR] = 3.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.70–4.01). These rare variants strengthened patients’ clinical progression that patients with 116Lys variants had a significantly higher metastasis rate and advanced N, M stages at diagnosis. In addition, the patients with 116Lys variants also contributed to worse cancer prognosis than those carriers with Glu/Glu genotype (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.32–1.78). Functional experiments further verified that the MKK7 p.116Lys variants altered the expression of several cancer-related genes and thus affected lung cancer cells proliferation, tumor growth and metastasis in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, our findings proposed that the MKK7 p.Glu116Lys rare polymorphism incurred a pernicious impact on lung cancer risk and prognosis through modulating expressions of a serial of cancer-related genes. PMID:27028764

  16. Gain-of-function missense variant in SLC12A2, encoding the bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 cotransporter, identified in human schizophrenia.

    Merner, Nancy D; Mercado, Adriana; Khanna, Arjun R; Hodgkinson, Alan; Bruat, Vanessa; Awadalla, Philip; Gamba, Gerardo; Rouleau, Guy A; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-06-01

    Perturbations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the human prefrontal cortex have been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia (SCZ), but the mechanisms are unclear. NKCC1 (SLC12A2) is a Cl(-)-importing cation-Cl(-) cotransporter that contributes to the maintenance of depolarizing GABA activity in immature neurons, and variation in SLC12A2 has been shown to increase the risk for schizophrenia via alterations of NKCC1 mRNA expression. However, no disease-causing mutations or functional variants in NKCC1 have been identified in human patients with SCZ. Here, by sequencing three large French-Canadian (FC) patient cohorts of SCZ, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and intellectual disability (ID), we identified a novel heterozygous NKCC1 missense variant (p.Y199C) in SCZ. This variant is located in an evolutionarily conserved residue in the critical N-terminal regulatory domain and exhibits high predicted pathogenicity. No NKCC1 variants were detected in ASD or ID, and no KCC3 variants were identified in any of the three neurodevelopmental disorder cohorts. Functional experiments show Y199C is a gain-of-function variant, increasing Cl(-)-dependent and bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 activity even in conditions in which the transporter is normally functionally silent (hypotonicity). These data are the first to describe a functional missense variant in SLC12A2 in human SCZ, and suggest that genetically encoded dysregulation of NKCC1 may be a risk factor for, or contribute to the pathogenesis of, human SCZ. PMID:26955005

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Variants of Respiratory Complex I that Uniquely Characterize Haplogroup T2 Are Associated with Increased Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    SanGiovanni, John Paul; Arking, Dan E.; Sudha K. Iyengar; Elashoff, Michael; Clemons, Traci E.; Reed, George F.; Henning, Alice K.; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Xu, Xuming; DeWan, Andrew; Agrón, Elvira; Rochtchina, Elena; Carolyn M Sue; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic neurodegenerative and neovascular retinal disease, is the leading cause of blindness in elderly people of western European origin. While structural and functional alterations in mitochondria (mt) and their metabolites have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative and vascular diseases, the relationship of inherited variants in the mitochondrial genome and mt haplogroup subtypes with advanced AMD has not been ...

  18. Polymorphic variants of UGT1A1 in neonatal jaundice in southern Brazil.

    Carvalho, Clarissa Gutiérrez; Castro, Simone Martins; Santin, Ana Paula; de Azevedo, Laura Alencastro; Pereira, Maria Luiza Saraiva; Giugliani, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Alterations in the hepatic conjugation of bilirubin due to uridyl-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) polymorphisms have been proposed as risk factors to neonatal jaundice. Herein, we estimated the frequency of genotypes of the promoter region of UGT1A1 gene in newborns and evaluated its association with severe hyperbilirubinemia. Prospective study of cases and controls including all newborns admitted for phototherapy at HCPA, Brazil, during 9 months; 490 babies were enrolled and PCR was performed. Polymorphic genotypes were detected in 16% of the patients and 7 of the 10 possible genotypes were identified with higher prevalence of polymorphisms in Afro-descendants. In this sample, the variants of UGT1A1 were not associated to severe hyperbilirubinemia; other genic factors should be sought in this high miscegenation area of Brazil. PMID:20061399

  19. Electrophoretic variants of blood proteins in japanese, 5

    The plasma ceruloplasmin (CP) of 22,367 children of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was examined for variants by electrophoresis. The sample was composed of 14,964 unrelated children and 7,403 siblings of the unrelated persons. A total of seven types of electrophoretic variants were detected; four migrating anodally and three cathodally to the normal B band. We have reported two of these variants, CP A sub(NG1) and CP C sub(NG1), previously but the other five, CP A sub(NG2), CP A sub(HR1), CP A sub(HR2), CP C sub(HR1), and CP C sub(HR2), are newly identified. The allelic frequency of CP*CNG1 was 0.00916, so that the variant is considered to be a polymorphic allele. Homozygosity for the CP*CNG1 allele was detected in five individuals. This is the first report of a homozygous phenotype for a CP variant in a Japanese population. Family study of the new five variants all demonstrated patterns of codominant inheritance. (author)

  20. Prebiotic Competition between Information Variants, With Low Error Catastrophe Risks

    Radu Popa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During competition for resources in primitive networks increased fitness of an information variant does not necessarily equate with successful elimination of its competitors. If variability is added fast to a system, speedy replacement of pre-existing and less-efficient forms of order is required as novel information variants arrive. Otherwise, the information capacity of the system fills up with information variants (an effect referred as “error catastrophe”. As the cost for managing the system’s exceeding complexity increases, the correlation between performance capabilities of information variants and their competitive success decreases, and evolution of such systems toward increased efficiency slows down. This impasse impedes the understanding of evolution in prebiotic networks. We used the simulation platform Biotic Abstract Dual Automata (BiADA to analyze how information variants compete in a resource-limited space. We analyzed the effect of energy-related features (differences in autocatalytic efficiency, energy cost of order, energy availability, transformation rates and stability of order on this competition. We discuss circumstances and controllers allowing primitive networks acquire novel information with minimal “error catastrophe” risks. We present a primitive mechanism for maximization of energy flux in dynamic networks. This work helps evaluate controllers of evolution in prebiotic networks and other systems where information variants compete.

  1. Epigenomic functional characterization of genetic susceptibility variants in systemic vasculitis.

    Sawalha, Amr H; Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic vasculitides are poorly understood inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels that are frequently associated with significant organ damage. Genetic risk variants contribute to the susceptibility of vasculitis, but functional consequences of these genetic variants are largely unknown. Most genetic risk variants in immune-mediated diseases, including systemic vasculitis, are localized to non-coding genetic regions suggesting they might increase disease risk by influencing regulatory elements within the genome. Long range regulatory interactions pose an additional obstacle in localizing functional consequences associated with risk variants to specific genes or cell types. We used cell-type specific enrichment patterns of histone changes that mark poised, primed, and active enhancers, and DNase hypersensitivity to identify specific immune cells mediating genetic risk in vasculitis. Our data suggest that genetic risk variants in ANCA-associated vasculitis are significantly enriched in enhancer elements in Th17 cells, supporting a role for Th17 cells in this disease. Primed and active enhancer elements in B cells can be potentially affected by genetic risk variants associated with Kawasaki disease. Genetic risk in Behçet's disease and Takayasu arteritis might affect enhancer elements in multiple cell types, possibly explained by influencing enhancers in hematopoietic stem cells. Interestingly, our analyses indicate a role for B cells in Kawasaki disease, Behçet's disease, and Takayasu arteritis, and suggest that further work to characterize the involvement of B cells in these diseases is warranted. PMID:26492816

  2. Anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody Fc variants differentially impact regulatory T cells and immune homeostasis.

    Huss, David J; Pellerin, Alex F; Collette, Brian P; Kannan, Arun K; Peng, Liaomin; Datta, Abhishek; Wipke, Brian T; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical regulator of immune homeostasis through its non-redundant role in regulatory T (Treg) cell biology. There is major interest in therapeutic modulation of the IL-2 pathway to promote immune activation in the context of tumour immunotherapy or to enhance immune suppression in the context of transplantation, autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Antibody-mediated targeting of the high-affinity IL-2 receptor α chain (IL-2Rα or CD25) offers a direct mechanism to target IL-2 biology and is being actively explored in the clinic. In mouse models, the rat anti-mouse CD25 clone PC61 has been used extensively to investigate the biology of IL-2 and Treg cells; however, there has been controversy and conflicting data on the exact in vivo mechanistic function of PC61. Engineering antibodies to alter Fc/Fc receptor interactions can significantly alter their in vivo function. In this study, we re-engineered the heavy chain constant region of an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody to generate variants with highly divergent Fc effector function. Using these anti-CD25 Fc variants in multiple mouse models, we investigated the in vivo impact of CD25 blockade versus depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells on immune homeostasis. We report that immune homeostasis can be maintained during CD25 blockade but aberrant T-cell activation prevails when CD25(+) Treg cells are actively depleted. These results clarify the impact of PC61 on Treg cell biology and reveal an important distinction between CD25 blockade and depletion of CD25(+) Treg cells. These findings should inform therapeutic manipulation of the IL-2 pathway by targeting the high-affinity IL-2R. PMID:27012310

  3. The effects of psychosis risk variants on brain connectivity: A Meta-analysis

    Omar eMothersill

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In light of observed changes in connectivity in schizophrenia and the highly heritable nature of the disease, neural connectivity may serve as an important intermediate phenotype for schizophrenia. However, how individual variants confer altered connectivity and which measure of brain connectivity is more proximal to the underlying genetic architecture (i.e. functional or structural has not been well delineated. In this review we consider these issues and the relative sensitivity of imaging methodologies to schizophrenia-related changes in connectivity.We searched PubMed for studies considering schizophrenia risk genes AND functional or structural connectivity. Where data was available, summary statistics were used to determine an estimate of effect size (i.e. Cohen’s d. A random-effects meta-analysis was used to consider (1 the largest effect and (2 all significant effects between functional and structural studies. Schizophrenia risk variants involved in neurotransmission, neurodevelopment and myelin function were found to be associated with altered neural connectivity. On average, schizophrenia risk genes had a large effect on functional (mean d=0.76 and structural connectivity (mean d=1.04. The examination of the largest effect size indicated that the outcomes of functional and structural studies were comparable (Q=2.17, p>0.05. Conversely, consideration of effect size estimates for all significant effects suggest that reported effect sizes in structural connectivity studies were more variable than in functional connectivity studies, and that there was a significant lack of homogeneity across the modalities (Q=6.928, p=0.008.Given the more variable profile of effect sizes associated with structural connectivity, these data may suggest that structural imaging methods are more sensitive to a wider range of effects, as opposed to functional studies which may only be able to determine large effects. These conclusions are limited by

  4. Detection of S-gene 'a' determinant variants in hepatitis B patients with both positive HBsAg and HBsAb markers

    Objective: To explore the S-gene 'a' determinant variants in hepatitis B patients with both positive HBsAg and HBsAb markers and the effect on the antigenicity of HBsAg. Methods: Quantitative determination of HBV - DNA with competent PCR microfluidic chit method was performed in eight sera specimens from seven hepatitis B patients with both positive HBsAg and HBsAb markers. HBV S-gene was amplified with nested PCR, the PCR product was directly examined for any sequence variant of the amino acids. HBV markers were tested with the very sensitive ELISA/MEIA method in these seven patients. The above rests were also performed in 15 children after failed immunization with hepatitis B vaccine and 9 recipients of liver transplantation for terminal hepatitis B treated with HBIG and lamivudine, serving as controls. Results: The HBsAb contents in the seven patients were all below 80 mIu/ml. Two of the patients with positive HBV-DNA showed no 'a' determinant variant. Two of the four HBV-DNA negative patients demonstrated amino-acid variants (126, 131). One patients who was originally HBV-DNA positive but later turned negative after treatment with interferon and lamivudine demonstrated variant (126). In the 9 patients after successful liver transplantation, the HBsAb contents were all about 150mIu/ml with negative HBV-DNA and no variant. In the 15 immunization failures, HBV-DNA was positive in 14 of them, with 2 cases of variant at 145, 1 case at 126 and 1 case at 134. Conclusion: In some patients with chronic B hepatitis with both positive HBsAg and HBsAb markers, as well as in some vaccine immunization failures, there were 'a' determinant variants, which might alter the antigenicity of HBsAg with escape from the neutralization of low HBsAb. The 'a' determinant variant might also affect the replication of the virus. In this study, no variant was shown in patients after successful liver transplantation. However, the number of patients was too small and the result was of no

  5. Acantholytic Variant of Bowen's Disease with Micro-invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Case Report of a Unique Variant

    Kanthilatha Pai; Shricharith Shetty; J Padmapriya; Sathish Pai; Lakshmi Rao

    2014-01-01

    Bowen′s disease is generally regarded as premalignant dermatoses. The disease affects both skin and the mucosa and has the potential to progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma. There are descriptions of several histological variants of Bowen′s disease like psoriasiform, atrophic, pagetoid, etc. Acantholysis of anaplastic keratinocytes with bullae/cleft formation is described in premalignant condition like actinic keratosis and adenoid variant of squamous cell carcinoma, but there is lack...

  6. Isolation and properties of fibroblast mutants overexpressing an altered Na+/H+ antiporter

    A new method based on the toxicity of low intracellular pH (pH/sub i/) was developed to isolate fibroblasts variants overexpressing Na+/H+ antiport activity. Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (CCL39) were incubated for 60 min in medium containing 50 mM NH4Cl. Removal of external NH+4 induced in a rapid and lethal intracellular acidification when the Na+/H+ antiporter was inhibited during the 60 min of the pH/sub i/ recovery phase. The inhibition was provoked either by adding 5-(N-methyl, N-propyl)amiloride (MPA, LD50= 0.3 μM) or by reducing external [Na+] (LD50 = 25 mM). Progressively increasing the MPA concentration during the acid-load selection led to the isolation of two stable variants: AR40 and AR300, resistant, respectively, to 40 and 300 μM MPA. In response to an acid-load, these variants display a much higher rate of pH/sub i/ recovery due to an overexpression of Na+/H+ antiport activity. In addition, AR40 and AR300 have an altered Na+/H+ antiporter. Alternatively reducing Na+ concentration of the pH/sub i/ recovery saline medium in a stepwise manner led to the selection of another class of variants (DD8 and DD12) also characterized by an altered Na+/H+ antiporter and an increased expression level. The 10-fold increased rate of amiloride-sensitive Na+ influx of DD12 is accounted for by a 4-fold increase in V/sub max/ and a 2.5-fold increase in affinity for Na+ or Li+ at the external site. In conclusion, the genetic approach presented here: (i) provides a general and specific method for selecting variants of the Na+/H+ antiporter with increased expression levels and/or with structural alterations and (ii) demonstrates that the external Na+-and amiloride-binding sites are not identical, since they can be genetically altered independently of each other

  7. Two insular regions are differentially involved in behavioral variant FTD and nonfluent/agrammatic variant PPA.

    Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Vitali, Paolo; Santos, Miguel; Henry, Maya; Gola, Kelly; Rosenberg, Lynne; Dronkers, Nina; Miller, Bruce; Seeley, William W; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The non-fluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) and the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are focal neurodegenerative disorders belonging to the FTD-spectrum clinical syndromes. NfvPPA is characterized by effortful speech and/or agrammatism and left frontal atrophy, while bvFTD is characterized by social-emotional dysfunction often accompanied by right-lateralized frontal damage. Despite their contrasting clinical presentations, both disorders show prominent left anterior insula atrophy. We investigated differential patterns of insular sub-region atrophy in nfvPPA and bvFTD. Based on knowledge of insular connectivity and physiology, we hypothesized that the left superior precentral region of the dorsal anterior insula (SPGI) would be more atrophic in nvfPPA due to its critical role in motor speech, whereas the ventral anterior region would be more atrophied in bvFTD reflecting its known role in social-emotional-autonomic functions. Early stage nfvPPA and bvFTD patients matched for disease severity, age, gender and education and healthy controls participated in the study. Detailed clinical history, neurological examination, neuropsychological screening evaluation, and high-resolution T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were collected. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was applied to perform group comparisons across the whole brain and in bilateral insula region of interest (ROI). Correlation analyses between insular sub-region atrophy and relevant clinical features were performed. Whole brain group comparisons between nfvPPA and bvFTD showed the expected predominantly left or right anterior insular atrophy pattern. ROI analysis of bilateral insula showed that the left SPGI was significantly more atrophied in nfvPPA compared to bvFTD, while the bilateral ventral anterior and right dorsal anterior insula sub-regions were more atrophied in bvFTD than nfvPPA. Only left SPGI volume correlated with speech production

  8. Art as Alterity in Education

    Zhao, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    In education, art has often been perceived as entertainment and decoration and is the first subject to go when there are budget cuts or test-score pressures. Drawing on Emmanuel Lévinas's idea of the primacy of radical alterity that breaks the totality of our being, enables self-transformation and ethics, and ensures community as a totality…

  9. Analysis of Maxi-K alpha subunit splice variants in human myometrium

    Morrison John J

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (Maxi-K channels are implicated in the modulation of human uterine contractions and myometrial Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the regulatory mechanism(s governing the expression of Maxi-K channels with decreased calcium sensitivity at parturition are unclear. The objectives of this study were to investigate mRNA expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, in human non-pregnant and pregnant myometrium, prior to and after labour onset, to determine whether altered expression of these splice variants is associated with decreased calcium sensitivity observed at labour onset. Methods Myometrial biopsies were obtained at hysterectomy (non-pregnant, NP, and at Caesarean section, at elective (pregnant not-in-labour, PNL and intrapartum (pregnant in-labour, PL procedures. RNA was extracted from all biopsies and quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to investigate for possible differential expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit, and that of its splice variants, between these functionally-distinct myometrial tissue sets. Results RT-PCR analysis identified the presence of a 132 bp and an 87 bp spliced exon of the Maxi-K alpha subunit in all three myometrial tissue sets. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated a decrease in the expression of the Maxi-K alpha subunit with labour onset. While there was no change in the proportion of Maxi-K alpha subunits expressing the 87 bp spliced exon, the proportion of alpha subunits expressing the 132 bp spliced exon was significantly increased with labour onset, compared to both non-pregnant and pregnant not-in-labour tissues. An increased proportion of 132 bp exon-containing alpha subunit variants with labour onset is of interest, as channels expressing this spliced exon have decreased calcium and voltage sensitivities. Conclusions Our findings suggest that decreased Maxi-K alpha subunit mRNA expression in human myometrium at

  10. No evidence for pathogenic variants or maternal effect of ZFP57 as the cause of Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome

    Boonen, Susanne E; Hahnemann, Johanne M D; Mackay, Deborah; Tommerup, Niels; Brøndum-Nielsen, Karen; Tümer, Zeynep; Grønskov, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome, which, in 50-60% of sporadic cases, is caused by hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1 differentially methylated region (DMR) at chromosome 11p15.5. The underlying defect of this hypomethylation is largely unknown. Recently, recessive mutations of...... the ZFP57 gene were reported in patients with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus type 1, showing hypomethylation at multiple imprinted loci, including KCNQ1OT1 DMR in some. The aim of our study was to determine whether ZFP57 alterations were a genetic cause of the hypomethylation at KCNQ1OT1 DMR in...... patients with BWS. We sequenced ZFP57 in 27 BWS probands and in 23 available mothers to test for a maternal effect. We identified three novel, presumably benign sequence variants in ZFP57; thus, we found no evidence for ZFP57 alterations as a major cause in sporadic BWS cases....

  11. HABP2 G534E Variant in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Jerneja Tomsic

    Full Text Available The main nonmedullary form of thyroid cancer is papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC that accounts for 80-90% of all thyroid malignancies. Only 3-10% of PTC patients have a positive family history of PTC yet the familiality is one of the highest of all cancers as measured by case control studies. A handful of genes have been implicated accounting for a small fraction of this genetic predisposition. It was therefore of considerable interest that a mutation in the HABP2 gene was recently implicated in familial PTC. The present work was undertaken to examine the extent of HABP2 variant involvement in PTC. The HABP2 G534E variant (rs7080536 was genotyped in blood DNA from 179 PTC families (one affected individual per family, 1160 sporadic PTC cases and 1395 controls. RNA expression of HABP2 was tested by qPCR in RNA extracted from tumor and normal thyroid tissue from individuals that are homozygous wild-type or heterozygous for the variant. The variant was found to be present in 6.1% familial cases, 8.0% sporadic cases (2 individuals were homozygous for the variant and 8.7% controls. The variant did not segregate with PTC in one large and 6 smaller families in which it occurred. In keeping with data from the literature and databases the expression of HABP2 was highest in the liver, much lower in 3 other tested tissues (breast, kidney, brain but not found in thyroid. Given these results showing lack of any involvement we suggest that the putative role of variant HABP2 in PTC should be carefully scrutinized.

  12. Biochemical characterization of the GM2 gangliosidosis B1 variant

    J.C. Tutor

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The deficiency of the A isoenzyme of ß-hexosaminidase (Hex produced by different mutations of the gene that codes for the alpha subunit (Tay-Sachs disease has two variants with enzymological differences: the B variant consists of the absence of Hex A isoenzyme and the B1 variant produces an inactive Hex A isoenzyme for the hydrolysis of the GM2 ganglioside and synthetic substrates with negative charge. In contrast to the early childhood form of the B variant, the B1 variant appears at a later clinical stage (3 to 7 years of age with neurodegenerative symptoms leading to the death of the patient in the second decade of life. The most frequent mutation responsible for the GM2 gangliosidosis B1 variant is R178H, which has a widespread geographic and ethnic distribution. The highest incidence has been described in Portugal, which has been suggested as the point of origin of this mutation. Biochemical characterization of this lysosomal disease is carried out using negatively charged synthetic alpha subunit-specific sulfated substrates, since Hex A isoenzyme heat-inactivation assays are not applicable. However, the determination of the apparent activation energy of Hex using the neutral substrate 3,3'-dichlorophenolsulfonphthaleinyl N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminide, may offer a valid alternative. The presence of an alpha subunit in the alphaß heterodimer Hex A means that its activation energy (41.8 kJ/mol is significantly lower than that of the ßß homodimer Hex B (75.1 kJ/mol; however, as mutation inactivates the alpha subunit, the Hex A of the B1 variant presents an activation energy that is similar to that of the Hex B isoenzyme.

  13. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) Variants with Primary Angle Closure and Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma

    Wiggs, Janey L.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Sun, Xinghuai; Fan, Bao Jian

    2016-01-01

    Shorter axial length observed in patients with primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) might be due to altered matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) activity resulting in ECM remodeling during eye growth and development. This study aimed to evaluate common variants in MMP9 for association with PACG. Six tag SNPs of MMP9 were genotyped in a Chinese sample of 1,030 cases, including 572 PACG and 458 primary angle closure (PAC), and 499 controls. None of 6 SNPs were significantly associated with overall PAC/PACG (P > 0.07) or with PAC/PACG subgroups (Pc > 0.18). Meta-analysis of two non-Chinese studies revealed significant association between rs17576 and PACG (ORs = 0.56, P 0.47). The largest association study to date did not find significant association between MMP9 and PAC/PACG in Chinese; meta-analysis with other Chinese datasets did not produce significant association. In most instances combination with non-Chinese datasets was not possible except for one variant showing nominally significant association. More work is needed to define the role of MMP9 variants in PACG. PMID:27272641

  14. Kinetic and sequence-structure-function analysis of known LinA variants with different hexachlorocyclohexane isomers.

    Pooja Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Here we report specific activities of all seven naturally occurring LinA variants towards three different isomers, α, γ and δ, of a priority persistent pollutant, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH. Sequence-structure-function differences contributing to the differences in their stereospecificity for α-, γ-, and δ-HCH and enantiospecificity for (+- and (--α -HCH are also discussed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Enzyme kinetic studies were performed with purified LinA variants. Models of LinA2(B90A A110T, A111C, A110T/A111C and LinA1(B90A were constructed using the FoldX computer algorithm. Turnover rates (min(-1 showed that the LinAs exhibited differential substrate affinity amongst the four HCH isomers tested. α-HCH was found to be the most preferred substrate by all LinA's, followed by the γ and then δ isomer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The kinetic observations suggest that LinA-γ1-7 is the best variant for developing an enzyme-based bioremediation technology for HCH. The majority of the sequence variation in the various linA genes that have been isolated is not neutral, but alters the enantio- and stereoselectivity of the encoded proteins.

