WorldWideScience

Sample records for 60-hz electric fields

  1. 50-60 Hz frequency electric and magnetic fields; Champs electriques et magnetiques de frequence 50-60 Hz

    Lambrozo, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Service Etudes Medicales

    1999-07-01

    After more than twenty years of research, if biological effects exist for electromagnetic fields intensity over 1000 times the public usual exposure levels, the demonstration of a risk for health has not been brought. The actual data do not demonstrate that these fields can be dangerous for Health, more particularly, no solid nor conclusive proof shows that the residential exposure to electromagnetic fields can be responsible of cancer, undesirable neurological effects, or effects about the reproduction or development ( report extract of the Academy of Sciences in Usa, october 1996). (N.C.)

  2. Computer simulation of induced electric currents and fields in biological bodies by 60 Hz magnetic fields

    Possible health effects of human exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields are a subject of increasing concern. An understanding of the coupling of electromagnetic fields to human body tissues is essential for assessment of their biological effects. A method is presented for the computerized simulation of induced electric currents and fields in bodies of men and rodents from power-line frequency magnetic fields. In the impedance method, the body is represented by a 3 dimensional impedance network. The computational model consists of several tens of thousands of cubic numerical cells and thus represented a realistic shape. The modelling for humans is performed with two models, a heterogeneous model based on cross-section anatomy and a homogeneous one using an average tissue conductivity. A summary of computed results of induced electric currents and fields is presented. It is confirmed that induced currents are lower than endangerous current levels for most environmental exposures. However, the induced current density varies greatly, with the maximum being at least 10 times larger than the average. This difference is likely to be greater when more detailed anatomy and morphology are considered. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. Biological effects of electric and magnetic fields with a 50/60 Hz frequency; Effets biologiques des champs electriques et magnetiques de frequence 50/60 Hz

    Lambrozo, J. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-05-01

    The question of the possible biological effects of electric and magnetic fields with a low frequency was raised in the 1970`s after the publication of Korobsova`s paper and the epidemiologic study of Wertheimer. It has generated an important research work in various scientific domains from the molecular biology to the epidemiology and the human experiments. This short paper takes stock of the results obtained so far. (J.S.)

  4. Electric and magnetic fields having a 50/60 hz frequency; Champs electriques et magnetiques de frequence 50/60 Hz

    Lambrozo, J.; Touitou, Y. [Electricite de France (EDF), Service des Etudes Medicales, 93 - Saint-Denis (France)]|[Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Biochimie Medicale, Faculte de Medecine, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    If variations of pineal or plasmatic rate of melatonin have been underlined with the rodent, with the man it does not appear that the electromagnetic fields exposure involve a significant change at the melatonin level or its principal metabolite. (N.C.)

  5. Effects of exposure to 30 kV/m, 60-Hz electric fields on the social behavior of baboons

    Coelho, A.M. Jr.; Easley, S.P.; Rogers, W.R. (Behavioral Medicine Laboratory, Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research, San Antonio, TX (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that exposure to a 30-kV/m, 60-Hz electric field produces significant change (stress) in the social behavior of adult male baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis). One group of eight baboons was exposed to an electric field (12 hours per day, 7 days per week for 6 weeks) while a second group of eight baboons was maintained in a sham-exposure (control) condition. Exposed subjects and control subjects were compared over three, six-week experimental periods (pre-exposure, exposure, and post-exposure). Performance rates of six categories of social behaviors (passive affinity, active affinity, approach, tension, threat, and attack) and four categories of nonsocial behaviors (forage, manipulate, posture, and stereotypy) were used to compare the two groups. The results of our study indicate that (1) there were no significant differences between the two groups during the pre-exposure or post-exposure periods; (2) during the exposure period, experimental and control groups exhibited statistically significant differences in the mean performance rates of three behavior categories; (3) within-group comparisons across periods indicate that the experimentally exposed group exhibited statistically significant changes in passive affinity, tension, and stereotypy; and (4) changes in behavior performance among the exposed subjects reflect a stress response to the electric field.

  6. Electric and magnetic fields with a frequency of 50-60 Hz: assessment of 20 years of research

    Lambrozo, J. [Electricite de France - Gaz de France, Paris (France)

    2001-07-01

    Since electricity is used everywhere, exposure to electromagnetic fields of extremely low frequency (50-60 Hz) is unavoidable in our daily life. The question of whether these electromagnetic fields could possibly have any biological or health effects has been a major environmental issue for more than 20 years. At high field strengths, biological effects such as nerve and cardio-stimulation through the induction of currents in the body have been noted. These biological effects have been used in the drafting of standards for public and professional exposure. However, it is the search for effects at low field levels that has been the focus of much research. The main results of this research can be summarised as follows: in vivo studies on whole animals have shown that there is no convincing evidence that electromagnetic fields cause cancer or birth defects, and despite some reduction in pineal and blood melatonin in rodents, studies on lambs, baboons and humans do not support such an effect of electromagnetic fields, while in vitro studies have shown that exposure to electromagnetic fields at usual residential levels (<100 {mu}T) does not produce any significant in vitro effects that could be replicated in independent studies. These results, correlated with the data provided by more recent epidemiological studies, do not show that exposure to electromagnetic fields at the usual residential exposure levels presents a human health hazard. (author)

  7. Regularly scheduled, day-time, slow-onset 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure does not depress serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D.; Orr, J.L. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Experiments conducted with laboratory rodents indicate that exposure to 60 Hz electric fields or magnetic fields can suppress nocturnal melatonin concentrations in pineal gland and blood. In three experiments employing three field-exposed and three sham-exposed nonhuman primates, each implanted with an indwelling venous cannula to allow repeated blood sampling, the authors studied the effects of either 6 kV/m and 50 {micro}T (0.5 G) or 30 kV/m and 100 {micro}T (1.0 G) on serum melatonin patterns. The fields were ramped on and off slowly, so that no transients occurred. Extensive quality control for the melatonin assay, computerized control and monitoring of field intensities, and consistent exposure protocols were used. No changes in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration resulted from 6 weeks of day-time exposure with slow field onset/offset and a highly regular exposure protocol. These results indicate that, under the conditions tested, day-time exposure to 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields in combination does not result in melatonin suppression in primates.

  8. Rapid-onset/offset, variably scheduled 60 Hz electric and magnetic field exposure reduces nocturnal serum melatonin concentration in nonhuman primates

    Rogers, W.R.; Smith, H.D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Biosciences and Bioengineering; Reiter, R.J.; Barlow-Walden, L. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Cellular and Structural Biology

    1995-12-31

    Experiments with rodents indicate that power-frequency electric field (EF) or magnetic field (MF) exposure can suppress the normal nocturnal increase in melatonin concentration in pineal gland and blood. In a separate set of three experiments conducted with nonhuman primates, the authors did not observe melatonin suppression as a result of 6 weeks of day-time exposure to combined 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields (E/MF) with regularly schedule ``slow`` E/MF onsets/offsets. The study described here used a different exposure paradigm in which two baboons were exposed to E/MF with ``rapid`` E/MF onsets/offsets accompanied by EF transients not found with slowly ramped E/MF onset/offset; profound reductions in nocturnal serum melatonin concentration were observed in this experiment. If replicated in a more extensive experiment, the observation of melatonin suppression only in the presence of E/MF transients would suggest that very specific exposure parameters determine the effects of 60 Hz E/MF on melatonin.

  9. Electric field of the power terrestrial sources observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere in frequency range 1-60 Hz

    Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery; Dudkin, Denis; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-07-01

    The power line emission (PLE) 50/60 Hz and the Schumann resonance (SR) harmonics were detected by the use of a compact electrical field sensor of length 0.42 m during microsatellite Chibis-M mission in years 2012-2014. The initial orbit of Chibis-M has altitude 500 km and inclination 52°. We present the space distribution of PLE and its connections with the possible overhead power lines. PLE has been recorded both in the shade and sunlit parts of the orbits as opposed to SR which have been recorded only in the nightside of the Earth. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere and increased value of SR Q factor have been also observed. These results should stimulate the ionosphere model refinement for ultralow frequency and extremely low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation as well as a study on new possibility of the ionosphere diagnostics.

  10. Residential 60-Hz magnetic fields and temporal variability

    Banks, Robert Stephen

    1998-06-01

    The basic question addressed by this research is: How well can data from a single measurement visit estimate longer-term ambient residential 60-Hz magnetic field levels? We undertook repeat 60-Hz magnetic field measurements every two months for one year, plus one additional visit for 14 days of measurement. The study sample consisted of 51 single-family homes, 24 in Minneapolis-St. Paul and 27 in Detroit. Homes were selected by random-digit dialing; each was home to a child eligible to serve a control subject in the National Cancer Institute-Children's Cancer Group Electromagnetic Fields and Radon Study. Trained survey interviewers obtained all measurement data, using an expanded measurement protocol from the main study: (1) spot 60-Hz magnetic field measurements at the centers of three rooms and at the front door; (2) 24- hour (or 14 day) 60-Hz magnetic field measurement in the subject child's bedroom; and (3) geomagnetic field at the centers of two rooms and on the child's bed. The data set available for analysis consists of 349 out of 357 (97.8%) possible sets of spot measurements and 1060 out of 1071 (99.0%) possible days of 24-hour and two-week measurements. A Long-Term Estimate, Child's Bedroom, or LTECB, the geometric mean of the 24-hour measurement geometric means, was used as the reference for analysis. The LTECB was analyzed for house-level main effects and for repeated-measures (temporal) main effects. House-level main effects account for only 41% of the variability in the LTECB. The statistically significant main effects are study area, wire code and population density. A clear trend of increasing LTECB with population density is evident. The seasonal effect is small, but statistically significant. There is no evidence for a day-of-week effect, but a statistically significant diurnal effect is present. Correlation coefficients relating the LTECB to any of three primary single-visit measurement and exposure metric surrogates are >.9. However, when

  11. Human exposure to a 60 Hz, 1800 micro tesla magnetic field: a neuro behavioral study

    The effects of time-varying magnetic fields (MF) on humans have been actively investigated for the past three decades. One important unanswered question that scientists continue to investigate is the potential for MF exposure to have acute effects on human biology. Different strategies have been used to tackle this question using various physiological, neuro-physiological and behavioral indicators. For example, researchers investigating electro-encephalography (EEG) have reported that Extremely Low Frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) MF can increase the resting occipital alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz) [1, 2]. Interestingly, other studies have demonstrated that human motor behavior can be modulated by ELF MF exposure, reporting that such an exposure can reduce anteroposterior standing balance oscillations [3, 4] or decrease physiological tremor intensity [5]. However, the main limitation in this domain is the difficulty of reproducing the results. A possible reason for this is the large variety of experimental approaches employed. Therefore, the aim of this project is to investigate the effects of a 60 Hz, 1800 μT MF exposure on physiological (i.e. heart rate and peripheral blood perfusion), neuro-physiological (brain electrical activity), and behavioral (postural oscillations, voluntary motor functions, and physiological tremor) aspects in humans using a single experimental procedure.Though the results from this study suggest a subtle reduction of human standing balance as well as a subtle increase of physiological tremor amplitude with MF exposure, no effect appeared on other investigated parameters, suggesting that one hour of 60 Hz, 1800 μT MF exposure may modulate human involuntary motor control without being detected in the electrical activity of the brain. (authors)

  12. Acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field increases DNA strand breaks in rat brain cells

    Lai, H.; Singh, N.P. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Acute exposure of rats to a 60 Hz magnetic field caused a dose-dependent increase in DNA strand breaks in brain cells of the animals (assayed by a microgel electrophoresis method at 4 h postexposure). An increase in single-strand DNA breaks was observed after exposure to magnetic fields of 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 mT, whereas an increase in double-strand DNA breaks was observed at 0.25 and 0.5 mT. Because DNA strand breaks may affect cellular functions, lead to carcinogenesis and cell death, and be related to onset of neurodegenerative diseases, the data may have important implications for the possible health effects of exposure to 60 Hz magnetic fields.

  13. Effects of 60-Hz fields, estradiol and xenoestrogens on human breast cancer cells

    Dees, C.; Travis, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Garrett, S. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Henley, D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    1996-10-01

    If exposure to xenoestrogens or electromagnetic fields (EMFs) such as 60 Hz contributes to the etiology of breast cancer, it is likely that they must stimulate the growth of breast cells, damage genetic material or enhance the effects of other mitogenic or mutagenic agents (co-promotion). Therefore, the ability of xenoestrogens or exposure to 60-Hz fields to stimulate the entry of growth-arrested human breast cancer cells into the cell cycle was determined using cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, synthesis of cyclin D1 and cdc2 activity. Exposure of estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 or T-47D cells to estrogen and xenoestrogens (DDT and Red No.3) increased Cdk2 and cyclin B1-cdc2 activity and cyclin D1 synthesis. Exposure of breast cancer cells to 12 mG or 1 or 9 G electromagnetic fields at 60 Hz failed to stimulate Cdk2 or cyclin B1-cdc2 activity or cyclin D1 synthesis. Simultaneous co-exposure of cells to 60-Hz fields and chemical promoters did not enhance Cdk2 activation above the levels produced by the chemical promoter alone. Estrogen and xenoestrogens also stimulated binding of the estrogen receptor to the estrogen receptor element but the EMF did not. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced phosphorylation of p53 and pRb105 in MCF-7 cells, but EMF exposure had no effect. DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents and Red Dye No. 3 were found to increase p53 site-specific DNA binding in breast cancer cells, but EMF exposure did not. These studies suggest that estrogen and xenoestrogens stimulate growth-arrested breast cancer cells to enter the growth cycle, but EMF exposure does not. Site-specific p53-DNA binding was increased in MCF-7 cells treated with DNA-damaging agents, but not by EMF exposure. EMF exposure does not appear to act as a promoter or DNA-damaging agent for human breast cancer cells in vitro. 34 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Effects of a 60 Hz magnetic field on central cholinergic systems of the rat

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States))

    1993-03-15

    The authors studied the effects of an acute exposure to a 60 Hz magnetic field on sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline uptake in the brain of the rat. Decreases in uptake were observed in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after the animals were exposed to a magnetic field at flux densities [>=] 0.75 mT. These effects of the magnetic field were blocked by pretreating the animals with the narcotic antagonist naltrexone, but not by the peripheral opioid antagonist, naloxone methiodide. These data indicate that the magnetic-field-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain were mediated by endogenous opioids in the central nervous systems.

  15. Assessment of every day extremely low frequency (Elf) electromagnetic fields (50-60 Hz) exposure: which metrics?

    Because electricity is encountered at every moment of the day, at home with household appliances, or in every type of transportation, people are most of the time exposed to extremely low frequency (E.L.F.) electromagnetic fields (50-60 Hz) in a various way. Due to a lack of knowledge about the biological mechanisms of 50 Hz magnetic fields, studies seeking to identify health effects of exposure use central tendency metrics. The objective of our study is to provide better information about these exposure measurements from three categories of metrics. We calculated metrics of exposure measurements from data series (79 very day exposed subjects), made up approximately 20,000 recordings of magnetic fields, measured every 30 seconds for 7 days with an E.M.D.E.X. II dosimeter. These indicators were divided into three categories : central tendency metrics, dispersion metrics and variability metrics.We use Principal Component Analysis, a multidimensional technique to examine the relations between different exposure metrics for a group of subjects. Principal component Analysis (P.C.A.) enabled us to identify from the foreground 71.7% of the variance. The first component (42.7%) was characterized by central tendency; the second (29.0%) was composed of dispersion characteristics. The third component (17.2%) was composed of variability characteristics. This study confirm the need to improve exposure measurements by using at least two dimensions intensity and dispersion. (authors)

  16. Possíveis efeitos adversos dos campos eletromagnéticos (50/60 Hz em humanos e em animais Potential adverse effects of electromagnetic fields (50/60 Hz on humans and animals

    Caroline Wanderley Souto Ferreira Anselmo

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Os avanços tecnológicos têm aumentado o número de equipamentos elétricos e eletrônicos, seja nas residências ou mesmo no ambiente de trabalho, fazendo com que a população conviva com grande número de fontes de irradiação eletromagnética, com os mais diversos níveis de potência e freqüência. Por muitos anos, alguns cientistas e engenheiros acreditaram que o campo eletromagnético (CEM com freqüência extremamente baixa não pudesse causar efeitos e alterações significantes no material biológico. O objetivo deste trabalho é verificar os possíveis efeitos adversos dos CEMs em humanos e animais, que foram publicados nos últimos anos, através de uma revisão da literatura disponível em Medline, revistas nacionais e internacionais e catálogos de obras de referência na área dos CEM (50/60 Hz. Como resultado foi observado que o CEM (50/60 Hz é capaz de produzir diversos efeitos adversos em humanos e animais, como por exemplo: distúrbios na reprodução, doenças degenerativas, efeitos psiquiátricos e psicológicos, alterações citogenéticas, alterações no sistema cardiovascular, nervoso e neuroendócrino, bem como nos parâmetros biológicos e bioquímicos. Apesar de todas estas constatações e devido a muitas controvérsias entre vários autores, faz-se necessário um estudo mais específico e aprofundado sobre o assunto.The technologic development has increased the number of electric and electronic devices for household and work environment applications. In this way, we have to cope with a diverse quantity of electromagnetic irradiation sources, with different power and frequency ranges. For many years, some scientists and engineers believed that low-frequencies electromagnetic field (EMF could not cause any bad effect or substantial alterations on the biologic livings. This work has the objective to perform a literature review of the possible effects of EMF in human beings and animals, that was published in the

  17. Modelling fields induced in humans by 50/60 Hz magnetic fields: reliability of the results and effects of model variations

    This paper presents a comparison of anatomically realistic human models and numerical codes in the dosimetry of power frequency magnetic fields. The groups at the University of Victoria and the National Radiological Protection Board have calculated the induced electric fields in both their 'UVic' and 'NORMAN' models using independently developed codes. A detailed evaluation has been performed for a uniform magnetic field at 60 Hz. Comparisons of all dosimetric metrics computed in each particular model agree within 2% or less. Since in situ measurements cannot be performed in humans, and achievable accuracy of measurements in models and animals is not likely to be better than 10-15%, the comparisons presented should provide confidence limits on computational dosimetry. An evaluation of the effect of model size, shape and resolution has also been performed and further illuminated the reasons for differences in induced electric fields for various human body models. (author)

  18. Anecdotal report of magneto-phosphene perception in 50 mT 20, 50 and 60 Hz magnetic fields

    Magneto-phosphenes are described as flickering lights appearing in the visual field, due to retinal exposure to time-varying magnetic fields (MF). Human magneto-phosphene perception (MP) serves as a scientific basis for inter- national guidelines intending to limit exposure to electromagnetic fields in the extremely low frequency range. However, the flux density threshold at which MP occurs, as well as the dose and frequency responses of the phenomenon, are not clearly experimentally established. The 50-60 Hz threshold is extrapolated from data in the lower frequency range. The objective of this paper is to provide a descriptive anecdotal report of MP from 8 individuals exposed to 50 mT MF at 20, 50 and 60 Hz. They describe variations of flickering light perceptions in the visual field, matching the description by D'Arsonval (1896). This preliminary testing introduces a new experimental protocol, which will test the threshold for MP and other associated neuro-physiological responses in humans. (authors)

  19. 50-60 Hz magnetic fields and health: what's new?

    In December 2013, the SCENIHR (Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks) released a new report on the health risks associated with electromagnetic fields from 0 to 300 GHz. This literature review does not show a possible health risk associated with the extremely low frequency magnetic field exposure. Concerning childhood leukemia, the report raises a number of critical issues that deserve more detailed analysis. Consideration of the exposure remains the Achilles' heel of epidemiological studies and none of these studies has provided a suitable answer to this question. The issue of childhood leukemia is analyzed here in the light of the recent literature. Given the weaknesses and gaps in exposure assessment, the heterogeneity of the studies and the reduction of the odds ratio over time for the most vulnerable populations, consistency between study results is not obvious. After 30 years of research, two key points deserve attention: the overall exposure assessment, taking into account all sources of exposure, on the one hand; and the duration of exposure (and not only the average over 24 hours) including the total duration of residence of the mother and child, on the other hand. (authors)

  20. In vitro assessment of the immunity of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators to magnetic fields of 50/60 Hz

    Public concern for the compatibility of electromagnetic (EM) sources with active implantable medical devices (AIMD) has prompted the development of new systems that can perform accurate exposure studies. EM field interference with active cardiac implants (e.g. implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs)) can be critical. This paper describes a magnetic field (MF) exposure system and the method developed for testing the immunity of ICD to continuous-wave MFs. The MFs were created by Helmholtz coils, housed in a Faraday cage. The coils were able to produce highly uniform MFs up to 4000 µT at 50 Hz and 3900 µT at 60 Hz, within the test space. Four ICDs were tested. No dysfunctions were found in the generated MFs. These results confirm that the tested ICDs were immune to low frequency MFs. (paper)

  1. BIGEL analysis of gene expression in HL60 cells exposed to X rays or 60 Hz magnetic fields

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Han, L. H.; Harrison, G. H.; Davis, C. C.; Zhou, X. J.; Ioffe, V.; McCready, W. A.; Abraham, J. M.; Meltzer, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    We screened a panel of 1,920 randomly selected cDNAs to discover genes that are differentially expressed in HL60 cells exposed to 60 Hz magnetic fields (2 mT) or X rays (5 Gy) compared to unexposed cells. Identification of these clones was accomplished using our two-gel cDNA library screening method (BIGEL). Eighteen cDNAs differentially expressed in X-irradiated compared to control HL60 cells were recovered from a panel of 1,920 clones. Differential expression in experimental compared to control cells was confirmed independently by Northern blotting of paired total RNA samples hybridized to each of the 18 clone-specific cDNA probes. DNA sequencing revealed that 15 of the 18 cDNA clones produced matches with the database for genes related to cell growth, protein synthesis, energy metabolism, oxidative stress or apoptosis (including MYC, neuroleukin, copper zinc-dependent superoxide dismutase, TC4 RAS-like protein, peptide elongation factor 1alpha, BNIP3, GATA3, NF45, cytochrome c oxidase II and triosephosphate isomerase mRNAs). In contrast, BIGEL analysis of the same 1,920 cDNAs revealed no differences greater than 1.5-fold in expression levels in magnetic-field compared to sham-exposed cells. Magnetic-field-exposed and control samples were analyzed further for the presence of mRNA encoding X-ray-responsive genes by hybridization of the 18 specific cDNA probes to RNA from exposed and control HL60 cells. Our results suggest that differential gene expression is induced in approximately 1% of a random pool of cDNAs by ionizing radiation but not by 60 Hz magnetic fields under the present experimental conditions.

