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Sample records for 6-month-old infant due

  1. Cushing Syndrome in a 6-Month-Old Infant due to Adrenocortical Tumor

    Volmar KeithE

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Cushing syndrome is rare in infancy and usually due to an adrenocortical tumor (ACT. We report an infant with Cushing syndrome due to adrenocortical carcinoma. The patient presented at six months of age with a three-month history of growth failure, rapid weight gain, acne, and irritability. Physical examination showed obesity, hypertension, and Cushingoid features. Biochemical evaluation showed very high serum cortisol, mildly elevated testosterone, and suppressed ACTH. Abdominal MRI revealed a heterogeneous right adrenal mass extending into the inferior vena cava. Evaluation for metastases was negative. The tumor was removed surgically en bloc. Pathologic examination demonstrated low mitotic rate, but capsular and vascular invasion. She received no adjuvant therapy. Her linear growth has improved and Cushingoid features resolved. Hormonal markers and quarterly PET scans have been negative for recurrence 24 months postoperatively. In conclusion, adrenocortical neoplasms in children are rare, but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Cushing syndrome.

  2. Acute gastroenteritis in infants under 6 months old.

    Fox, R; Leen, C L; Dunbar, E M; Ellis, M E; Mandal, B K

    1990-01-01

    Sixty two babies under the age of 6 months who were admitted with gastroenteritis completed a study of gradual refeeding compared with abrupt refeeding after a period of rehydration. There was no difference in the incidence of recurrence of diarrhoea due to lactose intolerance, effect on weight, or duration of hospital stay. Twenty six babies (42%) had recurrence of diarrhoea after refeeding, all of whom settled with the introduction of a lactose free soya based formula. Well nourished babies...

  3. Social perception: How do 6-month-old infants look at pointing gestures?

    Schmitow, Clara; Kochukhova, Olga; Nyström, Pär

    2016-02-01

    The study explored 6-month-old infants' ability to follow a pointing gesture in a dynamic social context. The infants were presented with a video of a model pointing to one of two toys. The pointing gesture was performed either normally (with arm and hand pointing at the same direction), with a stick, or the model's arm and hand pointing in different directions (at different toys). The results indicate that infants at this age reliably followed pointing performed normally. PMID:26859864

  4. Diet-Induced Changes in Spectrum Patterns of Serum Gangliosides in 6-Month-Old Infants

    Dida A. Gurnida

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Human milk contains higher levels of gangliosides than infant formula. Gangliosides play a role in neuronal growth, migration and maturation, sinaptogenesis, and myelination. Seven of gangliosides (GM1, GM2, GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b are dominant with their own specific functions. Thus, the aim of the study was to know the effects of add on diet gangliosides and to compare the spectrum patterns of those seven classes of serum gangliosides in infants consuming standard infant formula (IF group, ganglioside-fortified infant formula (GA group and exclusive breastfeeding (BF group. This study used liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS method. This was a prospective study involving 30 infants in IF group, 29 in GA group and 32 in BF group. Subject recruitment was performed using consecutive admission from March 2008 to February 2009 in Bandung. Statistical analyses using Wilcoxon test showed that there was a significant change in the spectrum patterns of GD3, GM1, GM2 and GT1b in IF group; of GD1a, GM1 and GM2 in GA group and of GD1a, GD1b, GM1 and GM3 in BF group. Conclusions, add on diet gangliosides extend spectrum patterns of gangliosides especially in seven of them, i.e. GM1, GM2, GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b, in 6-month old infants.

  5. Frequency of “Nursing Strike” among 6-Month-Old Infants, at East Tehran Health Center and Contributing Factors

    Fatemeh Nayyeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:An abrupt refusal by the infant to breastfeed is often called “nursing strike”. In fact a common reason for cessation of nursing is infant’s refusal to breast feed. This problem can often be overcome. This paper has aimed to identify the causes of “breast feeding refusal” or “nursing strike” in 6 month old infants visiting the East Tehran health center for their scheduled vaccination of 6 months old.Materials and methods:Totally 175 six month old infants were enrolled in this study. A questionnaire was filled by mother for each child and later the infants with “nursing strike” were compared with all others.Results:In this study prevalence of breast feeding refusal in infants was 24%.There was significant relation between the “breastfeeding refusal” and maternal academic education or working status. In this study mothers reported various reasons associated with “refusal breast feeding. According to the mothers playful infant and nasal obstructions were the probable causes for refusal.Conclusion:There is a diverse variety of factors influencing nursing strike. Most of these factors can be prevented by identifying the background reasons and proper training.

  6. Verapamil-sensitive idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia in a 6-month-old: unique considerations in diagnosis and management in an infant.

    Hiremath, Gurumurthy; Li, Walter; Foltz, Rhonda; Roy-Burman, Arup; Cocalis, Mark; Tanel, Ronn E

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia of the Belhassen type is rare in infants. We present a 6-month-old infant girl with a wide-complex tachycardia with right bundle branch block QRS morphology, a superior axis, and atrioventricular dissociation, consistent with a left anterior fascicular tachycardia. Initial echocardiogram revealed depressed ventricular function. The tachycardia was unresponsive to therapeutic trials of adenosine, esmolol, procainamide, and lidocaine. There was brief conversion of the tachycardia to sinus rhythm with transesophageal atrial overdrive pacing, suggesting a reentrant mechanism of the arrhythmia. Ultimately, the judicious administration of intravenous verapamil resulted in termination of the arrhythmia, which has been sustained on oral therapy. PMID:25526021

  7. Development/global validation of a 6-month-old pediatric head finite element model and application in investigation of drop-induced infant head injury.

    Li, Zhigang; Luo, Xiao; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2013-12-01

    Drop is a frequent cause for infant head injury. To date, finite element (FE) modeling was gradually used to investigate child head dynamic response under drop impact conditions, however, two shortages still exist on this topic: (1) due to ethical reasons, none of developed 6-month-old (6MO) head FE model was found to be quantitatively validated against child cadaver tests at similar age group; (2) drop height and impact surface stiffness effects on infant head responses were not comprehensively investigated. In this study, motivated by the recently published material properties of soft tissues (skull and suture, etc.) and reported pediatric head global cadaver tests, a 6MO child head FE model was developed and simulated results compared with the child cadaver experimental data under compression and drop conditions. Comparison of results indicated that the FE model showed a fairly good biofidelic behavior in most dynamic responses. The validated FE model was further used to investigate effects of different drop heights and impact surface stiffness on the head dynamic responses. Numerical results show that the pediatric head mechanical parameters (peak acceleration, HIC, maximal vonMises stress and maximal first principal strain of skull) keep increasing with the increase in drop height, and exhibit "logarithmic function" shapes at "fast-slow" trends with increase in impact surface stiffness. Based on above analysis, the regressions were conducted to describe the relationship between drop height and impact surface stiffness and head global injury predictors (head peak acceleration, HIC, etc.). This paper provides a fundamental study of child head injury mechanism and protection under drop conditions. PMID:24008251

  8. The Emergence of Probabilistic Reasoning in Very Young Infants: Evidence from 4.5- and 6-Month-Olds

    Denison, Stephanie; Reed, Christie; Xu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    How do people make rich inferences from such sparse data? Recent research has explored this inferential ability by investigating probabilistic reasoning in infancy. For example, 8- and 11-month-old infants can make inferences from samples to populations and vice versa (Denison & Xu, 2010a; Xu & Denison, 2009; Xu & Garcia, 2008a). The current…

  9. Are you talking to me? Neural activations in 6-month-old infants in response to being addressed during natural interactions.

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Széplaki-Köllőd, Borbála; Yin, Jun; Csibra, Gergely

    2015-09-01

    Human interactions are guided by continuous communication among the parties involved, in which verbal communication plays a primary role. However, speech does not necessarily reveal to whom it is addressed, especially for young infants who are unable to decode its semantic content. To overcome such difficulty, adults often explicitly mark their communication as infant-directed. In the present study we investigated whether ostensive signals, which would disambiguate the infant as the addressee of a communicative act, would modulate the brain responses of 6-month-old infants to speech and gestures in an ecologically valid setting. In Experiment 1, we tested whether the gaze direction of the speaker modulates cortical responses to infant-direct speech. To provide a naturalistic environment, two infants and their parents participated at the same time. In Experiment 2, we tested whether a similar modulation of the cortical response would be obtained by varying the intonation (infant versus adult directed speech) of the speech during face-to-face communication, one on one. The results of both experiments indicated that only the combination of ostensive signals (infant directed speech and direct gaze) led to enhanced brain activation. This effect was indicated by responses localized in regions known to be involved in processing auditory and visual aspects of social communication. This study also demonstrated the potential of fNIRS as a tool for studying neural responses in naturalistic scenarios, and for simultaneous measurement of brain function in multiple participants. PMID:25891796

  10. Rural N(SO) and German middle-class mothers' interaction with their 3- and 6-month-old infants: A longitudinal cross-cultural analysis.

    Lamm, Bettina; Gudi, Helene; Fassbender, Ina; Freitag, Claudia; Graf, Frauke; Goertz, Claudia; Spangler, Sibylle; Teubert, Manuel; Knopf, Monika; Lohaus, Arnold; Schwarzer, Gudrun; Keller, Heidi

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to analyze culture-specific development of maternal interactional behavior longitudinally. Rural Cameroonian Nso mothers (n = 72) and German middle-class mothers (n = 106) were observed in free-play interactions with their 3- and 6-month-old infants. Results reveal the expected shift from a social to a nonsocial focus only in the German middle-class mothers' play interactions but not the rural Nso mothers' play. Nso mothers continue their proximal interactional style with a focus on body contact and body stimulation, whereas German middle-class mothers prefer a distal style of interaction with increasing object-centeredness. These cultural differences are in line with broader cultural models and become more accentuated as the infants grow older. PMID:26075741

  11. Reduced engagement with social stimuli in 6-month-old infants with later autism spectrum disorder: a longitudinal prospective study of infants at high familial risk

    Jones, E.J.H.; Venema, K.; Earl, R; Lowy, R.; Barnes, K; Estes, A; Dawson, G.; Webb, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects more than 1 % of the population and close to 20 % of prospectively studied infants with an older sibling with ASD. Although significant progress has been made in characterizing the emergence of behavioral symptoms of ASD, far less is known about the underlying disruptions to early learning. Recent models suggest that core aspects of the causal path to ASD may only be apparent in early infancy. Here, we inv...

  12. Cortical Responses to Speech Sounds in 3- and 6-Month-Old Infants Fed Breast Milk, Milk Formula, or Soy Formula

    The influence of the three most common infant diets (breast milk, milk-based and soy-based formulas) on growth, behavioral development, and cortical responses (ERPs) to the consonant-vowel syllable /pa/, was examined in 130 healthy infants from an ongoing longitudinal study of 600 from birth through...

  13. Do 6-month-olds understand that speech can communicate?

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Martin, Alia; Onishi, Kristine H

    2014-11-01

    Adults and 12-month-old infants recognize that even unfamiliar speech can communicate information between third parties, suggesting that they can separate the communicative function of speech from its lexical content. But do infants recognize that speech can communicate due to their experience understanding and producing language, or do they appreciate that speech is communicative earlier, with little such experience? We examined whether 6-month-olds recognize that speech can communicate information about an object. Infants watched a Communicator selectively grasp one of two objects (target). During test, the Communicator could no longer reach the objects; she turned to a Recipient and produced speech (a nonsense word) or non-speech (coughing). Infants looked longer when the Recipient selected the non-target than the target object when the Communicator spoke but not when she coughed - unless the Recipient had previously witnessed the Communicator's selective grasping of the target object. Our results suggest that at 6 months, with a receptive vocabulary of no more than a handful of commonly used words, infants possess some abstract understanding of the communicative function of speech. This understanding may provide an early mechanism for language and knowledge acquisition. PMID:24835877

  14. 6月龄超重和肥胖婴儿神经心理发育分析%Analysis of neuropsychological development of overweight and obese 6-month-old infants

    熊淑英; 孙晓勉; 钟赛如

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of overweight and obesity on the development of neuropsychology of 6-month-old infants, and to provide theoretical basis for prevention and intervention of infant obesity .Methods Neuropsychological development of 98 overweight and obese infants aged 6 months ( overweight and obese group ) and that of 100 normal weight infants ( normal group ) were assessed with Developmental Screening Test (DST), an intellectual developmental screening test developed by Pediatric Hospital of Fudan University in Shanghai , and the differences in developmental quotient abnormality , exercise capacity , social adaptation and intelligence were compared between two groups .Results The proportion of infants with suspicious values of DQ in the overweight and obese group was obviously higher than that in the normal group (χ2 =4.521,P<0.05).The value of the exercise capacity in the overweight and obese group was lower than that of the normal group (χ2 =3.207, P <0.05 ).Conclusion Overweight and obesity have bad influence on neuropsychological development of 6-month-old infants, so they should be prevented .%目的:探讨超重和肥胖对6月龄婴儿神经心理发育的影响,为婴儿肥胖的预防和干预提供理论依据。方法采用上海复旦大学儿科医院0~6岁发育筛查测验( DST),对98例6月龄超重和肥胖婴儿和100例正常体质量婴儿进行对照研究,比较两组发育商( DQ)的异常率和在运动、社会适应、智力能区的差异。结果超重和肥胖组中DQ值可疑的婴儿比例明显高于正常体质量组(χ2=4.521,P<0.05)。在运动能区得分中,超重和肥胖组低于正常体质量组(χ2=3.207,P<0.05)。结论超重和肥胖对6月龄婴儿神经心理发育有不良影响,应预防婴儿超重和肥胖的发生。

  15. Immune Response and Clinical Reaction to Measles Vaccine in 6-month old Infants%6月龄婴儿麻疹疫苗免疫效果及人体反应观察

    卢莉; 王文胜; 王岩; 柳银芝; 王冬梅; 郭舫如; 辜荫华

    2001-01-01

    In vaccine era, measles antibody in women of childbearing age is vaccine-induced, and the maternal antibody of their infants disappeared in advance. In big city, such as Beijing, more and more <8 month-old infants who do not reach the first immunization age are attacked by measles virus. We selected 119*"6 month-old infants, giving them measles vaccine (MV) , to observe their immune response and clinical reaction. The results showed the maternal antibody in 84% of the 6 month-old infants before vaccination were negative, and the antibody level in rest of them were very low. After MV vaccination, their seropositive rate reached 86.6%, the immunization successful rate was 80.7%, the GMT was 1∶528.45, the rates for fever and rash were 16.8% and 2.52% respectively, suggesting that the first vaccination of MV in 6 month-old infants is feasible. Compared with infants primarily vaccinated at 8 months old, both the immunization successful rate and GMT were lower. This means that there is interference of residual maternal antibody with vaccine but most chiefly contributes to the immature development of the immune system of the infants (age related factor). We recommend to give the first dose of MV to infants of 6 months old and the second dose at 1 year old, but before doing this, it is necessary to do cost effectiveness analysis and to explore new MV with good antigenicity to infants of lower age.%疫苗时代育龄期妇女体内麻疹抗体多为麻疹疫苗所介导,所生婴儿母传抗体消失提前,未及初免月龄已成为易感者。针对北京市及其它一些大城市<8月龄婴儿麻疹发病越来越突出的情况,为控制该人群发病,选取北京市户籍的6月龄婴儿119人进行麻疹减毒活疫苗(MV)免疫效果及人体反应观察。结果显示:6月龄婴儿中有84%母传抗体已阴转,阳性者抗体水平也极低。接种MV后抗体阳性率达到86.6%,免疫成功率为80.7%,

  16. 喂养方式与0~6月龄婴儿肥胖关系的研究%Correlation between Different Feeding Types and Obesity in 0-6 Month Old Infants

    陈凯; 叶小青; 彭雪娟

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究不同的喂养方式与0~6月龄婴儿的超重和肥胖之间是否有关系,从而为制定预防儿童超重和肥胖干预措施提供依据.方法 回顾调查512名婴儿,定期儿童保健系统管理,比较出生以后0~6月内不同喂养方式对婴儿的超重和肥胖的影响,探讨不同的喂养方式与超重和肥胖率之间的关系.结果 42d、3月、4月、5月、6月龄婴儿的母乳喂养组与配方奶喂养组以及混合喂养组三者之间的超重率和肥胖率的差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 不同喂养方式与婴儿期的超重和肥胖无相应关系,未显示母乳喂养对0~6月龄婴儿的肥胖发生有保护作用.婴儿的性别、出生体重、分娩方式、母亲年龄、文化水平、职业、家庭经济状况以及辅食添加时间对6月龄儿童肥胖发生率影响不明显.%Objective To explore the relationship between different feeding patterns and overweight and obesity in 0 to 6-month-old infants,so as to develop the prevention measures of childhood overweight and provide the basis for obesity interventions. Methods Child care system management was carried out and the data of 512 infants were surveyed to analyze the effects of feeding patterns on the overweight and obesity in 0 to 6-monlh-old infants. Results Among the breastfeeding group .formula feeding group and the mixed feeding group,the difference in the incidence of overweight and obesity in 42 day,3-month,4-month, 5-month and 6-month-old infants was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion There is no corresponding relationship between the feeding patterns and ihe incidence of overweight and obesity in infants, the result does not reveal a protective effect of breastfeeding.The baby's sex and birth weight,mode of delivery,maternal age,educational level,occupation,family economic conditions and the time for adding complementary foods have not an obvious effect on the incidence of obesity in children aged 6

  17. Analysis of factors on development of 6-month-old infants%影响6月龄婴儿发育水平的相关因素分析

    孔莉芳

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To analyse the factors which influence the infants' early development and provide the theoretical basis for promoting child early development. [Methods] Compared the effects on developmental quotients by 15 factors including feeding method,early education method,nutrition condition,periodical check,main caregivers and so on,based on 518 6-month-old infants' developmental quotients in Gesell development scale. {Results] In single-factor analysis, there were 12 factors which executively affect on early developmental quotients of babies including mother education level, feeding method,early education method,nutrition condition. And through Multiple regression analysis, there were 6 factors which were correlated positively with 6-month-old infants' developmental quotients including mother education level, feeding method,early education method, pregnant woman's health, nutrition status and the main caregivers. I Conclusions] There are 6 factors which greatly affect on 6-month infants' developmental quotients including mother education level, feeding method,early education method, pregnant woman's health, nutrition status and the main caregivers. So great importance should be focused to these factors to promote early child development.%[目的]研究影响婴儿早期发育状况的相关因素,为婴儿发育的早期促进提供参考依据. [方法]收集2008-2010年在浏阳市妇幼保健院心理行为发育门诊进行盖泽尔发育测试的6月龄婴儿共518例,从喂养方式,母亲文化程度、家庭经济收入、早教方式、营养状况、定期检查、主要抚养人等15个方面进行多因素分析,分别比较对婴儿发育水平的影响. [结果]相关因素的分析显示母亲文化、喂养方式、早教方式、孕母营养等12种因素影响婴儿的早期发育水平.经多元回归分析,母亲文化、喂养方式、早教方式、孕母营养、营养状况、主要抚养人6项因素与6月龄

  18. Effects of diet on early stage cortical perception and discrimination of syllables differing in voice-onset time: A longitudinal ERP study in 3 and 6 month old infants

    The influence of infant diet on early stage cortical processing of syllables was examined in 239 healthy infants who were breastfed (BF) or fed milk-based formula (MF) or soy formula (SF). Using an oddball paradigm, event-related potentials to consonant-vowel syllables differing in voice-onset time ...

  19. Fetus -in -fetu in a 6-month-old

    Abdur-Rahman L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetus-in-fetu is a malformed parasitic monozygotic diamniotic twin found inside the body of the living child or adult. We report a case of lumbar mass having superficial rudimentary phallus, labioscrotal fold, testes, pedunculated thumb-like digit and rudimentary pelvis in addition to bowel loops in a 6-month-old Nigerian girl. The mass was excised and the baby did well. We propose based on these that dizygotic parasitic foetiform twin could exist.

  20. Influência do tipo de aleitamento materno e da presença de anemia na mãe na concentração de hemoglobina aos 6 meses de idade Influence of breastfeeding type and maternal anemia on hemoglobin concentration in 6-month-old infants

    Maria de Lourdes P. D. Teixeira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência do tipo de aleitamento materno e da presença de anemia na mãe no nível de hemoglobina de lactentes aos 6 meses de idade. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, aninhado em estudo de intervenção de base comunitária, randomizado, controlado, que objetivou aumentar a duração do aleitamento materno exclusivo nos primeiros 6 meses de vida. O estudo foi realizado em quatro cidades do estado de Pernambuco, sendo os recém-nascidos recrutados no período de março a agosto de 2001. Seis meses após o parto, avaliou-se a concentração da hemoglobina de 330 mães/lactentes e o tipo de aleitamento. A identificação dos fatores que, de modo independente, contribuíram na concentração de hemoglobina das crianças foi realizada utilizando análise de regressão linear multivariada. RESULTADOS: O tipo de aleitamento não influenciou a concentração de hemoglobina na amostra como um todo. No entanto, ao se analisar o grupo de crianças em aleitamento exclusivo/predominante, verificou-se uma diferença significante na mediana da hemoglobina de 0,7 g/dL em detrimento das filhas de mães anêmicas. A hemoglobina materna, o tipo de piso da residência, o tipo de parto e o peso ao nascer contribuíram significantemente na variação da concentração de hemoglobina das crianças. CONCLUSÕES: Ao contrário do observado em relação ao tipo de aleitamento materno, a anemia materna exerceu influência sobre os valores de hemoglobina de lactentes aos 6 meses, mesmo quando consideradas apenas as crianças em aleitamento exclusivo/predominante, apontando para a necessidade de prevenção da anemia materna antes da concepção, durante a gravidez e na lactação.OBJECTIVE: To verify the influence of breastfeeding type and of maternal anemia on hemoglobin concentration in 6-month-old infants. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study nested in a community-based, randomized and controlled intervention study that aimed to prolong the

  1. Adipsia and hypernatraemia in a 6-month-old Staffordshire bull terrier

    Vanessa McClure

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A 6-month-old female Staffordshire bull terrier cross presented to the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital with lethargy, weakness, decreased appetite, abnormal vocalisation, twitching of the facial muscles and ears, circling, alopecia, pruritus, seborrhoea sicca and erythema. Serum biochemistry revealed severe hypernatraemia (200.4 mmol/L; Reference Interval 140 mmol/L – 155 mmol/L. Treatment required careful administration of intravenous fluids. The electrolytes were monitored to ensure slow and controlled sodium normalisation (the target reduction of Na concentration was by 0.5 mmol/L/h –1 mmol/L/h or 12 mmol/L/24 h – 24 mmol/L/24 h. Despite the careful fluid calculations and close monitoring, the serum sodium levels dropped more than the recommended 0.5 mmol/L/h – 1 mmol/L/h in the first 4 h and the fluids had to be adjusted. The patient’s habitus improved and the central nervous system signs started to resolve after 1 day of fluid treatment. The puppy started eating food mixed with water, but made no attempt to drink water. The pruritus and erythema resolved once the sodium levels normalised and the seborrhoea sicca began to resolve. At a follow up visit 20 days post discharge the skin was normal. A diagnosis of hypernatraemia as a result of pure water loss due to hypodipsia or adipsia was made, as the puppy made no attempt to drink water when her serum sodium levels increased (a strong thirst stimulus. Hypernatraemia recurred if she was not forced to take in adequate amounts of water mixed with her food. Dermatological changes such as seborrhoea, hyperkeratosis and alopecia have been reported in a few other cases of hypernatraemia in dogs and sodium levels should be investigated in dermatological patients when no other cause can be established. This study, supported by another retrospective study done in 2008, suggests that the Staffordshire bull terrier may be a breed that is predisposed to hypernatraemia.

  2. Protecting Against the Flu: Advice for Caregivers of Children Less than 6 Months Old. Fact Sheet

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown that children less than 5 years of age are at high risk of serious flu-related complications. It is estimated that more than 20,000 children less than 5 years old are hospitalized due to flu each year in the U.S. Many more have to go to a doctor, an urgent care center, or the emergency room because of flu. Complications from the…

  3. Treatment of the Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip with an Abduction Brace in Children up to 6 Months Old

    Raphaël Wahlen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Use of Pavlik harness for the treatment of DDH can be complicated for parents. Any misuse or failure in the adjustments may lead to significant complications. An abduction brace was introduced in our institution, as it was thought to be easier to use. Aim. We assess the results for the treatment of DDH using our abduction brace in children of 0–6 months old and compare these results with data on treatments using the Pavlik harness. Method. Retrospective analysis of patients with DDH from 0 to 6 months old at diagnosis, performed from 2004 to 2009. Outcomes were rates of reduction of the hip and avascular necrosis of the femoral head (AVN. Follow-up was at one year and up to 4 years old. Results. Hip reduction was successful in 28 of 33 patients (85%, with no AVN. Conclusion. Our results in terms of hip reduction rate and AVN rate are similar to those found in literature assessing Pavlik harness use, with a simpler and comfortable treatment procedure.

  4. Importance of back blow maneuvers in a 6 month old patient with sudden upper airway obstruction.

    Gencpinar, Pinar; Duman, Murat

    2015-12-01

    Foreign body aspiration in children under four years old is one of the most frequently observed reasons for accident related deaths. It is more common in this age group due to inadequate swallowing functions and exploration of objects with the mouth. The most frequently encountered foreign bodies are food and toy parts. Life threatening complete laryngeal obstruction is rarely observed. Dyspnea, hypersalivation, cough and cyanosis can be seen. The basic and life-saving treatment approach is complete removal of foreign body maneuvers in the sudden onset of total obstruction. Here we report a six-month old male, who ingested a foreign body and was treated with back blow maneuvers successfully. In this case we emphasized the importance of back blow maneuvers. PMID:27239623

  5. Immunoglobulin G2 deficiency with transient hypogammaglobulinemia and chronic respiratory disease in a 6-month-old Holstein heifer.

    Francoz, David; Lapointe, Jean-Martin; Wellemans, Vincent; Desrochers, André; Caswell, Jeff L; Stott, Jeff L; Dubreuil, Pascal

    2004-09-01

    A 6-month-old Holstein heifer that was nonresponsive to medical treatment was evaluated for chronic respiratory disease. Complete blood count and serum chemistry revealed neutrophilic leukocytosis and low globulin levels. Assays for bovine leukemia virus, bovine virus diarrhea, and bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency were negative. Serum globulin subclass assays revealed transient low concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig) G1 and IgA, persistent low IgG2, and subnormal IgM. Vaccination with 2 doses of multiple, inactived viruses induced seroconversion for most viruses. Flow cytometric analysis of blood lymphocyte subpopulation demonstrated an increase in CD5+ B-cells. Blood lymphocyte proliferation and neutrophil function tests were normal. Results of immunologic assays indicated IgG2 deficiency with transient hypogammaglobulinemia. PMID:15460327

  6. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the pancreatic head – a case report of a 6 months old child and review of the literature

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are rare in the pediatric population. Most common localizations were reported in the lungs. A localization in the pancreas needs differentiation from other tumors and chronic pancreatitis. Treatment is surgical resection, although there are reports of treatment with oral steroids and radiation therapy. A 6-month-old child was treated due to a tumor in the head of the pancreas. On admission he was jaundiced with pruritus. US and MRI confirmed pancreatic tumor. Preoperative biopsy wasn’t conclusive regarding the nature of the tumor. Duodenopancreatectomy was performed. Postoperative course was uneventful. Histologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. On follow up, he remained with no evidence of recurrence. A literature review revealed 10 cases of pancreatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors in the pediatric age group. Our patient is the youngest reported. Despite major resection, there were no complications. However, management of this child might be possible with steroids, but conservative treatment might be insufficient, especially in aggressive forms of tumors

  7. Tendência e determinantes do aleitamento materno exclusivo em crianças menores de 6 meses Trends and patterns of exclusive breastfeeding for under-6-month-old children

    Giuliana M. Parizoto

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar a tendência e os determinantes do aleitamento materno exclusivo no município de Bauru (SP. MÉTODOS: Foram comparados três inquéritos transversais, metodologicamente equivalentes, que integram projeto de monitoramento de indicadores de aleitamento materno no estado de São Paulo. Foram estudadas crianças de 0 a 6 meses de idade que compareceram a uma das duas etapas da campanha de multivacinação nos anos de 1999, 2003 e 2006, com respectivamente 496, 674 e 509 crianças. Apresentam-se estatísticas descritivas comparando a prevalência de aleitamento materno exclusivo segundo idade (em meses e conjunto de crianças menores de 6 meses. As diferenças de prevalência foram expressas em termos de pontos percentuais e submetidas a teste estatístico (qui-quadrado de Pearson e tendência, adotando-se p OBJECTIVE: To study the trends and patterns of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF for under-6-month-old infants in the city of Bauru, Brazil. METHODS: Data from three methodologically equivalent cross-sectional surveys integrating the project for monitoring breastfeeding indicators in São Paulo state were compared. Infants aged zero to 6 months who attended one of the two phases of the Multivaccination Campaign in 1999, 2003 and 2006, respectively 496, 674 and 509 infants, were studied. Descriptive statistics were presented to compare the prevalence of EBF according to age (in months and for the set of children under 6 months. The differences in prevalence were expressed in percentage and submitted to statistical tests (Pearson's chi-square and tendency, adopting p < 0.05 as the critical level. Factors associated with EBF interruption in 2006 were also studied by uni- and multivariate analysis. RESULTS: Increase in EBF prevalence was found in under-6-month-old infants: in the 1999-2003 period, increase of 9.1%; in the 2003-2006 period, increase of 6.6%, thus reaching the annual increase rate of 2.3% in the first period and 2.2% in

  8. Unusual pediatric co-morbility: autoimmune thyroiditis and cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a 6-month-old Italian patient

    Urbano Flavia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a case of autoimmune thyroiditis in a 6-month-old patient with cortico-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Normal serum levels of thyroid hormons and thyroid-stimulating hormone were detected with high titers of circulant antithyroid antibodies and a dysomogeneous ultrasound appearance of the gland, typical of autoimmune thyroiditis. The research of maternal thyroid antibodies was negative. This is the first case of autoimmune thyroiditis found in such a young patient with pre-existing nephrotic syndrome ever described in literature. This association is random because nephrotic syndrome does not have an autoimmune pathogenesis and the genes involved in autoimmune thyroiditis are not related to those of nephrotic syndrome.

  9. Extreme hypernatremic dehydration due to potential sodium intoxication: consequences and management for an infant with diarrhea at an urban intensive care unit in Bangladesh: a case report

    Das, Sumon Kumar; Afroze, Farzana; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Faruque, Abu Syed Golam; Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Huq, Sayeeda; Islam, M. Munirul; Shahrin, Lubaba; Matin, Fariha Bushra; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypernatremia (serum sodium ≥150mmol/L) is one of the most life-threatening complications of childhood diarrhea, and its management remains challenging, even in a highly advanced critical care setting. This case report describes the acute clinical course and 3-month neurological follow-up after discharge of an infant with extreme hypernatremia in an intensive care unit in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Case presentation A 6-month-old Asian Bangladeshi girl of middle-class socioeconomic statu...

  10. Number Sense in Human Infants

    Xu, Fei; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Goddard, Sydney

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments used a preferential looking method to investigate 6-month-old infants' capacity to represent numerosity in visual-spatial displays. Building on previous findings that such infants discriminate between arrays of eight versus 16 discs, but not eight versus 12 discs (Xu & Spelke, 2000), Experiments 1 and 2 investigated whether…

  11. Motor Acquisition Rate in Brazilian Infants

    Lopes, Virlaine Bardella; de Lima, Carolina Daniel; Tudella, Eloisa

    2009-01-01

    This study used the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) with the aim of characterizing motor acquisition rate in 70 healthy 0-6-month-old Brazilian infants, as well as comparing both emergence (initial age) and establishment (final age) of each skill between the study sample and the AIMS normative data. New motor skills were continuously acquired…

  12. Infant formula increases bone turnover favoring bone formation

    In the first year of life, the major infant food choices have traditionally been breast milk (BM), cow's milk formula (MF), or soy formula (SF). Studies examining the effects of infant formula on early life skeletal development are extremely limited. We have enrolled 120 healthy 6-month-old infants ...

  13. Brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction due to adrenal insufficiency in preterm infants

    Su-Mi Shin; Jee Won Chai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction (LCD) due to adrenal insufficiency (AI) in preterm infants. Methods: Among the 257 preterm infants born at

  14. Determinants of Anger in Young Infants: The Effect of Loss of Control.

    Sullivan, Margaret W.; Lewis, Michael

    This study examined the effect of different types of loss of control on the quality and quantity of the frustration response in 4- to 6-month-old infants. To establish an expectancy, all infants received 4 minutes of contingency training in which infants were presented with slides and music after they performed a pulling response with their right…

  15. Brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction due to adrenal insufficiency in preterm infants

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the brain ultrasonographic findings of late-onset circulatory dysfunction (LCD) due to adrenal insufficiency (AI) in preterm infants. Methods: Among the 257 preterm infants born at AI. Brain ultrasonographic findings were retrospectively analyzed before and after LCD in 14 preterm infants, after exclusion of the other 21 infants with AI due to the following causes: death (n=2), early AI (n=5), sepsis (n=1), and patent ductus arteriosus (n=13). Results: Fourteen of 257 infants (5.4%) were diagnosed with LCD due to AI. The age at LCD was a median of 18.5 days (range, 9 to 32 days). The last ultrasonographic findings before LCD occurred showed grade 1 periventricular echogenicity (PVE) in all 14 patients and germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) with focal cystic change in one patient. Ultrasonographic findings after LCD demonstrated no significant change in grade 1 PVE and no new lesions in eight (57%), grade 1 PVE with newly appearing GMH in three (21%), and increased PVE in three (21%) infants. Five infants (36%) showed new development (n=4) or increased size (n=1) of GMH. Two of three infants (14%) with increased PVE developed cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and rapid progression to macrocystic encephalomalacia. Conclusion: LCD due to AI may be associated with the late development of GMH, increased PVE after LCD, and cystic PVL with rapid progression to macrocystic encephalomalacia. PMID:27156563

  16. Gaze Behavior and Affect at 6 Months: Predicting Clinical Outcomes and Language Development in Typically Developing Infants and Infants at Risk for Autism

    Young, Gregory S.; Merin, Noah; Rogers, Sally J.; Ozonoff, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents follow-up longitudinal data to research that previously suggested the possibility of abnormal gaze behavior marked by decreased eye contact in a subgroup of 6-month-old infants at risk for autism (Merin, Young, Ozonoff & Rogers, 2007). Using eye-tracking data and behavioral data recorded during a live mother-infant interaction…

  17. 父母受教育水平对婴儿早期智能发育的影响%The Effect of the Parent's Education on the Early Intellectual Development of infants

    张朝; 于宗富

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of parent's education on the early intellectual development of infants. Methods: A total of 3,000 infants in a general hospital were sampled and divided into three groups: 3-month-old, 6-month-old and 9-month-old. All of the infants were tested with DST. Results: The parent's education was shown to have a significant effect on the intellectual development of 6-month-old and 9-month-old infants. The better education the parents had, the brighter the infants were. Conclusions: The parent's education had significant effect on the baby's early intelligence development.

  18. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report. PMID:26844816

  19. Small and Large Number Processing in Infants and Toddlers with Williams Syndrome

    Van Herwegen, Jo; Ansari, Daniel; Xu, Fei; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that typically developing 6-month-old infants are able to discriminate between small and large numerosities. However, discrimination between small numerosities in young infants is only possible when variables continuous with number (e.g. area or circumference) are confounded. In contrast, large number discrimination…

  20. Intergenerational Pathways From Reflective Functioning to Infant Attachment Through Parenting

    Ensink, K.; Normandin, L.; Plamondon, A.; Berthelot, N.; Fonagy, P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to examine temporal pathways from mothers’ reflective functioning (RF) through parenting to infant attachment measured more than 16 months later. Participants were 88 mother–infant dyads from demographically diverse backgrounds and included a group of mothers with histories of childhood maltreatment. RF was assessed using the RF rating of the Adult Attachment Interview before the birth of the baby. Parenting was assessed when the infants were 6 months old...

  1. Sudden Infant Death With Area Postrema Lesion Likely Due to Wrong Use of Insecticide.

    Lavezzi, Anna M; Cappiello, Achille; Termopoli, Veronica; Bonoldi, Emanuela; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    We report a noteworthy case of a 7-month-old infant who suddenly and unexpectedly died during her sleep. After a complete postmortem examination, review of the clinical history, and detailed death scene investigation, the death remained unexplained, leading to a diagnosis of sudden infant death syndrome. However, an extensive review of the brainstem neuropathology revealed a severe alteration in the area postrema (a highly vascular structure lying at the base of the fourth ventricle outside of the blood-brain barrier). The alteration was likely due to massive and repeated to a common household insecticide in the last few weeks of life. These results provide an explanation for this sudden infant death, allowing a differential diagnosis from sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:26371202

  2. Red to Green or Fast to Slow? Infants' Visual Working Memory for "Just Salient Differences"

    Kaldy, Zsuzsa; Blaser, Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this study, 6-month-old infants' visual working memory for a static feature (color) and a dynamic feature (rotational motion) was compared. Comparing infants' use of different features can only be done properly if experimental manipulations to those features are equally salient (Kaldy & Blaser, 2009; Kaldy, Blaser, & Leslie,…

  3. Severe hypoglycemic encephalopathy due to hypoallergenic formula in an infant.

    Ogawa, Erika; Ishige, Mika; Takahashi, Yuno; Kodama, Hiroko; Fuchigami, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Shori

    2016-08-01

    A 7-month-old girl was brought to hospital due to vomiting. Upon admission, she was in a convulsive state and stupor with extremely low blood glucose. Head computed tomography showed brain edema, and comprehensive treatment for acute encephalopathy was initiated immediately. Severe hypoglycemia, metabolic acidosis, elevation of ammonia and serum transaminases and creatine kinase suggested metabolic decompensation. Infusion of a high-glucose solution containing vitamins, biotin, and l-carnitine resolved the metabolic crisis quickly, but brain damage was irreversible. She was found to have been fed exclusively on a hypoallergenic formula (HF) for 7 months, although she was found later to be non-allergic. Evidence of inborn metabolic diseases was absent, therefore biotin deficiency and carnitine deficiency were concluded to be a consequence of reliance on a HF for a prolonged period. Health-care professionals should warn parents of the consequences of using HF. PMID:27324861

  4. When infants talk, infants listen: pre-babbling infants prefer listening to speech with infant vocal properties.

    Masapollo, Matthew; Polka, Linda; Ménard, Lucie

    2016-03-01

    To learn to produce speech, infants must effectively monitor and assess their own speech output. Yet very little is known about how infants perceive speech produced by an infant, which has higher voice pitch and formant frequencies compared to adult or child speech. Here, we tested whether pre-babbling infants (at 4-6 months) prefer listening to vowel sounds with infant vocal properties over vowel sounds with adult vocal properties. A listening preference favoring infant vowels may derive from their higher voice pitch, which has been shown to attract infant attention in infant-directed speech (IDS). In addition, infants' nascent articulatory abilities may induce a bias favoring infant speech given that 4- to 6-month-olds are beginning to produce vowel sounds. We created infant and adult /i/ ('ee') vowels using a production-based synthesizer that simulates the act of speaking in talkers at different ages and then tested infants across four experiments using a sequential preferential listening task. The findings provide the first evidence that infants preferentially attend to vowel sounds with infant voice pitch and/or formants over vowel sounds with no infant-like vocal properties, supporting the view that infants' production abilities influence how they process infant speech. The findings with respect to voice pitch also reveal parallels between IDS and infant speech, raising new questions about the role of this speech register in infant development. Research exploring the underpinnings and impact of this perceptual bias can expand our understanding of infant language development. PMID:25754812

  5. A 6-month-old with vaccine-hesitant parents.

    Opel, Douglas J; Feemster, Kristen A; Omer, Saad B; Orenstein, Walter A; Richter, Monica; Lantos, John D

    2014-03-01

    Many primary care pediatricians find vaccine hesitancy to be one of the most frustrating situations that they face. Parents who refuse to vaccinate their children implicitly call into question an intervention that most pediatricians see as one of the safest and most effective health care interventions of all time. Many pediatricians respond by refusing to care for children whose parents refuse vaccines, and some may consider that the parent's refusal warrants referral to child protective services. We present a case in which a pediatrician faces this dilemma, with responses from pediatricians in academia and private practice. PMID:24515506

  6. Treatable newborn and infant seizures due to inborn errors of metabolism.

    Campistol, Jaume; Plecko, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    About 25% of seizures in the neonatal period have causes other than asphyxia, ischaemia or intracranial bleeding. Among these are primary genetic epileptic encephalopathies with sometimes poor prognosis and high mortality. In addition, some forms of neonatal infant seizures are due to inborn errors of metabolism that do not respond to common AEDs, but are amenable to specific treatment. In this situation, early recognition can allow seizure control and will prevent neurological deterioration and long-term sequelae. We review the group of inborn errors of metabolism that lead to newborn/infant seizures and epilepsy, of which the treatment with cofactors is very different to that used in typical epilepsy management. PMID:26234933

  7. Gaze Behavior and Affect at 6-Months: Predicting Clinical Outcomes and Language Development in Typically Developing Infants and Infants At-Risk for Autism

    Young, Gregory S.; Merin, Noah; Rogers, Sally J.; Ozonoff, Sally

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents follow-up longitudinal data to research that previously suggested the possibility of abnormal gaze behavior marked by decreased eye contact in a subgroup of 6-month-old infants at risk for autism (Merin et al., 2007). Using eye-tracking data and behavioral data recorded during a live mother-infant interaction involving the still-face procedure, the predictive utility of gaze behavior and affective behaviors at 6 months was examined using diagnostic outcome data obtained lo...

  8. Estimation of the dose to the nursing infant due to direct irradiation from activity present in maternal organs and tissues

    ) due to the incorporation of 1 Bq of a radionuclide by the mother. This information may be used to provide external dose estimates to the infant in the case of a known or suspected radionuclide incorporation by the mother due to, for example, a nuclear medicine procedure. (authors)

  9. Hemoglobin cut-off values in healthy Turkish infants

    Ahmet Arvas; Emel Gür; DurmuşDoğan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia is a widespread public health problem associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. This study was undertaken to determine the cut-off value of hemoglobin for infant anemia. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was carried out at well-baby clinics of a tertiary care hospital. A total of 1484 healthy infants aged between 4 to 24 months were included in the study. The relationship of hemoglobin (Hb) levels with mother age, birth weight, weight gain rate, feeding, and gender was evaluated. Results: The Hb levels were assessed in four age groups (4 months, 6 months, 9-12 months, and 15-24 months) and the cut-off values of Hb were determined. Hb cut-off values (5th percentile for age) were detected as 97 g/L and 93 g/L at 4 months and 6 months, respectively. In older infants, the 5th percentile was 90.5 g/L and 93.4 g/L at 9-12 months and 15-24 months, respectively. The two values were lower than the World Health Organization criteria for anemia, which could partly due to the lack of information on iron status in our population. However, this difference highlights the need for further studies on normal Hb levels in healthy infants in developing countries. Hb levels of females were higher in all age groups; however, a statistically significant difference was found in gender in only 6 month-old infants. No statistically significant difference was found among Hb levels, mother's age, birth weight, weight gain rate, and nutritional status. Conclusion: Hb cut-off values in infants should be re-evaluated and be compatible with growth and development of children in that community.

  10. Cortical Activation to Action Perception is Associated with Action Production Abilities in Young Infants

    Lloyd-Fox, Sarah; Wu, Rachel; RICHARDS, JOHN E.; Elwell, Clare E; Johnson, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which perception and action share common neural processes is much debated in cognitive neuroscience. Taking a developmental approach to this issue allows us to assess whether perceptual processing develops in close association with the emergence of related action skills within the same individual. The current study used functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to investigate the perception of human action in 4- to 6-month-old human infants. In addition, the infants' manual ...

  11. Maternal and Paternal Plasma, Salivary, and Urinary Oxytocin and Parent-Infant Synchrony: Considering Stress and Affiliation Components of Human Bonding

    Feldman, Ruth; Gordon, Ilanit; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna

    2011-01-01

    Studies in mammals have implicated the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) in processes of bond formation and stress modulation, yet the involvement of OT in human bonding throughout life remains poorly understood. We assessed OT in the plasma, saliva, and urine of 112 mothers and fathers interacting with their 4-6-month-old infants. Parent-infant…

  12. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases

    Yakut, Nurhayat; Kepenekli, Eda Kadayifci; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Demir, Sevliya Ocal; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter ursingii is an aerobic, gram-negative, opportunistic microorganism which is rarely isolated among Acinetobacter species. We present two immunocompetent infants who developed bacteremia due to A. ursingii. The first patient is a two -month- old boy who had been hospitalized in pediatric surgery unit for suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula because of recurrent aspiration pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The second patient is a fourteen -month- old boy with prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. A. ursingii was isolated from their blood cultures. They were successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Although A. ursingii has recently been isolated from a clinical specimen; reports of infection with A. ursingii in children are rare. A. ursingii should be kept in mind as an opportunistic microorganism in children. PMID:27347282

  13. 214例婴儿缺铁性贫血的特点及其相关因素分析%Analysis on Features and Related Factors of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 214 Infants

    李蕙; 周敏; 曹雪梅; 徐鸣; 李丹; 史宏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics and the risk factors of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infants.Methods The retrospective study of clinical data involving 214 IDA inpatients aged 4- 12 months old in our hospital from January 2002 to June 2009 was carried out.Results Among 214 infantile cases, infants less than 6 months old accounted 12.62% and infants more than 6 months old accounted for 87.38%.Rural infants with IDA were more prevalent than city infants (61.21% vs.38.79% ).Most of these IDA infants had mild to moderate anemia degree (56.54% and 38.79% ), only 4.67% inpatients were severe anemia.The prevalence rate of IDA in infants with breast- feeding without food supplement on time was 29.44%, which was more than that in infants with artificial feeding and mixed feeding.Most of these infants were full term infants (89.25% ), while only 10.75% were premature or twins.Laboratory examination indicated serum iron decrease (49.06% ), ferritin decrease (56.07%) and serum transferrin receptor increase (33.33%).A hundred and eighty - four cases (85.98%) of these IDA infants were hospitalized because of varied complications such as respiratory infection.Conclusion Infants with IDA are more prevalent in rural infants more than 6 months old, in which the main cause is breast- feeding without food supplement on time.And IDA is often neglected because most of the patients could see a doctor due to complicating diseases.Prevention aiming at high risk groups, early diagnosis and early treatment are very important.%目的 分析医院婴儿缺铁性贫血的特点和相关危险因素.方法 回顾性分析儿童医院2002年1月至2009年6月收治的214例缺铁性贫血患儿的临床资料.结果 214例患儿中,6月龄以下占12.62%,6月龄以上占87.38%;农村患儿占61.21%,城市患儿占38.79% ;轻度贫血占56.54%,中度贫血占38.79%,重度贫血占4.67%;母乳喂养但未按时添加辅食者占29.44%;足月儿占89

  14. Study of community-based intervention on early education caregivers attitude in 0 ~ 6 months old infants%0~6月龄婴儿早期教育综合干预模式对看护人态度的影响

    何红; 曾芳芳; 朱明范; 陈慧; 石英英; 陈亚英; 江明; 郭丽

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] Community as a link, to study community-based intervention on early education'caregivers attitude change. [Methods] 422 newborns selected from November 2009 to March 2010, were divided into intervention group (202) and control group (220). Both groups were given basic health services. In addition, the intervention group were given comprehensive intervention program. Intervention period lasted 6-month. Caregivers knowledge, attitude and behavior change were compared before and after intervention. [Result] Caregivers increased frequency of listening music and movement training significantly, and parents actively participated in other early education course in intervention group. [Conclusion] Early community-based comprehensive intervention can obviously promote caregivers mothering knowledge, attitude and behavior.%目的 以社区家庭为纽带,了解立足社区的婴儿早期教育的综合干预模式对看护人教养态度的影响 方法 选择2009年11月-2010年3月出生的新生儿422人,干预组202人,对照组220人 两组婴儿均给予基本的儿童保健服务,干预组在此基础上给予自行设计的早期教育综合干预方案,干预为期6个月,比较综合干预前后两组看护人的育儿知识、态度、行为的变化情况 结果 干预组看护者明显增加了婴儿听音乐及动作训练的频率,并主动参与其他早教课程 结论 对看护人进行早期教育综合干预,可明显改善看护人的育儿知识、态度和行为.