  15. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of variants of monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger

    Atkin, Kate E. [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom); Reiss, Renate; Turner, Nicholas J. [School of Chemistry, Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre, University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Brzozowski, Andrzej M.; Grogan, Gideon, E-mail: grogan@ysbl.york.ac.uk [Structural Biology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of York, York YO10 5YW (United Kingdom)

    2008-03-01

    Crystals of A. niger monoamine oxidase variants display P2{sub 1} or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2/P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 symmetry, with eight or two molecules in the asymmetric unit, respectively. Monoamine oxidase from Aspergillus niger (MAO-N) is an FAD-dependent enzyme that catalyses the conversion of terminal amines to their corresponding aldehydes. Variants of MAO-N produced by directed evolution have been shown to possess altered substrate specificity. Crystals of two of these variants (MAO-N-3 and MAO-N-5) have been obtained; the former displays P2{sub 1} symmetry with eight molecules per asymmetric unit and the latter has P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 symmetry and two molecules per asymmetric unit. Solution of these structures will help shed light on the molecular determinants of improved activity and high enantioselectivity towards a broad range of substrates.

  16. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9 Variants with Primary Angle Closure and Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma.

    Xueli Chen

    Full Text Available Shorter axial length observed in patients with primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG might be due to altered matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9 activity resulting in ECM remodeling during eye growth and development. This study aimed to evaluate common variants in MMP9 for association with PACG. Six tag SNPs of MMP9 were genotyped in a Chinese sample of 1,030 cases, including 572 PACG and 458 primary angle closure (PAC, and 499 controls. None of 6 SNPs were significantly associated with overall PAC/PACG (P > 0.07 or with PAC/PACG subgroups (Pc > 0.18. Meta-analysis of two non-Chinese studies revealed significant association between rs17576 and PACG (ORs = 0.56, P 0.47. The largest association study to date did not find significant association between MMP9 and PAC/PACG in Chinese; meta-analysis with other Chinese datasets did not produce significant association. In most instances combination with non-Chinese datasets was not possible except for one variant showing nominally significant association. More work is needed to define the role of MMP9 variants in PACG.

  17. Genetic Alterations in Hungarian Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer.

    Tobiás, Bálint; Halászlaki, Csaba; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Árvai, Kristóf; Horváth, Péter; Takács, István; Nagy, Zsolt; Horváth, Evelin; Horányi, János; Járay, Balázs; Székely, Eszter; Székely, Tamás; Győri, Gabriella; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Dank, Magdolna; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Vasas, Béla; Iványi, Béla; Lakatos, Péter

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancers is increasing worldwide. Some somatic oncogene mutations (BRAF, NRAS, HRAS, KRAS) as well as gene translocations (RET/PTC, PAX8/PPAR-gamma) have been associated with the development of thyroid cancer. In our study, we analyzed these genetic alterations in 394 thyroid tissue samples (197 papillary carcinomas and 197 healthy). The somatic mutations and translocations were detected by Light Cycler melting method and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction techniques, respectively. In tumorous samples, 86 BRAF (44.2%), 5 NRAS (3.1%), 2 HRAS (1.0%) and 1 KRAS (0.5%) mutations were found, as well as 9 RET/PTC1 (4.6%) and 1 RET/PTC3 (0.5%) translocations. No genetic alteration was seen in the non tumorous control thyroid tissues. No correlation was detected between the genetic variants and the pathological subtypes of papillary cancer as well as the severity of the disease. Our results are only partly concordant with the data found in the literature. PMID:26259532

  18. Evaluating pathogenic dementia variants in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Barber, Imelda; Lincoln, Sarah J; Murray, Melissa E; Camsari, Gamze Balci; Khan, Qurat ul Ain; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina D; Crook, Julia E; Younkin, Steven G; Dickson, Dennis W; Boeve, Bradley F; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Morgan, Kevin; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2016-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is an understudied visual impairment syndrome most often due to "posterior Alzheimer's disease (AD)" pathology. Case studies detected mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT, and PRNP in subjects with clinical PCA. To detect the frequency and spectrum of mutations in known dementia genes in PCA, we screened 124 European-American subjects with clinical PCA (n = 67) or posterior AD neuropathology (n = 57) for variants in genes implicated in AD, frontotemporal dementia, and prion disease using NeuroX, a customized exome array. Frequencies in PCA of the variants annotated as pathogenic or potentially pathogenic were compared against ∼ 4300 European-American population controls from the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project. We identified 2 rare variants not previously reported in PCA, TREM2 Arg47His, and PSEN2 Ser130Leu. No other pathogenic or potentially pathogenic variants were detected in the screened dementia genes. In this first systematic variant screen of a PCA cohort, we report 2 rare mutations in TREM2 and PSEN2, validate our previously reported APOE ε4 association, and demonstrate the utility of NeuroX. PMID:26507310

  19. Persistent trigeminal artery variants detected by MR angiography

    Uchino, A.; Kato, A.; Takase, Y.; Kudo, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) variants are cerebellar arteries that originate directly from the precavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA). The goal of our study was to determine the incidence and MR angiographic features of PTA variants. Between April 1996 and September 1999, 523 cranial MR angiographies were performed at our institution. Most of the patients examined had or were suspected of having cerebrovascular disease. We retrospectively reviewed these 523 MR angiograms. A 1.5-T scanner was used in all studies, and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images obtained using the three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D TOF) technique were displayed stereoscopically. Four PTA variants were detected on MR angiograms, at a rate of 0.76 %. At least three of the four PTA variants were anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICAs), small tortuous arteries arising from the precavernous portions of the ICAs and taking a posterior course. Although the clinical significance is not great, we found a relatively high incidence of PTA variants on MR angiograms. We stress that knowledge and recognition of these anomalous cerebellar arteries are useful and important in the interpretation of cranial MR angiograms. (orig.)

  20. De novo variants in sporadic cases of childhood onset schizophrenia.

    Ambalavanan, Amirthagowri; Girard, Simon L; Ahn, Kwangmi; Zhou, Sirui; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Bourassa, Cynthia V; Gauthier, Julie; Hamdan, Fadi F; Xiong, Lan; Dion, Patrick A; Joober, Ridha; Rapoport, Judith; Rouleau, Guy A

    2016-06-01

    Childhood-onset schizophrenia (COS), defined by the onset of illness before age 13 years, is a rare severe neurodevelopmental disorder of unknown etiology. Recently, sequencing studies have identified rare, potentially causative de novo variants in sporadic cases of adult-onset schizophrenia and autism. In this study, we performed exome sequencing of 17 COS trios in order to test whether de novo variants could contribute to this disease. We identified 20 de novo variants in 17 COS probands, which is consistent with the de novo mutation rate reported in the adult form of the disease. Interestingly, the missense de novo variants in COS have a high likelihood for pathogenicity and were enriched for genes that are less tolerant to variants. Among the genes found disrupted in our study, SEZ6, RYR2, GPR153, GTF2IRD1, TTBK1 and ITGA6 have been previously linked to neuronal function or to psychiatric disorders, and thus may be considered as COS candidate genes. PMID:26508570

  1. Targeted quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassay for human protein variants

    Nedelkov Dobrin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications and genetic variations give rise to protein variants that significantly increase the complexity of the human proteome. Modified proteins also play an important role in biological processes. While sandwich immunoassays are routinely used to determine protein concentrations, they are oblivious to protein variants that may serve as biomarkers with better sensitivity and specificity than their wild-type proteins. Mass spectrometry, coupled to immunoaffinity separations, can provide an efficient mean for simultaneous detection and quantification of protein variants. Results Presented here is a mass spectrometric immunoassay method for targeted quantitative proteomics analysis of protein modifications. Cystatin C, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor and a potential marker for several pathological processes, was used as a target analyte. An internal reference standard was incorporated into the assay, serving as a normalization point for cystatin C quantification. The precision, linearity, and recovery characteristics of the assay were established. The new assay was also benchmarked against existing cystatin C ELISA. In application, the assay was utilized to determine the individual concentration of several cystatin C variants across a cohort of samples, demonstrating the ability to fully quantify individual forms of post-translationally modified proteins. Conclusions The mass spectrometric immunoassays can find use in quantifying specific protein modifications, either as a part of a specific protein biomarker discovery/rediscovery effort to delineate the role of these variants in the onset of the disease, progression, and response to therapy, or in a more systematic study to delineate and understand human protein diversity.

  2. HGVS Recommendations for the Description of Sequence Variants: 2016 Update.

    den Dunnen, Johan T; Dalgleish, Raymond; Maglott, Donna R; Hart, Reece K; Greenblatt, Marc S; McGowan-Jordan, Jean; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Smith, Timothy; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Taschner, Peter E M

    2016-06-01

    The consistent and unambiguous description of sequence variants is essential to report and exchange information on the analysis of a genome. In particular, DNA diagnostics critically depends on accurate and standardized description and sharing of the variants detected. The sequence variant nomenclature system proposed in 2000 by the Human Genome Variation Society has been widely adopted and has developed into an internationally accepted standard. The recommendations are currently commissioned through a Sequence Variant Description Working Group (SVD-WG) operating under the auspices of three international organizations: the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS), the Human Variome Project (HVP), and the Human Genome Organization (HUGO). Requests for modifications and extensions go through the SVD-WG following a standard procedure including a community consultation step. Version numbers are assigned to the nomenclature system to allow users to specify the version used in their variant descriptions. Here, we present the current recommendations, HGVS version 15.11, and briefly summarize the changes that were made since the 2000 publication. Most focus has been on removing inconsistencies and tightening definitions allowing automatic data processing. An extensive version of the recommendations is available online, at http://www.HGVS.org/varnomen. PMID:26931183

  3. Chemosensory alterations and cancer therapies

    Taste and olfaction provide sensory information and sensory pleasure. Cancer therapies affect both. Chemotherapy has not been shown to produce dramatic losses of taste or smell, but systematic studies on various chemotherapeutic agents and types of cancer are lacking. Radiation therapy does produce clear losses of both taste and smell. Both chemotherapy and radiation therapy alter the pleasure produced by taste and smell through the formation of conditioned aversions. That is, foods consumed in proximity with the nausea of therapy come to be unpleasant. The impact of conditioned aversions can be diminished by providing a scapegoat food just before therapy. Alterations in foods may be beneficial to the cancer patient. Increasing the concentrations of flavor ingredients can compensate for sensory losses, and providing pureed foods that retain the cognitive integrity of a meal can benefit the patient who has chewing or swallowing problems

  4. Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1), Variant SGI1-I, and New Variant SGI1-O in Proteus mirabilis Clinical and Food Isolates from China▿

    Boyd, David A.; Shi, Xiaolu; Hu, Qing-Hua; Ng, Lai King; Doublet, Benoit; Cloeckaert, Axel; Mulvey, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) and variants (SGI1-I and the new variant SGI1-O) were mapped in five strains of Proteus mirabilis isolated from humans and food in China. Sequencing showed that SGI1 and variants were integrated at the 3′ end of the chromosomal thdF gene as previously described for Salmonella strains.

  5. Altered states: psychedelics and anesthetics.

    Icaza, Eduardo E; Mashour, George A

    2013-12-01

    The psychedelic experience has been reported since antiquity, but there is relatively little known about the underlying neural mechanisms. A recent neuroimaging study on psilocybin revealed a pattern of decreased cerebral blood flow and functional disconnections that is surprisingly similar to that caused by various anesthetics. In this article, the authors review historical examples of psychedelic experiences induced by general anesthetics and then contrast the mechanisms by which these two drug classes generate altered states of consciousness. PMID:24061599

  6. Buccal alterations in diabetes mellitus

    Negrato Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Long standing hyperglycaemia besides damaging the kidneys, eyes, nerves, blood vessels, heart, can also impair the function of the salivary glands leading to a reduction in the salivary flow. When salivary flow decreases, as a consequence of an acute hyperglycaemia, many buccal or oral alterations can occur such as: a increased concentration of mucin and glucose; b impaired production and/or action of many antimicrobial factors; c absence of a metalloprotein called gustin, that contains zinc and is responsible for the constant maturation of taste papillae; d bad taste; e oral candidiasis f increased cells exfoliation after contact, because of poor lubrication; g increased proliferation of pathogenic microorganisms; h coated tongue; i halitosis; and many others may occur as a consequence of chronic hyperglycaemia: a tongue alterations, generally a burning mouth; b periodontal disease; c white spots due to demineralization in the teeth; d caries; e delayed healing of wounds; f greater tendency to infections; g lichen planus; h mucosa ulcerations. Buccal alterations found in diabetic patients, although not specific of this disease, have its incidence and progression increased when an inadequate glycaemic control is present.

  7. Shank3-mutant mice lacking exon 9 show altered excitation/inhibition balance, enhanced rearing, and spatial memory deficit

    Jiseok Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Shank3 is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein implicated in synapse development and autism spectrum disorders. The Shank3 gene is known to produce diverse splice variants whose functions have not been fully explored. In the present study, we generated mice lacking Shank3 exon 9 (Shank3∆9 mice, and thus missing 5 out of 10 known Shank3 splice variants containing the N-terminal ankyrin repeat region, including the longest splice variant, Shank3a. Our X-gal staining results revealed that Shank3 proteins encoded by exon 9-containing splice variants are abundant in upper cortical layers, striatum, hippocampus, and thalamus, but not in the olfactory bulb or cerebellum, despite the significant Shank3 mRNA levels in these regions. The hippocampal CA1 region of Shank3∆9 mice exhibited reduced excitatory transmission at Schaffer collateral synapses and increased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory synaptic events in pyramidal neurons. In contrast, prelimbic layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex displayed decreased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory synaptic events, indicating alterations in the ratio of excitation/inhibition (E/I ratio in the Shank3∆9 brain. These mice displayed a mild increase in rearing in a novel environment and mildly impaired spatial memory, but showed normal social interaction and repetitive behavior. These results suggest that ankyrin repeat-containing Shank3 splice variants are important for E/I balance, rearing behavior, and spatial memory.

  8. Missense splice variant (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val) of interferon gamma receptor 1 (IFNGR1) coincidental with mycobacterial osteomyelitis - a screen of osteoarticular lesions.

    Bińczak-Kuleta, Agnieszka; Szwed, Aleksander; Walter, Mark R; Kołban, Maciej; Ciechanowicz, Andrzej; Clark, Jeremy S C

    2016-08-01

    Previously, dominant partial interferon-gamma receptor 1 (IFN-g-R1) susceptibility to environmental mycobacteria was found with IFNGR1 deletions or premature stop. Our aim was to search for IFNGR1 variants in patients with mycobacterial osteoarticular lesions. Biopsies from the patients were examined for acid-fast bacilli, inflammatory cell infiltration, and mycobacterial niacin. Mycobacterial rRNA was analyzed using a target-amplified rRNA probe test. Peripheral-blood-leukocyte genomic DNA was isolated from 19 patients using the QIAamp DNA Mini Kit, and all IFNGR1 exons were sequenced using an ABIPRISM 3130 device. After the discovery of an exon 5 variant, a Polish newborn population sample (n = 100) was assayed for the discovered variant. Splice sites and putative amino acid interactions were analyzed. All patients tested were positive for mycobacteria; one was heterozygous for the IFNGR1 exon 5 single-nucleotide-missense substitution (g.20746A>G, p.Ile183Val). No other variant was found. The splice analysis indicated the creation of an exonic splicing silencer, and alternatively, molecular graphics indicated that the p.Ile183Val might alter beta-strand packing (loss of van der Waals contacts; Val183/Pro205), possibly altering the IFN-g-R1/IFN-g-R2 interaction. The probability of non-deleterious variant was estimated as genes affecting Type 1 T-helper-cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27483180

  9. Intra- and interfamily phenotypic diversity in pain syndromes associated with a gain-of-function variant of NaV1.7

    Estacion Mark

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium channel NaV1.7 is preferentially expressed within dorsal root ganglia (DRG, trigeminal ganglia and sympathetic ganglion neurons and their fine-diamter axons, where it acts as a threshold channel, amplifying stimuli such as generator potentials in nociceptors. Gain-of-function mutations and variants (single amino acid substitutions of NaV1.7 have been linked to three pain syndromes: Inherited Erythromelalgia (IEM, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder (PEPD, and Small Fiber Neuropathy (SFN. IEM is characterized clinically by burning pain and redness that is usually focused on the distal extremities, precipitated by mild warmth and relieved by cooling, and is caused by mutations that hyperpolarize activation, slow deactivation, and enhance the channel ramp response. PEPD is characterized by perirectal, periocular or perimandibular pain, often triggered by defecation or lower body stimulation, and is caused by mutations that severely impair fast-inactivation. SFN presents a clinical picture dominated by neuropathic pain and autonomic symptoms; gain-of-function variants have been reported to be present in approximately 30% of patients with biopsy-confirmed idiopathic SFN, and functional testing has shown altered fast-inactivation, slow-inactivation or resurgent current. In this paper we describe three patients who house the NaV1.7/I228M variant. Methods We have used clinical assessment of patients, quantitative sensory testing and skin biopsy to study these patients, including two siblings in one family, in whom genomic screening demonstrated the I228M NaV1.7 variant. Electrophysiology (voltage-clamp and current-clamp was used to test functional effects of the variant channel. Results We report three different clinical presentations of the I228M NaV1.7 variant: presentation with severe facial pain, presentation with distal (feet, hands pain, and presentation with scalp discomfort in three patients housing this NaV1.7 variant

  10. Cathepsin D SNP associated with increased risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Sanchez-Juan Pascual

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD originally resulted from the consumption of foodstuffs contaminated by bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE material, with 163 confirmed cases in the UK to date. Many thousands are likely to have been exposed to dietary infection and so it is important (for surveillance, epidemic modelling, public health and understanding pathogenesis to identify genetic factors that may affect individual susceptibility to infection. This study looked at a polymorphism in the cathepsin D gene (refSNP ID: rs17571 previously examined in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Methods Blood samples taken from 110 vCJD patients were tested for the C-T base change, and genotype data were compared with published frequencies for a control population using multiple logistic regression. Results There was a significant excess of the cathepsin D polymorphism TT genotype in the vCJD cohort compared to controls. The TT genotype was found to have a 9.75 fold increase in risk of vCJD compared to the CT genotype and a 10.92 fold increase compared to the CC genotype. Conclusion This mutation event has been observed to alter the protease activity of the cathepsin D protein and has been linked to an increase in amyloid beta plaque formation in AD. vCJD neuropathology is characterised by the presence of amyloid plaques, formed from the prion protein, and therefore alterations in the amyloid processing activity of cathepsin D may affect the neuropathogenesis of this disease.

  11. Human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 genetic variants found in 71 oral and anogenital epithelial samples from Australia.

    Jennifer A Danielewski

    Full Text Available Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP (n = 17, genital warts (n = 43, anal cancer (n = 6 and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5, was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65% clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04. This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02. Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific variants for these

  12. Proteomic profiling of SupT1 cells reveal modulation of host proteins by HIV-1 Nef variants.

    Reshu Saxena

    Full Text Available Nef is an accessory viral protein that promotes HIV-1 replication, facilitating alterations in cellular pathways via multiple protein-protein interactions. The advent of proteomics has expanded the focus on better identification of novel molecular pathways regulating disease progression. In this study, nef was sequenced from randomly selected patients, however, sequence variability identified did not elicited any specific mutation that could have segregated HIV-1 patients in different stages of disease progression. To explore the difference in Nef functionality based on sequence variability we used proteomics approach. Proteomic profiling was done to compare the effect of Nef variants in host cell protein expression. 2DGE in control and Nef transfected SupT1 cells demonstrated several differentially expressed proteins. Fourteen protein spots were detected with more than 1.5 fold difference. Significant down regulation was seen in six unique protein spots in the Nef treated cells. Proteins were identified as Cyclophilin A, EIF5A-1 isoform B, Rho GDI 1 isoform a, VDAC1, OTUB1 and α-enolase isoform 1 (ENO1 through LC-MS/MS. The differential expression of the 6 proteins was analyzed by Real time PCR, Western blotting and Immunofluorescence studies with two Nef variants (RP14 and RP01 in SupT1 cells. There was contrasting difference between the effect of these Nef variants upon the expression of these six proteins. Downregulation of α-enolase (ENO1, VDAC1 and OTUB1 was more significant by Nef RP01 whereas Cyclophilin A and RhoGDI were found to be more downregulated by Nef RP14. This difference in Nef variants upon host protein expression was also studied through a site directed mutant of Nef RP01 (55AAAAAAA61 and the effect was found to be reversed. Deciphering the role of these proteins mediated by Nef variants will open a new avenue of research in understanding Nef mediated pathogenesis. Overall study determines modulation of cellular protein

  13. Functional characterisation of ADIPOQ variants using individuals recruited by genotype.

    Lee, Benjamin P; Lloyd-Laney, Henry O; Locke, Jonathan M; McCulloch, Laura J; Knight, Bridget; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Cory, Giles; Kos, Katarina; Frayling, Timothy M; Harries, Lorna W

    2016-06-15

    Four non-coding GWAS variants in or near the ADIPOQ gene (rs17300539, rs17366653, rs3821799 and rs56354395) together explain 4% of the variation in circulating adiponectin. The functional basis for this is unknown. We tested the effect of these variants on ADIPOQ transcription, splicing and stability respectively in adipose tissue samples from participants recruited by rs17366653 genotype. Transcripts carrying rs17300539 demonstrated a 17% increase in expression (p = 0.001). Variant rs17366653 was associated with disruption of ADIPOQ splicing leading to a 7 fold increase in levels of a non-functional transcript (p = 0.002). Transcripts carrying rs56354395 demonstrated a 59% decrease in expression (p = tissues in functional interpretation of GWAS signals. PMID:26996131

  14. Strong Gravitational Lens Modeling with Spatially Variant Point Spread Functions

    Rogers, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  15. Grinder Variant System Design and Implementation Based on Ontology

    Yang, G. H.; Zhang, T. P.

    In order to improve the efficiency of product design and reuse in heterogeneous system of knowledge sharing, this paper introduced the concept of ontology into product variant design, and grinding machine design was as an example. A lot of experience and accumulated knowledge in product design was shared and reused. It is precisely to formulate ontology knowledge such as variant design features and parameter, and applied the software protégé4.3 to construct ontology model, as well as runed resoning on model data information. It developed a set of complete product intelligent system of variant design, which can effectively solve the problem of the repeated design and greatly shorten product development cycle.

  16. Private mitochondrial DNA variants in danish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole;

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM....... Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mitochondrial variants in the etiology of HCM. In 87 Danish HCM patients, full mtDNA sequencing revealed 446...... MT-CYB: m.15024G>A, p.C93Y remained. A detailed analysis of these variants indicated that none of them are likely to cause HCM. In conclusion, private mtDNA mutations are frequent, but they are rarely, if ever, associated with HCM....