  2. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results.

    Davies, M S

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at "ion-cyclotron resonance" conditions for stimulation of Ca(2+) (B(H) = 78.3 mu T, B(HAC) = 40 mu T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B(V) = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science. PMID:8860733

  3. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results

    Davis, M.S. [Univ. of Sunderland (United Kingdom). Ecology Centre

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at ion-cyclotron resonance conditions for stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} (B{sub H} = 78.3 {micro}T, B{sub HAC} = 40 {micro}T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B{sub v} = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  4. Ntp technical report on toxicity, reproductive, and developmental studies of 60-Hz magnetic fields, administered by whole body exposure to F344/N rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicity report series

    Boorman, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Electric and magnetic fields are associated with the production, transmission, and use of electricity; thus the potential for human exposure is high. These electric and magnetic fields are predominantly of low frequency (60 Hz) and generally of low intensity. The prevailing view among physicists is that exposure to these low-frequency, low-intensity fields does not pose a health hazard. However, this view has been challenged by reports linking magnetic field exposure to the development of leukemia and other cancers. Because multiple epidemiologic studies suggested a potential for increased cancer rates with increasing exposure, and because of public concern, the effects of 60-Hz magnetic field exposure were examined in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice in 8-week full-body-exposure studies. Animals were evaluated for hematology and clinical chemistry (rats only) parameters, pineal gland hormone concentrations, and histopathology. Additional studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats to examine teratologic and reproductive effects of magnetic field exposure.

  5. Long-term exposure to a magnetic field (5 mT at 60 Hz) increases X-ray-induced mutations

    Exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF) at 400 mT has been shown to induce mutations (Mutat. Res., 349: 109-114, 1996; Int. J. Radiat. Biol., 71: 75-79, 1997; and Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun., 243: 579-584, 1998). However, whether ELFMF at low flux densities (under 1 mT) induces mutations is debatable. We investigated the effect of long-term exposure to 5 mT ELFMF at 60 Hz on mutant frequency. Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells were exposed or sham-exposed to 5 mT ELFMF for up to 6 weeks with or without X-irradiation (3 Gy), and the mutant frequency of the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene was analyzed. Long-term exposure to 5 mT ELFMF did not increase mutations, suggesting a threshold for mutation induction greater than 115 mA/m2 or a magnetic density of 5 mT. However, enhancement of the X-ray-induced mutation rate was observed after treatment with X-irradiation followed by long-term exposure to 5 mT ELFMF. At little as a 1-week exposure to ELFMF after X-irradiation enhanced the mutation rate. We also found that 400 mT exposure enhanced the mutation rate induced by X-irradiation (Mutat. Res., 349: 109-114, 1996). These results suggest that exposure to more than 5 mT ELFMF may promote X-ray-induced mutations. (author)

  6. Field acquisition system of signals produced by 60 Hz electric power distribution networks; Sistema de aquisicao em campo de sinais produzidos por redes eletricas de 60 Hz

    Arasaki, Arnaldo Takashi

    1996-12-31

    Signal acquisition and analysis problems generally require expensive instruments whose utilization may be optimized through the use of portable signal acquisition modules with signal storage capability. Signals could be registered where they are generated and then analyzed properly in a laboratory far away. A portable acquisition module is developed after studying promising solutions such as direct analog storage, analog-to-digital binary conversion and delta modulation of the collected signals. Since some years ago, a solid state non-volatile analog memory has been commercially available and it was chosen in this portable module design. It also provides low power consumption, turning out to be interesting to signal acquisition and storage applications. This work also presents the portable acquisition module results. (author) 100 refs., 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Residential exposures to indoor air pollutants could yield childhood leukemia risk levels similar to those associated with 60 Hz magnetic fields

    Over a decade ago Easterly suggested that electromagnetic fields may be able to participate in a cooperative process leading to the expression of cancer. Evidence derived from the literature is presented to support the suggestion that potentially cooperative factors other than electromagnetic fields are present in homes in sufficient quantities to result in approximately the same risk levels as are being measured in epidemiology studies of childhood leukemia and electromagnetic fields. Generally these odds ratios vary from 1.5 to 2.5

  8. Involvement of protein kinase C in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and the inhibitory effects of exposure to 60-hz magnetic fields in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis

    Kavaliers, M.; Ossenkopp, K.P. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1990-02-26

    One of the more consistent and dramatic effects of exposure to magnetic fields is the attenuation of morphine-induced analgesia. Results of previous studies have implicated alterations in calcium channel functioning and Ca{sup ++} flux in the mediation of these effects. It is generally accepted that Ca{sup ++}-activated-phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (Protein kinase C; PKC) plays an important role in relaying trans-membrane signaling in diverse Ca{sup ++} dependent cellular processes. In experiment 1 we observed that morphine-induced analgesia in the land snail, Cepaea nemoralis, as measured by the latency of an avoidance behavior to a warmed surface, was reduced by the PKC activator, SC-9, and was enhanced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9. In contrast, HA-10004, a potent inhibitor of other protein kinases, but only a very weak inhibitor of PKC, had no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. In experiment 2 exposure of snails for 30 minutes to a 1.0 gauss (rms) 60-Hz magnetic field reduced morphine-induced analgesia. This inhibitory effect of the magnetic field was reduced by the PKC inhibitors, H-7 and H-9, and was augmented by the PKC activator SC-9. These results suggest that: (i) PKC is involved in the modulation of morphine-induced analgesia and, (ii) the inhibitory effects of magnetic fields involve PKC.

  9. 60 HZ beam motion reduction at NSLS UV storage ring

    A significant reduction in 60 hz beam motion has been achieved in the UV storage ring. From the wide band harmonic beam motion signal, 60 hz signal is extracted by tuned bandpass filter. This signal is processed by the phase and amplitude adjustment circuits and then, it is fed into the harmonic orbit generation circuits. Several harmonics, near the tune, were canceled by employing one circuit for each harmonic. The design and description of this experiment is given in this paper. The results showing reduction in beam motion at 60 hz are also provided

  10. Numerical calculation and measurement of 60-Hz current densities induced in an upright grounded cylinder.

    Kaune, W T; McCreary, F A

    1985-01-01

    Power-frequency electric fields are strongly perturbed in the vicinity of human beings and experimental animals. As a consequence, the extrapolation of biological data from laboratory animals to human-exposure situations cannot use the unperturbed exposure field strength as a common exposure parameter. Rather, comparisons between species must be based on the actual electric fields at the outer surfaces of and inside the bodies of the subjects. Experimental data have been published on surface and internal fields for a few exposure situations, but it is not feasible to characterize experimentally more than a small fraction of the diverse types of exposures which occur in the laboratory and in the field. A predictive numerical model is needed, one whose predictions have been verified in situations where experimental data are available, and one whose results can be used with confidence in new exposure situations. This paper describes a numerical technique which can be used to develop such a model, and it carries out this development for a test case, that of a homogeneous right-circular cylinder resting upright on-end on a ground plane and exposed to a vertical, uniform, 60-Hz electric field. The accuracy of the model is tested by comparing short-circuit currents and induced current densities predicted by it to measured values: Agreement is good. PMID:3836665

  11. Bone growth in electric fields

    Research performed in several laboratories has shown that artificially induced currents affect bone growth. Studies of various current characteristics produced by implanted electrodes indicate that continuous dc, interrupted dc, and asymmetric ac all increase osteogenesis at the cathode. Stimulation from an externally applied balanced ac field was reported to reduce bone loss from disuse. The purpose of the study being reported here was to examine the influence of a uniform ac electric field on the normal skeletal growth pattern of rats. Juvenile rats received whole body exposure to uniform, vertical 60-Hz electric fields at 100 kV/m for 30 days. There were no marked alterations in the general growth pattern of the exposed animals compared to controls maintained under similar conditions. Bone growth rate, measured by tetracycline labeling, morphology of lumbar vertebrae and tibias and cortical bone area and marrow space area of tibias were not disturbed by exposure to the electric fields. (author)

  12. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Annual report, April 1977--March 1978

    1978-04-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the biological effects on mice and rats of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields. Results are reported on the effects of 30-day and 60-day exposures to 100 kV/m, 60-Hz electric fields on hematologic values, blood chemistry, and organ weights. With the possible exception of elevated blood platelet counts following 60-day exposures, there were no pathological changes observed in either mice or rats.

  13. Power line emission 50/60 Hz and Schumann resonances observed by microsatellite Chibis-M in the Earth's ionosphere

    Dudkin, Denys; Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Dudkin, Fedir; Pronenko, Vira; Klimov, Stanislav

    2015-04-01

    The overhead power lines are the sources of intense wideband electromagnetic (EM) emission, especially in ELF-VLF range, because of significant length (up to a few thousand kilometers) and strong 50/60 Hz currents with noticeable distortion. The radiation efficiency of the power line emission (PLE) increases with the harmonic order, so they are well observed by ground-based EM sensors. However their observations by low orbiting satellites (LEO) are very rare, particularly at basic harmonic 50/60 Hz, because of the ionospheric plasma opacity in ELF band. The Schumann resonance (SR) is the narrow-band EM noise that occurs due to the global thunderstorm activity in the Earth-ionosphere cavity. The first five eigenmodes of the SR are 7.8, 14.3, 20.8, 27.3 and 33.8 Hz and, thus, SR harmonics are also strongly absorbed by the Earth ionosphere. The published numerical simulations show that the penetration depth of such an ELF emission into the Earth's ionosphere is limited to 50-70 km for electric field and 120-240 km for magnetic field. From this follows, that PLE and SR can hardly ever be detected by LEO satellites, i.e. above the F-layer of ionosphere. In spite of this fact, these emissions were recently observed with use of the electric field antennas placed on the satellites C/NOFS (USA) and Chibis-M (Russia). Microsatellite Chibis-M was launched on January 24, 2012, at 23:18:30 UTC from the cargo ship "Progress M-13M" to circular orbit with altitude ~500 km and inclination ~52° . Chibis-M mass is about 40 kg where one third is a scientific instrumentation. The dimensions of the microsatellite case are 0.26x0.26x0.54 m with the outside mounted solar panels, service and scientific instrumentation. The main scientific objective of Chibis-M is the theoretical model verification for the atmospheric gamma-ray bursts. It requires the study of the accompanying EM processes such as the plasma waves produced by the lightning discharges in the VLF band. Chibis-M decayed on 15

  14. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim progress report, March 9, 1976--September 8, 1976

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Hjeresen, D.L.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on a broad and comprehensive series of biological experiments made under strictly controlled laboratory conditions to screen for possible effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals. Electric field strengths comparable to and exceeding those under existing and anticipated transmission line designs will be used. Dosimetry studies will complement the animal studies to establish the relationship between tissue dose and any observed biological effects. Information derived from this project will provide a better basis for evaluating potential hazards of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields and help define parameters to be studied in clinical evaluations on humans.

  15. A new look at gamma? High- (>60 Hz) γ-band activity in cortical networks: function, mechanisms and impairment.

    Uhlhaas, Peter J; Pipa, Gordon; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Wibral, Michael; Singer, Wolf

    2011-03-01

    γ-band oscillations are thought to play a crucial role in information processing in cortical networks. In addition to oscillatory activity between 30 and 60 Hz, current evidence from electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG) and local-field potentials (LFPs) has consistently shown oscillations >60 Hz (high γ-band) whose function and generating mechanisms are unclear. In the present paper, we summarize data that highlights the importance of high γ-band activity for cortical computations through establishing correlations between the modulation of oscillations in the 60-200 Hz frequency and specific cognitive functions. Moreover, we will suggest that high γ-band activity is impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and epilepsy. In the final part of the paper, we will review physiological mechanisms underlying the generation of high γ-band oscillations and discuss the functional implications of low vs. high γ-band activity patterns in cortical networks. PMID:21034768

  16. Biological effects of high-strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim report, March 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Phillips, R.D.; Anderson, L.E.; Kaune, W.T.

    1979-12-01

    Progress is described on a project assessing the biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals (rats and mice). The report includes sections on hematology and seram chemistry, immunology, pathology, metabolism, bone growth, endocrinology, cardiovascular function, neurophysiology, growth and development, and animal behavior. (ACR)

  17. Lay understanding of low-frequency electric and magnetic fields.

    Morgan, M G; Florig, H K; Nair, I; Cortés, C; Marsh, K; Pavlosky, K

    1990-01-01

    People do not start with a blank slate when they hear risk-communication messages. All such messages are processed through existing knowledge structures and understanding. Hence, to design effective and reliable risk-communication materials one must understand the state of people's knowledge--correct and incorrect--about an issue. We developed a simple "mental model" of what people minimally need to know to make informed decisions about field-related issues. Then we performed studies to explore how and to what extent respondents of various groups understood physical properties of 60-Hz electric and magnetic fields. Actual knowledge of respondents was then compared with the predicates of the model. Electrical engineering juniors and semi-technical employees of utilities displayed a good command of most of the concepts in the simple model, but little awareness of the limits to their knowledge. Lay respondents correctly knew only a few of the simplest elements of the model, but they displayed a much greater awareness of the limits to their knowledge. Both lay and semi-technical respondents were found to share several misconceptions. On average, they correctly rank-ordered some common field-exposure conditions by field strength, but they could not differentiate between electric and magnetic fields and could not differentiate among field strengths associated with different appliances. Most respondents dramatically underestimated the range of actual field strengths. Many respondents understood that field strength decreases with distance from a source, but they underestimated the rate of decrease. In contrast to X-rays and microwaves, which respondents appeared to think about in rather similar terms, 60-Hz fields were not thought of as being highly similar to any other agent, although the closest parallels were found with ultrasound. Changes in mood, thought, and behavior, and the existence of an "electrical aura," were all seen as plausible results of exposure to a 60-Hz

  18. Electric Field Imaging Project

    Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Burke, Eric; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields. This work is intended to bring electrostatic imaging to the forefront of new inspection technologies, and new technologies in general. The specific goals are to specify the electric potential and electric field including the electric field spatial components emanating from, to, and throughout volumes containing objects or in free space.

  19. Effect of substrate temperature and input power on TiN film deposition by low-frequency (60 Hz) PECVD

    Kim, H T; Han, D H; Park, D K

    2000-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) thin films were prepared by low-frequency (60 Hz) plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (LF-PECVD) using a mixture of TiCl sub 4 and N sub 2 as source materials and H sub 2 as an atmospheric material. The LF sub P ECVD can be used as a new method for process control at a lower deposition temperature, and the apparatus is simpler than others. The effects of the substrate temperature and the input power on the characteristics of the TiN films deposited by using LF-PECVD were investigated. The SEM results showed that the deposition rate increased as the substrate temperature and the input power increased. The crystalline TiN films had a strong crystallographically preferred orientation of (200) on the XRD patterns. The electrical resistivity of the TiN films had a tendency to decrease with increasing substrate temperature, but did not exhibit any unique tendency with increasing input power. The TiN films had high IR reflection and an edge in the visible region. The reflectance of the f...

  20. Electric fields and electrical insulation

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    2002-01-01

    The adoption of a field-theoretical approach to problems arising in the framework of electrical insulation is discussed with reference to six main topics, which have been addressed over the last 30 years. These include uniform field electrodes, Green's differential equation, electrode surface...... roughness, induced charge, electrostatic probes, and partial discharge transients, together with several follow-on aspects. Each topic is introduced and thereafter the progress achieved through the use of a field-theoretical approach is reviewed. Because the topics cover a wide spectrum of conditions......, it is amply demonstrated that such an approach can lead to significant progress in many areas of electrical insulation....

  1. Deficits in High- (> 60 Hz Gamma-Band Oscillations during Visual Processing in Schizophrenia

    Christine eGruetzner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Current theories of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia have focused on abnormal temporal coordination of neural activity. Oscillations in the gamma-band range (> 25 Hz are of particular interest as they establish synchronisation with great precision in local cortical networks. However, the contribution of high gamma (> 60 Hz oscillations towards the pathophysiology is less established. To address this issue, we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG data from 16 medicated patients with chronic schizophrenia and 16 controls during the perception of Mooney faces. Magnetoencephalographic data were analysed in the 25-150 Hz frequency range. Patients showed elevated reaction times and reduced detection rates during the perception of upright Mooney faces while responses to inverted stimuli were intact. Impaired processing of Mooney faces in schizophrenia patients was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in spectral power between 60-120 Hz (effect size: d = 1.26 which was correlated with disorganised symptoms (r = -.72. Our findings demonstrate that deficits in high gamma-band oscillations as measured by MEG are a sensitive marker for aberrant cortical functioning in schizophrenia, suggesting an important aspect of the pathophysiology of the disorder.

  2. Electric field analysis

    Chakravorti, Sivaji

    2015-01-01

    This book prepares newcomers to dive into the realm of electric field analysis. The book details why one should perform electric field analysis and what are its practical implications. It emphasizes both the fundamentals and modern computational methods of electric machines. The book covers practical applications of the numerical methods in high voltage equipment, including transmission lines, power transformers, cables, and gas insulated systems.

  3. Final report on key comparison EURAMET.EM-K5.1 (EURAMET Project No. 687): Comparison of 50/60 Hz power

    Çayci, Hüseyin

    2011-01-01

    To support the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMCs) declared by members of EURAMET (formerly EUROMET) in the framework of the CIPM-MRA, a EURAMET key comparison was organized. Electrical standards of low-frequency (50/60 Hz) power were compared at ten national metrology institutes (NMIs) of EURAMET member states and at two NMIs of COOMET and APMP member states, to establish the relationship between the electrical units of AC power at these laboratories. The results of this comparison are described. The differences between the values of almost all laboratories and the EURAMET reference values were within the expanded measurement uncertainties at a coverage factor k = 2. The link between the comparisons of 50/60 Hz power conducted by the Consultative Committee for Electricity and Magnetism (CCEM) from 1996 to 2000 (CCEM-K5) and by EURAMET from 2003 to 2008 (EUROMET.EM-K5.1, Project no 687) is carried out following the example given by F Delahaye and T J Witt, in a similar way as in the previous comparison EUROMET.EM-K5, Project no 385. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  4. Power line harmonic radiation observed by the DEMETER spacecraft at 50/60 Hz and low harmonics

    Němec, F.; Parrot, M.; Santolík, O.

    2015-10-01

    We present a low-altitude satellite survey of Power Line Harmonic Radiation (PLHR), i.e., electromagnetic waves radiated by electric power systems on the ground. We focus on frequencies corresponding to the first few harmonics of the base power system frequencies (50 Hz or 60 Hz, depending on the region). It is shown that the intensities of electromagnetic waves detected at these frequencies at an altitude of about 700 km are significantly enhanced above industrialized areas. The frequencies at which the wave intensities are increased are in excellent agreement with base power system frequencies just below the satellite location. We also investigate a possible presence of the weekend effect, i.e., if the situation is different during the weekends when the power consumption is lower than during the weekdays. Such an effect might be possibly present in the European region, but it is very weak. PLHR effects are less often detected in the summer, as the ionospheric absorption increases, and also, the radiation is obscured by lightning generated emissions. This difference is smaller in the U.S. region, in agreement with the monthly variations of the power consumption. The analysis of the measured frequency spectra reveals that although intensity increases at low odd harmonics of base power system frequencies are routinely detected, low even harmonics are generally absent. Finally, we verify the relation of PLHR intensities to the geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) proxy. It is shown that the PLHR intensity is increased at the times of higher GIC proxy values during the night.

  5. Pulsed electric fields

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  6. Dielectrics in electric fields

    Raju, Gorur G

    2003-01-01

    Discover nontraditional applications of dielectric studies in this exceptionally crafted field reference or text for seniors and graduate students in power engineering tracks. This text contains more than 800 display equations and discusses polarization phenomena in dielectrics, the complex dielectric constant in an alternating electric field, dielectric relaxation and interfacial polarization, the measurement of absorption and desorption currents in time domains, and high field conduction phenomena. Dielectrics in Electric Fields is an interdisciplinary reference and text for professionals and students in electrical and electronics, chemical, biochemical, and environmental engineering; physical, surface, and colloid chemistry; materials science; and chemical physics.

  7. Transcranial Electric Field Stimulation

    Arfaee, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Nervous stimulation with electric methods not only has a long history in the treatment of many conditions but also in the last two decades has been used increasingly as a powerful functional brain mapping tool alongside other imaging techniques. This technology has been used to record the stimulation-evoked activity of the stimulated location. This research describes work surrounding a novel technique for brain and nervous stimulation using the electric field as the medium; particularly tra...

  8. Electromagnetic Fields Associated with Commercial Solar Photovoltaic Electric Power Generating Facilities.

    Tell, R A; Hooper, H C; Sias, G G; Mezei, G; Hung, P; Kavet, R

    2015-01-01

    The southwest region of the United States is expected to experience an expansion of commercial solar photovoltaic generation facilities over the next 25 years. A solar facility converts direct current generated by the solar panels to three-phase 60-Hz power that is fed to the grid. This conversion involves sequential processing of the direct current through an inverter that produces low-voltage three-phase power, which is stepped up to distribution voltage (∼12 kV) through a transformer. This study characterized magnetic and electric fields between the frequencies of 0 Hz and 3 GHz at two facilities operated by the Southern California Edison Company in Porterville, CA and San Bernardino, CA. Static magnetic fields were very small compared to exposure limits established by IEEE and ICNIRP. The highest 60-Hz magnetic fields were measured adjacent to transformers and inverters, and radiofrequency fields from 5-100 kHz were associated with the inverters. The fields measured complied in every case with IEEE controlled and ICNIRP occupational exposure limits. In all cases, electric fields were negligible compared to IEEE and ICNIRP limits across the spectrum measured and when compared to the FCC limits (≥0.3 MHz). PMID:26023811

  9. Comparative Analysis Between the Middle and Small-size Turbine-generator of 50 Hz and That of 60 Hz%60 Hz与50 Hz中小型汽轮发电机之比较

    蔡恒川; 翁祥玲; 王庆波

    2013-01-01

    阐述了中小型60 H z空冷汽轮发电机的方案设计,针对30 M W以下的中小型机组,从设计角度与国内50 H z同等容量的产品进行比较,探讨两种频率发电机主要电气性能参数及结构特点的异同。%Program design of the middle and small-size turbine-generator of 60 Hz was described. For power less than 30 MW, comparative analysis between the middle and small-size turbine-generator of 50 Hz and that of 60 Hz was done under same power capacity. Main electric performance data as well as their difference in the ifeld of construction of these two type generator with different frequency were discussed.