  15. Influência do tipo de aleitamento materno e da presença de anemia na mãe na concentração de hemoglobina aos 6 meses de idade Influence of breastfeeding type and maternal anemia on hemoglobin concentration in 6-month-old infants

    Maria de Lourdes P. D. Teixeira; Pedro I. C. de Lira; Sonia B. Coutinho; Sophie H. Eickmann; Marília de C. Lima

    2010-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência do tipo de aleitamento materno e da presença de anemia na mãe no nível de hemoglobina de lactentes aos 6 meses de idade. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, aninhado em estudo de intervenção de base comunitária, randomizado, controlado, que objetivou aumentar a duração do aleitamento materno exclusivo nos primeiros 6 meses de vida. O estudo foi realizado em quatro cidades do estado de Pernambuco, sendo os recém-nascidos recrutados no período de março a agosto de 2001...

  16. Acute liver failure due to Human Herpesvirus 6 in an infant

    G.M. Tronconi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus, drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6 genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases’ review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus’s genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus.

  17. [Acute liver failure due to human herpesvirus 6 in an infant].

    Tronconi, G M; Mariani, B; Pajno, R; Fomasi, M; Cococcioni, L; Biffi, V; Bove, M; Corsin, P; Garbetta, G; Barera, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF) with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus), drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV6) genome was positive with a significant number of copies for mL. A favorable evolution of the clinical symptoms and a progressive hematochemical resolution were obtained. Plasma and Vitamin K were administrated as a support therapy for treating coagulopathy. The present case report and the cases' review from the literature, evidence the importance of always including screening for HHV6 infection in the diagnostic approach to acute onset of liver failure. HHV6 is a common virus in the pediatric population with a greater number of cases of fulminant viral non-A, non-B, non-C hepatitis in immunocompetent patients due to this virus: these forms have often a high mortality rate and maybe necessitate liver transplantation; for this reason correct etiological agent identification is mandatory for the prognosis and it has to be based on the quantitative search of the virus's genome. Pathogenesis of liver-induced damage associated to HHV6 remains unclear; however in vitro studies demonstrate the potential hepatotoxicity effects of this virus. PMID:23342747

  18. Social looking, social referencing and humor perception in 6- and-12-month-old infants.

    Mireault, Gina C; Crockenberg, Susan C; Sparrow, John E; Pettinato, Christine A; Woodard, Kelly C; Malzac, Kirsten

    2014-11-01

    Social referencing refers to infants' use of caregivers as emotional referents in ambiguous situations (Walden, 1993). Studies of social referencing typically require ambulation, thereby over-looking younger, non-ambulatory infants (i.e., ≤8-months) and resulting in a widespread assumption that young infants do not employ this strategy. Using a novel approach that does not require mobility, we found that when parents provided unsolicited affective cues during an ambiguous-absurd (i.e., humorous) event, 6-month-olds employ one component of social referencing, social looking Additionally, 6-month-olds who did not laugh at the event were significantly more likely to look toward parents than their counterparts who found the event funny. Sequential analyses revealed that, following a reference to a smiling parent, 6-month olds were more likely to smile at the parent, but by 12 months were more likely to smile at the event suggesting that older infants are influenced by parental affect in humorous situations. The developmental implications of these findings are discussed, as well as the usefulness of studying humor for understanding important developmental phenomena. PMID:25061893

  19. Infant exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) via consumption of homemade baby food in Korea.

    Jeong, Yunsun; Lee, Sunggyu; Kim, Sunmi; Choi, Sung-Deuk; Park, Jeongim; Kim, Hai-Joong; Lee, Jeong Jae; Choi, Gyuyeon; Choi, Sooran; Kim, Sungjoo; Kim, Su Young; Kim, Young Don; Cho, Geumjoon; Suh, Eunsook; Kim, Sung Koo; Eun, So-Hee; Eom, Soyong; Kim, Seunghyo; Kim, Gun-Ha; Lee, Won Chan; Choi, Kyungho; Kim, Sungkyoon; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2014-10-01

    Limited data are available on the residue levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in baby food. In this study, 24 PBDE congeners were determined in 147 homemade baby food samples collected from 97 households for 6-, 9-, 12-, 15-, and from 24 to 27-month-old infant groups during the period of 2012-2013. The concentrations of total PBDEs (ΣPBDE) ranged from 24.5 to 6000 (mean: 263) pg/g fresh weight, higher than those found in commercial formulae from the United States. The predominant congeners were BDEs 209 and 47, accounting for 92% of the ΣPBDE concentrations, reflected by high deca-BDE consumption in Korea. The residue levels and detection rates of BDE 47 in the baby food samples showed a gradual increasing trend with an increase in infant ages, due to changes in the food ingredients from hypoallergenic to greasy. The daily intakes of BDEs 47 and 209 via baby food consumption ranged from 0.04 to 0.58, 0.80 to 20.3, and 1.06 to 22.3 ng/kg body weight/day for 6-, 9-, 12-, 15-, and 24-27-month-old infant groups, respectively; these intakes were lower than the oral reference doses proposed by the US EPA. Together with three exposure sources, baby food, breast milk and dust ingestion for 6-month-old infants, the daily intake of ΣPBDE was 25.5 ng/kg body weight/day, which was similar to the intake via baby food consumption only for over 24-month-old infants in our study. This indicates that baby food is an important exposure pathway of PBDEs for over 24-month-old infants. This is the first study regarding the occurrence and exposure assessment of PBDEs via homemade baby food. PMID:25218705

  20. Effectiveness of zinc supplementation plus oral rehydration salts for diarrhoea in infants aged less than 6 months in Haryana state, India

    Sarmila Mazumder; Sunita Taneja; Nita Bhandari; Brinda Dube; RC Agarwal; Dilip Mahalanabis; Olivier Fontaine; Robert E. Black

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if educating caregivers in providing zinc supplements to infants < 6 months old with acute diarrhoea is effective in treating diarrhoea and preventing acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs), and whether it leads to a decrease in the use of oral rehydration salts (ORS). METHODS: In this retrospective subgroup analysis of infants aged < 6 months, six clusters were randomly assigned to intervention or control sites. Care providers were trained to give zinc and ORS to ...

  1. The Effects of Music and Movement on Mother-Infant Interactions

    Vlismas, Wendy; Malloch, Stephen; Burnham, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the effects of a music and movement (M&M) programme on healthy first-time mothers and their 2-6-month-old infants over a five-week period. Experiment 1 (N?=?96) examined the effects of the M&M activities and the face-to-face (F2F) social contact of a group instruction method on the perception of mothers'…

  2. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction due to anomalous mitral valve: successful mitral valve replacement in a four month old infant.

    Morais, P.; Westaby, S.; Hallidie-Smith, K A

    1986-01-01

    A four month old infant was investigated for heart failure was found to have mitral incompetence and severe subvalvar aortic stenosis. The left ventricular outflow tract obstruction was found to be due to an anatomically anomalous mitral valve. The obstruction could only be relieved by removal of the mitral valve and its replacement with a St Jude's prosthesis. Two years after operation the child is fit and active. There have been no difficulties with anticoagulant treatment.

  3. The Reliability and Validity of the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Leerkes, Esther M.

    2008-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised was examined in a sample of 6 month old infants and their parents. One hundred and fifteen mothers and 79 fathers completed the IBQ-R and a measure of depression and 98 infants participated in a laboratory assessment of temperament. Internal consistency reliability was adequate for all 14 IBQ-R subscales for both mothers and fathers and inter-rater reliability of mother and father reports was demonstrated for 11 of 14 s...

  4. Acute liver failure due to Human Herpesvirus 6 in an infant

    G.M. Tronconi; B. Mariani; R. Pajno; M. Fomasi; L. Cococcioni; Biffi, V.; Bove, M.; P. Corsin; G. Garbetta; Barera, G

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a 4-months infant with fever in the absence of other specific symptoms that has rapidly and unexpectedly developed acute liver failure (ALF) with coagulopathy and complicated with bone marrow failure without encephalopathy. The main viral infection agents (hepatitis virus A, B, C, Citomegalovirus, Ebstain Barr virus, Parvovirus B19, Adenovirus), drug-induced hepatotoxicity and metabolic disorders associated to ALF were excluded. Quantitative determination of Human Herpesvi...

  5. The impact of infant feeding patterns on infection and diarrheal disease due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    Long Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE. Determine the impact of dietary risk factors on patterns of infection by heat labile toxin-producing Escherichia coli (LT-ETEC. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ninety-eight infants were followed from birth for one year in Guadalajara, Mexico, beginning in august of 1986. Stool and breast milk samples were collected weekly from infants and their mothers, respectively. Mothers were also interviewed on a weekly basis regarding the health of the infants. Parametric hazard models were fit to durations of different LTETEC disease states determined through the analysis of stools. The child's consumption of supplemental foods and liquids as well as specific levels of LT-ETEC-specific breast milk antibodies were included in each model as time-varying covariates. RESULTS. The hazard of LTETEC asymptomatic infection increased 400 percent among children who received oats gruel (hazard rate= 4.01; 95% CI 2.77-5.24. The duration of infection was reduced if the child had had a previous LT-ETEC diarrheal episode (2.12; 95% CI 1.74-2.49 but was prolonged if the child consumed herbal teas (0.53; 95% CI 0.27-0.7. Herbal teas and high LTETEC-specific breast milk antibody levels each reduced the hazard of symptomatic infection by ninety percent. Symptomatic episodes became asymptomatic more rapidly if a child was given rice water. CONCLUSIONS. Specific weaning foods increase the risk of infection. Breastmilk antibodies and liquid infusions reduce diarrheal disease and infection duration.

  6. Fecal calprotectin levels are higher in rural than in urban Chinese infants and negatively associated with growth

    Liu Jin-Rong; Sheng Xiao-Yang; Hu Yan-Qi; Yu Xiao-Gang; Westcott Jamie E; Miller Leland V; Krebs Nancy F; Hambidge K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Fecal calprotectin (FC) is an established simple biomarker of gut inflammation. To examine a possible relationship between linear growth and gut inflammation, we compared fecal calprotectin levels in 6 month old infants from poor rural vs affluent urban families. Methods The project was a cross-sectional comparison of FC from rural and urban populations in China. The relationship between length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) and FC concentrations were also compared. Single fecal sa...

  7. Early Prosodic Acquisition in Bilingual Infants: The Case of the Perceptual Trochaic Bias

    Bijeljac-Babic, Ranka; Höhle, Barbara; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Infants start learning the prosodic properties of their native language before 12 months, as shown by the emergence of a trochaic bias in English-learning infants between 6 and 9 months (Jusczyk et al., 1993), and in German-learning infants between 4 and 6 months (Höhle et al., 2009, 2014), while French-learning infants do not show a bias at 6 months (Höhle et al., 2009). This language-specific emergence of a trochaic bias is supported by the fact that English and German are languages with trochaic predominance in their lexicons, while French is a language with phrase-final lengthening but lacking lexical stress. We explored the emergence of a trochaic bias in bilingual French/German infants, to study whether the developmental trajectory would be similar to monolingual infants and whether amount of relative exposure to the two languages has an impact on the emergence of the bias. Accordingly, we replicated Höhle et al. (2009) with 24 bilingual 6-month-olds learning French and German simultaneously. All infants had been exposed to both languages for 30 to 70% of the time from birth. Using the Head Preference Procedure, infants were presented with two lists of stimuli, one made up of several occurrences of the pseudoword /GAba/ with word-initial stress (trochaic pattern), the second one made up of several occurrences of the pseudoword /gaBA/ with word-final stress (iambic pattern). The stimuli were recorded by a native German female speaker. Results revealed that these French/German bilingual 6-month-olds have a trochaic bias (as evidenced by a preference to listen to the trochaic pattern). Hence, their listening preference is comparable to that of monolingual German-learning 6-month-olds, but differs from that of monolingual French-learning 6-month-olds who did not show any preference (Höhle et al., 2009). Moreover, the size of the trochaic bias in the bilingual infants was not correlated with their amount of exposure to German. The present results thus

  8. Early Prosodic Acquisition in Bilingual Infants: The Case of the Perceptual Trochaic Bias.

    Bijeljac-Babic, Ranka; Höhle, Barbara; Nazzi, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Infants start learning the prosodic properties of their native language before 12 months, as shown by the emergence of a trochaic bias in English-learning infants between 6 and 9 months (Jusczyk et al., 1993), and in German-learning infants between 4 and 6 months (Höhle et al., 2009, 2014), while French-learning infants do not show a bias at 6 months (Höhle et al., 2009). This language-specific emergence of a trochaic bias is supported by the fact that English and German are languages with trochaic predominance in their lexicons, while French is a language with phrase-final lengthening but lacking lexical stress. We explored the emergence of a trochaic bias in bilingual French/German infants, to study whether the developmental trajectory would be similar to monolingual infants and whether amount of relative exposure to the two languages has an impact on the emergence of the bias. Accordingly, we replicated Höhle et al. (2009) with 24 bilingual 6-month-olds learning French and German simultaneously. All infants had been exposed to both languages for 30 to 70% of the time from birth. Using the Head Preference Procedure, infants were presented with two lists of stimuli, one made up of several occurrences of the pseudoword /GAba/ with word-initial stress (trochaic pattern), the second one made up of several occurrences of the pseudoword /gaBA/ with word-final stress (iambic pattern). The stimuli were recorded by a native German female speaker. Results revealed that these French/German bilingual 6-month-olds have a trochaic bias (as evidenced by a preference to listen to the trochaic pattern). Hence, their listening preference is comparable to that of monolingual German-learning 6-month-olds, but differs from that of monolingual French-learning 6-month-olds who did not show any preference (Höhle et al., 2009). Moreover, the size of the trochaic bias in the bilingual infants was not correlated with their amount of exposure to German. The present results thus

  9. [An infant with unexplained epilepsy].

    van Gaal, J Carlijn; Petru, Ronald; Sie, Lilian T J

    2010-01-01

    A 6-month-old male infant with an unremarkable past medical history was admitted to the emergency department in an epileptic state. The seizures were resistant to treatment with conventional drugs. The child was sedated, intubated and admitted to the intensive care department. Despite extensive investigations no underlying disease was found. The seizures persisted and the child was repeatedly admitted to the hospital. Four months after the first presentation, ventricular fibrillation occurred from which the child was successfully resuscitated. His stomach appeared to contain a disinfectant and a severe ethanol-intoxication was found, leading to the diagnosis "Munchausen syndrome by proxy". The incidence of this syndrome is underestimated. Recognition of this potentially fatal phenomenon is often difficult, resulting in a delay in diagnosis. Paediatricians and general practitioners should be aware of this syndrome in children presenting with an unusual disease or an unusual medical history reported by the parents or care providers. PMID:21176267

  10. Sonographic detection of intrarenal and intraarterial fungus balls in a preterm infant due to systemic candidiasis

    Shortly after birth a preterm infant suffering from aspiration syndrome and subsequent Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis showed signs of renal insufficiency and mycotic infection: Yeast cells were identified in several urinalyses; there was also an increasing anti-Candida IgM antibody titer. At the same time sonographic examinations revealed an increasing echogenicity of the renal cortex and echogenic masses of variable size which did not cause acoustic shadows in both enlarged kidneys. A few days later, we found a right-sided hydronephrosis caused by an intraureteric prevesical mass of equal echogenicity. As we could observe sonographically, the aggressive antimycotic therapy was successful. Eleven weeks later there were signs of cardiac insufficiency. An angiographically demonstrated filling defect within the pulmonary artery showed the same sonographic findings as the previously found intrarenal masses. The baby underwent embolectomy and recovered. The thrombotic material contained yeast cells giving evidence of systemic Candidasis. Provided appropriate equipment is available, ultrasound today is an excellent non-invasive screening and followup method not only for echoencephalography, but also for more complicated neonatologic problems as seen here. The detailed observation of a changing echogenicity of the renal cortex and pelvis is important and often allows a decisive diagnostic clue before other radiological methods become conclusive. (orig.)

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Cerebrolysin in Infants with Communication Defects due to Severe Perinatal Brain Insult: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Hassanein, Sahar M.A.; Deifalla, Shaymaa M.; El-Houssinie, Moustafa; Mokbel, Somaia A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The neuroregenerative drug Cerebrolysin has demonstrated efficacy in improving cognition in adults with stroke and Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of Cerebrolysin in the treatment of communication defects in infants with severe perinatal brain insult. Methods A randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in which 158 infants (age 6-21 months) with communication defects due to severe perinatal brain insul...

  12. Intervention by the mental health specialist nurse for preventing sleep disorders due to incorrect habits in infants

    Natalia Cámara Conde

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The sleep disorders are among the most common behaviour problems in infancy and early childhood, not only affect children, but parents also suffer from lack of sleep which creates problems of anxiety and communication in the partner by exhaustion. One way to prevent insomnia in children is that parents know how to create the habit of sleeping with their children.The main aims of the protocol are: - To train parents to establish healthy habits for proper sleep hygiene.- Preventing sleep disorders caused by bad habits in the infant. - To prevent symptoms of anxiety due to lack of sleep in the parents.The program will consist of 6 sessions of 90 minutes long, 3 pre-natal where they thrive knowledge and 3 sessions after to exposure doubts and search for solutions. We think that cooperation between the mental health nurse specialist with the midwife it is necessary to create a program that establish a healthy dream pattern in both infants and their parents, will prevent the sleep disorders by incorrect habits and their effects

  13. [Outbreak of hospital infection, due to members of the Klebsielleae tribe, in an intensive care unit for infants].

    Albesa, I; Eraso, A J; Frigerio, C I; Lubetkin, A M

    1980-01-01

    At the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Provincial Regional Hospital, in Río Cuarto, Argentina, nearly all hospitalized infants showed clinical symptoms of septicaemia and gastroenteritis. Neither Salmonella nor Shigella were found in the stool cultures, but Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated as predominant flora. Three haemocultures displayed K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae; the other three developed only E. cloacae. Since the infants came from different places and it was possible to isolate members of the Klebsielleae tribe from all of them, a hospital infection was suspected. Searching for the infectious source, K. pneumoniae was detected in the water bath used to keep the feeding-bottles at 37 degrees C. To clarify the existence of any relationship between the strains isolated from patients and from the water bath, several characteristics were compared: biotypes, haemolityc activity, antibiotic sensibility patterns, and pathogenicity, assessed as lethal dose 50%. Identical results were found for the biochemical tests of all the strains belonging to the same species. The antibiotic sensibility patterns and LD 50% showed quite similar values. All bacteria displayed haemolityc activity for rabbit and lamb erythrocytes. It could be considered that the septicaemia had an intestinal origin, and that the infection spread was due to the contamination of the water bath where the feeding bottles were kept. PMID:6755552

  14. Maternal eating disorder and infant diet. A latent class analysis based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa)

    Torgersen, Leila; Ystrom, Eivind; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Berg, Cecilie Knoph; Zerwas, Stephanie; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of infant diet and feeding practices among children of mothers with eating disorders is essential to promote healthy eating in these children. This study compared the dietary patterns of 6-month-old children of mothers with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and eating disorder not otherwise specified - purging subtype, to the diet of children of mothers with no eating disorders. The study was based on 53,879 mothers in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort St...

  15. The Effect of Exclusive Breastfeeding on Hospital Stay and Morbidity due to Various Diseases in Infants under 6 Months of Age: A Prospective Observational Study

    Kaur, Amarpreet; Singh, Karnail; Pannu, M. S.; Singh, Palwinder; Sehgal, Neeraj; Kaur, Rupinderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mother's milk is the best for the babies. Protective and preventive role of breast milk was evaluated in this study by assessing the relation of type of feeding and duration of hospital stay or morbidity. Methods. This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital and 232 infants in the age group of 14 weeks to 6 months formed the sample. There are two groups of infants, that is, one for breastfed and one for top fed infants. Statistical analysis was done and results were calculated up to 95% to 99% level of significance to find effect of feeding pattern on hospital stay due to various diseases and morbidity. Results. Prolonged hospital stay, that is, >7 days, was lesser in breastfed infants and results were statistically significant in case of gastroenteritis (p value < 0.001), bronchopneumonia (p value = 0.0012), bronchiolitis (p value = 0.005), otitis media (p value = 0.003), and skin diseases (p value = 0.047). Lesser morbidity was seen in breastfed infants with gastroenteritis (p value 0.0414), bronchopneumonia (p value 0.03705), bronchiolitis (p value 0.036706), meningitis (p value 0.043), and septicemia (p value 0.04). Conclusions. Breastfed infants have shorter hospital stay and lesser morbidity in regard to various diseases as compared to top fed infants.

  16. Refractory status epilepticus due to pneumococcal meningitis in an infant with congenital immunodeficiency

    Prasanth, Sudhakaran; Shaji, Velayudhan Cheruvallil; Lyla, Chacko; Jayalakshmi, Vasudevapanicker

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis remains a life-threatening infection, with varied presentations. A 3 month-old-baby with pneumococcal meningitis presented with clusters of seizures evolving into refractory status epilepticus despite standard antibiotic and aggressive anticonvulsant therapy. Progressive illness despite antibiotic initially suggested possible antibiotic resistance and resulted in addition of another antibiotic. Nonresponse to standard treatment and previous history of abscess in the back of neck pointed to some underlying congenital immunodeficiency. Further evaluation showed a deficiency of complement factor C3. This case underlines the need to consider underlying immunodeficiency in cases of refractory status epilepticus due to bacterial meningitis. Gram-staining of cerebrospinal fluid sample showing plenty of Gram-positive bacteria and comparatively fewer pus cells is a clue regarding some underlying immunodeficiency.

  17. Severe G6PD Deficiency Due to a New Missense Mutation in an Infant of Northern European Descent

    Warny, Marie; Lausen, Birgitte; Birgens, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    We report a term male infant born to parents of Danish descent, who on the second day of life developed jaundice peaking at 67 hours and decreasing on applied double-sided phototherapy. In the weeks following, the infant showed signs of ongoing hemolysis. Laboratory tests showed very low glucose-6...

  18. Diabetes mellitus in a 6-month-old Charolais heifer calf.

    Clark, Zoe

    2003-11-01

    This unthrifty heifer calf was thin, weak and had a dull haircoat. Urinalysis and blood work revealed glycosuria, ketonuria, hypoproteinemia, and hyperglycemia. Euthanasia and necropsy were performed, revealing multifocal intersitial lymphocytic infiltration, an absence of islet cells, and a positive stain for bovine viral diarrhea virus in the pancreas. PMID:14664356

  19. The first description of metyrapone use in severe Cushing Syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion in an infant with immature sacrococcygeal teratoma. Case Report.

    Wojcik, Malgorzata; Kalicka-Kasperczyk, Anna; Luszawska-Kutrzeba, Teresa; Balwierz, Walentyna; Starzyk, Jerzy B

    2015-12-01

    Cushing syndrome due to ectopic secretion of ACTH in infants is rare. The treatment of choice is radical resection of the tumour in combination with pre-operative chemotherapy using steroidogenesis inhibitors if necessary. If radical surgery is not possible, palliative treatment of hypercortisolemia is recommended. The most frequently used drug in infants is ketoconazole. Experience with the use of metyrapone is poor. We report an 8-month-old female infant with congenital immature sacrococcygeal teratoma secreting AFP, beta hCG and ACTH who had undergone non-radical resection of the tumour mass and was receiving standard risk chemotherapy (vinblastine, bleomycin, and cisplatin). The infant initially presented at the age of 6 months with ACTH-dependent Cushing syndrome (cortisol and ACTH level 325 ng/mL, 112 pg/mL respectively). Treatment with ketoconazole was initiated with a dose of 600 mg/day. Due to its ineffectiveness metyrapne was added in increasing dosages, up to 1,500 mg/day. In addition the schema of chemotherapy was changed (adriamycin, bleomycin, carboplatin), which resulted in normalization of cortisol levels and blood pressure. There were no metyrapone side effects during the treatment period. We can conclude that treatment with metyrapone at a dose of 1500 mg/day might be effective and safe in infants with Cushing syndrome. PMID:26859587

  20. Severe G6PD Deficiency Due to a New Missense Mutation in an Infant of Northern European Descent.

    Warny, Marie; Lausen, Birgitte; Birgens, Henrik; Knabe, Niels; Petersen, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We report a term male infant born to parents of Danish descent, who on the second day of life developed jaundice peaking at 67 hours and decreasing on applied double-sided phototherapy. In the weeks following, the infant showed signs of ongoing hemolysis. Laboratory tests showed very low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzymatic activity, and sequencing of the G6PD gene revealed a previously uncharacterized missense mutation c. 592 C>A (Arg198Ser). Oral DNA from the infant had the same G6PD mutation, suggesting a spontaneous maternal germline mutation as the mutation was not observed in leukocytes from the mother. PMID:26479991

  1. Attentional capture by social stimuli in young infants

    Maxie eGluckman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the possibility that a range of social stimuli capture the attention of 6-month-old infants when in competition with other non-face objects. Infants viewed a series of six-item arrays in which one target item was a face, body part, or animal as their eye movements were recorded. Stimulus arrays were also processed for relative salience of each item in terms of color, luminance, and amount of contour. Targets were rarely the most visually salient items in the arrays, yet infants’ first looks toward all three target types were above chance, and dwell times for targets exceeded other stimulus types. Girls looked longer at faces than did boys, but there were no sex differences for other stimuli. These results are interpreted in a context of learning to discriminate between different classes of animate stimuli, perhaps in line with affordances for social interaction, and origins of sex differences in social attention.

  2. Maternal fatty acid desaturase genotype correlates with infant immune responses at 6 months.

    Muc, Magdalena; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Larsen, Jeppe M; Birch, Sune; Brix, Susanne; Bisgaard, Hans; Lauritzen, Lotte

    2015-09-28

    Breast milk long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) have been associated with changes in early life immune responses and may modulate T-cell function in infancy. We studied the effect of maternal fatty acid desaturase (FADS) genotype and breast milk LCPUFA levels on infants' blood T-cell profiles and ex vivo-produced cytokines after anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in 6-month-old infants from the Copenhagen Prospective Study of Asthma in Childhood birth cohort. LCPUFA concentrations of breast milk were assessed at 4 weeks of age, and FADS SNP were determined in both mothers and infants (n 109). In general, breast milk arachidonic acid (AA) levels were inversely correlated with the production of IL-10 (r -0.25; P=0.004), IL-17 (r -0.24; P=0.005), IL-5 (r -0.21; P=0.014) and IL-13 (r -0.17; P=0.047), whereas EPA was positively correlated with the counts of blood regulatory T-cells and cytotoxic T-cells and decreased T-helper cell counts. The minor FADS alleles were associated with lower breast milk AA and EPA, and infants of mothers carrying the minor allele of FADS SNP rs174556 had higher production of IL-10 (r -0.23; P=0.018), IL-17 (r -0.25; P=0.009) and IL-5 (r -0.21; P=0.038) from ex vivo-activated immune cells. We observed no association between T-cell distribution and maternal or infant FADS gene variants. We conclude that increased maternal LCPUFA synthesis and breast milk AA are associated with decreased levels of IL-5, IL-13 (type-2 related), IL-17 (type-17 related) and IL-10 (regulatory immune responses), but not with interferon-γ and TNF-α, which could be due to an effect of the maternal FADS variants on the offspring immune response transferred via breast milk LCPUFA. PMID:26283408

  3. Impact on infants' cognitive development of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency disorder and common mental disorders.

    Thach Duc Tran

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of antenatal exposure to iron deficiency anemia (IDA and common mental disorders (CMD on cognitive development of 6 months old infants in a developing country. METHODS: A prospective population-based study in a rural province in Vietnam, which enrolled pregnant women at 12-20 weeks gestation and followed them up with their infants until six months postpartum. Criteria for IDA were Hb 30 years and primiparity had an indirect adverse effect on infants' Bayley cognitive scores. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that antenatal IDA and CMD both have adverse effects on child cognitive development, which if unrecognized and unaddressed are likely to be lasting. It is crucial that both these risks are considered by policy makers, clinicians, and researchers seeking to improve child cognitive function in developing countries.

  4. Cervical mycotic aneurysm in an infant. MRI findings and endovascular treatment

    A case of cervical mycotic aneurysm in a 6-month-old infant is presented. Eight days after birth the preterm newborn had a perforated necrotizing enterocolitis. Treatment included abdominal percutaneous drainage and surgery. Hemo cultures grew staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistant. Antibiotic therapy was indicated with a favorable evolution. Five months later the infant showed a lateral cervical mass nad hemorrhagic fluid in her right external auditory canal. Ultrasound and MRI were performed. MRI demonstrated a heterogeneous fluid-containing neck mass, similar in appearance to a parapharyngeal hematoma, with flow void sign. Digital substraction angiography (DSA) was performed to highlight the vascular anatomy demonstrating a mycotic aneurysm adjacent to the ascendent pharyngeal artery. The endovascular treatment with Histoacryl-Lipiodol was successful without any technical or neurological complications. Mycotic aneurysm is a very rare, but potentially fatal complication in infants. In our case report, MRI and DSA provided an accurate diagnosis leading to a rapid endovascular therapy. (author)

  5. Stent implantation of left main coronary artery stenosis in an infant: Effective long-term treatment?

    Christian Paech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery stenosis is a rare phenomenon in children. Coronary stent implantation is generally not considered a standard treatment option due to technical difficulties and potential complications in this group of patients. Nevertheless, several pediatric cases reporting successful implantation with acceptable short-term experiences have been described. The following case presents a successful stent implantation for left main coronary artery (LMCA stenosis early after surgery for anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery (ALCAPA at the age of 6 months. The excellent mid-term results and notably the procedure′s potential as a long-term treatment in small children are highlighted. A 6-month-old infant underwent surgery for ALCAPA. Due to sudden postoperative deterioration, cardiac catheterization was performed. Coronary angiography revealed severe (90% ostial LMCA stenosis. A PROMUS drug-eluting stent (Promus Element AL3.0 Χ 8 mm, Boston Scientific, Natick, Massachusetts, USA was implanted. The procedure was performed without complications. Antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel was initiated. Subsequently, cardiac function improved slowly. Cardiac catheterization 3 years 8 months after stent implantation showed no restenosis with a proximal LMCA diameter still at the 50 th percentile for age. Neither were signs of heart failure reported at the last follow-up at 7 years of age. Presupposing normal growth, the implanted stent would thus provide sufficient myocardial perfusion with a LMCA lumen at the 40 th percentile at the age of 16 years. In selected cases, coronary stent implantation may be an effective mid- to long-term treatment of coronary artery stenosis even in very young children.

  6. The Preterm Infant: A High-Risk Situation for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Due to Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    Kaplan, Michael; Hammerman, Cathy; Bhutani, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    Prematurity and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency are risk factors for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. The 2 conditions may interact additively or synergistically, contributing to extreme hyperbilirubinemia, with the potential for bilirubin neurotoxicity. This hyperbilirubinemia is the result of sudden, unpredictable, and acute episodes of hemolysis in combination with immaturity of bilirubin elimination, primarily of conjugation. Avoidance of contact with known triggers of hemolysis in G6PD-deficient individuals will prevent some, but not all, episodes of hemolysis. All preterm infants with G6PD deficiency should be vigilantly observed for the development of jaundice both in hospital and after discharge home. PMID:27235211

  7. Comparing effects of Beractant and Poractant alfa in decreasing mortality rate due to respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants

    Saeidi R

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Exogenous natural and synthetic surfactants is a rescue treatment for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. The goals of the study were to compare the clinical response and side-effects of two frequently used surfactants, poractant alfa (Curosurf and beractant (Survanta, for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants."n "nMethods: This clinical trial study was performed during a two-year period in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Ghaem Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. Sample size calculated by a 95% confidence and power of 80, included 104 premature neonates, 74 in survanta and 30 in curosurf groups. The level of statistical significance was considered to be < 0.05."n "nResults: There were no statistically significant differences between the infants treated by survanta or cursurf groups regarding their mean gestational age (30.58 Vs. 29.00 weeks and birth weight (1388 Vs. 1330 g, (p=0.3 There were also no significant differences between the two groups regarding incidences of broncho- pulmonary dysplasia (BPD (40.5% Vs. 40%, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH grades III/IV (13.5% Vs. 13.3%, pneumothorax (both 20%, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (28/3% Vs. 20% or death (28% Vs. 26.6% on the 28th day postpartum."n "nConclusion: This study showed that survanta and curosurf had similar therapeutic effects in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

  8. Sonographic detection of intrarenal and intra-arterial fungus balls in a preterm infant due to systemic candidiasis

    Reither, M.; Schumacher, R.; Hagel, K.J.; Hering, F.

    1983-10-01

    Shortly after birth a preterm infant suffering from aspiration syndrome and subsequent Pseudomonas aeruginosa sepsis showed signs of renal insufficiency and mycotic infection: yeast cells were identified in several urinalyses; there was also an increasing anti-candida IgM antibody titer. At the same time sonographic examinations revealed an increasing echogenicity of the renal cortex and echogenic masses of variable size which did not cause acoustic shadows in both enlarged kidneys. A few days later, we found a right-sided hydronephrosis caused by an intraureteric prevesical mass of equal echogenicity. As we could observe sonographically, the aggressive antimycotic therapy was successful. Eleven weeks later there were signs of cardiac insufficiency. An angiographically demonstrated filling defect, within the pulmonary artery, showed the same sonographic findings as the previously found intrarenal masses. The baby underwent embolectomy and recovered. The thrombotic material contained yeast cells giving evidence of systemic candidasis. Provided appropriate equipment is available, ultrasound today is an excellent non-invasive screening and followup method not only for echoencephalography, but also for more complicated neonatologic problems as seen here. The detailed observation of a changing echogenicity of the renal cortex and pelvis is important and often allows a decisive diagnostic clue before other radiological methods become conclusive.

  9. [ACOUSTIC FEATURES OF VOCALIZATIONS, REFLECTING THE DISCOMFORT AND COMFORT STATE OF INFANTS AGED THREE AND SIX MONTHS].

    Pavlikova, M I; Makarov, A K; Lyakso, E E

    2015-08-01

    The paper presented the possibility of recognition by adult the comfort and discomfort state of 3 and 6 months old infant's on the base of their vocalizations. The acoustic features of the vocalizations that are important for the recognition of the infant state of the characteristics of voice was described. It is shown that discomfort vocalizations differ from comfort ones on the basis of the average and maximum values of pitch, pitch values in the central and final part of the vocalization. A mathematical model is proposed and described a classification function signal of discomfort and comfort. Was found that the vocalizations of infants attributable adults with a probability of 0.75 and above the categories of comfort and discomfort with high reliability are recognized by the mathematical model based on a classification function. PMID:26591591

  10. An unusual tongue base mass in an infant: Tongue base sialolipoma.

    Teo, Dawn T; Johnson, Romaine F; McClay, John E

    2015-12-01

    Sialolipoma is a rare tumor that occurs in the head and neck. We present a case arising from a minor salivary gland in an infant. The 6-month-old infant presented with difficulty swallowing, frequent reflux, and snoring that had been worsening several weeks before presentation. Physical examination showed a large mass arising from the tongue base. The patient was taken to the operating room for transoral removal of a presumed cyst. Histologic examination of the lesion showed a well-circumscribed lesion composed of lobules of mature adipose tissue and nodules of entrapped, non-neoplastic acini and ductules separated by thin, fibrous septae, consistent with a sialolipoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a sialolipoma at the tongue base in a child. The patient has had no evidence of recurrence at 1 year of follow-up. PMID:26670759

  11. Personal familiarity influences the processing of upright and inverted faces in infants.

    Balas, Benjamin J; Nelson, Charles A; Westerlund, Alissa; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Riggins, Tracy; Kuefner, Dana

    2010-01-01

    Infant face processing becomes more selective during the first year of life as a function of varying experience with distinct face categories defined by species, race, and age. Given that any individual face belongs to many such categories (e.g. A young Caucasian man's face) we asked how the neural selectivity for one aspect of facial appearance was affected by category membership along another dimension of variability. 6-month-old infants were shown upright and inverted pictures of either their own mother or a stranger while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded. We found that the amplitude of the P400 (a face-sensitive ERP component) was only sensitive to the orientation of the mother's face, suggesting that "tuning" of the neural response to faces is realized jointly across multiple dimensions of face appearance. PMID:20204154

  12. A young infant with musicogenic epilepsy.

    Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Kao, Pan-Fu

    2003-05-01

    Musicogenic epilepsy is a relatively rare form of epilepsy. In its pure form, it is characterized by epileptic seizures that are provoked exclusively by listening to music. The usual type of seizure is partial complex or generalized tonic-clonic. Precipitating factors are quite specific, such as listening to only one composition or the actual playing of music on an instrument. However, simple sound also can be a trigger. We report a 6-month-old infant with musicogenic epilepsy. She manifested right-sided focal seizures with occasional generalization. The seizures were frequently triggered by loud music, especially that by the Beatles. The interictal electroencephalography results were normal. Ictal spikes were present throughout the left temporal area during continuous electroencephalograpic monitoring. Brain magnetic resonance imaging results were normal, whereas single-photon emission computed tomography of the brain revealed hypoperfusion of the left temporal area. The young age and epileptogenic left temporal lobe lesion in this patient with musicogenic epilepsy were unusual characteristics. Theoretically, three levels of integration are involved in music processing in the brain. The involved integration of this infant's brain may be the sensory level rather than the emotional level. Nevertheless, the personal musicality and musical style of the Beatles might play an important role in this patient's epilepsy. PMID:12878300

  13. Congenital disorders of glycosylation type I: a rare but new cause of hyperechoic kidneys in infants and children due to early microcystic changes

    There are numerous causes of bilateral hyperechoic kidneys. Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are a rapidly growing family of inherited disorders due to defects in the synthesis of the glycans of glycoproteins or other glycoconjugates. To describe renal sonographic abnormalities in CDG type I in infants and children. A retrospective study of renal US in 12 infants and children: 8 CDG-Ia (6 multivisceral forms, 2 neurological forms), 2 CDG-Ib, and 2 CDG-Ix, with detailed functional renal tests in 6. Histology of the kidneys of one 35-week fetus with CDG-Ia was available. Renal US was normal in the two children with the neurological form of CDG-Ia. All patients with the multivisceral form of CDG-Ia or with CDG-Ib showed increased cortical echogenicity, and/or abnormal pyramids (small +/- hyperechoic). The two patients with CDG-Ix showed predominant involvement of the medulla, with inverted corticomedullary differentiation in one. Kidney size was normal in all but two patients. The fetal kidneys exhibited diffuse microcysts arising from the distal tubules. Hyperechoic kidneys are common in CDG-I patients, contrasting with grossly preserved renal function. The US pattern seems to differ slightly according to the type of CDG-I, and is consistent with microcystic changes of the renal parenchyma, which occur prenatally, and may be due to ciliary dysfunction secondary to altered glycosylation of tubular glycoproteins. CDG-I, which remains largely underdiagnosed at present, should be added to the causes of hyperechoic kidneys in children, especially in cases of multivisceral involvement, after ruling out other more frequent causes. (orig.)

  14. An infant with hyperalertness, hyperkinesis, and failure to thrive: a rare diencephalic syndrome due to hypothalamic anaplastic astrocytoma

    Stival, Alessia; Lucchesi, Maurizio; Farina, Silvia; Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Castiglione, Francesca; Genitori, Lorenzo; de Martino, Maurizio; Sardi, Iacopo

    2015-01-01

    Background Diencephalic Syndrome is a rare clinical condition of failure to thrive despite a normal caloric intake, hyperalertness, hyperkinesis, and euphoria usually associated with low-grade hypothalamic astrocytomas. Case presentation We reported an unusual case of diencephalic cachexia due to hypothalamic anaplastic astrocytoma (WHO-grade III). Baseline endocrine function evaluation was performed in this patient before surgery. After histological diagnosis, he enrolled to a chemotherapy p...

  15. Maternal group B Streptococcus and the infant gut microbiota.

    Cassidy-Bushrow, A E; Sitarik, A; Levin, A M; Lynch, S V; Havstad, S; Ownby, D R; Johnson, C C; Wegienka, G

    2016-02-01

    Early patterns of gut colonization may predispose children to adult disease. Exposures in utero and during delivery are associated with the infant gut microbiome. Although ~35% of women carry group B strep (GBS; Streptococcus agalactiae) during pregnancy, it is unknown if GBS presence influences the infant gut microbiome. As part of a population-based, general risk birth cohort, stool specimens were collected from infant's diapers at research visits conducted at ~1 and 6 months of age. Using the Illumina MiSeq (San Diego, CA) platform, the V4 region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was sequenced. Infant gut bacterial community compositional differences by maternal GBS status were evaluated using permutational multivariate analysis of variance. Individual operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were tested using a zero-inflated negative binomial model. Data on maternal GBS and infant gut microbiota from either 1 (n=112) or 6-month-old stool (n=150) specimens was available on 262 maternal-child pairs. Eighty women (30.5%) were GBS+, of who 58 (72.5%) were given intrapartum antibiotics. After adjusting for maternal race, prenatal antifungal use and intrapartum antibiotics, maternal GBS status was statistically significantly associated with gut bacterial composition in the 6 month visit specimen (Canberra R 2=0.008, P=0.008; Unweighted UniFrac R 2=0.010, P=0.011). Individual OTU tests revealed that infants of GBS+ mothers were significantly enriched for specific members of the Clostridiaceae, Ruminococcoceae, and Enterococcaceae in the 6 month specimens compared with infants of GBS- mothers. Whether these taxonomic differences in infant gut microbiota at 6 months lead to differential predisposition for adult disease requires additional study. PMID:26264560

  16. CPR - infant

    ... breathing and chest compressions - infant; Resuscitation - cardiopulmonary - infant; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - infant ... CPR is best done by someone trained in an accredited CPR course. The newest techniques emphasize compression ...

  17. CPR - infant

    Rescue breathing and chest compressions - infant; Resuscitation - cardiopulmonary - infant; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - infant ... those who take care of children should learn infant and child CPR. See www.americanheart.org for ...

  18. The muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of a 6-month-old Crocodylus niloticus (Reptilia: Crocodylia).

    Fechner, R; Schwarz-Wings, D

    2013-06-01

    The muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of crocodilians play an important role in their ventilatory mechanism. Yet the anatomy and homology of these muscles is poorly understood. To gain new insights into the anatomy of the crocodilian infrapubic abdominal wall, we dissected a specimen of Crocodylus niloticus. Origin and insertion of the muscles, as well as their arrangement relative to each other was examined in great detail. The findings were compared with those of other crocodilian taxa to detect potential variability of the muscles of interest. The homology of the muscles was studied by comparing the muscles of the crocodilian infrapubic abdominal wall with those of other diapsids. In Crocodylus niloticus, the infrapubic abdominal wall consists of four muscles: Musculus truncocaudalis, M. ischiotruncus, and Mm. rectus abdominis externus and internus. The arrangement of the muscles of the infrapubic abdominal wall of Crocodylus niloticus is consistent with that found in most other crocodilian taxa. In some crocodilian taxa, an additional muscle, M. ischiopubis, is found. In the remaining diapsids, only M. rectus abdominis is present. The crocodilian M. truncocaudalis, M. ischiotruncus and, if present, M. ischiopubis appear to be derivates of M. rectus abdominis; the development of those might be related to the evolution of the unique crocodilian ventilatory mechanism. PMID:22909340

  19. Relationship between the behaviour of sows at 6 months old and the behaviour and performance at farrowing.

    Lensink, B J; Leruste, H; Le Roux, T; Bizeray-Filoche, D

    2009-01-01

    Piglet crushing remains a major problem in pig production. Reduced crushing might be obtained through genetic selection on sow behavioural traits. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between behavioural responses at 6 months of age, around farrowing, and sows' reproductive performance including crushing levels. At 6 months of age, behavioural responses of 75 nulliparous sows were observed both during behavioural tests to human presence and to the presence of a novel object in their home pen, and their responses when placed in a weighing device. At first farrowing, nervousness of the sows was observed when placed in the farrowing crate 1 week before and the day of farrowing, as well as their fear responses when approached by a human from behind or at the front of the farrowing crate. At 6 months of age, escape from a human tended to be correlated with the reactivity in the weighing device (rs = 0.21, P = 0.09). Around first farrowing, the withdrawal reaction when a human approached at the front was correlated with the fear response when approached from behind and the nervousness of the sow in the crate (rs = 0.29, P piglets crushed at first farrowing was correlated with the latency to approach a novel object at 6 months and nervousness around farrowing (rs = -0.27, P crushing levels of piglets at farrowing. PMID:22444179

  20. Pulmonary hypoplasia on preterm infant associated with diffuse chorioamniotic hemosiderosis caused by intrauterine hemorrhage due to massive subchorial hematoma: report of a neonatal autopsy case.

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Marutani, Takamitsu; Hisaoka, Masanori; Tasaki, Takashi; Nabeshima, Atsunori; Shiraishi, Mika; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2012-08-01

    A male infant born prematurely at 31 weeks of gestation weighed 789 g and had mildly brown-colored oral/tracheal aspirates at delivery. The amniotic fluid was also discolored, and its index was below 5. The patient died of hypoxemic respiratory and cardiac failure 2 hours after birth. The maternal profiles showed placenta previa and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) at 22 weeks of gestation, and revealed recurrent episodes of antenatal and substantial vaginal bleeding and oligohydramnios, indicating chronic abruption-oligohydramnios sequence. The thickened placenta, weighing 275 g, grossly displayed unevenness and diffuse opacity with green to brown discoloration in the chorioamniotic surface, and revealed chronic massive subchorial hematomas (Breus' mole) with old peripheral blood clot, circumvallation, and infarction. Microscopically, diffuse Berlin-blue staining-positive hemosiderin deposits were readily encountered in the chorioamniotic layers of the chorionic plate, consistent with diffuse chorioamniotic hemosiderosis (DCH) due to Breus' mole, accompanied by diffuse amniotic necrosis. At autopsy, an external examination showed several surface anomalies and marked pulmonary hypoplasia, 0.006 (less 0.012) of lung:body weight ratio. Since Breus' mole has a close relationship with intrauterine hemorrhage, resulting in DCH, IUGR, and/or pulmonary hypoplasia of the newborn, the present features might be typical. PMID:22827763

  1. Premature infant

    Preterm infant; Preemie; Premie ... The infant may have trouble breathing and keeping a constant body temperature. ... A premature infant may have signs of the following problems: Anemia Bleeding into the brain or damage to the brain's white ...