  17. Cutaneous Cellular Pseudoglandular Schwannoma: An Unusual Histopathologic Variant.

    Sundarkrishnan, Lohini; Bradish, Joshua R; Oliai, Bahram R; Hosler, Gregory A

    2016-04-01

    Cellular schwannoma and pseudoglandular schwannoma are both previously described rare variants of schwannoma. The authors present an unusual case of a cellular spindle cell neoplasm with prominent gland-like structures, having features of both variants. The nature of this lesion was confirmed by histology and immunohistochemistry, with diffuse and strong S100 and membranous collagen type IV staining. The gland-like structures were lined by S100 + cells and contained proteinaceous, mucicarmine-negative material, supporting a degenerative, not true glandular, phenomenon. This is the first case of a cutaneous schwannoma demonstrating both marked cellularity and pseudoglandular formation, which the authors have designated cutaneous cellular pseudoglandular schwannoma. Recognition of this extremely rare variant will help avoid diagnostic confusion and overtreatment of this benign entity. PMID:26844614

  18. Two distinct variants of erythrocyte spectrin beta IV domain.

    Pothier, B; Alloisio, N; Morlé, L; Maréchal, J; Barthélemy, H; Ducluzeau, M T; Dorier, A; Delaunay, J

    1989-11-01

    We report two distinct variants affecting the beta IV domain of erythrocyte spectrin, designated spectrin Saint-Chamond and spectrin Tlemcen. They were discovered in a French family and an Algerian individual, respectively. They appeared clinically and morphologically asymptomatic in the heterozygous state. In two-dimensional maps of spectrin partial digests, both mutants were manifested by cathodic shifts (with no change of the molecular weights) of the peptides that cover the N-terminal region of spectrin beta IV domain. The relevance of the abnormal peptides to the beta IV domain was established by quantitative analysis and by Western blotting using anti-beta IV domain-specific antibodies. These two variants are thus far the most distal variants of spectrin to be defined on an unequivocal structural basis. PMID:2807277

  19. Arrhythmogenic KCNE gene variants: current knowledge and future challenges

    Shawn M Crump

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are twenty-five known inherited cardiac arrhythmia susceptibility genes, all of which encode either ion channel pore-forming subunits or proteins that regulate aspects of ion channel biology such as function, trafficking and localization. The human KCNE gene family comprises five potassium channel regulatory subunits, sequence variants in each of which are associated with cardiac arrhythmias. KCNE gene products exhibit promiscuous partnering and in some cases ubiquitous expression, hampering efforts to unequivocally correlate each gene to specific native potassium currents. Likewise, deducing the molecular etiology of cardiac arrhythmias in individuals harboring rare KCNE gene variants, or more common KCNE polymorphisms, can be challenging. In this review we provide an update on putative arrhythmia-causing KCNE gene variants, and discuss current thinking and future challenges in the study of molecular mechanisms of KCNE-associated cardiac rhythm disturbances.

  20. UPRE-variant: a novel criterion for parametric PSF estimation

    Xue, Feng; Li, Zhifeng; Liu, Jiaqi; Meng, Gang; Zhao, Min

    2015-10-01

    We propose a variant of unbiased predictive risk estimate (UPRE) as a novel criterion for estimating a point spread function (PSF) from the degraded image only. Compared to the traditional unbiased estimates (e.g. UPRE and SURE), the key advantage of this variant is that it does not require the knowledge of noise variance. The PSF is obtained by minimizing this new objective functional over a family of smoother processings. Based on this estimated PSF, we then perform deconvolution using our recently developed SURE-LET algorithm. The novel criterion is exemplified with a number of parametric PSF. The experimental results demonstrate that the UPRE-variant minimization yields highly accurate estimates of the PSF parameters, which also result in a negligible loss of visual quality, compared to that obtained with the exact PSF. The highly competitive results outline the great potential of developing more powerful blind deconvolution algorithms based on this criterion.

  1. Contribution of bioinformatics predictions and functional splicing assays to the interpretation of unclassified variants of the BRCA genes

    Théry, Jean Christophe; Krieger, Sophie; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Révillion, Françoise; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Killian, Audrey; Duponchel, Christiane; Rousselin, Antoine; Vaur, Dominique; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Berthet, Pascaline; Frébourg, Thierry; Martins, Alexandra; Hardouin, Agnès; Tosi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    A large fraction of sequence variants of unknown significance (VUS) of the breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 may induce splicing defects. We analyzed 53 VUSs of BRCA1 or BRCA2, detected in consecutive molecular screenings, by using five splicing prediction programs, and we classified them into two groups according to the strength of the predictions. In parallel, we tested them by using functional splicing assays. A total of 10 VUSs were predicted by two or more programs to induce a significant reduction of splice site strength or activation of cryptic splice sites or generation of new splice sites. Minigene-based splicing assays confirmed four of these predictions. Five additional VUSs, all at internal exon positions, were not predicted to induce alterations of splice sites, but revealed variable levels of exon skipping, most likely induced by the modification of exonic splicing regulatory elements. We provide new data in favor of the pathogenic nature of the variants BRCA1 c.212+3A>G and BRCA1 c.5194−12G>A, which induced aberrant out-of-frame mRNA forms. Moreover, the novel variant BRCA2 c.7977−7C>G induced in frame inclusion of 6 nt from the 3′ end of intron 17. The novel variants BRCA2 c.520C>T and BRCA2 c.7992T>A induced incomplete skipping of exons 7 and 18, respectively. This work highlights the contribution of splicing minigene assays to the assessment of pathogenicity, not only when patient RNA is not available, but also as a tool to improve the accuracy of bioinformatics predictions. PMID:21673748

  2. Sequence-Specific Fidelity Alterations Associated with West Nile Virus Attenuation in Mosquitoes.

    Greta A Van Slyke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High rates of error-prone replication result in the rapid accumulation of genetic diversity of RNA viruses. Recent studies suggest that mutation rates are selected for optimal viral fitness and that modest variations in replicase fidelity may be associated with viral attenuation. Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are unique in their requirement for host cycling and may necessitate substantial genetic and phenotypic plasticity. In order to more thoroughly investigate the correlates, mechanisms and consequences of arbovirus fidelity, we selected fidelity variants of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus utilizing selection in the presence of a mutagen. We identified two mutations in the WNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with increased fidelity, V793I and G806R, and a single mutation in the WNV methyltransferase, T248I, associated with decreased fidelity. Both deep-sequencing and in vitro biochemical assays confirmed strain-specific differences in both fidelity and mutational bias. WNV fidelity variants demonstrated host-specific alterations to replicative fitness in vitro, with modest attenuation in mosquito but not vertebrate cell culture. Experimental infections of colonized and field populations of Cx. quinquefaciatus demonstrated that WNV fidelity alterations are associated with a significantly impaired capacity to establish viable infections in mosquitoes. Taken together, these studies (i demonstrate the importance of allosteric interactions in regulating mutation rates, (ii establish that mutational spectra can be both sequence and strain-dependent, and (iii display the profound phenotypic consequences associated with altered replication complex function of flaviviruses.

  3. The calpain, caspase 12, caspase 3 cascade leading to apoptosis is altered in F508del-CFTR expressing cells.

    Mathieu Kerbiriou

    Full Text Available In cystic fibrosis (CF, the most frequent mutant variant of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, F508del-CFTR protein, is misfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. We previously showed that the unfolded protein response (UPR may be triggered in CF. Since prolonged UPR activation leads to apoptosis via the calcium-calpain-caspase-12-caspase-3 cascade and because apoptosis is altered in CF, our aim was to compare the ER stress-induced apoptosis pathway between wild type (Wt and F508del-CFTR expressing cells. Here we show that the calcium-calpain-caspase-12-caspase-3 cascade is altered in F508del-CFTR expressing cells. We propose that this alteration is involved in the altered apoptosis triggering observed in CF.

  4. Human polymorphic variants of the NEIL1 DNA glycosylase.

    Roy, Laura M; Jaruga, Pawel; Wood, Thomas G; McCullough, Amanda K; Dizdaroglu, Miral; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2007-05-25

    In mammalian cells, the repair of DNA bases that have been damaged by reactive oxygen species is primarily initiated by a series of DNA glycosylases that include OGG1, NTH1, NEIL1, and NEIL2. To explore the functional significance of NEIL1, we recently reported that neil1 knock-out and heterozygotic mice develop the majority of symptoms of metabolic syndrome (Vartanian, V., Lowell, B., Minko, I. G., Wood, T. G., Ceci, J. D., George, S., Ballinger, S. W., Corless, C. L., McCullough, A. K., and Lloyd, R. S. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 103, 1864-1869). To determine whether this phenotype could be causally related to human disease susceptibility, we have characterized four polymorphic variants of human NEIL1. Although three of the variants (S82C, G83D, and D252N) retained near wild type levels of nicking activity on abasic (AP) site-containing DNA, G83D did not catalyze the wild type beta,delta-elimination reaction but primarily yielded the beta-elimination product. The AP nicking activity of the C136R variant was significantly reduced. Glycosylase nicking activities were measured on both thymine glycol-containing oligonucleotides and gamma-irradiated genomic DNA using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two of the polymorphic variants (S82C and D252N) showed near wild type enzyme specificity and kinetics, whereas G83D was devoid of glycosylase activity. Although insufficient quantities of C136R could be obtained to carry out gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses, this variant was also devoid of the ability to incise thymine glycol-containing oligonucleotide, suggesting that it may also be glycosylase-deficient. Extrapolation of these data suggests that individuals who are heterozygous for these inactive variant neil1 alleles may be at increased risk for metabolic syndrome. PMID:17389588

  5. CEACAM6 gene variants in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Jürgen Glas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 acts as a receptor for adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC and its ileal expression is increased in patients with Crohn's disease (CD. Given its contribution to the pathogenesis of CD, we aimed to investigate the role of genetic variants in the CEACAM6 region in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. METHODOLOGY: In this study, a total of 2,683 genomic DNA samples (including DNA from 858 CD patients, 475 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, and 1,350 healthy, unrelated controls was analyzed for eight CEACAM6 SNPs (rs10415946, rs1805223 = p.Pro42Pro, rs4803507, rs4803508, rs11548735 = p.Gly239Val, rs7246116 = pHis260His, rs2701, rs10416839. In addition, a detailed haplotype analysis and genotype-phenotype analysis were performed. Overall, our genotype analysis did not reveal any significant association of the investigated CEACAM6 SNPs and haplotypes with CD or UC susceptibility, although certain CEACAM6 SNPs modulated CEACAM6 expression in intestinal epithelial cell lines. Despite its function as receptor of AIEC in ileal CD, we found no association of the CEACAM6 SNPs with ileal or ileocolonic CD. Moreover, there was no evidence of epistasis between the analyzed CEACAM6 variants and the main CD-associated NOD2, IL23R and ATG16L1 variants. CONCLUSIONS: This study represents the first detailed analysis of CEACAM6 variants in IBD patients. Despite its important role in bacterial attachment in ileal CD, we could not demonstrate a role for CEACAM6 variants in IBD susceptibility or regarding an ileal CD phenotype. Further functional studies are required to analyze if these gene variants modulate ileal bacterial attachment.

  6. PET/CT Artifacts, Pitfalls and Variants

    which would also affect the quantitative analysis of tumor FDG uptake. FDG clots are usually seen in the mediastinal vasculature or in the lungs. A careful analysis of the mediastinal or lung windows of the CT component of the PET/CT would help to avoid misinterpretation. Metallic implants such as dental fillings, hip prosthetics, or chemotherapy ports or oral contrast agents such as iodine and barium sulfate result in high CT numbers and generate streaking artifacts on CT images because of their high photon absorption. This increase in CT (or Hounsfield) numbers results in correspondingly high PET attenuation coefficients, which lead to an overestimation of the PET activity in that region and thereby to a false positive PET finding. None attenuated PET images, which do not manifest this error, can be used in these cases to aid the interpretation of these metal-induced artifacts. CT with intravenous contrast agent, on the other hand, has a minimal effect on the PET images. Because of the faster clearance and dilution of intravenous contrast agents, they have a low concentration at the time of the CT scan, thereby minimally affecting the quality of the CT attenuation corrected PET images. A spectrum of normal physiologic uptake, especially in the head and neck and gastro intestinal tract, and various benign conditions can simulate malignant pathologies. Spurious muscle uptake, brown fat, lipomatous hypertrophy, lactation, Teflon injection, overacting vocal cord, infective or inflammatory lesions such as an abscess or sarcoid, TB, histoplasmosis, and post radiotherapy inflammation can demonstrate moderate to intense FDG uptake and simulate malignant pathology. Benign tumors such as W arthins tumor of the parotid gland, hybernomas, oncocytomas, colonic adenoma and uterine fibroids can demonstrate moderate to intense FDG uptake. Understanding FDG uptakes of these variant and benign entities will avoid misinterpretation. (author)

  7. Analysis of BRIP1 Variants among Korean Patients with BRCA1/2 Mutation-Negative High-Risk Breast Cancer

    Kim, Haeyoung; Cho, Dae-Yeon; Choi, Doo Ho; Jung, Gee Hue; Shin, Inkyung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Gil, Won Ho; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study is to assess the spectrum of genetic variation in the BRIP1 gene among Korean high-risk breast cancer patients who tested negative for the BRCA1/2 mutation. Materials and Methods Overall, 235 Korean patientswith BRCA1/2 mutation–negative high-risk breast cancerwere screened for BRIP1 mutations. The entire BRIP1 gene was analyzed using fluorescent-conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis. In silico analysis of BRIP1 variants was performed using PolyPhen-2 and SIFT. Results A total of 20 sequence alterations including 12 exonic and eight intronic variantswere found. Among the 12 exonic variants, 10 were missense and two were silent mutations. No protein-truncating mutation was found among the tested patients. Among the 10 missense variants, four (p.L263F, p.L340F, p.L474P, and p.R848H) were predicted to be pathogenic by both PolyPhen-2 and SIFT, and these variants were found in five patients. Of the four missense variants, p.L263F, p.L474P, and p.R848H localize to regions between the helicase motifs, while p.L340F resides in an iron-sulfur domain of BRIP1. Conclusion No protein-truncating mutation in BRIP1 was found among the tested patients. The contribution of BRIP1 variants is thought to be minor in Korean non-BRCA1/2 high-risk breast cancer. PMID:26790966

  8. Replication of brain function effects of a genome-wide supported psychiatric risk variant in the CACNA1C gene and new multi-locus effects.

    Erk, Susanne; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Linden, David E J; Lancaster, Thomas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Grimm, Oliver; Degenhardt, Franziska; Holmans, Peter; Pocklington, Andrew; Schmierer, Phöbe; Haddad, Leila; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Mattheisen, Manuel; Witt, Stephanie H; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Tost, Heike; Schott, Björn H; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Heinz, Andreas; Walter, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Variation in the CACNA1C gene has consistently been associated with psychosis in genome wide association studies. We have previously shown in a sample of n=110 healthy subjects that carriers of the CACNA1C rs1006737 risk variant exhibit hippocampal and perigenual anterior cingulate dysfunction (pgACC) during episodic memory recall. Here, we aimed to replicate our results, by testing for the effects of the rs1006737 risk variant in a new large cohort of healthy controls. We furthermore sought to refine these results by identifying the impact of a CACNA1C specific, gene-wide risk score in the absence of clinical pathology. An independent sample of 179 healthy subjects genotyped for rs1006737 underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an associative episodic memory task and underwent psychological testing similar to the discovery sample. The effect of gene-wide risk scores was analyzed in the combined sample of 289 subjects. We replicated our discovery findings of hippocampal and pgACC dysfunction in carriers of the rs1006737 risk variant. Additionally, we observed diminished activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, in the replication sample. Our replicated results as well as this new effect were also observable in the combined sample. Moreover, the same system-level phenotypes were significantly associated with the individual gene-based genetic risk score. Our findings suggest that altered hippocampal and frontolimbic function is associated with variants in the CACNA1C gene. Since CACNA1C variants have been associated repeatedly with psychosis at a genome-wide level, and preclinical data provide convergent evidence for the relevance of the CACNA1C gene for hippocampal and frontolimbic plasticity and adaptive regulation of stress, our data suggest a potential pathophysiological mechanism conferred by CACNA1C variants that may mediate risk for symptom dimensions shared among bipolar disorder, major depression, and schizophrenia

  9. Overview of the role of alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase and their variants in the genesis of alcohol-related pathology.

    Crabb, David W; Matsumoto, Michinaga; Chang, David; You, Min

    2004-02-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) are responsible for metabolizing the bulk of ethanol consumed as part of the diet and their activities contribute to the rate of ethanol elimination from the blood. They are expressed at highest levels in liver, but at lower levels in many tissues. This pathway probably evolved as a detoxification mechanism for environmental alcohols. However, with the consumption of large amounts of ethanol, the oxidation of ethanol can become a major energy source and, particularly in the liver, interferes with the metabolism of other nutrients. Polymorphic variants of the genes for these enzymes encode enzymes with altered kinetic properties. The pathophysiological effects of these variants may be mediated by accumulation of acetaldehyde; high-activity ADH variants are predicted to increase the rate of acetaldehyde generation, while the low-activity ALDH2 variant is associated with an inability to metabolize this compound. The effects of acetaldehyde may be expressed either in the cells generating it, or by delivery of acetaldehyde to various tissues by the bloodstream or even saliva. Inheritance of the high-activity ADH beta2, encoded by the ADH2*2 gene, and the inactive ALDH2*2 gene product have been conclusively associated with reduced risk of alcoholism. This association is influenced by gene-environment interactions, such as religion and national origin. The variants have also been studied for association with alcoholic liver disease, cancer, fetal alcohol syndrome, CVD, gout, asthma and clearance of xenobiotics. The strongest correlations found to date have been those between the ALDH2*2 allele and cancers of the oro-pharynx and oesophagus. It will be important to replicate other interesting associations between these variants and other cancers and heart disease, and to determine the biochemical mechanisms underlying the associations. PMID:15099407

  10. Recent Advances in Space-Variant Deblurring and Image Stabilization

    Šorel, Michal; Šroubek, Filip; Flusser, Jan

    Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer Science + Business Media B.V, 2009 - (Byrnes, J.), s. 259-272. (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series. B: Physics and Biophysics). ISBN 978-1-4020-8922-0 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/1593 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : camera shake * image stabilization * space-variant restoration * blind deconvolution Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/ZOI/sorel-recent advances in space-variant deblurring and image stabilization.pdf

  11. Middle interhemispheric variant of holoprosencephaly: A rare midline malformation

    P Prathiba Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Middle interhemispheric variant (MIH of holoprosencephaly (HPE or syntelencephaly is a rare variant of HPE characterized by abnormal midline union of the posterior frontal and parietal lobes with variable fusion of thalami. It varies from classic HPE in embryopathogenesis, severity of fusion of brain structures, associated craniofacial anomalies and clinical presentation. We report a case of MIH in a 5-year-old girl, who presented with severe developmental delay and discuss the features differentiating it from other more common forms of HPE.

  12. Middle interhemispheric variant of holoprosencephaly: A rare midline malformation.

    Rajalakshmi, P Prathiba; Gadodia, Ankur; Priyatharshini, P

    2015-01-01

    Middle interhemispheric variant (MIH) of holoprosencephaly (HPE) or syntelencephaly is a rare variant of HPE characterized by abnormal midline union of the posterior frontal and parietal lobes with variable fusion of thalami. It varies from classic HPE in embryopathogenesis, severity of fusion of brain structures, associated craniofacial anomalies and clinical presentation. We report a case of MIH in a 5-year-old girl, who presented with severe developmental delay and discuss the features differentiating it from other more common forms of HPE. PMID:26557166

  13. Delayed type hypersensitivity responses to radiation leukemia virus variants

    DTH responses were evaluated in different strains of mice shown to be resistant or sensitive to leukemogenesis by the radiation leukemia virus variants A-RadLV and D-RadLV. A significant response was observed only in the H-2 complex-linked resistant haplotypes to RadLV leukemogenesis. The DTH response could be transferred by immune cells of mice resistant to the appropriate RadLV variant. Thus, an inverse relationship between the leukemogenic activity of the virus and its immunization ability expressed by DTH response was demonstrated in different mouse strains

  14. The 5-HTTLPR variant in the serotonin transporter gene modifies degeneration of brain regions important for emotion in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Yokoyama, Jennifer S.; Bonham, Luke W.; Sturm, Virginia E.; Adhimoolam, Babu; Karydas, Anna; Coppola, Giovanni; Miller, Bruce L.; Rankin, Katherine P.

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin transporter length polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) short allele (5-HTTLPR-s) has been associated with differential susceptibility for anxiety and depression in multiple psychiatric disorders. 5-HTTLPR-s modifies the serotonergic systems that support emotion and behavioral regulation by reducing gene expression, which slows the reuptake of serotonin, and is associated with distinct morphological and functional effects. Serotonergic systems are also shown to be dysfunctional in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), a disease characterized by marked socioemotional dysfunction. However, studies of 5-HTTLPR-s effects in bvFTD have been inconsistent. Our objective was to investigate the patterns of gray matter volume by 5-HTTLPR-s genotype in both healthy older controls and bvFTD patients. We performed voxel-based morphometry of 179 cognitively normal older adults and 24 bvFTD cases to determine brain changes associated with dose (0/1/2) of 5-HTTLPR-s allele. 5-HTTLPR-s frequency did not differ between controls and bvFTD. We found a significant interaction effect whereby carrying more 5-HTTLPR-s alleles in bvFTD was associated with smaller volume in left inferior frontal gyrus (T = 4.86, PFWE = 0.03) and larger volume in right temporal lobe (T = 5.01, PFWE = 0.01). These results suggest that the 5-HTTLPR-s allele differentially influences brain morphology in bvFTD. We propose that patients with bvFTD and 5-HTTLPR-s have altered volumes in regions that support socioemotional behavior, which may be a developmental or disease-related compensation for altered serotonergic activity. PMID:26509115

  15. The 5-HTTLPR variant in the serotonin transporter gene modifies degeneration of brain regions important for emotion in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

    Jennifer S. Yokoyama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin transporter length polymorphism (5-HTTLPR short allele (5-HTTLPR-s has been associated with differential susceptibility for anxiety and depression in multiple psychiatric disorders. 5-HTTLPR-s modifies the serotonergic systems that support emotion and behavioral regulation by reducing gene expression, which slows the reuptake of serotonin, and is associated with distinct morphological and functional effects. Serotonergic systems are also shown to be dysfunctional in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, a disease characterized by marked socioemotional dysfunction. However, studies of 5-HTTLPR-s effects in bvFTD have been inconsistent. Our objective was to investigate the patterns of gray matter volume by 5-HTTLPR-s genotype in both healthy older controls and bvFTD patients. We performed voxel-based morphometry of 179 cognitively normal older adults and 24 bvFTD cases to determine brain changes associated with dose (0/1/2 of 5-HTTLPR-s allele. 5-HTTLPR-s frequency did not differ between controls and bvFTD. We found a significant interaction effect whereby carrying more 5-HTTLPR-s alleles in bvFTD was associated with smaller volume in left inferior frontal gyrus (T = 4.86, PFWE = 0.03 and larger volume in right temporal lobe (T = 5.01, PFWE = 0.01. These results suggest that the 5-HTTLPR-s allele differentially influences brain morphology in bvFTD. We propose that patients with bvFTD and 5-HTTLPR-s have altered volumes in regions that support socioemotional behavior, which may be a developmental or disease-related compensation for altered serotonergic activity.

  16. Pharmacogenomic variants have larger effect sizes than genetic variants associated with other dichotomous complex traits.