  10. Procesos de corrosión debidos a corrientes alternas inducidas (60 Hz

    Vera, E.

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon by which a sinusoidal a.c. signal damages a steel in contact with an aggressive electrolite was determined. Thus, a series of electrochemical tests was carried out, when a signal of the previously mentioned characteristics is present in the metal-electrolite interphase, both with cathodic protection and without it. The results allowed to postulate an empirical relationship that determines the corrosive process kinetics exerted by the action of an alternating signal. The phenomenon by which the AC signal generates a corrosion state over a probe was determined from the physical point of view.

    Se determinó el fenómeno por el que una señal de c.a. de tipo sinusoidal genera fenómenos de corrosión en un acero en contacto con un electrólito agresivo. Para ello, se realizaron pruebas electroquímicas cuando una señal de las anteriores características está presente en la interfase metal-electrólito, con y sin protección catódica. Los resultados permitieron postular una relación empírica que determina la cinética del proceso corrosivo ejercido por la acción de la señal alterna. Se determinó, desde un punto de vista físico, el fenómeno por el cual la señal de c.a. genera un estado de corrosión sobre la probeta.

  11. Simple estimation of induced electric fields in nervous system tissues for human exposure to non-uniform electric fields at power frequency

    Tarao, Hiroo; Miyamoto, Hironobu; Korpinen, Leena; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Isaka, Katsuo

    2016-06-01

    Most results regarding induced current in the human body related to electric field dosimetry have been calculated under uniform field conditions. We have found in previous work that a contact current is a more suitable way to evaluate induced electric fields, even in the case of exposure to non-uniform fields. If the relationship between induced currents and external non-uniform fields can be understood, induced electric fields in nervous system tissues may be able to be estimated from measurements of ambient non-uniform fields. In the present paper, we numerically calculated the induced electric fields and currents in a human model by considering non-uniform fields based on distortion by a cubic conductor under an unperturbed electric field of 1 kV m‑1 at 60 Hz. We investigated the relationship between a non-uniform external electric field with no human present and the induced current through the neck, and the relationship between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in nervous system tissues such as the brain, heart, and spinal cord. The results showed that the current through the neck can be formulated by means of an external electric field at the central position of the human head, and the distance between the conductor and the human model. As expected, there is a strong correlation between the current through the neck and the induced electric fields in the nervous system tissues. The combination of these relationships indicates that induced electric fields in these tissues can be estimated solely by measurements of the external field at a point and the distance from the conductor.

  12. Design of exposure systems for ELF electric field bioeffects research

    Two systems for exposure and sham-exposure of large numbers of rats and mice to uniform, vertical, 60-Hz electric fields have been constructed. The rat system contains four racks of four rectangular 1.0m x 2.2m exposure-electrodes that are stacked vertically with a separation between adjacent electrodes of 0.41 m. Any two of the four exposure racks may be energized to a maximum field strength of 150 kV/m. Each exposure electrode is equipped with 24 Lexan cages, each of which holds a single rat. The cage floor is a stainless steel screen that serves as one electrode. The system for watering animals is contained entirely within the electrode and does not protrude above the cage's floor, thereby preventing distortion of the exposure field and electrical shock or discharge as the animal drinks. The total capacity of the system is 288 rats. A similar system of two racks of five electrodes each is used to expose as many as 450 mice to fields at a maximum strength of 150 kV/m while sham exposing an equal number. Measurements of the electric field reveal an overall uniformity within 4% over the area to be occupied by experimental animals. The field inside a Lexan cage is reduced by about 3%. No corona-discharge has been detected. Measurements of ozone concentration in the rat and mouse exposure systems show no difference from background levels. Harmonic distortion has been eliminated by damping and filtering the high-voltage supply. Animals housed in close proximity are partially shielded from the electric field; the total body current in a rat model is reduced by 35 ± 5% when rats are placed in adjacent cages. (author)

  13. Effects of controlled-frequency moderate electric fields on pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase activities in tomato homogenate.

    Samaranayake, Chaminda P; Sastry, Sudhir K

    2016-05-15

    The effect of controlled-frequency moderate electric field treatments on pectin methylesterase and polygalcturonase activities in tomato homogenate was investigated by subjecting identically treated control and electrically-treated samples to the same temperature history. Additionally, a model was developed for the motion of the enzyme molecules subjected to an electric field. Results show that the application of electric fields at a low field strength (0.4V/cm) constant temperature (65°C) has a statistically significant effect on pectin methylesterase activity, typically at or lower than 60 Hz. At higher frequencies, the effects are negligible. Molecular motion simulations suggest that the efficacy at low frequencies may be due to the amplitude of motion being of the order of the intermolecular distance for water. Higher frequencies result in small overall displacements due to rapid reversals in the direction of motion. PMID:26775970

  14. Electric charge in the stochastic electric field

    Simonov, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electric stochastic fields on the relativistic charged particles is investigated in the gauge invariant path integral formalism. Using the cumulant expansion one finds the exponential relaxation of the charge Green's function both for spinless and Dirac charges.

  15. Electric field gradients in metals

    A review of the recent works on electric field gradient in metals is given. The main emphasis is put on the temperature dependence of the electric field gradient in nonmagnetic metals. Some methods of investigation of this effect using nuclear probes are described. One of them is nuclear accoustic resonance method. (S.B.)

  16. Cryosurgery with pulsed electric fields.

    Charlotte S Daniels

    Full Text Available This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused

  17. Possíveis efeitos adversos dos campos eletromagnéticos (50/60 Hz) em humanos e em animais Potential adverse effects of electromagnetic fields (50/60 Hz) on humans and animals

    Caroline Wanderley Souto Ferreira Anselmo; Francisca Martins Bion; Maria Teresa Jansem de Almeida Catanho; Maria do Carmo Medeiros

    2005-01-01

    Os avanços tecnológicos têm aumentado o número de equipamentos elétricos e eletrônicos, seja nas residências ou mesmo no ambiente de trabalho, fazendo com que a população conviva com grande número de fontes de irradiação eletromagnética, com os mais diversos níveis de potência e freqüência. Por muitos anos, alguns cientistas e engenheiros acreditaram que o campo eletromagnético (CEM) com freqüência extremamente baixa não pudesse causar efeitos e alterações significantes no material biológico....

  18. Introducing electric fields

    Roche, John

    2016-09-01

    The clear introduction of basic concepts and definitions is crucial for teaching any topic in physics. I have always found it difficult to teach fields. While searching for better explanations I hit on an approach of reading foundational texts and electromagnetic textbooks in ten year lots, ranging from 1840 to the present. By combining this with modern techniques of textual interpretation I attempt to clarify three introductory concepts: how the field is defined; the principle of superposition and the role of the electrostatic field in a circuit.

  19. Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields

    Anderson, L.E.; Kelman, B.J.; Weigel, R.J. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    Although background levels of atmospheric electric and geomagnetic field levels are extremely low, over the past several decades, human beings and other life forms on this planet have been subjected to a dramatically changing electromagnetic milieu. An exponential increase in exposure to electromagnetic fields has occurred, largely because of such technological advances as the growth of electrical power generation and transmission systems, the increased use of wireless communications, and the use of radar. In addition, electromagnetic field generating devices have proliferated in industrial plants, office buildings, homes, public transportation systems, and elsewhere. Although significant increases have occurred in electromagnetic field strenghths spanning all frequency ranges, this symposium addresses only the impact of these fields at static and extremely low frequencies (ELF), primarily 50 and 60 Hz. This volume contains the proceedings of the symposium entitled /open quotes/Interaction of biological systems with static and ELF electric and magnetic fields/close quotes/. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for discussions of all aspects of research on the interaction of static and ELF electromagnetic fields with biological systems. These systems include simple biophysical models, cell and organ preparations, whole animals, and man. Dosimetry, exposure system design, and artifacts in ELF bioeffects research were also addressed, along with current investigations that examine fundamental mechanisms of interactions between the fields and biological processes. Papers are indexed separately.

  20. The effects of electric fields on the immune system of exposed mice

    Swiss-Webster male mice were exposed for 30 and 60 days in a 60-Hz, 100 kV/meter electric field to determine the effect of exposure on humoral and cellular components of the immune system. Quantitation of serum lgG and lgM with a double-antibody radioimmune assay revealed no significant difference in the levels of these immunoglobulins between exposed and sham-exposed mice for the two time periods. In conjunction with the serum studies, the relative concentrations of T and B lymphocytes in the peripheral blood were measured using the spontaneous rosette assay and the binding of fluorescent-labeled goat anti-mouse immunoglobulins. No significant difference was observed in the distribution of these lymphocyte populations in exposed and sham-exposed mice. (author)

  1. What Are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF)

    ... Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Games Activities Lessons MENU What are Electric and Magnetic Fields? (EMF) Kids Homepage ... electric power is something we take for granted. What are electric and magnetic fields? Electric and magnetic ...

  2. THOR Electric Field Instrument - EFI

    Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Bale, Stuart D.; Bonnell, John W.; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Phal, Yamuna; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Soucek, Jan; Vaivads, Andris; Åhlen, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Electric Field Instrument (EFI) will measure the vector electric field from 0 to 200 kHz. EFI consists of two sets of sensors: Spin-plane Double Probes (EFI-SDP) providing high sensitivity DC electric field in the spacecraft spin plane (2D), and the High-Frequency Antenna (EFI-HFA) providing 3D electric field at frequencies above ~1 kHz. EFI-SDP consists of 4 biased spherical probes extended on 50 m long wire booms, 90 degrees apart in the spin plane, giving a 100 m baseline for each of the two spin-plane electric field components. EFI-HFA consists of 6 x 1.25 m long monopoles, forming 3 dipolar antennas crossed at 90 degrees to each other. In addition to the sensors, EFI contains HFA and SDP pre-amplifiers, as well as bias electronics boards (BEBs) hosted in the man electronics box of the Field and Wave processor (FWP). As THOR spacecraft has a sun-pointing spin axis, EFI-SDP measures the electric field in the plane approximately orthogonal to the sun using long wire booms. The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces errors due to wake effects and asymmetric photoelectron clouds, enabling the highly accurate in comparison to earlier missions ±0.1 mV/m near-DC electric field measurements. Interferometry using the electric field probes can be used to infer wavelengths and scale sizes at the smallest scales in the plasma. EFI also measures the floating potential of the satellite, which can be used to estimate the plasma density at very high time resolution (up to a few hundred Hz). The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces changes in the illuminated area, and hence the associated spin-dependent errors. In combination with densities derived from the observed plasma frequency emission line, EFI monitors the plasma density from DC to a few hundred Hz. EFI measurements characterize electric field and density variations associated with kinetic scale plasma

  3. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    Engelhardt, Dalit; Freivogel, Ben; Iqbal, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole." We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a nonperturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U (1 ) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  4. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    Engelhardt, Dalit; Iqbal, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole". We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a non-perturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U(1) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  5. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    McComas, David J.; Nordholt, Jane E.

    1992-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field.

  6. Exposure assessment of extremely low frequency electric fields in Tehran, Iran, 2010.

    Nassiri, Parvin; Esmaeilpour, Mohammad Reza Monazzam; Gharachahi, Ehsan; Haghighat, Gholamali; Yunesian, Masoud; Zaredar, Narges

    2013-01-01

    Extremely Low-Frequency (ELF) electric and magnetic fields belonging to the nonionizing electromagnetic radiation spectrum have a frequency of 50 - 60 Hz. All people are exposed to a complex set of electric and magnetic fields that spread throughout the environment. The current study was carried out to assess people's exposure to an ELF electric field in the Tehran metropolitan area in 2010. The measurement of the electronic fields was performed using an HI-3604 power frequency field strength measurement device. A total number of 2,753 measurements were performed. Afterward, the data obtained were transferred to the base map using Arc View Version 3.2 and Arc Map Version 9.3. Finally, an interpolation method was applied to expand the intensity of the electric field to the entire city. Based on the results obtained, the electric field was divided into three parts with various intensities including 0-5 V m, 5-15 V m, and >15 V m. It should be noted that the status of high voltage transmission lines, electric substations, and specific points including schools and hospitals were also marked on the map. Minimum and maximum electric field intensities were measured tantamount to 0.31 V m and 19.80 V m, respectively. In all measurements, the electric field was much less than the amount provided in the ICNIRP Guide. The results revealed that 141 hospitals and 6,905 schools are situated in an area with electric field intensity equal to 0-5 V m, while 15 hospitals and 95 schools are located in zones of 5-15 V m and more than 15 V m. Examining high voltage transmission lines and electric substations in Tehran and its suburbs suggested that the impact of the lines on the background electric field of the city was low. Accordingly, 0.97 km of Tehran located on the city border adjacent to the high voltage transmission lines have an electric field in the range of 5 to 15 V m. The noted range is much lower than the available standards. In summary, it can be concluded that the public

  7. Special Effect of Parallel Inductive Electric Field

    陈涛; 刘振兴; W.Heikkila

    2002-01-01

    Acceleration of electrons by a field-aligned electric field during a magnetospheric substorm in the deep geomagnetic tail is studied by means of a one-dimensional electromagnetic particle code. It was found that the free acceleration of the electrons by the parallel electric field is obvious; kinetic energy variation is greater than electromagnetic energy variation in the presence of parallel electric field. Magnetic energy is greater than kinetic energy variation and electric energy variation in the absence of the parallel electric field. More wave modes in the presence of the parallel electric field are generated than those in the absence of the parallel electric field.

  8. Nanoconfined water under electric field

    Luzar, Alenka; Bratko, D.; Daub, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    We study the effect of electric field on interfacial tension of nanoconfined water [1,2] using molecular simulations. Our analysis and simulations confirm that classical electrostriction characterizes usual electrowetting behavior in nanoscale hydrophobic channels and nanoporous materials [3]. We suggest a new mechanism to orient nanoparticles by an applied electric field even when the particles carry no charges or dipoles of their own. Coupling to the field can be accomplished trough solvent-mediated interaction between the electric field and a nanoparticle [4]. For nanoscale particles in water, we find the response to the applied field to be sufficiently fast to make this mechanism relevant for biological processes, design of novel nanostructures and sensors, and development of nanoengineering methods [5]. [1]C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 505 (2007). [2] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 2504 (2007) [3] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 6807 (2008). [4] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Faraday Discussions 141, 55 (2009). [5] C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, T. Ali and A. Luzar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 207801 (2009).

  9. High power density, 60 Hz, single flow steam turbine with 42 inch titanium last row blade for advanced combined cycle applications

    Zabrecky, J.S.; Bezugly, J.A.; Brown, M.K.; Martin, H.F.

    1999-07-01

    Highly efficient, yet economical steam turbines with large exhaust areas and increased inlet pressure and temperature capability are required to complement the growth in combustion turbine power ratings and address the pursuit of higher combined cycle plant efficiencies. This paper discussed the design of a 130--190MW, 60 Hz steam turbine which addresses these requirements for 2 x 1F, 1 x 1G and Advanced Turbine Study (ATS) combined cycle plants. Features of interest include a compact, two casing, axial exhaust, single flow design with a two piece, welded IP-LP rotor and 42 inch titanium last row blade.

  10. Lattice QCD with strong external electric fields

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2012-01-01

    We study particle generation by a strong electric field in lattice QCD. To avoid the sign problem of the Minkowskian electric field, we adopt the "isospin" electric charge. When a strong electric field is applied, the insulating vacuum is broken down and pairs of charged particles are produced by the Schwinger mechanism. The competition against the color confining force is also discussed.

  11. Exhibition of electric and magnetic fields of extra-low frequency

    The existent norms were studied in the international environment regarding human beings' exhibition to electro-magnetic fields, under the points of view of the industrial frequency (60 Hz) and the time of exhibition. The norm CENELEC was selected (Committee Europeen of Normalisation Electro technique) ENV 50166-1. The electro-magnetic fields existent were measured in four substations of the Colombian interconnected system, locating the critical fields and relation them with the work places from the personnel exposed to this fields. In different areas of the substations studied they were values of electric field that violate the norm CENELEC, being the most critical case the areas of the module of line and of the patios of transformation. In magnetic field not it founded any violation of the mentioned norm. A serious case of exposed population was identified that corresponds to the gang in charge of carrying out the basic maintenance. This gang carries out its maintenance works in areas with critical electric fields and during superior times of exhibition to those permitted for the norm. The fields electrician and magnetic too were measured under the vain of transmission line of 115 kw and double vertical circuit. The measured values were compared with the values theoretical ob had by means of programs of calculation of fields electric and magnetic developed in the national university of Colombia, being obtained a very good approach for the case of the magnetic field. Using electro-magnetic field well known and trusts procedures, the measure probes were gauged in the laboratory of high voltage of the national university of Colombia

  12. Localization in an external electric field

    Bleibaum, O.; Belitz, D.

    2003-01-01

    The impact of an electric field on the electron localization problem is studied within the framework of a field-theoretic formulation. The investigation shows that the impact of the electric field on the localization corrections is governed by the interplay between two time scales, one set by the electric field, and the other by the phase relaxation rate. At very low temperatures the scaling of the conductivity is governed by the electric field. In this regime the conductivity depends logarit...

  13. GROUNDWATER AND SOIL REMEDIATION USING ELECTRICAL FIELD

    Enhancements of contaminants removal and degradation in low permeability soils by electrical fields are achieved by the processes of electrical heating, electrokinetics, and electrochemical reactions. Electrical heating increases soil temperature resulting in the increase of cont...

  14. Electrical field of electrical appliances versus distance: A preliminary analysis

    Every household electrical appliance that is plugged in emits electric field even if it is not operating. The source where the appliance is plugged into and the components of household electrical appliance contribute to electric field emission. The electric field may cause unknown disturbance to the environment or also affect the human health and the effect might depends on the strength of the electric field emitted by the appliance. This paper will investigate the strength of the electric field emitted by four different electrical appliances using spectrum analyser. The strength will be captured at three different distances; (i) 1m (ii) 2m and (iii) 3m and analysis of the strength of the electrical field is done based on the three different distances. The measurement results show that the strength of the electric field is strongest when it is captured at 1m and the weakest at 3m from the electrical appliance. The results proved that the farther an object is located from the electrical appliance; the less effect the magnetic field has.

  15. Electric Field Effect in Intrinsic Josephson Junctions

    Koyama, T.

    The electric field effect in intrinsic Josephson junction stacks (IJJ's) is investigated on the basis of the capacitively-coupled IJJ model. We clarify the current-voltage characteristics of the IJJ's in the presence of an external electric field. It is predicted that the IJJ's show a dynamical transition to the voltage state as the external electric field is increased.

  16. Influence of extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields upon growth development and behavior in domestic birds. Phase II (modulated wave). Final report, 15 Sep 1971--30 Apr 1976

    Durfee, W.K.; Polk, C.; Smith, L.T.; Keefe, T.J.; Muthukrishnan, S.

    1976-12-15

    Chicks and embryos of the domestic fowl were continuously exposed to ELF magnetic or electric fields modulated between 72 and 80 hertz. The magnetic fields were maintained at an intensity of 1 or 8 gauss and the electric fields were maintained at either 10 V/m; 1 V/m; 10 V/m plus 60 Hz, 3.5 V/m; or 1 V/m plus 60 Hz, 3.5 V/m. Uniform fields at identical frequencies and amplitudes were provided for continuous exposure of embryos and chicks during the preincubation holding period, incubation and hatching periods and through the first 28 days of brooding. Statistical analyses of the study results revealed that neither the magnetic nor the electric fields tested had significant or consistent effects on: Hatchability of fertile eggs; Embryo survival during the most critical stages of development; Early post-hatching growth and development; Growth and development of the sexually immature bird; Carbon dioxide production of the developing embryo; Subsequent aggressiveness (as adults) of females exposed early in life; or Hematocrits of birds at 4-6 weeks or at 8 months of age. The ELF fields used do not appear to have been detrimental to the survival or well-being of the exposed chicks.

  17. Cell separation using electric fields

    Mangano, Joseph (Inventor); Eppich, Henry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention involves methods and devices which enable discrete objects having a conducting inner core, surrounded by a dielectric membrane to be selectively inactivated by electric fields via irreversible breakdown of their dielectric membrane. One important application of the invention is in the selection, purification, and/or purging of desired or undesired biological cells from cell suspensions. According to the invention, electric fields can be utilized to selectively inactivate and render non-viable particular subpopulations of cells in a suspension, while not adversely affecting other desired subpopulations. According to the inventive methods, the cells can be selected on the basis of intrinsic or induced differences in a characteristic electroporation threshold, which can depend, for example, on a difference in cell size and/or critical dielectric membrane breakdown voltage. The invention enables effective cell separation without the need to employ undesirable exogenous agents, such as toxins or antibodies. The inventive method also enables relatively rapid cell separation involving a relatively low degree of trauma or modification to the selected, desired cells. The inventive method has a variety of potential applications in clinical medicine, research, etc., with two of the more important foreseeable applications being stem cell enrichment/isolation, and cancer cell purging.

  18. Rydberg atoms in magnetic and electric fields

    This chapter examines highly excited atoms in the presence of a uniform field, magnetic or electric. It discusses Rydberg atoms in magnetic fields; Rydberg atoms in electric fields; and Rydberg atoms in crossed fields. It reviews present knowledge of this subject which is of great theoretical interest and which has recently benefited from laser spectroscopy

  19. Electric Dipole Moment Experiment Systematic from Electric Field Discharge Current

    Feinberg, B.; Gould, Harvey

    2014-09-01

    A magnetic field, in the direction of the electric field and synchronous with the electric field reversal, will mimic an EDM signal. One might expect a discharge across the electric field plates to produce magnetic fields with only small or vanishing components parallel to the electric field, minimizing its systematic effect. Our experimental model, using simulated discharge currents, found otherwise: the discharge current may be at an angle to the normal, and thus generate a normal magnetic field. Comparison of data from the experimental model with the results from calculations will be presented, along with estimates of the time-averaged normal magnetic field seen by atoms in an electron EDM experiment using a fountain of laser-cooled francium, as a function of discharge current.