  2. When do infants understand that they can obtain a desired part of a composite object by grasping another part?

    Fagard, Jacqueline; Florean, Cecilia; Petkovic, Maja; Rat-Fischer, Lauriane; Fattori, Patrizia; O'Regan, J Kevin

    2015-11-01

    When do infants start to understand that they can grasp an object by its handle when the interesting part is out of reach? Whereas it is known from preferential looking tasks that already at three months of age infants show surprise when all parts of an object do not move together, little is known about when infants are able to use such knowledge in an active grasp situation. To answer this question we presented six, eight, and 10 month-old infants in a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study with a white cardboard handle within reach and a bright ball at the end of the handle and out of reach. A trick condition, where the handle and the ball seem attached but were not, was added to get an indication of the infant's expectation by observing a possible surprise reaction. Results show that 6-month-olds' most frequent first behaviors consisted in pointing toward the ball without grasping the handle, or grasping the handle without looking at the ball until it moved. In addition, they often did not look surprised in the trick condition. Eight- and 10-month-olds most often grasped the handle while looking at the ball, and showed clear surprise in the trick condition. This was interpreted as showing that around eight or 10 months, infants take a significant step in understanding the cohesiveness of composite objects during grasping. PMID:26275587

  3. Supply and Demand Determine the Market Value of Access to Infants in the Golden Snub-Nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana)

    Garber, Paul A.; Guo, SongTao; Zhang, Pei; Li, BaoGuo

    2013-01-01

    According to a biological market paradigm, trading decisions between partners will be influenced by the current ‘exchange rate’ of commodities (good and services), which is affected by supply and demand, and the trader’s ability to outbid competitors. In several species of nonhuman primates, newborn infants are attractive to female group members and may become a desired commodity that can be traded for grooming within a biological market place. We investigated whether grooming was interchanged for infant handling in female golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) inhabiting the Qinling Mountains of central China. R. roxellana exhibit a multilevel social organization characterized by over 100 troop members organized into 6–11 one-male units each composed one adult male and several adult females and their offspring. Behavioral data were collected over the course of 28 months on grooming patterns between mothers with infants less than 6 months old (N = 36) and other adult female troop members. Our results provide strong evidence for the interchange of grooming for access to infants. Grooming for infant access was more likely to be initiated by potential handlers (nonmothers) and less likely reciprocated by mothers. Moreover, grooming bout duration was inversely related to the number of infants per female present in each one-male unit indicating the possibility of a supply and demand market effect. The rank difference between mothers and handlers was negatively correlated with grooming duration. With increasing infant age, the duration of grooming provided by handlers was shorter suggesting that the ‘value’ of older infants had decreased. Finally, frequent grooming partners were allowed to handle and maintain access to infants longer than infrequent groomers. These results support the contention that grooming and infant handling may be traded in R. roxellana and that the price individuals paid for access to infants fluctuated with supply and

  4. Infant humor perception from 3- to 6-months and attachment at one year.

    Mireault, Gina; Sparrow, John; Poutre, Merlin; Perdue, Brittany; Macke, Laura

    2012-12-01

    Infancy is a critical time for the development of secure attachment, which is facilitated by emotionally synchronous interactions with parents. Humor development, which includes shared laughter and joint attention to an event, emerges concurrently with attachment, but little is known regarding the relationship, if any, between humor development and attachment in the first year. Thirty 3-month-old infants were videoed at home each month until they were 6-months old while their parents attempted to amuse them. Frequency of infants' smiles and laughs served as a measure of "state humor", and the smiling/laughing subscale of the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised served as a measure of "trait humor". State and trait humor were not correlated. Lower trait humor as 6 months predicted higher attachment security on the Attachment Q-sort at 12-months (r=.46), suggesting that less good-humored infants elicit greater parental engagement, which works to the benefit of attachment, or vice versa. Future studies should examine the importance of smiling and laughter as they relate to other developmental phenomena in the first year. PMID:22982281

  5. Asian infants show preference for own-race but not other-race female faces: The role of infant caregiving arrangements

    Shaoying eLiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported that 3- to 4-month-olds show a visual preference for faces of the same gender as their primary caregiver (e.g., Quinn et al., 2002. In addition, this gender preference has been observed for own-race faces, but not for other-race faces (Quinn et al., 2008 However, most of the studies of face gender preference have focused on infants at 3 to 4 months. Development of gender preference in later infancy is still unclear. Moreover, all of these studies were conducted with Caucasian infants from Western countries. It is thus unknown whether a gender preference that is limited to own-race faces can be generalized to infants from other racial groups and different cultures with distinct caregiving practices. The current study investigated the face gender preferences of Asian infants presented with male versus female face pairs from Asian and Caucasian races at 3, 6, and 9 months and the role of caregiving arrangements in eliciting those preferences. The results showed an own-race female face preference in 3- and 6-month-olds, but not in 9-month-olds. Moreover, the downturn in the female face preference correlated with the cumulative male face experience obtained in caregiving practices. In contrast, no gender preference or correlation between gender preference and face experience was found for other-race Caucasian faces at any age. The data indicate that the face gender preference is not specifically rooted in Western cultural caregiving practices. In addition, the race dependency of the effect previously observed for Caucasian infants reared by Caucasian caregivers looking at Caucasian but not Asian faces extends to Asian infants reared by Asian caregivers looking at Asian but not Caucasian faces. The findings also provide additional support for an experiential basis for the gender preference, and in particular suggest that cumulative male face experience plays a role in inducing a downturn in the preference in older

  6. Infant difficult behaviors in the context of perinatal biomedical conditions and early child environment

    Sirvinskiene Giedre

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problems experienced within the first year of an infant's life can be precursors of later mental health conditions. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency and continuity of difficult behaviors in infants at 3 and 6 months of age and the associations of these difficulties with biomedical and psychosocial factors. Methods This study was a part of an ongoing prospective birth-cohort study. Study participants were 189 uniparous mothers and their full-term newborns. The index of infant difficult behavior was constructed. This index was then associated with the following factors: delivery mode, newborn function after birth, maternal emotional well-being, risk behavior, subjective evaluation of the quality of the relationship of the couple, and attitudes toward infant-rearing. Results Common difficult behaviors, including crying, sleeping and eating problems, were characteristic for 30.2% of 3 month old and for 22.2% of 6 month old full-term infants. The expression of infant difficult behaviors at the age of 3 months increased the likelihood of the expression of these difficulties at 6 months by more than 5 times. Factors including younger maternal age, poor prenatal and postnatal emotional well-being, prenatal alcohol consumption, low satisfaction with the couple's relationship before pregnancy, and deficiency of infant-centered maternal attitudes towards infant-rearing increased the likelihood of difficult behaviors in infants at the age of 3 months. Low maternal satisfaction with the relationship of the couple before pregnancy, negative emotional reactions of both parents toward pregnancy (as reported by the mother and the deficiency of an infant-centered maternal attitude towards infant-rearing increased the likelihood of infant difficult behaviors continuing between the ages of 3 to 6 months. Perinatal biomedical conditions were not related to the difficult behaviors in infants. Conclusions Our study suggests

  7. Fecal calprotectin levels are higher in rural than in urban Chinese infants and negatively associated with growth

    Liu Jin-Rong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fecal calprotectin (FC is an established simple biomarker of gut inflammation. To examine a possible relationship between linear growth and gut inflammation, we compared fecal calprotectin levels in 6 month old infants from poor rural vs affluent urban families. Methods The project was a cross-sectional comparison of FC from rural and urban populations in China. The relationship between length-for-age Z-score (LAZ and FC concentrations were also compared. Single fecal samples were assayed for FC using EK-CAL ELISA kits. Results The age of subjects for both locations was 6.1 ± 0.2 mo; all were apparently healthy. The mean ± SD of the LAZ for the rural and urban infants were −0.6 ± 0.9 and 0.4 ± 0.9, respectively. FC had a non-normal distribution. The median FC of 420.9 and 140.1 μg/g for rural and urban infants, respectively, were significantly different (P  Conclusion FC levels were significantly elevated in the rural infants and high concentrations accounted for approximately one-third of the low LAZ scores of these infants.

  8. Fecal calprotectin levels are higher in rural than in urban Chinese infants and negatively associated with growth

    2012-01-01

    Background Fecal calprotectin (FC) is an established simple biomarker of gut inflammation. To examine a possible relationship between linear growth and gut inflammation, we compared fecal calprotectin levels in 6 month old infants from poor rural vs affluent urban families. Methods The project was a cross-sectional comparison of FC from rural and urban populations in China. The relationship between length-for-age Z-score (LAZ) and FC concentrations were also compared. Single fecal samples were assayed for FC using EK-CAL ELISA kits. Results The age of subjects for both locations was 6.1 ± 0.2 mo; all were apparently healthy. The mean ± SD of the LAZ for the rural and urban infants were −0.6 ± 0.9 and 0.4 ± 0.9, respectively. FC had a non-normal distribution. The median FC of 420.9 and 140.1 μg/g for rural and urban infants, respectively, were significantly different (P < 0.0001). For the rural group, linear regression analysis showed that an increase in FC of 100 μg/g was associated with a decrease of 0.06 in LAZ. Conclusion FC levels were significantly elevated in the rural infants and high concentrations accounted for approximately one-third of the low LAZ scores of these infants. PMID:22917269

  9. Hypersensitivity reaction in an infant fed hydrolyzed lactalbumin contained in a semielemental formula.

    Heyman, M B; Stoker, T W; Rudolph, C D; Frick, O L

    1990-02-01

    Following introduction of milk protein formula feedings, a 6-month-old male developed profuse, watery diarrhea progressing to shock, requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Reinstitution of enteral feedings with a formula containing hydrolyzed lactalbumin (Travasorb STD) resulted in recurrence of diarrhea with fever. Intestinal and rectal biopsies showed only nonspecific inflammatory changes. He was discharged on an elemental formula (Vivonex). Twenty-three months later, while admitted for evaluation of hypophosphatemic rickets, immunologic testing using the lymphocyte migration inhibition factor (LIF) test demonstrated positive reactions, especially to alpha-lactalbumin (56% inhibition) and whole cow's milk (22%, normal of less than 20% inhibition). Skin tests revealed sensitivity to cow's milk and eggs. Soy formula also produced diarrhea and bloody stools. Protein hydrolysate formulas, touted as hypoallergenic diets, are useful in infants with intolerance to milk protein. This is the first documented case of an immunological reaction to the hydrolyzed whey protein, lactalbumin. Although protein hydrolysate formulas are effective treatment in most infants with milk protein intolerance, allergic reactions are possible. Caution and close observation should be exercised in immunologically sensitized infants rechallenged with any formula. PMID:2135732

  10. Maternal Stress and Depressive Symptoms and Infant Development at Six Months: the Mothers and Children's Environmental Health (MOCEH) Prospective Study.

    Bhang, Soo-Young; Ha, Eunhee; Park, Hyesook; Ha, Mina; Hong, Yun-Chul; Kim, Boong-Nyun; Lee, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Kyung Yeon; Kim, Ja Hyeong; Jeong, Joseph; Jeong, Kyoung Sook; Lee, Boeun; Kim, Yangho

    2016-06-01

    Our objective is to evaluate the relationships between prenatal maternal stress and depressive symptoms, respectively, and infant neurodevelopment at 6 months, adjusted for heavy metals and oxidative stress. This research is a part of a multi-center birth cohort study in South Korea. Information on stress and depressive symptoms was collected during the first trimester using Psychosocial Well-Being Index Short Form (PWI-SF) and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). The Korean Bayley Scales of Infant Development-II assessment (BSID-II), which includes the standardized mental development index (MDI) and psychomotor developmental index (PDI), and Korean Ages & Stages Questionnaires (K-ASQ) were applied to infants at six months of age. A higher index score indicates better development. Among 641 babies, 320 were female (50%). Maternal PWI ≥ 29 (vs. PWI ≤ 18) during early pregnancy was associated with a decrease in MDI scores of 5.37 points (P = 0.02) after adjusting for socioeconomic factors. Maternal CES-D ≥ 26 (vs. CES-D ≤ 10) during early pregnancy was associated with a decrease in MDI scores of 8.18 points (P = 0.01). The associations remained significant even after adjustment for lead, cadmium, and MDA levels (P depressive symptoms, and MDI scores in 6-month-old infants after adjustment for prenatal lead exposure, which is known to affect cognitive function negatively. PMID:27247491

  11. Tentativa de infanticídio por um macho dominante de Alouatta caraya (Humboldt (Primates, Atelidae em um infante extra-grupo devido a influência do observador Infanticide attempt by a dominant male of Alouatta caraya (Humboldt (Primates, Atelidae against an extra-group infant due to the influence of the observer

    Lucas M. Aguiar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho relata um caso de tentativa de infanticídio por um macho residente e dominante de um grupo de Alouatta caraya (Humboldt, 1812 em um infante extra-grupo, em ilha do rio Paraná, Paraná, Brasil. O encontro do par fêmea-infante com o macho residente foi propiciado pela interferência humana. Devido às circunstâncias em que ocorreu o fato e a posição hierárquica do agressor, a hipótese de patologia social pareceu plausível na explicação do comportamento.This work reports on an infanticide attempt by a dominant resident male in a group of Alouatta caraya (Humboldt, 1812 on an extra-group infant in an Island in the Paraná river, Paraná, Brazil. The encounter of an infant-female pair with a resident male was brought about by human interference. Give the circumstances in which the event ocurred and the hierarchical position of the agressor, the social pathology hypothesis seems the most plausible explanation for such behavior.

  12. Infant Mortality

    ... Activities Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Depression Among Women Depression Treatment Resources Publications Maternal and Infant Health Pregnancy Complications Severe Maternal Morbidity Weight Gain During Pregnancy ...

  13. Sialylated Milk Oligosaccharides Promote Microbiota-Dependent Growth in Models of Infant Undernutrition.

    Charbonneau, Mark R; O'Donnell, David; Blanton, Laura V; Totten, Sarah M; Davis, Jasmine C C; Barratt, Michael J; Cheng, Jiye; Guruge, Janaki; Talcott, Michael; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Ilkayeva, Olga; Wu, Chao; Struckmeyer, Tedd; Barile, Daniela; Mangani, Charles; Jorgensen, Josh; Fan, Yue-Mei; Maleta, Kenneth; Dewey, Kathryn G; Ashorn, Per; Newgard, Christopher B; Lebrilla, Carlito; Mills, David A; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-02-25

    Identifying interventions that more effectively promote healthy growth of children with undernutrition is a pressing global health goal. Analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) from 6-month-postpartum mothers in two Malawian birth cohorts revealed that sialylated HMOs are significantly less abundant in those with severely stunted infants. To explore this association, we colonized young germ-free mice with a consortium of bacterial strains cultured from the fecal microbiota of a 6-month-old stunted Malawian infant and fed recipient animals a prototypic Malawian diet with or without purified sialylated bovine milk oligosaccharides (S-BMO). S-BMO produced a microbiota-dependent augmentation of lean body mass gain, changed bone morphology, and altered liver, muscle, and brain metabolism in ways indicative of a greater ability to utilize nutrients for anabolism. These effects were also documented in gnotobiotic piglets using the same consortium and Malawian diet. These preclinical models indicate a causal, microbiota-dependent relationship between S-BMO and growth promotion. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26898329

  14. [Changes in infant mortality].

    Aguirre, A

    1997-01-01

    Mexico's infant mortality rate is estimated to have declined from 189 in 1930 to 129 in 1950 and 30 in 1995. The infant mortality rate has continued its decline despite the economic crisis of recent years. The use of oral rehydration therapy has reduced mortality from diarrhea, and the spread of family planning has reduced the numbers of births at high risk due to maternal age, parity, or short birth intervals. The types of causes of infant death have changed as the numbers have decreased. They can be grouped in ascending order according to the difficulty of prevention: diseases preventable by immunization, acute diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, perinatal disorders, and congenital anomalies. Over two-thirds of infant deaths recorded since 1950 have been due to these causes. Infectious diseases, including diarrhea, acute respiratory infections, and conditions preventable by immunization predominated as causes of infant mortality before 1930. As the epidemiological transition progresses, diseases preventable by immunization lose importance, and diarrhea and respiratory infections occupy the first two places, with perinatal disorders being third. Between 1980 and 1990, in Mexico, diarrhea and acute respiratory infections dropped to second and third place after perinatal disorders, with congenital anomalies in fourth place. In most developed countries, perinatal disorders and congenital anomalies are the two most frequent causes of death, while diarrhea and respiratory infections no longer appear in the top five. In 1995, the four main causes in Mexico in descending order were perinatal disorders, congenital anomalies, acute respiratory infections, and diarrhea. PMID:12158082

  15. Ptosis - infants and children

    Blepharoptosis-children; Congenital ptosis; Eyelid drooping-children; Eyelid drooping-amblyopia; Eyelid drooping-astigmatism ... Ptosis in infants and children is often due to a problem with the muscle that raises the eyelid. A nerve problem in the eyelid can ...

  16. CPR: Infant

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home ...

  17. Premature infant

    A premature infant is a baby born before 37 completed weeks of gestation (more than 3 weeks before the ... baby is classified as one of the following: Premature (less than 37 weeks gestation) Full term (37 ...

  18. Pneumothorax - infants

    ... around the lungs, which leads to a lung collapse. This article discusses pneumothorax in infants. Causes A pneumothorax occurs when some of the tiny air sacs (alveoli) in a baby's lung become overinflated and burst. ...

  19. Neutropenia - infants

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007230.htm Neutropenia - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neutropenia is an abnormally low number of white blood ...

  20. Response level of the transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions on infants having a gastroesophageal reflux

    Camboim, Elizângela Dias

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE have been the most widespread technique to perform neonatal hearing screening. Scrutinizing their measures by way of an association with other alterations that may impair the infant's auditory system is important. Objective: Analyze the incidence and the response levels of the transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions on infants having a physiological gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Method: A prospective study was performed at Santa Juliana Hospital's Otorhinolaryngology Department. 118 prematurely-born and timely-born babies, from newly-born to 6 months old, who were sent by pediatricians and gastropediatricians, participated in the study and they were divided into two groups: Study Group: 63 infants clinically diagnosed of a physiological gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Control Group: 55 infants without a physiological gastroesophageal reflux. The peripheral hearing function was evaluated by both transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions and otoscopy examinations performed by an otorhinolaryngologist. Results: The average response levels of the transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions were higher in the non-reflux group for frequency bands of 2kHz, 2.5kHz, 3kHz, 3.5kHz and 4.5kHz bilaterally, with a statistically significant difference, achieving the average values of 7.71dB and 7dB in the right ear found in the frequency bands of 2 and 4kHz, respectively. Conclusion: There was a lower incidence and a lower response level of the transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in physiological gastroesophageal reflux children in comparison with children having no reflux.

  1. Classical swine fever virus infection modulates serum levels of INF-α, IL-8 and TNF-α in 6-month-old pigs

    von Rosen, Tanya; Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the important role of cytokines in disease development of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) infection. In the present study, we examined the kinetics of 7 porcine cytokines in serum from pigs infected with 3 different CSFV strains. Based on the clinical picture in...

  2. Temperament of premature infants with cerebral palsy

    Ryu, Hyo Jeong; Don Kim, Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the infant temperaments of children with cerebral palsy due to premature birth. [Subjects and Methods] Data were collected through questionnaires sent to 118 mothers of infants diagnosed with cerebral palsy due to premature birth. [Results] Different infant temperament scores were obtained according to the degrees of disability, type of palsy, birth weights, gestational age, and periods of hospitalization in an NICU; however, the differences ...

  3. Perception and management of fever in infants up to six months of age: A survey of US pediatricans

    Markson Leona E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fever is an increase in the body's temperature above normal. This study examined how US pediatricians perceive and manage fever generally versus fever occurring after vaccination in infants up to six months of age. Methods A web-based survey of 400 US pediatricians subscribing to the Physician Desk Reference was conducted in December 2008. Data were collected on the respondents' socio-demographics, number of years in practice, type of practice, their definition of fever severity in infants, and their recommendations for managing fever. Generalized Estimating Equations were used to estimate the odds of a pediatrician recommending an emergency room visit (ER or a hospital admission, office visits, or other treatment option, as a function of infant's age, temperature, whether the infant has recently received a vaccine, and whether the fever was reported during or after office hours, adjusting for practice type and socio-demographic variables. Results On average, the 400 responding pediatricians' (64% were female, average age of 49 years, years in practice = 20 years threshold for extremely serious fever was ≥39.5°C and ≥ 40.0°C for infants 0-2 month and >2-6 month of age respectively. Infants were more likely to be referred to an ER or hospital admission if they were ≤ 2 months of age (Odds Ratio [OR], 29.13; 95% Confidence interval [95% CI], 23.69-35.82 or >2-4 months old (OR 3.37; 95% CI 2.99-3.81 versus > 4 to 6 months old or if they had a temperature ≥ 40.0°C (OR 21.06; 95% CI 17.20-25.79 versus a temperature of 38.0-38.5°C. Fever after vaccination (OR 0.29; 95% CI 0.25-0.33 or reported during office hours (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.15-0.20 were less likely to result in referral to ER or hospital admission. Conclusion Within this sample of US pediatricians, perception of the severity of fever in infants, as well as the response to infant fever are likely to depend on the infant's age. Recommendations for the management

  4. Breastfeeding the preterm infant

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its peculiar nutritional and non-nutritional contents, which include long-chain polyunsatured fatty acids (LC-PUFA, prebiotics, immunological factors, hormones and growth factors, breast milk shows significant advantages over infant formulas in nourishing preterm infants. Better neurocognitive outcomes, which are reported to persist far beyond the early childhood, have been largely observed in breastfed preterm infants; a role of LC-PUFA in promoting neural and retinal development is assumed. As far as the gastrointestinal tract is concerned, several evidences have reported a dose-related reduction in NEC incidence among preterm infants fed on human milk. Moreover, the higher amount of immunological factors as secretory IgA within preterm breast milk might play a remarkable role in reducing the overall infections. Despite breastfeeding in preterm infants is generally linked with lowered growth rates which might potentially affect neurocognitive outcomes, the beneficial effects of human milk on neurodevelopment prevail. Fortified human milk might better fulfill the particular nutritional needs of preterm infants. However, as breast milk fortification is difficult to carry out after the achievement of full oral feeding, some concerns on the nutritional adequacy of exclusive breastfeeding during hospitalization as well as after discharge have been raised. Finally, breastfeeding also entails maternal psychological beneficial effects, as promoting the motherhood process and the mother-child relationship, which could be undermined in those women experiencing preterm delivery. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  5. CPR: Infant

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  6. Early colonization of the oral cavity in 6- and 12-month-old infants by cariogenic and periodontal pathogens: a case-control study.

    Merglova, Vlasta; Polenik, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    The colonization of the oral cavity by cariogenic and periodontal pathogens occurs earlier than previously thought. This study aimed to identify the presence and quantity of representative cariogenic and periodontal pathogens in the oral cavities of 6- and 12-month olds and to evaluate the influence of C-section delivery on early Streptococcus mutans (Sm) colonization of the oral cavity. The research cohort was composed of 59 infants (35 infants were delivered vaginally and 24 via C-section) and their mothers. At 6 months of age, the infants were examined, and unstimulated saliva samples were collected. Variables concerning mothers were DMF index and salivary levels of Sm. Repeated saliva samples were taken 6 months later. The representative cariogenic and periodontal microorganisms were identified, and their quantities were measured using a polymerase chain reaction-based method. The relationships between the presence of detected microbes, the mode of delivery, and maternal variables were evaluated using paired t tests, chi-squared test, and ANOVAs. High rates of cariogenic bacteria, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), were found in both infant cohorts. An analysis of the differences between delivery methods revealed that the group of 6-month-old vaginally delivered infants had a significantly higher amount of Sm. We conclude that the cariogenic bacteria, Aa and Fn, are present in edentulous infants. This presence increases in the months following the eruption of the deciduous teeth. Results did not confirm the influence of C-section delivery on the early Sm colonization of the oral cavity. PMID:26914065

  7. Infant feeding among HIV-positive mothers and the general population mothers: comparison of two cross-sectional surveys in Eastern Uganda

    Tylleskär Thorkild

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant feeding recommendations for HIV-positive mothers differ from recommendations to mothers of unknown HIV-status. The aim of this study was to compare feeding practices, including breastfeeding, between infants and young children of HIV-positive mothers and infants of mothers in the general population of Uganda. Methods This study compares two cross-sectional surveys conducted in the end of 2003 and the beginning of 2005 in Eastern Uganda using analogous questionnaires. The first survey consisted of 727 randomly selected general-population mother-infant pairs with unknown HIV status. The second included 235 HIV-positive mothers affiliated to The Aids Support Organisation, TASO. In this article we compare early feeding practices, breastfeeding duration, feeding patterns with dietary information and socio-economic differences in the two groups of mothers. Results Pre-lacteal feeding was given to 150 (64% infants of the HIV-positive mothers and 414 (57% infants of general-population mothers. Exclusive breastfeeding of infants under the age of 6 months was more common in the general population than among the HIV-positive mothers (186 [45%] vs. 9 [24%] respectively according to 24-hour recall. Mixed feeding was the most common practice in both groups of mothers. Solid foods were introduced to more than half of the infants under 6 months old among the HIV-positive mothers and a quarter of the infants in the general population. Among the HIV-positive mothers with infants below 12 months of age, 24 of 90 (27% had stopped breastfeeding, in contrast to 9 of 727 (1% in the general population. The HIV-positive mothers were poorer and had less education than the general-population mothers. Conclusion In many respects, HIV-positive mothers fed their infants less favourably than mothers in the general population, with potentially detrimental effects on both the child's nutrition and the risk of HIV transmission. Mixed feeding and pre

  8. Osteopenia - premature infants

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... so that the baby's bones will grow. A premature infant may not receive the proper amount of ...

  9. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the sudden, unexplained death of an infant younger than one year old. Some people call ... boys, African Americans, and American Indian/Alaska Native infants have a higher risk of SIDS. Although health ...

  10. Osteopenia - premature infants

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... the baby. This helps the baby grow. A premature infant may not receive the proper amount of calcium ...

  11. Effects of prenatal blood lead exposure lower than 100 μg/L on infants neurobehavioral development%出生前低于100μg/L血铅暴露对婴儿发育的影响

    王波; 邵迪初; 项张华; 倪为民; 杨水莲; 吴翠娥; 李凭健; 傅华

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To determine the effects of prenatal lead exposure(lower than 100 μg/L) on six-month-old infant's growth and development. [Methods] The study subjects were 6-month-old infants whose mothers' blood lead were lower than 100 μg/L both during the 1st and 3rd trimester of gestation in a cohort study. Bayley infant development scale was used to evaluate the infants' development. The differences in mental development index(MDI) and psychomotor development index(PDI) of infant were compared across different prenatal blood exposure levels, using the P25, P50 and P75 of the blood lead during pregnancy as the dividing value of groups, respectively. [Results] The MDI and PDI of 6month-old infants tended to decrease as the increase of prenatal blood lead exposure level. The PDI of 6-month-old infants in the relative high lead level group was lower than that in the relative low lead group as the dividing value of groups was P25 and P50 of blood lead, and the difference were statistically significant(P<0.05). There were no significant differences in the MDI of 6-month-old infants across groups. Besides, multivariate analysis indicated that the PDI of the infants whose prenatal lead concentration higher than P50 was 4.48 point lower than that of infants below P50. Similarly, the PDI of the infants whose prenatal lead concentration higher than P25 was 6.51 point lower than that of infants below P25. The differences were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Low level prenatal lead exposure may exert an influence on infants' behavior development and such effect might be more significant at the low level of lead exposure, which merits further research.%[目的]探讨出生前100 μg/L以下剂量铅暴露对婴儿6月龄时智力和行为发育的影响.[方法]以出生前孕早期和晚期孕妇血铅低于100 μg/L的婴儿为研究对象,在其6月龄时用Bayley婴幼儿发育量表评价智力发育和精神运动发育.根据孕早期和晚期血铅的P25

  12. Body-Part Tracking of Infants

    Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Herskind, Anna; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    Motion tracking is a widely used technique to analyze and measure adult human movement. However, these methods cannot be transferred directly to motion tracking of infants due to the big differences in the underlying human model. However, motion tracking of infants can be used for automatic...

  13. Infant Mortality and African Americans

    ... African American > Infant Heath & Mortality Infant Mortality and African Americans African Americans have 2.2 times the infant mortality rate ... birthweight as compared to non-Hispanic white infants. African Americans had almost twice the sudden infant death syndrome ...

  14. Maternal eating disorder and infant diet. A latent class analysis based on the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa).

    Torgersen, Leila; Ystrom, Eivind; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Berg, Cecilie Knoph; Zerwas, Stephanie C; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of infant diet and feeding practices among children of mothers with eating disorders is essential to promote healthy eating in these children. This study compared the dietary patterns of 6-month-old children of mothers with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and eating disorder not otherwise specified-purging subtype, to the diet of children of mothers with no eating disorders (reference group). The study was based on 53,879 mothers in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa). Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify discrete latent classes of infant diet based on the mothers' responses to questions about 16 food items. LCA identified five classes, characterized by primarily homemade vegetarian food (4% of infants), homemade traditional food (8%), commercial cereals (35%), commercial jarred baby food (39%), and a mix of all food groups (11%). The association between latent dietary classes and maternal eating disorders were estimated by multinomial logistic regression. Infants of mothers with bulimia nervosa had a lower probability of being in the homemade traditional food class compared to the commercial jarred baby food class, than the referent (O.R. 0.59; 95% CI 0.36-0.99). Infants of mothers with binge eating disorder had a lower probability of being in the homemade vegetarian class compared to the commercial jarred baby food class (O.R. 0.77; 95% CI 0.60-0.99), but only before adjusting for relevant confounders. Anorexia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified-purging subtype were not statistically significantly associated with any of the dietary classes. These results suggest that maternal eating disorders may to some extent influence the child's diet at 6 months; however, the extent to which these differences influence child health and development remains an area for further inquiry. PMID:25453594

  15. The case for social evaluation in preverbal infants: Gazing toward one’s goal drives infants’ preferences for Helpers over Hinderers in the hill paradigm

    J Kiley eHamlin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In a 2007 empirical report, Hamlin, Wynn, and Bloom provided the first evidence that preverbal infants at 6 and at 10 months of age evaluate others on the basis of their helpful and unhelpful actions toward unknown third parties. In their hill paradigm, a Climber puppet tried but failed to climb a steep hill, and was alternately bumped up the hill by the Helper and bumped down the hill by the Hinderer. After being habituated to these events, both 10- and 6-month-olds selectively reached for the Helper over the Hinderer. In response, Scarf, Imuta, Colombo, & Hayne (2012b provided evidence that rather than reflecting an early developing capacity for social evaluation, infants’ choices in Hamlin et al. reflected low-level perceptual preferences whereby infants are drawn to any character who is associated with the Climber bouncing. The current studies represent an attempt to adjudicate between the social and perceptual accounts of infants’ preferences for Helpers over Hinderers in the hill paradigm, by pitting a perceptual cue (e.g., bouncing against a social cue (e.g., whether or not the Climber gazes toward his goal. Infants’ patterns of preference across 2 experiments support the social account.

  16. Effect of complementary feeding with lipid-based nutrient supplements and corn-soy blend on the incidence of stunting and linear growth among 6- to 18-month-old infants and children in rural Malawi.

    Mangani, Charles; Maleta, Kenneth; Phuka, John; Cheung, Yin Bun; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Dewey, Kathryn; Manary, Mark; Puumalainen, Taneli; Ashorn, Per

    2015-12-01

    Low nutritional value of complementary foods is associated with high incidence of childhood growth stunting in low-income countries. This study was done to test a hypothesis that dietary complementation with lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) promotes linear growth and reduces the incidence of severe stunting among at-risk infants. A total of 840 6-month-old healthy infants in rural Malawi were enrolled to a randomised assessor-blinded trial. The participants received 12-month supplementation with nothing, milk-LNS, soy-LNS, or corn-soy blend (CSB). Supplements provided micronutrients and approximately 280 kcal energy per day. Outcomes were incidence of severe and very severe stunting [length-for-age z-score, (LAZ) supplementation and the lower incidence of stunting. Exploratory analyses suggest that provision of milk-LNS, but not soy-LNS promotes linear growth among at-risk infants mainly between 9 and 12 months of age. PMID:23795976

  17. Morbimortalidade infantil por diarréia aguda em área metropolitana da região Nordeste do Brasil, 1986-1989 Infant morbimortality due to acute diarrhoea in a metropolitan area of northeastern Brazil

    Gilvana de J. do V. Campos

    1995-04-01

    occurred in S. José de Ribamar. The distribution of cases according to age showed a higher prevalence among children of 6-11 months and between 1 and 2 years of age. The prevalence of diarrhoea was highest among the families: that excreted directly into the sea or a latreen; that used water from uncovered wells; that threw their garbage into the sea; and whose bread-winners were unemployed. Diarrhoea was the principal cause of death in both surveys. Infant mortality, in May 1986, was 44.0 per thousand in children under 1 year of age and 12.8 in children under 5 years old; in May 1989 it was 7.9 per thousand and 4.9 per thousand respectively. The decrease in child morbidity and mortality due to diarrhoea between 1986 and 1989 was statistically significant.

  18. Phospholipids in Human Milk and Infant Formulas: Benefits and Needs for Correct Infant Nutrition.

    Cilla, Antonio; Diego Quintaes, Késia; Barberá, Reyes; Alegría, Amparo

    2016-08-17

    The composition of human milk has served as a basis for the development of infant formulas, which are used when breastfeeding is not possible. Among the human milk nutrients, 50% of the total energetic value corresponds to fat, with a high level of fatty acids and 0.2-2.0% present in the form of phospholipids (PLs). The PL contents and fatty acid distribution in PL species have been investigated as bioactive elements for the production of infant formulas, since they offer potential benefits for the optimum growth and health of the newborn infant. The differences in the amount of PLs and in fatty acid distribution in PL species between human milk and infant formulas can imply biologically significant differences for newborn infants fed with infant formulas versus human milk-mainly due to the greater proportion of sphingomyelin with respect to phosphatidylcholine in infant formulas. The limited information referred to the characterization of fatty acid distribution in PL species in infant formulas or in ingredients used to enrich them merits further research in order to obtain products with benefits similar to those of human milk in terms of infant growth, visual acuity, and neurological development. The present review establishes the scientific basis for helping to adjust formulations to the requirements of infant nutrition. PMID:26075805

  19. Touch and massage for medically fragile infants.

    Livingston, Karen; Beider, Shay; Kant, Alexis J; Gallardo, Constance C; Joseph, Michael H; Gold, Jeffrey I

    2009-12-01

    Research investigating the efficacy of infant massage has largely focused on premature and low birth weight infants. The majority of investigations have neglected highly acute patients in academic neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The current study was developed with two aims: (Phase 1) to develop, implement and demonstrate the feasibility and safety of a parent-trained compassionate touch/massage program for infants with complex medical conditions and (Phase 2) to conduct a longitudinal randomized control trial (RCT) of hand containment/massage versus standard of care in a level III academic Center for Newborn and Infant Critical Care (CNICC). Certified infant massage instructors (CIMIs) taught parents to massage their hospitalized infants. Massage therapy and instruction were performed for seven consecutive days and health outcomes were collected for up to 1 month following treatment. Caregivers, nurses and certified infant massage therapists indicated moderate to high levels of satisfaction and feasibility with the implementation of hand containment/massage in a level III academic center CNICC. In addition, infant behavioral and physiological measures were within safe limits during the massage sessions. All caregivers participating in the massage group reported high levels of satisfaction 7 days into the intervention and at the 1-month follow-up with regards to their relationship with their infant, the massage program's impact on that relationship and the massage program. Due to unequal and small sample sizes, between group analyses (control versus massage) were not conducted. Descriptive infant characteristics of health outcomes are described. Preliminary data from this study indicates feasibility and safety of infant massage and satisfaction among the caregivers, CIMIs and the nurses in the CNICC. An important contribution from this study was the demonstration of the infants' safety based on physiological stability and no change in agitation/pain scores

  20. Crisis epilépticas generalizadas asociadas a intoxicación pasiva por cocaína en un lactante Generalized epileptic seizures in an infant due to passive exposure to cocaine

    S. Aguilera

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. Las crisis convulsivas sin fiebre en lactantes implican un diagnóstico diferencial amplio. Caso clínico. Lactante mujer de 7 meses que presenta, estando afebril, dos crisis generalizadas tónico-clónicas breves en 23 horas. Su desarrollo psicomotor y estaturo-ponderal seguía un curso normal. Se obtuvo analítica de sangre, ecografía cerebral y electroencefalograma, normales. Debido a una situación sociofamiliar desfavorable, se realizaron tóxicos en orina, positivos para cocaína en dos muestras sucesivas; se negativizaron en 48 horas. Estuvo en contacto con humo ambiental horas previas al inicio de las crisis. Sin crisis en los siguientes 6 meses, con desarrollo normal, sigue bajo vigilancia por asistencia social. Discusión. La inhalación pasiva de humo de cocaína se asocia a crisis convulsivas en lactantes. Este riesgo es casi desconocido en nuestro país, a pesar del aumento del consumo de crack. Ante una primera crisis epiléptica afebril en cualquier edad, se debe incluir de forma rutinaria la detección de tóxicos en orina.Background. The differential diagnosis of afebrile seizures in the first year of life is extensive. Case report. A 7-month old infant presented two afebrile generalized tonic-clonic seizures in 23 hours; her psychomotor and growth development followed a normal course. Laboratory analysis, cerebral echography and electroencephalogram were normal. Urine toxicology was positive for cocaine on two occasions. A negative urine sample was obtained 48 hours later. The parents denied drug abuse but explained a recent exposure to smoke some hours before the episode. The patient had no seizures in the following six months, with normal psychomotor development. Discussion. Passive inhalation of cocaine is associated with seizures in infants. There is no perception of the risk of passive exposure to cocaine in our country, despite the increasing consumption of crack in young adults. Urine toxicology should be

  1. Infant - newborn development

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002004.htm Infant - newborn development To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Infant development is most often divided into the following areas: ...

  2. Infant formulas - overview

    ... rice starch. They are usually needed only for infants with reflux who are not gaining weight or who are very uncomfortable. Formulas for premature and low-birth-weight infants have extra calories and minerals to meet the ...

  3. Infant and Newborn Nutrition

    ... It has all the necessary vitamins and minerals. Infant formulas are available for babies whose mothers are not able or decide not to breastfeed. Infants usually start eating solid foods between 4 and ...

  4. Prebiotics in infant formula

    Vandenplas, Yvan; De Greef, Elisabeth; Veereman, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    The gastrointestinal microbiota of breast-fed babies differ from classic standard formula fed infants. While mother's milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and contains small amounts of probiotics, standard infant formula doesn’t. Different prebiotic oligosaccharides are added to infant formula: galacto-oligosaccharides, fructo-oligosaccharide, polydextrose, and mixtures of these. There is evidence that addition of prebiotics in infant formula alters the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota ...

  5. Caudal ropivacaine in infants

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Ilett, K F; Reid, C;

    2001-01-01

    Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months.......Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months....

  6. Primary hyperoxaluria in infants

    Manel Jellouli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The infantile form of primary hyperoxaluria type-1 (PH-1 is characterized by a rapid progression to the end-stage renal disease (ESRD due to both increased oxalate load and reduced glomerular filtration rate. In the literature, data on this form are limited. The purpose of this study is to analyze retrospectively the clinical, biological, and radiological features of children who were diagnosed with PH-1 during the 1styear of life. We reviewed the records of all children with PH-1 diagnosed and followed-up at our department between January 1995 and December 2013. Among them, only infants younger than 12 months of age were retrospectively enrolled in the study. Fourteen infants with the median age of two months were enrolled in the study. At diagnosis, 11 patients had ESRD. All patients had nephrocalcinosis and two of them had calculi. The diagnosis was established in nine patients on the basis of the positive family history of PH-1, bilateral nephrocalcinosis, and quantitative crystalluria. In four patients, the diagnosis was made with molecular analysis of DNA. Kidney biopsy contributed to the diagnosis in one patient. During follow-up, two patients were pyridoxine sensitive and preserved renal function. Seven among 11 patients who had ESRD died, four patients are currently undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Children with infantile PH and ESRD are at high risk of early death. Peritoneal dialysis is not a treatment of choice. Combined liver-kidney transplantation is mandatory.

  7. Infant crying and abuse

    Reijneveld, S.A.; van der Wal, M.F.; Brugman, E.; Hira Sing, R.A.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important causes of child morbidity and death. We assessed potentially detrimental parental actions induced by infant crying in 3259 infants aged 1-6 months, in the Netherlands. In infants aged 6 months, 5.6% (95% CI 4.2-7.0) of parents reported having smothered, slapped,

  8. Risk assessment of furan in commercially jarred baby foods, including insights into its occurrence and formation in freshly home-cooked foods for infants and young children.

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Reusch, Helmut; Kuballa, Thomas

    2009-06-01

    Furan is a possible human carcinogen (IARC group 2B) with widespread occurrence in many types of foods. In this study, a survey of furan contamination in 230 commercially jarred ready-to-eat infant food products was conducted using headspace sampling in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (HS-GC/MS) with a detection limit of 0.2 microg kg(-1). The incidence of furan contamination in jarred infant beverages, cereals and fruits was relatively low, with average concentrations below 10 microg kg(-1). Significantly higher concentrations were found in pasta (34.8 +/- 14.5 microg kg(-1)), meals containing meat (28.2 +/- 15.0 microg kg(-1)), and meals containing vegetables (31.2 +/- 17.3 microg kg(-1)). The average exposure of 6-month-old infants to furan was estimated to be 0.2 microg per kg bodyweight per day. The margin of exposure calculated using the T25 dose descriptor would be 2692, which points to a possible public health risk. In contrast to commercially jarred food products, none of 20 freshly home-prepared baby foods contained furan above the limit of detection. Only after re-heating in closed vessels was furan found to have formed. Furan was especially prevalent in reheated foods containing potatoes, with values ranging between 2.3 and 29.2 microg kg(-1). The formation of furan in potato-containing baby foods was increased by addition of ascorbic acid, by longer heating times above 1 h and by temperatures above 50 degrees C. Research regarding reduction of furan in commercial baby foods should be conducted, with a priority aimed at reducing this heat-induced contaminant without concomitantly increasing the microbiological risk. PMID:19680950

  9. Infant-Infant Interaction in a Daycare Setting.

    Durfee, Joan T.; Lee, Lee C.

    The Infant-Infant Contact Code, developed to observe the social behavior in infants, is described. Results from using this scale with nine infants under nine months indicated that contacts between infants are complex in nature, that there are developmental changes in models of encounter, and that babies take different roles in relation to the…

  10. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  11. Involuntary movement in infants during vitamin B12 treatment

    Ayşe Tosun; Yusuf Ziya Aral; Emre Çeçen; Ayvaz Aydoğdu; Bilin Çetinkaya Çakmak

    2011-01-01

    Megaloblastic anemia is rare in infants and is generally due to vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency in the mother. Neurologic symptoms of vitamin B12 deficiency include irritability, failure to thrive, hypotonia, and developmental regression/delay. Herein we present 2 infants with vitamin B12 that developed movement disorder 5 d after initiation of vitamin B12 treatment. Symptoms included tremor and myoclonus, involving in particular the face, tongue, and hands. Clinical findings in infants as...

  12. Planning infant learning programs.

    Campbell, S K; Wilson, J M

    1976-12-01

    Based on a review of the literature, a theoretical basis for planning learning programs for infants is presented. The prerequisites for effective programming include attention to the characteristics of the learning environment, the infant or learner, and the stimulus-response mechanism. The goals of such a program include provision of sensorimotor experience and promotion of infant attachment to a mother or mother-surrogate as a basis for establishing a sense of security and competency in the infant. The parent must be taught to recognize the infant's best periods of alertness, develop sensitivity to the infant's signals, and utilize appropriate stimulation routines in interactive patterns in order to create an environment most conducive to cognitive development. Specific program content may be varied within the theoretical framework to fit the needs of special children and their families. PMID:996090

  13. Immunisation of premature infants

    Bonhoeffer, J; Siegrist, C‐A; Heath, P T

    2006-01-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk of vaccine preventable infections, but audits have shown that their vaccinations are often delayed. Early protection is desirable. While the evidence base for immunisation of preterm infants is limited, the available data support early immunisation without correction for gestational age. For a number of antigens the antibody response to initial doses may be lower than that of term infants, but protective concentrations are often achieved and memory succ...

  14. Cerebral salt wasting following tuberculous meningoencephalitis in an infant

    Syed Ahmed Zaki; Vijay Lad; Preeti Shanbag

    2012-01-01

    In patients with central nervous system disease, life-threatening hyponatremia can result from either the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone or cerebral salt wasting. Clinical manifestations of the two conditions may be similar, but their pathogeneses and management protocols are different. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome is a disorder in which excessive natriuresis and hyponatremia occurs in patients with intracranial diseases. We report a 6-month-old girl with CSWS a...

  15. Desmoplastic fibroma of the mandible in an infant

    Wippold, Franz J. [Washington University Medical Center, Neuroradiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (United States); White, Frances V. [Louis Children' s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St., St. Louis, MO (United States); Jamroz, Gregory [Washington University Medical Center, Neuroradiology Section, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States); Haughey, Bruce; Forsen, James [Barnes-Jewish Hospital and St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2005-09-01

    We report the CT and MR imaging findings of a case of a desmoplastic fibroma of the mandible in a 6-month-old girl who presented with a rapidly enlarging facial mass and who represents one of the youngest reported children with this rare tumor. Although imaging is non-specific and these lesions are best distinguished histologically, the desmoplastic fibroma should be considered when there is an occurrence of any bubbly or cystic expansile mandibular lesion presenting in childhood. (orig.)

  16. Maternal smoking effects on infant growth

    Maternal smoking is known to have adverse effects on birth weight, duration and volume of breast feeding. It also negatively affects maternal body composition and prolactin concentration at the end of pregnancy. The effect of smoking on longitudinal growth has not been studied thoroughly. Sixteen smoking mothers (S) during pregnancy and lactation (7.1 ± 4.4 cigarettes/day) and 22 non-smoking mothers (NS), were selected at delivery time, in Santiago, Chile. Infants were evaluated monthly and volume of breast milk was measured at one month by dose-to-infant deuterium dilution, as well as cotinine levels. The concentration of zinc, copper and iron in milk was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Zinc, copper and cadmium were also determined in the infant's hair at one and six months and once in the mother (beginning of lactation). Cotinine levels were determined at one and six months by a radio-immuno-analysis standard kit. In monthly visits to the house, additional formula/food intake to breast feeding was determined in a 48 hours questionnaire to the mother, as well as infant's morbidity was registered. At birth, weight and height were not significantly different, although higher in NS infants. Cotinine levels were 30 times higher in S-mothers compared to NS mothers and 12 times higher in their infants. Both S and NS infants grew within normality as defined by the National Centre for Health Statistics (NCHS) in the Z-scores curves (weight/age, height/age and weight/height). Breast milk was similar in a partial group of NS and S groups (730 ± 133 g/d, 736 ± 136 g/d) and there was no difference in the content of zinc, copper and iron in milk or hair, except for cadmium which was higher in infant's hair at one month of age. Significant differences in height and height/age were found from one to six months of age. Weight/height began to be significantly higher in S-infants from three months onward, due to their slower height growth. Another group of

  17. Postpartum depression and infant-mother attachment at one year:

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne; Steele, Howard;

    Findings on effects of Postpartum depression (PPD) on infant-mother attachment have been contradictory. This may be due to not considering maternal interpersonal difficulties, for example co-morbid personality disorder (PD). We examined the role of PD in the association between postpartum...... depression and infant-mother attachment. Mothers were recruited either during pregnancy (non-clinical group, n=56) or eight weeks postpartum (PPD-group, n=29). Infants of mothers with PPD only or in combination with PD were compared with infants of mothers with no psychopathology. Depression and PD were...

  18. Clinical and therapeutic data of a child with ecthyma gangrenosum

    Ilirjana Bakalli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in healthy children is very uncommon. Infants may occasionally present with community-acquired sepsis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, preceded by prolonged contact with contaminated bath water. Ecthyma gangrenosum is a characteristic dermatological manifestation caused most commonly by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We describe the clinical data and therapeutic management of a 6 month-old infant with ecthyma gangrenousum caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, complicated with septicaemia and meningitis. The infant was immunodeficient as indicated by hypogammaglobulinemia, neutropenia, and a low level of C3 complement component.

  19. [Gastroesophageal reflux in infants: myths and realities].

    Baudon, J-J

    2009-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common problem in infants but the distinction between GER and GER disease remains difficult. Clinical manifestations such as vomiting, poor weight gain, respiratory disorders, and apneas do always not correlate with the demonstration of reflux episodes. Premature infants frequently suffer from reflux but correlations with apneas are also poor. Esophagitis is a complication suggested in infants experiencing pain but reflux by itself can induce pain as well. The "gold" diagnosis test is pH recording; however, overlap between normal and abnormal indices is obvious. Impedance measurement demonstrates more reflux episodes but non-acid reflux harm is not established. GER disease is probably self-limited in most infants, although it is impossible to predict whether some of them continue to have GER in adult life. The treatment raises doubts concerning indications and efficacy. Overprescription is frequent in infants with regurgitations. Nonpharmacological treatment - small-volume thickened milk and correct positioning - should be the first-line treatment. Prokinetic drugs have not proved their efficacy. Among anti-acid drugs, proton pump inhibitors are the best choice, but their indications are not very clearly established for infants. On the other hand, considerable variations of their metabolism due to the patients' age and genetic factors can explain variations in therapeutic effects. PMID:19303264

  20. Milk Allergy in Infants

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Milk Allergy in Infants KidsHealth > For Parents > Milk Allergy ... español Alergia a la leche en bebés About Milk Allergy Almost all infants are fussy at times. ...

  1. Cerebral Asymmetry in Infants.

    Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Corballis, Michael C.