    Maranville, J C; Cox, N J

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that pharmacogenomic phenotypes are influenced by genetic variants with larger effect sizes than other phenotypes, such as complex disease risk. This is presumed to reflect the fact that relevant environmental factors (drug exposure) are appropriately measured and taken into account. To test this hypothesis, we performed a systematic comparison of effect sizes between pharmacogenomic and non-pharmacogenomic phenotypes across all genome-wide association studies (GWAS) reported in the NHGRI GWAS catalog. We found significantly larger effect sizes for studies focused on pharmacogenomic phenotypes, as compared with complex disease risk, morphological phenotypes and endophenotypes. We found no significant differences in effect sizes between pharmacogenomic studies focused on adverse events versus those focused on drug efficacy. Furthermore, we found that this pattern persists among sample size-matched studies, suggesting that this pattern does not reflect overestimation of effect sizes due to smaller sample sizes in pharmacogenomic studies.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 7 July 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.47. PMID:26149738

  17. Multiple scenarios of bentonite alteration

    Performance assessment for TRU waste repositories has shown that soluble and poorly sorbing nuclides such as I-129 and C-14 dominate the dose. These nuclides are expected to migrate with groundwater flow, hence hydraulic conditions and their evolution with time in the repository are key issues for repository safety. Cementitious material will be used for waste packaging, backfilling and structural material in a TRU waste repository. Bentonite is also expected to be used for some TRU wastes to provide the function of a hydraulic barrier in the disposal system. There is concern that the coexistence of cementitious material and bentonite cause the alteration of smectite due to interaction with hyperalkaline leachates and consequent deleterious perturbation of the function of bentonite as a hydraulic barrier. Many research studies have been performed to identify possible mechanisms of cement-bentonite interaction. However, uncertainties still exist in our understanding of the precise chemical scheme of bentonite alteration in highly alkaline conditions, especially the space and time variation of secondary mineral occurrences. In order to reflect this uncertainty, multiple scenarios of bentonite alteration were developed based on the possible mineralogical changes derived from knowledge of both experiments and observation of natural systems. It was focused that the mineral reaction involving hyperalkaline fluids would thermodynamically depend on the variable chemical condition in bentonite buffer and that kinetics would be important as well as thermodynamic stability in controlling their occurrence, i.e., the kinetic controls may operate to remain metastable minerals over the long term. The mineralogical consequences of the interaction between clays and alkaline fluids are summarized as follows. Clay → C-S-H gel and other solids which can rapidly precipitate. Clay and gel → illite. Clay and gel → metastable zeolite. Clay and gel → metastable zeolite → stable

  18. Acid Sulfate Alteration on Mars

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of mineralogical and geochemical indicators for aqueous alteration on Mars have been identified by a combination of surface and orbital robotic missions, telescopic observations, characterization of Martian meteorites, and laboratory and terrestrial analog studies. Acid sulfate alteration has been identified at all three landing sites visited by NASA rover missions (Spirit, Opportunity, and Curiosity). Spirit landed in Gusev crater in 2004 and discovered Fe-sulfates and materials that have been extensively leached by acid sulfate solutions. Opportunity landing on the plains of Meridiani Planum also in 2004 where the rover encountered large abundances of jarosite and hematite in sedimentary rocks. Curiosity landed in Gale crater in 2012 and has characterized fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments. Jarosite and hematite were discovered in some of the lacustrine sediments. The high elemental abundance of sulfur in surface materials is obvious evidence that sulfate has played a major role in aqueous processes at all landing sites on Mars. The sulfate-rich outcrop at Meridiani Planum has an SO3 content of up to 25 wt.%. The interiors of rocks and outcrops on the Columbia Hills within Gusev crater have up to 8 wt.% SO3. Soils at both sites generally have between 5 to 14 wt.% SO3, and several soils in Gusev crater contain around 30 wt.% SO3. After normalization of major element compositions to a SO3-free basis, the bulk compositions of these materials are basaltic, with a few exceptions in Gusev crater and in lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater. These observations suggest that materials encountered by the rovers were derived from basaltic precursors by acid sulfate alteration under nearly isochemical conditions (i.e., minimal leaching). There are several cases, however, where acid sulfate alteration minerals (jarosite and hematite) formed in open hydrologic systems, e.g., in Gale crater lacustrine mudstones. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the

  19. Coinfection with human herpesvirus 6 variants A and B in lung tissue.

    Cone, R W; Huang, M.L.; Hackman, R C; Corey, L

    1996-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) variant B is frequently identified in peripheral blood, but identification of HHV-6 variant A is relatively rare. We devised a PCR-based method for sensitive, simultaneous detection of both HHV-6 variants. The method was applied to 34 lung tissue specimens that were previously shown to contain HHV-6 DNA. A total of 22 lung tissue samples showed coinfections with HHV-6 variants A and B, 2 had only HHV-6 variant A DNA, and 10 had only HHV-6 variant B DNA. The prevale...

  20. Correlated alteration effects in CM carbonaceous chondrites

    Browning, Lauren B.; McSween, Harry Y., Jr.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1996-07-01

    Three parameters are proposed to determine the relative extent of alteration in CM chondrites. The mineralogic alteration index monitors the relative progress of coupled substitutions in the progressive alteration of cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine and increases with increasing alteration. To calculate values of this index, an algorithm has been developed to estimate the average matrix phyllosilicate composition in individual CM chondrites. The second parameter is the volume percent of isolated matrix silicates, which decreases with progressive alteration due to mineral hydration. Finally, the volume percent of chondrule alteration monitors the extent of chondrule phyllosilicate production and increases as alteration proceeds. These parameters define the first CM alteration scale that relies on multiple indicators of progressive alteration. The following relative order of increasing alteration is established by this model: Murchison ≤ Bells Cochabamba and Boriskino experienced is less precisely constrained, although both fall near the middle of this sequence. A comparison between the mineralogic alteration index and literature values for the whole-rock chemistry of CM chondrites reveals several correlations. A positive, nearly linear correlation between bulk H content and progressive CM alteration suggests an approximately constant production rate of new phyllosilicates relative to the mineralogical transition from cronstedtite to Mg-serpentine. The abundance of trapped planetary 36Ar decreases systematically in progressively altered CM chondrites, suggesting the wholesale destruction of primary noble gas carrier phase (s) by aqueous reactions. Because low temperature fluid-rock reactions are generally associated with large isotopic mass fractionation factors, we also compared our model predictions with δ18O values for bulk CM samples. Although some of these data are poorly resolved, the order of increasing δ18O values approximates the order of increasing

  1. TWO STAGE FRAMEWORK FOR ALTERED FINGERPRINT MATCHING

    T. R. Anoop; M.G. Mini

    2015-01-01

    Fingerprint alteration is the process of masking one’s identity from personal identification systems especially in boarder control security systems. Failure of matching the altered fingerprint of the criminals against the watch list of fingerprints can help them to break the security system. This fact leads to the need of a method for altered fingerprint matching. This paper presents a two stage method for altered fingerprint matching. In first stage, approximated global ridge orientation fie...

  2. Comprehensive genetic testing identifies targetable genomic alterations in most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, single institute investigation

    Won, Brian M.; Patton, Kathryn Alexa; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Hoffman, Philip C.; Hensing, Thomas; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Malik, Renuka; MacMahon, Heber; Mueller, Jeffrey; Simon, Cassie A.; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.; Wigfield, Christopher H.; Ferguson, Mark K.; Husain, Aliya N.; Vokes, Everett E.; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews extensive genetic analysis in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in order to: describe how targetable mutation genes interrelate with the genes identified as variants of unknown significance; assess the percentage of patients with a potentially targetable genetic alterations; evaluate the percentage of patients who had concurrent alterations, previously considered to be mutually exclusive; and characterize the molecular subset of KRAS. Thoracic Oncology Research Program Databases at the University of Chicago provided patient demographics, pathology, and results of genetic testing. 364 patients including 289 adenocarcinoma underwent genotype testing by various platforms such as FoundationOne, Caris Molecular Intelligence, and Response Genetics Inc. For the entire adenocarcinoma cohort, 25% of patients were African Americans; 90% of KRAS mutations were detected in smokers, including current and former smokers; 46% of EGFR and 61% of ALK alterations were detected in never smokers. 99.4% of patients, whose samples were analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS), had genetic alterations identified with an average of 10.8 alterations/tumor throughout different tumor subtypes. However, mutations were not mutually exclusive. NGS in this study identified potentially targetable genetic alterations in the majority of patients tested, detected concurrent alterations and provided information on variants of unknown significance at this time but potentially targetable in the future. PMID:26934441

  3. The Coronary Artery Disease-associated Coding Variant in Zinc Finger C3HC-type Containing 1 (ZC3HC1) Affects Cell Cycle Regulation.

    Jones, Peter D; Kaiser, Michael A; Ghaderi Najafabadi, Maryam; McVey, David G; Beveridge, Allan J; Schofield, Christine L; Samani, Nilesh J; Webb, Tom R

    2016-07-29

    Genome-wide association studies have to date identified multiple coronary artery disease (CAD)-associated loci; however, for most of these loci the mechanism by which they affect CAD risk is unclear. The CAD-associated locus 7q32.2 is unusual in that the lead variant, rs11556924, is not in strong linkage disequilibrium with any other variant and introduces a coding change in ZC3HC1, which encodes NIPA. In this study, we show that rs11556924 polymorphism is associated with lower regulatory phosphorylation of NIPA in the risk variant, resulting in NIPA with higher activity. Using a genome-editing approach we show that this causes an effective decrease in cyclin-B1 stability in the nucleus, thereby slowing its nuclear accumulation. By perturbing the rate of nuclear cyclin-B1 accumulation, rs11556924 alters the regulation of mitotic progression resulting in an extended mitosis. This study shows that the CAD-associated coding polymorphism in ZC3HC1 alters the dynamics of cell-cycle regulation by NIPA. PMID:27226629

  4. Observational consequences of the standard model Higgs inflation variants

    We consider the possibility to observationally differentiate the Standard Model (SM) Higgs driven inflation with non-minimal coupling to gravity from other variants of SM Higgs inflation based on the scalar field theories with non-canonical kinetic term such as Galileon-like kinetic term and kinetic term with non-minimal derivative coupling to the Einstein tensor. In order to ensure consistent results, we study the SM Higgs inflation variants by using the same method, computing the full dynamics of the background and perturbations of the Higgs field during inflation at quantum level. Assuming that all the SM Higgs inflation variants are consistent theories, we use the MCMC technique to derive constraints on the inflationary parameters and the Higgs boson mass from their fit to WMAP7+SN+BAO data set. We conclude that a combination of the SM Higgs mass measurement by the LHC and accurate determination by the PLANCK satellite of the spectral index of curvature perturbations and tensor-to-scalar ratio will enable to distinguish among these models. We also show that the consistency relations of the SM Higgs inflation variants are distinct enough to differentiate among them

  5. The Main Social Variants in the English Language

    QUANHong-mei

    2002-01-01

    To use a language properly, we of course have to know the grammatical structures of the language and their meanings,but we also have to know what forms of language are appropriate for given situations,and for this purpose,this thesis briefly explains the social variants of English,such asl (informal English), (written English)and (American English).

  6. The Main Social Variants in the English Language

    权红梅

    2002-01-01

    To use a language properly, we of course have to know the grammatical structures of the language and their meanings ,but we also have to know what forms of language are appropriate for given situations,and for this purpose,this thesis briefly explains the social variants of English,such as (informal English), (written English)and (American English).

  7. Structure of chymotrypsin variant B from Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Asgeirsson, B; Thórólfsson, M;

    1996-01-01

    The amino-acid sequence of chymotrypsin variant B isolated from the pyloric caeca of Atlantic cod has been elucidated. The characterization of the primary structure is based on N-terminal Edman degradation and mass spectrometry of the native protein and enzymatically derived peptides. Chymotrypsi...

  8. Analysis of Trivium by a Simulated Annealing variant

    Borghoff, Julia; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Matusiewicz, Krystian

    2010-01-01

    characteristic of equation systems that may be efficiently solvable by the means of such algorithms is provided. As an example, we investigate equation systems induced by the problem of recovering the internal state of the stream cipher Trivium. We propose an improved variant of the simulated annealing method...

  9. Host Genetic Variants in the Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C

    Monika Rau

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs are currently replacing antiviral therapy for Hepatitis C infection. Treatment related side effects are even worse and the emergence of resistant viruses must be avoided because of the direct-antiviral action. Altogether it remains a challenge to take treatment decisions in a clinical setting with cost restrictions. Genetic host factors are hereby essential to implement an individualized treatment concept. In recent years results on different genetic variants have been published with a strong association with therapy response, fibrosis and treatment-related side effects. Polymorphisms of the IL28B gene were identified as accurate predictors for therapy response and spontaneous clearance of HCV infection and are already used for diagnostic decisions. For RBV-induced side effects, such as hemolytic anemia, associations to genetic variants of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA were described and different SLC28 transporters for RBV-uptake have been successfully analyzed. Fibrosis progression has been associated with variants of Vitamin D receptor (VDR and ABCB11 (bile salt export pump. Cirrhotic patients especially have a high treatment risk and low therapy response, so that personalized antiviral treatment is mandatory. This review focuses on different host genetic variants in the pathogenesis of Hepatitis C at the beginning of a new area of treatment.

  10. Two new splice variants in porcine PPARGC1A

    Peelman Luc J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A is a coactivator with a vital and central role in fat and energy metabolism. It is considered to be a candidate gene for meat quality in pigs and is involved in the development of obesity and diabetes in humans. How its many functions are regulated, is however still largely unclear. Therefore a transcription profile of PPARGC1A in 32 tissues and 4 embryonic developmental stages in the pig was constructed by screening its cDNA for possible splice variants with exon-spanning primers. Findings This led to the discovery of 2 new splice variants in the pig, which were subsequently also detected in human tissues. In these variants, exon 8 was either completely or partly (the last 66 bp were conserved spliced out, potentially coding for a much shorter protein of respectively 337 and 359 amino acids (aa, of which the first 291 aa would be the same compared to the complete protein (796 aa. Conclusion Considering the functional domains of the PPARGC1A protein, it is very likely these splice variants considerably affect the function of the protein and alternative splicing could be one of the mechanisms by which the diverse functions of PPARGC1A are regulated.

  11. Retracing Atypical Development: A Preserved Speech Variant of Rett Syndrome

    Marschik, Peter B.; Einspieler, Christa; Oberle, Andreas; Laccone, Franco; Prechtl, Heinz F. R.

    2009-01-01

    The subject of the present study is the development of a girl with the preserved speech variant of Rett disorder. Our data are based on detailed retrospective and prospective video analyses. Despite achieving developmental milestones, movement quality was already abnormal during the girl's first half year of life. In addition, early hand…

  12. Protein variants in human cells: enumeration by protein indexing

    In any attempt to construct a catalog of the proteins of a given species, the genetic heterogeneity of natural plant and animal populations makes it necessary to consider variants of each protein. Thus in compiling a Human Protein Index using high resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis as a separating technique, protein variants differing from the wild type by charge or by polypeptide length will be recognized as different and must be accounted for. Results of several recent investigations have argued for average heterozygosities of approximately 1% for human cellular proteins examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis, while the results of classical biochemical genetics lead to higher results. The ability to observe genetic variation in large numbers of proteins can be valuable in several contexts. More than 2000 human genetic diseases have been identified, the vast majority of which have not as yet been associated with a defect in a particular protein. The present study of 63 human fibroblast cell lines was initiated in order to determine the level of genetic variation at many loci and to see whether known genetic diseases were associated with any obvious variant proteins that might be expressed in fibroblasts in culture. The main result is a group of ten new putative variants available in permanent cell lines

  13. Rare variants of cutaneous leishmaniasis presenting as eczematous lesions

    Ayatollahi, Jamshid; Fattahi Bafghi, Ali; Shahcheraghi, Seyed Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous Leishmaniasis may present with clinical presentation such as zosteriform, sporotrichoid and erysipeloid. The eczema variant has rarely been reported. We report a 27- year- old patient with atypical cutaneous leishmaniasis resembling eczema on the hand of a man in Yazd province in the central of Iran.

  14. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  15. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    Stacey, S.N.; Sulem, P.; Masson, G.; Gudjonsson, S.A.; Thorleifsson, G.; Jakobsdottir, M.; Sigurdsson, A.; Gudbjartsson, D.F.; Sigurgeirsson, B.; Benediktsdottir, K.R.; Thorisdottir, K.; Ragnarsson, R.; Scherer, D.; Hemminki, K.; Rudnai, P.; Gurzau, E.; Koppova, K.; Botella-Estrada, R.; Soriano, V.; Juberias, P.; Saez, B.; Gilaberte, Y.; Fuentelsaz, V.; Corredera, C.; Grasa, M.; Hoiom, V.; Lindblom, A.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Rossum, M.M. van; Aben, K.K.H.; Vries, E. de; Santinami, M.; Mauro, M.G. Di; Maurichi, A.; Wendt, J.; Hochleitner, P.; Pehamberger, H.; Gudmundsson, J.; Magnusdottir, D.N.; Gretarsdottir, S.; Holm, H.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Frigge, M.L.; Blondal, T.; Saemundsdottir, J.; Bjarnason, H.; Kristjansson, K.; Bjornsdottir, G.; Okamoto, I.; Rivoltini, L.; Rodolfo, M.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Hansson, J.; Nagore, E.; Mayordomo, J.I.; Kumar, R.; Karagas, M.R.; Nelson, H.H.; Gulcher, J.R.; Rafnar, T.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Olafsson, J.H.; Kong, A.; Stefansson, K.

    2009-01-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A vari

  16. A Variant of Young's Double Slit Experiment for Educational Purposes

    Henault, Francois; Spang, Alain

    2011-01-01

    We describe a variant of the classical Young's double slit experiment that can be easily realized in any classroom, in order to evidence the wave nature of light. The proposed apparatus and its simplified theory are described and pictures of fringes, readily obtained using only cheap and off-the-shelf optical components, are reproduced. The…

  17. Genetic variants regulating immune cell levels in health and disease.

    Orrù, Valeria; Steri, Maristella; Sole, Gabriella; Sidore, Carlo; Virdis, Francesca; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Busonero, Fabio; Mulas, Antonella; Floris, Matteo; Mentzen, Wieslawa I; Urru, Silvana A M; Olla, Stefania; Marongiu, Michele; Piras, Maria G; Lobina, Monia; Maschio, Andrea; Pitzalis, Maristella; Urru, Maria F; Marcelli, Marco; Cusano, Roberto; Deidda, Francesca; Serra, Valentina; Oppo, Manuela; Pilu, Rosella; Reinier, Frederic; Berutti, Riccardo; Pireddu, Luca; Zara, Ilenia; Porcu, Eleonora; Kwong, Alan; Brennan, Christine; Tarrier, Brendan; Lyons, Robert; Kang, Hyun M; Uzzau, Sergio; Atzeni, Rossano; Valentini, Maria; Firinu, Davide; Leoni, Lidia; Rotta, Gianluca; Naitza, Silvia; Angius, Andrea; Congia, Mauro; Whalen, Michael B; Jones, Chris M; Schlessinger, David; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Fiorillo, Edoardo; Sanna, Serena; Cucca, Francesco

    2013-09-26

    The complex network of specialized cells and molecules in the immune system has evolved to defend against pathogens, but inadvertent immune system attacks on "self" result in autoimmune disease. Both genetic regulation of immune cell levels and their relationships with autoimmunity are largely undetermined. Here, we report genetic contributions to quantitative levels of 95 cell types encompassing 272 immune traits, in a cohort of 1,629 individuals from four clustered Sardinian villages. We first estimated trait heritability, showing that it can be substantial, accounting for up to 87% of the variance (mean 41%). Next, by assessing ∼8.2 million variants that we identified and confirmed in an extended set of 2,870 individuals, 23 independent variants at 13 loci associated with at least one trait. Notably, variants at three loci (HLA, IL2RA, and SH2B3/ATXN2) overlap with known autoimmune disease associations. These results connect specific cellular phenotypes to specific genetic variants, helping to explicate their involvement in disease. PMID:24074872

  18. The possible variants for disgusting of unit 'Shelter'

    The free variants of the junction main elements of the closed for gus systems for disgusting from the isolate area is considered. The received quotient solutions is generalized of the line combination exponent functions eλ-it. The model of disgusting in regime of real time is constructed

  19. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  20. Reliability and Validation Study of the Online Instinctual Variant Questionnaire

    Andre, Sherry

    2014-01-01

    Leaders often manage both chaos and diversity. We can improve our leadership effectiveness by better understanding our motives and behaviors, and those of our followers. A potential tool for leadership development is the Instinctual Variant Questionnaire (IVQ). Based on Enneagram theory (pronounced "ANY-a-gram"), this online instrument…

  1. Interaction of human butyrylcholinesterase variants with bambuterol and terbutaline.

    Kovarik, Zrinka; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera

    2004-04-01

    Bambuterol, a dimethylcarbamate, carbamoylates butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8). The carbamoylated enzyme is not very stable and the final product of the two-step hydrolysis is a bronchodilator drug, terbutaline (1-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-t-butylamino-ethanol sulphate). Both bambuterol and terbutaline inhibit BChE, but their affinities differ in human serum BChE variants (U, A, F, K and S) due to their positive charge. Bambuterol inhibition rate constants for the homozygous usual (UU), Kalow (KK), fluoride-resistant (FF) or atypical (AA) variant ranged from 4.4 to 0.085min (-1)microM(-1). Terbutaline showed competitive reversible inhibition for all BChE variants. The dissociation constants for UU, FF and AA homozygotes were 0.18, 0.31 and 3.3 mM, respectively. The inhibition rate or dissociation constants for heterozygotes were distributed between the respective constants for the corresponding homozygotes. A 50-fold difference in inhibition between the UU and AA enzyme might affect terbutaline release in humans. The affinity of all studied BChE variants for terbutaline was low, which suggests that terbutaline originating from bambuterol hydrolysis should not affect the hydrolysis of bambuterol by BChE. PMID:15449725

  2. Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis Differ in Krabbe Disease Variants.

    Spratley, Samantha J; Hill, Chris H; Viuff, Agnete H; Edgar, James R; Skjødt, Karsten; Deane, Janet E

    2016-08-01

    Krabbe disease is a severe, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by defects in the lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase (GALC). The correct targeting of GALC to the lysosome is essential for the degradation of glycosphingolipids including the primary lipid component of myelin. Over 100 different mutations have been identified in GALC that cause Krabbe disease but the mechanisms by which they cause disease remain unclear. We have generated monoclonal antibodies against full-length human GALC and used these to monitor the trafficking and processing of GALC variants in cell-based assays and by immunofluorescence microscopy. Striking differences in the secretion, processing and endosomal targeting of GALC variants allows the classification of these into distinct categories. A subset of GALC variants are not secreted by cells, not proteolytically processed, and remain trapped in the ER; these are likely to cause disease due to protein misfolding and should be targeted for pharmacological chaperone therapies. Other GALC variants can be correctly secreted by cells and cause disease due to catalytic defects in the enzyme active site, inappropriate post-translational modification or a potential inability to bind essential cofactors. The classification of disease pathogenesis presented here provides a molecular framework for appropriate targeting of future Krabbe disease therapies. PMID:27126738

  3. Potential viral pathogenic mechanism for new variant inflammatory bowel disease

    Uhlmann, V; Martin, C. M.; Sheils, O; Pilkington, L; I. Silva; Killalea, A; Murch, S B; Walker-Smith, J; Thomson, M.; Wakefield, A J; O'Leary, J J

    2002-01-01

    Aims: A new form of inflammatory bowel disease (ileocolonic lymphonodular hyperplasia) has been described in a cohort of children with developmental disorder. This study investigates the presence of persistent measles virus in the intestinal tissue of these patients (new variant inflammatory bowel disease) and a series of controls by molecular analysis.

  4. Tafazzin splice variants and mutations in Barth syndrome.

    Kirwin, Susan M; Manolakos, Athena; Barnett, Sarah Swain; Gonzalez, Iris L

    2014-01-01

    Barth syndrome is caused by mutations in the TAZ (tafazzin) gene on human chromosome Xq28. The human tafazzin gene produces four major mRNA splice variants; two of which have been shown to be functional (TAZ lacking exon 5 and full-length) in complementation studies with yeast and Drosophila. This study characterizes the multiple alternative splice variants of TAZ mRNA and their proportions in blood samples from a cohort of individuals with Barth syndrome (BTHS). Because it has been reported that collection and processing methods can affect the expression of various genes, we tested and chose a stabilizing medium for collecting, shipping and processing of the blood samples of these individuals. In both healthy controls and in BTHS individuals, we found a greater variety of alternatively spliced forms than previously described, with a sizeable proportion of minor splice variants besides the four dominant isoforms. Individuals with certain exonic and intronic splice mutations produce additional mutant mRNAs that could be translated into two or more proteins with different amino acid substitutions in a single individual. A fraction of the minor splice variants is predicted to be non-productive. PMID:24342716

  5. Neuropathology in classical and variant ataxia-telangiectasia

    Verhagen, Mijke M. M.; Martin, Jean-Jacques; van Deuren, Marcel; Groote, Chantal Ceuterick-de; Weemaes, Corry M. R.; Kremer, Berry H. P. H.; Taylor, Malcolm A. R.; Willemsen, Michel A. A. P.; Lammens, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is classically characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and elevated a-fetoprotein levels. Some patients, classified as variant A-T, exhibit a milder clinical course. In the latter patients extrapyramidal symptoms, in

  6. Anatomic basis for localized occipital thinning: a normal anatomic variant

    The radiographic evidence presented in this case confirms that the asymptomatic, incidentally found occipital radiolucencies previously described by Keats are not a problem in differential diagnosis of inner table erosion. The entity appears to be a developmental variant with typical features and occurring in a characteristic location

  7. The Four F's of Variant Family Forms and Marriage Styles

    Sussman, Marvin B.