  20. Dosimetric and exposure reference levels in national and international guidelines/standards for low-frequency electric & magnetic fields

    Contemporary guidelines and standards on exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields consider- that induced currents/electric fields inside the human body (principally neural tissues) are relevant dosimetric quantities for setting protective limits against undesirable electrostimulation potentially leading to adverse effects. Additional consideration is given for surface electric charge effects such as discharges and contact currents for exposure to electric fields. These effects, with known interaction mechanisms providing sufficient basis for deriving human exposure limits, differ from effects connecting with the reported association of cancer or other illness with chronic exposure to ambient magnetic fields or proximity to electrical infrastructures The latter are considered associated with proposed- mechanisms that presently do not provide sufficient basis for deriving protective exposure limits. The International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has published relevant guidelines in 1998 and in 2010, and the Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE) has published its first standard StdC95.6 in 2002 and reaffirmed in 2007. In Australia, there was NHMRC* 'Interim guidelines on limits of exposure to 50/60Hz electric & magnetic fields' in 1989, and the Australian Radiation Protection & Nuclear Safety Agency (APPANSA) released for public consultation an ELF4 draft standard 'Exposure Limits for Electric & Magnetic Fields - ID Hz to 3 kHz' in 2006&. Its rationale is similar to the international documents with added information on precautionary approach and compliant verification. This paper reviews the historical development and presents a comparison of limits specified in the contemporary national and international standards/ guidelines. Although having a similar principal rationale, there are significant differences in specified dosimetric and exposure reference levels due to variation in available experimental data on

  1. Electric double layer of anisotropic dielectric colloids under electric fields

    Han, M.; Wu, H.; Luijten, E.

    2016-07-01

    Anisotropic colloidal particles constitute an important class of building blocks for self-assembly directed by electrical fields. The aggregation of these building blocks is driven by induced dipole moments, which arise from an interplay between dielectric effects and the electric double layer. For particles that are anisotropic in shape, charge distribution, and dielectric properties, calculation of the electric double layer requires coupling of the ionic dynamics to a Poisson solver. We apply recently proposed methods to solve this problem for experimentally employed colloids in static and time-dependent electric fields. This allows us to predict the effects of field strength and frequency on the colloidal properties.

  2. Discharge-generated electrical fields and electrical tree structures

    L. A. Dissado; Fothergill, J; Bromley, K. S.

    1998-01-01

    The discharge-avalanche (D-A) model for electrical tree propagation in polymers is founded entirely upon basic physical concepts. Electrical discharges in an existing tree structure are taken to raise the electrical field in the polymer both along the discharge path and particularly at the tree tips. As a result of the field increase, electron multiplication avalanches occur within the polymer causing damage, possibly through ionisation of polymer molecules, which is accumulated over a period...

  3. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    Schmid, Riccardo; Plaster, B; Filippone, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}$He atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}$He samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (long...

  4. Quantification of high latitude electric field variability

    Crowley, G.; Hackert, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Variability in the high latitude electric field has been identified as a major contributor to global Joule heating. Electric field patterns from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure are used to characterize the E-field temporal variability over the course of 18 hours. The standard deviation of the E-field magnitude on May 4, 1998 often exceeds the average value of the E-field magnitude. A significant fraction of this variability arises from oscillations wit...

  5. Spin-current induced electric field

    Sun, QF; Guo, H; Wang, J

    2003-01-01

    We theoretically investigate properties of the induced electric field of a steady-state spin-current without charge current, using an 'equivalent magnetic charge' method. Several general formula for the induced electric field are derived which play the role of 'Biot-Savart law' and 'Ampere's law.' Conversely, a moving spin is affected by an external electric field and we derive an expression for the interaction torque.

  6. Entanglement generation by electric field background

    Ebadi, Zahra, E-mail: z.ebadi@ph.iut.ac.ir; Mirza, Behrouz, E-mail: b.mirza@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-12-15

    The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

  7. Positrons trapped in polyethylene: Electric field effect

    The intensity of the iot2-component of positrons annihilated in polyethylene is found to increase with increasing electric field, while the formation probability of the positron state responsible for this component remains independent of the field. (orig.) 891 HPOE

  8. Radial electric fields for improved tokamak performance

    The influence of externally-imposed radial electric fields on the fusion energy output, energy multiplication, and alpha-particle ash build-up in a TFTR-sized, fusing tokamak plasma is explored. In an idealized tokamak plasma, an externally-imposed radial electric field leads to plasma rotation, but no charge current flows across the magnetic fields. However, a realistically-low neutral density profile generates a non-zero cross-field conductivity and the species dependence of this conductivity allows the electric field to selectively alter radial particle transport

  9. Rotating artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields

    Lembessis, V E; Alshamari, S; Siddig, A; Aldossary, O M

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of artificial gauge magnetic and electric fields created when a two-level atom interacts with an optical Ferris wheel light field.These fields have the spatial structure of the optical Ferris wheel field intensity profile. If this optical field pattern is made to rotate in space then we have the creation of artificial electromagnetic fields which propagate in closed paths. The properties of such fields are presented and discussed

  10. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value ar

  11. Substorm electric fields at nightside low latitude

    Hashimoto, K. K.; Kikuchi, T.; Tomizawa, I.; Nagatsuma, T.

    2014-12-01

    The convection electric field penetrates from the polar ionosphere to low latitude and drives the DP2 currents in the global ionosphere with an intensified equatorial electrojet (EEJ). The electric field often reverses its direction, that is, the overshielding occurs and causes the equatorial counterelectrojet (CEJ) during storm and substorms. In this paper we report that the overshielding electric field is detected by the HF Doppler sounders at low latitude on the nightside. We analyzed the Doppler frequency of the HF radio signals propagated over 120 km in Japan at frequencies of 5 and 8 MHz and compared with the equatorial EEJ/CEJ during the substorm expansion phase. We found that the overshielding electric field reaches around 2 mV/m during major substorms (AL <-1800 nT). Taking the geometrical attenuation into account, we estimate the equatorial electric field to be about 1.5 mV/m. We also found that the correlation coefficient was 0.94 between the overshielding electric field and eastward equatorial electrojet at YAP on the night side. The electric field drives the eastward electrojets in the equatorial ionosphere on the night side. It is to be noted that the overshielding electric field is observed on the nightside at low latitude during the major substorms, while the convection electric field is dominant during smaller size substorms, as the CEJ flows on the dayside. These results suggest that the overshielding electric field associated with the Region-2 field-aligned currents becomes dominant during substorms at low latitude on the nightside as well as on the dayside.

  12. Classical theory of electric and magnetic fields

    Good, Roland H

    1971-01-01

    Classical Theory of Electric and Magnetic Fields is a textbook on the principles of electricity and magnetism. This book discusses mathematical techniques, calculations, with examples of physical reasoning, that are generally applied in theoretical physics. This text reviews the classical theory of electric and magnetic fields, Maxwell's Equations, Lorentz Force, and Faraday's Law of Induction. The book also focuses on electrostatics and the general methods for solving electrostatic problems concerning images, inversion, complex variable, or separation of variables. The text also explains ma

  13. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  14. Electric field generation in martian dust devils

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Mars in situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the Macroscopic Triboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system. Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  15. Electric Conductivity of Carbon Nanoparticles Stimulated by Electric Field

    Host-guest interactions can be the unique method of spin manipulation in nanoscale. Strong changes in spin localization are generated when potential barriers between nanographitic units of activated carbon fibers are modified by interaction with adsorbed molecules. Stronger modifications occur when dipolar guest molecules are stimulated with external electric field. We report experimental results which show the influence of electric field on the spin localization in activated carbon fibers. (authors)

  16. Electric Field Dependence of the Electrical Conductivity of VOx

    Garcia, N.

    1985-01-01

    We have observed non-ohmic behavior in the resistivity of VOx for very small electric fields. In an attempt to explain these results several models are considered. We suggest that the sharpening of the transition to the insulating state with applied electric field is due to a reduction of the length of time during which regions of the sample fluctuate into the insulating state.

  17. Local electric field measurements by optical tweezers

    G. Pesce

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a new technique to measure direction and amplitude of electric fields generated by microelectrodes embedded in polar liquid environment, as often used in microfluidic devices. The method is based on optical tweezers which act as sensitive force transducer while a trapped charged microsphere behaves as a probe. When an electric field is applied the particles moves from its equilibrium position and finishes in a new equilibrium position where electric and optical forces are balanced. A trapped bead is moved to explore the electric field in a wide region around the microelectrodes. In such way maps of electric fields with high spatial resolution can be reconstructed even for complex electrode geometries where numerical simulation approaches can fail. Experimental results are compared with calculations based on finite element analysis simulation.

  18. Electric field replaces gravity in laboratory

    Gorgolewski, S.

    For several years experiments in physical laboratories and in the fitotron have shown that one can replace gravitational field with electrical fields for plants. First obvious experiments in strong electrical fields in the MV/m regi on show that any materials and living plants respond immediately to Coulomb forces. Such fields are found in nature during thunderstorms. One has to be very careful in handling such strong fields for safety reasons. The fair weather global electrical field is about 20,000 times weaker. The coulomb forces are proportional to the square of the field strength and are thus 400 milion times weaker for a field of the order of 100 V/m.Yet it was found that some plants respond to such "weak" fields. We must remember that the electrical field is a factor of 10 38 times stronger than gravitational interaction. In plants we have dissociated in water mineral salts and the ions are subject to such ernormous forces. It was shown and published that the positive charges in the air in fields of the order of 3kV/m enhance lettuce growth by a factor of four relative to fields about 30 times weaker (100V/m). Reversal of the field polarity reverses the direction of plant growth and retards the plant's growth. Such fields overpower the gravitropism in the laboratory. More so horizontal electrical field is othogonal to gravity, now the fields do not see each other. Lettuce now growth horizontally ignoring the gravitational field. We can thus select the plants whose electrotropism even in the laboratory overwhelms gravity. This is important for the long space flights that we must grow vegetarian food for the crew. The successful harvesting of wheat in orbit does not contradict our experimental findings because wheat is not electrotropic like all plants from the grass family. The results of fitotron experiments with kV/m electrical fields are richly illustrated with colour digital photographs. We also subjected the candle flame to very strong horizontal

  19. ESTIMATING ELECTRIC FIELDS FROM VECTOR MAGNETOGRAM SEQUENCES

    Determining the electric field distribution on the Sun's photosphere is essential for quantitative studies of how energy flows from the Sun's photosphere, through the corona, and into the heliosphere. This electric field also provides valuable input for data-driven models of the solar atmosphere and the Sun-Earth system. We show how observed vector magnetogram time series can be used to estimate the photospheric electric field. Our method uses a 'poloidal-toroidal decomposition' (PTD) of the time derivative of the vector magnetic field. These solutions provide an electric field whose curl obeys all three components of Faraday's Law. The PTD solutions are not unique; the gradient of a scalar potential can be added to the PTD electric field without affecting consistency with Faraday's Law. We then present an iterative technique to determine a potential function consistent with ideal MHD evolution; but this field is also not a unique solution to Faraday's Law. Finally, we explore a variational approach that minimizes an energy functional to determine a unique electric field, a generalization of Longcope's 'Minimum Energy Fit'. The PTD technique, the iterative technique, and the variational technique are used to estimate electric fields from a pair of synthetic vector magnetograms taken from an MHD simulation; and these fields are compared with the simulation's known electric fields. The PTD and iteration techniques compare favorably to results from existing velocity inversion techniques. These three techniques are then applied to a pair of vector magnetograms of solar active region NOAA AR8210, to demonstrate the methods with real data. Careful examination of the results from all three methods indicates that evolution of the magnetic vector by itself does not provide enough information to determine the true electric field in the photosphere. Either more information from other measurements, or physical constraints other than those considered here are necessary to find

  20. Nonlinear cell response to strong electric fields

    Bardos, D. C.; Thompson, C. J.; Yang, Y. S.; Joyner, K. H.

    2000-07-01

    The response of living cells to externally applied electric fields is of widespread interest. In particular, the intensification of electric fields across cell membranes is believed to be responsible, through membrane rupture and reversible membrane breakdown processes, for certain types of tissue damage in electrical trauma cases which cannot be attributed to Joule heating. Large elongated cells such as skeletal muscle fibres are particularly vulnerable to such damage. Previous theoretical studies of field intensification across cell membranes in such cells have assumed the membrane current to be linear in the applied field (Ohmic membrane conductivity) and were limited to sinusoidal applied fields. In this paper, we investigate a simple model of a long cylindrical cell, corresponding to nerve or skeletal muscle cells. Employing the electroquasistatic approximation, a system of coupled first-order differential equations for the membrane electric field is derived which incorporates arbitrary time dependence in the external field and nonlinear membrane response (non-Ohmic conductivity). The behaviour of this model is investigated for a variety of applied fields in both the linear and highly nonlinear regimes. We find that peak membrane fields predicted by the nonlinear model are approximately twice as intense, for low-frequency electrical trauma conditions, as those of the linear theory.

  1. Electropumping of water with rotating electric fields

    Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; De Luca, Sergio; Todd, Billy;

    2013-01-01

    exploiting the coupling of spin angular momentum to linear streaming momentum. A spatially uniform rotating electric field is applied to water molecules, which couples to their permanent electric dipole moments. The resulting molecular rotational momentum is converted into linear streaming momentum...

  2. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Zhifei Ge; Jeffrey L. Moran; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced i...

  3. Dimensional crossover driven by an electric field.

    Aron, Camille; Kotliar, Gabriel; Weber, Cedric

    2012-02-24

    We study the steady-state dynamics of the Hubbard model driven out of equilibrium by a constant electric field and coupled to a dissipative heat bath. For a very strong field, we find a dimensional reduction: the system behaves as an equilibrium Hubbard model in lower dimensions. We derive steady-state equations for the dynamical mean-field theory in the presence of dissipation. We discuss how the electric field induced dimensional crossover affects the momentum resolved and integrated spectral functions, the energy distribution function, as well as the steady current in the nonlinear regime. PMID:22463546

  4. Rotating Capacitor Measures Steady Electric Fields

    Johnston, A. R.; Kirkham, H.; Eng, B.

    1986-01-01

    Portable sensor measures electric fields created by dc powerlines or other dc-high-voltage sources. Measures fields from 70 to 50,000 V/m with linearity of 2 percent. Sensor used at any height above ground. Measures both magnitude and direction of field and provides signals representing these measurements to remote readout device. Sensor functions with minimal disturbance of field it is measuring.

  5. Midday reversal of equatorial ionospheric electric field

    R. G. Rastogi

    Full Text Available A comparative study of the geomagnetic and ionospheric data at equatorial and low-latitude stations in India over the 20 year period 1956–1975 is described. The reversal of the electric field in the ionosphere over the magnetic equator during the midday hours indicated by the disappearance of the equatorial sporadic E region echoes on the ionograms is a rare phenomenon occurring on about 1% of time. Most of these events are associated with geomagnetically active periods. By comparing the simultaneous geomagnetic H field at Kodaikanal and at Alibag during the geomagnetic storms it is shown that ring current decreases are observed at both stations. However, an additional westward electric field is superimposed in the ionosphere during the main phase of the storm which can be strong enough to temporarily reverse the normally eastward electric field in the dayside ionosphere. It is suggested that these electric fields associated with the V×Bz electric fields originate at the magnetopause due to the interaction of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field.

  6. Nanoparticle Near-Surface Electric Field.

    Chkhartishvili, Levan

    2016-12-01

    Theoretical studies show that surface reconstruction in some crystals involves splitting the surface atomic layer into two-upper and lower-sublayers consisting of atoms with only positive or only negative effective electric charges, respectively. In a macroscopic crystal with an almost infinite surface, the electric field induced by such a surface-dipole is practically totally concentrated between the sublayers. However, when the material is powdered and its particles are of sufficiently small sizes, an electric field of a significant magnitude can be induced outside the sublayers as well. We have calculated the distribution of the electric field and its potential induced at the surface of a disc-shaped particle. The suggested novel nanoscale effect explains the increase in physical reactivity of nanopowders with decreasing particle sizes. PMID:26831686

  7. Rotationally Vibrating Electric-Field Mill

    Kirkham, Harold

    2008-01-01

    A proposed instrument for measuring a static electric field would be based partly on a conventional rotating-split-cylinder or rotating-split-sphere electric-field mill. However, the design of the proposed instrument would overcome the difficulty, encountered in conventional rotational field mills, of transferring measurement signals and power via either electrical or fiber-optic rotary couplings that must be aligned and installed in conjunction with rotary bearings. Instead of being made to rotate in one direction at a steady speed as in a conventional rotational field mill, a split-cylinder or split-sphere electrode assembly in the proposed instrument would be set into rotational vibration like that of a metronome. The rotational vibration, synchronized with appropriate rapid electronic switching of electrical connections between electric-current-measuring circuitry and the split-cylinder or split-sphere electrodes, would result in an electrical measurement effect equivalent to that of a conventional rotational field mill. A version of the proposed instrument is described.

  8. Computer Simulation of Electric Field Lines.

    Kirkup, L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a computer program which plots electric field line plots. Includes program listing, sample diagrams produced on a BBC model B microcomputer (which could be produced on other microcomputers by modifying the program), and a discussion of the properties of field lines. (JN)

  9. Electric field measurements from Halley, Antarctica

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles

    2016-04-01

    Antarctica is a unique location for the study of atmospheric electricity. Not only is it one of the most pollutant free places on Earth, but its proximity to the south magnetic pole means that it is an ideal location to study the effects of solar variability on the atmospheric electric field. This is due to the reduced shielding effect of the geomagnetic field at the poles which leads to a greater flux of incoming Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) as well as an increased probability of energetic particle precipitation from SEPs and relativistic electrons. To investigate such effects, two electric field mills of different design were installed at the British Antarctic Survey Halley base in February 2015 (75. 58 degrees south, 26.66 degrees west). Halley is situated on the Brunt Ice Shelf in the south east of the Weddell Sea and has snow cover all year round. Preliminary analysis has focused on selection of fair weather criteria using wind speed and visibility measurements which are vital to assess the effects of falling snow, blowing snow and freezing fog on the electric field measurements. When the effects of such adverse weather conditions are removed clear evidence of the characteristic Carnegie Curve diurnal cycle exists in the Halley electric field measurements (with a mean value of 50V/m and showing a 40% peak to peak variation in comparison to the 34% variation in the Carnegie data). Since the Carnegie Curve represents the variation in thunderstorm activity across the Earth, its presence in the Halley data confirms the presence of the global atmospheric electric circuit signal at Halley. The work presented here will discuss the details of the Halley electric field dataset, including the variability in the fair weather measurements, with a particular focus on magnetic field fluctuations.

  10. Field Models in Electricity and Magnetism

    Barba, Paolo Di; Wiak, S

    2008-01-01

    Covering the development of field computation in the past forty years, Field Models in Electricity and Magnetism intends to be a concise, comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to field models in electricity and magnetism, ranging from basic theory to numerical applications. The approach assumed throughout the whole book is to solve field problems directly from partial differential equations in terms of vector quantities. Theoretical issues are illustrated by practical examples. In particular, a single example is solved by different methods so that, by comparison of results, limitations and advantages of the various methods are made clear. The subjects of the synthesis of fields and of the optimal design of devices, which are growing in research and so far have not been adequately covered in textbooks, are developed in addition to more classical subjects of analysis. Topics covered include: vector fields: electrostatics, magnetostatics, steady conduction; analytical methods for solving boundary-value probl...

  11. Pair production from an external electric field

    We solve numerically the problem of pair production from an external electric field in 1 + 1 dimensions including the quantum back-reaction from the produced pairs. We find that in the linear regime our numerical results agree perfectly with analytic calculations. In the strong field regime where tunnelling is uninhibited we determine the time it takes for the electric field to degrade due to energy transfer to the large number of pion field degrees of freedom. The problem has three time scales--the oscillation frequency of the charged quanta, the induced plasma oscillation frequency due to the production of pairs and finally the time scale for energy to be transferred from the electromagnetic field to the pion field. 4 refs., 5 figs

  12. Electric field profiles in obstructed helium discharge

    Fendel, Peter; Ganguly, Biswa; Bletzinger, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Axial and radial variations of electric field have been measured in dielectric shielded 25 mm diameter parallel plate electrode for 2 mA, 2250 V helium dc discharge at 1.75 Torr with 6.5 mm gap. The axial and radial electric field profiles have been measured from the polarization dependent Stark splitting of 21S --> 11 1P transition through collision induced fluorescence from 43D --> 23P. The electric field values showed a strong radial variation peaking up to 5 kV/cm near the cathode radial boundary, and decreasing to about 1 kV/cm near the anode, suggesting the formation of an obstructed discharge for this low Pd condition. Also, the on-axis electric field was nearly constant across the gap indicating a radially non-uniform current density. In order to obtain information about the space charge distribution in this obstructed discharge, it was modeled using the 2-d axisymmetric Poisson solver with COMSOL finite element modeling program. The model discharge dimensions were selected to match the experimental dimensions. The best fit to the measured electric field distribution was obtained with a space charge variation of ρ(r) =ρ0 (r/r0)3 , where ρ(r) is the local space charge density, ρ0 is the maximum space-charge density, r the local radial value and r0 the radius of the electrode.

  13. Nanoparticle Near-Surface Electric Field

    Chkhartishvili, Levan

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical studies show that surface reconstruction in some crystals involves splitting the surface atomic layer into two—upper and lower—sublayers consisting of atoms with only positive or only negative effective electric charges, respectively. In a macroscopic crystal with an almost infinite surface, the electric field induced by such a surface-dipole is practically totally concentrated between the sublayers. However, when the material is powdered and its particles are of sufficiently smal...

  14. Microwave electric field sensing with Rydberg atoms

    Stack, Daniel T.; Kunz, Paul D.; Meyer, David H.; Solmeyer, Neal

    2016-05-01

    Atoms form the basis of precise measurement for many quantities (time, acceleration, rotation, magnetic field, etc.). Measurements of microwave frequency electric fields by traditional methods (i.e. engineered antennas) have limited sensitivity and can be difficult to calibrate properly. Highly-excited (Rydberg) neutral atoms have very large electric-dipole moments and many dipole allowed transitions in the range of 1 - 500 GHz. It is possible to sensitively probe the electric field in this range using the combination of two quantum interference phenomena: electromagnetically induced transparency and the Autler-Townes effect. This technique allows for very sensitive field amplitude, polarization, and sub-wavelength imaging measurements. These quantities can be extracted by measuring properties of a probe laser beam as it passes through a warm rubidium vapor cell. Thus far, Rydberg microwave electrometry has relied upon the absorption of the probe laser. We report on our use of polarization rotation, which corresponds to the real part of the susceptibility, for measuring the properties of microwave frequency electric fields. Our simulations show that when a magnetic field is present and directed along the optical propagation direction a polarization rotation signal exists and can be used for microwave electrometry. One central advantage in using the polarization rotation signal rather than the absorption signal is that common mode laser noise is naturally eliminated leading to a potentially dramatic increase in signal-to-noise ratio.