    This paper describes two experiments conducted to replicate the reported findings (Entus, 1975) that infants demonstrate a right ear advantage in the perception of dichotically presented syllables. Using the non-nutritive sucking paradigm, 48 infants 1-3 months of age were presented with verbal stimuli contingent upon criterion level sucking.…

  2. Postnatal remodeling of the neural components of the epithelial-mesenchymal trophic unit in the proximal airways of infant rhesus monkeys exposed to ozone and allergen

    Nerves and neuroendocrine cells located within the airway epithelium are ideally situated to sample a changing airway environment, to transmit that information to the central nervous system, and to promote trophic interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cellular and acellular components. We tested the hypothesis that the environmental stresses of ozone (O3) and house dust mite allergen (HDMA) in atopic infant rhesus monkeys alter the distribution of airway nerves. Midlevel bronchi and bronchioles from 6-month-old infant monkeys that inhaled filtered air (FA), house dust mite allergen HDMA, O3, or HDMA + O3 for 11 episodes (5 days each, 0.5 ppm O3, 8 h/day followed by 9 days recovery) were examined using immunohistochemistry for the presence of Protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), a nonspecific neural indicator, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Along the axial path between the sixth and the seventh intrapulmonary airway generations, there were small significant (P 3, while in monkeys exposed to HDMA + O3 there was a greater significant (P 3 or HDMA + O3 there was a significant increase in the number of PGP 9.5 positive/CGRP negative cells that were anchored to the basal lamina and emitted projections in primarily the lateral plain and often intertwined with projections and cell bodies of other similar cells. We conclude that repeated cycles of acute injury and repair associated with the episodic pattern of ozone and allergen exposure alter the normal development of neural innervation of the epithelial compartment and the appearance of a new population of undefined PGP 9.5 positive cells within the epithelium

  3. Metabolic bone disease in the preterm infant: Current state and future directions

    Rehman, Moghis Ur; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal osteopenia is an important area of interest for neonatologists due to continuing increased survival of preterm infants. It can occur in high-risk infants such as preterm infants, infants on long-term diuretics or corticosteroids, and those with neuromuscular disorders. Complications such as rickets, pathological fractures, impaired respiratory function and poor growth in childhood can develop and may be the first clinical evidence of the condition. It is important for neonatologists ...

  4. Due diligence

    The Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Act requires that every employer shall ensure the health and safety of workers in the workplace. Issues regarding the practices at workplaces and how they should reflect the standards of due diligence were discussed. Due diligence was described as being the need for employers to identify hazards in the workplace and to take active steps to prevent workers from potentially dangerous incidents. The paper discussed various aspects of due diligence including policy, training, procedures, measurement and enforcement. The consequences of contravening the OHS Act were also described

  5. When Infants Talk, Infants Listen: Pre-Babbling Infants Prefer Listening to Speech with Infant Vocal Properties

    Masapollo, Matthew; Polka, Linda; Ménard, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    To learn to produce speech, infants must effectively monitor and assess their own speech output. Yet very little is known about how infants perceive speech produced by an infant, which has higher voice pitch and formant frequencies compared to adult or child speech. Here, we tested whether pre-babbling infants (at 4-6 months) prefer listening to…

  6. Auditory steady-state evoked response in diagnosing and evaluating hearing in infants

    Fei Mai; Xiaozhuang Zhang; Qunxin Lai; Yanfei Wu; Nanping Liao; Yi Ye; Zhenghui Zhong

    2006-01-01

    .4% of the 321 infants failed in the initial hearing screening and secondary screening after 42 days. ② Severe to extremely severe hearing loss was detected in only 16 cases (8.3%) of the 193 infants of 0-6 months, in 9 cases (27.3%) of the 33 infants of 25-30 months,and 13 cases (39.4%) of the 33 infants of 31-36 months. Of the 193 infants of 0-6 months old who failed in the initial screening and the second screening after 42 days, the ASSR auditory threshold was < 30 dB in 97 cases (50.26%), 31-50 dB in 63 cases (32.6%), 51-70 dB in 17 cases (8.8%), 71-90 dB in 7 cases (3.6%), and > 91 dB in 9 cases (4.7%). ③ Among the 321 infants failed in the screening, the auditory threshold in the 6 age groups was < 30 dB in 47.4%, 31-50 dB in 27.1%, 51-70 dB in 8.4%, 71-90 dB in 6.2%, and > 91 dB in 10.9%. ④The difference between ASSR response threshold and VRA auditory thresholds was 6-18 dB in the normal hearing group, mild and moderate hearing loss groups, and there was high correlation between them. The difference of ASSR and VRA thresholds was less than 5 dB between extremely severe and severe hearing loss groups, 5-13 dB between extremely severe and moderate-to-severe hearing loss groups (P < 0.05), and there was no significant differences between severe and moderate-to-severe hearing loss groups (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: ① The hearing was normal in about half of the infants, although they failed in the primary screening and secondary screening. ② The proportion of the severity of hearing loss was increased along with aging. ③ Mild and moderate hearing losses are dominant in infants. ④ ASSR is reliable to evaluate the hearing of infants.

  7. Breastfed infants metabolize perchlorate.

    Shelor, C Phillip; Kirk, Andrea B; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Kroll, Martina; Campbell, Catrina A; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2012-05-01

    Bifidobacteria are the dominant intestinal bacteria in breastfed infants. It is known that they can reduce nitrate. Although no direct experiments have been conducted until now, inferred pathways for Bifidobacterium bifidum include perchlorate reduction via perchlorate reductase. We show that when commercially available strains of bifidobacteria are cultured in milk, spiked with perchlorate, perchlorate is consumed. We studied 13 breastfed infant-mother pairs who provided 43 milk samples and 39 infant urine samples, and 5 formula-fed infant-mother pairs who provided 21 formula samples and 21 infant urine samples. Using iodine as a conservative tracer, we determined the average urinary iodine (UI) to milk iodine (MI) concentration ratio to be 2.87 for the breastfed infants. For the same samples, the corresponding perchlorate concentration ratio was 1.37 (difference significant, p perchlorate is lost. For the formula fed infant group the same ratios were 1.20 and 1.58; the difference was not significant (p = 0.68). However, the small number of subjects in the latter group makes it more difficult to conclude definitively whether perchlorate reduction does or does not occur. PMID:22497505

  8. Stillbirth and Infant Mortality

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms behind these associations remain largely unknown. Although maternal obesity is associated with a wide range of complications in the mother and neonate that may impair fetal and infant survival, the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality is virtually unchanged when accounting...... indicating that some of the excess risk may have a placental origin. To further understand the associations between maternal obesity and late fetal and infant death, we need better and more detailed clinical data, which is difficult to obtain on a population level given the rarity of the outcomes. The best...

  9. Cow's milk - infants

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002448.htm Cow's milk - infants To use the sharing features on this ... old, you should not feed your baby cow's milk, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). ...

  10. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly...

  11. Unconscious Choking: Infant

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Unconscious Choking—Infant (1:36) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase ...

  12. CPR - infant - slideshow

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100216.htm CPR - infant - series To use the sharing features on ... yourself to call 911 until you have performed CPR for about 2 minutes. 3. Carefully place the ...

  13. Infant formulas - overview

    ... based formulas should be used for infants with galactosemia , a rare condition. These formulas can also be ... free formulas: These formulas are also used for galactosemia and for children who can't digest lactose. ...

  14. Parenting Your Infant

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Parenting Your Infant ...

  15. CHEST PHYSIOTHERAPY FOR INFANTS

    Preeti S. Christian (M.P.T Cardiopulmonary Conditions

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In the normal lung, secretions are removed by Mucociliary activity, normal breathing cycles, and cough. In disease, increased secretion viscosity and volume, dyskinesia of the cilia, and ineffective cough combine to reduce the ability to clear secretions, and may increase exacerbations and infections. Many chest physiotherapy techniques like postural drainage, percussion and vibration are used since many years. These techniques are derived from adult studies but these techniques are quite stressful for the infants as the infant respiratory system is different from the adult respiratory system. Advance chest physiotherapy techniques were developed specifically for infants; in accordance with their physiological characteristics. So this review is to introduce some new chest physiotherapy helpful for newborn infants.

  16. Diarrhea in infants

    When your infant has diarrhea; When your baby has diarrhea; BRAT diet; Diarrhea in children ... Children who have diarrhea may have less energy, dry eyes, or a dry, sticky mouth. They may also not wet their diaper as ...

  17. Infant dental care (image)

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  18. Unnatural sudden infant death

    Meadow, R

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To identify features to help paediatricians differentiate between natural and unnatural infant deaths.
METHOD—Clinical features of 81 children judged by criminal and family courts to have been killed by their parents were studied. Health and social service records, court documents, and records from meetings with parents, relatives, and social workers were studied.
RESULTS—Initially, 42 children had been certified as dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), and 29 wer...

  19. Tracheotomy for infant botulism.

    Wolfe, J A; Rowe, L D; Pasquariello, P; Potsic, W P

    1979-01-01

    Botulism is a serious intoxication caused by ingestion of food containing preformed botulinus toxin and characterized by rapidly progressive bulbar paralysis, generalized weakness, and respiratory insufficiency. In 1976 a distinct clinical entity of infant botulism was recognized. The disease apparently results from intraintestinal toxin production which produces a defect in neuromuscular transmission by interfering with release of acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses. Five cases of infant botulism were identified at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia between 1975 and 1977. Initial symptoms included constipation, slow feeding, lethargy and weak cry. Four of the patients progressed to respiratory insufficiency requiring nasotracheal intubation. Three of the infants with respiratory failure required tracheotomy. Because infants with respiratory failure may require support for months, we recommend that a tracheotomy be performed early in the management to avoid the complications associated with prolonged intubation. The effectiveness of antitoxin or antibiotics to treat infant botulism remains questionable and therefore prolonged respiratory supportive care is the mainstay of therapy. In addition, we offer guidelines for decannulation in cases of infant botulism. None of the patients in our series could be decannulated prior to initial discharge from the hospital. PMID:517932

  20. Laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy in infants

    Marcio L. Miranda

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Report the results of laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy in infants. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six consecutive infants underwent 7 laparoscopic upper-pole nephroureterectomy. Pre and postoperative evaluation included renal sonography, voiding cystourethrogram and renal scintigraphy. All infants showed upper-pole exclusion. Surgery was performed through a transperitoneal approach with full flank position in all infants. Three or 4 ports were used according to the necessity of retracting the liver. The distal ureter was ligated close to the bladder whenever reflux was present and the dysplastic upper-pole was divided with the help of an electrocautery. Data regarding operative time, postoperative use of analgesics, time to resume oral feeding, hospital stay and tubular function were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: All procedures were concluded as planned. Mean operative time was 135 min. One patient underwent staged bilateral upper-pole nephrectomy. There were no complications and the postoperative hospital stay was 48 hours in 5 procedures and 24 hours in 2 procedures. Pain medication was required only in the first day. Renal tubular function showed improvement in half of the cases. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is a safe and feasible procedure in infants. Due to the magnification provided by the lenses, a better vision of the structures is achieved, facilitating selective dissection of vascular upper-pole, renal parenchyma and distal ureter. This approach is less damaging to the lower pole, and is associated to low morbidity and a short hospital stay.

  1. Interpersonal synchrony increases prosocial behavior in infants.

    Cirelli, Laura K; Einarson, Kathleen M; Trainor, Laurel J

    2014-11-01

    Adults who move together to a shared musical beat synchronously as opposed to asynchronously are subsequently more likely to display prosocial behaviors toward each other. The development of musical behaviors during infancy has been described previously, but the social implications of such behaviors in infancy have been little studied. In Experiment 1, each of 48 14-month-old infants was held by an assistant and gently bounced to music while facing the experimenter, who bounced either in-synchrony or out-of-synchrony with the way the infant was bounced. The infants were then placed in a situation in which they had the opportunity to help the experimenter by handing objects to her that she had ‘accidently’ dropped. We found that 14-month-old infants were more likely to engage in altruistic behavior and help the experimenter after having been bounced to music in synchrony with her, compared to infants who were bounced to music asynchronously with her. The results of Experiment 2, using anti-phase bouncing, suggest that this is due to the contingency of the synchronous movements as opposed to movement symmetry. These findings support the hypothesis that interpersonal motor synchrony might be one key component of musical engagement that encourages social bonds among group members, and suggest that this motor synchrony to music may promote the very early development of altruistic behavior. PMID:25513669

  2. Ocular Manifestations in Infants Resulted from Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART.

    Ebrahim Jafarzadehpur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many infertile couples can have child by assistant reproductive technology (ART. Always the undesirable effects of these methods on newborn are considered and are evaluated. The aim of this study is to describe the impact of ART on ocular and visual performances of infants born by these methods.In a cross-sectional descriptive study, 479 infants aged three-nine months presented to an optometry clinic of Child Health and Development Research Department (CHDRD, Tehran, Iran. Static retinoscopy, qualitative fixation evaluation, Hirschberg test, red reflex assessment and external eye examination were carried out. Other information such as birth weight and maturity of the infants was recorded.It was possible to assess only 320 out of 479 infants due to general condition of some participants. Comparison of mean refractive error in infants' right and left eyes did not show any significant difference. Our findings confirmed that 20.3% had poor fixation, while 2.9% revealed manifest strabismus. The results also revealed the prevalences of myopia, hyperopia and emmetropia are 2.9%, 87%, and 10.1%, respectively. Red reflex abnormalities were significantly found in boys and in preterm infants (p < 0.05. Failure of fixation control was seen more frequently with increasing refractive error, which significantly developed in preterm infants (p < 0.001.These results reflect the necessity of more comprehensive assessments and further follow-up of infants born by ART, especially for premature male ART infants. These results also suggest the probability of fixation condition and visual deficiencies in these infants. It is recommended to pay close attention to this preliminary report about the refractive and fixation condition of the infants born after ART.

  3. Renal transplantation in infants.

    Jalanko, Hannu; Mattila, Ilkka; Holmberg, Christer

    2016-05-01

    Renal transplantation (RTx) has become an accepted mode of therapy in infants with severe renal failure. The major indications are structural abnormalities of the urinary tract, congenital nephrotic syndrome, polycystic diseases, and neonatal kidney injury. Assessment of these infants needs expertise and time as well as active treatment before RTx to ensure optimal growth and development, and to avoid complications that could lead to permanent neurological defects. RTx can be performed already in infants weighing around 5 kg, but most operations occur in infants with a weight of 10 kg or more. Perioperative management focuses on adequate perfusion of the allograft and avoidance of thrombotic and other surgical complications. Important long-term issues include rejections, infections, graft function, growth, bone health, metabolic problems, neurocognitive development, adherence to medication, pubertal maturation, and quality of life. The overall outcome of infant RTx has dramatically improved, with long-term patient and graft survivals of over 90 and 80 %, respectively. PMID:26115617

  4. Overview: Infant Formula and Fluorosis

    ... Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Overview: Infant Formula and Fluorosis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... dentist or hygienist to see. Because most infant formulas contain low levels of fluoride, regularly mixing powdered ...

  5. Cronobacter Illness and Infant Formula

    ... most at risk. Illnesses Linked to Powdered Infant Formula In some outbreak investigations, Cronobacter was found in ... other sources of this rare sickness. Powdered Infant Formula is Not Sterile Manufacturers report that, using current ...

  6. Nutrition for healthy term infants

    1998-01-01

    Nutrition for Healthy Term Infants is the new national statement on nutrition for infants from birth to 24 months, developed collaboratively by the Canadian Paediatric Society, Dietitians of Canada and Health Canada.

  7. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  8. Wearable Sensor Systems for Infants

    Zhihua Zhu; Tao Liu; Guangyi Li; Tong Li; Yoshio Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Continuous health status monitoring of infants is achieved with the development and fusion of wearable sensing technologies, wireless communication techniques and a low energy-consumption microprocessor with high performance data processing algorithms. As a clinical tool applied in the constant monitoring of physiological parameters of infants, wearable sensor systems for infants are able to transmit the information obtained inside an infant's body to clinicians or parents. Moreover, such sys...

  9. Infant feeding and HIV

    Ameena Ebrahim Goga

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on antiretroviral prophylaxis during breastfeeding show that maternal HAART (alone or with 1,4 or 24 weeks infant prophylaxis or infant prophylaxis alone (with limited maternal prophylaxis for 6, 14 or 24 weeks reduces HIV transmission through breastmilk (postnatal transmission. Maternal postnatal regimens appear to be as efficacious as infant postnatal regimens, although one study shows a trend favouring infant nevirapine over maternal HAART (both used from 1 week to 6 months post-delivery. These new findings necessitate a review of existing PMTCT interventions, and the immediate implementation of regimens that reduce postnatal transmission - where this is feasible – to save children’s lives. In the public sector, whilst stakeholders engage in discussions about which is the best regimen to minimise postnatal transmission SSSUPPORT should be given to all HIV-positive women, as explained below, to improve infant outcomes and reduce postnatal transmission: Screen all women for HIV, Send off CD4 cell counts on all HIV-positive women, Screen all HIV-positive women for AFASS using a standardised tool (e.g. Table 3; Understand the woman’s personal and socio-cultural context; Promote exclusive or predominant breastfeeding if all AFASS criteria are not met; Promote exclusive formula feeding if all AFASS criteria are met; Organise supplies of formula milk and cotrimoxazole; Review mothers and infants in the first 3 days post-delivery, in the first two weeks postnatally and monthly thereafter, and review health and feeding practices, regardless of feeding choice, at every visit; lastly Treat all pregnant women with HAART if they meet national criteria for HAART initiation.

  10. Clopidogrel in infants with systemic-to-pulmonary-artery shunts

    Wessel, David L; Berger, Felix; Li, Jennifer S;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infants with cyanotic congenital heart disease palliated with placement of a systemic-to-pulmonary-artery shunt are at risk for shunt thrombosis and death. We investigated whether the addition of clopidogrel to conventional therapy reduces mortality from any cause and morbidity related......) or placebo (439 infants), in addition to conventional therapy (including aspirin in 87.9% of infants). The primary efficacy end point was a composite of death or heart transplantation, shunt thrombosis, or performance of a cardiac procedure due to an event considered to be thrombotic in nature before...

  11. Infant Neurobehavioral Development

    Lester, Barry M.; Miller, Robin J.; Hawes, Katheleen; Salisbury, Amy; Bigsby, Rosemarie; Sullivan, Mary C.; James F. Padbury

    2011-01-01

    The trend toward single-room neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is increasing; however scientific evidence is, at this point, mostly anecdotal. This is a critical time to assess the impact of the single-room NICU on improving medical and neurobehavioral outcomes of the preterm infant. We have developed a theoretical model that may be useful in studying how the change from an open-bay NICU to a single-room NICU could affect infant medical and neurobehavioral outcome. The model identifies me...

  12. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    Rook, Denise

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants and to explore possible options to reduce the impact of oxidative stress in neonatal care. The studies presented in this thesis concern the optimal oxygen concentration for the resuscitation at bir...

  13. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2009-06-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  14. Alveolar lymphangioma in infants: report of two cases.

    FitzGerald, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    The alveolar lymphangioma is a benign but relatively rare condition found only in the oral cavities of black infants. Dentists practising in Ireland may be unaware of this condition due to its racial specificity. This paper presents two case reports of multiple alveolar lymphangiomas found in black infants in a children\\'s hospital in Ireland. The epidemiology, aetiology, clinical presentation, histology, and management options are discussed. The photographs should aid the practitioner in recognising these lesions.

  15. How do we determine oral readiness in infants?

    Harding, C.; Bowden, C.; Lima, L.; Levington, A.

    2016-01-01

    Determining oral feeding readiness in preterm infants is difficult and involves many aspects, including observations of behavioural state, physiological responses to the environment, oral skills and motor skills. Premature infants are challenged when developing the skills needed for effective oral feeding due to an immature neurological system, underdeveloped motor skills and poor autonomic regulation. Because of an infant’s complex needs and immature development, recognizing oral readiness s...

  16. Human donor milk for the vulnerable infant: a Canadian perspective

    Panczuk, Julia; Unger, Sharon; O’Connor, Deborah; Lee, Shoo K.

    2014-01-01

    Breast milk is the normal way to feed infants and is accepted worldwide as the optimal first source of nutrition. Though the majority intend to breastfeed, many mothers of sick, hospitalized newborns, particularly those of very low birth weight, are unable to provide a full volume of milk due to numerous physical and emotional barriers to breastfeeding. This vulnerable population of infants may benefit most from receiving breast milk nutrition and thus pasteurized donor milk should be the fir...

  17. Unconscious Choking: Infant

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Unconscious Choking—Infant (1:36) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  18. ZINC ABSORPTION BY INFANTS

    Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc absorption, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...

  19. Colic in infants

    Lucassen, P.L.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Colic in infants leads one in six families (17%) with children to consult a health professional. One systematic review of 15 community-based studies found a wide variation in prevalence, which depended on study design and method of recording. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a system

  20. Parent-Infant Education

    Charnley, Lucile; Myre, Gloria

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the development and philosophy of parent-infant education programs provided by Washington State community colleges and vocational technical schools consisting of parent-participation classes and cooperative preschools for 10,000 families. Describes program at Seattle Community College. (BF/JH)

  1. Eosinophilic colitis in infants

    Adriana Chebar Lozinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the literature for clinical data on infants with allergic or eosinophilic colitis. DATA SOURCE: MEDLINE search of all indexes was performed using the words ''colitis or procto-colitis and eosinophilic'' or ''colitis or proctocolitis and allergic'' between 1966 and February of 2013. All articles that described patients' characteristics were selected. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 770 articles were identified, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. The 32 articles included a total of 314 infants. According to the available information, 61.6% of infants were male and 78.6% were younger than 6 months. Of the 314 patients, 49.0% were fed exclusively breast milk, 44.2% received cow's milk protein, and 6.8% received soy protein. Diarrheal stools were described in 28.3% of patients. Eosinophilia was found in 43.8% (115/263 of infants. Colonic or rectal biopsy showed infiltration by eosinophils (between 5 and 25 perhigh-power field in 89.3% (236/264 of patients. Most patients showed improvement with theremoval of the protein in cow's milk from their diet or the mother's diet. Allergy challenge tests with cow's milk protein were cited by 12 of the 32 articles (66 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Eosinophilic colitis occurs predominantly in the first six months of life and in males. Allergy to cow's milk was considered the main cause of eosinophilic colitis. Exclusion of cow'smilk from the diet of the lactating mother or from the infant's diet is generally an effective therapeutic measure.

  2. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-01-01

    Late preterm (LPT) neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature ...

  3. Caucasian infants scan own- and other-race faces differently.

    Wheeler, Andrea; Anzures, Gizelle; Quinn, Paul C; Pascalis, Olivier; Omrin, Danielle S; Lee, Kang

    2011-01-01

    Young infants are known to prefer own-race faces to other race faces and recognize own-race faces better than other-race faces. However, it is entirely unclear as to whether infants also attend to different parts of own- and other-race faces differently, which may provide an important clue as to how and why the own-race face recognition advantage emerges so early. The present study used eye tracking methodology to investigate whether 6- to 10-month-old Caucasian infants (N = 37) have differential scanning patterns for dynamically displayed own- and other-race faces. We found that even though infants spent a similar amount of time looking at own- and other-race faces, with increased age, infants increasingly looked longer at the eyes of own-race faces and less at the mouths of own-race faces. These findings suggest experience-based tuning of the infant's face processing system to optimally process own-race faces that are different in physiognomy from other-race faces. In addition, the present results, taken together with recent own- and other-race eye tracking findings with infants and adults, provide strong support for an enculturation hypothesis that East Asians and Westerners may be socialized to scan faces differently due to each culture's conventions regarding mutual gaze during interpersonal communication. PMID:21533235

  4. Bone and soft tissue components of the leg in infants with protein calorie malnutrition

    The measurements of muscle, fat and cortical thickness were made on leg radiographs of 40 kwashiorkhor infants and were compared with those of 32 normal infants. There is a significant decrease in muscle cylinder ratio, an index of the contribution of muscle to calf thickness in kwashiorkhor. The loss of bone cortex in kwashiorkhor is due mainly to failure of appositional growth. The muscle cylinder ratio in normal Nigerian infants in much higher than has been reported amongst Caucasians. (orig.)

  5. Associação entre fatores sócio-econômicos e mortalidade infantil por diarréia, pneumonia e desnutrição em região metropolitana do Sudeste do Brasil: um estudo caso-controle Association between socioeconomic factors and infant deaths due to diarrhea, pneumonia, and malnutrition in a metropolitan area of Southeast Brazil: a case-control study

    Elisabeth França

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Para investigar fatores determinantes da mortalidade infantil pós-neonatal por diarréia, pneumonia e desnutrição, abordadas como um mesmo grupamento de causas, realizou-se um estudo caso-controle de base populacional na Região Metropolitana de Belo Horizonte. No período de maio de 1991 a abril de 1992, foram estudados 396 óbitos após investigação hospitalar da causa de óbito, os quais foram comparados a crianças residentes na mesma vizinhança, emparelhadas por idade. A pesquisa foi realizada em uma população de baixa renda, sendo que a maioria das famílias entrevistadas residiam em favelas. Neste artigo se discute a metodologia utilizada e resultados relevantes relativos aos fatores sócio-econômicos associados às mortes infantis. Verificou-se que a existência de eletrodomésticos no domicílio, o nível de escolaridade materna e paterna, a situação conjugal da mãe e o fato desta trabalhar fora permaneceram estatisticamente associados ao risco de óbito infantil, após ajuste pelas variáveis sócio-econômicas consideradas, utilizando-se modelo de regressão logística condicional. Estes resultados evidenciam a importância do nível sócio-econômico na determinação dos óbitos infantis por causas evitáveis.A population-based case-control study was carried out to identify determinant factors for post-neonatal infant deaths due to diarrhea, pneumonia, and malnutrition in Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte, Southeast Brazil. From May 1, 1991, to April 30, 1992, 511 post-neonatal deaths due to diarrhea, pneumonia, and malnutrition were selected after investigation of medical records to validate cause of death. Of this total, 396 deaths were compared to a neighborhood control group, matched for age. The study was carried out in a low-income area with a high proportion of families living in shantytowns. The article discusses the methodology and selected socioeconomic factors. Logistic regression analysis indicated that

  6. Infant-Directed Speech Drives Social Preferences in 5-Month-Old Infants

    Schachner, Adena; Hannon, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    Adults across cultures speak to infants in a specific infant-directed manner. We asked whether infants use this manner of speech (infant- or adult-directed) to guide their subsequent visual preferences for social partners. We found that 5-month-old infants encode an individuals' use of infant-directed speech and adult-directed speech, and use this…

  7. Causes and risk factors for infant mortality in Nunavut, Canada 1999–2011

    Collins Sorcha A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The northern territory Nunavut has Canada’s largest jurisdictional land mass with 33,322 inhabitants, of which 85% self-identify as Inuit. Nunavut has rates of infant mortality, postneonatal mortality and hospitalisation of infants for respiratory infections that greatly exceed those for the rest of Canada. The infant mortality rate in Nunavut is 3 times the national average, and twice that of the neighbouring territory, the Northwest Territories. Nunavut has the largest Inuit population in Canada, a population which has been identified as having high rates of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS and infant deaths due to infections. Methods To determine the causes and potential risk factors of infant mortality in Nunavut, we reviewed all infant deaths ( Results Sudden death in infancy (SIDS/SUDI; 48% and infection (21% were the leading causes of infant death, with rates significantly higher than for Canada (2003–2007. Of SIDS/SUDI cases with information on sleep position (n=42 and bed-sharing (n=47, 29 (69% were sleeping non-supine and 33 (70% were bed-sharing. Of those bed-sharing, 23 (70% had two or more additional risk factors present, usually non-supine sleep position. CPT1A P479L homozygosity, which has been previously associated with infant mortality in Alaska Native and British Columbia First Nations populations, was associated with unexpected infant death (SIDS/SUDI, infection throughout Nunavut (OR:3.43, 95% CI:1.30-11.47. Conclusion Unexpected infant deaths comprise the majority of infant deaths in Nunavut. Although the CPT1A P479L variant was associated with unexpected infant death in Nunavut as a whole, the association was less apparent when population stratification was considered. Strategies to promote safe sleep practices and further understand other potential risk factors for infant mortality (P479L variant, respiratory illness are underway with local partners.

  8. Infant Visual Habituation

    Colombo, John; Mitchell, D. Wayne

    2008-01-01

    The use of visual habituation in the study of infant cognition and learning is reviewed. This article traces the history of the technique, underlying theory, and procedural variation in its measurement. In addition, we review empirical findings with respect to the cognitive processes that presumably contribute to habituation, studies of developmental course and long-term prediction, as well as recent attempts to address or explain the phenomenon of visual habituation through the use of mathem...

  9. Neuroprotection in Preterm Infants

    Berger, R.; Söder, S.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants born before the 30th week of pregnancy are especially at risk of perinatal brain damage which is usually a result of cerebral ischemia or an ascending intrauterine infection. Prevention of preterm birth and early intervention given signs of imminent intrauterine infection can reduce the incidence of perinatal cerebral injury. It has been shown that administering magnesium intravenously to women at imminent risk of a preterm birth leads to a significant reduction in the likelih...

  10. Infant feeding practices in Malaysia.

    Chen, S T

    1978-12-01

    Retrospective nutritional data on 100 children, aged 6 months to 2 1/2 years, who were admitted to the University Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, was obtained by interviewing the mothers of the children. Analysis of the data revealed that 1) only 49% of the children were breast-fed as infants; 2) 50% of the mothers who did breast-feed discontinued breast-feeding before the children were 3 months old; and 3) the weaning diet of at least 1/3 of the children was inadequate. 18% of the children were Malays, 49% were Chinese, and 33% were Indian. The proportion of breast-fed children was highest among the Malays and lowest among the Chinese. Mothers with higher incomes tended to stop breast-feeding earlier than mothers with lower incomes. 67% of the women said they stopped breast-feeding due to inadequate lactation. Most of the children received supplementary foods at relatively early ages. 50% of the infants received starchy foods by the time they were 3 1/2 months old, and 50% received fruit or fruit juice by the time they were 3 1/2 months old. Vegetable products, meat, fish, and eggs were not added to the diet until the children were considerably older. Recommendations, based on the study findings, were 1) hospitals should discontinue the practice of deferring breast-feeding initiation for 24 hours after delivery; 2) mothers should be encouraged to breast-feed fully; and 3) health personnel should discourage the widespread use of costly precooked cereals for supplementary feeding. Tables depicted 1) the frequency distribution of the 100 children by income and by milk feeding patterns according to ethnic affiliation and 2) the cost of serving precooked cereals as compared to the cost of serving home cooked meals. PMID:755160

  11. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in t...

  12. Bullous mastocytosis in an infant associated with the use of a nonprescription cough suppressant.

    Cook, J; Stith, M; Sahn, E E

    1996-01-01

    Bullous mastocytosis is an unusual expression of mastocytosis typically seen in young children, and many causes of the acute mast cell degranulation with bulla formation have been identified. We report a 6-month-old boy with urticaria pigmentosa and an extensive bullous eruption associated with the ingestion of a nonprescription cough suppressant containing dextromethorphan. The pathogenesis of mastocytosis and the care of patients with this disease are discussed. PMID:8893244

  13. Hemangioma of the scrotal septum: a rare entity in infants with review of the literature.

    Kumar, Tarun; Vaughan, Richard; Dangle, Pankaj P

    2012-01-01

    Hemagiomas are most common tumors in infancy; however, scrotal septum hemangiomas are very rare with only 45 cases reported in the literature. We report a case of a 6-month-old child who presented with a scrotal mass at birth which had increased in size with age. A scrotal ultrasound with color doppler analysis, revealed a soft tissue mass with diffusely increased blood flow. Scrotal mass excision was performed and the pathology confirmed a capillary hemangioma. PMID:22872962

  14. Vanishing calcification of the brain in an infant after open heart surgery

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia are well known. A 6 months-old child is described with severe neurological complications after cardiac surgery for Fallots tetralogy. On the CT scan cortical calcification was seen to vanish. Such calcification has not been reported in similar patients. Possible causes are discussed but the precise pathophysiology of this phenomenon remains unclear. (orig.)

  15. Infant Formula - Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000806.htm Infant Formula – Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding To use the ... using infant formula . Buying, Preparing, and Storing Infant Formula The following tips can help you buy, prepare, ...

  16. Infant of a substance using mother

    ... Maternal substance use; Maternal drug use; Narcotic exposure - infant; Substance use disorder - infant ... ARE THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS SEEN IN AN INFANT OF A SUBSTANCE-ABUSING MOTHER? Babies born to ...

  17. Infant Neurosensory Development: Considerations for Infant Child Care

    Marshall, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Infant brain development is a dynamic process dependent upon endogenous and exogenous stimulation and a supportive environment. A critical period of brain and neurosensory development occurs during the third trimester and into the "fourth" trimester (first three months of life). Disruption, damage, or deprivation in the infant's social and…

  18. Perception of infant cues : the role of childhood experiences and oxytocin

    Bhandari, Ritu

    2013-01-01

    In the present thesis we report our findings assessing individual differences in perception of infant signals due to early-life experiences and variability in the oxytocinergic system. We found that the perception of infant cues differs between individuals with fewer versus more experiences of emoti

  19. Differences in perinatal and infant mortality in high-income countries

    Deb-Rinker, Paromita; León, Juan Andrés; Gilbert, Nicolas L.;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variation in birth registration criteria may compromise international comparisons of fetal and infant mortality. We examined the effect of birth registration practices on fetal and infant mortality rates to determine whether observed differences in perinatal and infant mortality rates...... by gestational age and birth weight; gestational age-and birth weight-specific stillbirth rates; neonatal, post-neonatal, and cause-specific infant mortality. RESULTS: Proportion of live births ... of viability are likely due to differences in birth registration practices, although true differences in maternal, fetal and infant health cannot be ruled out. This study emphasises the need for further standardisations, in order to enhance the relevance of international comparisons of infant mortality....

  20. U.S. differentials in infant mortality: why do they persist?

    Johnson, J H

    1987-01-01

    Large racial differentials in infant mortality persist in the US. While black babies made up 3.54 million singleton deliveries in the US in 1980, they accounted for 35% of all low-birthweight infants nationwide. Because of this disadvantage in birthweight, black babies accounted for 28% of infant deaths. Furthermore, while overall risk of infant mortality declined from 23.3/1000 live births to 11/1000 from 1960 to 1980 due to technological advances, the gap in infant mortality between black and white babies remains. The chances that a black infant wil die during the 1st year of life are still 2 times greater than white infants--the same odds as existed in 1960. Investigators concluded that the higher proportion of low birth weight babies among blacks is due to adverse socioeconomic conditions. Other recent studies cited in Arizona, Ohio, and California expand on this theory, suggesting that cultural, social, and biological factors may interact to create unique mortality patterns among racial and ethnic subgroups. The number of and risk for infant deaths is given for sex of infant, birth order, mother's age and region of birth. PMID:3691767

  1. Early infant diagnosis and post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV- exposed infants.

    Gawde, Nilesh Chandrakant

    2016-01-01

    Recent scientific evidence suggests that early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) among infants exposed perinatally to HIV has beneficial effects on their health and survival, and may even induce remission. This has led to the roll-out of early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV and early treatment. Also, there is talk of using ART as post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to prevent mother-to-child transmission. EID involves carrying out diagnostic tests before initiating ART. In India, current programme design of centralised diagnosis has been resulting in poor access to diagnosis and treatment. To save the lives of HIV-infected infants, it is important to prevent delay. Another issue to be kept in mind is that the results of HIV tests may turn negative after the initiation of ART. This could be due to viral remission induced by ART or false positive initial results. Differentiating between the two is difficult. To deal with such cases, we need to develop a clinical algorithm and tools for capacity-building in counselling. The use of ART as PEP is expected to encounter further challenges. Between ART as PEP and EID, the later has advantages from an ethical perspective. There is a need to address the ethical issues within the EID programme by strengthening the current mechanisms for protecting the rights of HIV-exposed infants. PMID:26827263

  2. Learning and Memory in Infants.

    Lipsitt, Lewis P.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses important recent strides in the documentation and understanding of the infant's learning and memory capacity. Focuses on the psychobiology of learning, hedonic mediation of approach-avoidance and learned behavior, infant memory, and critical conditions of infancy and behavioral misadventures. (RJC)

  3. What Is Infant Mental Health?

    Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

    2012-01-01

    Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

  4. Determinants of Infant Behaviour IV.

    Foss, B. M., Ed.

    This volume consists of reports of individual studies and surveys of research work on mother-infant interactions. It is divided into two parts. The first section presents a wide range of studies on mother-infant relations as exhibited in the behavior of animals. The second part, concerning human behavior, includes studies on the natural history of…

  5. Beriberi (thiamine deficiency and high infant mortality in northern Laos.

    Hubert Barennes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Infantile beriberi (thiamine deficiency occurs mainly in infants breastfed by mothers with inadequate intake of thiamine, typically among vulnerable populations. We describe possible and probable cases of infantile thiamine deficiency in northern Laos.Three surveys were conducted in Luang Namtha Province. First, we performed a retrospective survey of all infants with a diagnosis of thiamine deficiency admitted to the 5 hospitals in the province (2007-2009. Second, we prospectively recorded all infants with cardiac failure at Luang Namtha Hospital. Third, we further investigated all mothers with infants (1-6 months living in 22 villages of the thiamine deficiency patients' origin. We performed a cross-sectional survey of all mothers and infants using a pre-tested questionnaire, physical examination and squat test. Infant mortality was estimated by verbal autopsy. From March to June 2010, four suspected infants with thiamine deficiency were admitted to Luang Namtha Provincial hospital. All recovered after parenteral thiamine injection. Between 2007 and 2009, 54 infants with possible/probable thiamine deficiency were diagnosed with acute severe cardiac failure, 49 (90.2% were cured after parenteral thiamine; three died (5.6%. In the 22 villages, of 468 live born infants, 50 (10.6%, 95% CI: 8.0-13.8 died during the first year. A peak of mortality (36 deaths was reported between 1 and 3 months. Verbal autopsy suggested that 17 deaths (3.6% were due to suspected infantile thiamine deficiency. Of 127 mothers, 60 (47.2% reported edema and paresthesia as well as a positive squat test during pregnancy; 125 (98.4% respected post-partum food avoidance and all ate polished rice. Of 127 infants, 2 (1.6% had probable thiamine deficiency, and 8 (6.8% possible thiamine deficiency.Thiamine deficiency may be a major cause of infant mortality among ethnic groups in northern Laos. Mothers' and children's symptoms are compatible with thiamine deficiency. The severity

  6. Infant Cries Rattle Adult Cognition.

    Joanna Dudek

    Full Text Available The attention-grabbing quality of the infant cry is well recognized, but how the emotional valence of infant vocal signals affects adult cognition and cortical activity has heretofore been unknown. We examined the effects of two contrasting infant vocalizations (cries vs. laughs on adult performance on a Stroop task using a cross-modal distraction paradigm in which infant distractors were vocal and targets were visual. Infant vocalizations were presented before (Experiment 1 or during each Stroop trial (Experiment 2. To evaluate the influence of infant vocalizations on cognitive control, neural responses to the Stroop task were obtained by measuring electroencephalography (EEG and event-related potentials (ERPs in Experiment 1. Based on the previously demonstrated existence of negative arousal bias, we hypothesized that cry vocalizations would be more distracting and invoke greater conflict processing than laugh vocalizations. Similarly, we expected participants to have greater difficulty shifting attention from the vocal distractors to the target task after hearing cries vs. after hearing laughs. Behavioral results from both experiments showed a cry interference effect, in which task performance was slower with cry than with laugh distractors. Electrophysiology data further revealed that cries more than laughs reduced attention to the task (smaller P200 and increased conflict processing (larger N450, albeit differently for incongruent and congruent trials. Results from a correlation analysis showed that the amplitudes of P200 and N450 were inversely related, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between attention and conflict processing. The findings suggest that cognitive control processes contribute to an attention bias to infant signals, which is modulated in part by the valence of the infant vocalization and the demands of the cognitive task. The findings thus support the notion that infant cries elicit a negative arousal bias that is

  7. Infant Cries Rattle Adult Cognition.

    Dudek, Joanna; Faress, Ahmed; Bornstein, Marc H; Haley, David W

    2016-01-01

    The attention-grabbing quality of the infant cry is well recognized, but how the emotional valence of infant vocal signals affects adult cognition and cortical activity has heretofore been unknown. We examined the effects of two contrasting infant vocalizations (cries vs. laughs) on adult performance on a Stroop task using a cross-modal distraction paradigm in which infant distractors were vocal and targets were visual. Infant vocalizations were presented before (Experiment 1) or during each Stroop trial (Experiment 2). To evaluate the influence of infant vocalizations on cognitive control, neural responses to the Stroop task were obtained by measuring electroencephalography (EEG) and event-related potentials (ERPs) in Experiment 1. Based on the previously demonstrated existence of negative arousal bias, we hypothesized that cry vocalizations would be more distracting and invoke greater conflict processing than laugh vocalizations. Similarly, we expected participants to have greater difficulty shifting attention from the vocal distractors to the target task after hearing cries vs. after hearing laughs. Behavioral results from both experiments showed a cry interference effect, in which task performance was slower with cry than with laugh distractors. Electrophysiology data further revealed that cries more than laughs reduced attention to the task (smaller P200) and increased conflict processing (larger N450), albeit differently for incongruent and congruent trials. Results from a correlation analysis showed that the amplitudes of P200 and N450 were inversely related, suggesting a reciprocal relationship between attention and conflict processing. The findings suggest that cognitive control processes contribute to an attention bias to infant signals, which is modulated in part by the valence of the infant vocalization and the demands of the cognitive task. The findings thus support the notion that infant cries elicit a negative arousal bias that is distracting; they

  8. Nutritional requirements of extremely low birthweight infants.

    Hay, W W

    1994-09-01

    Extremely low birthweight (ELBW) infants are unique in many developmental characteristics that determine nutritional requirements, including: low energy reserves (both carbohydrate and fat); higher metabolic rate (intrinsically, due to a higher body content of more metabolically active organs, e.g. brain, heart, liver); higher protein turnover rate (especially when growing); higher glucose needs for energy and brain metabolism; higher lipid needs to match the in utero rate of fat deposition, and for essential fatty acids for brain, neural and vascular development; excessive evaporative rates, and occasionally very high urinary water and solute losses; low rates of gastrointestinal peristalsis; limited production of gut digestive enzymes and growth factors; high incidence of stressful events (e.g. hypoxemia, respiratory distress, sepsis); and abnormal neurological outcome if not fed adequately. Postnatally, ELBW infants do not grow well, or at all, often for weeks. This leads to a virtual "growth deficit", which has unknown consequences (which for the most part are not good) and requires excessive feeding later on to catch up to normal growth rates and body composition. The major future challenge for the nutrition of these infants is to define more accurately their nutritional requirements, particularly in the early postnatal period, in order to feed them more appropriately, to reduce to a minimum the nutritional and growth deficits that they so commonly develop and to prevent neurodevelopmental handicaps that are the result of nutritional deficiencies. PMID:7841630

  9. Pulmonary function testing in children and infants

    Pulmonary function testing is performed in children and infants with the aim of documenting lung development with age and making diagnoses of lung diseases. In children and infants with an established lung disease, pulmonary function is tested to assess the disease progression and the efficacy of therapy. It is difficult to carry out the measurements in this age group without disturbances, so obtaining results of good quality and reproducibility is challenging. Young children are often uncooperative during the examinations. This is partly related to their young age but also due to the long testing duration and the unpopular equipment. We address a variety of examination techniques for lung function assessment in children and infants in this review. We describe the measuring principles, examination procedures, clinical findings and their interpretation, as well as advantages and limitations of these methods. The comparability between devices and centres as well as the availability of reference values are still considered a challenge in many of these techniques. In recent years, new technologies have emerged allowing the assessment of lung function not only on the global level but also on the regional level. This opens new possibilities for detecting regional lung function heterogeneity that might lead to a better understanding of respiratory pathophysiology in children. (topical review)

  10. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infant Cortisol Reactivity

    Eiden, Rina D.; Veira, Yvette; Granger, Douglas A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on infant hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and reactivity at 7 months of infant age. Participants were 168 caregiver-infant dyads (87 cocaine exposed, 81 not cocaine exposed; 47% boys). Maternal behavior, caregiving instability, and infant growth and behavior were assessed,…

  11. Observed Infant Reactions during Live Interparental Conflict

    Du Rocher Schudlich, Tina D.; White, Clare R.; Fleischhauer, Emily A.; Fitzgerald, Kelly A.

    2011-01-01

    Associations between interparental conflict and infant reactions were examined. Infants' history of exposure to interparental conflict and infant reactive temperament were examined as moderators. A community sample of 74 infants, aged 6-14 months, participated with their parents. Behavioral observations were made of parents' marital conflict and…

  12. The effectiveness of video interaction guidance in parents of premature infants: A multicenter randomised controlled trial

    Tooten Anneke

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have consistently found a high incidence of neonatal medical problems, premature births and low birth weights in abused and neglected children. One of the explanations proposed for the relation between neonatal problems and adverse parenting is a possible delay or disturbance in the bonding process between the parent and infant. This hypothesis suggests that due to neonatal problems, the development of an affectionate bond between the parent and the infant is impeded. The disruption of an optimal parent-infant bond -on its turn- may predispose to distorted parent-infant interactions and thus facilitate abusive or neglectful behaviours. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG is expected to promote the bond between parents and newborns and is expected to diminish non-optimal parenting behaviour. Methods/design This study is a multi-center randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance in parents of premature infants. In this study 210 newborn infants with their parents will be included: n = 70 healthy term infants (>37 weeks GA, n = 70 moderate term infants (32–37 weeks GA which are recruited from maternity wards of 6 general hospitals and n = 70 extremely preterm infants or very low birth weight infants (i.e. full term infants and their parents, receiving care as usual, a control group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving care as usual and an intervention group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving VIG. The data will be collected during the first six months after birth using observations of parent-infant interactions, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcomes are the quality of parental bonding and parent-infant interactive behaviour. Parental secondary outcomes are (posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, anxiety and feelings of anger and hostility. Infant secondary outcomes are behavioral aspects such as crying

  13. The effectiveness of video interaction guidance in parents of premature infants: A multicenter randomised controlled trial

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have consistently found a high incidence of neonatal medical problems, premature births and low birth weights in abused and neglected children. One of the explanations proposed for the relation between neonatal problems and adverse parenting is a possible delay or disturbance in the bonding process between the parent and infant. This hypothesis suggests that due to neonatal problems, the development of an affectionate bond between the parent and the infant is impeded. The disruption of an optimal parent-infant bond -on its turn- may predispose to distorted parent-infant interactions and thus facilitate abusive or neglectful behaviours. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) is expected to promote the bond between parents and newborns and is expected to diminish non-optimal parenting behaviour. Methods/design This study is a multi-center randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance in parents of premature infants. In this study 210 newborn infants with their parents will be included: n = 70 healthy term infants (>37 weeks GA), n = 70 moderate term infants (32–37 weeks GA) which are recruited from maternity wards of 6 general hospitals and n = 70 extremely preterm infants or very low birth weight infants (<32 weeks GA) recruited by the NICU of 2 specialized hospitals. The participating families will be divided into 3 groups: a reference group (i.e. full term infants and their parents, receiving care as usual), a control group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving care as usual) and an intervention group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving VIG). The data will be collected during the first six months after birth using observations of parent-infant interactions, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcomes are the quality of parental bonding and parent-infant interactive behaviour. Parental secondary outcomes are (posttraumatic) stress symptoms

  14. Novel Approaches to Improve the Intrinsic Microbiological Safety of Powdered Infant Milk Formula

    Robert M. Kent

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human milk is recognised as the best form of nutrition for infants. However; in instances where breast-feeding is not possible, unsuitable or inadequate, infant milk formulae are used as breast milk substitutes. These formulae are designed to provide infants with optimum nutrition for normal growth and development and are available in either powdered or liquid forms. Powdered infant formula is widely used for convenience and economic reasons. However; current manufacturing processes are not capable of producing a sterile powdered infant formula. Due to their immature immune systems and permeable gastro-intestinal tracts, infants can be more susceptible to infection via foodborne pathogenic bacteria than other age-groups. Consumption of powdered infant formula contaminated by pathogenic microbes can be a cause of serious illness. In this review paper, we discuss the current manufacturing practices present in the infant formula industry, the pathogens of greatest concern, Cronobacter and Salmonella and methods of improving the intrinsic safety of powdered infant formula via the addition of antimicrobials such as: bioactive peptides; organic acids; probiotics and prebiotics.