    1975-01-01

    Touches on the "fabulousness, fantasies, fantastics, and fictiveness" of variant family forms and marriage styles. Before the nuclear family structure and monogamous marriage are discarded, have we assessed if the issues related to individual survival, self-actualization, and quality of life are better served with new forms than with the old?…

  8. Interaction between 5 genetic variants and allergy in glioma risk

    Schoemaker, Minouk J; Robertson, Lindsay; Wigertz, Annette;

    2010-01-01

    The etiology of glioma is barely known. Epidemiologic studies have provided evidence for an inverse relation between glioma risk and allergic disease. Genome-wide association data have identified common genetic variants at 5p15.33 (rs2736100, TERT), 8q24.21 (rs4295627, CCDC26), 9p21.3 (rs4977756...

  9. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  10. Maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA variants in familial Parkinson's disease

    Pfeiffer Ronald F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial function is impaired in Parkinson's disease (PD and may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD, but the causes of mitochondrial impairment in PD are unknown. Mitochondrial dysfunction is recapitulated in cell lines expressing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA from PD patients, implicating mtDNA variants or mutations, though the role of mtDNA variants or mutations in PD risk remains unclear. We investigated the potential contribution of mtDNA variants or mutations to the risk of PD. Methods We examined the possibility of a maternal inheritance bias as well as the association between mitochondrial haplogroups and maternal inheritance and disease risk in a case-control study of 168 multiplex PD families in which the proband and one parent were diagnosed with PD. 2-tailed Fisher Exact Tests and McNemar's tests were used to compare allele frequencies, and a t-test to compare ages of onset. Results The frequency of affected mothers of the proband with PD (83/167, 49.4% was not significantly different from the frequency of affected females of the proband generation (115/259, 44.4% (Odds Ratio 1.22; 95%CI 0.83 - 1.81. After correcting for multiple tests, there were no significant differences in the frequencies of mitochondrial haplogroups or of the 10398G complex I gene polymorphism in PD patients compared to controls, and no significant associations with age of onset of PD. Mitochondrial haplogroup and 10398G polymorphism frequencies were similar in probands having an affected father as compared to probands having an affected mother. Conclusions These data fail to demonstrate a bias towards maternal inheritance in familial PD. Consistent with this, we find no association of common haplogroup-defining mtDNA variants or for the 10398G variant with the risk of PD. However, these data do not exclude a role for mtDNA variants in other populations, and it remains possible that other inherited mitochondrial DNA variants, or somatic m

  11. Species-specific activity of HIV-1 Vpu and positive selection of tetherin transmembrane domain variants.

    Matthew W McNatt

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin/BST-2/CD317 is a recently identified antiviral protein that blocks the release of nascent retrovirus, and other virus, particles from infected cells. An HIV-1 accessory protein, Vpu, acts as an antagonist of tetherin. Here, we show that positive selection is evident in primate tetherin sequences and that HIV-1 Vpu appears to have specifically adapted to antagonize variants of tetherin found in humans and chimpanzees. Tetherin variants found in rhesus macaques (rh, African green monkeys (agm and mice were able to inhibit HIV-1 particle release, but were resistant to antagonism by HIV-1 Vpu. Notably, reciprocal exchange of transmembrane domains between human and monkey tetherins conferred sensitivity and resistance to Vpu, identifying this protein domain as a critical determinant of Vpu function. Indeed, differences between hu-tetherin and rh-tetherin at several positions in the transmembrane domain affected sensitivity to antagonism by Vpu. Two alterations in the hu-tetherin transmembrane domain, that correspond to differences found in rh- and agm-tetherin proteins, were sufficient to render hu-tetherin completely resistant to HIV-1 Vpu. Interestingly, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domain sequences in primate tetherins exhibit variation at numerous codons that is likely the result of positive selection, and some of these changes coincide with determinants of HIV-1 Vpu sensitivity. Overall, these data indicate that tetherin could impose a barrier to viral zoonosis as a consequence of positive selection that has been driven by ancient viral antagonists, and that the HIV-1 Vpu protein has specialized to target the transmembrane domains found in human/chimpanzee tetherin proteins.

  12. Catecholaminergic Gene Variants: Contribution in ADHD and Associated Comorbid Attributes in the Eastern Indian Probands

    Paramita Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of genes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD has been explored in various populations, and several genes were speculated to contribute small but additive effects. We have assessed variants in four genes, DDC (rs3837091 and rs3735273, DRD2 (rs1800496, rs1801028, and rs1799732, DRD4 (rs4646984 and rs4646983, and COMT (rs165599 and rs740603 in Indian ADHD subjects with comorbid attributes. Cases were recruited following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV-TR after obtaining informed written consent. DNA isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes of ADHD probands (N=170, their parents (N=310, and ethnically matched controls (n=180 was used for genotyping followed by population- and family-based analyses by the UNPHASED program. DRD4 sites showed significant difference in allelic frequencies by case-control analysis, while DDC and COMT exhibited bias in familial transmission (P<0.05. rs3837091 “AGAG,” rs3735273 “A,” rs1799732 “C,” rs740603 “G,” rs165599 “G” and single repeat alleles of rs4646984/rs4646983 showed positive correlation with co-morbid characteristics (P<0.05. Multi dimensionality reduction analysis of case-control data revealed significant interactive effects of all four genes (P<0.001, while family-based data showed interaction between DDC and DRD2 (P=0.04. This first study on these gene variants in Indo-Caucasoid ADHD probands and associated co-morbid conditions indicates altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in ADHD.

  13. Interleukin 1B Variant -1473G/C (rs1143623) Influences Triglyceride and Interleukin 6 Metabolism

    Delgado-Lista, Javier; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Solivera, Juan; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M.; Fuentes, Francisco; Parnell, Laurence D.; Shen, Jian; Gomez, Purificacion; Jimenez-Gomez, Yolanda; Gomez-Luna, Maria J.; Marin, Carmen; Belisle, Sarah E.; Rodriguez-Cantalejo, Fernando; Meydani, Simin N.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Context: IL1b (IL1B or IL1β), a key modulator of the immune response, exerts its functions mainly via IL6 regulation. Fatty meals cause transient hypertriglyceridemia and are considered to be proinflammatory, but the extent of these responses shows high interindividual susceptibility. Objective: We evaluated the influence of a genetic variant located in the promoter region of IL1B (-1473G/C) on fasting and postprandial lipids and IL6. Design, Setting, and Participants: A total of 477 people over age 65 yr were genotyped for IL1B -1473G/C, and we evaluated fasting lipids depending on genotype. Then, 88 healthy young men were also genotyped and were fed a saturated fatty acid-rich meal. Serial blood samples were drawn for 11 h after the meal, and lipid fractions and IL6 were assayed. Main Outcome and Interventions: Fasting lipids were studied in the aged persons. Fasting and postprandial measurements of lipids and IL6 were performed in the healthy young men. Results: In the aged persons, CC subjects (minor allele homozygotes) showed higher triglyceride (P = 0.002) and cholesterol (P = 0.011) levels. Healthy young male carriers of the minor C allele showed higher postprandial triglycerides (P = 0.037), and those carried into large triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (P = 0.004). In addition, they showed higher postprandial IL6 concentrations (P = 0.008). Conclusions: Our work shows that inflammatory genes may regulate fasting and postprandial lipids because the carriers of the minor allele of an IL gene variant have altered lipid metabolism. To reinforce these gene-phenotype findings, IL6 (the natural effector of IL1B) was increased in these persons. PMID:21307135

  14. A novel signal transduction protein P(II) variant from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 indicates a two-step process for NAGK-P(II) complex formation.

    Fokina, Oleksandra; Chellamuthu, Vasuki-Ranjani; Zeth, Kornelius; Forchhammer, Karl

    2010-06-11

    P(II) signal transduction proteins are highly conserved in bacteria, archaea and plants and have key functions in coordination of central metabolism by integrating signals from the carbon, nitrogen and energy status of the cell. In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, P(II) binds ATP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) in a synergistic manner, with the ATP binding sites also accepting ADP. Depending on its effector molecule binding status, P(II) (from this cyanobacterium and other oxygenic phototrophs) complexes and regulates the arginine-controlled enzyme of the cyclic ornithine pathway, N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase (NAGK), to control arginine biosynthesis. To gain deeper insights into the process of P(II) binding to NAGK, we searched for P(II) variants with altered binding characteristics and found P(II) variants I86N and I86T to be able to bind to an NAGK variant (R233A) that was previously shown to be unable to bind wild-type P(II) protein. Analysis of interactions between these P(II) variants and wild-type NAGK as well as with the NAGK R233A variant suggested that the P(II) I86N variant was a superactive NAGK binder. To reveal the structural basis of this property, we solved the crystal structure of the P(II) I86N variant at atomic resolution. The large T-loop, which prevails in most receptor interactions of P(II) proteins, is present in a tightly bended conformation that mimics the T-loop of S. elongatus P(II) after having latched onto NAGK. Moreover, both P(II) I86 variants display a specific defect in 2-OG binding, implying a role of residue I86 in 2-OG binding. We propose a two-step model for the mechanism of P(II)-NAGK complex formation: in an initiating step, a contact between R233 of NAGK and E85 of P(II) initiates the bending of the extended T-loop of P(II), followed by a second step, where a bended T-loop deeply inserts into the NAGK clefts to form the tight complex. PMID:20399792

  15. Phenotypically distinct subtypes of psychosis accompany novel or rare variants in four different signaling genes

    Kranz, Thorsten M.; Berns, Adam; Shields, Jerry; Rothman, Karen; Walsh-Messinger, Julie; Goetz, Raymond R.; Chao, Moses V.; Malaspina, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Background Rare gene variants are important sources of schizophrenia vulnerability that likely interact with polygenic susceptibility loci. This study examined if novel or rare missense coding variants in any of four different signaling genes in sporadic schizophrenia cases were associated with clinical phenotypes in an exceptionally well-characterized sample. Method Structured interviews, cognition, symptoms and life course features were assessed in 48 ethnically-diverse cases with psychosis who underwent targeted exome sequencing of PTPRG (Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase, Receptor Type G), SLC39A13 (Solute Carrier Family 39 (Zinc Transporter) Member 13), TGM5 (transglutaminase 5) and ARMS/KIDINS220 (Ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning protein or Kinase D-Interacting Substrate of 220 kDa). Cases harboring rare missense coding polymorphisms or novel mutations in one or more of these genes were compared to other cases not carrying any rare missense coding polymorphisms or novel mutations in these genes and healthy controls. Findings Fifteen of 48 cases (31.25%) carried rare or novel missense coding variants in one or more of these genes. The subgroups significantly differed in important features, including specific working memory deficits for PTPRG (n = 5); severe negative symptoms, global cognitive deficits and poor educational attainment, suggesting a developmental disorder, for SLC39A13 (n = 4); slow processing speed, childhood attention deficit disorder and milder symptoms for TGM5 (n = 4); and global cognitive deficits with good educational attainment suggesting neurodegeneration for ARMS/KIDINS220 (n = 5). Case vignettes are included in the appendix. Interpretation Genes prone to missense coding polymorphisms and/or mutations in sporadic cases may highlight influential genes for psychosis and illuminate heterogeneous pathways to schizophrenia. Ethnicity appears less important at the level of genetic variability. The sequence variations that potentially

  16. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variants in epithelial ovarian tumor subtypes and stages

    Aikhionbare Felix O

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A majority of primary ovarian neoplasms arise from cell surface epithelium of the ovaries. Although old age and a positive family history are associated risk factors, the etiology of the epithelial ovarian tumors is not completely understood. Additionally, knowledge of factors involved in the histogenesis of the various subtypes of this tumor as well as those factors that promote progression to advanced stages of ovarian malignancy are largely unknown. Current evidence suggests that mitochondrial alterations involved in cellular signaling pathways may be associated with tumorigenesis. Methods In this study, we determined the presence of polymorphisms and other sequence variants of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in 102 epithelial ovarian tumors including 10 matched normal tissues that paired with some of the tumors. High-resolution restriction endonucleases and PCR-based sequencing were used to assess the mtDNA variants spanning 3.3 kb fragment that comprised the D-Loop and 12S rRNA-tRNAphe, tRNAval, tRNAser, tRNAasp, tRNAlys, ATPase 6, ATPase 8, cytochrome oxidase I and II genes. Results Three hundred and fifty-two (352 mtDNA sequence variants were identified, of which 238 of 352 (68% have not been previously reported. There were relatively high frequencies of three mutations in the 12S rRNA gene at np 772, 773, and 780 in stage IIIC endometrioid tumors, two of which are novel (773delT and 780delC, and occurred with a frequency of 100% (7/7. Furthermore, two mutations were observed in serous tumors only at np 1657 in stage IV (10/10, and at np 8221delA in benign cystadenomas (3/3 and borderline tumors (4/4. A high frequency, 81% (13/16 of TC insertion at np 310 was found only in early stages of serous subtype (benign cystadenomas, 3/3; borderline tumors, 4/4; stage I tumors, 2/5 and matched normal tissues 4/4. Conclusion Our findings indicate that certain mtDNA mutations can reliably distinguish the different histologic subtypes of

  17. Association of common ATM variants with familial breast cancer in a South American population

    The ATM gene has been frequently involved in hereditary breast cancer as a low-penetrance susceptibility gene but evidence regarding the role of ATM as a breast cancer susceptibility gene has been contradictory. In this study, a full mutation analysis of the ATM gene was carried out in patients from 137 Chilean breast cancer families, of which 126 were BRCA1/2 negatives and 11 BRCA1/2 positives. We further perform a case-control study between the subgroup of 126 cases BRCA1/2 negatives and 200 controls for the 5557G>A missense variant and the IVS38-8T>C and the IVS24-9delT polymorphisms. In the full mutation analysis we detected two missense variants and eight intronic polymorphisms. Carriers of the variant IVS24-9delT, or IVS38-8T>C, or 5557G>A showed an increase in breast cancer risk. The higher significance was observed in the carriers of IVS38-8T>C (OR = 3.09 [95%CI 1.11–8.59], p = 0.024). The IVS24-9 T/(-T), IVS38-8 T/C, 5557 G/A composite genotype confered a 3.19 fold increase in breast cancer risk (OR = 3.19 [95%CI 1.16–8.89], p = 0.021). The haplotype estimation suggested a strong linkage disequilibrium between the three markers (D' = 1). We detected only three haplotypes in the cases and control samples, some of these may be founder haplotypes in the Chilean population. The IVS24-9 T/(-T), IVS38-8 T/C, 5557 G/A composite genotype alone or in combination with certain genetic background and/or environmental factors, could modify the cancer risk by increasing genetic inestability or by altering the effect of the normal DNA damage response

  18. VPA: an R tool for analyzing sequencing variants with user-specified frequency pattern

    Hu Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The massive amounts of genetic variant generated by the next generation sequencing systems demand the development of effective computational tools for variant prioritization. Findings VPA (Variant Pattern Analyzer is an R tool for prioritizing variants with specified frequency pattern from multiple study subjects in next-generation sequencing study. The tool starts from individual files of variant and sequence calls and extract variants with user-specified frequency pattern across the study subjects of interest. Several position level quality criteria can be incorporated into the variant extraction. It can be used in studies with matched pair design as well as studies with multiple groups of subjects. Conclusions VPA can be used as an automatic pipeline to prioritize variants for further functional exploration and hypothesis generation. The package is implemented in the R language and is freely available from http://vpa.r-forge.r-project.org.

  19. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  20. Genetic alterations in pancreatic cancer

    Muhammad Wasif Saif; Lena Karapanagiotou; Kostas Syrigos

    2007-01-01

    The diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating for patients and their relatives as the incidence rate is approximately the same as mortality rate. Only a small percentage, which ranges from 0.4% to 4% of patients who have been given this diagnosis, will be alive at five years. At the time of diagnosis, 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have unresectable or metastatic disease.Moreover, the therapeutic alternatives offered by chemotherapy or radiotherapy are few, if not zero. For all these reasons, there is an imperative need of analyzing and understanding the primitive lesions that lead to invasive pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Molecular pathology of these lesions is the key of our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of this cancer and will probably help us in earlier diagnosis and better therapeutic results. This review focuses on medical research on pancreatic cancer models and the underlying genetic alterations.

  1. Epigenetic alterations underlying autoimmune diseases.

    Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Karami, Jafar; Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza; Malekshahi, Zahra; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-03-01

    Recent breakthroughs in genetic explorations have extended our understanding through discovery of genetic patterns subjected to autoimmune diseases (AID). Genetics, on the contrary, has not answered all the conundrums to describe a comprehensive explanation of causal mechanisms of disease etiopathology with regard to the function of environment, sex, or aging. The other side of the coin, epigenetics which is defined by gene manifestation modification without DNA sequence alteration, reportedly has come in to provide new insights towards disease apprehension through bridging the genetics and environmental factors. New investigations in genetic and environmental contributing factors for autoimmunity provide new explanation whereby the interactions between genetic elements and epigenetic modifications signed by environmental agents may be responsible for autoimmune disease initiation and perpetuation. It is aimed through this article to review recent progress attempting to reveal how epigenetics associates with the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26761426

  2. Alteration of the Donor/Acceptor Spectrum of the (S-Amine Transaminase from Vibrio fluvialis

    Maika Genz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To alter the amine donor/acceptor spectrum of an (S-selective amine transaminase (ATA, a library based on the Vibrio fluvialis ATA targeting four residues close to the active site (L56, W57, R415 and L417 was created. A 3DM-derived alignment comprising fold class I pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP-dependent enzymes allowed identification of positions, which were assumed to determine substrate specificity. These positions were targeted for mutagenesis with a focused alphabet of hydrophobic amino acids to convert an amine:α-keto acid transferase into an amine:aldehyde transferase. Screening of 1200 variants revealed three hits, which showed a shifted amine donor/acceptor spectrum towards aliphatic aldehydes (mainly pentanal, as well as an altered pH profile. Interestingly, all three hits, although found independently, contained the same mutation R415L and additional W57F and L417V substitutions.

  3. Drug hypersensitivity caused by alteration of the MHC-presented self-peptide repertoire

    Ostrov, David A; Grant, Barry J; Pompeu, Yuri A;

    2012-01-01

    studies have identified strong linkages between drug hypersensitivity reactions to several drugs and specific HLA alleles. One of the strongest such genetic associations found has been for the antiviral drug abacavir, which causes severe adverse reactions exclusively in patients expressing the HLA...... molecular variant B*57:01. Abacavir adverse reactions were recently shown to be driven by drug-specific activation of cytokine-producing, cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells that required HLA-B*57:01 molecules for their function; however, the mechanism by which abacavir induces this pathologic T-cell response remains...... unclear. Here we show that abacavir can bind within the F pocket of the peptide-binding groove of HLA-B*57:01, thereby altering its specificity. This provides an explanation for HLA-linked idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions, namely that drugs can alter the repertoire of self-peptides presented to T...

  4. Family- and population-based designs identify different rare causal variants

    Zhang Xue; He Hua; Ding Lili; Baye Tesfaye M; Kurowski Brad G; Martin Lisa J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Both family- and population-based samples are used to identify genetic variants associated with phenotypes. Each strategy has demonstrated advantages, but their ability to identify rare variants and genes containing rare variants is unclear. To compare these two study designs in the identification of rare causal variants, we applied various methods to the population- and family-based data simulated by the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 with knowledge of the simulated model. Our results...

  5. Effect of population stratification analysis on false-positive rates for common and rare variants

    He Hua; Zhang Xue; Ding Lili; Baye Tesfaye M; Kurowski Brad G; Martin Lisa J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Principal components analysis (PCA) has been successfully used to correct for population stratification in genome-wide association studies of common variants. However, rare variants also have a role in common disease etiology. Whether PCA successfully controls population stratification for rare variants has not been addressed. Thus we evaluate the effect of population stratification analysis on false-positive rates for common and rare variants at the single-nucleotide polymorphism (S...

  6. New variants of alpha 1-antitrypsin: comparison of Pi typing techniques.

    Cox, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    Four new rare inherited variants (Pi types) of alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-protease inhibitor) are described. Each variant has been compared with previously reported genetic variants by several techniques used for Pi typing: isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gel, starch gel electrophoresis, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Some variants are identical or very similar by one technique but can be clearly distinguished by another technique. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis and gel immunofixati...

  7. Classifying MLH1 and MSH2 variants using bioinformatic prediction, splicing assays, segregation and tumor characteristics

    Arnold, Sven; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Barker, Melissa; Jaskowski, Lesley; Walsh, Michael D.; Birney, Genevieve; Woods, Michael O.; Hopper, John L.; Jenkins, Mark A; Brown, Melissa A.; Sean V Tavtigian; Goldgar, David E.; Young, Joanne P; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2009-01-01

    Reliable methods for predicting functional consequences of variants in disease genes would be beneficial in the clinical setting. This study was undertaken to predict, and confirm in vitro, splicing aberrations associated with mismatch repair (MMR) variants identified in familial colon cancer patients. Six programs were used to predict the effect of 13 MLH1 and 6 MSH2 gene variants on pre-mRNA splicing. mRNA from cycloheximide-treated lymphoblastoid cell lines of variant carriers was screened...

  8. A rare sequence variant in intron 1 of THAP1 is associated with primary dystonia

    Vemula, Satya R.; Xiao, Jianfeng; ZHAO Yu; Bastian, Robert W; Perlmutter, Joel. S.; Racette, Brad A.; Paniello, Randal C; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Uitti, Ryan J.; Van Gerpen, Jay A.; Hedera, Peter; Truong, Daniel D.; Blitzer, Andrew; Rudzińska, Monika; Momčilović, Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Although coding variants in THAP1 have been causally associated with primary dystonia, the contribution of noncoding variants remains uncertain. Herein, we examine a previously identified Intron 1 variant (c.71+9C>A, rs200209986). Among 1672 subjects with mainly adult-onset primary dystonia, 12 harbored the variant in contrast to 1/1574 controls (P < 0.01). Dystonia classification included cervical dystonia (N = 3), laryngeal dystonia (adductor subtype, N = 3), jaw-opening oromandibular dysto...

  9. rVarBase: an updated database for regulatory features of human variants

    Guo, Liyuan; Du, Yang; Qu, Susu; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    We present here the rVarBase database (http://rv.psych.ac.cn), an updated version of the rSNPBase database, to provide reliable and detailed regulatory annotations for known and novel human variants. This update expands the database to include additional types of human variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and novel variants, and include additional types of regulatory features. Now rVarBase annotates variants in three dimensions: chromatin states of the surrounding regions, overlapp...

  10. Dominance of variant A in Human Herpesvirus 6 viraemia after renal transplantation

    Csoma Eszter; Mészáros Beáta (1985-) (molekuláris biológus, mikrobiológus); Gáll Tamás (1982-) (molekuláris biológus, mikrobiológus); Asztalos László; Kónya József (1964-) (szakorvos, klinikai mikrobiológus); Gergely Lajos (1965-) (belgyógyász, haematológus)

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6), mostly variant B reactivation in renal transplant patients has been published by other authors, but the pathogenetic role of HHV-6 variant A has not been clarified. Our aims were to examine the prevalence of HHV-6, to determine the variants, and to investigate the interaction between HHV-6 viraemia, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection and clinical symptoms. Methods Variant-specific HHV-6 nested PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to...

  11. Variant-Specific Tropism of Human Herpesvirus 6 in Human Astrocytes

    Donati, Donatella; Martinelli, Elena; Cassiani-Ingoni, Riccardo; Ahlqvist, Jenny; Hou, Jean; Major, Eugene O.; Jacobson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Though first described as a lymphotropic virus, human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is highly neuropathogenic. Two viral variants are known: HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Both variants can infect glial cells and have been differentially associated with central nervous system diseases, suggesting an HHV-6 variant-specific tropism for glial cell subtypes. We have performed infections with both viral variants in human progenitor-derived astrocytes (HPDA) and monitored infected cell cultures for cytopathic effect (...