  15. Temperature/electric field scaling in Ferroelectrics

    Hajjaji, Abdelowahed, E-mail: Hajjaji12@gmail.co [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Guyomar, Daniel; Pruvost, Sebastien [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Touhtouh, Samira [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, LPMC, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El-Jadida, Maroc (Morocco); Yuse, Kaori [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite, LGEF, INSA LYON, Bat. Gustave Ferrie, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Boughaleb, Yahia [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee, LPMC, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, 24000 El-Jadida, Maroc (Morocco)

    2010-07-01

    The effects of the field amplitude (E) and temperature on the polarization and their scaling relations were investigated on rhombohedral PMN-xPT ceramics. The scaling law was based on the physical symmetries of the problem and rendered it possible to express the temperature variation ({Delta}{theta}) as an electric field equivalent {Delta}E{sub eq}=({alpha}+2{beta}xP(E,{theta}{sub 0}))x{Delta}{theta}. Consequently, this was also the case for the relationship between the entropy ({Gamma}) and polarization (P). Rhombohedral Pb(Mg{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3}){sub 0.75}Ti{sub 0.25}O{sub 3} ceramics were used for the verification. It was found that such an approach permitted the prediction of the maximal working temperature, using only purely electrical measurements. It indicates that the working temperature should not exceed 333 K. This value corresponds to the temperature maximum before the dramatic decrease of piezoelectric properties. Reciprocally, the polarization behavior under electrical field can be predicted, using only purely thermal measurements. The scaling law enabled a prediction of the piezoelectric properties (for example, d{sub 31}) under an electrical field replacing the temperature variation ({Delta}{theta}) by {Delta}E/({alpha}+2{beta}xp(E,{theta}{sub 0})). Inversely, predictions of the piezoelectric properties (d{sub 31}) as a function of temperature were permitted using purely only electrical measurements.

  16. Electric field control of the cell orientation

    Westman, Christopher; Sabirianov, Renat

    2008-03-01

    Many physiological processes depend on the response of biological cells to external forces. The natural electric field at a wound controls the orientation of the cell and its division.[1] We model the cell as an elongated elliptical particle with given Young's modulus with surface charge distribution in the external electric field. Using this simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to electrostatics and the elasticity of cells, we calculated analytically the response of the cell orientation and its dynamics in the presence of time varying electric field. The calculations reflect many experimentally observed features. Our model predicts the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied electric field as a function of frequency similar to recent stress-induced effects.[2] *Bing Song, Min Zhao, John V. Forrester, and Colin D. McCaig, ``Electrical cues regulate the orientation and frequency of cell division and the rate of wound healing in vivo'', PNAS 2002, vol. 99 , 13577-13582. *R. De, A. Zemel, and S.A. Safran, ``Dynamics of cell orientation'', Nature Physics 2007, vol.3, 655.

  17. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation.

    Garcia, Paulo A; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L; Buie, Cullen R

    2016-01-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX(®), which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX(®) after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes. PMID:26893024

  18. Microfluidic Screening of Electric Fields for Electroporation

    Garcia, Paulo A.; Ge, Zhifei; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Buie, Cullen R.

    2016-02-01

    Electroporation is commonly used to deliver molecules such as drugs, proteins, and/or DNA into cells, but the mechanism remains poorly understood. In this work a rapid microfluidic assay was developed to determine the critical electric field threshold required for inducing bacterial electroporation. The microfluidic device was designed to have a bilaterally converging channel to amplify the electric field to magnitudes sufficient to induce electroporation. The bacterial cells are introduced into the channel in the presence of SYTOX®, which fluorescently labels cells with compromised membranes. Upon delivery of an electric pulse, the cells fluoresce due to transmembrane influx of SYTOX® after disruption of the cell membranes. We calculate the critical electric field by capturing the location within the channel of the increase in fluorescence intensity after electroporation. Bacterial strains with industrial and therapeutic relevance such as Escherichia coli BL21 (3.65 ± 0.09 kV/cm), Corynebacterium glutamicum (5.20 ± 0.20 kV/cm), and Mycobacterium smegmatis (5.56 ± 0.08 kV/cm) have been successfully characterized. Determining the critical electric field for electroporation facilitates the development of electroporation protocols that minimize Joule heating and maximize cell viability. This assay will ultimately enable the genetic transformation of bacteria and archaea considered intractable and difficult-to-transfect, while facilitating fundamental genetic studies on numerous diverse microbes.

  19. Electric field in type II superconductors

    Kolacek, J.; Lipavsky, P.; Spicka, V.

    1999-01-01

    Generally it is accepted that electric field E in type II superconductors is created by the vortex motion, so that it is proportional to the vortex velocity v_L. This assertion is based on the Josephson relation E = - v_L x B, which was derived and is valid if no transport current is present. We present arguments showing that if transport current is present, static electric field is proportional to the relative velocity of vortices in respect to the velocity of superconducting fluid v_s, so t...

  20. Electric Field Quantitative Measurement System and Method

    Generazio, Edward R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and system are provided for making a quantitative measurement of an electric field. A plurality of antennas separated from one another by known distances are arrayed in a region that extends in at least one dimension. A voltage difference between at least one selected pair of antennas is measured. Each voltage difference is divided by the known distance associated with the selected pair of antennas corresponding thereto to generate a resulting quantity. The plurality of resulting quantities defined over the region quantitatively describe an electric field therein.

  1. Electric field effects in RUS measurements.

    Darling, Timothy W; Allured, Bradley; Tencate, James A; Carpenter, Michael A

    2010-02-01

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material--a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the "statistical residual" strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods. PMID:19850314

  2. Electric Field Effects in RUS Measurements

    Darling, Timothy W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allured, Bradley [UNIV NEVADA, RENO; Carpenter, Michael A [CAMBRIDGE UNIV. UK

    2009-09-21

    Much of the power of the Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) technique is the ability to make mechanical resonance measurements while the environment of the sample is changed. Temperature and magnetic field are important examples. Due to the common use of piezoelectric transducers near the sample, applied electric fields introduce complications, but many materials have technologically interesting responses to applied static and RF electric fields. Non-contact optical, buffered, or shielded transducers permit the application of charge and externally applied electric fields while making RUS measurements. For conducting samples, in vacuum, charging produces a small negative pressure in the volume of the material - a state rarely explored. At very high charges we influence the electron density near the surface so the propagation of surface waves and their resonances may give us a handle on the relationship of electron density to bond strength and elasticity. Our preliminary results indicate a charge sign dependent effect, but we are studying a number of possible other effects induced by charging. In dielectric materials, external electric fields influence the strain response, particularly in ferroelectrics. Experiments to study this connection at phase transformations are planned. The fact that many geological samples contain single crystal quartz suggests a possible use of the piezoelectric response to drive vibrations using applied RF fields. In polycrystals, averaging of strains in randomly oriented crystals implies using the 'statistical residual' strain as the drive. The ability to excite vibrations in quartzite polycrystals and arenites is explored. We present results of experimental and theoretical approaches to electric field effects using RUS methods.

  3. DC Electric Fields at the Magnetopause

    Laakso, H. E.; Escoubet, C. P.; Masson, A.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the transfer of energy, momentum and mass through the magnetopause one needs to know several plasma and field parameters including the DC electric field which is known to be challenging to measure in tenuous plasma regions, e.g. in the inner side of the magnetopause where the density drops below 1/cc. However, each of the Cluster spacecraft carries five different experiments that can provide information about DC electric fields, i.e. double probe antenna (EFW) and electron drift meter (EDI) as well as electron and ion spectrometers (PEACE, CIS-HIA, CIS-CODIF). Each technique is very different and has its own strengths and limitations. Therefore it is important to compare all available measurements before making a judgement on DC electric field variation at the magnetopause; note that only very rarely all five measurements are available at the same time. Although the full-resolution observations in the Cluster archive are calibrated, they can still contain various errors. However, when two experiments show the same field, it is quite likely that this is the right field because the different measurements are based on so complimentary techniques and the field varies so much when the spacecraft moves from the magnetosheath through the magnetopause into the magnetosphere, or vice versa. In this presentation we present several cases of the magnetopause crossings and how the different measurements agree and disagree around the magnetopause region.

  4. Particle creation by peak electric field

    Adorno, T C; Gitman, D M

    2016-01-01

    The particle creation by the so-called peak electric field is considered. The latter field is a combination of two exponential parts, one exponentially-increasing and another exponentially-decreasing. We find exact solutions of the Dirac equation with the field under consideration with appropriate asymptotic conditions and calculate all the characteristics of particle creation effect, in particular, differential mean numbers of created particle, total number of created particles, and the probability for a vacuum to remain a vacuum. Characteristic asymptotic regimes are discussed in detail and a comparison with the pure asymptotically decaying field is considered.

  5. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, ∼10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching

  6. Atomic emission spectroscopy in high electric fields

    Bailey, J.E.; Filuk, A.B.; Carlson, A.L. [and others

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed-power driven ion diodes generating quasi-static, {approximately}10 MV/cm, 1-cm scale-length electric fields are used to accelerate lithium ion beams for inertial confinement fusion applications. Atomic emission spectroscopy measurements contribute to understanding the acceleration gap physics, in particular by combining time- and space-resolved measurements of the electric field with the Poisson equation to determine the charged particle distributions. This unique high-field configuration also offers the possibility to advance basic atomic physics, for example by testing calculations of the Stark-shifted emission pattern, by measuring field ionization rates for tightly-bound low-principal-quantum-number levels, and by measuring transition-probability quenching.

  7. Surface superconductivity controlled by electric field

    We discuss an effect of the electrostatic field on superconductivity near the surface. First, we use the microscopic theory of de Gennes to show that the electric field changes the boundary condition for the Ginzburg-Landau function. Second, the effect of the electric field is evaluated in the vicinity of Hc3, where the boundary condition plays a crucial role.We predict that the field effect on the surface superconductivity leads to a discontinuity of the magnetocapacitance. We estimate that the predicted discontinuity is accessible for nowadays experimental tools and materials. It is shown that the magnitude of this discontinuity can be used to predict the dependence of the critical temperature on the charge carrier density which can be tailored by doping.

  8. Interaction of electric and hydrodynamic fields

    Ostroumov, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic presentation is made of the basic electrophysical and hydromechanical characteristics that are responsible for the processes of heat and mass exchange in insulating fluids that are found in strong electric fields. Recommendations are made with respect to the intensification of these processes as well as to their use in science and technology. Promising topics for future research are indicated. The introduction lists two ways that lead to the elaboration of two concepts that are essential to electrohydrodynamics - electrochemical and electro-power engineering. The first four chapters deal with a study of pondermotive forces in immobile media. The fifth chapter presents experimental material on electric wind in gases. Information is also given on electric wind in fluids and a theoretical interpretation of this phenomenon, and on results of experimental and theoretical studies of electric breakdown of fluids. 200 references, 108 figures, 12 tables.

  9. Motional Spin Relaxation in Large Electric Fields

    Schmid, Riccardo; Filippone, B W

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the precession of spin-polarized Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms in uniform and static magnetic and electric fields and calculate the spin relaxation effects from motional $v\\times E$ magnetic fields. Particle motion in an electric field creates a motional $v\\times E$ magnetic field, which when combined with collisions, produces variations of the total magnetic field and results in spin relaxation of neutron and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ samples. The spin relaxation times $T_{1}$ (longitudinal) and $T_{2}$ (transverse) of spin-polarized UCN and $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms are important considerations in a new search for the neutron Electric Dipole Moment at the SNS \\emph{nEDM} experiment. We use a Monte Carlo approach to simulate the relaxation of spins due to the motional $v\\times E$ field for UCN and for $^{3}\\mathrm{He}$ atoms at temperatures below $600 \\mathrm{mK}$. We find the relaxation times for the neutron due to the $v\\times E$ effect to be long compared to the neutron lifetime, ...

  10. Vacuum interface flashover with bipolar electric fields

    Tucker, W.K.; Anderson, R.A.; Hasti, D.E.; Jones, E.E.; Bennett, L.F.

    1985-05-01

    High energy, compact, particle accelerators require accelerating cavities that have large gradients and operate with high efficiency. The bipolar electric fields required in these efficient accelerating cavities place severe requirements on the vacuum interface. Experimentally, we have found that the bipolar flashover field varies as t/sup -1/2/ for times out to 300 ns and then remains essentially constant at 33 kV/cm for longer duration waveforms, whereas materials subjected to unipolar electric fields follow a t/sup -1/6/ relationship. Furthermore, specific accelerating cavities offer enhancements that may be employed to achieve highly uniform electric fields across the vacuum interface. Using these results and the results of a previously developed theory of unipolar flashover, a new interface has been designed and 50 kV/cm bipolar flashover field achieved for a waveform train that lasted 1 ..mu..s. This paper will discuss the design of this vacuum interface and the evaluation of various materials that led to achieving bipolar flashover fields 50% greater than we had previously obtained for long duration waveforms. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Vacuum interface flashover with bipolar electric fields

    High energy, compact, particle accelerators require accelerating cavities that have large gradients and operate with high efficiency. The bipolar electric fields required in these efficient accelerating cavities place severe requirements on the vacuum interface. Experimentally, we have found that the bipolar flashover field varies as t/sup -1/2/ for times out to 300 ns and then remains essentially constant at 33 kV/cm for longer duration waveforms, whereas materials subjected to unipolar electric fields follow a t/sup -1/6/ relationship. Furthermore, specific accelerating cavities offer enhancements that may be employed to achieve highly uniform electric fields across the vacuum interface. Using these results and the results of a previously developed theory of unipolar flashover, a new interface has been designed and 50 kV/cm bipolar flashover field achieved for a waveform train that lasted 1 μs. This paper will discuss the design of this vacuum interface and the evaluation of various materials that led to achieving bipolar flashover fields 50% greater than we had previously obtained for long duration waveforms. 10 refs., 6 figs

  12. Plasma instabilities in high electric fields

    Morawetz, K.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1994-01-01

    expression is derived for the nonequilibrium dielectric function epsilon(K, omega). For certain values of momenta K and frequency omega, Imepsilon(K, omega) becomes negative, implying a plasma instability. This new instability exists only for strong electric fields, underlining its nonequilibrium origin....

  13. Modelling electricity forward markets by ambit fields

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole; Fred Espen Benth, Fred Espen; Veraart, Almut

    This paper proposes a new modelling framework for electricity forward markets, which is based on ambit fields. The new model can capture many of the stylised facts observed in energy markets. One of the main differences to the traditional models lies in the fact that we do not model the dynamics...

  14. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric electric fields

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the observed distribution of the ionospheric electric field can be deduced from an equation combining Ohm's law with the current continuity equation by using the 'observed' distribution of field-aligned currents as the boundary condition for two models of the ionosphere. The first model has one conductive annular ring representing the quiet-time auroral precipitation belt; the second has two conductive annular rings that simulate the discrete and diffuse auroral regions. An analysis is performed to determine how well the electric-field distribution can be reproduced. The results indicate that the first model reproduces the Sq(p)-type distribution, the second model reproduces reasonably well a substorm-type potential and ionospheric current patterns together with the Harang discontinuity, and that the distribution of field-aligned currents is the same for both models.

  15. Vacuum interface flashover with bipolar electric fields

    High energy, compact, particle accelerators require accelerating cavities that have large gradients and operate with high efficiency. The bipolar electric fields necessary in these efficient accelerating cavities place severe requirements on the insulator-vacuum interface. A new interface has been designed and 50 gv/cm bipolar flashover field achieved for a waveform train that lasted 1 μs. This paper discusses the design of this vacuum interface and the evaluation of various materials that led to achieving bipolar flashover fields 50% greater than the authors had previously obtained

  16. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  17. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of macromolecules: The electric field

    The use of dielectrophoresis is fast becoming a proven technique for manipulating particles and macromolecules in microfluidic systems. Here an analytic solution for the gradient in the electric field strength, {nable}·(E·E), produced by a two-dimensional array of parallel electodes is derived using the method of Green's functions. The boundary condition for the potential between electrodes is estimated by using a linear approximation. While the Green's function used here is somewhat different from Wang , J. Phys. D 29, 1649 (1996), the resulting analytic expression for the potential field is in exact agreement with their result. Selected results for equispaced electrodes with equal widths are compared with Wang , J. Phys. D 29, 1649 (1996). The analytic solution is employed to study the effects of electrode spacing and electrode width on the gradient in electric field intensity. Results show that the magnitude in the gradient in the electric field intensity exhibited the expected dependence on the applied voltage; however, the dependence on electrode width was found to be on the order of the electrode width squared. Results to explore the effects of electrode spacing show that as the spacing is reduced below two electrode widths the magnitude of the gradient increases exponentially

  18. Experimental demonstration of electric field tomography

    Electric field tomography (EFT) has recently been introduced in theory. It is a new kind of quasistatic tomography suitable for contactless imaging of biological tissues. Single-channel measurements have already proven the theory. Herein the first multi-channel measuring system for EFT is presented. Experiments on imaging of a test object with different geometries are described. The first EFT images obtained experimentally have been demonstrated and discussed

  19. Anisotropic donor states in electric field

    Zakrzewski, Adam J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we consider the application of the stabilization method to calculations of the ground state energy and resonance width of shallow donors in a uniform electric field. We show for the first time that within our formulation of this method it is very easy to include various factors influencing electronic structure of shallow impurities, like effective mass anisotropy or magnetic field. We demonstrate that the effective mass anisotropy significantly changes the lifetime of donor bound electrons. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Spin generation by strong inhomogeneous electric fields

    Finkler, Ilya; Engel, Hans-Andreas; Rashba, Emmanuel; Halperin, Bertrand

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by recent experiments [1], we propose a model with extrinsic spin-orbit interaction, where an inhomogeneous electric field E in the x-y plane can give rise, through nonlinear effects, to a spin polarization with non-zero sz, away from the sample boundaries. The field E induces a spin current js^z= z x(αjc+βE), where jc=σE is the charge current, and the two terms represent,respectively, the skew scattering and side-jump contributions. [2]. The coefficients α and β are assumed to be E- independent, but conductivity σ is field dependent. We find the spin density sz by solving the equation for spin diffusion and relaxation with a source term ∇.js^z. For sufficiently low fields, jc is linear in E, and the source term vanishes, implying that sz=0 away from the edges. However, for large fields, σ varies with E. Solving the diffusion equation in a T-shaped geometry, where the electric current propagates along the main channel, we find spin accumulation near the entrance of the side channel, similar to experimental findings [1]. Also, we present a toy model where spin accumulation away from the boundary results from a nonlinear and anisotropic conductivity. [1] V. Sih, et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 096605 (2006). [2] H.-A. Engel, B.I. Halperin, E.I.Rashba, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 166605 (2005).

  1. Mott insulators in strong electric fields

    Recent experiments on ultracold atomic gases in an optical lattice potential have produced a Mott insulating state of 87Rb atoms. This state is stable to a small applied potential gradient (an 'electric' field), but a resonant response was observed when the potential energy drop per lattice spacing (E), was close to the repulsive interaction energy (U) between two atoms in the same lattice potential well. We identify all states which are resonantly coupled to the Mott insulator for E≅U via an infinitesimal tunneling amplitude between neighboring potential wells. The strong correlation between these states is described by an effective Hamiltonian for the resonant subspace. This Hamiltonian exhibits quantum phase transitions associated with an Ising density wave order and with the appearance of superfluidity in the directions transverse to the electric field. We suggest that the observed resonant response is related to these transitions and propose experiments to directly detect the order parameters. The generalizations to electric fields applied in different directions and to a variety of lattices should allow study of numerous other correlated quantum phases

  2. Spontaneous electric fields in solid films: spontelectrics

    Field, David; Plekan, Oksana; Cassidy, Andrew;

    2013-01-01

    When dipolar gases are condensed at sufficiently low temperature onto a solid surface, they form films that may spontaneously exhibit electric fields in excess of 108V/m. This effect, called the ‘spontelectric effect’, was recently revealed using an instrument designed to measure scattering...... that the spontelectric field generally decreases monotonically with increased deposition temperature, with the exception of methyl formate that shows an increase beyond a critical range of deposition temperature. Films of spontelectric material show a Curie temperature above which the spontelectric effect disappears....... Heterolayers may also be laid down creating potential wells on the nanoscale. A model is put forward based upon competition between dipole alignment and thermal disorder, which is successful in reproducing the variation of the degree of dipole alignment and the spontelectric field with deposition temperature...

  3. Calculation of electric fields in imperfect dielectrics

    Filippov, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    No existing numerical method of calculating electric fields in kinetical form allows simultaneous consideration of bias current and conductivity current. This article suggests a modification of the method of integral equations allowing computation of the field in imperfect media. The use of the method is said to be more effective than the method of equivalent discharges. The method suggested allows computation of the field while simultaneously considering conductivity current and permeability current. It also allows determination of the frequency characteristics of high voltage apparatus. Furthermore, it can be used to calculate various transient processes if the applied voltage is expanded into a Fourier series and calculations are performed individually for each member of the series.