  15. Lung volume, breathing pattern and ventilation inhomogeneity in preterm and term infants.

    Philipp Latzin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Morphological changes in preterm infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD have functional consequences on lung volume, ventilation inhomogeneity and respiratory mechanics. Although some studies have shown lower lung volumes and increased ventilation inhomogeneity in BPD infants, conflicting results exist possibly due to differences in sedation and measurement techniques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 127 infants with BPD, 58 preterm infants without BPD and 239 healthy term-born infants, at a matched post-conceptional age of 44 weeks during quiet natural sleep according to ATS/ERS standards. Lung function parameters measured were functional residual capacity (FRC and ventilation inhomogeneity by multiple breath washout as well as tidal breathing parameters. Preterm infants with BPD had only marginally lower FRC (21.4 mL/kg than preterm infants without BPD (23.4 mL/kg and term-born infants (22.6 mL/kg, though there was no trend with disease severity. They also showed higher respiratory rates and lower ratios of time to peak expiratory flow and expiratory time (t(PTEF/t(E than healthy preterm and term controls. These changes were related to disease severity. No differences were found for ventilation inhomogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that preterm infants with BPD have a high capacity to maintain functional lung volume during natural sleep. The alterations in breathing pattern with disease severity may reflect presence of adaptive mechanisms to cope with the disease process.

  16. Hepatitis B Postexposure Prophylaxis in Preterm and Low-Birth-Weight Infants

    Markus Waitz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective - Recommendations for immunoprophylaxis in low-birth-weight (LBW infants born to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-positive mothers vary. We successfully immunized an HBsAg-exposed infant (birth weight: 400 g and performed a literature review on the outcome of postexposure immunoprophylaxis in HBsAg-exposed preterm and LBW infants. Methods - By use of PubMed we identified articles relevant to the topic. Studies were included if the intended vaccine schedule was completed and follow-up data were reported. Results - Antibody response was reported in 31 LBW infants (birth weight < 2,500 g and 49 infants with gestational age of < 38 weeks. Low anti-HBs antibody levels (< 100 IU/L were found in 9 (29% of the 31 LBW infants. Overall, 2 of 20 (10% preterm infants and 2 of 17 (12% LBW were HBsAg-positive on follow-up. In one study, none of the 26 exposed very LBW infants became infected. Conclusion - Due to heterogeneity in immunization schedules, lack of information on transmission rates, and the small number of included subjects, no firm conclusions can be drawn regarding the optimal postexposure prophylaxis in LBW infants. We propose that active and passive immunization at birth should be completed by three further active doses (0–1–2–12 month schedule until further prospective studies are available.

  17. Design of wireless multi-parameter monitoring system for oral feeding of premature infants.

    Wang, Yu-Lin; Kuo, Hsing-Chien; Wang, Lin-Yu; Ko, Mei-Ju; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2016-07-01

    Premature infants often cannot successfully and coordinately complete their oral feeding. Mature sucking, swallowing, and respiration activities are crucial indicators for the survival of newborn infants. Due to the vulnerability and unobvious muscle activities of premature infants, current clinical care givers mainly depend on the subjective behavioral observation of infants during oral feeding. There is still lack of an integrated oral feeding monitoring system to objectively and quantifiably monitor the related physiological parameters of premature infants. In this study, a wireless multi-parameter monitoring system for oral feeding of premature infants was proposed to monitor the sucking-swallowing-respiratory activities and the heart rate variability to provide quantitative indices of oral feeding. Here, a novel sucking pressure sensing module was also developed to monitor the premature infant's sucking pressure under oral feeding to avoid the immersion influence of milk. The experimental results showed that the proposed system detected the related physiological parameters of premature infants during oral feeding effectively and may provide an objective clinical evaluation tool for oral feeding ability and safety of premature infants in the future. PMID:26429347

  18. Nonpharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    Luigi Corvaglia; Silvia Martini; Arianna Aceti; Santo Arcuri; Roberto Rossini; Giacomo Faldella

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of fe...

  19. New Perspectives on Premature Infants and Their Parents

    Browne, Joy V.

    2003-01-01

    More than 485,000 low-birth-weight, premature babies are born in the U.S. each year. The increase in preterm births since 1990 may be due to assisted pregnancies and births to older mothers. Although their survival rates are improving, many premature infants experience long-lasting developmental and behavioral problems. The author describes recent…

  20. Neonatal small left colon in an infant with cystic fibrosis

    A small left colon has been observed in neonates due to several causes: aganglionosis, meconium plug, and neonatal small left colon syndrome. We report a case of small left colon in an infant with cystic fibrosis, underscoring the need to consider this diesease in the diagnostic work up. (orig.)

  1. Accidental and Nonaccidental Head Injuries in Infants: Distinguishing Characteristics

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available One hundred fifty infants hospitalized with head injury over a 3-year period, 57 (38% due to child abuse, were studied prospectively at the Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Legal Medicine, CHRU de Lille, France.

  2. Infant hip sonography: current concepts.

    Harcke, H T; Grissom, L E

    1994-08-01

    Sonography of the infant hip has gained wide acceptance in the decade since its introduction. The two principle techniques of Graf and Harcke have been combined with the proposal of a Dynamic Standard Minimum Examination. Whereas sonography is used increasingly to manage developmental dislocation and/or displasia of the hip, there is no agreement on the use of sonography for universal newborn screening. This article describes in detail the Dynamic Standard Minimum Sonographic Examination of the infant hip. In addition, this article reviews the classification and management of infant hip disorders. PMID:7946476

  3. Breastfeeding infants with congenital torticollis.

    Genna, Catherine Watson

    2015-05-01

    Infants with unilateral sternocleidomastoid tension and associated craniofacial, spinal, and hip asymmetries may feed poorly. Anatomic and muscular asymmetry stress both biomechanics and state control, increasing the potential for difficulty latching and sucking. A combination of positioning modifications to allow the infant to maintain his or her comfortable head tilt and turn, supportive techniques to restore alignment of oral structures, and handling techniques to help activate the weak contralateral muscles have been effective in the author's practice. Lactation consultants can promote positioning and muscle activation strategies and encourage physical therapy referrals for infants who do not respond promptly to reduce the risk of craniofacial deformity and developmental problems. PMID:25616913

  4. Disorders of Sex Development: Management of Gender Assignment in a Preterm Infant with Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    Mastrandrea, Lucy D.; Albini, Christine H.; Wynn, Ralph J.; Greenfield, Saul P.; Robinson, Luther K.; Tom Mazur

    2012-01-01

    We describe how a gender specialist team managed the case of a disorder of sex development in a preterm infant where definitive diagnosis and gender assignment were delayed due to complications of prematurity, anemia, and severe intrauterine growth restriction.

  5. Infant feeding practices and weight gain for length of term normal birth weight infants in the first 6 months of life%喂养习惯与婴儿出生后前6个月按身长体质量增加的相关性

    周丽莉; 孙倩倩; 胡燕琪; 刘金荣; 刘珊珊; 张杰; 盛晓阳

    2010-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between infant feeding practices and infants growth,especially the weight gain for length in the first 6 months of life. Methods Two-hundred healthy full-term singlet normal birth weight 5 - 6 months old infants and their main care givers were recruited in Kongjiang community health service center in Shanghai. The questionnaires included infants feeding pattern, feeding environment and care givers feeding behaviors, and were completed on-site by investigators. The birth weight was obtained. The weight and length of infants at 6 months were measured. Results There were 70/200 (35.0%) infants overweight (BMI for age Z score>+1) at 6 months. There were more overweight boys than girls (40.0% vs. 30.9%, x2 = 1.798, P = 0.180). Compared with normal weight infants, the overweight infants had same birth weight (3.30 ± 0.35 kg vs. 3.35 ± 0.32 kg, t =1.010, P = 0.314) and same length at 6 months (67.64 ± 2.10 cm vs. 67.91 ± 1.97 cm, t=- 0.896, P = 0.371). However, the overweight infants gained much more weight for length in the first six months of life. At 6 months, the weight and BMI of overweight infants was significantly higher than that of normal weight infants (9.16 ± 0.67 vs. 7.94 ±0.64, t = 12.324, P 0.05). The grandparents played an important role in infants feeding in Shanghai. There were 39.0% infants fed only by grandparents, and 23.0% infants fed jointly by grandparents and parents (x2 = 0.175, P > 0.05).The care givers' educational level and knowledge of feeding skill were similar in overweight and normal weight infants (x2 = 0.446, t = 0.949, P > 0.05). However, the overweight infants were fed more quickly than normal weight infants (Z = 2.753, P +1),占35%.男婴超重多于女婴(40.0%对30.9%,x2=1.798,P=0.180).超重婴儿和体质量正常婴儿的出生体质量一致(3.30±0.35 kg对3.35±0.32 kg,t=1.010,P=0.314),6月龄时两组婴儿的身长也一致(67.64±2.10 cm对67.91±1.97cm,t=0.896,P=0.371).

  6. Infant temperament contributes to early infant growth: A prospective cohort of African American infants

    Goldman Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospective studies linking infant temperament, or behavioral style, to infant body composition are lacking. In this longitudinal study (3 to 18 months, we seek to examine the associations between two dimensions of infant temperament (distress to limitations and activity level and two anthropometric indicators (weight-for-length z-scores (WLZ and skin fold (SF measures in a population at high risk of overweight. Methods Data are from the Infant Care and Risk of Obesity Project, a longitudinal study of North Carolina low income African American mother-infant dyads (n = 206. Two temperament dimensions were assessed using the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised. A high distress to limitations score denotes an infant whose mother perceives that s/he often cries or fusses, and a high activity level score one who moves his/her limbs and squirms frequently. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted using ordinary least squares regression. Fixed effects longitudinal models were used to estimate anthropometric outcomes as a function of time varying infant temperament. Results In longitudinal models, increased activity levels were associated with later decreased fatness and WLZ. In contrast, high levels of distress to limitations were associated with later increased fatness at all time points and later increased WLZ at 12 months. Conclusion Infant temperament dimensions contribute to our understanding of the role of behavior in the development of the risk of overweight in the formative months of life. Identification of modifiable risk factors early in life may help target strategies for establishing healthy lifestyles prior to the onset of overweight.

  7. 婴儿唾液成分与饮食行为的相关性研究%A study on relationship between saliva constituents and dietary behaviors of the infant

    吴虹桥; 童梅玲; 张敏; 陈丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析婴儿唾液成分与饮食行为之间的相关关系,为临床指导婴儿喂养提供客观指标.方法 649例婴儿根据居住地的不同分为城市组和农村组;按月龄段的不同分为1~3月、4~6月、7~9月和10~12月4组;按性别不同分为男婴组和女婴组.对带养人进行面对面婴儿饮食行为的问卷调查,调查内容包括固体食物引入;对每名婴儿测量体重和身长,评价其生长发育状况;收集该婴儿的口腔全唾液,用全自动生化分析仪测定唾液中淀粉酶,K+,Na+,Cl-,葡萄糖,总蛋白,总胆固醇,三酰甘油的含量.结果 不同地区、不同月龄、不同进食能力的婴儿,其唾液成分存在着差异(P<0.01);婴儿唾液成分与饮食行为、体重和身长之间有着一定的相关关系.结论 唾液成分分析对于指导婴儿饮食行为发育具有一定的现实意义.%Objective To explore relationship between saliva constituents and dietary (feeding) behaviors of infants aged under 1 year so as to provide objective basis for infant-feeding instruction in clinic. Methods 649 infants were divided into two groups (city group and rural group) according to their living areas, into four age groups (under 3-month-old group, between 4-6-month-old group, between 7-9-month-old group and between 10-12-month-old group) according to their month ages and into two gender groups (boy group and girl group).Parents and caregivers were investigated by filling in questionnaires about the infants' dietary behaviors for solid food introduction and so on. The body weight and height of the infants were measured to evaluate their growth condition. The subjects' saliva was taken. The contents of K+, Na+, Cl-, glucose, total proteins, total cholesterols and triglyceride were determined by Automatic Biochemical Analysor. Results There were significant differences in saliva constituents among infants in different living areas, ages and abilities to take food (all P < 0

  8. Chest X-ray in newborns and infants

    Chest X-ray in newborns and infants shows great differences to that in adults. Therefore all radiologists, who engage in X-rays in this age group, must be familiar with the special features. At the beginning specific items of examination methods are explained, which must be strictly followed due to radiological protection. Focus of the paper is the discussion of the important chest diseases in newborn and infants, which are mostly unknown in chest diagnosis in adults. Many of them can be life-threatening, thus their knowledge is essential. Pathophysiological explanations shall make the special radiological signs understandable. (orig.)

  9. Search asymmetry and eye movements in infants and adults.

    Adler, Scott A; Gallego, Pamela

    2014-08-01

    Search asymmetry is characterized by the detection of a feature-present target amidst feature-absent distractors being efficient and unaffected by the number of distractors, whereas detection of a feature-absent target amidst feature-present distractors is typically inefficient and affected by the number of distractors. Although studies have attempted to investigate this phenomenon with infants (e.g., Adler, Inslicht, Rovee-Collier, & Gerhardstein in Infant Behavioral Development, 21, 253-272, 1998; Colombo, Mitchell, Coldren, & Atwater in Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 19, 98-109, 1990), due to methodological limitations, their findings have been unable to definitively establish the development of visual search mechanisms in infants. The present study assessed eye movements as a means to examine an asymmetry in responding to feature-present versus feature-absent targets in 3-month-olds, relative to adults. Saccade latencies to localize a target (or a distractor, as in the homogeneous conditions) were measured as infants and adults randomly viewed feature-present (R among Ps), feature-absent (P among Rs), and homogeneous (either all Rs or all Ps) arrays at set sizes of 1, 3, 5, and 8. Results indicated that neither infants' nor adults' saccade latencies to localize the target in the feature-present arrays were affected by increasing set sizes, suggesting that localization of the target was efficient. In contrast, saccade latencies to localize the target in the feature-absent arrays increased with increasing set sizes for both infants and adults, suggesting an inefficient localization. These findings indicate that infants exhibit an asymmetry consistent with that found with adults, providing support for functional bottom-up selective attention mechanisms in early infancy. PMID:24858309

  10. The evolution of clinical trials for infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants has a significantly inferior outcome in comparison with older children. Despite initial improvements in survival of infants with ALL since establishment of the first pediatric cooperative group ALL trials, the poor outcome has plateaued in recent years. Historically, infants were treated on risk-adapted childhood ALL protocols. These studies were pivotal in identifying the need for infant-specific protocols, delineating prognostic categories and the requirement for a more unified approach between study groups to overcome limitations in accrual because of low incidence. This subsequently led to the development of collaborative infant-specific studies. Landmark outcomes have included the elimination of cranial radiotherapy following the discovery of intrathecal and high-dose systemic therapy as a superior and effective treatment strategy for central nervous system disease prophylaxis, with improved neurodevelopmental outcome. Universal prospective identification of independent adverse prognostic factors, including presence of a mixed lineage leukemia rearrangement and young age, has established the basis for risk stratification within current trials. The infant-specific trials have defined limits to which conventional chemotherapeutic agents can be intensified to optimize the balance between treatment efficacy and toxicity. Despite variations in therapeutic intensity, there has been no recent improvement in survival due to the equilibrium between relapse and toxicity. Ultimately, to improve the outcome for infants with ALL, key areas still to be addressed include identification and adaptation of novel prognostic markers and innovative therapies, establishing the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission, treatment strategies for relapsed/refractory disease and monitoring and timely intervention of late effects in survivors. This would be best achieved through a single unified

  11. FDA Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — On September 22, 2010, Abbott issued a voluntary recall of certain Similac powdered infant formula after identifying a common warehouse beetle (both larvae and...

  12. Home apnea monitor use - infants

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000755.htm Home apnea monitor use - infants To use the sharing ... portable. Why is an Apnea Monitor Used at Home? A monitor may be needed when: Your baby ...

  13. Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) in Infants

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis) A parent's guide for infants and babies A ... scaling, red, slightly elevated lesions typical of atopic dermatitis (eczema). Overview Eczema, formally known as atopic dermatitis, ...

  14. Infant Allergies and Food Sensitivities

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Breastfeeding > Infant Allergies ...

  15. Infant Mortality and Hispanic Americans

    ... Program Grants Other Grants Planning and Evaluation Grantee Best Practices Hispanic/Latino Asthma Cancer Chronic Liver Disease Diabetes Heart Disease Hepatitis HIV/AIDS Immunizations Infant Heath & Mortality Mental Health Obesity Organ and Tissue Donation Stroke Stay Connected ...

  16. Parents Bereaved by Infant Death

    Christiansen, Dorte Mølgaard; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentiallytraumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic...... posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)´symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Methods: Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study......, female sex, attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping, rational coping, feeling let down and social support satisfaction accounted for 42% of the variance in PTSD severity. Conclusions: The study highlights the long-term impact of infant loss and points to attachment, coping...

  17. Parents bereaved by infant death

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Elklit, Ask; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Losing an infant or fetus late in pregnancy, during birth or in the first year of life is a potentially traumatic event for parents. However, little is known about the factors contributing to chronic posttraumatic stress reactions in this population. The present study examined chronic posttraumatic...... stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and potential correlates in 634 mothers and fathers up to 18 years (M=3.4 years) after the death of their infant. Members of a private national support organization for parents bereaved by infant death were contacted and asked to participate in the study. Participants...... avoidance, attachment anxiety, emotion-focused coping, avoidant coping, feeling let down and social support satisfaction accounted for 44% of the variance in PTSD severity. The study highlights the long-term impact of infant loss and points to attachment, coping and social support as important contributors...

  18. Infant care following delivery (image)

    ... determine the APGAR scores. If some cyanosis (bluish skin) is present, the APGAR scores are lower and oxygen may be administered. The oxygen can often be merely blown by the newborn's face, through the mask in front of the infant.

  19. Cystic fibrosis in premature infants

    Lu, KD; Engmann, C.; Moya, F. (Francina); Muhlebach, M

    2011-01-01

    There are few reports of cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed in premature infants. We describe the clinical course of three patients, from our neonatal intensive care units, who were diagnosed with CF, and discuss the existing literature and treatment considerations.

  20. The effect of open and closed endotracheal tube suctioning system on respiratory parameters of infants undergoing mechanical ventilation

    Taheri, Parvin; Asgari, Narges; Mohammadizadeh, Majid; Golchin, Mehri

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Mechanical ventilation is used for some infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) due to many physiological and clinical causes. Since these patients have endotracheal tubes, cleaning and keeping the airways open through suctioning should be done to increase oxygenation. This study aimed to evaluate effect of open and closed suctioning methods on respiratory parameters of infants undergoing mechanical ventilation. Materials and Methods: In this crossover clinical trial, 44 infants...

  1. Infant observation: opportunities, challenges, threats

    Hollway, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the value of the infant observation tradition from the perspective of someone originally trained in scientific psychology and recently ending a four-year period as external examiner for the Masters and Diploma course in Psychoanalytic Observation at the Tavistock clinic. My aim is to convey, from the perspective of an outsider, how I came to appreciate the core insights that I learned from infant observation through my experience of them in a research context; to conv...

  2. Treatment with paracetamol in infants

    Arana, A; Morton, N S; Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2001-01-01

    Paracetamol (N-acetyl-p-amino-phenol) or acetaminophen has become the most widely used analgesic and antipyretic in children. However, there is a wide discrepancy between the extent to which paracetamol is used and the limited available pharmacological data in small infants. The purpose of this...... article is to present a review of the current literature regarding the use of paracetamol in neonates and infants with a particular emphasis on pharmacological issues....

  3. Outcomes for Extremely Premature Infants

    Glass, HC; Costarino, AT; Stayer, SA; Brett, CM; Cladis, F; Davis, PJ

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 International Anesthesia Research Society. Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have bet...

  4. The study of countermeasures on measles control in infants%小月龄婴儿麻疹发病控制对策探讨

    王联君; 康顺爱; 刘英; 姜晓春; 孙丽英; 姜忠林

    2001-01-01

    that the newborn's antibody level can be improved by vaccination to matured women. In order to reduce morbidity of infant measles, the age of first vaccination of measles vaccine should be changed from 8 months old to 6 months old in some regions.

  5. Factors affecting visualization of posterior rib fractures in abused infants

    Rib fractures in abused infants commonly occur in the posterior rib arcs. Fractures occurring near the costovertebral articulations are usually identified radiographically only once callus has formed. To assess the factors influencing the visibility of fractures near the costovertical articulations, the authors studied 103 posterior rib fractures occurring in 16 abused infants. Radiologic findings were correlated with CT findings and pathologic material from nine ribs in four patients. The limited visibility of fractures relates to (1) the frequent superimposition of the transverse process over the rib fracture site, (2) a fracture line that crosses at an obliquity to the x-ray beam, and (3) nondisplacement of rib fragments due to preservation of the posterior periosteum. Fresh rib fractures invisible on a frontal projection may be clearly defined on axial CT scans, or on postmortem radiographs. A knowledge of the factors influencing the visibility of these important injuries is useful in planning an appropriate diagnostic evaluation of suspected infant abuse

  6. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER’s improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects.

  7. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in infants: clinical features and natural history

    The clinical and morphologic features of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 20 patients recognized as having cardiac disease in the first year of life are described. Fourteen of these 20 infants were initially suspected of having heart disease solely because a heart murmur was identified. However, the infants showed a variety of clinical findings, including signs of marked congestive heart failure (in the presence of nondilated ventricular cavities and normal or increased left ventricular contractility) and substantial cardiac enlargement on chest radiograph. Other findings were markedly different from those usually present in older children and adults with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (e.g., right ventricular hypertrophy on the ECG and cyanosis). Consequently, in 14 infants, the initial clinical diagnosis was congenital cardiac malformation other than hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The clinical course was variable in these patients, but the onset of marked congestive heart failure in the first year of life appeared to be an unfavorable prognostic sign; nine of the 11 infants with congestive heart failure died within the first year of life. In infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, unlike older children and adults with this condition, sudden death was less common (two patients) than death due to progressive congestive heart failure

  8. Concurrent bacteraemia and malaria in febrile Nigerian infants.

    Ayoola, Omolola O; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; Osinusi, Kikelomo

    2005-01-01

    In the tropics, febrile illnesses are often presumed to be due to malaria, because of its endemicity, and treatment can lead to delay in diagnosis or failure to detect severe infections such as bacteraemia. This study sought to determine the prevalence of bacteraemia and malaria parasitaemia in febrile post-neonatal infants (age 1-12 months) at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria, and the bacterial aetiological agents of bacteraemia in the infants. Therefore, 102 infants aged 1-12 months who presented with fever with a negative history of antimicrobial use in the week prior to presentation were evaluated and had blood cultures done for the detection of aerobic organisms by standard methods and blood films for malaria parasites. Bacteraemia was found in 38.2% of the infants, malaria parasitaemia was found in 46.1%. The most common organisms isolated were Escherichia coli (35.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (33.3%) and Klebsiella spp. (10.3%). Febrile children should be investigated for the presence of bacterial infection even if the blood film for malaria parasites is positive. Where laboratory facilities are not available, consideration should be given to the use of both anti-malarial therapy and empiric antibiotic therapy in the management of febrile infants, depending on the clinician's judgement. PMID:15712544

  9. What could infant and young child nutrition learn from sweatshops?

    Sagoe-Moses Isabella

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adequate infant and young child nutrition demands high rates of breastfeeding and good access to nutrient rich complementary foods, requiring public sector action to promote breastfeeding and home based complementary feeding, and private sector action to refrain from undermining breastfeeding and to provide affordable, nutrient rich complementary foods. Unfortunately, due to a lack of trust, the public and private sectors, from both the North and the South, do not work well together in achieving optimal infant and young child nutrition. Discussion As the current debate in infant and young child nutrition is reminiscent of the "sweatshop" debate fifteen years ago, we argue that lessons from the sweatshops debate regarding cooperation between public and private sectors - and specific organizational experiences such as the Ethical Trading Initiative in which companies, trade unions, and civil society organizations work together to enhance implementation of labour standards and address alleged allegations - could serve as a model for improving cooperation and trust between public, civil society and private groups, and ultimately health, in infant and young child nutrition. Summary Lessons from the sweatshops debate could serve as a model to promote cooperation and trust between public and private groups, such that they learn to work together towards their common goal of improving infant and young child nutrition.

  10. Narrowing inequalities in infant mortality in Southern Brazil

    Goldani Marcelo Zubaran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the trends of infant mortality from 1995 to 1999 according to a geographic area-based measure of maternal education in Porto Alegre, Brazil. METHODS: A registry-based study was carried out and a municipal database created in 1994 was used. All live births (n=119,170 and infant deaths (n=1,934 were considered. Five different geographic areas were defined according to quintiles of the percentage of low maternal educational level (<6 years of schooling: high, medium high, medium, medium low, and low. The chi-square test for trend was used to compare rates between years. Incidence rate ratio was calculated using Poisson regression to identify excess infant mortality in poorer areas compared to higher schooling areas. RESULTS: The infant mortality rate (IMR decreased steadily from 18.38 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1995 to 12.21 in 1999 (chi-square for trend p<0.001. Both neonatal and post-neonatal mortality rates decreased although the drop seemed to be steeper for the post-neonatal component. The higher decline was seen in poorer areas. CONCLUSION: Inequalities in IMR seem to have decreased due to a steeper reduction in both neonatal and post-neonatal components of infant mortality in lower maternal schooling area.

  11. Patterns of psychological distress in mothers of preterm infants.

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; Santos, Hudson; Levy, Janet; White-Traut, Rosemary; O'Shea, T Michael; Geraldo, Victoria; David, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Mothers of preterm infants experience significant psychological distress, with elevated levels of inter-correlated depressive, stress, anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms. In a sample of racially and ethnically diverse mothers of preterm infants, we identified differing patterns of psychological distress during infant hospitalization and examined the effect of these psychological distress patterns on longitudinal trajectories of each psychological distress measure and on maternal perceptions of the child over the first year of the infant's life. Mothers of preterm infants (N=232) completed five questionnaires assessing depressive symptoms, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, stress due to infant appearance, and stress due to parental role alteration during enrollment during the neonatal hospitalization, discharge, and at 2, 6, and 12 months of age adjusted for prematurity. Latent class analysis on the enrollment psychological distress variables allowed us to identify five sub-groups of mothers exhibiting similar patterns of psychological distress, differing primarily in degree and type: low distress, moderate distress, high NICU-related distress, high depressive and anxiety symptoms, and extreme distress. These classes continued to show different longitudinal trajectories for the psychological distress measures through 12 months corrected age. Mothers in the extreme distress class and, to a lesser degree, mothers in the high depressive and anxiety symptom class remained at risk of significant psychological distress one year after discharge and had less positive perceptions of their child (greater worry and higher perceptions of child vulnerability). In conclusion, distinctive sub-groups of mothers during hospitalization had different patterns of psychological distress throughout the 12-month period and may require different interventions in the NICU. PMID:26495909

  12. ASSESSMENT OF GROSS MOTOR DEVELOPMENT IN INFANTS OF AGE 6 TO 18 MONTHS WITH PROTEIN ENERGY MALNUTRITION USING ALBERTA INFANT MOTOR SCALE: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY

    Amruta Kulkarni; Deepa Metgud

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Malnutrition is one of the leading cause of death among young children of developing countries and occurs due to deficiency of essential nutrients. In infancy protein deficiency (PEM) can severely affect the different domains of development. Motor development, one of the domains of development has been previously assessed in older children with PEM and not in younger infants. Early detection of motor impairment in infants with PEM followed by early intervention wil...

  13. Lactobacillus Sepsis following a Laparotomy in a Preterm Infant: A Note of Caution.

    Brecht, Marcus; Garg, Alka; Longstaff, Karen; Cooper, Celia; Andersen, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics for preterm infants have been shown to reduce the incidence of necrotising enterocolitis and all-cause mortality in a recent meta-analysis. It has been argued, however, that some of these results may not be applicable to specific subgroups, e.g. infants with a birth weight of probiotics in improving health outcomes in preterm and term infants following intestinal surgery is not well defined. We report a case of a premature infant diagnosed with late-onset sepsis due to Lactobacillus rhamnosus following a laparotomy. We review pertinent published cases. This case highlights the importance of considering preterm infants as being at a higher risk of systemic probiotic infection following intestinal surgery. PMID:26780534

  14. Nevirapine Resistance in Previously Nevirapine-Unexposed HIV-1-Infected Kenyan Infants Initiating Early Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Chohan, Bhavna H; Tapia, Kenneth; Benki-Nugent, Sarah; Khasimwa, Brian; Ngayo, Musa; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth; Wamalwa, Dalton; Overbaugh, Julie; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-08-01

    Nevirapine (NVP) resistance occurs frequently in infants following NVP use in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) regimens. However, among previously NVP-unexposed infants treated with NVP-antiretroviral therapy (ART), the development and impact of NVP resistance have not been well characterized. In a prospective clinical trial providing early ART to HIV-infected infants Kenya (OPH03 study), we followed NVP-unexposed infants who initiated NVP-ART for 12 months. Viral loads were assessed and resistance determined using a population-based genotypic resistance assay. Of 99 infants screened, 33 had no prior NVP exposure, 22 of whom were initiated on NVP-ART. Among 19 infants with follow-up, seven (37%) infants developed resistance: one at 3 months and six at 6 months after ART initiation. The cumulative probability of NVP resistance was 5.9% at 3 months and 43.5% at 6 months. Baseline HIV RNA levels (p=0.7) and other characteristics were not associated with developing resistance. Post-ART, higher virus levels at visits preceding the detection of resistance were significantly associated with increased detection of resistance (p=0.004). Virus levels after 6 and 12 months of ART were significantly higher in infants with resistance than those without (p=0.007, p=0.030, respectively). Among infants without previous NVP exposure, development of NVP resistance was frequent and was associated with virologic failure during the first year of ART. Earlier development of NVP resistance in infants than in adults initiating NVP-ART may be due to longer viremia following ART or inadequate NVP levels resulting from NVP lead-in dosing. The development of NVP resistance may, in part, explain the superiority of protease inhibitor-based ART in infants. PMID:25819584

  15. Breast feeding and growth in a group of selected 0 to 24 months infants

    WHO is undertaking a combined growth study in several countries, in order to establish adequate growth curves for breast-feeding infants. Present growth charts in use, were obtained in a sample of breast and artificial feeding infants, which have overestimated the growth needs. In our country during the last two decades the number of mothers who decide to breast-feed their infants has permanently grown, due to the implementation of health care programs that promote, mother-infant interaction tight after birth, in all Public Hospitals, and education programs for the mothers, during both antenatal and post natal control of mother and child. The last figures obtained in a country sample of 10000 mother-infant pair, shows that 45% of the mothers are exclusively breast-feeding their infants at 6 months of age. This figure could increase if our infants were evaluated by the adequate charts, because it is of common use that many health professionals suggest to stop breast-feeding because the infant is not growing according the charts in use. The anthropometric study proposed by WHO will benefit considerably by adding determination of breast-milk intake using isotopic dilution of deuterium, a standard procedure proposed by Coward et al and extensively used in our country. The proposed study will also include milk composition (fat, protein and lactose) and energy density of milk to correlate energy supply, milk volume and growth. (author)

  16. Feasibility of intensive multimodal therapy in infants affected by rhabdoid tumors - experience of the EU-RHAB registry.

    Seeringer, A; Bartelheim, K; Kerl, K; Hasselblatt, M; Leuschner, I; Rutkowski, S; Timmermann, B; Kortmann, R-D; Koscielniak, E; Schneppenheim, R; Warmuth-Metz, M; Gerß, J; Siebert, R; Graf, N; Boos, J; Frühwald, M C

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdoid tumors mainly affect infants and other very young children with a marked vulnerability towards intensive therapy such as invasive surgery, high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and dose intense radiotherapy. Radiotherapy (RT) is a promising option in rhabdoid tumors but its application in infants remains controversial. Neurocognitive and vascular side effects occur even long after completion of therapy. Therapeutic recommendations suggested by the European Rhabdoid Registry including RT, high dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and methotrexate (MTX) were developed by a consensus committee. Unique to our EU-RHAB database is the ability to analyze data of 64 of 81 registered infants (under one year of age) separate from older children. 20 (age at diagnoses 2-12 months) of these had received radiotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report specifically analyzing treatment data of infants suffering from malignant rhabdoid tumors. Our results suggest that radiotherapy significantly increases the mean survival time as well as the 3 year overall survival in infants. We detected a doubling of survival times in infants who received RT. Overall, our results suggest that infants benefit from RT with tolerable acute side effects. Severe long term sequelae likely due to intraventricular MTX and/or RT were reported in 4 patients (leukoencephalopathy). No differences in chemotherapy-related toxicity were observed between infants and children. We suggest that a nihilistic therapeutic approach towards young infants is not warranted and that RT may not be a priori rejected as a therapeutic option in infants. PMID:24633978

  17. The impact of infant feeding patterns on infection and diarrheal disease due to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli El impacto de las modalidades de alimentación infantil en la infección y en las enfermedades diarreicas por Escherichia coli enterotoxigénica

    Kurt Long

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE. Determine the impact of dietary risk factors on patterns of infection by heat labile toxin-producing Escherichia coli (LT-ETEC. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Ninety-eight infants were followed from birth for one year in Guadalajara, Mexico, beginning in august of 1986. Stool and breast milk samples were collected weekly from infants and their mothers, respectively. Mothers were also interviewed on a weekly basis regarding the health of the infants. Parametric hazard models were fit to durations of different LTETEC disease states determined through the analysis of stools. The child's consumption of supplemental foods and liquids as well as specific levels of LT-ETEC-specific breast milk antibodies were included in each model as time-varying covariates. RESULTS. The hazard of LTETEC asymptomatic infection increased 400 percent among children who received oats gruel (hazard rate= 4.01; 95% CI 2.77-5.24. The duration of infection was reduced if the child had had a previous LT-ETEC diarrheal episode (2.12; 95% CI 1.74-2.49 but was prolonged if the child consumed herbal teas (0.53; 95% CI 0.27-0.7. Herbal teas and high LTETEC-specific breast milk antibody levels each reduced the hazard of symptomatic infection by ninety percent. Symptomatic episodes became asymptomatic more rapidly if a child was given rice water. CONCLUSIONS. Specific weaning foods increase the risk of infection. Breastmilk antibodies and liquid infusions reduce diarrheal disease and infection duration.OBJETIVOS. Determinar el impacto de los factores dietéticos sobre patrones de infección por Escherichia coli enterotoxigénica productora de la toxina lábil (ECET-TL. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se reclutaron 98 infantes al nacer, en agosto de 1986; se hizo seguimiento durante un año. En visitas semanales se recolectaron muestras de heces de los niños y una muestra de leche de las madres; éstas fueron entrevistadas sobre la morbilidad del niño. Se ajustaron modelos de hazard a la

  18. Development of the Object Permanence Concept in Cleft Lip and Palate and Noncleft Lip and Palate Infants.

    Pecyna, Paula M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of object permanence was investigated with eight infants with cleft lip/palate and four nonimpaired infants. Superior performance of the cleft lip/palate group was found, possibly due to increased environmental stimulation provided by parents. (DB)

  19. Outcomes for extremely premature infants.

    Glass, Hannah C; Costarino, Andrew T; Stayer, Stephen A; Brett, Claire M; Cladis, Franklyn; Davis, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    Premature birth is a significant cause of infant and child morbidity and mortality. In the United States, the premature birth rate, which had steadily increased during the 1990s and early 2000s, has decreased annually for 7 years and is now approximately 11.39%. Human viability, defined as gestational age at which the chance of survival is 50%, is currently approximately 23 to 24 weeks in developed countries. Infant girls, on average, have better outcomes than infant boys. A relatively uncomplicated course in the intensive care nursery for an extremely premature infant results in a discharge date close to the prenatal estimated date of confinement. Despite technological advances and efforts of child health experts during the last generation, the extremely premature infant (less than 28 weeks gestation) and extremely low birth weight infant (premature labor improved neonatal mortality and morbidity in the late 1990s. The recognition that chronic postnatal administration of steroids to infants should be avoided may have improved outcomes in the early 2000s. Evidence from recent trials attempting to define the appropriate target for oxygen saturation in preterm infants suggests arterial oxygen saturation between 91% and 95% (compared with 85%-89%) avoids excess mortality; however, final analyses of data from these trials have not been published, so definitive recommendations are still pending. The development of neonatal neurocritical intensive care units may improve neurocognitive outcomes in this high-risk group. Long-term follow-up to detect and address developmental, learning, behavioral, and social problems is critical for children born at these early gestational ages.The striking similarities in response to extreme prematurity in the lung and brain imply that agents and techniques that benefit one organ are likely to also benefit the other. Finally, because therapy and supportive care continue to change, the outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants are

  20. Wearable Sensor Systems for Infants

    Zhihua Zhu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuous health status monitoring of infants is achieved with the development and fusion of wearable sensing technologies, wireless communication techniques and a low energy-consumption microprocessor with high performance data processing algorithms. As a clinical tool applied in the constant monitoring of physiological parameters of infants, wearable sensor systems for infants are able to transmit the information obtained inside an infant’s body to clinicians or parents. Moreover, such systems with integrated sensors can perceive external threats such as falling or drowning and warn parents immediately. Firstly, the paper reviews some available wearable sensor systems for infants; secondly, we introduce the different modules of the framework in the sensor systems; lastly, the methods and techniques applied in the wearable sensor systems are summarized and discussed. The latest research and achievements have been highlighted in this paper and the meaningful applications in healthcare and behavior analysis are also presented. Moreover, we give a lucid perspective of the development of wearable sensor systems for infants in the future.

  1. Mothers' Beliefs about Infant Size: Associations with Attitudes and Infant Feeding Practices

    Holub, Shayla C.; Dolan, Elaine A.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined maternal attitudes toward infant body size, but extant work suggests there might be less negativity toward overweight sizes and less positivity toward thin sizes for infants than older children. Fifty mothers of 12 to 25 month-old infants completed questionnaires examining attitudes toward infants', children's and their…

  2. How to Save Money on Infant Formula

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000805.htm How to Save Money on Infant Formula To use the sharing features ... ways you can save money on infant formula . Money-Saving Ideas Here are a few ways to ...

  3. Feeding Vegetarian and Vegan Infants and Toddlers

    ... Men For Women For Seniors Feeding Vegetarian and Vegan Infants and Toddlers By Dayle Hayes, MS, RD ... of Pediatrics (AAP) agree: Well-planned vegetarian and vegan eating patterns are healthy for infants and toddlers. ...

  4. Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Authorized Vendors

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program is a federally-funded health and nutrition program that provides assistance to pregnant women, new mothers, infants...

  5. fNIRS: An emergent method to document functional cortical activity during infant movements

    Ryota eNishiyori

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural basis underlying the emergence of goal-directed actions in infants has been severely understudied, with minimal empirical evidence for hypotheses proposed. This was largely due to the technological constraints of traditional neuroimaging techniques. Recently, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS technology has emerged as a tool developmental scientists are finding useful to examine cortical activity, particularly in young children and infants due to its greater tolerance to movements than other neuroimaging techniques. fNIRS provides an opportunity to finally begin to examine the neural underpinnings as infants develop goal-directed actions.In this methodological paper, I will outline the utility, challenges, and outcomes of using fNIRS to measure the changes in cortical activity as infants reach for an object. I will describe the advantages and limitations of the technology, the setup I used to study primary motor cortex activity during infant reaching, and example steps in the analyses processes. I will present exemplar data to illustrate the feasibility of this technique to quantify changes in hemodynamic activity as infants move. The viability of this research method opens the door to expanding studies of the development of neural activity related to goal-directed actions in infants. I encourage others to share details of techniques used, as well, including analyticals, to help this neuroimaging technology grow as others, such as EEG and fMRI have.

  6. Cord Serum Lipid Profile of Infants of Diabetic Mothers

    Jasim Almusawi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infants of diabetic mothers (IDM is a critical issue in pediatrics, which is regarded as a major risk factor for birth trauma, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, birth asphyxia, transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN and jaundice. IDM is also a risk factor for microvascular (e.g., ocular and renal complications and macrovascular complications (e.g., cerebrovascular accident, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of hydrophobic organic molecules which can be extracted from tissues using non-polar solvents. Lipids, due to their hydrophobic property, are mainly found in membranes enclosing various cell organelles. Diabetes mellitus management with insulin (nowadays also with oral hypoglycemic medications has improved the outcomes of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM (most infants born to diabetic mother are large for gestational age. The neonatal mortality rate in IDM is over five times higher than that of infants of non-diabetic mothers. In this study, therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of maternal diabetes on cord serum lipid profile. Methods: This prospective (case-control study was carried out on 60 infants born in Al-Zahra teaching hospital during February 2014–October 2014. The study group consisted of 30 randomly chosen IDM, and the control group comprised 30 infants who were born to healthy mothers. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that there are significant differences between IDM and infants of healthy mothers regarding lipid profile and birth weight. Conclusion: This study confirms that cord serum lipid profile (serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein is higher at birth in IDM. Moreover, this study shows a significant association between lipid profile and body weight.

  7. Normal infant sleep and parental expectations.

    Rudzik, Alanna E.F.

    2015-01-01

    Infant sleep is a subject of great interest - and concern - for many new parents. Parental expectations for infant sleep often reflect cultural norms that may not align well with the realities of infant growth and development. Unrealistic expectations for infant sleep have been linked to the early cessation of breastfeeding (Ball, 2003) and may contribute to the development of postnatal depressions symptoms (Muscat et al., 2012). Parents frequently consult health providers for advice when the...

  8. A new holder and surface MRI coil for the examination of the newborn infant hip

    A special holder was developed for examination of the infant hip joint using MRI. This holder allows the infant hip joint to be examined both in a neutral position and in various defined functional positions. A special integrated surface coil, also developed for this purpose, provides the high spatial resolution required for assessment of the fine joint structures. Thirty infants were examined and the new device has proved useful in advanced hip dysplasia, therapy-resistant subluxation and luxation, and for operative therapy planning (reconstruction of the acetabular roof, redirectional osteotomies). Interpretation errors due to misprojection can be eliminated to a large extent since the holder allows standardized and reproducible positioning. (orig.)

  9. Early screening of an infant's visual system

    Costa, Manuel F. M.; Jorge, Jorge M.

    1999-06-01

    It is of utmost importance to the development of the child's visual system that she perceives clear focused retinal images. Furthermore if the refractive problems are not corrected in due time amblyopia may occur--myopia and hyperopia can only cause important problems in the future when they are significantly large, however for the astigmatism (rather frequent in infants) and anisometropia the problems tend to be more stringent. The early evaluation of the visual status of human infants is thus of critical importance. Photorefraction is a convenient technique for this kind of subjects. Essentially a light beam is delivered into the eyes. It is refracted by the ocular media, strikes the retina, focusing or not, reflects off and is collected by a camera. The photorefraction setup we established using new technological breakthroughs on the fields of imaging devices, digital image processing and fiber optics, allows a fast noninvasive evaluation of children visual status (refractive errors, accommodation, strabismus, ...). Results of the visual screening of a group of risk' child descents of blinds or amblyopes will be presented.

  10. Neurodevelopmental outcomes of infants born prematurely.

    Aylward, Glen P

    2014-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of infants born prematurely is necessary to determine neurodevelopmental outcomes, particularly with the expansion of interest from major disabilities to high prevalence/low severity dysfunctions. Models of pathogenesis include changes due to developmental disruptions and to injury, the magnitude and type of change influenced by the infant's age, and central nervous system recovery and reorganization. Alterations in neurogenesis, migration, myelination, cell death, and synaptogenesis occur even in the absence of insult. Despite increased knowledge regarding these processes, the functional significance of brain abnormalities is unclear. Because of methodologic problems in follow-up studies, it is difficult to characterize outcome definitively. Nonetheless, an acceptable degree of agreement across studies is found with regard to specific neurodevelopmental outcomes: motor/neurologic function, visuomotor integrative skills, IQ, academic achievement, language, executive function, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder/behavioral issues. In general, children born prematurely have more problems in these areas than do their normal birth weight counterparts. Suggestions for improved analyses and clarification of outcomes include use of cluster analysis, structural equation modeling, growth curve analysis, developmental epidemiologic approaches, and better control of background variables using risk indexes and factor scores. Better assessment techniques measuring functions documented to be at higher risk of problems are discussed. PMID:25007063

  11. Proton pump inhibitors for irritable infants

    Smith, Christine H.; Israel, David M.; Schreiber, Richard; Goldman, Ran D.

    2013-01-01

    Question Crying is common in infants; however, caring for infants with inconsolable crying, previously also known as colic or reflux, is often extremely distressing for parents. Is there a benefit to using gastric acid suppression (eg, proton pump inhibitors [PPIs]) in these infants?

  12. The Lost Infant: Impact on the Family

    Higgins, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Stillbirth, sudden infant death syndrome, death of a premature infant or death of an infant through disease give rise grieving processes with many features in common. Feelings, particularly between the parents, and between parents and surviving children, must be dealt with if the grief reaction is to achieve a normal resolution. The family physician can be extremely helpful in bringing these issues to light.

  13. The Neural Substrates of Infant Speech Perception

    Homae, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Hama; Taga, Gentaro

    2014-01-01

    Infants often pay special attention to speech sounds, and they appear to detect key features of these sounds. To investigate the neural foundation of speech perception in infants, we measured cortical activation using near-infrared spectroscopy. We presented the following three types of auditory stimuli while 3-month-old infants watched a silent…

  14. Social Information Guides Infants' Selection of Foods

    Shutts, Kristin; Kinzler, Katherine D.; McKee, Caitlin B.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments investigated the influence of socially conveyed emotions and speech on infants' choices among food. After watching films in which two unfamiliar actresses each spoke while eating a different kind of food, 12-month-old infants were allowed to choose between the two foods. In Experiment 1, infants selected a food endorsed by a…

  15. Infant Communicative Behaviors and Maternal Responsiveness

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Onwujuba, Chinwe; Baumgartner, Jennifer I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study applies attachment and transactional theories in evaluating the dyadic interactions observed between a mother and her infant. Infant communication and maternal responsivity are highlighted as the medium for positive interaction. Objective: The impact of individualized maternal training on mother infant communicative…

  16. Go Naked: Diapers Affect Infant Walking

    Cole, Whitney G.; Lingeman, Jesse M.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2012-01-01

    In light of cross-cultural and experimental research highlighting effects of childrearing practices on infant motor skill, we asked whether wearing diapers, a seemingly innocuous childrearing practice, affects infant walking. Diapers introduce bulk between the legs, potentially exacerbating infants' poor balance and wide stance. We show that…

  17. Infant Developmental Outcomes: A Family Systems Perspective

    Parfitt, Ylva; Pike, Alison; Ayers, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine whether parental mental health, parent-infant relationship, infant characteristics and couple's relationship factors were associated with the infant's development. Forty-two families took part at three time points. The first, at 3?months postpartum, involved a video recorded observation…

  18. Investigating human infant anthropomorphism in products

    Hellen, K.; Saaksjarvi, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we set out to investigate the nature and effects of infant anthropomorphism in products, i.e. products that share features of human infants. Across four studies, evidence suggests that infant anthropomorphism comprise four dimensions: sweetness, simplicity, sympathy, and smallness. We

  19. Hepatitis B vaccination in preterm infants

    Huang, F.; Lee, P; Lee, C.; Huang, L.; Chang, L; Liu, S.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To investigate the immunogenicity and safety of existing recommendations for hepatitis B vaccination in preterm infants.
METHODS—Recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (H-B-VAX II, 5 µg per dose) was given to 85 preterm infants divided into two groups, using two different schedules. Forty four group A infants with birthweights of 

  20. Facial Expressivity in Infants of Depressed Mothers.

    Pickens, Jeffrey; Field, Tiffany

    1993-01-01

    Facial expressions were examined in 84 3-month-old infants of mothers classified as depressed, nondepressed, or low scoring on the Beck Depression Inventory. Infants of both depressed and low-scoring mothers showed significantly more sadness and anger expressions and fewer interest expressions than infants of nondepressed mothers. (Author/MDM)

  1. Caffeine therapy in preterm infants.

    Abdel-Hady, Hesham; Nasef, Nehad; Shabaan, Abd Elazeez; Nour, Islam

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used medication for treatment of apnea of prematurity. Its effect has been well established in reducing the frequency of apnea, intermittent hypoxemia, and extubation failure in mechanically ventilated preterm infants. Evidence for additional short-term benefits on reducing the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and patent ductus arteriosus has also been suggested. Controversies exist among various neonatal intensive care units in terms of drug efficacy compared to other methylxanthines, dosage regimen, time of initiation, duration of therapy, drug safety and value of therapeutic drug monitoring. In the current review, we will summarize the available evidence for the best practice in using caffeine therapy in preterm infants. PMID:26566480

  2. Alfentanil pharmacokinetics in preterm infants.

    Marlow, N; Weindling, A M; Van Peer, A; Heykants, J.