  12. Segregation of naturally occurring mitochondrial DNA variants in a mini-pig model

    Within cells and tissues, the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is present in multimeric form and can harbour naturally occurring variants. Whilst high variant load can cause mitochondrial disease, naturally occurring mtDNA variants likely persist at low levels across generations of ...

  13. Choosing variants of pragmatic argumentation in anticipation of countermoves in health brochures

    L. van Poppel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I will determine the strategic function of the use of four variants of pragmatic argumentation in the context of advisory health brochures. I argue that each variant functions as a strategic manoeuvre that deals with potential countermoves: with variant I and II writers can address an

  14. A framework for the definition of variants of high-level Petri nets

    Kindler, Ekkart; Petrucci, Laure

    2009-01-01

    There exist many different variants of high-level Petri nets. Many differences between these variants, however, do not concern the features of the particular versions of Petri nets, but they concern the data types that can be defined and used in the different variants of high-level nets. One famous...

  15. An atlas of normal roentgen variants that may stimulate disease. Third ed

    Over 2,900 detailed photographs lead through this reference on variants, cross referenced to facilitate recognition. The new third edition introduces over 600 newly-documented variants in both adult and children. A reference list and arrangement by anatomic area make this diagnostic reference a useful book. Encompassing both soft tissues and bone, the new edition features a large section on musculoskeletal variants

  16. A Genetic Biomarker of Oxidative Stress, the Paraoxonase-1 Q192R Gene Variant, Associates with Cardiomyopathy in CKD: A Longitudinal Study

    E. Dounousi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of CKD and this alteration is strongly implicated in LV hypertrophy and in LV dysfunction. Methods and Patients. We resorted to the strongest genetic biomarker of paraoxonase-1 (PON1 activity, the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene, to unbiasedly assess (Mendelian randomization the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of this gene-variant with LV mass and function in 206 CKD patients with a 3-year follow-up. Results. The R allele of Q192R polymorphism associated with oxidative stress as assessed by plasma 8-isoPGF2α (P=0.03 and was dose-dependently related in a direct fashion to LVMI (QQ: 131.4 ± 42.6 g/m2; RQ: 147.7 ± 51.1 g/m2; RR: 167.3 ± 41.9 g/m2; P=0.001 and in an inverse fashion to systolic function (LV Ejection Fraction (QQ: 79 ± 12%; RQ: 69 ± 9%; RR: 65 ± 10% P=0.002. On longitudinal observation, this gene variant associated with the evolution of the same echocardiographic indicators [LVMI: 13.40 g/m2 per risk allele, P=0.005; LVEF: −2.96% per risk allele, P=0.001]. Multivariate analyses did not modify these associations. Conclusion. In CKD patients, the R allele of the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene is dose-dependently related to the severity of LVH and LV dysfunction and associates with the longitudinal evolution of these cardiac alterations. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that oxidative stress is implicated in cardiomyopathy in CKD patients.

  17. A Genetic Biomarker of Oxidative Stress, the Paraoxonase-1 Q192R Gene Variant, Associates with Cardiomyopathy in CKD: A Longitudinal Study

    Bouba, I.; Spoto, B.; Pappas, K.; Tripepi, G.; Georgiou, I.; Tselepis, A.; Elisaf, M.; Tsakiris, D.; Zoccali, C.; Siamopoulos, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Oxidative stress is a hallmark of CKD and this alteration is strongly implicated in LV hypertrophy and in LV dysfunction. Methods and Patients. We resorted to the strongest genetic biomarker of paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene, to unbiasedly assess (Mendelian randomization) the cross-sectional and longitudinal association of this gene-variant with LV mass and function in 206 CKD patients with a 3-year follow-up. Results. The R allele of Q192R polymorphism associated with oxidative stress as assessed by plasma 8-isoPGF2α (P = 0.03) and was dose-dependently related in a direct fashion to LVMI (QQ: 131.4 ± 42.6 g/m2; RQ: 147.7 ± 51.1 g/m2; RR: 167.3 ± 41.9 g/m2; P = 0.001) and in an inverse fashion to systolic function (LV Ejection Fraction) (QQ: 79 ± 12%; RQ: 69 ± 9%; RR: 65 ± 10% P = 0.002). On longitudinal observation, this gene variant associated with the evolution of the same echocardiographic indicators [LVMI: 13.40 g/m2 per risk allele, P = 0.005; LVEF: −2.96% per risk allele, P = 0.001]. Multivariate analyses did not modify these associations. Conclusion. In CKD patients, the R allele of the Q192R variant in the PON1 gene is dose-dependently related to the severity of LVH and LV dysfunction and associates with the longitudinal evolution of these cardiac alterations. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that oxidative stress is implicated in cardiomyopathy in CKD patients.

  18. PET/TAC: Basic principles, physiological variants and artifacts

    This presentation is about the basic principles, physiologic variants and devices that work in the PET/TAC technique. Next the conclusions obtained in the same one are presented: For a correct evaluation of the PET/TAC images with FDG is necessary the knowledge of the image acquisition technique, as well as of the physiologic distribution of the FDG, variants of the normality, benign causes of captation and more frequent devices. The introduction of this hybrid procedure allows the correct anatomical localization and identification of the deposits of FDG largely avoiding false or doubtful interpretations, but it can also originate not specific devices existent in the conventional PET. The previous knowledge of the possible devices will make possible in certain cases its elimination and in other its identification avoiding incorrect interpretations. (Author)

  19. A Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: forensic implication.

    Rizzo, M; Bruni, A; Barberio, C; Magro, G; Foncin, J F

    2004-12-01

    To investigate whether typical clinical, diagnostic and neuropathological findings can be identified in a patient with a postmortem diagnosis of a Heidenhain variant of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). We report a new case of CJD in a rare variant. A man admitted to hospital with cefalea and vision disorder. Clinical and neurological examination showed headache, vision reduction, psychomotor anxiety and progressive torpor. The patient died 4 h after admission to hospital. The autopsy findings included marked encephalic vascular congestion. Hystoneurology examination showed no macroscopic anomaly. Microscopy findings included neuronal loss, gliosis in striate area with arachnoid cells and cerebellum microspongiosis. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is a rare neurodegenerative human disorder. The prion hypothesis as an explanatory model is currently favoured by majority of researchers. A disease course described by Heidenhain including the leading symptoms of a visual disorder and rapid progression. This report emphasize the multidisciplinary role (forensic, neurogenetic and neurohistologic) for diagnosis and to standardize a protocol to investigate. PMID:15639587

  20. Anatomical variants of surgical interest in inner ear pathology

    The study of the temporal bone by means of high-resolution computed tomography has had a great impact on the medical and surgical management of patients with middle ear pathology. In addition to making it possible to evaluate the disorder and determine its extension, ct aids in demonstrating the existence of morphological variants that can make the surgical approach enormously difficult. The operative knowledge of these variants allows the ear specialist to choose the most suitable surgical approach in each case (endaural, retro auricular mastoid or modifications of these strategies) and foresee the technical difficulties associated with the changes. We have considered the presence of lateral sinus procidentia, dehiscence or elevation of the jugular bulb, descent of the dura mater the middle cranial fossa and changes in the paths of the carotid artery and the facial nerve to be of surgical interest. (Author) 8 refs

  1. 'Variant' angina: Evidence for small vessel coronary artery spasm

    A unique case of 'variant' angina pectoris has been observed in a patient with normal coronary arteries and typical chest pain appearing spontaneously at rest, and repeatedly provoked by ergonovine maleate (0.1 mg iv) associated with large transmural perfusion defects on 201TI-imaging (after ergonovine) and a marked increase in T wave voltage despite no demonstrable spasm of a major coronary artery after the same doses of ergonovine. While saline solution could not provoke chest pain and treatment with a beta-blocking agent increased the frequency of ischemic attacks, a calcium antangonist therapy reduced and eventually eliminated the attacks. Thus, this case provides evidence for yet another aspect of a 'variant' form of angina pectoris: small vessel coronary artery spasm. (orig.)

  2. Intergenic spacer length variants in Old Portuguese bread wheat cultivars

    Ana Carvalho; Henrique Guedes-Pinto; José Lima-Brito

    2011-08-01

    The intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA is highly variable, but is location specific in the nucleolar organizer region of the chromosomes. This study provides an event of high level of polymorphism / size variation and occurrence of 14 unique phenotypes in 48 landraces of Portuguese bread wheat cultivars for IGS-amplified products obtained by PCR-RFLP technique performed with TaqI. The attendant IGS polymorphism has been used to deduce affinities between landraces. Some of the high molecular weight IGS allelic variants were also probed for their chromosomal localization by sequential silver nitrate staining and fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, only the intergenic spacer allelic variant of 3.1 kb could be successfully hybridized, and was observed to be physically located on the chromosome pair 1B in the NOR loci of the cultivar ‘Magueija’.

  3. Phosphorylation of histone variant regions in chromatin: unlocking the linker?

    Green, G R

    2001-01-01

    Histone variants illuminate the behavior of chromatin through their unique structures and patterns of postsynthetic modification. This review examines the literature on heteromorphous histone structures in chromatin, structures that are primary targets for histone kinases and phosphatases in vivo. Special attention is paid to certain well-studied experimental systems: mammalian culture cells, chicken erythrocytes, sea urchin sperm, wheat sprouts, Tetrahymena, and budding yeast. A common theme emerges from these studies. Specialized, highly basic structures in histone variants promote chromatin condensation in a variety of developmental situations. Before, and sometimes after condensed chromatin is formed, the chromatin is rendered soluble by phosphorylation of the heteromorphous regions, preventing their interaction with linker DNA. A simple structural model accounting for histone variation and phosphorylation is presented. PMID:11467741

  4. Variants of ICE-technique with reduced of numerical damping

    The ICE-(Implicit-Continuous-Eulerian)technique is a widespread numerical method for solving flow-problems. This method has many advantages but suffers on strong numerical damping. Here some variants of this technique are investigated in order to find a stable variant with as least damping as possible. For testing we used a one-dimensional (1D) problem (shock tube) and two two-dimendional (2D) problems (shallow water flow, backward facing step). The calculations show that in may cases the numerical results of ICE are improved by a lower dergree of implicitness of the finite difference equations. The use of central differences instead of onesided upwind differences is generally not advisable because then the scheme is less stable. (orig.)

  5. A Survey: variants of TCP in Ad-hoc networks

    Komal Zaman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MANET (Mobile Ad-hoc network forms a temporary network of wireless mobile nodes without any infrastructure where all nodes are allowed to move freely, configure themselves and interconnect with its neighbors to perform peer to peer communication and transmission. TCP (Transmission Control Protocol offers reliable, oriented connection and mechanism of end to end delivery. This article provides the review and comparison of existing variants of TCP for instance: The TCP Tahoe, The TCP Reno, The TCP New Reno, The Lite, The Sack, The TCP Vegas, Westwood and The TCP Fack. TCP’s performance depends on the type of its variants due to missing of congestion control or improper activation procedures such as Slow Start, Fast Retransmission, and Congestion Avoidance, Retransmission, Fast Recovery, Selective Acknowledgement mechanism and Congestion Control. This analysis is essential to be aware about a better TCP implementation for a specific scenario and then nominated a suitable one.

  6. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma

    Stacey, Simon N.; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Daniel F Gudbjartsson; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R.; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC)1, we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 × 10−9). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 × 10−9), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 × 10−10...

  7. Classification of normal labral variants and labral injuries

    The glenoid labrum is an important stabilizer of the glenohumeral joint. Labral injuries affect the stability of the shoulder joint to varying degrees depending on the localization, the extension and the structures involved. Because of the complex anatomy and the high variability of the glenoid labrum, in-depth knowledge concerning normal variations and labral injury patterns is required as well as high-resolution imaging with intra-articular contrast in order to discriminate anatomical variants from pathological findings. Therefore, magnetic resonance (MR) and alternatively computed tomography (CT) arthrography have become established as the imaging methods of choice. In this review MR arthrographic findings of normal labral variants and different labral injury patterns are portrayed. (orig.)

  8. A new hypercube variant: Fractal Cubic Network Graph

    Ali Karci

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypercube is a popular and more attractive interconnection networks. The attractive properties of hypercube caused the derivation of more variants of hypercube. In this paper, we have proposed two variants of hypercube which was called as “Fractal Cubic Network Graphs”, and we have investigated the Hamiltonian-like properties of Fractal Cubic Network Graphs FCNGr(n. Firstly, Fractal Cubic Network Graphs FCNGr(n are defined by a fractal structure. Further, we show the construction and characteristics analyses of FCNGr(n where r=1 or r=2. Therefore, FCNGr(n is a Hamiltonian graph which is obtained by using Gray Code for r=2 and FCNG1(n is not a Hamiltonian Graph. Furthermore, we have obtained a recursive algorithm which is used to label the nodes of FCNG2(n. Finally, we get routing algorithms on FCNG2(n by utilizing routing algorithms on the hypercubes.

  9. Intervention of martensite variants on the spatial aspect of microvoids

    Das, Arpan

    2016-06-01

    The spatial aspect of microvoids’ distribution at different strained austenite grains has been investigated through strain rate variation during tensile deformation of metastable austenitic stainless steel at ambient temperature. Ductile fracture micromechanisms of metastable austenite have been investigated through direct measurements of void density, its fraction and their distribution at various levels of stresses/strains for all strain rates. The nature of the distribution of microvoids’ fraction closely corresponds to the local stress-state and strain-state variation and hence is strongly attributed to the crystallographic variant selection of martensite and their spatial nature of distribution. The direct intervention of martensite variants has been looked into for influencing void nucleation, growth and coalescence under tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel.

  10. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    V. Yu. Zimina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients with some phenocopies concentric left ventricular hypertrophy can transform into its dilatation with reduced contractility. Such variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is presented in the first clinical observation. The second case shows that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be one of the symptoms of the disease with other reasons for poor outcome.

  11. Characterization of a Mycobacterium intracellulare Variant Strain by Molecular Techniques

    Menendez, M. C.; Palenque, E.; Navarro, M. C.; Nuñez, M. C.; Rebollo, M. J.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Mycobacterium intracellulare variant strain causing an unusual infection. Several isolates obtained from an immunocompromised patient were identified as members of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) by the commercial AccuProbe system and biochemical standard identification. Further molecular approaches were undertaken for a more accurate characterization of the bacteria. Up to seven different genomic sequences were analyzed, ranging from conserved mycobacterial genes such as 16S ribosomal DNA to MAC-specific genes such as mig (macrophage-induced gene). The results obtained identify the isolates as a variant of M. intracellulare, an example of the internal variability described for members of the MAC, particularly within that species. The application of other molecular approaches is recommended for more accurate identification of bacteria described as MAC members. PMID:11724827

  12. Complementation of the Function of Glycoprotein H of Human Herpesvirus 6 Variant A by Glycoprotein H of Variant B in the Virus Life Cycle

    Oyaizu, Hiroko; Tang, Huamin; Ota, Megumi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ozono, Keiichi; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2012-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a T-cell-tropic betaherpesvirus. HHV-6 can be classified into two variants, HHV-6 variant A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B, based on genetic, antigenic, and cell tropisms, although the homology of their entire genomic sequences is nearly 90%. The HHV-6A glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 is a viral ligand that binds to the cellular receptor human CD46. Because gH has 94.3% amino acid identity between the variants, here we examined whether gH from one variant could compleme...

  13. Reciprocal white matter alterations due to 16p11.2 chromosomal deletions versus duplications.

    Chang, Yi Shin; Owen, Julia P; Pojman, Nicholas J; Thieu, Tony; Bukshpun, Polina; Wakahiro, Mari L J; Marco, Elysa J; Berman, Jeffrey I; Spiro, John E; Chung, Wendy K; Buckner, Randy L; Roberts, Timothy P L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Sherr, Elliott H; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2016-08-01

    Copy number variants at the 16p11.2 chromosomal locus are associated with several neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and speech and language disorders. A gene dosage dependence has been suggested, with 16p11.2 deletion carriers demonstrating higher body mass index and head circumference, and 16p11.2 duplication carriers demonstrating lower body mass index and head circumference. Here, we use diffusion tensor imaging to elucidate this reciprocal relationship in white matter organization, showing widespread increases of fractional anisotropy throughout the supratentorial white matter in pediatric deletion carriers and, in contrast, extensive decreases of white matter fractional anisotropy in pediatric and adult duplication carriers. We find associations of these white matter alterations with cognitive and behavioral impairments. We further demonstrate the value of imaging metrics for characterizing the copy number variant phenotype by employing linear discriminant analysis to predict the gene dosage status of the study subjects. These results show an effect of 16p11.2 gene dosage on white matter microstructure, and further suggest that opposite changes in diffusion tensor imaging metrics can lead to similar cognitive and behavioral deficits. Given the large effect sizes found in this study, our results support the view that specific genetic variations are more strongly associated with specific brain alterations than are shared neuropsychiatric diagnoses. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2833-2848, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27219475

  14. Restoration of retinal images with space-variant blur

    Marrugo, A.; Millán, M. S.; Šorel, Michal; Šroubek, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2014), 016023-1-016023-12. ISSN 1083-3668 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : blind deconvolution * space-variant restoration * retinal image Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.859, year: 2014 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/sorel-0424586.pdf

  15. Variable Costs Method. Application Variants Adapted to Romanian Accounting Plan

    Gheorghe V. Lepadatu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the variable costs method and its adaptation possibilities to the Romanian general accounting plan. There are described the three variants of the variable costs method and presented the methodological stages that are passing through managerial accounting using the 9th class “Management accounts”. The article is ending with the advantages and disadvantages of adaptation of variable costs method to the Romanian general accounting plan.

  16. Identification of pathogen genomic variants through an integrated pipeline

    Manary, Micah J; Singhakul, Suriya S; Flannery, Erika L.; Bopp, Selina ER; Corey, Victoria C.; Bright, Andrew Taylor; McNamara, Case W.; Walker, John R; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Whole-genome sequencing represents a powerful experimental tool for pathogen research. We present methods for the analysis of small eukaryotic genomes, including a streamlined system (called Platypus) for finding single nucleotide and copy number variants as well as recombination events. Results: We have validated our pipeline using four sets of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistant data containing 26 clones from 3D7 and Dd2 background strains, identifying an average of 11 single n...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Cervante-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to diff...

  18. Variants of equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer homology

    Marcolli, M.; Wang, B-L

    2005-01-01

    For a rational homology 3-sphere Y with a Spin c structure s, we show that simple algebraic manipulations of our construction of equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer homology in lead to a collection of variants, which are all topological invariants. We establish a long exact sequence relating them and we show that they satisfy a duality under orientation reversal. We explain their relation to the equivariant Seiberg-Witten Floer (co)homologies introduced in [loc. cit.]. We conjecture the equivale...

  19. Longitudinal Ventilation of Broiler House - Simulation of Variants

    Zajíček, Milan; Kic, P.

    Jelgava: Latvia University of Agriculture, 2013, s. 198-202. ISSN 1691-5976. [Engineering for Rural Development . Jelgava (LV), 23.05.2013-24.05.2013] Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : tunnel ventilation * computational fluid dynamics * broiler house Subject RIV: GB - Machines ; Buildings for Agriculture http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/VS/zajicek-longitudinal ventilation of broiler house-simulation of variants.pdf

  20. Cognitive rehabilitation in a visual variant of Alzheimer's disease

    Alves, Jorge; Rosana MAGALHÃES; Arantes, Mavilde; Cruz, Sara; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is commonly associated with marked memory deficits; however, nonamnestic variants have been consistently described as well. Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a progressive degenerative condition in which posterior regions of the brain are predominantly affected, therefore resulting in a pattern of distinctive and marked visuospatial symptoms, such as apraxia, alexia, and spatial neglect. Despite the growing number of studies on cognitive and neural bases of the visu...

  1. Genetic and epigenetic variants contributing to clofarabine cytotoxicity

    Eadon, Michael T.; Wheeler, Heather E.; Stark, Amy L.; Zhang, Xu; Moen, Erika L; Delaney, Shannon M.; Im, Hae Kyung; Cunningham, Patrick N.; Zhang, Wei; Dolan, M. Eileen

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-2-fluoro-deoxy-9-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (Clofarabine), a purine nucleoside analog, is used in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and as induction therapy for stem cell transplantation. The discovery of pharmacogenomic markers associated with chemotherapeutic efficacy and toxicity would greatly benefit the utility of this drug. Our objective was to identify genetic and epigenetic variants associated with clofarabine toxicity using an unbiased, whole genome approach. To this ...

  2. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris; Ritchie, Graham R.S.; Creixell, Pau; Karchin, Rachel; Vazquez, Miguel; Fink, J. Lynn; Kassahn, Karin S.; Pearson, John V.; Bader, Gary; Boutros, Paul C.; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Ouellette, B.F. Francis; Reimand, Jüri; Linding, Rune; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Valencia, Alfonso; Butler, Adam; Dronov, Serge; Flicek, Paul; Shannon, Nick B.; Carter, Hannah; Ding, Li; Sander, Chris; Stuart, Josh M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor, but only a minority drive tumor progression. We present the result of discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype. PMID:23900255

  3. HIGH BIFURCATION OF THE BRACHIAL ARTERY - A COMMON VARIANT

    Sesi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 28 cadavers were dissected for variations in the bifurcation of brachial artery bilaterally {n=56} at the department of anatomy, Rangaraya Medical College, Kakinada, A.P. from 2010 to 2015 . Found variations during routine dissections for first year MBBS students. The findings have thrown light on the common as well as rare variants in the anatomy of brachial artery bifurcation and the course of radial and ulnar arteries in current study

  4. Molecular basis for Duarte and Los Angeles variant galactosemia

    Langley, S.D.; Lai, K.; Dembure, P.P. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1997-02-01

    Human erythrocytes that are homozygous for the Duarte enzyme variant of galactosemia (D/D) have a characteristic isoform on isoelectric focusing and 50% reduction in galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) enzyme activity. The Duarte biochemical phenotype has a molecular genotype of N314D/N314D. The characteristic Duarte isoform is also associated with a variant called the {open_quotes}Los Angeles (LA) phenotype,{close_quotes} which has increased GALT enzyme activity. We evaluated GALT enzyme activity and screened the GALT genes of 145 patients with one or more N314D-containing alleles. We found seven with the LA biochemical phenotype, and all had a 1721C{r_arrow}T transition in exon 7 in cis with the N314D missense mutation. The 1721C{r_arrow}T transition is a neutral polymorphism for leucine at amino acid 218 (L218L). In pedigree analyses, this 1721C{r_arrow}T transition segregated with the LA phenotype of increased GALT activity in three different biochemical phenotypes (LA/N, LA/G, and LA/D). To determine the mechanism for increased activity of the LA variant, we compared GALT mRNA, protein abundance, and enzyme thermal stability in lymphoblast cell lines of D and LA phenotypes with comparable genotypes. GALT protein abundance was increased in LA compared to D alleles, but mRNA was similar among all genotypes. We conclude that the codon change N314D in cis with the base-pair transition 1721C{r_arrow}T produces the LA variant of galactosemia and that this nucleotide change increases GALT activity by increasing GALT protein abundance without increasing transcription or decreasing thermal lability. A favorable codon bias for the mutated codon with consequently increased translation rates is postulated as the mechanism. 23 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Bilateral variant of sciatic nerve exhibiting intra-pelvic division

    Rejeena P Raj, Kunjumon PC, More Anju B

    2014-01-01

    Context (background): In case of high division of the sciatic nerve in the pelvis its, common peroneal component may pierce the Piriformis muscle. This anatomical variant can explain many clinical findings. Aims: Its objective is to report a case of high division of the sciatic nerve in order to contribute towards better anatomical understanding of the gluteal region. Methods and Material: Routine undergraduate dissection of a male cadaver revealed bilateral variation in sciatic nerve. Result...

  6. Three familial cases of Pasini variant of dominant dystrophic epidermolysis

    Seirafi H

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa (EB is the term applied to a group of disorders whose common primary feature is the formation of blisters following trivial trauma. Hereditary EB comprises 3 major classes: simplex, junctional and dystrophic, and includes more than 23 phenotypes. The albopapuloid pasini variant of dominant dystrophic EB is characterized by a distinctive clinical appearance. In this article, we report this disease in three members of a family (father and two sons.