  4. Electron transport in argon in crossed electric and magnetic fields

    Ness; Makabe

    2000-09-01

    An investigation of electron transport in argon in the presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields is carried out over a wide range of values of electric and magnetic field strengths. Values of mean energy, ionization rate, drift velocity, and diffusion tensor are reported here. Two unexpected phenomena arise; for certain values of electric and magnetic field we find regions where the swarm mean energy decreases with increasing electric fields for a fixed magnetic field and regions where swarm mean energy increases with increasing magnetic field for a fixed electric field. PMID:11088933

  5. Observations of large transient magnetospheric electric fields

    Transient electric field events were observed with the long, double probe instrumentation carried by the IMP-6 satellite. Nine clearly defined, exceptionally large-amplitude events are presented here. The events are observed in the midnight sector at geocentric distances 3.5 to 5.5 R/sub e/ at middle latitudes within a magnetic L-shell range of 4.8 to 7.5. They usually have a total duration of one to several minutes, with peak power spectra amplitudes occurring at a frequency of about 0.3 Hz. The events occur under magnetically disturbed conditions, and in most cases they can be associated with negative dH/dt excursions at magnetic observatories located near the foot of the magnetic field line intersecting IMP-6. The magnetospheric motions calculated for these electric fields indicate a quasi-stochastical diffusive process rather than the general inward magnetospheric collapsing motion expected during the expansive phases of auroral substorm activity

  6. Hydrogel Actuation by Electric Field Driven Effects

    Morales, Daniel Humphrey

    Hydrogels are networks of crosslinked, hydrophilic polymers capable of absorbing and releasing large amounts of water while maintaining their structural integrity. Polyelectrolyte hydrogels are a subset of hydrogels that contain ionizable moieties, which render the network sensitive to the pH and the ionic strength of the media and provide mobile counterions, which impart conductivity. These networks are part of a class of "smart" material systems that can sense and adjust their shape in response to the external environment. Hence, the ability to program and modulate hydrogel shape change has great potential for novel biomaterial and soft robotics applications. We utilized electric field driven effects to manipulate the interaction of ions within polyelectrolyte hydrogels in order to induce controlled deformation and patterning. Additionally, electric fields can be used to promote the interactions of separate gel networks, as modular components, and particle assemblies within gel networks to develop new types of soft composite systems. First, we present and analyze a walking gel actuator comprised of cationic and anionic gel legs attached by electric field-promoted polyion complexation. We characterize the electro-osmotic response of the hydrogels as a function of charge density and external salt concentration. The gel walkers achieve unidirectional motion on flat elastomer substrates and exemplify a simple way to move and manipulate soft matter devices in aqueous solutions. An 'ionoprinting' technique is presented with the capability to topographically structure and actuate hydrated gels in two and three dimensions by locally patterning ions induced by electric fields. The bound charges change the local mechanical properties of the gel to induce relief patterns and evoke localized stress, causing rapid folding in air. The ionically patterned hydrogels exhibit programmable temporal and spatial shape transitions which can be tuned by the duration and/or strength of

  7. Electric field-free gas breakdown in explosively driven generators

    All known types of gas discharges require an electric field to initiate them. We are reporting on a unique type of gas breakdown in explosively driven generators that does not require an electric field.

  8. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  9. Electrostatic air filters generated by electric fields

    This paper presents theoretical and experimental findings on fibrous filters converted to electrostatic operation by a nonionizing electric field. Compared to a conventional fibrous filter, the electrostatic filter has a higher efficiency and a longer, useful life. The increased efficiency is attributed to a time independent attraction between polarized fibers and charged, polarized particles and a time dependent attraction between charged fibers and charged, polarized particles. The charge on the fibers results from a dynamic process of charge accumulation due to the particle deposits and a charge dissipation due to the fiber conductivity

  10. Perturbative renormalization of the electric field correlator

    Christensen, C.; Laine, M.

    2016-04-01

    The momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark in a hot QCD plasma can be extracted as a transport coefficient related to the correlator of two colour-electric fields dressing a Polyakov loop. We determine the perturbative renormalization factor for a particular lattice discretization of this correlator within Wilson's SU(3) gauge theory, finding a ∼ 12% NLO correction for values of the bare coupling used in the current generation of simulations. The impact of this result on existing lattice determinations is commented upon, and a possibility for non-perturbative renormalization through the gradient flow is pointed out.

  11. Perturbative renormalization of the electric field correlator

    C. Christensen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark in a hot QCD plasma can be extracted as a transport coefficient related to the correlator of two colour-electric fields dressing a Polyakov loop. We determine the perturbative renormalization factor for a particular lattice discretization of this correlator within Wilson's SU(3 gauge theory, finding a ∼12% NLO correction for values of the bare coupling used in the current generation of simulations. The impact of this result on existing lattice determinations is commented upon, and a possibility for non-perturbative renormalization through the gradient flow is pointed out.

  12. Perturbative renormalization of the electric field correlator

    Christensen, C

    2016-01-01

    The momentum diffusion coefficient of a heavy quark in a hot QCD plasma can be extracted as a transport coefficient related to the correlator of two colour-electric fields dressing a Polyakov loop. We determine the perturbative renormalization factor for a particular lattice discretization of this correlator within Wilson's SU(3) gauge theory, finding a ~12% NLO correction for values of the bare coupling used in the current generation of simulations. The impact of this result on existing lattice determinations is commented upon, and a possibility for non-perturbative renormalization through the gradient flow is pointed out.

  13. Application of Pulsed Electric Field on Bacteria

    Kadlec, Tomáš; Babický, Václav; Člupek, Martin; Vrbová, M.

    Prague: Czech Technical University in Prague, 2011 - (Pospíšilová, M.; Vrbová, M.; Macháň, R.), s. 161-164 ISBN 978-80-01-04915-0. [Instruments and Methods for Biology and Medicine 2011. Kladno (CZ), 02.06.2011-02.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802; GA ČR(CZ) GD104/09/H080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Pulsed Electric Field * Bacteria Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Characterization of composite particles responsive to electric and magnetic fields

    ZHAO Xiaopeng; GUO Hongxia

    2004-01-01

    The multilayer particles with responses to electric and magnetic fields are a prerequisite for particles assembled under external fields. Three routes to produce particles responsive to electric and magnetic fields are presented in this article. The size and morphology, properties as well as the electric-magnetic responses of three kinds of particles are comparatively discussed. This will provide a useful basis for the control of the behavior of the particles in suspensions by external electric and magnetic fields.

  15. Phosphate vibrations probe local electric fields and hydration in biomolecules

    Nicholas M Levinson; Bolte, Erin E.; Miller, Carrie S.; Corcelli, Steven A.; Boxer, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    The role of electric fields in important biological processes like binding and catalysis has been studied almost exclusively by computational methods. Experimental measurements of the local electric field in macromolecules are possible using suitably calibrated vibrational probes. Here we demonstrate that the vibrational transitions of phosphate groups are highly sensitive to an electric field and quantify that sensitivity, allowing local electric field measurements to be made in phosphate-co...

  16. Phosphate vibrations probe local electric fields and hydration in biomolecules

    Levinson, Nicholas M.; Bolte, Erin E.; Miller, Carrie S.

    2011-01-01

    The role of electric fields in important biological processes like binding and catalysis has been studied almost exclusively by computational methods. Experimental measurements of the local electric field in macromolecules are possible using suitably calibrated vibrational probes. Here we demonstrate that the vibrational transitions of phosphate groups are highly sensitive to an electric field and quantify that sensitivity, allowing local electric field measurements to be made in phosphate-containing biological systems without chemical modification. PMID:21809829

  17. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied

  18. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L.; Ström, P.; Lejeune, A.; Doveil, F.

    2015-06-01

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  19. Electric field induced Lyman-α emission of a hydrogen beam for electric field measurements

    Chérigier-Kovacic, L., E-mail: laurence.kovacic@univ-amu.fr; Doveil, F., E-mail: fabrice.doveil@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, FR-13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Ström, P., E-mail: pestro@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Lejeune, A., E-mail: aurelien.lejeune@ametek.com [CAMECA SAS - 29 Quai des Grésillons, 92622 Gennevilliers Cedex (France)

    2015-06-15

    Electric field induced Lyman-α emission is a new way of measuring weak electric fields in vacuum and in a plasma. It is based on the emission of Lyman-α radiation (121.6 nm) by a low-energy metastable H atom beam due to Stark-quenching of the 2s level induced by the field. In this paper, we describe the technique in detail. Test measurements have been performed in vacuum between two plates polarized at a controlled voltage. The intensity of emitted radiation, proportional to the square of the field modulus, has been recorded by a lock-in technique, which gives an excellent signal to noise ratio. These measurements provide an in situ calibration that can be used to obtain the absolute value of the electric field. A diagnostic of this type can help to address a long standing challenge in plasma physics, namely, the problem of measuring electric fields without disturbing the equilibrium of the system that is being studied.

  20. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field

    Rozenbaum, V. M.; Vovchenko, O. Ye.; Korochkova, T. Ye.

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters.

  1. Brownian dipole rotator in alternating electric field.

    Rozenbaum, V M; Vovchenko, O Ye; Korochkova, T Ye

    2008-06-01

    The study addresses the azimuthal jumping motion of an adsorbed polar molecule in a periodic n -well potential under the action of an external alternating electric field. Starting from the perturbation theory of the Pauli equation with respect to the weak field intensity, explicit analytical expressions have been derived for the time dependence of the average dipole moment as well as the frequency dependences of polarizability and the average angular velocity, the three quantities exhibiting conspicuous stochastic resonance. As shown, unidirectional rotation can arise only provided simultaneous modulation of the minima and maxima of the potential by an external alternating field. For a symmetric potential of hindered rotation, the average angular velocity, if calculated by the second-order perturbation theory with respect to the field intensity, has a nonzero value only at n=2 , i.e., when two azimuthal wells specify a selected axis in the system. Particular consideration is given to the effect caused by the asymmetry of the two-well potential on the dielectric loss spectrum and other Brownian motion parameters. When the asymmetric potential in a system of dipole rotators arises from the average local fields induced by an orientational phase transition, the characteristics concerned show certain peculiarities which enable detection of the phase transition and determination of its parameters. PMID:18643221

  2. Electric field control of Skyrmions in magnetic nanodisks

    Nakatani, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Kanai, S.; Fukami, S.; Ohno, H.

    2016-04-01

    The control of magnetic Skyrmions confined in a nanometer scale disk using electric field pulses is studied by micromagnetic simulation. A stable Skyrmion can be created and annihilated by an electric field pulse depending on the polarity of the electric field. Moreover, the core direction of the Skyrmion can be switched using the same electric field pulses. Such creation and annihilation of Skyrmions, and its core switching do not require any magnetic field and precise control of the pulse length. This unconventional manipulation of magnetic texture using electric field pulses allows a robust way of controlling magnetic Skyrmions in nanodiscs, a path toward building ultralow power memory devices.

  3. Fusion of bacterial spheroplasts by electric fields.

    Ruthe, H J; Adler, J

    1985-09-25

    Spheroplasts of Escherichia coli or Salmonella typhimurium were found to fuse in an electric field. We employed the fusion method developed by Zimmermann and Scheurich (1981): Close membrane contact between cells is established by dielectrophoresis (formation of chains of cells by an a.c. field), then membrane fusion is induced by the application of short pulses of direct current. Under optimum conditions the fusion yield was routinely 90%. Fusable spheroplasts were obtained by first growing filamentous bacteria in the presence of cephalexin, then converting these to spheroplasts by the use of lysozyme. The fusion products were viable and regenerated to the regular bacterial form. Fusion of genetically different spheroplasts resulted in strains of bacteria possessing a combination of genetic markers. Fusion could not be achieved with spheroplasts obtained by growing the cells in the presence of penicillin or by using lysozyme on bacteria of usual size. PMID:3899175

  4. Soil Identification using Field Electrical Resistivity Method

    Hazreek, Z. A. M.; Rosli, S.; Chitral, W. D.; Fauziah, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Aziman, M.; Ismail, B.

    2015-06-01

    Geotechnical site investigation with particular reference to soil identification was important in civil engineering works since it reports the soil condition in order to relate the design and construction of the proposed works. In the past, electrical resistivity method (ERM) has widely being used in soil characterization but experienced several black boxes which related to its results and interpretations. Hence, this study performed a field electrical resistivity method (ERM) using ABEM SAS (4000) at two different types of soils (Gravelly SAND and Silty SAND) in order to discover the behavior of electrical resistivity values (ERV) with type of soils studied. Soil basic physical properties was determine thru density (p), moisture content (w) and particle size distribution (d) in order to verify the ERV obtained from each type of soil investigated. It was found that the ERV of Gravelly SAND (278 Ωm & 285 Ωm) was slightly higher than SiltySAND (223 Ωm & 199 Ωm) due to the uncertainties nature of soils. This finding has showed that the results obtained from ERM need to be interpreted based on strong supported findings such as using direct test from soil laboratory data. Furthermore, this study was able to prove that the ERM can be established as an alternative tool in soil identification provided it was being verified thru other relevance information such as using geotechnical properties.

  5. Empirical high-latitude electric field models

    Electric field measurements from the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite have been analyzed to extend the empirical models previously developed from dawn-dusk OGO 6 measurements (J.P. Heppner, 1977). The analysis embraces large quantities of data from polar crossings entering and exiting the high latitudes in all magnetic local time zones. Paralleling the previous analysis, the modeling is based on the distinctly different polar cap and dayside convective patterns that occur as a function of the sign of the Y component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The objective, which is to represent the typical distributions of convective electric fields with a minimum number of characteristic patterns, is met by deriving one pattern (model BC) for the northern hemisphere with a +Y interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and southern hemisphere with a -Y IMF and two patterns (models A and DE) for the northern hemisphere with a -Y IMF and southern hemisphere with a +Y IMF. The most significant large-scale revisions of the OGO 6 models are (1) on the dayside where the latitudinal overlap of morning and evening convection cells reverses with the sign of the IMF Y component, (2) on the nightside where a westward flow region poleward from the Harang discontinuity appears under model BC conditions, and (3) magnetic local time shifts in the positions of the convection cell foci. The modeling above was followed by a detailed examination of cases where the IMF Z component was clearly positive (northward). Neglecting the seasonally dependent cases where irregularities obscure pattern recognition, the observations range from reasonable agreement with the new BC and DE models, to cases where different characteristics appeared primarily at dayside high latitudes

  6. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  7. Electric field assisted sintering (EFAST): Plasma?

    Electric Field Assisted Sintering (EFAST) discovered in third decade of nineteenth century. This field assisted sintering (FAST) plays a key role in compacting Nano-composites. This sintering technique is also named as Plasma Assisted Sintering (PAS). Commercially this technique is named as Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS). Plasma discharge plays a major role in consolidation of composites. The electrical discharge between powder particles results in confined to a small area and short-lived heating of the particles surfaces up to more than a few thousand degrees Celsius. Since the micro-plasma discharges form uniformly all through the sample volume, the generated heat is also consistently distributed. The particles surfaces are purified and activated due to the elevated temperature causing vaporization of the impurities strenuous on the particle surface. The purified surface layers of the particles melt and mingle to each other forming 'necks' between the particles. Several modeling and experimental studies carried out by researchers, but nobody confirms absolutely the existence of plasma in this technique till today. Present revise focusing on survival of PLASMA in Plasma Assisted Sintering (PAS) and its necessity. (author)

  8. Hypersensitivity test to electric magnetic fields

    The so-called electromagnetic hypersensitivity (RH) syndrome includes a number of unspecific, medically unexplained symptoms attributed to exposure to electric and magnetic fields. As a whole, laboratory tests have provided inconclusive results, in part due to the fact that many individuals show nuclear, inconsistent responses to repeated experimental field-exposures. It has been proposed that such inconsistencies could be due in part to distress caused by the lab test itself. We have developed a test to be conducted at the patient's residence, allowing for long-term follow up of exposure-response assessment and avoiding the laboratory environment and the presence of the researcher as potential stressors and confounding factors. In a pilot test, EMDEX-II magnetometers were used to continuously recording power-frequency magnetic fields in the residence of a patient with perceived EH. The patient's symptoms included distress, headache and dizziness, among other ailments. Magnetographic data of a total of 123 recording days were plotted against the corresponding data on occurrence of the symptoms episodes. As a whole, the results did not show positive linear correlation between the daily occurrence of the episode and the exposures levels recorded during the day or during the day before. These preliminary results are little supportive of the hypothesis that the patient's ailments are caused or worsened by a putative hypersensitivity to residential exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields in the 0.02-4.00 μT range. (Author) 29 refs

  9. Effect of electric fields on the stabilization of premixed laminar bunsen flames at low AC frequency: Bi-ionic wind effect

    Kim, Minkuk

    2012-03-01

    The stabilization characteristics of laminar premixed bunsen flames have been investigated experimentally by applying AC electric fields at low frequency below 60. Hz together with DC in the single electrode configuration. The blowoff velocity has been measured for varying AC voltage and frequency. A transition frequency between low and high frequency regimes has been identified near 40-50. Hz, where AC electric fields have minimal effect on flame stabilization. In the low frequency regime, the blowoff velocity decreased linearly with AC voltage such that the flames became less stable. This was consistent with the DC result, implying the influence of the ionic wind effect. The variation of blowoff velocity with AC frequency showed a non-monotonic behavior in that the velocity decreased and then increased, exhibiting minimum blowoff velocity near 6-8. Hz. Based on the molecular kinetic theory, the developing degree of ionic wind was derived. By considering the ionic wind effects arising from both positive and negative ions in a flame zone, the bi-ionic wind effect successfully explained the non-monotonic behavior of blowoff velocity with AC frequency in the low frequency regime. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  10. Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography for determining electric field distribution during electroporation

    Electroporation is a phenomenon caused by externally applied electric field to cells that results in an increase of cell membrane permeability to various molecules. Accurate coverage of the tissue with a sufficiently large electric field presents one of the most important conditions for successful membrane permeabilization. Applications based on electroporation would greatly benefit with a method for monitoring the electric field, especially if it could be done in situ. As the membrane electroporation is a consequence of an induced transmembrane potential, which is directly proportional to the local electric field, we have been investigating current density imaging and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography techniques to determine the electric field distribution during electroporation. In this paper, we present comparison of current density and electric field distribution in an agar phantom and in a liver tissue exposed to electroporation pulses. As expected, a region of increased electrical conductivity was observed in the liver tissue exposed to sufficiently high electric field but not in agar phantom.

  11. Anisotropy of magnetic emulsions induced by magnetic and electric fields

    Dikansky, Yury I.; Tyatyushkin, Alexander N.; Zakinyan, Arthur R.

    2011-01-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic emulsions induced by simultaneously acting electric and magnetic fields is theoretically and experimentally investigated. Due to the anisotropy, the electric conductivity and magnetic permeability of a magnetic emulsion are no longer scalar coefficients, but are tensors. The electric conductivity and magnetic permeability tensors of sufficiently diluted emulsions in sufficiently weak electric and magnetic fields are found as functions of the electric and magnetic in...

  12. Experimental Investigation of Integrated Optical Intensive Impulse Electric Field Sensors

    SUN Bao; CHEN Fu-Shen

    2009-01-01

    We design and fabricate an integrated optical electric field sensor with segmented electrode for intensive im-pulse electric field measurement. The integrated optical sensor is based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer with segmented electrodes. The output/input character of the sensing system is analysed and measured. The max-imal detectable electric field range (-75 kV/m to 245 kV/m) is obtained by analysing the results. As a result, the integrated optics electric field sensing system is suitable for transient intensive electric field measurement investigation.

  13. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields

  14. Experimental Investigation of Integrated Optical Intensive Impulse Electric Field Sensors

    We design and fabricate an integrated optical electric field sensor with segmented electrode for intensive impulse electric field measurement. The integrated optical sensor is based on a Mach–Zehnder interferometer with segmented electrodes. The output/input character of the sensing system is analysed and measured. The maximal detectable electric field range (−75 kV/m to 245 kV/m) is obtained by analysing the results. As a result, the integrated optics electric field sensing system is suitable for transient intensive electric field measurement investigation

  15. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [School of Biosystem and Biomedical Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Eui Kwan [Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  16. Saturation of the Electric Field Transmitted to the Magnetosphere

    Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.; Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    We reexamined the processes leading to saturation of the electric field, transmitted into the Earth's ionosphere from the solar wind, incorporating features of the coupled system previously ignored. We took into account that the electric field is transmitted into the ionosphere through a region of open field lines, and that the ionospheric conductivity in the polar cap and auroral zone may be different. Penetration of the electric field into the magnetosphere is linked with the generation of the Alfven wave, going out from the ionosphere into the solar wind and being coupled with the field-aligned currents at the boundary of the open field limes. The electric field of the outgoing Alfven wave reduces the original electric field and provides the saturation effect in the electric field and currents during strong geomagnetic disturbances, associated with increasing ionospheric conductivity. The electric field and field-aligned currents of this Alfven wave are dependent on the ionospheric and solar wind parameters and may significantly affect the electric field and field-aligned currents, generated in the polar ionosphere. Estimating the magnitude of the saturation effect in the electric field and field-aligned currents allows us to improve the correlation between solar wind parameters and resulting disturbances in the Earth's magnetosphere.

  17. Calculation of Electric Field Characteristics of Insulator Under Sandstorm Condition

    Zhao Shanpeng; Zhang Youpeng; Chen Zhidong; Dong Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Sandstorm has influence on the the electrical properties of outdoor insulator, and the analysis of the electric field characteristics of insulator under sandstorm condition is very important. The electrostatic field finite element method (FEM) is used to calculate the electric field distribution along long rod insulator under sandstorm condition with FEM software after calculating the one under clean condition. The results of calculation show that the sand deposition decreases the electric fi...

  18. Effect of Electric and Magnetic Fields on Spin Dynamics in the Resonant Electric Dipole Moment Experiment

    Silenko, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    A buildup of the vertical polarization in the resonant electric dipole moment (EDM) experiment [Y. F. Orlov, W. M. Morse, and Y. K. Semertzidis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 214802 (2006)] is affected by a horizontal electric field in the particle rest frame oscillating at a resonant frequency. This field is defined by the Lorentz transformation of an oscillating longitudinal electric field and a uniform vertical magnetic one. The effect of a longitudinal electric field is significant, while the cont...

  19. MTX microwave-electric-field diagnostic

    A joint Japan-U.S. project is in progress to measure the high electric fields produced by a free-electron laser beam of GW-peak-power level when injected into the plasma of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. In this report, we discuss the planned method of measurement and the status of the work. The equipment needed is either well along in the design stage or is being built. We plan to test out the combined operation of all components in Japan before shipping to Livermore. Although the measurement appears difficult for a variety of technical and physics reasons, calculations indicate that it should be possible. (author)

  20. Electrical integrity of oxides in a radiation field

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Kinoshita, C.

    1996-04-01

    In the absence of an applied electric field, irradiation generally produces a decrease in the permanent (beam-off) electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators. However, in the past 6 years several research groups have reported a phenomenon known as radiation induced electrical degradation (RIED), which produces significant permanent increases in the electrical conductivity of ceramic insulators irradiated with an applied electric field. RIED has been reported to occur at temperatures between 420 and 800 K with applied electric fields as low as 20 V/mm.