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of alfentanil were studied during the first four days after birth in 22 ventilated preterm infants who were all receiving muscle relaxants. Five minutes after a single dose of 20 micrograms/kg alfentanil median serum concentration was 66 ng/ml (range: 20-606). The median clearance was 0.87 ml/kg/min (range: 0.4-9.62) and median elimination half life 321 mins (64-1251). There were wide differences in the manner in which individual infants handled the drug and transient dep...

  3. A Innovative Technique - Modified Feeding Bottle for a Cleft Palate Infant

    Lingegowda, Ashwini Budunur; Rayannavar, Sounyala; Kumari, Nirmala

    2016-01-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate are one of the most common craniofacial anomalies. Infants suffer a lot of difficulty in sucking during the initial few days after birth. There is even psychological stress to the parents due to improper feeding and the infants lose weight and are prone to nutritional insufficiency. Due to recent advancement in the medical field, there is a total repair of cleft lip and cleft palate and these procedures are performed in the later stages of infants. It is the multidisciplinary approach which includes pedodontist, oral surgeon, prosthodontist and speech therapist. In this article, the technique is highlighted to fulfill the feeding problem of infants in the early stages of birth with a modified feeding bottle. PMID:27190971

  4. Congenital goiter due to maternal ingestion of iodide

    A newborn infant with large bilateral cervical masses developed respiratory difficulties three days after birth. A congenital goiter was suspected and a biopsy was performed. Later information pointed to the ingestion of large amounts of inorganic iodine, during the pregnancy, by the asthmatic mother. Further investigation proved the goiter to be due to transient depression of peroxidase activity by the exogenous iodine. Within several days after birth, the infant's thyroid regained its full activity, the goiter disappeared, and the few signs of hypothyroidism subsided. (U.S.)

  5. Mother, Infant, and Household Factors Associated with the Type of Food Infants Receive in Developing Countries

    Yarnoff, Benjamin; Allaire, Benjamin; Detzel, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We explore the complex factors associated with infant feeding by analyzing what mother, infant, and household factors are associated with the types of food given to infants. We seek to quantify associations in order to inform public health policy about the importance of target populations for infant feeding programs. Methods: We used data from the Demographic Health Survey in 20 developing countries for multiple years to examine mother, infant, and household factors associated ...

  6. Synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics in infant formula for full term infants: a systematic review

    Mugambi Mary N; Musekiwa Alfred; Lombard Martani; Young Taryn; Blaauw Reneé

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics are being added to infant formula to promote growth and development in infants. Previous reviews (2007 to 2011) on term infants given probiotics or prebiotics focused on prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity. This review focused on growth and clinical outcomes in term infants fed only infant formula containing synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics. Methods Cochrane methodology was followed using randomized controlled t...

  7. Infant Gaze Following during Parent-Infant Coviewing of Baby Videos

    Demers, Lindsay B.; Hanson, Katherine G.; Kirkorian, Heather L.; Pempek, Tiffany A.; Anderson, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    A total of 122 parent–infant dyads were observed as they watched a familiar or novel infant-directed video in a laboratory setting. Infants were between 12-15 and 18-21 months old. Infants were more likely to look toward the TV immediately following their parents' look toward the TV. This apparent social influence on infant looking at television…

  8. Therapeutic effects of hyperbaric oxygen at different time points in infants with cerebral palsy%不同时间窗高压氧治疗对脑性瘫痪患儿疗效的影响

    朱敏; 张跃; 汤健; 傅大林; 李红英; 赵晓科; 杜森杰; 张玲; 张丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the therapeutic effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) at different time points in infants with cerebral palsy.Methods Sixty cases of cerebral palsy with an age of 3 months were randomly divided into 4 groups:group 1,2,3,4,each consisting of 15 cases.All the infants of the 4 groups were given routine rehabilitation treatment until they were 1 year old.The sick infants in group 1,2 and 3started HBO therapy at the following ages:3 to 4 months old,4 to 6 months old and over 6 months old respectively,with a treatment course of 8 weeks and a total of 40 sessions.The infants in groups 4 were not treated with HBO.Gross motor function was evaluated with Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM).Intelligence was evaluated with Gesell Development Scale.Then,developmental quotient and total developmental quotient in gross motor,fine motor,adaptation,language and individual-social domains were calculated.Results At one year old,GMFM,developmental quotients in the above five domains and total developmental quotients of all the sick infants in the 4 groups improved significantly,when compared with those before treatment.Of all the patients in the 4 groups,the patients in groups 1 improved more significantly than those in group 2,3 and 4,with statistical significance (P < 0.05).The patients in groups B improved more significantly than those in group 3 and 4,also with statistical significance (P < 0.05).No statistical significance could be noted in therapeutic effects,when a comparison was made between group 3 and 4 (P >0.05).No serious adverse reactions could be noticed in the patients of the 4 groups during treatment.Conclusions Therapeutic time points of HBO therapy played an important role in the treatment of cerebral palsy in infants.The earlier the HBO therapy was implemented,the better the treatment.Optimal therapeutic effects could be achieved,if HBO therapy was started within 3 to 4 months after onset of the disease.Less optimal therapeutic results could

  9. Denmark: botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    Paerregaard, A; Angen, O; Lisby, M;

    2008-01-01

    was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...

  10. Denmark: Botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    Pærregaard, A; Angen, Øystein; Lisby, M;

    2008-01-01

    was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...

  11. The effectiveness of video interaction guidance in parents of premature infants: A multicenter randomised controlled trial

    Tooten Anneke; Hoffenkamp Hannah N; Hall Ruby AS; Winkel Frans; Eliëns Marij; Vingerhoets Ad JJM; van Bakel Hedwig JA

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have consistently found a high incidence of neonatal medical problems, premature births and low birth weights in abused and neglected children. One of the explanations proposed for the relation between neonatal problems and adverse parenting is a possible delay or disturbance in the bonding process between the parent and infant. This hypothesis suggests that due to neonatal problems, the development of an affectionate bond between the parent and the infant is imped...

  12. General Movements in preterm infants undergoing craniosacral therapy: a randomised controlled pilot-trial

    Raith, Wolfgang; Marschik, Peter B.; Sommer, Constanze; Maurer-Fellbaum, Ute; Amhofer, Claudia; Avian, Alexander; Löwenstein, Elisabeth; Soral, Susanne; Müller, Wilhelm; Einspieler, Christa; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate neurological short-term effects of craniosacral therapy as an ideal form of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) due to the soft kinaesthetic stimulation. Methods Included were 30 preterm infants, with a gestational age between 25 and 33 weeks, who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital of Graz, Austria. The infants were randomized either into the intervention group (IG) which received standard...

  13. Unclear across a barren landscape": parents' experiences with the aftermath of sudden infant death syndrome

    Krueger, Guenther

    2009-01-01

    The sudden and unexplained death of an apparently healthy infant produces a profound and catastrophic sense of loss in parents. This study examines these outcomes in a group of 21 Canadian parents who were each interviewed and asked to tell their story of how they dealt with the aftermath of a death due to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Using a grounded theory approach the results were analyzed using NVivo software and the themes and concepts that arose are described. The findings descr...

  14. Continuous positive airway pressure titration in infants with severe upper airway obstruction or bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Khirani, Sonia; Ramirez, Adriana; Aloui, Sabrina; Leboulanger, Nicolas; Picard, Arnaud; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Abstracta Introduction Noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is recognized as an effective treatment for severe airway obstruction in young children. The aim of the present study was to compare a clinical setting with a physiological setting of noninvasive CPAP in infants with nocturnal alveolar hypoventilation due to severe upper airway obstruction (UAO) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Methods The breathing pattern and respiratory muscle output of all consecutive infant...

  15. Oxytocin increases VTA activation to infant and sexual stimuli in nulliparous and postpartum women

    Gregory, Rebecca; Cheng, Hu; Rupp, Heather A.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Heiman, Julia R.

    2015-01-01

    After giving birth, women typically experience decreased sexual desire and increased responsiveness to infant stimuli. These postpartum changes may be viewed as a trade-off in reproductive interests, which could be due to alterations in brain activity including areas associated with reward. The goal of this study was to describe the roles of oxytocin and parity on reward area activation in response to reproductive stimuli, specifically infant and sexual images. Because they have been shown to...

  16. Negative extrathoracic pressure in treatment of respiratory failure in infants and young children.

    Samuels, M P; Southall, D P

    1989-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the efficacy of a newly developed system for applying continuous or intermittent negative (subatmospheric) extrathoracic pressure in respiratory failure. DESIGN--Uncontrolled clinical trials in infants deteriorating or failing to improve despite standard medical treatment. SETTING--Paediatric and neonatal intensive care units and paediatric wards. PATIENTS--88 Infants and young children aged 1 day to 2 years with respiratory failure due to bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the ...

  17. Análise da compliância e gradiente timpanométrico em lactentes com refluxo Analysis of compliance and tympanometric gradient in infants with reflux

    Elizângela Dias Camboim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar e comparar o gradiente timpanométrico e a compliância obtida nas sondas de 226 Hz e 1 kHz entre os grupos de lactentes com e sem refluxo gastroesofágico. MÉTODOS: Cento e dezoito lactentes a termo e pré-termo, de recém-nascidos a 6 meses de idade - 63 com diagnóstico clínico de refluxo gastroesofágico fisiológico realizado por pediatras ou gastropediatras e 55 sem refluxo -, foram submetidos a timpanometria com sondas de 226 Hz e 1 kHz. RESULTADOS: Foram observados maiores valores de compliância com sonda de 1 kHz em ambos os grupos. Ao se comparar a média de compliância entre os grupos, observou-se que o grupo sem refluxo apresentou maiores valores. A média dos valores do gradiente timpanométrico foi maior no grupo sem refluxo, quando comparada ao grupo com refluxo. CONCLUSÃO: A sonda de 1 kHz apresenta maior compliância em lactentes com e sem refluxo, em relação à sonda de 226 Hz. Lactentes com refluxo apresentam compliância dentro dos padrões de normalidade, porém apresentando menor compliância quando comparados com lactentes sem refluxo. Com relação ao gradiente, lactentes com refluxo apresentam valores alterados e/ou dentro dos padrões limítrofes da normalidade, em ambas as orelhas.PURPOSE: To analyze and compare the tympanometric gradient and the compliance obtained in probe tones of 226 and 1 kHz between groups of infants with and without gastroesophageal reflux (GER. METHODS: Participants were 118 full-term and preterm infants, from newborns to 6-month-olds - 63 with clinical diagnosis of physiological GER performed by pediatricians or gastroenterologists, and 55 without GER -, who were submitted to tympanometry with probe tones of 226 and 1 kHz. RESULTS: Higher compliance values were found with 1 kHz in both groups. Comparing the average compliance between groups, we observed that the group without reflux showed higher values. The mean value of the tympanometric gradient was higher in the

  18. Lessons from history--maternal and infant mortality.

    1989-07-15

    Historical analysis of trends in infant and maternal mortality rates reveal different patterns and factors that influence them. Recent international and urban-rural differences in trends, associations with population density and the influence of parental social class and income has led to questioning the long accepted interpretation of the sharp decline of infant mortality in Britain (at the turn of the century) as due to such measures as pure water supplies, sewage disposal and pasteurization of milk. Several authors now believe that direct control of fertility influenced parity and birth spacing, with all other factors contributing to the decline in infant mortality. While the drop in infant mortality rates can be attributable to social and environmental influence, trends in maternal mortality differ considerably. Even though high maternal mortality has often been associated with areas of poverty, such a link has been indirect; the determining factor is the place of delivery, and the skill and care of the birth attendant. The decline in maternal mortality rates began by the mid-1930's and have been halved every 10 years since. National concerns due to high rates of maternal mortality led to different organizational solutions. The US adopted a specialist obstetrician/hospital-based delivery system; the Netherlands combined midwives with home delivery; New Zealand trained midwives but with delivery in hospitals, and Britain included specialized obstetricians with better training of midwives and general practitioners. All of these variations had no effect on mortality rates. The decline is attributed to the use of sulphonamids followed by penicillin and improvements in medical management. In a recent publication entitled "Working for Patients", mortality rates continue to remain the outcome measures to be used universally while infant mortality rates are considered crude and not amenable to health interventions. PMID:2567902

  19. Bilateral hemorrhagic cystic adrenal neuroblastoma with liver and lymph nodal metastases in an infant

    Prema Menon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 6-month-old boy presented with pallor, large left hypochondrial mass and hepatomegaly. Computerized tomography (CT revealed cystic lesions in bilateral adrenals, liver and retroperitoneal lymph nodes and a lytic left femur lesion. There was hemorrhagic aspirate with round blue cells. Excised left sided mass with adjacent lymph nodes and biopsies of others confirmed well differentiated neuroblastoma. He received 4 cycles of chemotherapy with remaining lesions markedly reduced at 2 months CT scan. At 2 year follow up he is doing well.

  20. Stillbirth, Miscarriage, and Infant Death

    ... AmazonSmile Contact Us Donate Stillbirth, Miscarriage, and Infant Death A baby’s death, whenever or however it occurs, is a profound ... of isolation –A need to talk about the death and the details of what happened –Feelings of ...

  1. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  2. Asymmetry and infants born preterm

    Nuijsink, J.

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of the thesis was to contribute to the diagnostic process and clinical decision making by pediatric physiotherapists in very young infants with an atypical motor performance, influenced by both an asymmetric development, and a development according to a preterm birth. In Part I, the dev

  3. Infants Can Study Air Science.

    Ward, Alan

    1983-01-01

    Provided are activities and demonstrations which can be used to teach infants about the nature of air, uses of air, and objects that fly in the air. The latter include airships, hot-air balloons, kites, parachutes, airplanes, and Hovercraft. (JN)

  4. Infants Hierarchically Organize Memory Representations

    Rosenberg, Rebecca D.; Feigenson, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Throughout development, working memory is subject to capacity limits that severely constrain short-term storage. However, adults can massively expand the total amount of remembered information by grouping items into "chunks". Although infants also have been shown to chunk objects in memory, little is known regarding the limits of this…

  5. Infant Care Suggestions for Parents

    ... and a cure, education, awareness, and mutual support. Nurses who work in neonatal intensive care units and nursery departments have experience caring for very small and fragile infants. They can help parents learn the skills and gain confidence necessary to care for their ...

  6. Infant Care Self-Efficacy.

    Froman, Robin D.

    The Infant Care Survey (ICS) was developed to measure new mothers' confidence in their knowledge and skills regarding the care of babies under one year of age. One potential use of this test would be the identification of groups at high risk for health problems or for avoiding medical care. Self-efficacy was an important construct in the…

  7. Infant Memory for Musical Experiences.

    Saffran, Jenny R.; Loman, Michelle M.; Robertson, Rachel R. W.

    2000-01-01

    Two experiments examined memory of 7-month-olds after 2-week retention interval for passages of two Mozart movements heard daily for 2 weeks. Results suggested that the infants retained familiarized music in long-term memory and that their listening preferences were affected by the extent to which familiar passages were removed from the musical…

  8. Infants' Memory for Musical Performances

    Volkova, Anna; Trehub, Sandra E.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated 6- and 7-month-olds' preference and memory for expressive recordings of sung lullabies. In Experiment 1, both age groups preferred lower-pitched to higher-pitched renditions of unfamiliar lullabies. In Experiment 2, infants were tested after 2 weeks of daily exposure to a lullaby at one pitch level. Seven-month-olds listened…

  9. The infant caring process among Cherokee mothers.

    Nichols, Lee Anne

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the social process of infant care among Cherokee mothers. Nineteen informants, who had an infant less than 2 years of age, were interviewed. The data were analyzed using the technique of constant comparative analysis. A social process of Indian infant care among Cherokee mothers was identified. Eight concepts emerged from data analysis. The first and principal concept, being a Cherokee mother, describes the functions of being an Indian mother in Cherokee society. The other seven concepts describe the patterns of cultural care the mothers provided to their infants. These included accommodating everyday infant care, accommodating health perspectives, building a care-providing consortium, living spiritually, merging the infant into Indian culture, using noncoercive discipline techniques, and vigilantly watching for the natural unfolding of the infant. Trustworthiness and credibility of the generated theory were evaluated through multiple measures. PMID:15296577

  10. Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Mothers Regarding Infant Feeding Practices

    Sushma Sriram

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Present study was conducted to assess the knowledge, attitude and practices of mothers towards infant feeding practices. Materials and methods: The mothers of infants, coming to a tertiary care centre, Ahmedabad, on outpatient basis were interviewed using a pre-designed questionnaire. Total 150 mothers were interviewed. Results: Out of the total, 18% mothers were illiterate.58.67% mothers have been counselled by doctor about feeding. Regarding breast feeding, 96% knew about exclusive breast feeding up to 6months. 90.67% think that colostrum is good for baby.34.67% mothers have given pre-lacteal feeds, tea and jaggery was most common.84.67% mothers knew that they should take extra food during lactation. Father (36% most commonly help in feeding while 31.33% don’t get any domestic help.78.67% women consult doctor for feeding problems. Most common reason of stopping breast feeding was inadequate milk secretion(54.67%.18% think that feeding should be stopped during illness. 75.33% women were completely satisfied with their feeding practices. Conclusion-Mothers had good knowledge about infant feeding practices. Inspite of good knowledge there are lacunae in the practices of mothers due to social and economic reasons. Level of education has positive impact on infant feeding practices. Counselling by doctors had a better impact on the attitude and practices of mothers. [Natl J Med Res 2013; 3(2.000: 147-150

  11. Chondrosternal Arthritis in Infant: An Unusual Entity

    Athina Nikolarakou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option.

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  13. Hydrolyzed Formula for Every Infant?

    Fleischer, David M; Venter, Carina; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Presently, hydrolyzed formulas (HF) are used primarily in infants that cannot be exclusively breastfed, those with cow's milk allergy and for primary prevention of allergic disease, but HFs are increasingly being used worldwide, begging the question if they may be recommended as the optimal choice for all standard-risk, full-term, non-exclusively breastfed infants. Data regarding the nutritional adequacy of modern-day HFs are scarce and lack long-term data suggesting that growth in infants fed HF versus an intact protein formula (IPF) is different. While human breast milk is the optimal source of nutrition for multiple reasons, a 2006 systematic review determined there were no comparable long-term studies regarding prolonged use of HFs versus breastfeeding. Meta-analyses of formula consumption and risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) have found that infants fed partially HF compared to IPF had a lower risk of AD, but there are significant limitations to these studies, making conclusions about the general use of HFs problematic. Costs should be considered in decision-making regarding the choice of the formula, but global comparison of this is difficult given large cost differences in different countries. Despite the issues raised here, the desire to provide concrete recommendations of widespread HF use needs to be balanced carefully in order not to overstate claims of benefit. Long-term studies are needed to investigate the feasibility of HF as a routine feeding option for healthy, standard-risk infants. Because of the paucity of data, routine use of HF as an equivalent option to breastfeeding or IPF cannot be supported at present based on available scientific evidence. PMID:27336594

  14. Infants' learning of phonological status.

    Seidl, Amanda; Cristia, Alejandrina

    2012-01-01

    There is a substantial literature describing how infants become more sensitive to differences between native phonemes (sounds that are both present and meaningful in the input) and less sensitive to differences between non-native phonemes (sounds that are neither present nor meaningful in the input) over the course of development. Here, we review an emergent strand of literature that gives a more nuanced notion of the problem of sound category learning. This research documents infants' discovery of phonological status, signaled by a decrease in sensitivity to sounds that map onto the same phonemic category vs. different phonemic categories. The former phones are present in the input, but their difference does not cue meaning distinctions because they are tied to one and the same phoneme. For example, the diphthong I in I'm should map to the same underlying category as the diphthong in I'd, despite the fact that the first vowel is nasal and the second oral. Because such pairs of sounds are processed differently than those than map onto different phonemes by adult speakers, the learner has to come to treat them differently as well. Interestingly, there is some evidence that infants' sensitivity to dimensions that are allophonic in the ambient language declines as early as 11 months. We lay out behavioral research, corpora analyses, and computational work which sheds light on how infants achieve this feat at such a young age. Collectively, this work suggests that the computation of complementary distribution and the calculation of phonetic similarity operate in concert to guide infants toward a functional interpretation of sounds that are present in the input, yet not lexically contrastive. In addition to reviewing this literature, we discuss broader implications for other fundamental theoretical and empirical questions. PMID:23130004

  15. What could infant and young child nutrition learn from sweatshops?

    Sagoe-Moses Isabella; Ansett Sean; Singer Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Adequate infant and young child nutrition demands high rates of breastfeeding and good access to nutrient rich complementary foods, requiring public sector action to promote breastfeeding and home based complementary feeding, and private sector action to refrain from undermining breastfeeding and to provide affordable, nutrient rich complementary foods. Unfortunately, due to a lack of trust, the public and private sectors, from both the North and the South, do not work wel...

  16. Auditory maturation and congenital hearing loss in NICU infants

    Coenraad, Saskia

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe number of preterm births has increased over the past decades as a result of increasing maternal age and in vitro fertilization (1). At the same time the survival of preterm infants has increased due to advances in perinatal and neonatal care. For example, antenatal corticosteroids for women with threatened preterm delivery, high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and inhaled nitric oxide have now become standard therapy (1). Unfortunately, these improvements sometimes come at a...

  17. A premature infant with a bilateral thalamostriatal hemorrhage

    Hemorrhagic areas were seen on ultrasonography and computed tomography in both thalamostriatal regions in a preterm female infant with perinatal asphyxia due to abruptio placentae. At autopsy, marked perivascular bleeding in the thalamus and putamen and eosinophilic neuronal changes in the thalamus and pontine tegmentum were seen. These thalamostriatal and brain stem lesions are thought to have been caused by an acute process causing total asphyxia. (author)

  18. Developmental Outcome of Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infants

    F Solimani

    2007-01-01

    Fetal and extrauterine life form a continuum during which human growth and development are affected by genetic, environmental, and social factors. Perinatal mortality is influenced by prenatal, maternal, and fetal conditions and by circumstances surrounding delivery. The majority of infants deaths and developmental disorders are due to disorders relating to prematurity and unspecified low birth weight (LBW), as well as maternal complications of pregnancy and congenital malformations (chromoso...

  19. Diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in infants using dried blood spots in Tamil Nadu, South India

    D Anitha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diagnosis of HIV infection in infants is difficult due to the presence of maternal antibodies; only nucleic acid assays are very helpful in early detection. Filter papers are especially useful for blood collection in resource-poor settings with limited access to diagnostic facilities. Materials & Methods: DBS samples were collected from the infants born to HIV seropositive mothers who had received single dose nevirapine at onset of labor. The samples were directly spotted onto the Whatman 903 cards from heel, big toe or finger prick depending on the age of the infants. A total of 766 infant samples were collected on dried blood spots (DBS and transported to the Department of Experimental Medicine (DEM, Chennai, for testing from different government hospitals of rural and urban parts of Tamil Nadu, South India. According to National AIDS Control Organization′s (NACO protocol DNA was extracted from all these DBS and PCR was performed using the Roche kit version 1.5. Results: Fifteen infants were found to be HIV positive and 751 were HIV negative; all these 15 positive infants and 49 negative infants who were in the age group between 10 and 18 months were repeated with another DBS and compared with whole blood. The DBS results were concordant with the whole blood method and the sensitivity and specificity were 100%.

  20. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants: radiological findings and importance of the vascular anatomy

    Hart, Jonathan; Mazrani, Waseem; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Jones, Niall; Kiely, Edward M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Surgery Department, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Pathology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-15

    Primary upper abdominal teratomas are extremely rare tumours, most commonly arising in infants. The radiological literature relating to them is sparse. Surgical resection is difficult due to distortion of the vascular anatomy. To reassess the value of preoperative imaging with specific reference to the presence/absence of typical features of teratoma, anatomical location and adjacent vascular anatomy. The histopathology database was used to identify infants with upper abdominal teratoma. Pathological, surgical and radiological data were reviewed. The search of the database identified 12 infants (10 girls, 2 boys) with an abdominal/retroperitoneal teratoma during the period 1993 to 2006. All teratomas were benign. In the majority of infants, typical radiological features of teratoma were demonstrated (fat, calcium). Identification of the major abdominal vessels on CT scan (most commonly the inferior vena cava) was not possible in all infants. Distortion (and commonly encasement) of the adjacent major abdominal vessels was usually evident. Upper abdominal teratomas in infants have typical radiological features. Preoperative delineation of the major vascular anatomy is often imprecise. Significant distortion of vascular anatomy was present in all infants and awareness of this feature impacts on surgical planning. (orig.)

  1. Relationship of Maternal Psychological Distress Classes to Later Mother-Infant Interaction, Home Environment, and Infant Development in Preterm Infants.

    Santos, Hudson; Yang, Qing; Docherty, Sharron L; White-Traut, Rosemary; Holditch-Davis, Diane

    2016-06-01

    Latent class analyses can be used early in the postpartum period to identify mothers of preterm infants experiencing similar patterns of psychological distress symptoms, but whether these classes of mothers also differ in parental responses to their infants or in their infants' development is largely unknown. In this longitudinal multisite-repeated measures study, we evaluated the usefulness of three psychological distress classes (low distress, high depressive and anxiety symptoms, and extreme distress) in predicting mother-infant interactions, quality of home environment, and infant development in 229 mother-preterm infant pairs. Mothers completed psychological distress questionnaires at study entry; parent-infant interaction was recorded at 2 and 6 months of age corrected for prematurity; and infant developmental data were collected 12 months corrected age. Mothers in the extreme distress class engaged in more developmental stimulation at 2 months (β = .99, p development scores at 12 months corrected age than infants of mothers in the other distress classes, but after controlling for infant neurological insult, there were no differences in cognitive, motor, and language development based on maternal psychological distress class. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059608

  2. Distinguishing Mother-Infant Interaction from Stranger-Infant Interaction at 2, 4, and 6 Months of Age

    Bigelow, Ann E.; Power, Michelle; Mcquaid, Nancy; Ward, Ashley; Rochat, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Observers watched videotaped face-to-face mother-infant and stranger-infant interactions of 12 infants at 2, 4, or 6 months of age. Half of the observers saw each mother paired with her own infant and another infant of the same age (mother tapes) and half saw each infant paired with his or her mother and with a stranger (infant tapes). Observers…

  3. Early diagnosis of airway closure from pigtail signature capnogram and its management in intubated small infants undergoing general anaesthesia for surgery

    Sanghamitra Mishra

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous glottis closure during expiration in infants is a normal protective reflex that helps prevent alveolar and small airway collapse (due to compliant chest wall) and thereby maintains functional residual capacity. Endotracheal intubation eliminates this protective mechanism and puts the infant into the risk of hypoxaemia and hypercarbia. This report sums up the early detection of airway closure in a series of three intubated small infants undergoing surgery with general anaesthesia, ...

  4. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    Sousan Valizadeh; Mohammad Bagher Hosseini; Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi; Najmeh Ajoodanian

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with...

  5. Congenital Anomalies in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Zahra Razavi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available bjective: Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital anomalies in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran.Methods: The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study was conducted in infants diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism being followed up in Pediatric Endocrinology Clinicof Besat Hospital, a tertiary care centre in Hamadan. Cases included all infants with congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed through newborn screening program or detected clinically. Anomalies were identified by clinical examination, echocardiography, and X-ray of the hip during the infant’s first year of life.Results: A total of 150 infants with biochemically confirmed primary congenital hypothyroidism (72 females and 78 males were recruited during the period between May 2006-2010. Overall, 30 (20% infants had associated congenital anomalies. The most common type of anomaly was Down syndrome. Seven infants (3.1% had congenital cardiac anomalies such as: ASD (n=3, VSD (n=2, PS (n =1, PDA (n=1. Three children (2.6% had developmental displasia of the hip (n=3.Conclusion: The overall frequency of Down syndrome, cardiac malformation and other birth defect was high in infants with CH. This reinforces the need to examine all infants with congenital hypothyroidism for the presence of associated congenital anomalies.

  6. Challenges of infant nutrition research: a commentary.

    Ryan, Alan S; Hay, William W

    2016-01-01

    Considerable advances have been made in the field of infant feeding research. The last few decades have witnessed the expansion in the number of studies on the composition and benefits of human milk. The practice of breastfeeding and use of human milk represent today's reference standards for infant feeding and nutrition. Additional research regarding the benefits of breastfeeding is needed to determine which factors in human milk and in the act of breastfeeding itself, singly or in combination, are most important for producing the beneficial effects on infant growth, body composition, and neurodevelopmental outcome. We examine evidence that breastfeeding confers health benefits and offer suggestions on how best to interpret the data and present it to the public. We also describe some examples of well-designed infant nutrition studies that provide useful and clinically meaningful data regarding infant feeding, growth, and development. Because not all mothers choose to breastfeed or can breastfeed, other appropriate feeding options should be subjected to critical review to help establish how infant formula and bottle feeding can confer benefits similar to those of human milk and the act of breastfeeding. We conclude with the overarching point that the goal of infant feeding research is to promote optimal infant growth and development. Since parents/families may take different paths to feeding their infants, it is fundamental that health professionals understand how best to interpret research studies and their findings to support optimal infant growth and development. PMID:27103229

  7. Hurricane Katrina-related maternal stress, maternal mental health, and early infant temperament.

    Tees, Michael T; Harville, Emily W; Xiong, Xu; Buekens, Pierre; Pridjian, Gabriella; Elkind-Hirsch, Karen

    2010-07-01

    To investigate temperament in infants whose mothers were exposed to Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath, and to determine if high hurricane exposure is associated with difficult infant temperament. A prospective cohort study of women giving birth in New Orleans and Baton Rouge, LA (n = 288) in 2006-2007 was conducted. Questionnaires and interviews assessed the mother's experiences during the hurricane, living conditions, and psychological symptoms, 2 months and 12 months postpartum. Infant temperament characteristics were reported by the mother using the activity, adaptability, approach, intensity, and mood scales of the Early Infant and Toddler Temperament Questionnaires, and "difficult temperament" was defined as scoring in the top quartile for three or more of the scales. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between hurricane experience, mental health, and infant temperament. Serious experiences of the hurricane did not strongly increase the risk of difficult infant temperament (association with three or more serious experiences of the hurricane: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-3.58 at 2 months; 0.58, 0.15-2.28 at 12 months). Maternal mental health was associated with report of difficult infant temperament, with women more likely to report having a difficult infant temperament at 1 year if they had screened positive for PTSD (aOR 1.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-5.41), depression, (aOR 3.16, 95% CI 1.22-8.20) or hostility (aOR 2.17, 95% CI 0.81-5.82) at 2 months. Large associations between maternal stress due to a natural disaster and infant temperament were not seen, but maternal mental health was associated with reporting difficult temperament. Further research is needed to determine the effects of maternal exposure to disasters on child temperament, but in order to help babies born in the aftermath of disaster, the focus may need to be on the mother's mental health. PMID:19554438

  8. Nutrition, growth, and allergic diseases among very preterm infants after hospital discharge

    Zachariassen, Gitte

    2013-01-01

    with breastfeeding among very preterm infants at hospital discharge. 3. To describe possible feeding-problems during the intervention-period, and allergic diseases during the first year of life, among very preterm infants related to their nutrition after hospital discharge. 4. To describe the content...... until August 2008 of whom 157 were excluded due to diseases or circumstances influencing nutrition. Further 156 refused participation in the interventional part of the study, but data on breastfeeding, weight, and some epidemiological data until discharge were available. Results on breastfeeding rate at...... fortification (group B) until 4 months CA. Infants (n = 113) who were bottle-fed at discharge (group C) were given a preterm formula (PF) until 4 months CA. Infants were examined at the outpatient clinics at term, and at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months CA, where parameters on growth, allergic diseases, possible feeding...

  9. Smoking effects on milk's micronutrient content and infant growth

    Smoking during pregnancy negatively affects birth weight and during breast-feeding alters volume and duration of lactation. As consequence of both effects, breast fed infants of smoking mothers have lower growth rates, compared to those of non-smoking mothers. In smoking mothers, at the end of pregnancy, there is an inverse association between cadmium content in maternal plasma and zinc content in fetal blood, while their newborns exhibited increased copper and diminished iron concentrations. No information exists on micronutrient content of breast milk of smoking mothers, associated to longitudinal growth. Ten smoking mothers (mean of cigarettes: 7.1) and 22 non-smoker controls and their infants, have been recruited within one month after delivery, at a Public Hospital in Santiago, Chile. Infant's weight, height, tricipital skinfold, arm and head circumferences and mother's weight were registered. Milk volume has been assessed by deuterium dilution and cotinine concentrations by radio-immuno-assay (RIA). No significant differences existed in age and nutritional status, between mothers. Cotinine levels were 50 times higher in smoking mothers (2576±2341 mU/L vs 54±25) and 12 times higher in their infants compared with those of non smokers (121±99 mU/L vs 10±5 mU/L). Birth weight was significantly different (3290±327 g vs 3558±432 g, p=0.01) but not so at 3 months of age (6026±550 g vs 6099±510 g, p=0.8). Infants' height was significantly smaller in smokers' infants at birth and 3 months of age (50±1 cm vs 51±1 cm and 59±1 cm vs 61±2 cm). The evidence so far indicates that infant's height is compromised which could be related to an altered transference of essential micronutrients, due to a lesser amount of breast-milk and micronutrient concentrations. These objectives will be proved in the second year of the Coordinated Research Project. (author)

  10. Prophylactic Probiotics for Preterm Infants

    Olsen, Rie; Greisen, Gorm; Schrøder, Morten;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a major morbidity and cause of mortality in preterm neonates. Probiotics seem to have a beneficial role in preventing NEC, which is confirmed in meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We therefore aimed to review and confirm the efficacy...... of probiotics in preterm neonates obtained in observational studies. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effects of prophylactic probiotics in preterm infants. METHODS: A meta-analysis was performed searching PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library) and www.clinicaltrials.gov. Reference lists of reviews...... of RCTs were also searched. Included studies were observational studies that enrolled preterm infants <37 weeks of gestational age. Trials were included if they administered any probiotics and measured at least one clinical outcome (e.g. NEC, all-cause mortality, sepsis or long-term development...

  11. Radiation exposure and infant cancer

    Medical exposures accompanied by an increase in radiation use in the field of pediatrics were described. Basic ideas and countermeasures to radiation injuries were outlined. In order to decrease the medical exposure, it is necessary for the doctor, x-ray technician and manufacturer to work together. The mechanism and characteristics of radio carcinogenesis were also mentioned. Particularly, the following two points were described: 1) How many years does it take before carcinogenesis appears as a result of radiation exposure in infancy 2) How and when does the effect of fetus exposure appear. Radiosensitivity in infants and fetuses is greater than that of an adult. The occurrence of leukemia caused by prenatal exposure was reviewed. The relation between irradiation for therapy and morbidity of thyroid cancer was mentioned. Finally, precautions necessary for infants, pregnant women and nursing mothers when using radioisotopes were mentioned. (K. Serizawa)

  12. Infants' learning of phonological status

    AmandaSeidl; AlejandrinaCristia

    2012-01-01

    There is a substantial literature describing how infants become more sensitive to differences between native phonemes (sounds that are both present and meaningful in the input) and less sensitive to differences between non-native phonemes (sounds that are neither present nor meaningful in the input) over the course of development. Here, we review an emergent strand of literature that gives a more nuanced notion of the problem of sound category learning. This research documents ...

  13. Nutrition of the preterm infant

    Sauer, P. J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrition is of great importance for the preterm infant. It is not only essential for survival, but also makes provision for rapid development of many organs outside the uterus which process normally takes place in the third trimester of pregnancy. It is for future life essential that all factors that might influence the development are as optimal as possible, including nutrition. However, there might also be an upper limit to the intake of some ingredients in the neonatal period. The rate of...

  14. Infant discrimination of humanoid robots.

    Matsuda, Goh; Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Hiraki, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, extremely humanlike robots called "androids" have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants) were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm-a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android-two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants' looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body) was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human. PMID:26441772

  15. A History of Infant Feeding

    Stevens, Emily E.; Patrick, Thelma E.; Pickler, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The historical evolution of infant feeding includes wet nursing, the feeding bottle, and formula use. Before the invention of bottles and formula, wet nursing was the safest and most common alternative to the natural mother's breastmilk. Society's negative view of wet nursing, combined with improvements of the feeding bottle, the availability of animal's milk, and advances in formula development, gradually led to the substitution of artificial feeding for wet nursing. In addition, the adverti...

  16. Nanoparticle delivery in infant lungs

    Semmler-Behnke, Manuela; Kreyling, Wolfgang G; Schulz, Holger; Takenaka, Shinji; James P Butler; Henry, Frank S.; Tsuda, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The lung surface is an ideal pathway to the bloodstream for nanoparticle-based drug delivery. Thus far, research has focused on the lungs of adults, and little is known about nanoparticle behavior in the immature lungs of infants. Here, using nonlinear dynamical systems analysis and in vivo experimentation in developing animals, we show that nanoparticle deposition in postnatally developing lungs peaks at the end of bulk alveolation. This finding suggests a unique paradigm, consistent with th...

  17. Congenital chloridorrhea in Korean infants.

    Lee, Y. D.; Lee, H. J.; Moon, H. R.

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes two Korean male infants, 1. 16 year old and newly born neonate from two families who were diagnosed and managed for one of very rare inborn errors of metabolism, congenital chloridorrhea (Darrow-Gamble syndrome). The diagnosis was suggested by one of the authors (HRM) from the unusual combination of metabolic alkalosis with severe gastrointestinal disorder presenting with chronic, profuse watery diarrhea in the newborn period in the first patient; and the maternal ...

  18. Preclinical assessment of infant formula.

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Infant formulas are the sole or predominant source of nutrition for many infants and are fed during a sensitive period of development and may therefore have short- and long-term consequences for infant health. Preclinical safety assessment therefore needs to include both short-term and long-term studies in animals. It is recommended that procedures are instituted by which experts may serve as independent scientists for companies developing novel products, without having their integrity compromised, and later serve the legislative institutions. A two-level assessment approach to determine the potential toxicity of a novel ingredient, its metabolites, and their effects in the matrix on developing organ systems has been suggested by IOM. This appears reasonable, as novel ingredients can be of different levels of concern. The use of modern methods in genomics and proteomics should be considered in these evaluation processes as well as novel methods to evaluate outcomes, including metabolomics and molecular techniques to assess the microbiome. PMID:22699767

  19. Do infants detect indirect reciprocity?

    Meristo, Marek; Surian, Luca

    2013-10-01

    In social interactions involving indirect reciprocity, agent A acts prosocially towards B and this prompts C to act prosocially towards A. This happens because A's actions enhanced its reputation in the eyes of third parties. Indirect reciprocity may have been of central importance in the evolution of morality as one of the major mechanisms leading to the selection of helping and fair attitudes. Here we show that 10-month-old infants expect third parties to act positively towards fair donors who have distributed attractive resources equally between two recipients, rather than toward unfair donors who made unequal distributions. Infants' responses were dependent on the reciprocator's perceptual exposure to previous relevant events: they expected the reciprocator to reward the fair donor only when it had seen the distributive actions performed by the donors. We propose that infants were able to generate evaluations of agents that were based on the fairness of their distributive actions and to generate expectations about the social preferences of informed third parties. PMID:23887149

  20. Anatomy of the infant head

    This text is mainly an atlas of illustration representing the dissection of the head and upper neck of the infant. It was prepared by the author over a 20-year period. The commentary compares the anatomy of the near-term infant with that of a younger fetus, child, and adult. As the author indicates, the dearth of anatomic information about postnatal anatomic changes represents a considerable handicap to those imaging infants. In part 1 of the book, anatomy is related to physiologic performance involving the pharynx, larynx, and mouth. Sequential topics involve the regional anatomy of the head (excluding the brain), the skeleton of the cranium, the nose, orbit, mouth, larynx, pharynx, and ear. To facilitate use of this text as a reference, the illustrations and text on individual organs are considered separately (i.e., the nose, the orbit, the eye, the mouth, the larynx, the pharynx, and the ear). Each part concerned with a separate organ includes materials from the regional illustrations contained in part 2 and from the skeleton, which is treated in part 3. Also included in a summary of the embryologic and fetal development of the organ

  1. Transient Pseudohypoaldosteronism due to Urinary Tract Infection in Infancy: A Report of 4 Cases

    Kaplowitz Paul; Vaidyanathan Priya; Nandagopal Radha

    2009-01-01

    Hyponatremia with hyperkalemia in infancy is an uncommon but life-threatening occurrence. In the first weeks of life, this scenario is often associated with aldosterone deficiency due to salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia. However, alternative diagnoses involving inadequate mineralocorticoid secretion or action must be considered, particularly for infants one month of age or older. We report four infants who presented with profound hyponatremia accompanied by urinary tract infection...

  2. Transient Pseudohypoaldosteronism due to Urinary Tract Infection in Infancy: A Report of 4 Cases

    Radha Nandagopal; Priya Vaidyanathan; Paul Kaplowitz

    2009-01-01

    Hyponatremia with hyperkalemia in infancy is an uncommon but life-threatening occurrence. In the first weeks of life, this scenario is often associated with aldosterone deficiency due to salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia. However, alternative diagnoses involving inadequate mineralocorticoid secretion or action must be considered, particularly for infants one month of age or older. We report four infants who presented with profound hyponatremia accompanied by urinary tract infection,...

  3. Review of Infant Feeding: Key Features of Breast Milk and Infant Formula

    Martin, Camilia R.; Pei-Ra Ling; Blackburn, George L

    2016-01-01

    Mothers’ own milk is the best source of nutrition for nearly all infants. Beyond somatic growth, breast milk as a biologic fluid has a variety of other benefits, including modulation of postnatal intestinal function, immune ontogeny, and brain development. Although breastfeeding is highly recommended, breastfeeding may not always be possible, suitable or solely adequate. Infant formula is an industrially produced substitute for infant consumption. Infant formula attempts to mimic the nutritio...

  4. MOTHER-INFANT INTERACTION IMPROVES WITH A DEVELOPMENTAL INTERVENTION FOR MOTHER-PRETERM INFANT DYADS

    White-Traut, Rosemary; Norr, Kathleen F.; Fabiyi, Camille; Rankin, Kristin M.; Li, Zhyouing; Liu, Li

    2013-01-01

    While premature infants have a high need for positive interactions, both infants and their mothers are challenged by the infant‘s biological immaturity. This randomized clinical trial of 198 premature infants born at 29–34 weeks gestation and their mothers examined the impact of the H-HOPE (Hospital to Home: Optimizing the Infant’s Environment) intervention on mother-premature infant interaction patterns at 6-weeks corrected age (CA). Mothers had at least 2 social environmental risk factors s...

  5. Multilevel Analysis of Infant Mortality in Romania

    Ana-Maria BURLEA

    2012-01-01

    Appraise infant mortality evolution at different territorial scales, identify disparities in terms of trend evolution and explore the contribution of some socioeconomic factors (educational attainment, unemployment rate and ethnicity) in the existing regional differences of infant mortality levels. As the aim of our study is to identify geographic disparities based on different spatial tendencies in infant mortality evolution, trend analysis was the most suited method. Cluster analysis was us...

  6. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of cefoperazone in infants.

    Varghese, M; Khan, A. J.; K Kumar; Rosenfeld, W.; Schaeffer, H A; Evans, H E

    1985-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefoperazone were evaluated in 25 infants (mean age, 26 days) after intramuscular and intravenous routes of administration. The levels in blood that were achieved were severalfold higher than those required to inhibit common pathogens. The mean half-life of 240 min was one-half of that observed in 1- to 2-day-old infants but about twice that seen in adults. Further evaluation is needed to study the efficacy of the drug in infants and children.

  7. Congenital Anomalies in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Zahra Razavi; Alireza Yavarikia; Saadat Torabian

    2012-01-01

    bjective: Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital anomalies in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran.Methods: The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study wa...

  8. Cerebral palsy in very low birthweight infants.

    Cooke, R W

    1990-01-01

    Eighty one very low birthweight survivors with cerebral palsy were matched with controls by sex, gestational age, and place of birth. Using discriminant analysis, the perinatal profiles for infants with cerebral palsy and their controls were shown to differ significantly. When infants with various types of cerebral palsy were analysed with their controls the discriminating variables differed. Diplegic infants could be differentiated from controls on antenatal variables alone, but significant ...

  9. An Ecological Model for Premature Infant Feeding

    White-Traut, Rosemary; Norr, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk for poor health, feeding difficulties, and impaired mother-infant interaction leading to developmental delay. Social-environmental risks, such as poverty or minority status, compound these biologic risks, placing premature infants in double jeopardy. Guided by an ecological model, the Hospital-Home Transition: Optimizing Prematures’ Environment (H-HOPE) intervention combines the Auditory, Tactile, Visual, and Vestibular intervention with participatory g...

  10. Pulmonary Function in Infants with Swallowing Dysfunction

    Tutor, James D.; Srinivasan, Saumini; Gosa, Memorie M.; Spentzas, Thomas; Stokes, Dennis C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Swallowing dysfunction can lead to recurring aspiration and is frequently associated with chronic symptoms such as cough and wheezing in infants. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of infants with swallowing dysfunction, determine if pulmonary function abnormalities are detectable, and if they improve after therapy. Methods We studied 38 infants with a history of coughing and wheezing who had pulmonary function tests performed within two weeks of their diagnosis of s...

  11. Premature infants and neurodevelopmental morbidity Invited Author

    Uysal, Serap

    2010-01-01

    Brain injury in some surviving premature infants increases the risk of nbsp; neurodevelopmental disability including major cognitive and motor deficits Periventricular leukomalacia PVL is the main type of brain injury The cerebral white matter thalamus basal ganglia cerebral cortex brain stem and cerebellum may be nbsp; affected Infants with low birth weight are also in high risk It is difficult to shout a clear clinico pathologic correlations in premature infants has been difficult The neuro...

  12. Infant and child mortality in Andhra Pradesh.

    White, Howard

    2003-01-01

    Most countries of the world are reducing infant and child mortality too slowly to meet the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of a two-thirds reduction by 2015. Yet, some countries and regions – including the Indian state of Kerala – have achieved impressive reductions. This paper examines infant and child mortality in Andhra Pradesh (where Young Lives research is being conducted) and in Kerala, and considers the factors explaining their differential performance. Infant mortality is found to d...

  13. Christianity and Infant Health in India

    Menon, Nidhiya; McQueeney, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies child health in India focusing on differences in anthropometric outcomes between the three main religions – Hindus, Muslims and Christians. The results indicate that Christian infants have higher height-for-age z-scores as compared to infants of other religious identities, and that this is especially true for infant girls in states with a relatively large Christian presence. We instrument for Christian identity today using data on the location of Protestant and Christian mi...

  14. How Infants Learn About the Visual World

    Scott P Johnson

    2010-01-01

    The visual world of adults consists of objects at various distances, partly occluding one another, substantial and stable across space and time. The visual world of young infants, in contrast, is often fragmented and unstable, consisting not of coherent objects but rather surfaces that move in unpredictable ways. Evidence from computational modeling and from experiments with human infants highlights three kinds of learning that contribute to infants' knowledge of the visual world: learning vi...

  15. Touch and Massage for Medically Fragile Infants

    Gold, Jeffrey I.; Joseph, Michael H.; Gallardo, Constance C.; Karen Livingston; Shay Beider; Kant, Alexis J.

    2007-01-01

    Research investigating the efficacy of infant massage has largely focused on premature and low birth weight infants. The majority of investigations have neglected highly acute patients in academic neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The current study was developed with two aims: (Phase 1) to develop, implement and demonstrate the feasibility and safety of a parent-trained compassionate touch/massage program for infants with complex medical conditions and (Phase 2) to conduct a longitudinal...