  7. Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fracture: a variant of scaphocapitate fractures.

    Burke, Neil G

    2014-01-01

    Transstyloid, transscaphoid, transcapitate fractures are uncommon. We report the case of a 28-year-old man who sustained this fracture following direct trauma. The patient was successfully treated by open reduction internal fixation of the scaphoid and proximal capitate fragment, with a good clinical outcome at 1-year follow-up. This pattern is a new variant of scaphocapitate fracture as involves a fracture of the radial styloid as well.

  8. Variability and pathogenicity of hepatitis E virus genotype 3 variants

    Smith, Donald B.; Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard S.; Hogema, Boris; Zaaijer, Hans L; Izopet, Jacques; Bradley-Stewart, Amanda; Gunson, Rory; Harvala, Heli; Kokki, Inka; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be clinically inapparent or produce symptoms and signs of hepatitis of varying severity and occasional fatality. This variability in clinical outcomes may reflect differences in host susceptibility or the presence of virally encoded determinants of pathogenicity. Analysis of complete genome sequences supports the division of HEV genotype 3 (HEV-3) variants into three major clades: 3ra comprising HEV isolates from rabbits, and 3efg and 3abchij compris...

  9. Recent emergence of new variants of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar.

    Guiyoule, A; Rasoamanana, B; Buchrieser, C.; Michel, P.; Chanteau, S.; Carniel, E

    1997-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, has been responsible for at least three pandemics. During the last pandemic, which started in Hong Kong in 1894, the microorganism colonized new, previously unscathed geographical areas where it has become well established. The aim of this longitudinal study was to investigate the genetic stability of Y. pestis strains introduced into a new environment just under a century ago and to follow the epidemiology of any new genetic variant detected. I...

  10. Lesson Twenty-two The early repolarization variant

    鲁端; 王劲

    2007-01-01

    @@ The ST-segment elevation seen in apparently healthy and asymptomatic persons,the so-called early repolarization variant (ERPV)1.Hiss et al reported that 91% of 6014 healthy men in the US Air Force who were between 16 and 58 years old had an ST-segment elevation of 0.1 to 0.3 mV in one or more precordial leads2.The elevation was most common and marked in lead V2.

  11. The Phylloplane as a Source of Bacillus thuringiensis Variants

    Smith, Robert A.; Couche, Graham A.

    1991-01-01

    Novel variants of Bacillus thuringiensis were isolated from the phylloplane of deciduous and conifer trees as well as of other plants. These isolates displayed a range of toxicity towards Trichoplusia ni. Immunoblot and toxin protein analysis indicate that these strains included representatives of the three principal B. thuringiensis pathotypes active against larvae of the orders Lepidoptera, Diptera, and Coleoptera. We propose that B. thuringiensis be considered part of the common leaf micro...

  12. A Survey: variants of TCP in Ad-hoc networks

    Komal Zaman; Muddesar Iqbal; Muhammad Shafiq; Azeem Irshad; Saqib Rasool

    2013-01-01

    MANET (Mobile Ad-hoc network) forms a temporary network of wireless mobile nodes without any infrastructure where all nodes are allowed to move freely, configure themselves and interconnect with its neighbors to perform peer to peer communication and transmission. TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) offers reliable, oriented connection and mechanism of end to end delivery. This article provides the review and comparison of existing variants of TCP for instance: The TCP Tahoe, The TCP Reno, Th...

  13. Search for Genetic Variants Underlying Musical Aptitude and Related Traits

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Music perception and practice represents complex cognitive functions of the brain. There is an abundance of data about the neurophysiological effects of music on the human brain, but heritability and especially molecular studies have been lacking. The development of genome technologies and bioinformatics has enabled the identification of genetic variants underlying complex human traits. These methods can be applied to normal human traits like music perception and performance. Prior to th...

  14. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte; Drost, Mark; Tavtigian, Sean; Hofstra, Robert M W; de Wind, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is the most prevalent hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. A significant proportion of variants identified in MMR and other common cancer susceptibility genes are missense or noncoding changes whose...... attention to common misconceptions about functional assays and endorse development of an integrated approach comprising validated assays for diagnosis of VUS in patients suspected of LS....

  15. Variable Costs Method. Application Variants Adapted to Romanian Accounting Plan

    Gheorghe V. Lepadatu

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the variable costs method and its adaptation possibilities to the Romanian general accounting plan. There are described the three variants of the variable costs method and presented the methodological stages that are passing through managerial accounting using the 9th class “Management accounts”. The article is ending with the advantages and disadvantages of adaptation of variable costs method to the Romanian general accounting plan.

  16. Copy Number Variants and Segmental Duplications Show Different Formation Signatures

    Kim, Philip M.; Korbel, Jan O.; Chen, Xueying; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to variation in terms of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), whole regions ranging from several kilobases up to a megabase in length differ in copy number among individuals. These differences are referred to as Copy Number Variants (CNVs) and extensive mapping of these is underway. Recent studies have highlighted their great prevalence in the human genome. Segmental Duplications (SDs) are long (>1kb) stretches of duplicated DNA with high sequence identity. First, we analyzed t...

  17. Binary Morphology With Spatially Variant Structuring Elements: Algorithm and Architecture

    Hedberg, Hugo; Dokladal, Petr; Öwall, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical morphology with spatially variant structuring elements outperforms translation-invariant structuring elements in various applications and has been studied in the literature over the years. However, supporting a variable structuring element shape imposes an overwhelming computational complexity, dramatically increasing with the size of the structuring element. Limiting the supported class of structuring elements to rectangles has allowed for a fast algorithm to be developed, which...

  18. RARE CASES OF HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: VARIANTS AND CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS

    V. Yu. Zimina; G. V. Mislitskaya; S. A. Sayganov; S. D. Dzakhova

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy belongs to a group of hereditary diseases due to sarcomere gene mutation. This abnormality is characterized by the development of symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of left ventricular myocardium with its normal contractile function or hypercontractility. Authors provide a brief overview of variants of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies of this disease, when structural changes in the heart are not the result of classic sarcomere gene mutation. In patients...

  19. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris;

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu...... discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype....

  20. Multiple Sodium Channel Variants in the Mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus

    He, Lin; Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Liu, Nannan

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the target sites of both DDT and pyrethroid insecticides. The importance of alternative splicing as a key mechanism governing the structural and functional diversity of sodium channels and the resulting development of insecticide and acaricide resistance is widely recognized, as shown by the extensive research on characterizing alternative splicing and variants of sodium channels in medically and agriculturally important insect species. Here we present the fi...

  1. A variant of the reciprocal super Catalan matrix

    Kılıç Emrah; Akkus Ilker; Kızılaslan Gonca

    2015-01-01

    Recently Prodinger [8] considered the reciprocal super Catalan matrix and gave explicit formulæ for its LU-decomposition, the LU-decomposition of its inverse, and obtained some related matrices. For all results, q-analogues were also presented. In this paper, we define and study a variant of the reciprocal super Catalan matrix with two additional parameters. Explicit formulæ for its LU-decomposition, LUdecomposition of its inverse and the Cholesky decomposition are obtained. For a...

  2. Enterococcus faecium small colony variant endocarditis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Egido, S Hernández; Ruiz, M Siller; Inés Revuelta, S; García, I García; Bellido, J L Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Small colony variants (SCV) are slow-growing subpopulations of bacteria usually associated with auxotrophism, causing persistent or recurrent infections. Enterococcus faecalis SCV have been seldom described, and only one case of Enterococcus faecium SCV has been reported, associated with sepsis in a leukaemia patient. Here we report the first case described of bacteraemia and endocarditis by SCV E. faecium in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:26862434

  3. Private Mitochondrial DNA Variants in Danish Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole; Hedley, Paula L.; Jensen, Morten K.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Pham, Tam T.; Bundgaard, Henning; Christiansen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a genetic cardiac disease primarily caused by mutations in genes coding for sarcomeric proteins. A molecular-genetic etiology can be established in ~60% of cases. Evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are susceptibility factors for HCM. Several polymorphic mtDNA variants are associated with a variety of late-onset degenerative diseases and affect mitochondrial function. We examined the role of private, non-haplogroup associated, mi...

  4. Feixos variants espacialment polaritzats amb perfils a mida

    Maluenda Niubó, David

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] A new approach for the generation of spatially-variant polarized beams has been developed by manipulating vertical and horizontal field component of the optical signal individually in a Mach-Zehnder interferometric setup employing two liquid crystal spatial light modulators. After some simulations, the optical system has been mounted and the modulators have been calibrated. By using double pixel holograms two semi-full complex modulations has been achieved and their combination has l...

  5. Epistatic Interactions between CREB and CREM Variants in Affective Disorder

    Chiesa, Alberto; Marsano, Agnese; Han, Changsu; Lee, Soo-Jung; Patkar, Ashwin A.; Pae, Chi-Un; Serretti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the existence of epistatic interactions possibly influencing psychotropic agents' response between rs6740584 within Cyclic adenosine monophosphate Response Element Binding (CREB) and rs12775799 within cAMP response element-modulator (CREM) variants in bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). All BD and MDD patients were administered with the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) at baseline a...

  6. Familial progressive hypo- and hyperpigmentation: A variant case

    Ru-zhi Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial progressive hyper- and hypopigmentation (FPHH is characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation with variable intensity. Cafe′-au-lait macules and larger hypopigmented ash-leaf macules are also present. Herein, we reported a variant case of FPHH. The patient was a two-year-old Chinese girl showing diffuse hyper- and hypopigmented lesions, longitudinal melanonychia in both thumbs, and infantile seizures, without any lentigines.

  7. Enterococcus faecium small colony variant endocarditis in an immunocompetent patient

    S. Hernández Egido

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small colony variants (SCV are slow-growing subpopulations of bacteria usually associated with auxotrophism, causing persistent or recurrent infections. Enterococcus faecalis SCV have been seldom described, and only one case of Enterococcus faecium SCV has been reported, associated with sepsis in a leukaemia patient. Here we report the first case described of bacteraemia and endocarditis by SCV E. faecium in an immunocompetent patient.

  8. Gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome complicating ruptured appendicitis

    Fadi Al Akhrass; Lina Abdallah; Steven Berger; Rami Sartawi

    2015-01-01

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a non-spore-forming, obligate anaerobic, filamentous, gramnegative bacillus that frequently colonizes the human oral cavity, respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal tract. Fusobacterium species have rarely been implicated in cases of gastrointestinal variant of Lemierre's syndrome. We describe a case of F. necrophorum bacteremia associated with suppurative porto-mesenteric vein thrombosis (PVT) following acute ruptured appendicitis. In addition, we list the docume...

  9. Rare Variants Association Analysis in Large-Scale Sequencing Studies at the Single Locus Level

    Lu, Wenbin; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Genetic association analyses of rare variants in next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies are fundamentally challenging due to the presence of a very large number of candidate variants at extremely low minor allele frequencies. Recent developments often focus on pooling multiple variants to provide association analysis at the gene instead of the locus level. Nonetheless, pinpointing individual variants is a critical goal for genomic researches as such information can facilitate the precise delineation of molecular mechanisms and functions of genetic factors on diseases. Due to the extreme rarity of mutations and high-dimensionality, significances of causal variants cannot easily stand out from those of noncausal ones. Consequently, standard false-positive control procedures, such as the Bonferroni and false discovery rate (FDR), are often impractical to apply, as a majority of the causal variants can only be identified along with a few but unknown number of noncausal variants. To provide informative analysis of individual variants in large-scale sequencing studies, we propose the Adaptive False-Negative Control (AFNC) procedure that can include a large proportion of causal variants with high confidence by introducing a novel statistical inquiry to determine those variants that can be confidently dispatched as noncausal. The AFNC provides a general framework that can accommodate for a variety of models and significance tests. The procedure is computationally efficient and can adapt to the underlying proportion of causal variants and quality of significance rankings. Extensive simulation studies across a plethora of scenarios demonstrate that the AFNC is advantageous for identifying individual rare variants, whereas the Bonferroni and FDR are exceedingly over-conservative for rare variants association studies. In the analyses of the CoLaus dataset, AFNC has identified individual variants most responsible for gene-level significances. Moreover, single-variant results

  10. Hindlimb unloading alters ligament healing

    Provenzano, Paolo P.; Martinez, Daniel A.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Dwyer, Kelley W.; Turner, Joanne; Vailas, Arthur C.; Vanderby, Ray Jr

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hindlimb unloading inhibits healing in fibrous connective tissue such as ligament. Male rats were assigned to 3- and 7-wk treatment groups with three subgroups each: sham control, ambulatory healing, and hindlimb-suspended healing. Ambulatory and suspended animals underwent surgical rupture of their medial collateral ligaments, whereas sham surgeries were performed on control animals. After 3 or 7 wk, mechanical and/or morphological properties were measured in ligament, muscle, and bone. During mechanical testing, most suspended ligaments failed in the scar region, indicating the greatest impairment was to ligament and not to bone-ligament insertion. Ligament testing revealed significant reductions in maximum force, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and low-load properties in suspended animals. In addition, femoral mineral density, femoral strength, gastrocnemius mass, and tibialis anterior mass were significantly reduced. Microscopy revealed abnormal scar formation and cell distribution in suspended ligaments with extracellular matrix discontinuities and voids between misaligned, but well-formed, collagen fiber bundles. Hence, stress levels from ambulation appear unnecessary for formation of fiber bundles yet required for collagen to form structurally competent continuous fibers. Results support our hypothesis that hindlimb unloading impairs healing of fibrous connective tissue. In addition, this study provides compelling morphological evidence explaining the altered structure-function relationship in load-deprived healing connective tissue.

  11. Dolichol alters brain membrane functions

    It has been well demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between increase in dolichol level in brain and aging. An abnormally high level of dolichol was found in brain tissue of patients with pathological aging disorders. The aim of this study is to examine the physiological significance of dolichol affecting membrane transport activity and phospholipid acyl group turnover. Dolichol added to synaptic plasma membranes resulted in a biphasic effect on (Na+, K+)-ATPase, i.e., an enhancement of activity at low concentrations (5 μg/125 mg protein) and an inhibition of activity at high concentrations (40-100 μg). To probe the membrane acyl group turnover, the incorporation of [14C]-arachidonate into plasma membrane phospholipids was examined in the presence and absence of dolichol. Dolichol elicited an increase in the incorporation of label into phospholipids. However, the effects varied depending on whether BSA is present. In the absence of BSA, the increase in labeling of phosphatidylinositols is higher than that of phosphatidylcholines. These results suggest that dolichols, when inserted into membranes, may alter membrane functions

  12. Dolichol alters brain membrane functions

    Sun, G.Y.; Sun, A.Y.; Schroeder, F.; Wood, G.; Strong, R.

    1986-03-05

    It has been well demonstrated that there is a direct correlation between increase in dolichol level in brain and aging. An abnormally high level of dolichol was found in brain tissue of patients with pathological aging disorders. The aim of this study is to examine the physiological significance of dolichol affecting membrane transport activity and phospholipid acyl group turnover. Dolichol added to synaptic plasma membranes resulted in a biphasic effect on (Na/sup +/, K/sup +/)-ATPase, i.e., an enhancement of activity at low concentrations (5 ..mu..g/125 mg protein) and an inhibition of activity at high concentrations (40-100 ..mu..g). To probe the membrane acyl group turnover, the incorporation of (/sup 14/C)-arachidonate into plasma membrane phospholipids was examined in the presence and absence of dolichol. Dolichol elicited an increase in the incorporation of label into phospholipids. However, the effects varied depending on whether BSA is present. In the absence of BSA, the increase in labeling of phosphatidylinositols is higher than that of phosphatidylcholines. These results suggest that dolichols, when inserted into membranes, may alter membrane functions.

  13. Solid Variant of Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: Difficulties in Diagnostic Recognition.

    Ben Salha, Imen; Bhide, Shree; Mourtzoukou, Despoina; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-08-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a malignant neoplasm that mainly affects the salivary glands but has been described in many other anatomical sites. It is composed of basaloid cells with myoepithelial/basal cell differentiation and ductal epithelial cells that proliferate in a fibrous stroma, with variable amounts of myxohyaline material. Three patterns (cribriform, tubular, and solid) occur, and the solid variant is characterized by a predominant compact sheet-like and nested pattern of rounded basaloid cells lacking obvious cribriform or tubular architecture. The solid variant has significant morphological and immunohistochemical overlap with a large range of neoplasms of different lineages, including other carcinomas and sarcomas. We describe a case of solid variant ACC of the paranasal sinuses, which showed an almost entirely solid pattern of growth (in >95% of cells) and which on initial biopsy showed no features of classical ACC. This highlights the potential for diagnostic misinterpretation with a variety of other neoplasms, which is particularly important because of the significant difference in treatment for ACC and tumors in its differential diagnosis. PMID:27069025

  14. Heterogeneity of pneumococcal phase variants in invasive human infections

    Ramirez M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae can be carried asymptomatically in the nasopharynx of its human host but can also cause a wide range of infections. A role for pneumococcal phase variants in the different lifestyles of this bacterium has been suggested but no systematic survey of the colony phenotypes of isolates associated with human infections has been undertaken. Results We report the colony opacity phenotypes of a genetically diverse set of 304 invasive isolates representing 10 serotypes. Over half of the isolates (52% presented the opaque phenotype whereas transparent variants accounted for only 26% of the total. However, the frequency of recovery of each phase variant was not uniform, while serotypes 1, 4, 12B and 23F presented the opaque phenotype more frequently than expected by chance, serotypes 3 and 14 where less frequently associated with this phenotype. Conclusion The opaque phenotype was the most frequent phenotype found among invasive isolates. An unexpected and equally important finding is the variability of the dominant opacity phenotype found among serotypes. This observation highlights the heterogeneity of opacity phenotypes in invasive isolates and lends further support to the proposal that other factors, in addition to the site of isolation, determine the opacity phenotype of a given isolate. The association between serotype and colonial opacity could help explain epidemiological differences observed among pneumococcal serotypes such as a higher invasive disease potential.

  15. Melanocortin-1 receptor gene variants in four Chinese ethnic populations

    2001-01-01

    There is strong relationship between melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants and human hair color and skin type.Based on a sequencing study of MC1R gene in 50 individuals from the Uygur,Tibetan,Wa and Dai ethnic populations,we discuss the occurrence of 7 mc1r variants consisting of 5 nonsynonymous sites (Val60Leu,Arg67Gln,Val92Met,Arg163Gln and Ala299Val) and 2 synonymous sites (C414T and A942G),among which C414T and Ala299Val were reported for the first time.Confirmation and analysis were also made of 122 individuals at three common point mutations (Val92Met,Arg163Gln,A942G) using PCR-SSCP.The frequency of Arg163Gln variant varies in the four ethnic populations,with percentage of 40%,85.0%,66.2% and 72.7%,respectively,while those of Val92Met and A942G are roughly similar in these four populations.The different environments,migration and admixture of various ethnic groups in China might have impact on the observed frequency of Arg163Gln.

  16. Review of different TCP Variants in Adhoc networks

    Varsha Sharma,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Ad-Hoc networks (MANETs are collection of mobile nodes that dynamically forming a temporary network without pre-existing network infrastructure and communicate with its neighbours to perform peer to peer communication and transmission. Transmission Control Protocol (TCP provides connection oriented, reliable and end to end echanism. It tries to control packet losses, which are due to traffic congestion or transmission errors. In this article we present the review and comparison of existing TCP variants: TCP Tahoe, Reno, Lite, New Reno, elective Acknowledgement (Sack, Westwood, Vegas and Forward Acknowledgement (Fack. The behaviour of TCP was different depending on the type of TCP variants because of improper activation or missing of congestion control algorithms such as Slow Start, Congestion Avoidance, Fast Retransmission, Fast Recovery, etransmission, Congestion Control and Selective Acknowledgement echanism. This analysis is necessary to be aware of which TCP implementation is better for a specific scenario, where from an ppropriate one will be selected. This paper covers all the variants and its algorithms to observe their nature regarding to their eatures.

  17. Variability and pathogenicity of hepatitis E virus genotype 3 variants

    Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard S.; Hogema, Boris; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Izopet, Jacques; Bradley-Stewart, Amanda; Gunson, Rory; Harvala, Heli; Kokki, Inka; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be clinically inapparent or produce symptoms and signs of hepatitis of varying severity and occasional fatality. This variability in clinical outcomes may reflect differences in host susceptibility or the presence of virally encoded determinants of pathogenicity. Analysis of complete genome sequences supports the division of HEV genotype 3 (HEV-3) variants into three major clades: 3ra comprising HEV isolates from rabbits, and 3efg and 3abchij comprising the corresponding named subtypes derived from humans and pigs. Using this framework, we investigated associations between viral genetic variability of HEV-3 in symptomatic and asymptomatic infections by comparing HEV-3 subgenomic sequences previously obtained from blood donors with those from patients presenting with hepatitis in the UK (54 blood donors, 148 hepatitis patients), the Netherlands (38 blood donors, 119 hepatitis patients), France (24 blood donors, 55 hepatitis patients) and Germany (14 blood donors, 36 hepatitis patients). In none of these countries was evidence found for a significant association between virus variants and patient group (P>0.05 Fisher's exact test). Furthermore, within a group of 123 patients in Scotland with clinically apparent HEV infections, we found no evidence for an association between variants of HEV-3 and disease severity or alanine aminotransferase level. The lack of detectable virally encoded determinants of disease outcomes in HEV-3 infection implies a more important role for host factors in its clinical phenotype. PMID:26282123

  18. Cosmic Hunt: Variants of Siberian-North American Myth

    Yuri Berezkin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The mythological motif of the Cosmic Hunt is peculiar to Northern and Central Eurasia and for the Americas but seems to be absent in other parts of the globe. Two distinct Eurasian versions demonstrate North-American parallels at the level of minor details which could be explained only by particular historical links between corresponding traditions. The first version (three stars of the handle of the Big Dipper are hunters and the dipper itself is an animal; Alcor is a dog or a cooking pot connects Siberian (especially Western Siberian traditions with the North-American West (Salish, Chinook and East (especially with the Iroquois. The second version (the Orion’s Belt represents three deer, antelopes, mountain sheep or buffaloes; the hunter is Rigel or other star below the Orion's Belt; his arrow has pierced the game and is seen either as Betelgeuze or as the stars of Orion's Head connects the South-Siberian – Central-Eurasian mythologies with traditions of North-American West – Southwest. Both variants unknown in Northeast Asia and in Alaska probably date to the time of initial settling of the New World. The circum-Arctic variant(s (hunter or game are associated with Orion or thePleiades are represented by neighbouring traditions which form an almost continuous chain from the Lapps to the Polar Inuit. This version could be brought across the American Arctic with the spread of Tule Eskimo.