  1. Difficulties in Learning the Concept of Electric Field.

    Furio, C.; Guisasola, J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes students' main difficulties in learning the concept of electric field. Briefly describes the main conceptual profiles within which electric interactions can be interpreted and concludes that most students have difficulty using the idea of electric field. Contains 28 references. (DDR)

  2. Silica microwire-based interferometric electric field sensor.

    Han, Chunyang; Lv, Fangxing; Sun, Chen; Ding, Hui

    2015-08-15

    Silica microwire, as an optical waveguide whose diameter is close to or smaller than the wavelength of the guided light, is of great interest because it exhibits a number of excellent properties such as tight confinement, large evanescent fields, and great configurability. Here, we report a silica microwire-based compact photonic sensor for real-time detection of high electric field. This device contains an interferometer with propylene carbonate cladding. Based on the Kerr electro-optic effect of propylene carbonate, the applied intensive transient electric field can change the refractive index of propylene carbonate, which shifts the interferometric fringe. Therefore, the electric field could be demodulated by monitoring the fringe shift. The sensor was successfully used to detect alternating electric field with frequency of 50 Hz and impulse electric field with duration time of 200 μs. This work lays a foundation for future applications in electric field sensing. PMID:26274634

  3. Calculation of Electric Field Characteristics of Insulator Under Sandstorm Condition

    Zhao Shanpeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sandstorm has influence on the the electrical properties of outdoor insulator, and the analysis of the electric field characteristics of insulator under sandstorm condition is very important. The electrostatic field finite element method (FEM is used to calculate the electric field distribution along long rod insulator under sandstorm condition with FEM software after calculating the one under clean condition. The results of calculation show that the sand deposition decreases the electric field strength of insulator covered with sand, and increases the field strength of the corresponding shed key points. The electric field strength of the non-sand region will increase, when the non-sand region appears in sand layer on insulator. Suspended sand particles in the ambient air can distort the electric field distribution along insulator, and which is significantly affected by the size, the quantity, the charge-to-mass ratio and the charge polarity of sand particles.

  4. A new probe for measuring small electric fields in plasmas

    Stenzel, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    A dipolar double probe has been developed for in situ measurements of small electric fields in laboratory plasmas. The probe measures dc to ac electric fields (f values between 0 and 20 MHz) with high sensitivity (Emin about 10 microV/cm) and responds to both space charge electric fields and inductive electric fields. Using voltage-to-frequency conversion, the probe signal is obtained free of errors and loading effects by a transmission line. Various examples of useful applications for the new probe are presented, such as measurements of dc ambipolar fields, ac space-charge fields of ion acoustic waves, ac inductive fields of whistler waves, and mixed inductive and space-charge electric fields in current-carrying magnetoplasmas.

  5. Giant enhancement of photodissociation of polar dimers in electric fields

    González-Férez, R.; Schmelcher, P.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the photodissociation of polar dimers in static electric fields in the cold regime using the example of the LiCs molecule. A giant enhancement of the differential cross section is found for laboratory electric field strengths, and analyzed with varying rovibrational bound states, continuum energies as well as field strengths.

  6. Pair Creation of Open Strings in an Electric Field

    Bachas, C.; Porrati, M.

    1992-01-01

    We calculate exactly the rate of pair production of open bosonic and supersymmetric strings in a constant electric field. The rate agrees with Schwinger's classic result in the weak-field limit, but diverges when the electric field approaches some critical value of the order of the string tension. (Phyzzx file)

  7. Generation of Electric Field and Net Charge in Hall Reconnection

    MA Zhi-Wei; FENG Shu-Ling

    2008-01-01

    @@ Generation of Hall electric field and net charge associated with magnetic reconnection is studied under different initial conditions of plasma density and magnetic field. With inclusion of the Hall effects, decoupling of the electron and ion motions leads to the formation of a narrow layer with strong electric field and large net charge density along the separatrix. The asymmetry of the plasma density or magnetic field or both across the current sheet will largely increase the magnitude of the electric field and net charge. The results indicate that the asymmetry of the magnetic field is more effective in producing larger electric field and charge density. The electric field and net charge are always much larger in the low density or/and high magnetic field side than those in the high density or/and low magnetic field side. Both the electric field and net charge density are linearly dependent on the ratios of the plasma density or the square of the magnetic field across the current sheet. For the case with both initial asymmetries of the magnetic field and density, rather large Hall electric field and charge density are generated.

  8. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  9. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    Hirata, Akimasa; Hattori, Junya; Laakso, Ilkka; Takagi, Airi; Shimada, Takuo

    2013-11-01

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat.

  10. Computation of induced electric field for the sacral nerve activation

    The induced electric field/current in the sacral nerve by stimulation devices for the treatment of bladder overactivity is investigated. Implanted and transcutaneous electrode configurations are considered. The electric field induced in the sacral nerve by the implanted electrode is largely affected by its surrounding tissues, which is attributable to the variation in the input impedance of the electrode. In contrast, the electric field induced by the transcutaneous electrode is affected by the tissue conductivity and anatomical composition of the body. In addition, the electric field induced in the subcutaneous fat in close proximity of the electrode is comparable with the estimated threshold electric field for pain. These computational findings explain the clinically observed weakness and side effect of each configuration. For the transcutaneous stimulator, we suggest that the electrode contact area be increased to reduce the induced electric field in the subcutaneous fat. (paper)

  11. Measurement of electric fields in the H-1NF heliac

    There are a number of laser induced fluorescence techniques which can be used to measure internal plasma electric fields. It is planned to use a technique based on Stark mixing of energy levels in a supersonic beam containing metastable helium atoms to measure radial electric fields in H-1NF. Enhanced values of radial electric field are associated with improved confinement modes in H-1NF and other magnetically confined plasmas

  12. Measurements of the vertical atmospheric electric field and of the electrical conductivity with stratospheric balloons

    Iversen, I. B.; Madsen, M. M.; Dangelo, N.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric (vertical) electric field with balloons in the stratosphere are reported. The atmospheric electrical conductivity is also measured and the current density inferred. The average vertical current shows the expected variation with universal time and is also seen to be influenced by external (magnetospheric) electric fields.

  13. Electric field breakdown in single molecule junctions.

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy A; Zhang, Vivian; Steigerwald, Michael L; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    2015-04-22

    Here we study the stability and rupture of molecular junctions under high voltage bias at the single molecule/single bond level using the scanning tunneling microscope-based break-junction technique. We synthesize carbon-, silicon-, and germanium-based molecular wires terminated by aurophilic linker groups and study how the molecular backbone and linker group affect the probability of voltage-induced junction rupture. First, we find that junctions formed with covalent S-Au bonds are robust under high voltage and their rupture does not demonstrate bias dependence within our bias range. In contrast, junctions formed through donor-acceptor bonds rupture more frequently, and their rupture probability demonstrates a strong bias dependence. Moreover, we find that the junction rupture probability increases significantly above ∼1 V in junctions formed from methylthiol-terminated disilanes and digermanes, indicating a voltage-induced rupture of individual Si-Si and Ge-Ge bonds. Finally, we compare the rupture probabilities of the thiol-terminated silane derivatives containing Si-Si, Si-C, and Si-O bonds and find that Si-C backbones have higher probabilities of sustaining the highest voltage. These results establish a new method for studying electric field breakdown phenomena at the single molecule level. PMID:25675085

  14. The electric field gradient in fluorides

    The electric quadrupole hyperfine interaction was investigated for various fluorides by the time-differential observation of the perturbed γ angular correlation and the Kern-Hanle effect of the 197 keV radiation of the 5/2+ level in 19F. This level was excited by inelastic proton scattering. The dependence of the quadrupole coupling constant from the chemical bond of the atom to its ligands was measured in fluorides of two-valid transition elements and in pureley covalent molecules, as (CF2)sub(n) or SF6. The influence of radiation-induced defects in nonmetals was investigated for cubic fluorides between 80 K and 1050 K. For CaF2 two different field gradients are obtained with coupling constants between 27 MHz and 3 MHz. By measurements of the angular distribution for CaF2/PrF3 mixed crystals which contain a variable concentration of F- interstitials was shown that the appearance of the 3 MHz frequency is correlated with the concentration of F- interstitials in CaF2. (BHO)

  15. Substorm electric fields in the earth's magnetotail

    A survey has been made of all the electric field data from the University of California, Berkeley, double probe experiment on ISEE-1 (apogee approximately 22 earth radii) during 1980 when the satellite was in the magnetotail. This study was restricted to the 74 events where E cross B flows could be calculated and were equal to or greater than 100 km/s. Substorm times were determined by examining the Ae index for peaks equal to or greater than 250 gamma. In association with substorms, approximately 70 percent of the flows were earthward, and approximately 20 percent had a signature called near satellite reconnection (first described by Nishida et al. (1983) of tailward flow followed by earthward flow which can be interpreted in terms of a model where the x-line forms earthward of the satellite and subsequently propagates tailward of X(GSM) = -21 earth radii and within the absolute value of Y(GSM) equal to or less than 4.5 earth radii. These data suggest that the near earth x-line usually forms tailward of X(GSM) approximately -20 earth radii. 17 references

  16. Effect of increased ionization on the atmospheric electric field

    This study is a review of atmospheric electrical theory with the purpose of predicting the atmospheric electrical effects of increased ionization caused by radioactive inert gases. A time-independent perturbation model for the global atmospheric electric circuit precdicts that the electric field at the sea surface would be reduced to about 76% of its unperturbed value by a surface 85Kr concentration of 3 nCi/m3. The electric field at a typical land station is predicted to be about 84% of its unperturbed value. Some scientists have suggested that the atmospheric electric field is part of a closed electrical feedback loop. The present model does not include such a closed feedback loop and may underestimate the total effects. This model is also useful for interpreting atmospheric electrical responses to natural fluctuations in the cosmic-ray component of background radiation

  17. High electric field measurement using slab-coupled optical sensors.

    Stan, Nikola; Seng, Frederick; Shumway, LeGrand; King, Rex; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    A fiber-optic electric field sensor was developed to measure electric field up to 18 MV/m. The sensor uses resonant coupling between an optical fiber and a nonlinear electro-optical crystal. The sensing system uses high dielectric strength materials to eliminate dielectric breakdown. A postprocessing nonlinear calibration method is developed that maps voltage change to wavelength shift and then converts the wavelength shift to electric field using the transmission spectrum. The nonlinear calibration method is compared against the linear method with electric field pulses having magnitudes from 1.5 to 18 MV/m. PMID:26835936

  18. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2008-06-10

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  19. Dynamics of carbon nanotube alignment by electric fields

    The dynamics of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) alignment inside viscous media using electric fields is investigated. Electrical current measurements were performed in situ during the application of an electric field to liquid solutions of deionized water or dissolved polymer containing MWCNTs. The variation of electrical current over time was associated to the dynamics of the MWCNT network formation. The influence of the electric field magnitude and frequency on the MWCNT network formation was studied. MWCNT migration towards the negative electrode was observed when a direct current electric field was applied, whereas formation of an aligned MWCNT network was achieved for an alternating current electric field. The increase of the electric field frequency promotes a faster formation of an aligned MWCNT network and thinner MWCNT bundles. A higher viscosity of the liquid medium yields slower MWCNT alignment evidenced by a slower change of electrical current through the viscous system. An analytical model based on the dielectrophoresis-induced torque, which considers the viscosity of the medium, is also proposed to explain the dynamics of MWCNT alignment. Furthermore, aligned MWCNT/polysulfone solid composites were fabricated and electrically characterized. The solid composites presented anisotropic electrical conductivity, which was more evident for low MWCNT concentrations (0.1–0.2 wt%). (paper)

  20. Surface electric fields for North America during historical geomagnetic storms

    Wei, Lisa H.; Homeier, Nichole; Gannon, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the impact of geomagnetic disturbances on the electric grid, we recreate surface electric fields from two historical geomagnetic storms—the 1989 “Quebec” storm and the 2003 “Halloween” storms. Using the Spherical Elementary Current Systems method, we interpolate sparsely distributed magnetometer data across North America. We find good agreement between the measured and interpolated data, with larger RMS deviations at higher latitudes corresponding to larger magnetic field variations. The interpolated magnetic field data are combined with surface impedances for 25 unique physiographic regions from the United States Geological Survey and literature to estimate the horizontal, orthogonal surface electric fields in 1 min time steps. The induced horizontal electric field strongly depends on the local surface impedance, resulting in surprisingly strong electric field amplitudes along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The relative peak electric field amplitude of each physiographic region, normalized to the value in the Interior Plains region, varies by a factor of 2 for different input magnetic field time series. The order of peak electric field amplitudes (largest to smallest), however, does not depend much on the input. These results suggest that regions at lower magnetic latitudes with high ground resistivities are also at risk from the effect of geomagnetically induced currents. The historical electric field time series are useful for estimating the flow of the induced currents through long transmission lines to study power flow and grid stability during geomagnetic disturbances.

  1. Effect of applied DC electric fields in flame spread over polyethylene-coated electrical wire

    Jin, Young Kyu

    2011-03-01

    We experimentally investigated the effect of applied DC electric fields on the flame spread over polyethylene-coated electrical wire. The flame-spread rates over electrical wire with negative and positive DC electric fields from 0 to ±7 kV were measured and analyzed. We compared the results for DC electric fields with previous results for AC electric fields. We explored whether or not various flame shapes could be obtained with DC electric fields and the main reason for the flame-spread acceleration, particularly at the end of the electrical wire, for AC electric fields. We found that DC electric fields do not significantly affect the flame-spread rates. However, the flame shape is mildly altered by the ionic wind effect even for DC electric fields. The flame-spread rate is relevant to the flame shape and the slanted direction in spite of the mild impact. A possible explanation for the flame spread is given by a thermal-balance mechanism and fuel-vapor jet. © 2011 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  2. Inner Magnetospheric Electric Fields Derived from IMAGE EUV

    Gallagher, D. L.; Adrian, M. L.

    2007-01-01

    The local and global patterns of plasmaspheric plasma transport reflect the influence of electric fields imposed by all sources in the inner magnetosphere. Image sequences of thermal plasma G:istribution obtained from the IMAGE Mission Extreme Ultraviolet Imager can be used to derive plasma motions and, using a magnetic field model, the corresponding electric fields. These motions and fields directly reflect the dynamic coupling of injected plasmasheet plasma and the ionosphere, in addition to solar wind and atmospheric drivers. What is being learned about the morphology of inner magnetospheric electric fields during storm and quite conditions from this new empirical tool will be presented and discussed.

  3. Electric fields inside and outside an anisotropic dielectric sphere

    Li Ying-Le; Wang Ming-Jun

    2009-01-01

    Analytical expressions of electric fields inside and outside an anisotropic dielectric sphere are presented by transforming an anisotropic medium into an isotropic one based on the multi-scale transformation of electromagnetic theory.The theoretical expressions are consistent with those in the literature. The inside electric field, the outside electric field and the angle between their directions are derived in detail. Numerical simulations show that the direction of the outside field influences the magnitude of the inside field, while the dielectric constant tensor greatly affects its direction.

  4. Electric thruster in the space field

    The interest of electric thruster over other techniques of propulsion by reaction is exposed. After a brief mention of the different planetary explorations missions using primary electric propulsion, the use of auxiliary propulsion for the station keeping of geosynchronous satellites is discussed. The principal technologies for the development of ion thrusters (ionization by bombardment and cesium surface ionization) are described and compared

  5. Gastric applications of electrical field stimulation.

    Hogan, Aisling M

    2012-02-01

    Advances in clinical applications of electricity have been vast since the launch of Hayman\\'s first cardiac pacemaker more than 70 years ago. Gastric electrical stimulation devices have been recently licensed for treatment of gastroparesis and preliminary studies examining their potential for use in refractory obesity yield promising results.

  6. Dipole Relaxation in an Electric Field.

    Neumann, Richard M.

    1980-01-01

    Derives an expression for the orientational entropy of a rigid rod (electric dipole) from Boltzmann's equation. Subsequent application of Newton's second law of motion produces Debye's classical expression for the relaxation of an electric dipole in a viscous medium. (Author/GS)

  7. Method for electric field and potential calculations in Hall plates

    Raman, Johan; Rombouts, Pieter; Weyten, Ludo

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic field problems occurring in Hall plates are difficult to solve, mainly because of a non-standard boundary condition defining an oblique angle of the electric field w.r.t. an isolating boundary. A new approach for solving Hall-related field problems is presented. Compared to prior approaches, the technique leads more easily to closed-form expressions for the electric field, and allows obtaining voltage-related Hall characteristics in numerically well conditioned forms.

  8. Static and low frequency electric and magnetic fields

    The biological effects of exposure to low frequency electric and magnetic fields are reviewed with the objective of summarizing effects directly relevant to considerations of the health and safety of exposed people. Static and low frequency electric and magnetic fields may elicit biological reactions. Whether exposure to such fields may affect human health at field strengths present in everyday or occupational life is still unsettled. There is unsufficient knowledge to establish any dose concept relevant to health risk. 196 refs., 6 tabs

  9. On the ionospheric coupling of auroral electric fields

    G. T. Marklund

    2009-01-01

    The quasi-static coupling of high-altitude potential structures and electric fields to the ionosphere is discussed with particular focus on the downward field-aligned current (FAC) region. Results are presented from a preliminary analysis of a selection of electric field events observed by Cluster above the acceleration region. The degree of coupling is here estimated as the ratio between the magnetic field-aligned potential drop, ΔΦII, as inferred fro...

  10. Orientation of the agarose gel matrix in pulsed electric fields.

    Stellwagen, J; Stellwagen, N C

    1989-01-01

    The technique of transient electric birefringence was used to investigate the effect of pulsed electric fields on the orientation of the agarose gel matrix. Orientation of the gel was observed at all electric field strengths. Very slow, time-dependent effects were observed when pulses of 10-100 V/cm were applied to 1% gels for 0.5-2 seconds, indicating that domains of the matrix were being oriented by the electric field. The sign of the birefringence reversed when the direction of the applied...

  11. Rocket borne instrument to measure electric fields inside electrified clouds

    Ruhnke, L. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the electric field in the atmosphere which includes a pair of sensors carried on a rocket for sensing the voltages in the atmosphere being measured is described. One of the sensors is an elongated probe with a fine point which causes a corona current to be produced as it passes through the electric field. An electric circuit is coupled between the probe and the other sensor and includes a high ohm resistor which linearizes the relationship between the corona current and the electric field being measured. A relaxation oscillator and transmitter are provided for generating and transmitting an electric signal having a frequency corresponding to the magnitude of the electric field.

  12. External electric field effect on electron transport in carbon nanotubes

    2012-01-01

    Electronic transport properties of carbon nanotubes are studied theoretically in the presence of external electric field E(t) by using the Boltzmann's transport with constant relaxation time. An analytical expression for the current densities of the nanotubes are obtained. It is observed that the current density-electric field characteristics of the CNs exhibit total self-induced transparency and absolute negative conductivity

  13. On electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Starikovskaia, S M; Allegraud, K; Guaitella, O; Rousseau, A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Analysis of available data on electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) was carried out. Experimental measurements of emission spectra in triggered and non?triggered sinusoidal surface DBD were performed. The obtained results were used for the calculation of electric field value. The comparison of data obtained and the results published by other authors is presented.

  14. On electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharge

    Starikovskaia, S M; Allegraud, K; Guaitella, O; Rousseau, A, E-mail: svetlana.starikovskaya@lpp.polytechnique.f [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-03-31

    Analysis of available data on electric field measurements in surface dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) was carried out. Experimental measurements of emission spectra in triggered and non-triggered sinusoidal surface DBD were performed. The results obtained were used for the calculation of electric field value. The comparison of data obtained and the results published by other authors is presented.

  15. High School Students' Representations and Understandings of Electric Fields

    Cao, Ying; Brizuela, Bárbara M.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the representations and understandings of electric fields expressed by Chinese high school students 15 to 16 years old who have not received high school level physics instruction. The physics education research literature has reported students' conceptions of electric fields post-instruction as indicated by students'…

  16. Tokamak burn extension by radial electric field control

    This study considers a TFTR-sized plasma operating on a long cycle. The temperature profile is fixed in time, and the plasma is not refuelled. In order to isolate the electric field effects, this last condition is extended to prohibit the electric field at the plasma edge from returning more fuel to the plasma than gradient-driven forces expel

  17. Defect agglomeration in ferroelectric ceramics under cyclic electric field

    2008-01-01

    The agglomeration of point defects in ferroelectric ceramics could be driven by repeated domain switching under cyclic electric field. The evolution equation of pore concentration under cyclic electric field is derived, with the help of a relation between the pore concentration and the extent of pore agglomeration. The results of the simulation agree quantitatively with the experimental data. An integrated framework about the mechanisms of electrically induced fatigue is proposed, which links the mechanisms at different scales.

  18. Strong electric fields induced on a sharp stellar boundary

    Mishustin, Igor N.; Ebel, Claudio; Greiner, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Due to a first order phase transition, a compact star may have a discontinuous distribution of baryon as well as electric charge densities, as e.g. at the surface of a strange quark star. The induced separation of positive and negative charges may lead to generation of supercritical electric fields in the vicinity of such a discontinuity. We study this effect within a relativistic Thomas-Fermi approximation and demonstrate that the strength of the electric field depends strongly o...

  19. Electric field measurements in the auroral E region

    Dipole electric field, positive ion and electron densities and temperatures, vehicle potential, and plasma sheath measurements have been made in the auroral E region by means of rockets flown from Fort Churchill, Canada. These results are described and compared over the altitude region 100 to 165 km. On a rocket flight launched on 10 December 1969 during very quiet conditions, adjacent to a stable, low intensity auroral arc, the plasma density and temperatures are found to be high and the electric fields large and steady. Electric field components of the order of -17 mv m-1 to +6 mv m-1 were measured along the Earth's magnetic field. The plasma results indicate that these fields may be contributing to enhanced electron temperatures. On a flight of 9 March 1970 during a large magnetic storm with widespread auroral activity, lower plasma densities and temperatures and much smaller and more erratic electric fields were observed with no significant component parallel to the magnetic field. (auth)

  20. Comments on electric field experiments of positronium formation

    Validity of using static electric field in studying Ps formation mechanism is tested experimentally. At the present experimental condition, Ps intensity in low-density polyethylene was decreased seemingly in a similar way as a function of the strength of static and alternating electric fields. However, a time-dependent screening effect, possibly caused by accumulated charge, was apparent. By using an alternating field, it was possible to eliminate the screening effect. It is highly recommended to use alternating fields in the forthcoming electric field experiments. In another experiment, while applying alternating electric field, PAL was measured only when the polarity was positive or negative with respect to the positron implantation trajectory. The results showed that positive and negative fields have the same effect, indicating that the structure of terminal positron spur is symmetric, unlike the asymmetric structure at the end of muon track

  1. Magnetic phase diagram of graphene nanorings in an electric field

    Magnetic properties of graphene nanorings are investigated in the presence of an electric field. Within the formalism of Hubbard model, the graphene nanorings of various geometric configurations are found to exhibit rich phase diagram. For a nanoring system which has degenerate states at the Fermi level, the system is shown to undergo an abrupt phase transition from the antiferromagnetic to a nonmagnetic state in an electric field applied cross its zigzag edges. However, the nanoring is found to always stay in the antiferromagnetic state when the electric field is applied cross its armchair edges. For the other nanoring system with a finite single-particle gap, the magnetic moments of its antiferromagnetic ground state is seen to decrease gradually to zero with the electric field applied cross the zigzag edges. When the electric field is applied cross the armchair edges, the nanoring is shown to undergo several magnetic phase transitions before settling itself in a nonmagnetic ordering. (paper)

  2. Satellite measurements of high latitude convection electric fields.

    Cauffman, D. P.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    This paper reviews the first results of satellite experiments to measure magnetospheric convection electric fields using the double-probe technique. The earliest successful measurements were made with the low-altitude (680-2530 km) polar orbiting Injun-5 spacecraft. The Injun-5 results are compared with the initial findings of the electric field experiment on the polar orbiting OGO-6 satellite. Electric field measurements from the OGO-6 satellite have substantiated many of the initial Injun-5 observations with improved accuracy and sensitivity. The OGO-6 detector revealed the persistent occurrence of anti-sunward convection across the polar cap region at velocities not generally detectable with the Injun-5 experiment. The OGO-6 observations also provided information indicating that the location of the electric field reversal shifts equatorward during periods of increased magnetic activity. The implications of the electric field measurements for magnetospheric and auroral structure are summarized, and a list of specific recommendations for improving future experiments is presented.