  16. Hypothermia: Novel Approaches for Premature Infants

    Higgins, Rosemary D.; Shankaran, Seetha

    2011-01-01

    Hypothermia for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy has recently permeated clinical practice for term infants. Speculation regarding a neuroprotective benefit of hypothermia for premature infants with HIE has been raised as a need for further research. Hypothermia for other indications including necrotizing enterocolitis with the hope of tissue preservation following injury is less well studied. A summary of evidence for hypothermia and premature infants is presented in this brief report.

  17. Maintaining Optimal Oxygen Saturation in Premature Infants

    Lau, Yoke Yen; Tay, Yih Yann; Shah, Varsha Atul; Chang, Pisun; Loh, Khuan Tai

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Advances in technology have resulted in increasing survival rates for premature infants. Oxygen therapy is commonly used in neonatal units as part of respiratory support. The number of premature infants in our institution surviving with severe (stage ≥3) retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) prompted a review of oxygen therapy as a contributing factor. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of oxygen may cause irreversible damage to the eyes of very-low-birth-weight preterm infant...

  18. HIV-exposed uninfected infants in Zimbabwe: insights into health outcomes in the pre-antiretroviral therapy era

    Ceri eEvans

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ZVITAMBO trial recruited 14110 mother-infant pairs to a randomised controlled trial of vitamin A between 1997-2000, before the availability of antiretroviral therapy for HIV prophylaxis or treatment in Zimbabwe. The HIV status of mothers and infants was well characterised through 1-2 years of follow-up, leading to the largest cohort to date of HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU infants (n=3135, with a suitable comparison group of HIV-unexposed infants (n=9510. Here, we draw on 10 years of published findings from the ZVITAMBO trial. HEU infants had increased morbidity compared to HIV-unexposed infants, with 50% more hospitalisations in the neonatal period and 30% more sick clinic visits during infancy, particularly for skin infections, lower respiratory tract infections and oral thrush. HEU children had 3.9-fold and 2.0-fold higher mortality than HIV-unexposed children during the first and second years of life, respectively, most commonly due to acute respiratory infections, diarrhoea/dysentery, malnutrition, sepsis and meningitis. Infant morbidity and mortality was strongly related to maternal HIV disease severity, with a risk that remained until maternal CD4 counts were >800 cells/uL. HEU infants were more likely to be premature and small-for-gestational age than HIV-unexposed infants, and had more postnatal growth failure. Here, we propose a conceptual framework to explain the increased risk of infectious morbidity, mortality and growth failure among HEU infants, hypothesizing that immune activation and inflammation are key drivers of both infection susceptibility and growth failure. Future studies should further dissect the causes of infection susceptibility and growth failure, and determine the impact of ART and co-trimoxazole on outcomes of this vulnerable group of infants in the current era.

  19. Evaluation of the Growth Process of Infants Conceived by Assisted Reproductive Techniques at Royan Institute from Birth to 9 Months

    Mohammad-Reza Nateghi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to recent scientific progress in assisted reproductive techniques (ART, infertile couples can now become fertile. Thus, a number of infants in our country are the results of these costly interventions. This study has been undertaken to evaluate the physical growth process of different methods of ART infants by standard growth charts from birth until nine months of age.Methods: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study of 333 infants conceived through ART [intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and in vitro fertilization (IVF] at Royan Institute. A sequential, non-random sampling method in a period of 22 months was used. Their growth was assessed by measuring infants weight, height and head circumference, and physical examination. The growth patterns were calculated by recording the values in standard growth charts. The final analysis was done with SPSS version 16 and by using Chi-square test.Findings: In comparison with growth charts, the weights of one-third of the infants were less than two standard deviations (SD at birth and one-fourth had head circumference less than three SD at birth. Low birth weight (LBW infants were six times more than infants of normal population. From birth to six months of age, growth abnormalities were seen in a substantial number of infants. However, at nine months of age, there was no significant difference observed between infants conceived by different methods of ART (IVF and ICSI.Conclusion: Multiple births are the most important confounding factor impacting the growth process of ART infants. Multiple pregnancies can lead to low birth weight, height and head circumference, and growth abnormalities up to six months of age. This abnormality improves by increasing age of the infants.

  20. HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants in Zimbabwe: Insights into Health Outcomes in the Pre-Antiretroviral Therapy Era.

    Evans, Ceri; Humphrey, Jean H; Ntozini, Robert; Prendergast, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    The ZVITAMBO trial recruited 14,110 mother-infant pairs to a randomized controlled trial of vitamin A between 1997 and 2000, before the availability of antiretroviral therapy for HIV prophylaxis or treatment in Zimbabwe. The HIV status of mothers and infants was well characterized through 1-2 years of follow-up, leading to the largest cohort to date of HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants (n = 3135), with a suitable comparison group of HIV-unexposed infants (n = 9510). Here, we draw on 10 years of published findings from the ZVITAMBO trial. HEU infants had increased morbidity compared to HIV-unexposed infants, with 50% more hospitalizations in the neonatal period and 30% more sick clinic visits during infancy, particularly for skin infections, lower respiratory tract infections, and oral thrush. HEU children had 3.9-fold and 2.0-fold higher mortality than HIV-unexposed children during the first and second years of life, respectively, most commonly due to acute respiratory infections, diarrhea/dysentery, malnutrition, sepsis, and meningitis. Infant morbidity and mortality were strongly related to maternal HIV disease severity, and increased morbidity remained until maternal CD4 counts were >800 cells/μL. HEU infants were more likely to be premature and small-for-gestational age than HIV-unexposed infants, and had more postnatal growth failure. Here, we propose a conceptual framework to explain the increased risk of infectious morbidity, mortality, and growth failure among HEU infants, hypothesizing that immune activation and inflammation are key drivers of both infection susceptibility and growth failure. Future studies should further dissect the causes of infection susceptibility and growth failure and determine the impact of ART and cotrimoxazole on outcomes of this vulnerable group of infants in the current era. PMID:27375613

  1. Infant Temperament, Maternal Personality, and Parenting Stress as Contributors to Infant Developmental Outcomes

    Molfese, Victoria J.; Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Beswick, Jennifer L.; Jacobi-Vessels, Jill L.; Ferguson, Melissa C.; White, Jamie M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined contributions of maternal personality and infant temperament to infant vocabulary and cognitive development both directly and indirectly through parental stress. Participants were recruited at birth and included 63 infant twin pairs and their mothers. Assessments were completed at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months of age and included…

  2. In and out of Synch: Infant Childcare Teachers' Adaptations to Infants' Developmental Changes

    Recchia, Susan L.; Shin, Minsun

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative multi-case study explored the social exchanges and responsive connections between infants and their infant childcare teachers within a group care context. Infants' naturally occurring behaviours were videotaped purposefully at two separate time points, near the end of their first year and approximately six months later. Findings…

  3. The Infant Parent Training Institute: A Developmental Model for Training Infant Mental Health Professionals

    Arons, Judith; Epstein, Ann; Sklan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Parent Training Institute (IPTI) at Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Boston offers integrated clinical and theoretical infant mental health training. The curriculum reflects the belief that nurturing and reflective relationships promote optimal learning and growth. A specialty in infant mental health requires knowledge…

  4. 78 FR 37706 - Safety Standards for Infant Walkers and Infant Swings

    2013-06-24

    ... for Infant Walkers, with 22 modifications to make the standard more stringent. 75 FR 35266. ASTM... assessment bodies for testing infant walkers (75 FR 35282 (June 21, 2010)) and infant swings (78 FR 15836..., with two modifications to make the standard more stringent. 77 FR 66703. ASTM notified CPSC that...

  5. Socially guided attention influences infants' communicative behavior.

    Miller, Jennifer L; Gros-Louis, Julie

    2013-12-01

    For effective prelinguistic communication, infants must be able to direct their attention, vocalizations, and nonverbal gestures in social interactions. The purpose of our study was to examine how different styles of caregiver responses influenced infant attentional and communicative behavior in social interactions, based on prior studies that have shown influences of responsiveness on attention, language and cognitive outcomes. Infants were exposed to redirective and sensitive behavior systematically using an ABA design to examine real-time changes in infants' behavior as a function of caregiver responses. During the two baseline "A" periods, caregivers were instructed to play as they would at home. During the social response "B" period, caregivers were instructed to respond sensitively to infants' behavior on one visit and redirectively on the other visit. Results demonstrated that when caregivers behaved redirectively, infants shifted their attention more frequently and decreased the duration of their visual attention. Caregiver responses also resulted in changes in vocal and gesture production. Infants decreased their production of caregiver-directed vocalizations, gestures, and gesture-vocal combinations during in the redirective condition. Results suggest that caregiver sensitive responding to infants' attentional focus may be one influence on infants' attentional and prelinguistic communicative behavior. PMID:23906941

  6. Speech vs. singing: infants choose happier sounds

    Corbeil, Marieve; Trehub, Sandra E.; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Infants prefer speech to non-vocal sounds and to non-human vocalizations, and they prefer happy-sounding speech to neutral speech. They also exhibit an interest in singing, but there is little knowledge of their relative interest in speech and singing. The present study explored infants' attention to unfamiliar audio samples of speech and singing. In Experiment 1, infants 4–13 months of age were exposed to happy-sounding infant-directed speech vs. hummed lullabies by the same woman. They list...

  7. Does infant cognition research undermine sociological theory?

    Bjerre, Jørn

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses how the results of infant research challenge the assumptions of the classical sciences of social behaviour. According to A.J. Bergesen, the findings of infant research invalidate Durkheim's theory of mental categories, thus requiring a re-theorizing of sociology. This article...... argues that Bergesen's reading of Emile Durkheim is incorrect, and his review of the infant research in fact invalidates his argument. Reviewing the assumptions of sociology in the light of the findings of infant research, it is argued that the real challenge is to formulate a research strategy...

  8. Quantitative genetic analysis of injury liability in infants and toddlers

    Phillips, K.; Matheny, A.P. Jr. [Univ. of Louisville Medical School, KY (United States)

    1995-02-27

    A threshold model of latent liability was applied to infant and toddler twin data on total count of injuries sustained during the interval from birth to 36 months of age. A quantitative genetic analysis of estimated twin correlations in injury liability indicated strong genetic dominance effects, but no additive genetic variance was detected. Because interpretations involving overdominance have little research support, the results may be due to low order epistasis or other interaction effects. Boys had more injuries than girls, but this effect was found only for groups whose parents were prompted and questioned in detail about their children`s injuries. Activity and impulsivity are two behavioral predictors of childhood injury, and the results are discussed in relation to animal research on infant and adult activity levels, and impulsivity in adult humans. Genetic epidemiological approaches to childhood injury should aid in targeting higher risk children for preventive intervention. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Attachment Behaviors in Human Infants: Discriminative Vocalization on Maternal Separation

    Fleener, Don E.; Cairns, Robert B.

    1970-01-01

    Study of 64 infants showed that (1) once infants began to cry, they tended to persist, (2) only older infants specifically missed their mothers, and (3) tendency to cry was not related to maternal responsiveness or sex of child. (MH)

  10. Cineoesophagogastroscintigraphy and positioning therapy of infant gastroesophageal reflux

    During this prospective study, using cineoesophagogastroscintigraphy carried out in 27 infants under seven months of age, the positioning of the infants in the infant seat for the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux was not detrimental in comparison to prone positioning

  11. Cineoesophagogastroscintigraphy and positioning therapy of infant gastroesophageal reflux

    Peyraud, J.; Guillet, J.; Bouix, G.; Brendel, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    During this prospective study, using cineoesophagogastroscintigraphy carried out in 27 infants under seven months of age, the positioning of the infants in the infant seat for the treatment of the gastroesophageal reflux was not detrimental in comparison to prone positioning.

  12. Infants and Toddlers (Ages 0-3) - Raising Healthy Children

    ... Submit Button Information For... Media Policy Makers Infants & Toddlers (Ages 0-3) - Raising Healthy Children Recommend on ... Milestones Fruits & Vegetables Hand Washing Hearing Screening Infant & Toddler Health Maternal and Infant Health Newborn Screening Nutrition, ...

  13. Postpartum depression and infant-mother attachment security at one year: The impact of co-morbid maternal personality disorders.

    Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; Tharner, Anne; Steele, Howard; Cordes, Katharina; Mehlhase, Heike; Vaever, Mette Skovgaard

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies on effects of postpartum depression (PPD) on infant-mother attachment have been divergent. This may be due to not taking into account the effects of stable difficulties not specific for depression, such as maternal personality disorder (PD). Mothers (N=80) were recruited for a longitudinal study either during pregnancy (comparison group) or eight weeks postpartum (clinical group). Infants of mothers with depressive symptoms only or in combination with a PD diagnosis were compared with infants of mothers with no psychopathology. Depression and PD were assessed using self-report and clinical interviews. Infant-mother attachment was assessed when infants were 13 months using Strange Situation Procedure (SSP). Attachment (in)security was calculated as a continuous score based on the four interactive behavioral scales of the SSP, and the conventional scale for attachment disorganization was used. PPD was associated with attachment insecurity only if the mother also had a PD diagnosis. Infants of PPD mothers without co-morbid PD did not differ from infants of mothers with no psychopathology. These results suggest that co-existing PD may be crucial in understanding how PPD impacts on parenting and infant social-emotional development. Stable underlying factors may magnify or buffer effects of PPD on parenting and child outcomes. PMID:27400381

  14. Denmark: botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    Pærregaard, Anders; Angen, O.; Mølbak, Kare; Clausen, M.E.; Christensen, Jens Juul Dencker; Lisby, Michael; Paerregaard, A; Angen, O; Lisby, M; Mølbak, K; Clausen, M E; Christensen, J J

    2008-01-01

    A 4.5 months old, previously healthy Danish girl was admitted to a paediatric department after six days of passive behaviour and weak suck. Over the next days she became increasingly weak, developed bilateral ptosis, the muscle stretch reflexes were lost, and mydriasis with slow pupillary responses...... was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food with...

  15. Infants' Temperament and Mothers', and Fathers' Depression Predict Infants' Attention to Objects Paired with Emotional Faces.

    Aktar, Evin; Mandell, Dorothy J; de Vente, Wieke; Majdandžić, Mirjana; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Bögels, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Between 10 and 14 months, infants gain the ability to learn about unfamiliar stimuli by observing others' emotional reactions to those stimuli, so called social referencing (SR). Joint processing of emotion and head/gaze direction is essential for SR. This study tested emotion and head/gaze direction effects on infants' attention via pupillometry in the period following the emergence of SR. Pupil responses of 14-to-17-month-old infants (N = 57) were measured during computerized presentations of unfamiliar objects alone, before-and-after being paired with emotional (happy, sad, fearful vs. neutral) faces gazing towards (vs. away) from objects. Additionally, the associations of infants' temperament, and parents' negative affect/depression/anxiety with infants' pupil responses were explored. Both mothers and fathers of participating infants completed questionnaires about their negative affect, depression and anxiety symptoms and their infants' negative temperament. Infants allocated more attention (larger pupils) to negative vs. neutral faces when the faces were presented alone, while they allocated less attention to objects paired with emotional vs. neutral faces independent of head/gaze direction. Sad (but not fearful) temperament predicted more attention to emotional faces. Infants' sad temperament moderated the associations of mothers' depression (but not anxiety) with infants' attention to objects. Maternal depression predicted more attention to objects paired with emotional expressions in infants low in sad temperament, while it predicted less attention in infants high in sad temperament. Fathers' depression (but not anxiety) predicted more attention to objects paired with emotional expressions independent of infants' temperament. We conclude that infants' own temperamental dispositions for sadness, and their exposure to mothers' and fathers' depressed moods may influence infants' attention to emotion-object associations in social learning contexts. PMID

  16. Septic arthritis in the newborn and infants

    Gajdobranski Đorđe R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septic arthritis represents an intra-articular infection caused by pyogenic bacteria. During the earliest childhood it is considered to be a systemic septic condition and demands early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients with septic arthritis treated at the Department of Orthopedics of the Pediatric Surgery Clinic in Novi Sad, over a 10-year period. We are also presenting a case of a 12-day-old newborn baby, with clear radiological signs of osteoarthritis of the right knee. Results A retrospective study included the period 1991-2000, and showed that 15 patients, aged 10 days - 12 months were treated for osteoarthritis. The most common localization was the hip, in 60% of cases. In 11 patients the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus while in the 4 remaining patients the bacteriologic finding was negative. One patient died of generalized sepsis. Discussion In neonates and infants septic arthritis is characterized by atypical clinical picture, often causing delayed diagnosis. In the initial phases of the disease ultrasonographic findings were of greater use compared to radiological imaging, due to relatively late appearance of radiological signs of disease. Conclusions Due to possible development of serious and irreversible damage, even lethal outcome, septic arthritis requires early diagnosis, prompt administration of antibiotics and early surgical treatment. It is a quite unique area in Pediatric Orthopedics where missed or delayed diagnosis may have serious consequences.

  17. [Infant metabolic alkalosis of dietetic origin].

    Mesa Medina, O; González, J León; García Nieto, V; Romero Ramírez, S; Marrero Pérez, C

    2009-04-01

    Cases of metabolic alkalosis are divided into susceptible or resistant to treatment with sodium chloride, depending on the response to it. The resistant cases present with high urinary excretion of chloride, and are secondary to tubular disease or use of diuretics. Included among the sensitive cases are, vomiting, cystic fibrosis and low intake. Two infants were fed with "almond milk" and showed clinical symptoms of dehydration and failure to thrive. Hypochloraemic and hypokalaemic metabolic alkasosis was seen in both cases, which responded satisfactorily to water and electrolyte replacement. After ruling out vomiting, ingestion of drugs, tubular disease, and cystic fibrosis, the diagnosis was low intake, due to poor contribution of Na+ and Cl(-) provided by the "almond milk". This deficit induces an increase in proximal tubular reabsorption of H(-)CO3 and in parts of the distal nephron, an increase in reabsorption of Na+ and Cl(-) which are exchanged with K+ and H+, which can give rise to a hypochloraemic alkalosis and hypokalaemia. Secondary hypothyroidism was found in one case, apparently due to the lack of iodine in the almond milk, and disorders of the myelination characterized by optic neuritis and hearing loss. These disorders were resolved when feeding with human formula was established. PMID:19303829

  18. Healthcare professionals' perceptions of pain in infants at risk for neurological impairment

    Camfield Carol S

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine whether healthcare professionals perceive the pain of infants differently due to their understanding of that infant's level of risk for neurological impairment. Method Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU's at two tertiary pediatric centers. Ninety-five healthcare professionals who practice in the NICU (50 nurses, 19 physicians, 17 respiratory therapists, 9 other participated. They rated the pain (0–10 scale and 0–6 Faces Pain Scale, distress (0–10, effectiveness of cuddling to relieve pain (0–10 and time to calm without intervention (seconds for nine video clips of neonates receiving a heel stick. Prior to each rating, they were provided with descriptions that suggested the infant had mild, moderate or severe risk for neurological impairment. Ratings were examined as a function of the level of risk described. Results Professionals' ratings of pain, distress, and time to calm did not vary significantly with level of risk, but ratings of the effectiveness of cuddling were significantly lower as risk increased [F (2,93 = 4.4, p = .02]. No differences in ratings were found due to participants' age, gender or site of study. Physicians' ratings were significantly lower than nurses' across ratings. Conclusion Professionals provided with visual information regarding an infants' pain during a procedure did not display the belief that infants' level of risk for neurological impairment affected their pain experience. Professionals' estimates of the effectiveness of a nonpharmacological intervention did differ due to level of risk.

  19. Nutritional management of newborn infants: Practical guidelines

    Xiao-Ming Ben

    2008-01-01

    The requirements of growth and organ development create a challenge in nutritional management of newborn infants, especially premature newborn and intestinal-failure infants. Since their feeding may increase the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, some high-risk infants receive a small volume of feeding or parenteral nutrition (PN) without enteral feeding. This review summarizes the current research progress in the nutritional management of newborn infants. Searches of MEDLINE (1998-2007), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2007), abstracts and conference proceedings, references from relevant publications in the English language were performed, showing that breast milk is the preferred source of nutrients for enteral feeding of newborn infants. The number of nutrients found in human milk was recommended as a guideline in establishing the minimum and maximum levels in infant formulas. The fear of necrotizing enterocolitis and feeding intolerance are the major factors limiting the use of the enteral route as the primary means of nourishing premature infants. PN may help to meet many of the nutritional needs of these infants, but has significant detrimental side effects. Trophic feedings (small volume of feeding given at the same rate for at least 5 d) during PN are a strategy to enhance the feeding tolerance and decrease the side effects of PN and the time to achieve full feeding. Human milk is aey component of any strategy for enteral nutrition of all infants. However, the amounts of calcium, phosphorus, zinc and other nutrients are inadequate to meet the needs of the very low birth weight (VLBW) infants during growth. Therefore, safe and effective means to fortify human milk are essential to the care of VLBW infants.

  20. "MOODY BLUES": Affect Interpretation of Infant Facial Expressions and Negative Affect in Mothers of Preterm and Term Infants

    Hedwig J.A. van Bakel; Hoffenkamp, Hannah N.; Anneke Tooten; Ruby A.S. Hall; Merel ter Beek; Hartman, Esther E.; Vingerhoets, Ad. J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Preterm birth places infants at increased risk for adverse developmental outcomes, with self- and affect regulation problems among the most important impairments. However, few studies have empirically examined maternal interpretation of infant affect in mothers of pre- and term infants. The current study examines how negative affect of mothers of preterm and term infants is associated with their interpretation of infant facial expressions.One hundred and sixty-eight mothers with their infants...

  1. Neonatal segmental enteritis due to cow′s milk allergy

    Pavai Arunachalam; John Mathai

    2013-01-01

    Cow′s milk protein allergy (CMPA) typically presents with persistent diarrhea or dysentery, vomiting and bleeding per rectum in young infants. CMPA is reported to mimic Hirschsprung′s disease and malrotation. We report, a neonate who presented with recurrent attacks of segmental enteritis due to CMPA and the last episode presented with signs of peritonitis. He improved dramatically after elimination of cow′s milk from his diet. CMPA should be considered in artificially fed babies with surgica...

  2. Neonatal segmental enteritis due to cow's milk allergy

    Arunachalam, Pavai; Mathai, John

    2013-01-01

    Cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA) typically presents with persistent diarrhea or dysentery, vomiting and bleeding per rectum in young infants. CMPA is reported to mimic Hirschsprung's disease and malrotation. We report, a neonate who presented with recurrent attacks of segmental enteritis due to CMPA and the last episode presented with signs of peritonitis. He improved dramatically after elimination of cow's milk from his diet. CMPA should be considered in artificially fed babies with surgica...

  3. Be Careful, Mom and Doc: Hepatotoxicity Associated with Prescribed Medications in Young Infants

    Kam-Lun Ellis Hon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Accidental poisonings in young infants are relatively uncommon, and the careless caregiver is usually the culprit. We report two cases of hepatotoxicity due to prescribed medications. An infant was given 15 mL instead of 1.5 mL of paracetamol by his mother because she omitted the decimal point on the label of the drug bottle. The infant became symptomatic, and liver enzyme and clotting profile were abnormal, necessitating treatment with N-acetyl cysteine. Another infant was prescribed oral ketoconazole for thrush, resulting in elevation of liver enzymes. The serum alanine aminotransferase levels were transiently elevated but returned to normal, and both infants recovered uneventfully. This report serves to alert the doctor to avoid using decimal points in drug labeling and to avoid prescribing excessive amount of drug for trivial acute illness. Thrush in infancy is common and usually treated with oral nystatin. Other oral antifungals such as ketoconazole may be associated with liver derangement and should be avoided in infants.

  4. Teenage mothers and their infants.

    Badger, E

    1985-06-01

    The outcomes of the IS/MT pilot project and the expanded services program as well as program replications in other geographic areas suggest that efforts to support the teenage mother in the care of her firstborn infant can have a demonstrable effect. Completing school, securing employment, going off welfare, and acting on a decision to prevent subsequent unwanted pregnancies were all secondary effects of a 20-week postnatal mother-infant class program designed to positively influence infant development. Similar treatment effects have been reported by IS/MT replications in St. Louis and Genesee County, Michigan. Other program innovations, however, lacking the funds and/or the expertise to conduct adequate evaluations, are nonetheless significant because they provide a groundswell capable of establishing a climate for social change. At the community level, this is expressed in the creation of new service paradigms, as in Norfolk and Memphis, where individuals and agencies are transformed and experiment with new solutions to thorny problems. At the national level, it is expressed in coalitions and political alliances around a single issue, as with the Children's Defense Fund and adolescent and single-parent families. As one who has spent almost 20 years addressing the consequences of teenage parenthood, it is heartening to know that the time is near to address the prevention of the problem. Let us hope that the Children's Defense Fund agenda accurately reflects the beliefs and feelings of the majority of our citizenry and that our national priorities will change to include the reduction of teen pregnancy and teen parenthood. PMID:2410176

  5. Infant discrimination of humanoid robots

    Goh eMatsuda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, extremely humanlike robots called androids have been developed, some of which are already being used in the field of entertainment. In the context of psychological studies, androids are expected to be used in the future as fully controllable human stimuli to investigate human nature. In this study, we used an android to examine infant discrimination ability between human beings and non-human agents. Participants (N = 42 infants were assigned to three groups based on their age, i.e., 6- to 8-month-olds, 9- to 11-month-olds, and 12- to 14-month-olds, and took part in a preferential looking paradigm. Of three types of agents involved in the paradigm—a human, an android modeled on the human, and a mechanical-looking robot made from the android—two at a time were presented side-by-side as they performed a grasping action. Infants’ looking behavior was measured using an eye tracking system, and the amount of time spent focusing on each of three areas of interest (face, goal, and body was analyzed. Results showed that all age groups predominantly looked at the robot and at the face area, and that infants aged over 9 months watched the goal area for longer than the body area. There was no difference in looking times and areas focused on between the human and the android. These findings suggest that 6- to 14-month-olds are unable to discriminate between the human and the android, although they can distinguish the mechanical robot from the human.

  6. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and prenatal maternal smoking: rising attributed risk in the Back to Sleep era

    Batal Holly A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parental smoking and prone sleep positioning are recognized causal features of Sudden Infant Death. This study quantifies the relationship between prenatal smoking and infant death over the time period of the Back to Sleep campaign in the United States, which encouraged parents to use a supine sleeping position for infants. Methods This retrospective cohort study utilized the Colorado Birth Registry. All singleton, normal birth weight infants born from 1989 to 1998 were identified and linked to the Colorado Infant Death registry. Multivariable logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between outcomes of interest and prenatal maternal cigarette use. Potential confounders analyzed included infant gender, gestational age, and birth year as well as maternal marital status, ethnicity, pregnancy interval, age, education, and alcohol use. Results We analyzed 488,918 birth records after excluding 5835 records with missing smoking status. Smokers were more likely to be single, non-Hispanic, less educated, and to report alcohol use while pregnant (p Conclusions Due to a decreased overall rate of SIDS likely due to changing infant sleep position, the attributed risk associating maternal smoking and SIDS has increased following the Back to Sleep campaign. Mothers should be informed of the 2-fold increased rate of SIDS associated with maternal cigarette consumption.

  7. Infant feeding practices at routine PMTCT sites, South Africa: results of a prospective observational study amongst HIV exposed and unexposed infants - birth to 9 months

    Goga Ameena E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We sought to investigate infant feeding practices amongst HIV-positive and -negative mothers (0-9 months postpartum and describe the association between infant feeding practices and HIV-free survival. Methods Infant feeding data from a prospective observational cohort study conducted at three (of 18 purposively-selected routine South African PMTCT sites, 2002-2003, were analysed. Infant feeding data (previous 4 days were gathered during home visits at 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32 and 36 weeks postpartum. Four feeding groups were of interest, namely exclusive breastfeeding, mixed breastfeeding, exclusive formula feeding and mixed formula feeding. Cox proportional hazards models were fitted to investigate associations between feeding practices (0-12 weeks and infant HIV-free survival. Results Six hundred and sixty five HIV-positive and 218 HIV-negative women were recruited antenatally and followed-up until 36 weeks postpartum. Amongst mothers who breastfed between 3 weeks and 6 months postpartum, significantly more HIV-positive mothers practiced exclusive breastfeeding compared with HIV-negative: at 3 weeks 130 (42% versus 33 (17% (p Conclusions Although feeding practices were poor amongst HIV-positive and -negative mothers, HIV-positive mothers undertake safer infant feeding practices, possibly due to counseling provided through the routine PMTCT programme. The data on differences in infant outcome by feeding practice and site validate the WHO 2009 recommendations that site differences should guide feeding practices amongst HIV-positive mothers. Strong interventions are needed to promote exclusive breastfeeding (to 6 months with continued breastfeeding thereafter amongst HIV-negative motherswho are still the majority of mothers even in high HIV prevalence setting like South Africa.

  8. Respiratory symptoms among infants at risk for asthma: association with surfactant protein A haplotypes

    Bracken Michael B

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in loci encoding surfactant protein A (SFTPA and risk of wheeze and persistent cough during the first year of life among a cohort of infants at risk for developing asthma. Methods Between September 1996 and December 1998, mothers of newborn infants were invited to participate if they had an older child with clinician-diagnosed asthma. Each mother was given a standardized questionnaire within 4 months of her infant's birth. Infant respiratory symptoms were collected during quarterly telephone interviews at 6, 9 and 12 months of age. Due to the association of SFTPA polymorphisms and race/ethnicity, analyses were restricted to 221 white infants for whom whole blood and respiratory data were available. Ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between respiratory symptom frequency and SFTPA haplotypes. Results The 6A allele haplotype of SFTPA1, with an estimated frequency of 6% among our study infants, was associated with an increased risk of persistent cough (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.71, 7.98 and wheeze (OR 4.72, 95% CI 2.20, 10.11. The 6A/1A haplotype of SFTPA, found among approximately 5% of the infants, was associated with an increased risk of persistent cough (OR 3.20, 95% CI 1.39, 7.36 and wheeze (OR 3.25, 95% CI 1.43, 7.37. Conclusion Polymorphisms within SFTPA loci may be associated with wheeze and persistent cough in white infants at risk for asthma. These associations require replication and exploration in other ethnic/racial groups.

  9. Pneumothorax in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome: focus on risk factors

    Sabina Terzic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumothorax is a life threatening condition, more often seen in immature infants receiving mechanical ventilation. It carries a significant risk of death and impaired outcome.Objective: To determine predictive factors for the occurrence of pneumothorax in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS.Patients and methods: The present study was conducted in a tertiary research and educational hospital, NICU, Pediatric Clinic UKC Sarajevo, from January 2010 to December 2013. All infants had chest X-ray at admission, and were treated due to RDS with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, mechanical ventilation, or high frequency oscillatory ventilation. At admission we registered data regarding birth weight, gestational age, Apgar score, prenatally given steroids. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 417 infants. Data about timing, circumstances, side and treatment of pneumothorax were gathered from medical records.Results: Mean birth weight was 1,477 g, mean gestational age 29.6 weeks. We report 98 infants who did not survive. We also report incidence of pneumothorax in 5% of the infants with RDS. In this study pneumothorax and non-pneumothorax groups didn’t differ regarding sex, gestational age (median 29 and 30 nor birth weight (p = 0.818. Apgar score at the 1st and 5th minute of life had no influence in genesis of pulmonary air leak, neither prenatally given steroids (p = 0.639, nor surfactant administration. There was a low coverage of preterm infants with prenatal steroids (overall 28.29%. We found that FiO2 ≥ 0.4 in the first 12 hours of life, and need for mechanical ventilation are predicting factors for developing pneumothorax (p < 0.05.Conclusion: Together with mechanical ventilation, inspired fraction of oxygen higher than 40%, needed to provide adequate oxygenation in the first 12 hours of life in preterm infants, could be a predictive factor in selecting the highest risk babies for development of

  10. The Goldilocks Effect in Infant Auditory Attention

    Kidd, Celeste; Piantadosi, Steven T.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Infants must learn about many cognitive domains (e.g., language, music) from auditory statistics, yet capacity limits on their cognitive resources restrict the quantity that they can encode. Previous research has established that infants can attend to only a subset of available acoustic input. Yet few previous studies have directly examined infant…

  11. Ultrasonically detectable cerebellar haemorrhage in preterm infants.

    McCarthy, Lisa Kenyon

    2011-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of cerebellar haemorrhage (CBH) on routine cranial ultrasound (cUS) imaging in infants of ≤32 weeks gestation, and to investigate how extremely preterm infants with CBH differ from those with severe intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH).

  12. Mother-Infant "Bonding": Failure to Generalize.

    Svejda, Marilyn J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Designed with procedural and methodological controls which were not always adequate in earlier studies, this study tests the hypothesis that early and enhanced contact between mothers and infants after delivery facilitates maternal attachment behavior. Thirty mother-infant pairs from a lower-middle-class population were studied. (Author/MP)

  13. Glucose kinetics in infants of diabetic mothers

    Glucose kinetic studies were performed to define the glucose turnover rate with 78% enriched D-[U-13C] glucose by the prime constant infusion technique at less than or equal to 6 hours of age in nine infants of diabetic mothers (four insulin-dependent and five chemical diabetic patients) at term. Five normal infants were studied as control subjects. All infants received 0.9% saline intravenously during the study with the tracer. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and glucose13/12C ratios were measured during the steady state, and the glucose turnover rate was derived. The average plasma glucose concentration was similar during the steady state in the infants of the diabetic mothers and in the control infants, and the glucose turnover rate was not significantly different among the groups: 2.3 +/- 0.6 mg . kg-1 min-1 in infants of insulin-dependent diabetic patients; 2.4 +/- 0.4 mg . kg-1 min-1 in infants of chemical diabetic patients; and 3.2 +/- 0.3 mg . kg-1 min-1 in the control subjects. Good control of maternal diabetes evidenced by the normal maternal hemoglobin A1c and plasma glucose concentration at delivery and cord plasma glucose concentration resulted in glucose kinetic values in the infants of diabetic mothers that were indistinguishable from those of control subjects. The data further support the importance of good control of the diabetic state in the pregnant woman to minimize or prevent neonatal hypoglycemia

  14. How to Save Money on Infant Formula

    ... months. Here are some ways you can save money on infant formula . ... Here are a few ways to save money on infant formula: DO NOT buy just one type of baby bottle at first. Try a few different types to see which kind ...

  15. Achalasia cardia in a premature infant

    Shettihalli, Naveen; Venugopalan, Vikranth; Ives, Nicholas Kevin; Lakhoo, Kokila

    2010-01-01

    Achalasia cardia is defined as a neuromuscular disorder of the oesophagus with abnormal motility and failure of relaxation of the distal oesophagus. It is an uncommon but well-recognised entity in infants and children. However, achalasia in a preterm baby has not been previously described. We report the condition in a premature infant with unusual presentation, treated successfully with Heller's oesophagomyotomy and fundoplication.

  16. Nap-Dependent Learning in Infants

    Hupbach, Almut; Gomez, Rebecca L.; Bootzin, Richard R.; Nadel, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Sleep has been shown to aid a variety of learning and memory processes in adults (Stickgold, 2005 ). Recently, we showed that infants' learning also benefits from subsequent sleep such that infants who nap are able to abstract the general grammatical pattern of a briefly presented artificial language (Gomez, Bootzin & Nadel, 2006 ). In the present…

  17. Phonotactic Constraints on Infant Word Learning

    Estes, Katharine Graf; Edwards, Jan; Saffran, Jenny R.

    2011-01-01

    How do infants use their knowledge of native language sound patterns when learning words? There is ample evidence of infants' precocious acquisition of native language sound structure during the first year of life, but much less evidence concerning how they apply this knowledge to the task of associating sounds with meanings in word learning. To…

  18. Strategies to decrease pertussis transmission to infants.

    Forsyth, Kevin; Plotkin, Stanley; Tan, Tina; Wirsing von König, Carl Heinz

    2015-06-01

    The Global Pertussis Initiative (GPI) is an expert scientific forum addressing the worldwide burden of pertussis, which remains a serious health issue, especially in infants. This age cohort is at risk for developing pertussis by transmission from those in close proximity. Risk is increased in infants aged 0 to 6 weeks, as they are too young to be vaccinated. Older infants are at risk when their vaccination schedules are incomplete. Infants also bear the greatest disease burden owing to their high risk for pertussis-related complications and death; therefore, protecting them is a high priority. Two vaccine strategies have been proposed to protect infants. The first involves vaccinating pregnant women, which directly protects through the passive transfer of pertussis antibodies. The second strategy, cocooning, involves vaccinating parents, caregivers, and other close contacts, which indirectly protects infants from transmission by preventing disease in those in close proximity. The goal of this review was to present and discuss evidence on these 2 strategies. Based on available data, the GPI recommends vaccination during pregnancy as the primary strategy, given its efficacy, safety, and logistic advantages over a cocoon approach. If vaccination during pregnancy is not feasible, then all individuals having close contact with infants authority guidelines. These efforts are anticipated to minimize pertussis transmission to vulnerable infants, although real-world effectiveness data are limited. Countries should educate lay and medical communities on pertussis and introduce robust surveillance practices while implementing these protective strategies. PMID:25963002

  19. Model-Based Motion Tracking of Infants

    Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Herskind, Anna; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    Even though motion tracking is a widely used technique to analyze and measure human movements, only a few studies focus on motion tracking of infants. In recent years, a number of studies have emerged focusing on analyzing the motion pattern of infants, using computer vision. Most of these studies...

  20. Euthanasia of Severely Handicapped Infants: Ethical Issues.

    Cohen, Libby

    Ethical decisions are involved in life and death decisions for severely handicapped infants. Although it has become common practice for physicians not to treat severely handicapped infants, the ethical considerations involved in euthanasia are complex. A review of the literature reveals that concerns center around the quality of life of the…

  1. Jinan:infant clothing test notification

    2012-01-01

    Before the Spring Festival, Jinan Consumer Council issued the report of comparison test on 16 brands of infant apparel. The results show that all the products are qualified. To create a safe, secure environment for consumption, to ensure that the infants

  2. Infants' Recognition of Objects Using Canonical Color

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Yang, Jiale; Otsuka, Yumiko; Dan, Ippeita; Masuda, Tomohiro; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2010-01-01

    We explored infants' ability to recognize the canonical colors of daily objects, including two color-specific objects (human face and fruit) and a non-color-specific object (flower), by using a preferential looking technique. A total of 58 infants between 5 and 8 months of age were tested with a stimulus composed of two color pictures of an object…

  3. Posture Support Improves Object Individuation in Infants

    Woods, Rebecca J.; Wilcox, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    A hierarchical progression in infants' ability to use surface features, such as color, as a basis for object individuation in the first year has been well established (Tremoulet, Leslie, & Hall, 2000; Wilcox, 1999). There is evidence, however, that infants' sensitivity to surface features can be increased through multisensory (i.e.,…

  4. Severe apnoeas following immunisation in premature infants

    Slack, M; Schapira, D

    1999-01-01

    Four premature infants developed apnoeas severe enough to warrant resuscitation after immunisation with diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT), and Haemophilus influenzae B (Hib). One required re-intubation and ventilation.
 Although apnoeas after immunisation are recognised, they are not well documented. It is time for further research to elucidate the best time to immunise such infants.



  5. Feeding premature infants after hospital discharge

    Yuen, Doris E

    1998-01-01

    Supplying adequate nutrition to premature infants is an ongoing challenge. Common medical conditions that premature infants develop and therapies given to them can increase their nutritional requirements or interfere with the delivery of nutrients. This article outlines factors to consider when prescribing appropriate diet and nutritional supplements at hospital discharge.

  6. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis in a premature infant

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder characterized by widespread capillary proliferation in the lung, infiltrating the interstitium and the alveolar walls. We present the HRCT features of PCH in a surviving ex-premature infant. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of the radiological features of PCH in a young living infant. (orig.)

  7. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis in a premature infant

    Silva, Cicero J.T.A.; Massie, John; Mandelstam, Simone A. [University of Melbourne, Royal Children' s Hospital, Parkville, VIC (Australia)

    2005-06-01

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder characterized by widespread capillary proliferation in the lung, infiltrating the interstitium and the alveolar walls. We present the HRCT features of PCH in a surviving ex-premature infant. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of the radiological features of PCH in a young living infant. (orig.)

  8. Learning about Occlusion: Initial Assumptions and Rapid Adjustments

    Kochukhova, Olga; Gredeback, Gustaf

    2007-01-01

    We examined 6-month-olds' abilities to represent occluded objects, using a corneal-reflection eye-tracking technique. Experiment 1 compared infants' ability to extrapolate the current pre-occlusion trajectory with their ability to base predictions on recent experiences of novel object motions. In the first condition infants performed at asymptote…

  9. Providing lipid-based nutrient supplements does not affect developmental milestones among Malawian children

    Our objective was to assess whether using lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) to complement the diets of infants and young children affected when they achieved selected developmental milestones. In rural Malawi, 840 6-month-old healthy infants were enrolled to a randomised trial. Control particip...

  10. Mother, Infant, and Household Factors Associated with the Type of Food Infants Receive in Developing Countries

    Benjamin eYarnoff

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We explore the complex factors associated with infant feeding by analyzing what mother, infant, and household factors are associated with the types of food given to infants. We seek to quantify associations in order to inform public health policy about the importance of target populations for infant feeding programs. Methods: We used data from the Demographic Health Survey in 20 developing countries for multiple years to examine mother, infant, and household factors associated with six types of food given to infants (exclusive breastfeeding, non-exclusive breastfeeding, infant formula, milk liquids, non-milk liquids, and solid foods. We performed a seemingly unrelated regressions analysis with community-year fixed effects to account for correlation between food types and control for confounding factors associated with community resources, culture, time period, and geography in the pooled analysis.Results: We found that several mother, infant, and household characteristics were associated with each of the feeding types. Most notably, mother’s education, working status, and weight are significantly associated with the type of food given to infants. We provide quantified estimates of the association of each of these variables with six types of food given to infants. Conclusions: By identifying maternal characteristics associated with infant feeding and quantifying those associations, we help public health policymakers generate priorities for targeting infant feeding programs to specific populations that are at greatest risk. Higher educated, working mothers are best to target with exclusive breastfeeding programs for young infants. Mothers with lower education are best to target with complementary feeding programs in infants older than 1 year. Finally, while maternal weight is associated with higher levels of exclusive breastfeeding the association is too weak to merit targeting of breastfeeding programs to low-weight mothers.

  11. Intestinal absorption of the antiepileptic drug substance vigabatrin is altered by infant formula in vitro and in vivo

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-01

    formula and selected amino acids on the pharmacokinetic profile of vigabatrin was investigated after oral coadministration to male Sprague–Dawley rats using acetaminophen as a marker for gastric emptying. The presence of infant formula significantly reduced the uptake rate and permeability of vigabatrin....... The infant formula decreased the rate of gastric emptying. Here we provide experimental evidence for an in vivo role of PAT1 in the intestinal absorption of vigabatrin. The effect of infant formula on the oral absorption of vigabatrin was found to be due to delayed gastric emptying, however, it seems...

  12. An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli 0142 H6 in a neonatal department

    Fleer, A.; Gerards, L.J.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Dijk, W.C.V.; Roord, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of gastroenteritis due to Escherichia coli 0142 H6 in a neonatal ward is described. The epidemic affected 16 of 24 infants (infection-rate 66 per cent), of whom one died due to necrotizing enterocolitis. Administration of antibiotics was of limited value in treatment or in eradicating E.

  13. Preterm Infants and Parents’ self-esteem

    Aagaard, Hanne; Madsen, Mette Kold

    Background: Little is known about parents to preterm infants and their self-esteem. The care of preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is in accordance with the principles of Family Centered Care. Previously, focus has mainly been on the mother-infant-dyad. Current research has...... shown that involving the father at an early stage improves the psychological dynamic of fatherhood and encourages bonding with the infant. The self-esteem of parents appears to be negatively affected after preterm birth. Objective: To get more knowledge and a deeper understanding of the preterm parents......’ experiences of their self-esteem during admission to the NICU and later eight months after discharge. Method and data collection: A qualitative semi-structured interview was conducted in two phases: 1) Three weeks after giving birth to a preterm infant and eight months after discharge. Parents were...

  14. Shining light on infants' discovery of structure.

    Mendoza, Jennifer K; Baldwin, Dare

    2014-01-01

    Learning and discovery seem often to begin with noting patterns. Human infants are skilled at pattern detection, even patterns only definable at an abstract level, which is key to their acquisition of complex knowledge systems such as language and music. However, research examining infants' abstract rule learning has generated inconsistent results. We propose that apparent domain differences in infants' abstract rule learning may be the result of extraneous stimulus variation and discrepancies in the methodologies employed across studies probing this skill. We discuss how a behavioral methodology indexing infants' online learning would be valuable in furthering understanding of infants' (as well as adults') abstract rule learning and its neurophysiological concomitants. We outline current research aimed at developing such an index, and we propose future research, pairing such techniques with neurophysiological methods, aimed at shining more light on human skill at discovering structure. PMID:24851348

  15. Copenhagen Infant Mental Health Project (CIMHP)

    Væver, Mette Skovgaard; Smith-Nielsen, Johanne; von Wowern, Rie Krondorf;

    Introduction: Infant mental health is a significant public health issue as early adversity and childhood stress has life-long consequences for the affected children. One in five Danish families is at risk of inadequate parenting resources and child neglect. There is a lack of knowledge on best...... practice in screening for and preventing adverse infant mental health risks. Aims: The overall aim of CIMHP is to test the feasibility of an infant mental health screening and indicated prevention system and its capacity to (1) detect children at risk of longer term mental health adversities and (2) alter...... these risks in a cost effective way in a general population. Methods: In a period of 20 months 8.800 mothers and infants in Copenhagen are screened (at 2, 4 and 8 months) using two standardized screening instruments: 1) Alarm Distress Baby Scale (ADBB) in detecting infant social withdrawal and 2) Edinburg...

  16. Brief report: sound output of infant humidifiers.

    Royer, Allison K; Wilson, Paul F; Royer, Mark C; Miyamoto, Richard T

    2015-06-01

    The sound pressure levels (SPLs) of common infant humidifiers were determined to identify the likely sound exposure to infants and young children. This primary investigative research study was completed at a tertiary-level academic medical center otolaryngology and audiology laboratory. Five commercially available humidifiers were obtained from brick-and-mortar infant supply stores. Sound levels were measured at 20-, 100-, and 150-cm distances at all available humidifier settings. Two of 5 (40%) humidifiers tested had SPL readings greater than the recommended hospital infant nursery levels (50 dB) at distances up to 100 cm. In this preliminary study, it was demonstrated that humidifiers marketed for infant nurseries may produce appreciably high decibel levels. Further characterization of the effect of humidifier design on SPLs and further elucidation of ambient sound levels associated with hearing risk are necessary before definitive conclusions and recommendations can be made. PMID:25904578

  17. Enteral nutrition of the premature infant

    Su Jin Cho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early nutritional support for preterm infants is critical because such support influences long-term outcome. Minimal enteral feeding should be initiated as soon as possible if an infant is stable and if feeding advancement is recommended as relevant to the clinical course. Maternal milk is the gold standard for enteral feeding, but fortification may be needed to achieve optimal growth in a rapidly growing premature infant. Erythromycin may aid in promoting gastrointestinal motility in cases that exhibit feeding intolerance. Selected preterm infants need vitamins, mineral supplements, and calorie enhancers to meet their nutritional needs. Despite all that is known about this topic, additional research is needed to guide postdischarge nutrition of preterm infants in order to maintain optimal growth and neurodevelopment.