  19. The role of germline alterations in the DNA damage response genes BRIP1 and BRCA2 in melanoma susceptibility.

    Tuominen, Rainer; Engström, Pär G; Helgadottir, Hildur; Eriksson, Hanna; Unneberg, Per; Kjellqvist, Sanela; Yang, Muyi; Lindén, Diana; Edsgärd, Daniel; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica

    2016-07-01

    We applied a targeted sequencing approach to identify germline mutations conferring a moderately to highly increased risk of cutaneous and uveal melanoma. Ninety-two high-risk melanoma patients were screened for inherited variation in 120 melanoma candidate genes. Observed gene variants were filtered based on frequency in reference populations, cosegregation with melanoma in families and predicted functional effect. Several novel or rare genetic variants in genes involved in DNA damage response, cell-cycle regulation and transcriptional control were identified in melanoma patients. Among identified genetic alterations was an extremely rare variant (minor allele frequency of 0.00008) in the BRIP1 gene that was found to cosegregate with the melanoma phenotype. We also found a rare nonsense variant in the BRCA2 gene (rs11571833), previously associated with cancer susceptibility but not with melanoma, which showed weak association with melanoma susceptibility in the Swedish population. Our results add to the growing knowledge about genetic factors associated with melanoma susceptibility and also emphasize the role of DNA damage response as an important factor in melanoma etiology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074266

  20. Human TTR conformation altered by rhenium tris-carbonyl derivatives.

    Ciccone, Lidia; Policar, Clotilde; Stura, Enrico A; Shepard, William

    2016-09-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is a 54 kDa homotetrameric serum protein that transports thyroxine (T4) and retinol. TTR is potentially amyloidogenic due to homotetramer dissociation into monomeric intermediates that self-assemble as amyloid deposits and insoluble fibrils. Most crystallographic structures, including those of amyloidogenic variants show the same tetramer without major variations in the monomer-monomer interface nor in the volume of the interdimeric cavity. Soaking TTR crystals in a solution containing rhenium tris-carbonyl derivatives yields a TTR conformer never observed before. Only one of the two monomers of the crystallographic dimer is significantly altered, and the inner part of the T4 binding cavity is expanded at one end and shrunk at the other. The result redefines the mechanism of allosteric communication between the two sites, suggesting that negative cooperativity is a function of dimer asymmetry, which can be induced through internal or external binding. An aspect that remains unexplained is why the conformational changes are ubiquitous throughout the crystal although the heavy metal content of the derivatized crystals is relatively low. The conformational changes observed, which include Leu(82), may represent a form of TTR better at scavenging β-Amyloid. At a resolution of 1.69Å, with excellent refinement statistics and well defined electron density for all parts of the structure, it is possible to envisage answering important questions that range from protein cooperative behavior to heavy atom induced protein conformational modifications that can result in crystallographic non-isomorphism. PMID:27402536

  1. Hyperglycaemia Alters Thymic Epithelial Cell Function

    Vera Alexandrovna Abramova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM is considered to be a consequence of unchecked auto-immune processes. Alterations in immune system responses are thought to be the cause of the disease, but the possibility that altered metabolite levels (glucose can establish the disease by specifically acting on and altering thymus stroma functions has not been investigated. Therefore, the direct effect of hyperglycaemia (HG on central tolerance mechanisms as a causative agent needs to be investigated.

  2. Carcinoma papilar tiroideo variante esclerosante difuso Diffuse Sclerosing Variant of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    JL D'Addino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Presentar un carcinoma inusual de tiroides y de difícil diagnóstico, su manejo y evolución. Caso clínico: Paciente de raza blanca de 37 años, desde hace 6 meses presentaba formación laterocervical derecha asintomática y ecografía con nódulo tiroideo sobre tiroides heterogénea. Sin antecedentes personales ni familiares de importancia. La punción de una adenopatía regional resultó adenocarcinoma y la del nódulo tiroideo: quiste coloide. Se intervino quirúrgicamente efectuándose un vaciamiento radical derecho y la biopsia por congelación informó carcinoma tiroideo por lo que se completó con vaciamiento cervical izquierdo y tiroidectomía total. La biopsia diferida fue: "carcinoma papilar difuso esclerosante con metástasis ganglionares en 5 de 6 ganglios peritiroideos derechos y en 7 de 9 ganglios cervicales, correspondiendo a 4 derechos y 3 izquierdos. Estadio: I, T3-N1b-M0. Se trató posteriormente con 3 dosis de yodo 131 y radioterapia externa por compromiso ganglionar mediastinal. A 6 meses de seguimiento hasta el presente, continúa libre de enfermedad. Los individuos con insulinorresistencia y síndrome metabólico presentan aumento del tamaño de la glándula tiroides y mayor prevalencia de nódulos. Tanto la insulina como la TSH se constituyen en factores de crecimiento para las células tiroideas, y los niveles de TSH son mayores en individuos con síndrome metabólico, presente en este caso. Conclusión: El carcinoma papilar, variante difusa esclerosante es un tumor inusual, de evolución más agresiva y con rápido compromiso extratiroideo y metástasis a distancia. Los autores declaran no poseer conflictos de interés.Objective: To report a case of a diffuse sclerosing papillary carcinoma, a rare type of thyroid carcinoma, of difficult diagnosis, its management and further follow-up. Case: 37-year-old white male who presented with a 6-month history of sudden onset of an asymptomatic right-sided lateral

  3. Common and Low Frequency Variants in MERTK Are Independently Associated with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility with Discordant Association Dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 Status.

    Michele D Binder

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The risk of developing MS is strongly influenced by genetic predisposition, and over 100 loci have been established as associated with susceptibility. However, the biologically relevant variants underlying disease risk have not been defined for the vast majority of these loci, limiting the power of these genetic studies to define new avenues of research for the development of MS therapeutics. It is therefore crucial that candidate MS susceptibility loci are carefully investigated to identify the biological mechanism linking genetic polymorphism at a given gene to the increased chance of developing MS. MERTK has been established as an MS susceptibility gene and is part of a family of receptor tyrosine kinases known to be involved in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. In this study we have refined the association of MERTK with MS risk to independent signals from both common and low frequency variants. One of the associated variants was also found to be linked with increased expression of MERTK in monocytes and higher expression of MERTK was associated with either increased or decreased risk of developing MS, dependent upon HLA-DRB1*15:01 status. This discordant association potentially extended beyond MS susceptibility to alterations in disease course in established MS. This study provides clear evidence that distinct polymorphisms within MERTK are associated with MS susceptibility, one of which has the potential to alter MERTK transcription, which in turn can alter both susceptibility and disease course in MS patients.

  4. Confirmation of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia variants, ARID5B and IKZF1, and interaction with parental environmental exposures.

    Tiffany-Jane Evans

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS have established association of ARID5B and IKZF1 variants with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental factors alone appear to make a relatively minor contribution to disease risk. The polygenic nature of childhood ALL predisposition together with the timing of environmental triggers may hold vital clues for disease etiology. This study presents results from an Australian GWAS of childhood ALL cases (n = 358 and population controls (n = 1192. Furthermore, we utilised family trio (n = 204 genotypes to extend our investigation to gene-environment interaction of significant loci with parental exposures before conception, and child's sex and age. Thirteen SNPs achieved genome wide significance in the population based case/control analysis; ten annotated to ARID5B and three to IKZF1. The most significant SNPs in these regions were ARID5B rs4245595 (OR 1.63, CI 1.38-1.93, P = 2.13×10(-9, and IKZF1 rs1110701 (OR 1.69, CI 1.42-2.02, p = 7.26×10(-9. There was evidence of gene-environment interaction for risk genotype at IKZF1, whereby an apparently stronger genetic effect was observed if the mother took folic acid or if the father did not smoke prior to pregnancy (respective interaction P-values: 0.04, 0.05. There were no interactions of risk genotypes with age or sex (P-values >0.2. Our results evidence that interaction of genetic variants and environmental exposures may further alter risk of childhood ALL however, investigation in a larger population is required. If interaction of folic acid supplementation and IKZF1 variants holds, it may be useful to quantify folate levels prior to initiating use of folic acid supplements.

  5. Concordant association of insulin degrading enzyme gene (IDE variants with IDE mRNA, Abeta, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Minerva M Carrasquillo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The insulin-degrading enzyme gene (IDE is a strong functional and positional candidate for late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined conserved regions of IDE and its 10 kb flanks in 269 AD cases and 252 controls thereby identifying 17 putative functional polymorphisms. These variants formed eleven haplotypes that were tagged with ten variants. Four of these showed significant association with IDE transcript levels in samples from 194 LOAD cerebella. The strongest, rs6583817, which has not previously been reported, showed unequivocal association (p = 1.5x10(-8, fold-increase = 2.12,; the eleven haplotypes were also significantly associated with transcript levels (global p = 0.003. Using an in vitro dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that rs6583817 increases reporter gene expression in Be(2-C (p = 0.006 and HepG2 (p = 0.02 cell lines. Furthermore, using data from a recent genome-wide association study of two Croatian isolated populations (n = 1,879, we identified a proxy for rs6583817 that associated significantly with decreased plasma Abeta40 levels (ss = -0.124, p = 0.011 and total measured plasma Abeta levels (b = -0.130, p = 0.009. Finally, rs6583817 was associated with decreased risk of LOAD in 3,891 AD cases and 3,605 controls. (OR = 0.87, p = 0.03, and the eleven IDE haplotypes (global p = 0.02 also showed significant association. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, a previously unreported variant unequivocally associated with increased IDE expression was also associated with reduced plasma Abeta40 and decreased LOAD susceptibility. Genetic association between LOAD and IDE has been difficult to replicate. Our findings suggest that targeted testing of expression SNPs (eSNPs strongly associated with altered transcript levels in autopsy brain samples may be a powerful way to identify genetic associations with LOAD that would otherwise be difficult to detect.

  6. PET/TAC: Basic principles, physiological variants and artifacts; PET/TAC: Generalidades, variantes fisiologicas y artefactos

    Jimenez V, A.M. [Especialista en Medicina Nuclear, Profa. Depto. Radiologia de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation is about the basic principles, physiologic variants and devices that work in the PET/TAC technique. Next the conclusions obtained in the same one are presented: For a correct evaluation of the PET/TAC images with FDG is necessary the knowledge of the image acquisition technique, as well as of the physiologic distribution of the FDG, variants of the normality, benign causes of captation and more frequent devices. The introduction of this hybrid procedure allows the correct anatomical localization and identification of the deposits of FDG largely avoiding false or doubtful interpretations, but it can also originate not specific devices existent in the conventional PET. The previous knowledge of the possible devices will make possible in certain cases its elimination and in other its identification avoiding incorrect interpretations. (Author)

  7. ATM missense variant P1054R predisposes to prostate cancer

    Background: Prostate cancer is associated with defective DNA strand break repair after DNA damage leading to genetic instability and prostate cancer progression. The ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) gene product is known to play an important role in cell cycle regulation and maintenance of genomic integrity. We investigated whether the prevalence of the ATM missense substitution P1054R is increased in a hospital-based series of prostate cancer patients and whether carriers are at increased risk for treatment-related side effects. Materials and methods: A consecutive series of 261 patients treated for early-stage prostate cancer with I-125 brachytherapy (permanent seed implantation) between 10/2000 and 04/2006 at our institution and a comparison group of 460 male control individuals were screened for the presence of the P1054R variant. Outcome of therapy regarding morbidity was assessed prospectively and compared between carriers vs. non-carriers with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a Quality-of-Life-index (QoL) and the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-15) with its subgroups (IIEF-5 and EF). Results: The proportion of carriers of the P1054R variant was significantly higher among prostate cancer patients than in the general population (25 out of 261 vs. 22 out of 460; OR 2.1; 95% CI 1.2-3.8, p < 0.01). A subgroup of the carriers additionally harboured the ATM missense variant F858L that was associated with a similar risk (OR = 2.2; 95% CI 1.1-4.6; p = 0.03). After a mean follow-up of 18 months there were no statistically significant differences regarding IPSS (p = 0.48), QoL (p = 0.61), IIEF-15 score (p = 0.78), IIEF-5 score (p = 0.83), and EF score (p = 0.80), respectively. Conclusions: The ATM missense variant P1054R confers an about twofold increased risk for prostate cancer in our series. The subgroup of patients with the second-site variant F858L is not at significantly higher risk. After 18 months, there was no evidence for an

  8. In vitro mutagenesis for development of novel variants in Rose (Rosa X Hybrida)

    /explants, shoot length, number of roots per shoot and root length while maximum days to bud sprouting, contamination free culture and more days to root initiation. In vitro raised, irradiated and non irradiated (control) plants were transferred to earthen pots one month after acclimatization under laboratory conditions and examined for morphological traits. Variation was observed between mutated and control plants. Three variants with altered flower colour or with small stripes compare to original flower colour were isolated. These variants were multiplied through micropropagation and are under evaluation for their stability. This investigation developed a protocol for in vitro mutagenesis that could be used to induce more novel colour variants/mutants in rose. Further, novel variants could be utilized in breeding of roses to obtain new genotypes from well adapted variety. (author)

  9. Structural differences between bovine A(1) and A(2) β-casein alter micelle self-assembly and influence molecular chaperone activity.

    Raynes, J K; Day, L; Augustin, M A; Carver, J A

    2015-04-01

    Within each milk protein there are many individual protein variants and marked alterations to milk functionality can occur depending on the genetic variants of each protein present. Bovine A(1) and A(2) β-casein (β-CN) are 2 variants that contribute to differences in the gelation performance of milk. The A(1) and A(2) β-CN variants differ by a single AA, the substitution of histidine for proline at position 67. β-Casein not only participates in formation of the casein micelle but also forms an oligomeric micelle itself and functions as a molecular chaperone to prevent the aggregation of a wide range of proteins, including the other caseins. Micelle assembly of A(1) and A(2) β-CN was investigated using dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering, whereas protein functionality was assessed using fluorescence techniques and molecular chaperone assays. The A(2) β-CN variant formed smaller micelles than A(1) β-CN, with the monomer-micelle equilibrium of A(2) β-CN being shifted toward the monomer. This shift most likely arose from structural differences between the 2 β-CN variants associated with the adoption of greater polyproline-II helix in A(2) β-CN and most likely led to enhanced chaperone activity of A(2) β-CN compared with A(1) β-CN. The difference in micelle assembly, and hence chaperone activity, may provide explain differences in the functionality of homozygous A(1) and A(2) milk. The results of this study highlight that substitution of even a single AA can significantly alter the properties of an intrinsically unstructured protein such as β-CN and, in this case, may have an effect on the functionality of milk. PMID:25648798

  10. Glycolysis controls the induction of human regulatory T cells by modulating the expression of FOXP3 exon 2 splicing variants.

    De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Porcellini, Antonio; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Santopaolo, Marianna; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; De Simone, Salvatore; Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carrieri, Pietro Biagio; Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Salvetti, Marco; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Franzese, Adriana; Mozzillo, Enza; La Cava, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Human regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells) that develop from conventional T cells (T(conv) cells) following suboptimal stimulation via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) (induced T(reg) cells (iT(reg) cells)) express the transcription factor Foxp3, are suppressive, and display an active proliferative and metabolic state. Here we found that the induction and suppressive function of iT(reg) cells tightly depended on glycolysis, which controlled Foxp3 splicing variants containing exon 2 (Foxp3-E2) through the glycolytic enzyme enolase-1. The Foxp3-E2-related suppressive activity of iT(reg) cells was altered in human autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, and was associated with impaired glycolysis and signaling via interleukin 2. This link between glycolysis and Foxp3-E2 variants via enolase-1 shows a previously unknown mechanism for controlling the induction and function of T(reg) cells in health and in autoimmunity. PMID:26414764

  11. Allelic variants of XRCC1 and XRCC3 repair genes and susceptibility of oral cancer in Brazilian patients

    Dos Reis, Mariana Bisarro; Losi-Guembarovski, Roberta; de Souza Fonseca Ribeiro, Enilze Maria; Cavalli, Iglenir João; Morita, Maria Celeste; Ramos, Gyl Henrique Albrecht; de Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir; Mizuno, Lauro Toyoshi; Rogatto, Silvia Regina; de Syllos Cólus, Ilce Mara

    2013-01-01

    genes have been found to be associated with oral cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of allelic variants Arg194Trp (rs:1799782) and Arg399Gln (rs: 25487) of XRCC1 gene and Thr241Met (rs: 861539) of XRCC3 gene and susceptibility to oral cancer. We also...... variants of the XRCC1 gene within codon 194 (OR 0.82, 95% CI: 0.44-1.51) and codon 399 (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.59-1.50) and within the XRCC3 gene (OR 0.72; 95% CI: 0.45-1.16) were not associated with an increased risk of oral cancer. A combinational analysis of SNPs in both genes indicated no association. The......BACKGROUND: The capacity for DNA repair is essential in maintaining cellular functions and homeostasis; however, this capacity can be altered based on DNA sequence variations in DNA repair genes, which may contribute to the onset of cancer. Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in repair...

  12. Effects of 22 novel CYP2D6 variants found in Chinese population on the metabolism of dapoxetine

    Xu RA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ren-ai Xu,1,* Er-min Gu,2,* Quan Zhou,2 Lingjing Yuan,2 Xiaoxia Hu,2 Jianping Cai,3 Guoxin Hu1,2 1Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, 2Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3The Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital & Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Ministry of Health, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: CYP2D6 is one of the most important members of the cytochrome P450 superfamily. Its genetic polymorphism significantly influences the efficacy and safety of some drugs, which might cause adverse effects and therapeutic failure. Methods and results: The aim of this research was mainly to explore the catalytic activities of 22 newly reported CYP2D6 isoforms (2D6*87, *88, *89, *90, *91, *92, *93, *94, *95, *96,*97, *98, *R25Q, F164L, E215K, F219S, V327M, D336N, V342M, R344Q, R440C, R497C on dapoxetine in vitro. The research was designed with an appropriate incubation system in test tubes and carried out in the constant temperature water. Through detecting its two metabolites desmethyldapoxetine and dapoxetine-N-oxide, the available data were obtained to explain the influence of CYP2D6 polymorphism on the substrate drug dapoxetine. As a result, the intrinsic clearance (Vmax/Km values of most variants were significantly altered when compared with the counterpart of CYP2D6*1, with most of these variants exhibiting either reduced Vmax and/or increased Km values. For dapoxetine demethylation pathway (which produces desmethyldapoxetine, 2D6*89 and E215K exhibited no markedly decreased relative clearance of 92.81% and 97.70%, respectively. The relative clearance of rest 20 variants exhibited decrease in different levels, ranging from 20.44% to 90.90%. For the dapoxetine oxidation pathway (which produces dapoxetine-N-oxide, the relative clearance values of three variants, 2D6*90, *94, and

  13. Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk due to Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Variants in Pakistani Population: A Pakistani Database Report

    Ayesha Farooq

    2011-01-01

    Mutational screening of the exons in all the samples of our study group did not reveal any pathogenic mutation. These results along with the results of the previous Pakistani studies for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were summed up to prepare a Pakistani database. Percentage involvement of these genes was estimated. Nine percent of these cancers show alterations in BRCA1 gene while 3 percent have shown BRCA2 variants. The remaining 88 percent of breast and ovarian cancers can be attributed to the involvement of other genes.

  14. Transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) variant is associated with familial breast cancer risk: a case-control study

    Schmutzler Rita K; Meindl Alfons; Hemminki Kari; Shanmugam Kalai S; Burwinkel Barbara; Sutter Christian; Wappenschmidt Barbara; Kiechle Marion; Bartram Claus R; Frank Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) is a critical component of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Aberrant TCF7L2 expression modifies Wnt signaling and mediates oncogenic effects through the upregulation of c-MYC and cyclin D. Genetic alterations in TCF7L2 may therefore affect cancer risk. Recently, TCF7L2 variants, including the microsatellite marker DG10S478 and the nearly perfectly linked SNP rs12233372, were identified to associate with type 2 diabetes. Methods We inves...

  15. Spatially variant lagged responses of forest extent and landscape patterns to socioeconomic drivers in the Li River Basin, China

    Zhang, Yuan; Li, Jun; Qin, Qiming; Xu, Ruofeng; Lin, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Forest cover change is one of the most important land cover changes. Intensified economic development and population growth have led to extensive deforestation and afforestation, and greatly altered the forest landscape patterns. This paper analyzed how socioeconomic drivers influenced the forest extent and landscape patterns in a lagged manner within the Li River Basin, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, during the period of 1991 to 2013. First, the temporal variations of forest extent and landscape patterns as quantified by six forest cover metrics were analyzed. The cross-correlation analysis was employed to examine the lagged responses of forest cover metrics to each socioeconomic driver across regions. Last, the fixed effects regression models were built to quantitatively assess the spatially variant relationships. The results demonstrated that the influence of socioeconomic drivers lagged, and the lagged influence varied across regions.

  16. Assessing Noncoding Sequence Variants of GJB2 for Hearing Loss Association

    T. D. Matos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Involvement of GJB2 noncoding regions in hearing loss (HL has not been extensively investigated. However, three noncoding mutations, c.-259C>T, c.-23G>T, and c.-23+1G>A, were reported. Also, c.-684_-675del, of uncertain pathogenicity, was found upstream of the basal promoter. We performed a detailed analysis of GJB2 noncoding regions in Portuguese HL patients (previously screened for GJB2 coding mutations and the common GJB6 deletions and in control subjects, by sequencing the basal promoter and flanking upstream region, exon 1, and 3'UTR. All individuals were genotyped for c.-684_-675del and 14 SNPs. Novel variants (c.-731C>T, c.-26G>T, c.*45G>A, and c.*985A>T were found in controls. A hearing individual homozygous for c.-684_-675del was for the first time identified, supporting the nonpathogenicity of this deletion. Our data indicate linkage disequilibrium (LD between SNPs rs55704559 (c.*168A>G and rs5030700 (c.*931C>T and suggest the association of c.[*168G;*931T] allele with HL. The c.*168A>G change, predicted to alter mRNA folding, might be involved in HL.

  17. Variant abiotic factors and the infection of Fasciola gigantica larval stages in vector snail Indoplanorbis exustus

    Neha Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aquatic environment has numerous physical and chemical parameters that may influence the physiology and maturation rate of parasite found inside the vector snail. It may be possible that abiotic factors (temperature, pH, CO2, O2 and conductivity and higher population density of snails could promote the transmission of parasite and raise their local abundance. In the present paper, we examined that how these environmental factors affect the transmission of cercaria throughout the year 2009-2010. The infection of Fasciola gigantica larvae in Indoplanorbis exustus in Ramgarh Lake and GIDA pond was maximum in month of October (40% and minimum in month of November (8.33%. Trend of higher infection in I. exustus was observed in July to October. This study conclusively, shows that variant abiotic factors in different months of the year can significantly alter the infection rate and development process of larvae (sporocyst, redia and cercariae in the snail Indoplanorbis exustus. The paper also includes a discussion on the important factors that influence the timing of molluscicide operation for the control of fascioliosis in the Gorakhpur.

  18. Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.

    Han, J C

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27288826

  19. Survivin 2α: a novel Survivin splice variant expressed in human malignancies

    Honsey Laura E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin and its alternative splice forms are involved in critical cellular processes, including cell division and programmed cell death. Survivin is expressed in the majority of human cancers, but minimally in differentiated normal tissues. Expression levels correlate with tumor aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Results In the present study, we identify and characterize a novel survivin isoform that we designate survivin 2α. Structurally, the transcript consists of 2 exons: exon 1 and exon 2, as well as a 3' 197 bp region of intron 2. Acquisition of a new in-frame stop codon within intron 2 results in an open reading frame of 225 nucleotides, predicting a truncated 74 amino acid protein. Survivin 2α is expressed at high levels in several malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Functional assays show that survivin 2α attenuates the anti-apoptotic activity of survivin. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation of survivin 2α suggests a physical interaction with survivin. Conclusion We characterized a novel survivin splice variant that we designated survivin 2α. We hypothesize that survivin 2α can alter the anti-apoptotic functions of survivin in malignant cells. Thus survivin 2α may be useful as a therapeutic tool in sensitizing chemoresistant tumor cells to chemotherapy.

  20. Autoimmune Variant PTPN22 C1858T Is Associated With Impaired Responses to Influenza Vaccination.

    Crabtree, Juliet N; He, Wenqian; Guan, Weihua; Flage, Mark; Miller, Matthew S; Peterson, Erik J

    2016-07-15

    High-affinity-antibody production, T-cell activation, and interferon upregulation all contribute to protective immunity that occurs in humans following influenza immunization. Hematopoietic cell-specific PTPN22 encodes lymphoid phosphatase (Lyp), which regulates lymphocyte antigen receptor and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) signaling. A PTPN22 variant, R620W (LypW), predisposes to autoimmune and infectious diseases and confers altered signaling through antigen receptors and PRRs. We tested the hypothesis that LypW-bearing humans would have diminished immune response to trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). LypW carriers exhibited decreased induction of influenza virus-specific CD4(+) T cells expressing effector cytokines and failed to increase antibody affinity following TIV receipt. No differences between LypW carriers and noncarriers were observed in virus-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses, early interferon transcriptional responses, or myeloid antigen-presenting cell costimulatory molecule upregulation. The association of LypW with defects in TIV-induced CD4(+) T-cell expansion and antibody affinity maturation suggests that LypW may predispose individuals to have a diminished capacity to generate protective immunity against influenza virus. PMID:27034343