  3. Effects of geomagnetic activity on the mesospheric electric fields

    A. M. Zadorozhny

    Full Text Available The results of three series of rocket measurements of mesospheric electric fields carried out under different geomagnetic conditions at polar and high middle latitudes are analysed. The measurements show a clear dependence of the vertical electric fields on geomagnetic activity at polar and high middle latitudes. The vertical electric fields in the lower mesosphere increase with the increase of geomagnetic indexes Kp and ∑Kp. The simultaneous increase of the vertical electric field strength and ion conductivity was observed in the mesosphere during geomagnetic disturbances. This striking phenomenon was displayed most clearly during the solar proton events of October, 1989 accompanied by very strong geomagnetic storm (Kp=8+. A possible mechanism of generation of the vertical electric fields in the mesosphere caused by gravitational sedimentation of charged aerosol particles is discussed. Simultaneous existence in the mesosphere of both the negative and positive multiply charged aerosol particles of different sizes is assumed for explanation of the observed V/m vertical electric fields and their behaviour under geomagnetically disturbed conditions.

    Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles · Ionosphere (electric fields and currents · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (atmospheric electricity

  4. Enhancement factors for local electric fields in inhomogeneous media

    The microstructure of dielectric films provides a significant influence on the electric field distribution in these materials. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between the electric field distribution and organization of film constituents. Using our self-consistent determination of the local electric field in inhomogeneous media, we have shown that enhanced fields can result from columnar microstructures such as typically generated by CVD-type fabrication processes, and low dielectric components in optical coatings. In addition to the microstructural enhancement, a surface specific enhancement due to presence of low dielectric components is observed

  5. Effects of an electric field on white sharks: in situ testing of an electric deterrent.

    Charlie Huveneers

    Full Text Available Elasmobranchs can detect minute electromagnetic fields, <1 nV cm(-1, using their ampullae of Lorenzini. Behavioural responses to electric fields have been investigated in various species, sometimes with the aim to develop shark deterrents to improve human safety. The present study tested the effects of the Shark Shield Freedom7™ electric deterrent on (1 the behaviour of 18 white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias near a static bait, and (2 the rates of attacks on a towed seal decoy. In the first experiment, 116 trials using a static bait were performed at the Neptune Islands, South Australia. The proportion of baits taken during static bait trials was not affected by the electric field. The electric field, however, increased the time it took them to consume the bait, the number of interactions per approach, and decreased the proportion of interactions within two metres of the field source. The effect of the electric field was not uniform across all sharks. In the second experiment, 189 tows using a seal decoy were conducted near Seal Island, South Africa. No breaches and only two surface interactions were observed during the tows when the electric field was activated, compared with 16 breaches and 27 surface interactions without the electric field. The present study suggests that the behavioural response of white sharks and the level of risk reduction resulting from the electric field is contextually specific, and depends on the motivational state of sharks.

  6. Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms

    Amini, Jason M.; Munger Jr., Charles T.; Gould, Harvey

    2007-01-01

    A proof-of-principle electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM) experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic fields, and electric field quantization has been performed. With the ambient magnetic fields seen by the atoms reduced to less than 200 pT, an electric field of 6 MV/m lifts the degeneracy between states of unequal lbar mF rbar and, along with the low (approximately 3 m/s) velocity, suppresses the systematic effect from the motional magnetic field. The low velocity and small r...

  7. On the correlation analysis of electric field inside jet engine

    KRISHNA A.; Khattab, T.; Abdelaziz, A.F.; Guizani, M.

    2014-01-01

    A Simple channel modeling method based on correlation analysis of the electric field inside jet engine is presented. The analysis of the statistical propagation characteristics of electromagnetic field inside harsh jet engine environment is presented by using `Ansys® HFSS'. In this paper, we propose a method to locate the best position for receiving probes inside jet engine with minimum correlation between the receiver points which have strong average electric field. Moreover, a MIMO system c...

  8. Numerical Simulation of Modified Radial Electric Field by LHCD

    Wei Wei; Ding Bojiang; Kuang Guangli

    2005-01-01

    Based on the electron's radial force equilibrium, the profiles of radial electric field in OH and LHCD phase are calculated by using a simulation code. The dependences of radial electron field on electron density and its profile and different current ratio, Irf/Ip, are given. The connections between the improvement of plasma confinement and the modified radial electric field by LHCD are discussed by comparing the calculated results with the experimental results.

  9. Electric Field-Mediated Processing of Polymers. Appendix 1

    Wnek, G. E.; Bowlin, G. L.; Haas, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    Significant opportunities exist for the processing of polymers (homopolymers and blends) using electric fields. We suggest that a broad range of properties can be achieved using a relatively small number of polymers, with electric fields providing the ability to tailor properties via the control of shape, morphology, and orientation. Specific attention is given to electrospinning, but we note that electroaerosol formation and field-modulated film casting represent additional processing options.

  10. Solving the electrical control of magnetic coercive field paradox

    Vopson, Melvin; Lepadatu, S.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to tune magnetic properties of solids via electric voltages instead of external magnetic fields is a physics curiosity of great scientific and technological importance. Today, there is strong published experimental evidence of electrical control of magnetic coercive fields in composite multiferroic solids. Unfortunately, the literature indicates highly contradictory results. In some studies, an applied voltage increases the magnetic coercive field and in other studies the applied ...

  11. Determinants of the electric field during transcranial direct current stimulation

    Opitz, Alexander; Paulus, Walter; Will, Susanne;

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a complex spatial distribution of the electric current flow in the head which hampers the accurate localization of the stimulated brain areas. In this study we show how various anatomical features systematically shape the electric field...... over the motor cortex in small steps to examine the resulting changes of the electric field distribution in the underlying cortex. We examined the effect of skull thickness and composition on the passing currents showing that thinner skull regions lead to higher electric field strengths. This effect...... fluid and the skull, the gyral depth and the distance to the anode and cathode. These factors account for up to 50% of the spatial variation of the electric field strength. Further, we demonstrate that individual anatomical factors can lead to stimulation "hotspots" which are partly resistant...

  12. dc electric field meter with fiber-optic readout

    Johnston, Alan R.; Kirkham, Harold; Eng, Bjorn T.

    1986-01-01

    The design of a dc electric field meter capable of measuring the magnitude and direction of the electric field at an arbitrary location above the ground plane is described. The meter is based on measuring induced charge on a split cylindrical electrode pair which is rotated around its axis of symmetry. Data readout is by fiber-optic cable using pulse frequency encoding. The sensing head is electrically isolated. Initial results are reported from a series of tests at General Electric's High Voltage Transmission Research Facility, Pittsfield, MA. The electric field was measured in a large test cage and under a dc test line. Measurement of field magnitude and direction around a human subject standing under the conductor was demonstrated.

  13. Mechanosensory hairs in bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) detect weak electric fields.

    Sutton, Gregory P; Clarke, Dominic; Morley, Erica L; Robert, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) use information from surrounding electric fields to make foraging decisions. Electroreception in air, a nonconductive medium, is a recently discovered sensory capacity of insects, yet the sensory mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we investigate two putative electric field sensors: antennae and mechanosensory hairs. Examining their mechanical and neural response, we show that electric fields cause deflections in both antennae and hairs. Hairs respond with a greater median velocity, displacement, and angular displacement than antennae. Extracellular recordings from the antennae do not show any electrophysiological correlates to these mechanical deflections. In contrast, hair deflections in response to an electric field elicited neural activity. Mechanical deflections of both hairs and antennae increase with the electric charge carried by the bumblebee. From this evidence, we conclude that sensory hairs are a site of electroreception in the bumblebee. PMID:27247399

  14. Nonpremixed flame in a counterflow under electric fields

    Park, Daegeun

    2016-05-08

    Electrically assisted combustion has been studied in order to control or improve flame characteristics, and emphasizing efficiency and emission regulation. Many phenomenological observations have been reported on the positive impact of electric fields on flame, however there is a lack of detailed physical mechanisms for interpreting these. To clarify the effects of electric fields on flame, I have investigated flame structure, soot formation, and flow field with ionic wind electrical current responses in nonpremixed counterflow flames. The effects of direct current (DC) electric field on flame movement and flow field was also demonstrated in premixed Bunsen flames. When a DC electric field was applied to a lower nozzle, the flames moved toward the cathode side due to Lorentz force action on the positive ions, soot particles simultaneously disappeared completely and laser diagnostics was used to identify the results from the soot particles. To understand the effects of an electric field on flames, flow visualization was performed by Mie scattering to check the ionic wind effect, which is considered to play an important role in electric field assisted combustion. Results showed a bidirectional ionic wind, with a double-stagnant flow configuration, which blew from the flame (ionic source) toward both the cathode and the anode. This implies that the electric field affects strain rate and the axial location of stoichiometry, important factors in maintaining nonpremixed counterflow flames; thus, soot formation of the counterflow flame can also be affected by the electric field. In a test of premixed Bunsen flames having parallel electrodes, flame movement toward the cathode and bidirectional ionic wind were observed. Using PIV measurement it was found that a created radial velocity caused by positive ions (i.e. toward a cathode), was much faster than the velocity toward the anode. Even in a study of alternating current (AC) electric fields, bidirectional ionic wind could

  15. Electric field mapping inside metallized film capacitors

    Nielsen, Dennis Achton; Popok, Vladimir; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is an important step in the reliability assessment process of electric components. It provides knowledge of the physics of failure of a component that has been subjected to a given stress profile. This knowledge enables improvement of the component robustness...... of the metallization stripes had lost contact to the end-spray. Thus, it is shown that the surface electric potential distributions on micro-sectioned film capacitors can be obtained through KPFM analysis. We have, from KPFM measurements, shown that the degraded capacitors under investigation had suffered from...

  16. Electric field gradients in Hg compounds

    Arcisauskaité, Vaida; Knecht, Stefan; Sauer, Stephan P. A.;

    2012-01-01

    We examine the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches based on the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonian (with and without inclusion of spinorbit coupling) for predictions of electric ¿eld gradients (EFGs) at the heavy atom Hg nucleus. This is achieved by compar......We examine the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) approaches based on the Zeroth-Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonian (with and without inclusion of spinorbit coupling) for predictions of electric ¿eld gradients (EFGs) at the heavy atom Hg nucleus. This is achieved...

  17. The relationship between anatomically correct electric and magnetic field dosimetry and published electric and magnetic field exposure limits

    Electric and magnetic field exposure limits published by International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and Inst. of Electrical and Electronics Engineers are aimed at protection against adverse electro-stimulation, which may occur by direct coupling to excitable tissue and, in the case of electric fields, through indirect means associated with surface charge effects (e.g. hair vibration, skin sensations), spark discharge and contact current. For direct coupling, the basic restriction (BR) specifies the not-to-be-exceeded induced electric field. The key results of anatomically based electric and magnetic field dosimetry studies and the relevant characteristics of excitable tissue were first identified. This permitted us to assess the electric and magnetic field exposure levels that induce dose in tissue equal to the basic restrictions, and the relationships of those exposure levels to the limits now in effect. We identify scenarios in which direct coupling of electric fields to peripheral nerve could be a determining factor for electric field limits. (authors)

  18. Enhanced electrical properties of ferroelectric thin films with electric field induced domain control

    (0 0 1) oriented Pb(Zr0.5Ti0.5)O3 (PZT) thin films with high piezoelectric constant were deposited by the electric field-assisted annealing (EFA-A) of alkoxide-derived precursor thin films. So far, selective orientation control of (0 0 1) domain and (1 0 0) domain is very difficult, especially for the chemical solution deposition (CSD). We tried an electric field induced domain control to improve the electrical properties with CSD. An electric field of 10 kV/cm has been applied during an annealing. The high (0 0 1) domain ratio of 75.6% was obtained from the deconvolution of (0 0 2) and (2 0 0) X-ray diffraction peaks. The PZT thin films showed very high piezoelectric constant of 352 pm/V. This shows electric field induced domain control is very effective to enhance the electrical properties of CSD-derived PZT thin films.

  19. The effect of electrical conductivity on the growth of the electric field in a thunderstorm

    Levin, Z.; W. D. Scott

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the electrical conductivity on the electrical development of the cloud is investigated. By the use of a numerical model which couples the growth of the electric field and the precipitation development it is demonstrated that as long as the conductivity varies between values which are smaller than the fair weather conductivity and values of up to 100 times the fair weather conductivity, the polarization charging mechanism is powerful enough to generate fields large enough to crea...

  20. Electrical conductivity of single-wall carbon nanotube films in strong electric field

    Seliuta, D; Subačius, L; Kašalynas, I; Shuba, M.; Paddubskaya, A.

    2013-01-01

    (Received 6 March 2013; accepted 26 April 2013; published online 14 May 2013) Carrier transport features in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films under strong electric fields (up to 105 V/cm) are presented. Application of electrical pulses of nanosecond duration allowed to minimize Joule heating and resolve intrinsic nonlinearities with the electric field. Investigations within a wide range of temperatures—4.2–300 K—indicated that carrier localization as well as tunneling t...

  1. Electron electric-dipole-moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms

    A proof-of-principle electron electric-dipole-moment (e-EDM) experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic fields, and electric-field quantization has been performed. With the ambient magnetic fields seen by the atoms reduced to less than 200 pT, an electric field of 6 MV/m lifts the degeneracy between states of unequal |mF| and, along with the low (≅3 m/s) velocity, suppresses the systematic effect from the motional magnetic field. The low velocity and small residual magnetic field have made it possible to induce transitions between states and to perform state preparation, analysis, and detection in regions free of applied static magnetic and electric fields. This experiment demonstrates techniques that may be used to improve the e-EDM limit by two orders of magnitude, but it is not in itself a sensitive e-EDM search, mostly due to limitations of the laser system

  2. Electron electric dipole moment experiment using electric-field quantized slow cesium atoms

    Amini, Jason M; Gould, Harvey

    2007-01-01

    A proof-of-principle electron electric dipole moment (e-EDM) experiment using slow cesium atoms, nulled magnetic fields, and electric field quantization has been performed. With the ambient magnetic fields seen by the atoms reduced to less than 200 pT, an electric field of 6 MV/m lifts the degeneracy between states of unequal mF and, along with the low (approximately 3 m/s) velocity, suppresses the systematic effect from the motional magnetic field. The low velocity and small residual magnetic field have made it possible to induce transitions between states and to perform state preparation, analysis, and detection in regions free of applied static magnetic and electric fields. This experiment demonstrates techniques that may be used to improve the e-EDM limit by two orders of magnitude, but it is not in itself a sensitive e-EDM search, mostly due to limitations of the laser system.

  3. Scattering and pair creation by L-constant electric field

    Gavrilov, S P

    2015-01-01

    Using QFT approach developed by us in Ref. arXiv:1506.01156, we consider particle scattering and vacuum instability in the so-called L-constant electric field, which is a constant electric field confined between two capacitor plates separated by a finite distance L. We obtain and analyze special sets of stationary solutions of the Dirac and Klein-Gordon equations with the L-constant electric field. Then, we represent probabilities of particle scattering and characteristics of the vacuum instability (related to the pair creation) in terms of the introduced solutions. From exact formulas, we derive asymptotic expressions for the differential mean numbers, for the total mean number of created particles, and for the vacuum-to-vacuum transition probability. Using the equivalence principle, we demonstrate that the distributions of created particles by L-constant electric field and gravitational field of a black hole have similar thermal structure.

  4. Galvanotactic behavior of Tetrahymena pyriformis under electric fields

    Tetrahymena pyriformis, a eukaryotic ciliate, swims toward a cathode in straight or cross-shaped microchannels under an applied electric field, a behavioral response called cathodal galvanotaxis. In straight channel experiments, a one-dimensional electric field was applied, and the galvanotactic swimming behavior of Tetrahymena pyriformis was observed and described in detail while the polarity of this field is switched. In most individual cases, the cell would immediately switch its direction toward the cathode; however, exceptional cases have been observed where cells exhibit a turning delay or do not turn after a polarity switch. In cross-channel experiments, feedback control using vision-based tracking was used to steer a cell in the microchannel intersection using a two-dimensional electric field generated by four electrodes placed at four ends of the cross channel. The motivation for this work is to study the swimming behavior of Tetrahymena pyriformis as a microrobot under the control of electric fields. (paper)

  5. Optical Remote Sensing of Electric Fields Above Thunderstorms

    Burns, B. M.; Carlson, B. E.; Lauben, D.; Cohen, M.; Smith, D.; Inan, U. S.

    2010-12-01

    Measurement of thunderstorm electric fields typically require balloon-borne measurements in the region of interest. Such measurements are cumbersome and provide limited information at a single point. Remote sensing of electric fields by Kerr-effect induced optical polarization changes of background skylight circumvents many of these difficulties and can in principle provide a high-speed movie of electric field behavior. Above-thundercloud 100 kV/m quasi-static electric fields are predicted to produce polarization changes at above the part in one million level that should be detectable at a ground instrument featuring 1 cm2sr geometric factor and 1 kHz bandwidth (though more sensitivity is nonetheless desired). Currently available optical and electronic components may meet these requirements. We review the principles of this measurement and discuss the current status of a field-ready prototype instrument currently in construction.

  6. Electron propagation in crossed magnetic and electric fields

    Kramer, T; Kleber, M; Kramer, Tobias; Bracher, Christian; Kleber, Manfred

    2004-01-01

    Laser-atom interaction can be an efficient mechanism for the production of coherent electrons. We analyze the dynamics of monoenergetic electrons in the presence of uniform, perpendicular magnetic and electric fields. The Green function technique is used to derive analytic results for the field--induced quantum mechanical drift motion of i) single electrons and ii) a dilute Fermi gas of electrons. The method yields the drift current and, at the same time it allows us to quantitatively establish the broadening of the (magnetic) Landau levels due to the electric field: Level number k is split into k+1 sublevels that render the $k$th oscillator eigenstate in energy space. Adjacent Landau levels will overlap if the electric field exceeds a critical strength. Our observations are relevant for quantum Hall configurations whenever electric field effects should be taken into account.

  7. Improved Approximations for Fermion Pair Production in Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    Kim, S P; Kim, Sang Pyo; Page, Don N.

    2007-01-01

    Reformulating the instantons in a complex plane for tunneling or transmitting states, we calculate the pair-production rate of charged fermions in a spatially localized electric field, illustrated by the Sauter electric field E_0 (sech)^2 (z/L), and for a temporally localized electric field such as E_0 (sech)^2 (t/T). The integration of the quadratic part of WKB instantons over the frequency and transverse momentum leads to the pair-production rate obtained by the worldline instanton method including the prefactor of Phys. Rev. D 72, 105004 (2005) and 73, 065028 (2006). It is further shown that the WKB instanton plus the next-to-leading order contribution in spinor QED equals the WKB instanton in scalar QED, thus justifying why the WKB instanton in scalar QED can work for pair production of fermions. Finally we obtain the pair-production rate in a spatially localized electric field together with a constant magnetic field.

  8. Electromechanical analysis of tapered piezoelectric bimorph at high electric field

    Chattaraj, Nilanjan; Ganguli, Ranjan

    2015-04-01

    Piezoelectric bimorph laminar actuator of tapered width exhibits better performance for out-of-plane deflection compared to the rectangular surface area, while consuming equal surface area. This paper contains electromechanical analysis and modeling of a tapered width piezoelectric bimorph laminar actuator at high electric field in static state. The analysis is based on the second order constitutive equations of piezoelectric material, assuming small strain and large electric field to capture its behavior at high electric field. Analytical expressions are developed for block force, output strain energy, output energy density, input electrical energy, capacitance and energy efficiency at high electric field. The analytical expressions show that for fixed length, thickness, and surface area of the actuator, how the block force and output strain energy gets improved in a tapered surface actuator compared to a rectangular surface. Constant thickness, constant length and constant surface area of the actuator ensure constant mass, and constant electrical capacitance. We consider high electric field in both series and parallel electrical connection for the analysis. Part of the analytical results is validated with the experimental results, which are reported in earlier literature.

  9. Interferometric methods for mapping static electric and magnetic fields

    Pozzi, Giulio; Beleggia, Marco; Kasama, Takeshi;

    2014-01-01

    The mapping of static electric and magnetic fields using electron probes with a resolution and sensitivity that are sufficient to reveal nanoscale features in materials requires the use of phase-sensitive methods such as the shadow technique, coherent Foucault imaging and the Transport of Intensity...... on theoretical models that form the basis of the quantitative interpretation of electron holographic data. We review the application of electron holography to a variety of samples (including electric fields associated with p–n junctions in semiconductors, quantized magnetic flux in superconductors......) the model-independent determination of the locations and magnitudes of field sources (electric charges and magnetic dipoles) directly from electron holographic data....

  10. High Dynamic Range Electric Field Sensor for Electromagnetic Pulse Detection

    Lin, Che-Yun; Lee, Beom Suk; Zhang, Xingyu; Chen, Ray T

    2014-01-01

    We design a high dynamic range electric field sensor based on domain inverted electro-optic (E-O) polymer Y-fed directional coupler for electromagnetic wave detection. This electrode-less, all optical, wideband electrical field sensor is fabricated using standard processing for E-O polymer photonic devices. Experimental results demonstrate effective detection of electric field from 16.7V/m to 750KV/m at a frequency of 1GHz, and spurious free measurement range of 70dB.