  18. Infant mortality rates declining, but still high.

    Hoffman, M

    1992-10-01

    Family planning can improve infant survival. Specifically, use of family planning methods can minimize family size, increase birth spacing, and reduce the likelihood of pregnancy for teenagers and women aged 40 or older. Immunizations and oral rehydration are responsible for the falling infant mortality rats since 1977 in developing countries, especially among 1-12 month old infants. Yet, neonatal mortality in developing countries had not changed. WHO intends to step up efforts to improve newborn survival. Accurate data are needed, however. Even in developed countries which keep good statistics, infant mortality bias exists. For example, in Japan, some infant deaths are called fetal deaths. In developing countries, much of the data come from hospitals, yet most birth do not occur in hospitals. Even in surveys, bias exists, such as problems with recall. Many researchers use traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to follow up on all births in an area which may eliminate some biases. Such a prospective and longitudinal study in Trairi county in northeastern Brazil shows the infant mortality rate to be less than half of the official rate (65 vs. 142). The major causes of infant death in developed countries, which tends to occur in the neonatal period, are low birth weight, prematurity, birth complications, and congenital defects; developing countries; they are vaccine preventable infectious diseases, diarrhea and dehydration, and respiratory illnesses, all complicated by malnutrition. To make further strides in reducing infant mortality, public health workers must concentrate on the neonatal period. Training TBAs in sterile techniques, appropriate technology, resuscitation of infants, and identification of potential problems is a positive step. Yet, unpredictable conditions (e.g., AIDS) exist and/or will arise which erode improvements. For example, in Nicaragua, within 1 year after the new government introduced health budget cuts which resulted in the poor paying for

  19. Infant Respiratory Outcomes Associated with Prenatal Exposure to Maternal 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Vaccination

    Fell, Deshayne B.; Wilson, Kumanan; Ducharme, Robin; Hawken, Steven; Sprague, Ann E.; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Graeme; Wen, Shi Wu; Walker, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infants are at high risk for influenza illness, but are ineligible for vaccination before 6 months. Transfer of maternal antibodies to the fetus has been demonstrated for 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccines; however, clinical effectiveness is unknown. Our objective was to evaluate the association between 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccination during pregnancy and rates of infant influenza and pneumonia. Methods We linked a population-based birth cohort to administrative databases to measure rates of influenza and pneumonia diagnosed during ambulatory physician visits, hospitalizations and emergency department visits during one year of follow-up. We estimated incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using Poisson regression, comparing infants born to A/H1N1-vaccinated women (vaccine-exposed infants) with unexposed infants, adjusted for confounding using high-dimensional propensity scores. Results Among 117,335 infants in the study, 36,033 (31%) were born to A/H1N1-vaccinated women. Crude rates of influenza during the pandemic (per 100,000 infant-days) for vaccine-exposed and unexposed infants were similar (2.19, 95% CI: 1.27–3.76 and 3.60, 95% CI: 2.51–5.14, respectively), as were crude rates of influenza and pneumonia combined. We did not observe any significant differences in rates of study outcomes between study groups during the second wave of the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic, nor during any post-pandemic time period. Conclusion We observed no difference in rates of study outcomes among infants born to A/H1N1-vaccinated mothers relative to unexposed infants born during the second A/H1N1 pandemic wave; however, due to late availability of the pandemic vaccine, the available follow-up time during the pandemic time period was very limited. PMID:27486858

  20. Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum Presenting as Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease A Rare Case Report

    Rajendra Gokhroo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available   Cor triatriatum is an acyanotic congenital heart disease. We present a rare case of cor triatriatum sinistrum in a 6-month-old female infant who was presented with cyanosis and failure to thrive. The 2D transthoracic echocardiography and the Doppler color flow imaging showed a proximal venous chamber communicating to the distal left atrium  through restrictive opening to the low-pressure, distal left atrial chamber. The Saline Contrast Echocardiography confirmed a right-to-left atrial shunt due to a minor atrial septal defect. The defect was caused by a persistent pulmonary hypertension which had raised the right atrial pressure in the infant. To the best of our knowledge, barely any such cases have been reported in the literature so far. Our report highlights the clinical utility of the Saline Contrast Echo in other cases of congenital heart diseases.

  1. Pilot Study of Low-Income Parents' Perspectives of Managing Asthma In High-Risk Infants and Toddlers

    Koenig, Karel

    2007-01-01

    This pilot study describes the challenges low-income parents face in managing asthma in their infants and toddlers who are at high risk of morbidity due to asthma. Five families of children younger than 3 years and recently hospitalized for asthma were interviewed from 1 to 5 times and asked to give narratives about the everyday management of asthma in their high risk infants and toddlers. Interpretive phenomenology was used as the method to describe parents' perspectives on managing the illn...

  2. Infants-feeding practices and their relationship with socio-economic and health conditions in Lahore, Pakistan

    Saadia Ijaz; Tayyaba Ijaz; Raja Kamran Afzal; Muhammad Masood Afzal; Osama Mukhtar; Nayab Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pakistan, has high infant mortality rate. Among every 1000 live births 0.76% becomes the victim of death due to malnutrition and fatal infections. Therefore, feeding modes and practices may serve as important factors for assessment of an infant's growth and nutritional status. This study was designed to assess the exclusive breast feeding rate, frequency of diseases during breast feeding, status of breast feeding along with weaning, level of education, occupation and socio-economi...

  3. Development of Translational Methods in Spectral Analysis of Human Infant Crying and Rat Pup Ultrasonic Vocalizations for Early Neurobehavioral Assessment

    Philip Sanford Zeskind; McMurray, Matthew S.; Kristin Ann Garber; Juliana Miriam Neuspiel; Elizabeth Thomas Cox; Grewen, Karen M.; Mayes, Linda C.; Johns, Josephine M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development of translational methods by which spectrum analysis of human infant crying and rat pup ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) can be used to assess potentially adverse effects of various prenatal conditions on early neurobehavioral development. The study of human infant crying has resulted in a rich set of measures that has long been used to assess early neurobehavioral insult due to non-optimal prenatal environments, even among seemingly he...

  4. Non-immune hydrops fetalis: Clinical experience in newborn infants

    Pejić Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Non-immune hydrops fetalis is a condition of excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid without identifiable circulating antibody to erythrocytes membrane antigens. In newborn infants it is characterized by skin oedema and pleural, pericardial or peritoneal effusion. In the era of routine Rh immunization for the prevention of foetal erythroblastosis, non-immune pathophysiologic mechanisms are presented in 76-87% of all hydropic newborns. Non-immune hydrops fetalis can be associated with numerous and various disorders. The mortality rate may exceed 50%. This study was aimed at presenting our clinical experience in treating newborn infants with non-immune hydrops fetalis. Material and methods. A retrospective-prospective study included newborn infants with non-immune hydrops fetalis, who were treated in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Mother and Child Health Institute of Serbia between January 1, 2001 and October 31, 2010. All valid data about aetiology, diagnosis, clinical course and outcome were recorded. Results. The diagnosis of non-immune hydrops fetalis was made in 11 newborns. The etiologic diagnosis was established in 8 patients: anaemia due to fetomaternal transfusion in 4 patients and conatal cytomegalovirus infection, intracranial haemorrhage, isolated pulmonary lymphangiectasia and diffuse skin and mediastinal lymphangiomatosis in the remaining 4 patients. Conclusion. Non-immune hydrops of newborn infant is associated with a high mortality rate and requires complex diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. An optimal management of neonates with non-immune hydrops fetalis demands a multidisciplinary approach to the treatment in a neonatal intensive care unit.

  5. Vestibular Stimulation and Development of the Small Premature Infant.

    Neal, Mary V.

    This study was designed to explore the effects of vestibular stimulation on the developmental behavior, respiratory functioning, weight and length gains, and morbidity and mortality rates of premature infants. A total of 20 infants participated in this study in 4 groups of 5 infants each. Group A infants were placed in a motorized hammock within…

  6. Infant Negative Emotionality and Attachment: Implications for Preschool Intelligence

    Karrass, Jan; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.

    2004-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the extent to which dimensions of infant negative temperament in the first year predicted IQ at age 3, and whether these associations depended on the quality of the infant-mother attachment relationship. In a sample of 63 infant-mother dyads, mothers completed Rothbart's (1981) IBQ when infants were 4 and 12…

  7. Marital Aggression Predicts Infant Orienting toward Mother at Six Months

    Parade, Stephanie H.; Leerkes, Esther M.

    2011-01-01

    Links between marital aggression and infant orienting toward mother in fearful and frustrating contexts were examined in 92 mother-infant dyads when infants were 6 months. Results demonstrated that marital aggression was linked with less orienting toward mothers in frustrating situations, in fearful situations marital aggression was linked with less orienting among infants who were high on fear reactivity only.

  8. Breastfeeding and the Mother-Infant Relationship--A Review

    Jansen, Jarno; de Weerth, Carolina; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne

    2008-01-01

    A positive effect of breastfeeding on the mother-infant relationship is often assumed in the scientific literature, but this has not been systematically reviewed. This review aims to clarify the role of breastfeeding in the mother-infant relationship, which is conceptualized as the maternal bond toward the infant and infant attachment toward the…

  9. A unique case of extra-group infant adoption in free-ranging Angola black and white colobus monkeys (Colobus angolensis palliatus).

    Dunham, Noah Thomas; Opere, Paul Otieno

    2016-04-01

    Infant adoption has been reported in a variety of primate taxa both in captive and natural settings. Adoption by females may be adaptive by increasing inclusive fitness via shared genes between adoptive mother and adoptee or by providing valuable maternal practice which, in turn, may increase the female's future reproductive success. Others have argued that adoption may be non-adaptive and the result of a general attraction toward infants. Our study examines a unique case of adoption by an adult female Angola black and white colobus monkey (Colobus angolensis palliatus) who adopted an extra-group infant alongside her own biological infant. We compare infant behaviors and mother-infant interactions between biological infant and adoptee and then compare both biological infant and adoptee behavioral profiles to those of infants under normal circumstances. Data were collected from July 2014 to June 2015 on three habituated groups in the Diani Forest of Kenya. Scan sampling and pooled data were used to create daily and monthly behavioral profiles for the biological infant and adoptee, as well as a mean monthly profile of four infants under normal circumstances. Data include time spent (1) clinging to mother/adoptive mother, (2) clinging to another individual, (3) behaving independently, and (4) behaving in close proximity to mother/adoptive mother. Initially, the adoptee struggled to achieve behavioral profiles consistent with those of the biological infant and normal colobus infants of the same age as he spent significantly more time moving independently and significantly less time clinging to the adoptive mother. After the mysterious death of the biological infant in mid-January 2015, the adoptee assumed a behavioral profile similar to that of infants under normal conditions. This case does not support adaptive hypotheses for adoption (i.e., inclusive fitness or learning to mother). Instead, because the biological infant died, possibly due to the presence of the

  10. Pacifier Use, Finger Sucking, and Infant Sleep.

    Butler, Rachel; Moore, Melisa; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    Few studies to date have investigated the relationship between pacifier use or finger sucking and infant sleep. One hundred and four mothers of infants (ages 0-11 months) completed the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ). Infants who engaged in finger sucking had fewer night wakings and longer stretches of nighttime sleep, although less daytime sleep. There were no significant differences in sleep patterns between pacifier users and infants who did not engage in nonnutritive sucking. Furthermore, no significant differences were found across groups for sleep ecology, including parental involvement at bedtime and following night wakings. Finally, infants were consistently able to retrieve their pacifiers independently by 7 months of age, although this did not appear to be associated with sleep outcomes. Results suggest that when parents are deciding whether to give their infant a pacifier, sleep may not be a critical factor. In contrast, parents of finger and thumb suckers should be reassured that this nonnutritive sucking is beneficial to sleep, at least in the first year of life. PMID:26548755

  11. MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR INFANT COLIC (IN SPANISH

    González-Coquel Suanny del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: infant colic is a frequent problem in pediatric consultation, it has a prevalence from 15 to 40% in children younger than four months old, independently of the type of breast feeding administered. It usually generates anxiety to carers and even to pediatricians. Objective: to identify which one is the best alternative for infantile colic management. Methodology: a search was realized on the web in different databases of scientific articles. Systematic reviews, clinical trials and abstracts were considered. There were analyzed the different alternatives proposed for the managing of colic. RESULTS: infantile colic is multifactorial. Treatment options include the use of milkbased extensively hydrolyzed protein, lactose-free milk or soy protein-based, behavioral therapy, breastfeeding and use of drugs as: simethicone, dicyclomine and probiotics. Milks based on extensively hydrolyzed proteins are effective in infants with atopy history. Soy milk can generate unwanted effects in the reproductive system and crossreactive with proteins in cow’s milk effects, which is not recommended. Some studies have showed the efficiency of dicyclomine, nevertheless, it has important adverse effects. Administration of Lactobacillus reuteri has shown efficacy and appears to be an important therapeutic. CONCLUSION: changes in infant formula, drugs, behavioral measures and recently probiotics (L. Reuteri are proposed and recommended for an undefined cause benign and self-limited course. Rev.cienc.biomed. 2014;5(1:100-106 KEYWORDS Colic, Infant, Infant care, Infant welfare, Infant nutrition.

  12. Speech vs. singing: infants choose happier sounds.

    Corbeil, Marieve; Trehub, Sandra E; Peretz, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Infants prefer speech to non-vocal sounds and to non-human vocalizations, and they prefer happy-sounding speech to neutral speech. They also exhibit an interest in singing, but there is little knowledge of their relative interest in speech and singing. The present study explored infants' attention to unfamiliar audio samples of speech and singing. In Experiment 1, infants 4-13 months of age were exposed to happy-sounding infant-directed speech vs. hummed lullabies by the same woman. They listened significantly longer to the speech, which had considerably greater acoustic variability and expressiveness, than to the lullabies. In Experiment 2, infants of comparable age who heard the lyrics of a Turkish children's song spoken vs. sung in a joyful/happy manner did not exhibit differential listening. Infants in Experiment 3 heard the happily sung lyrics of the Turkish children's song vs. a version that was spoken in an adult-directed or affectively neutral manner. They listened significantly longer to the sung version. Overall, happy voice quality rather than vocal mode (speech or singing) was the principal contributor to infant attention, regardless of age. PMID:23805119

  13. Spontaneously resolving macular cyst in an infant

    Anuradha Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe transient macular cysts in an infant and correlate their occurrence with normal development events. A newborn Caucasian girl presented with a protruding corneal mass in her left eye at birth. She underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. A keratinized staphylomatous malformation involving the entire cornea and precluding further visualization of the anterior and posterior segment was observed in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT of the right eye performed when the child was approximately 6-week-old had revealed an unexpected finding of macular cysts involving the inner nuclear and outer retinal layers. Corneal transplant in the left eye was performed a month later. Ocular examination under anesthesia just prior to surgery revealed normal intraocular pressure, anterior segment and retina in the right eye. SD-OCT was normal in both eyes and showed complete resolution of the cysts in the right eye. The patient had not been on any medications at that time. Although clinical retinal examination might be unremarkable, SD-OCT may reveal cystic spaces in the macula. In the absence of conditions known to be associated with macular edema, transient macular cysts may arise due to a developmental incompetence of the blood-retinal barrier or may represent transient spaces created during normal migration of retinal cells. Further study is warranted to delineate the entity of transient macular cysts in infancy.

  14. [Severe vitamin B12 deficiency in infants breastfed by vegans].

    Roed, Casper; Skovby, Flemming; Lund, Allan Meldgaard

    2009-10-19

    Weight loss and reduction of motor skills resulted in paediatric evaluation of a 10-month-old girl and a 12-month-old boy. Both children suffered form anaemia and delayed development due to vitamin B12 deficiency caused by strict maternal vegan diet during pregnancy and nursing. Therapy with cyanocobalamin was instituted with remission of symptoms. Since infants risk irreversible neurologic damage following severe vitamin B12 deficiency, early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Vegan and vegetarian women should take vitamin B12 supplementation during the pregnancy and nursing period. PMID:19852900

  15. Controversies Surrounding Clostridium difficile Infection in Infants and Young Children

    Maribeth R. Nicholson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a frequent cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults and older children. However, as many as 80% of infants can be asymptomatically colonized. The reasons for this have not been well established but are believed to be due to differences in toxin receptors or toxin internalization. Determining which children who test positive for C. difficile warrant treatment is exceedingly difficult, especially in the setting of increased rates of detection and the rising risk of disease in children lacking classic risk factors for C. difficile.

  16. Effect of tilting on cerebral hemodynamics in preterm and term infants

    Pichler, G; van Boetzelar, MC; Muller, W; Urlesberger, B

    2001-01-01

    Tilting is known to cause changes in hemodynamics due to hydrostatic pressure. The present study is an analysis of changes in cerebral hemodynamics measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) following tilting up and down in preterm and term infants. A significantly different effect of tilting up

  17. 78 FR 20511 - Safety Standard for Soft Infant and Toddler Carriers

    2013-04-05

    ... issued a proposed rule on handheld infant carriers (77 FR 73354 (Dec. 10, 2012)). Hazards associated with... carrier due to fastener problems, large leg openings, stitching or seam problems, or straps that slip. A... products with rigid parts that move past one another; such a hazard does not generally exist with...

  18. Is near-infrared spectroscopy clinically useful in the preterm infant?

    da Costa, Cristine Sortica; Greisen, Gorm; Austin, Topun

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been used to study cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation in the preterm infant for many years, but its use as a clinical tool has remained elusive. This has partly been due to the challenges of providing a continuous quantitative measurement that is valid an...

  19. Review of Infant Feeding: Key Features of Breast Milk and Infant Formula

    Camilia R. Martin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mothers’ own milk is the best source of nutrition for nearly all infants. Beyond somatic growth, breast milk as a biologic fluid has a variety of other benefits, including modulation of postnatal intestinal function, immune ontogeny, and brain development. Although breastfeeding is highly recommended, breastfeeding may not always be possible, suitable or solely adequate. Infant formula is an industrially produced substitute for infant consumption. Infant formula attempts to mimic the nutritional composition of breast milk as closely as possible, and is based on cow’s milk or soymilk. A number of alternatives to cow’s milk-based formula also exist. In this article, we review the nutritional information of breast milk and infant formulas for better understanding of the importance of breastfeeding and the uses of infant formula from birth to 12 months of age when a substitute form of nutrition is required.

  20. Visual evoked potentials in infants and children.

    Taylor, M J; McCulloch, D L

    1992-07-01

    Visual evoked potential (VEP) studies are of great value in a wide variety of pediatric patients, including those with disorders of the sensory visual pathway and those at risk for visual pathway damage. VEPs are simple, non-invasive, and are particularly appropriate for infants and young children who cannot communicate visual symptoms or cooperate for standard vision assessment. VEPs in pediatric patients have the following main purposes: (1) detecting lesions causing dysfunction of the sensory visual pathways (the VEP is a sensitive indicator of subclinical lesions and can be used to differentiate visual impairment from visual inattention in young infants); (2) confirming functional loss when disorders of the visual system are present; (3) quantifying visual impairment in patients with known visual disorders, accomplished either empirically by noting the severity of the VEP abnormality to flash and pattern stimuli or by visual acuity estimation studies (early quantification of vision loss allows referral to early intervention programs, which can ameliorate the long-term consequences of the disability); (4) monitoring patients who are at risk for visual complications either from diseases (such as hydrocephalus or neurofibromatosis) or as a complication of therapeutic intervention (e.g., neurosurgery, chemotherapy) to help detect and avoid long-term sequelae of such therapies on the developing nervous system; (5) establishing prognosis for visual and systemic recovery based on flash VEPs for specific pediatric disorders including perinatal asphyxia in full-term neonates, acute-onset cortical blindness, and, to a fair extent, in comatose children; and (6) in some cases, contributing to the differential diagnosis. Abnormalities of flash and/or pattern VEPs are generally nonspecific to the type of exact location of the lesion, except in distinguishing prefrom postchiasmal lesions. However, in certain conditions, such as the hereditary ataxias of childhood, VEP

  1. Parental responsibility and the Infant Bioethics Committee.

    Fleischman, A R

    1990-01-01

    The prognosis is not good for an infant whose entire intestine has been destroyed by necrotizing enterocolitis. An infant bioethics committee is asked to advise whether the parents should be offered the option of total parenteral intravenous nutrition, with its ultimately fatal complications, for their child. Committee members agree that the option of intravenous feeding should be offered, and that it is morally acceptable for the parents to refuse it. Fleischman reviews the issues that an infant bioethics committee must consider when it is asked to help decide what treatment options will be discussed with the family of a seriously ill neonate. PMID:2108103

  2. [Infant psychiatry - more reality than tale].

    Puura, Kaija; Tamminen, Tuula

    2016-01-01

    In early childhood, the ability of the parent and the child to adapt to each other's needs during early interaction is essential for a healthy mental development.The parent's ability to carry out adequate early interaction may be compromised because of various problems. Positive, shared emotional experiences with the parent can protect the child's mental health. Severe or prolonged problems in baby care, interaction or behavior of the infant may result in the development of a psychic disorder in the infant. Infant psychiatric diagnosis and treatment plan are based on clinical examination of the child and the family and evaluation of the need for support. PMID:27382831

  3. Radiodiagnosis of meconial diseases in infants

    An analysis of X-ray data on 21 infants with meconial diseases including 7 with meconial peritonitis, 2 with colon perforation (1) and appendix perforation (1) resulting from Hirschprung's disease, 10 with intestimal obstruction and 2 with the meconium plung syndrome was performed. Obstruction type was correctly established in 13 infants. Methods of examination of infants with low intestinal obstruction permitting one to raise diagnostic accuracy, were presented. Expediency of conservative treatment of meconial obstruction with gastrografin was shown basing on literature data

  4. Speech versus singing: Infants choose happier sounds

    Marieve eCorbeil; Trehub, Sandra E.; Isabelle ePeretz

    2013-01-01

    Infants prefer speech to non-vocal sounds and to non-human vocalizations, and they prefer happy-sounding speech to neutral speech. They also exhibit an interest in singing, but there is little knowledge of their relative interest in speech and singing. The present study explored infants’ attention to unfamiliar audio samples of speech and singing. In Experiment 1, infants 4-13 months of age were exposed to happy-sounding infant-directed speech versus hummed lullabies by the same woman. They l...

  5. Neonatal osteomyelitis in Nigerian infants

    Twenty-seven Nigerian infants with osteomyelitis are presented during the first 28 days of life to highlight the severity of the clinical manifestations and the radiological features of this infection. The clinical signs inlcude limitation of movement of the extremities involved and localised swelling. Severe constitutional changes such as fever (>390C) and abdominal distension were common. This contrasts with results from North America and Europe which emphasize the paucity of clinical signs despite involvement of multiple sites. Multiple site involvement was encountered in only eight cases. Staphylococcus aureus, proteus mirabilis and candida albicans were the main pathogens isolated. The long bones were more frequently affected. Aggressive bone destruction was a constant radiological finding peculiar to Staphylococcal osteomyelitis while the formation of Sequestrum, are rare occurrence in the newborn, was present in six patients. The mortality rate was 7.4% and the morbidity rate was equally low. (orig.)

  6. Pathomorphological findings in preterm infants

    Pathomorphology in the preterm infant represents an interaction of morphological organ immaturity and neonatal management with their respective sequelae. Pathomorphological examples include the modification in the morphology of hyaline membrane disease and bronchopulmonary dysplasia as a consequence of modern neonatal therapy. Hemorrhagic and ischemic/hypoxic lesions of the central nervous system may occur in age- and agent-related distributional patterns, with subependymal hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia representing the most important examples. The most common intestinal finding, namely, necrotizing enterocolitis, typically shows segmental alterations, the morphology of which largely depends on the dominating causative agent. Hepatic cholestasis and fatty change are mostly consequences of parenteral nutrition or hypoxic/ischemic stress. Hepatic necrosis can be associated with the latter, but may also indicate disseminated intravascular coagulation. Vascular pathomorphology is represented by thromembolic lesions, in most instances corresponding to sequelae of neonatal management. (orig.)

  7. Lamotrigine Effects on Breastfed Infants

    Hosein Dalili

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lamotrigine is a safe anti-epileptic drug among pregnant and lactating women. Some concerns exist regarding the safety of lamotrigine during breastfeeding and related neonatal complications. In this brief review, this matter was evaluated and discussed. In this review study, the medical literature available in search databases such as Embase, Scopus, PubMed, and Medline and even also local medical search engines were evaluated. The results indicated that lamotrigine is a safe anti-epileptic drug for breastfeeding women with rare and usually mild adverse effects among neonates exposed to high milk concentration of this drug and its metabolites. However, close periodical monitoring for infants whose mothers are utilizing lamotrigine is recommended to decrease the probability of severe side effects among them.

  8. Neonatal osteomyelitis in Nigerian infants

    Omene, J.A.; Okolo, A.A.; Odita, J.C.

    1984-07-01

    Twenty-seven Nigerian infants with osteomyelitis are presented during the first 28 days of life to highlight the severity of the clinical manifestations and the radiological features of this infection. The clinical signs include limitation of movement of the extremities involved and localised swelling. Severe constitutional changes such as fever (>39/sup 0/C) and abdominal distension were common. This contrasts with results from North America and Europe which emphasize the paucity of clinical signs despite involvement of multiple sites. Multiple site involvement was encountered in only eight cases. Staphylococcus aureus, proteus mirabilis and candida albicans were the main pathogens isolated. The long bones were more frequently affected. Aggressive bone destruction was a constant radiological finding peculiar to Staphylococcal osteomyelitis while the formation of Sequestrum, are rare occurrence in the newborn, was present in six patients. The mortality rate was 7.4% and the morbidity rate was equally low.

  9. Human due diligence.

    Harding, David; Rouse, Ted

    2007-04-01

    Most companies do a thorough job of financial due diligence when they acquire other companies. But all too often, deal makers simply ignore or underestimate the significance of people issues in mergers and acquisitions. The consequences are severe. Most obviously, there's a high degree of talent loss after a deal's announcement. To make matters worse, differences in decision-making styles lead to infighting; integration stalls; and productivity declines. The good news is that human due diligence can help companies avoid these problems. Done early enough, it helps acquirers decide whether to embrace or kill a deal and determine the price they are willing to pay. It also lays the groundwork for smooth integration. When acquirers have done their homework, they can uncover capability gaps, points of friction, and differences in decision making. Even more important, they can make the critical "people" decisions-who stays, who goes, who runs the combined business, what to do with the rank and file-at the time the deal is announced or shortly thereafter. Making such decisions within the first 30 days is critical to the success of a deal. Hostile situations clearly make things more difficult, but companies can and must still do a certain amount of human due diligence to reduce the inevitable fallout from the acquisition process and smooth the integration. This article details the steps involved in conducting human due diligence. The approach is structured around answering five basic questions: Who is the cultural acquirer? What kind of organization do you want? Will the two cultures mesh? Who are the people you most want to retain? And how will rank-and-file employees react to the deal? Unless an acquiring company has answered these questions to its satisfaction, the acquisition it is making will be very likely to end badly. PMID:17432159

  10. Upper airway radiographs in infants with upper airway insufficiency.

    Tonkin, S L; Davis, S.L.; Gunn, T R

    1994-01-01

    Upper airway measurements in nine infants considered to be at risk of upper airway insufficiency, six of whom presented after an apnoeic episode, were compared with measurements taken in two age groups of healthy infants. Paired, inspiratory and expiratory, lateral upper airway radiographs were obtained while the infants were awake and breathing quietly. The radiographs of all nine infants demonstrated narrowing in the oropharyngeal portion of the airway during inspiration and in six infants ...

  11. Temperamental precursors of infant attachment with mothers and fathers☆

    Planalp, Elizabeth M.; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which parent sensitivity and infant temperament distinguish attachment classification was examined. Multilevel modeling was used to assess the effect of parent sensitivity and infant temperament on infant–mother and infant–father attachment. Data were collected from mothers, fathers, and their infants (N = 135) when the infant was 3-, 5-, 7-, 12-, and 14-months old. Temperament was measured using the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (Gartstein & Rothbart, 2003); parent sens...

  12. Transdermal estradiol treatment during breastfeeding: maternal and infant serum concentrations.

    Pinheiro, Emily; Bogen, Debra L; Hoxha, Denada; Wisner, Katherine L

    2016-04-01

    We examined estradiol (E2) and estrone (E1) concentrations in breastfeeding mother-infant dyads. The mothers had postpartum depression and were participants in a randomized clinical trial with three treatments (transdermal E2, sertraline, and placebo). Neither infant E1 and E2 concentrations nor infant growth differed across the treatments. Transdermal E2 administration of 50 to 200 mcg/day for breastfeeding women did not affect infant E1 or E2 concentrations or infant growth. PMID:25956588

  13. Progress in developing an infant and child feeding index

    Arimond, Mary; Ruel, Marie T.

    2002-01-01

    "Feeding practices are an important determinant of the nutritional status of infants and children. It is therefore useful to measure and describe infant and child feeding practices in a number of contexts. Such measurements could enable (1) international comparisons of the adequacy of infant and child feeding, (2) research linking infant and child feeding to determinants or outcomes, (3) advocacy regarding the importance of adequate infant and child feeding, and (4) monitoring and evaluation ...

  14. Motor Developmental Status of Moderately Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    TAVASOLI, Azita; Aliabadi, Faranak; Eftekhari, Rooholah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Motor development is frequently reported to be impaired in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, but little is known about the moderately low birth weight (MLBW) infants. The aim of this study was to investigate whether MLBW preterm infants present developmental delay. Methods: In a historical cohort study, 18±2 month-old infants with a history of low birth weight (LBW) were identified. All infants with complications of LBW with negative effects on development were excluded. Health...

  15. Relationship between maternal contingent responsiveness and infant social expectations

    Mcquaid, Nancy Ella

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between maternal contingent responsiveness and 4- and 5-month-old infants' (N = 61) social expectation behaviour in a Still Face procedure. Mothers were asked to interact with their infants for 2 minutes (Interactive phase), remain still-faced for 1 minute (Still Face phase), and resume interaction for 2 minutes. Mother and infant behaviour was assessed for the frequency of infant and mother smiles, mother smiles that were contingent to infant smiles d...

  16. Management of inguinal hernia in premature infants: 10-year experience

    Stanley John Crankson; Khalil Al Tawil; Mohammad Al Namshan; Saud Al Jadaan; Beverly Jane Baylon; Mutaz Gieballa; Ibrahim Hakim Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Debatable issues in the management of inguinal hernia in premature infants remain unresolved. This study reviews our experience in the management of inguinal hernia in premature infants. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart review of premature infants with inguinal hernia from 1999 to 2009. Infants were grouped into 2: Group 1 had repair (HR) just before discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and Group 2 after discharge. Results: Eighty four premature infants were i...

  17. Multiple sevoflurane exposures in infant monkeys do not impact the mother-infant bond.

    Raper, Jessica; Bush, Angela; Murphy, Kathy L; Baxter, Mark G; Alvarado, Maria C

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to general anesthesia during the postnatal period is associated with death of brain cells as well as long-term impairments in cognitive and emotional behavior in animal models. These models are critical for investigating mechanisms of pediatric anesthetic neurotoxicity as well as for testing potential strategies for preventing or mitigating this toxicity. Control conditions for anesthesia exposure involve separation of conscious infants from their mothers for variable periods of time, which could have its own effect on subsequent behavior because of stress to the mother and/or infant as a consequence of separation.We are conducting a long-term study of infant rhesus monkeys exposed three times for 4h each to sevoflurane anesthesia during the first six postnatal weeks, with a comparison condition of control infant monkeys that undergo brief maternal separations on the same schedule, to equate the period of time each infant is conscious and separated from its mother. Because mothers are separated from their infants longer for infants in the anesthesia condition, this could modify maternal behavior toward the infant, which may influence subsequent socioemotional behavior in the infants. In this study, we analyzed maternal behavior immediately after the first post-anesthesia (or control) reunion, as well as during reintroduction of the mother-infant pair to the larger social group 24 hpost-anesthesia or control separation, and found no differences between the conditions with mothers spending most of their time in contact with infants in all conditions analyzed. This indicates that the different durations of maternal separation in this study design do not impact the mother-infant bond, strengthening conclusions that subsequent differences in behavior between monkeys exposed to anesthesia compared to controls are a consequence of anesthesia exposure and not differential maternal behavior in the two conditions. PMID:26878984

  18. Supervised and semi-supervised infant-directed speech classification for parent-infant interaction analysis

    Mahdhaoui, Ammar; Chetouani, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper describes the development of an infant-directed speech discrimination system for parent-infant interaction analysis. Different feature sets for emotion recognition were investigated using two classification techniques: supervised and semi-supervised. The classification experiments were carried out with short pre-segmented adult-directed speech and infant-directed speech segments extracted from real-life family home movies (with durations typically between 0.5 s ...

  19. Costs and Infant Outcomes After Implementation of a Care Process Model for Febrile Infants

    Reynolds, Carolyn C.; Korgenski, Kent; Sheng, Xiaoming; Valentine, Karen J.; Nelson, Richard E.; Daly, Judy A.; Osguthorpe, Russell J.; James, Brent; Savitz, Lucy; Pavia, Andrew T.; Clark, Edward B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Febrile infants in the first 90 days may have life-threatening serious bacterial infection (SBI). Well-appearing febrile infants with SBI cannot be distinguished from those without by examination alone. Variation in care resulting in both undertreatment and overtreatment is common. METHODS: We developed and implemented an evidence-based care process model (EB-CPM) for the management of well-appearing febrile infants in the Intermountain Healthcare System. We report an observational study describing changes in (1) care delivery, (2) outcomes of febrile infants, and (3) costs before and after implementation of the EB-CPM in a children’s hospital and in regional medical centers. RESULTS: From 2004 through 2009, 8044 infants had 8431 febrile episodes, resulting in medical evaluation. After implementation of the EB-CPM in 2008, infants in all facilities were more likely to receive evidence-based care including appropriate diagnostic testing, determination of risk for SBI, antibiotic selection, decreased antibiotic duration, and shorter hospital stays (P < .001 for all). In addition, more infants had a definitive diagnosis of urinary tract infection or viral illness (P < .001 for both). Infant outcomes improved with more admitted infants positive for SBI (P = .011), and infants at low risk for SBI were more often managed without antibiotics (P < .001). Although hospital admissions were shortened by 27%, there were no cases of missed SBI. Health Care costs were also reduced, with the mean cost per admitted infant decreasing from $7178 in 2007 to $5979 in 2009 (−17%, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The EB-CPM increased evidence-based care in all facilities. Infant outcomes improved and costs were reduced, substantially improving value. PMID:22732178

  20. Comparison of the Effect of Two Human Milk Fortifiers on Clinical Outcomes in Premature Infants

    Melissa Thoene

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of human milk fortifiers (HMF helps to meet the high nutritional requirements of the human milk-fed premature infant. Previously available powdered products have not met the protein requirements of the preterm infant population and many neonatologists add powder protein modulars to help meet protein needs. The use of powdered products is discouraged in neonatal intensive care units (NICU due to concern for invasive infection. The use of a commercially available acidified liquid product with higher protein content was implemented to address these two concerns. During the course of this implementation, poor growth and clinically significant acidosis of infants on Acidified Liquid HMF (ALHMF was observed. The purpose of this study was to quantify those observations by comparing infant outcomes between groups receiving the ALHMF vs. infants receiving powdered HMF (PHMF. A retrospective chart review compared outcomes of human milk-fed premature infants <2000 g receiving the ALHMF (n = 23 and the PHMF (n = 46. Infant growth, enteral feeding tolerance and provision, and incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC, metabolic acidosis, and diaper dermatitis were compared between the two groups. No infants were excluded from this study based on acuity. Use of ALHMF resulted in a higher incidence of metabolic acidosis (p = 0.002. Growth while on HMF as measured in both g/kg/day (10.59 vs. 15.37, p < 0.0001 and in g/day (23.66 vs. 31.27, p = 0.0001 was slower in the ALHMF group, on increased mean cal/kg/day (128.7 vs. 117.3, p = 0.13 with nearly twice as many infants on the ALHMF requiring increased fortification of enteral feedings beyond 24 cal/ounce to promote adequate growth (48% vs. 26%, p = 0.10. Although we were not powered to study NEC as a primary outcome, NEC was significantly increased in the ALHMF group. (13% vs. 0%, p = 0.03. Use of a LHMF in an unrestricted NICU population resulted in an increase in clinical complications within a high

  1. Association between Infant Feeding and Early Postpartum Infant Body Composition: A Pilot Prospective Study

    Alex Kojo Anderson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Research studies have produced conflicting results of the impact of breastfeeding on overweight/obesity. This study evaluated the impact of infant feeding on infant body composition. There were two groups of mother-infant pairs (exclusive breastfeeding [EBF; n=27] and mixed feeding [MF; n=13] in this study. At baseline, participants were similar in their demographic characteristics except prepregnancy weight, where MF mothers tended to be heavier than their EBF counterparts (67.3 kg versus 59.9 kg; P=.034. Infant birth weight was slightly higher among the MF group than their EBF counterparts (3.5 kg versus 3.4 kg, although the differences were not statistically significant. At 3 months postpartum, mean infant FMI (4.1 kg/m2 versus 3.8 kg/m2 and percent body fat (24.4% versus 23.1% were slightly higher among EBF infants than MF infants. In terms of growth velocity, EBF infants gained weight faster than their MF counterparts, although the differences were not statistically significant. The findings from this study suggest that EBF may promote faster weight gain and increase in both fat mass index (FMI and percent body fat in the early postpartum period in addition to the numerous health benefits enjoyed by the infant and the mother who exclusively breastfeeds her newborn.

  2. Mother-infant interaction improves with a developmental intervention for mother-preterm infant dyads.

    White-Traut, Rosemary; Norr, Kathleen F; Fabiyi, Camille; Rankin, Kristin M; Li, Zhyouing; Liu, Li

    2013-12-01

    While premature infants have a high need for positive interactions, both infants and their mothers are challenged by the infant's biological immaturity. This randomized clinical trial of 198 premature infants born at 29-34 weeks gestation and their mothers examined the impact of the H-HOPE (Hospital to Home: Optimizing the Infant's Environment) intervention on mother-premature infant interaction patterns at 6-weeks corrected age (CA). Mothers had at least 2 social environmental risk factors such as minority status or less than high school education. Mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to the H-HOPE intervention group or an attention control group. H-HOPE is an integrated intervention that included (1) twice-daily infant stimulation using the ATVV (auditory, tactile, visual, and vestibular-rocking stimulation) and (2) four maternal participatory guidance sessions plus two telephone calls by a nurse-community advocate team. Mother-infant interaction was assessed at 6-weeks CA using the Nursing Child Assessment Satellite Training-Feeding Scale (NCAST, 76 items) and the Dyadic Mutuality Code (DMC, 6-item contingency scale during a 5-min play session). NCAST and DMC scores for the Control and H-HOPE groups were compared using t-tests, chi-square tests and multivariable analysis. Compared with the Control group (n = 76), the H-HOPE group (n = 66) had higher overall NCAST scores and higher maternal Social-Emotional Growth Fostering Subscale scores. The H-HOPE group also had significantly higher scores for the overall infant subscale and the Infant Clarity of Cues Subscale (p responsiveness during play as measured by the DMC (67.6% versus 58.1% of controls). After adjustment for significant maternal and infant characteristics, H-HOPE dyads had marginally higher scores during feeding on overall mother-infant interaction (β = 2.03, p = 0.06) and significantly higher scores on the infant subscale (β = 0.75, p = 0.05) when compared to controls. In the adjusted

  3. [Thromboembolic events, abortions and a sick infant--unusual presentation of a vitamin deficiency].

    Sturm, I; Hennermann, J B; von Arnim-Baas, A; Driever, P H; Massenkeil, G

    2008-12-01

    Homocysteine is a risk factor for the development of thromboembolic disorders and vascular diseases. Furthermore, complications during pregnancy have been ascribed to hyperhomocysteinemia. We report on a pregnant woman being substituted by high doses folic acid for hyperhomocysteinemia. Thereby, the underlying pernicious anemia was masked. After birth, the neonate was exclusively breastfed. At the age of 5 months, the infant had to be admitted to hospital due to severe vitamin B(12)-deficiency. Using parenteral vitamin B(12) substitution, homocystein levels of the mother normalized and the infant throve and prospered again. PMID:18815762

  4. Effectiveness of Montelukast on asthma control in infants: methodology of a French claims data study

    Belhassen, Manon; De Pouvourville, Gérard; Laforest, Laurent; Brouard, Jacques; de Blic, Jacques; Fauroux, Brigitte; Laigle, Valérie; Chanut-Vogel, Céline; Lamezec, Liliane; Van Ganse, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background This pilot study, conducted on a 1/97th representative sample of French claims data, prepared a project to assess the effectiveness of Montelukast (MTL-4) as add-on therapy for asthma in infants (6–24 months) compared to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), based on real-world data. Due to the very recent opening of French claims data for effectiveness research, and the complex structure of this data source, we first tested the feasibility of identifying infants with asthma and outcome c...

  5. [Aspiration of milk in healthy infant--cause of acute respiratory arrest?].

    Erler, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    We present the case of 4month old female infant, who obviously suffered from a respiratory arrest during bottle-feed ing. After primary successful resuscitation the baby died after 49 days due to large intracranial hemorrages. The diagnosis of shaking trauma was based on the detailed medical examinations and on the case history taken from the police file. The life-threatening shaking trauma is rare as an emergency. Therefore every doctor should be aware of a potential victim in cases of infants who are normal developed without signs of injuries, have no history of a severe disease and show life-threatening symptomes. PMID:17378325

  6. Chest X-ray in newborns and infants; Konventionelle Thoraxdiagnostik bei Neugeborenen und Kleinkindern

    Moritz, Joerg D. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer diagnostische Radiologie, Paediatrische Radiologie und Sonographie

    2012-12-15

    Chest X-ray in newborns and infants shows great differences to that in adults. Therefore all radiologists, who engage in X-rays in this age group, must be familiar with the special features. At the beginning specific items of examination methods are explained, which must be strictly followed due to radiological protection. Focus of the paper is the discussion of the important chest diseases in newborn and infants, which are mostly unknown in chest diagnosis in adults. Many of them can be life-threatening, thus their knowledge is essential. Pathophysiological explanations shall make the special radiological signs understandable. (orig.)

  7. Oxytocin is associated with infant-care behavior and motivation in cooperatively breeding marmoset monkeys.

    Finkenwirth, Christa; Martins, Eloisa; Deschner, Tobias; Burkart, Judith M

    2016-04-01

    The neurohormone oxytocin (OT) is positively involved in the regulation of parenting and social bonding in mammals, and may thus also be important for the mediation of alloparental care. In cooperatively breeding marmosets, infants are raised in teamwork by parents and adult and sub-adult non-reproductive helpers (usually older siblings). Despite high intrinsic motivation, which may be mediated by hormonal priming, not all individuals are always equally able to contribute to infant-care due to competition among care-takers. Among the various care-taking behaviors, proactive food sharing may reflect motivational levels best, since it can be performed ad libitum by several individuals even if competition among surplus care-takers constrains access to infants. Our aim was to study the link between urinary OT levels and care-taking behaviors in group-living marmosets, while taking affiliation with other adults and infant age into account. Over eight reproductive cycles, 26 individuals were monitored for urinary baseline OT, care-taking behaviors (baby-licking, -grooming, -carrying, and proactive food sharing), and adult-directed affiliation. Mean OT levels were generally highest in female breeders and OT increased significantly in all individuals after birth. During early infancy, high urinary OT levels were associated with increased infant-licking but low levels of adult-affiliation, and during late infancy, with increased proactive food sharing. Our results show that, in marmoset parents and alloparents, OT is positively involved in the regulation of care-taking, thereby reflecting the changing needs during infant development. This particularly included behaviors that are more likely to reflect intrinsic care motivation, suggesting a positive link between OT and motivational regulation of infant-care. PMID:26836769

  8. Musical intervention enhances infants' neural processing of temporal structure in music and speech.

    Zhao, T Christina; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2016-05-10

    Individuals with music training in early childhood show enhanced processing of musical sounds, an effect that generalizes to speech processing. However, the conclusions drawn from previous studies are limited due to the possible confounds of predisposition and other factors affecting musicians and nonmusicians. We used a randomized design to test the effects of a laboratory-controlled music intervention on young infants' neural processing of music and speech. Nine-month-old infants were randomly assigned to music (intervention) or play (control) activities for 12 sessions. The intervention targeted temporal structure learning using triple meter in music (e.g., waltz), which is difficult for infants, and it incorporated key characteristics of typical infant music classes to maximize learning (e.g., multimodal, social, and repetitive experiences). Controls had similar multimodal, social, repetitive play, but without music. Upon completion, infants' neural processing of temporal structure was tested in both music (tones in triple meter) and speech (foreign syllable structure). Infants' neural processing was quantified by the mismatch response (MMR) measured with a traditional oddball paradigm using magnetoencephalography (MEG). The intervention group exhibited significantly larger MMRs in response to music temporal structure violations in both auditory and prefrontal cortical regions. Identical results were obtained for temporal structure changes in speech. The intervention thus enhanced temporal structure processing not only in music, but also in speech, at 9 mo of age. We argue that the intervention enhanced infants' ability to extract temporal structure information and to predict future events in time, a skill affecting both music and speech processing. PMID:27114512

  9. Infant Sleep Positioners Pose Suffocation Risk

    ... other caregivers not to put babies in sleep positioning products as two recent deaths underscore concerns about suffocation. ... loose bedding. Advice for Consumers STOP using infant positioning products. Using this type of product to hold an ...

  10. Anesthesia Safe for Infants, Toddlers, Study Says

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159247.html Anesthesia Safe for Infants, Toddlers, Study Says No lingering ... 2016 TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- General anesthesia doesn't seem to harm young children's mental ...

  11. [Infant botulism: case report and review].

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Wilhelm B, Jan; Donoso F, Alejandro

    2009-04-01

    Botulism is a rare disease in Chile and of the known clinical presentation, infant botulism is the most common. We report the case of a previously healthy seven month old male infant with a two weeks history of rinorrea, cough, fatigue, constipation and progressive weakness after the consumption of honey. Stool cultures were positive for Clostridium botulinum group 1 type A and electromyography was compatible with the diagnosis. The patient evolved with arterial hypertension, interpreted as secondary to autonomic dysfunction, which responded to calcium channel blockers. Muscle tone improved progressively during the following four weeks. Infant botulism is a potentially fatal disease; diagnosis can be difficult given the broad clinical manifestations. Prevention should focus on education of parents of infants as well as medical personnel. PMID:19621149

  12. Dengue shock syndrome in an infant.

    Aurpibul, Linda; Khumlue, Punyawee; Issaranggoon na ayuthaya, Satja; Oberdorfer, Peninnah

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection affecting children and adults worldwide. In newborn infants, the dengue virus can cause diseases, especially in infants born to pregnant women hospitalised with dengue or postpartum women with fever. The authors report a case of a term newborn infant who presented with haemodynamic instability and thrombocytopaenia at the age of 7 days, without a history of clinical dengue infection in the mother. The physical examination revealed an afebrile and drowsy infant with a petechial rash all over the body and ecchymosis on both palms and soles. The authors confirmed the diagnosis using the dengue NS1 antigen on the first day of admission. The treatment included fluid management and platelet transfusion. The patient recovered well and was discharged from the hospital on the 10th day of hospitalisation. PMID:25073530

  13. Topiramate and Metabolic Acidosis in Infants

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available The acid-base metabolism was investigated in 9 infants and toddlers, aged 5 months to 2.3 years (median, 6 months, treated with topiramate (TPM for seizures at Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany.

  14. Do Big Bottles Kickstart Infant Weight Issues?

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159241.html Do Big Bottles Kickstart Infant Weight Issues? Smaller baby bottles ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Feeding babies formula from a big bottle might put them at higher risk for ...

  15. Myelination in very low birth weight infants

    The prognostic significance of cerebral myelination was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in very low birth weight infants. Myelination was graded in two specified sites, optic radiation and corpus callosum, based on the stages of normal term babies and healthy premature infants. The subjects were 30 preterm infants weighing less than 1,500 gm at birth. MRI was performed at 4 to 7 months (corrected age). The normal myelination stage was seen in 18 cases, while a delayed stage was noticed in 12 cases. In the normal myelination group, only 1 case (6%) had handicaps. In the delayed myelination group, 8 cases (67%) had handicaps. Our results showed that delayed myelination was closely related to a poor prognosis. We believe that MRI would be a very good imaging modality for predicting the outcome of very low birth weight infants, particularly in terms of evaluation of myelination. (author)

  16. Infant Ear Infections Becoming Less Common

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158002.html Infant Ear Infections Becoming Less Common Just under half of ... 2016 MONDAY, March 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Painful ear infections remain a scourge of childhood, but fewer ...

  17. Learning in Families Together. Infant Brain Development

    DeBord, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This publication is one in a series that reviews tips parents can use to improve the relationships with their children and the learning that happens within the family. This publication deals in particular with infant brain development.

  18. The aetiology of diarrhoea in newborn infants.

    Bishop, R F; Cameron, D J; Barnes, G L; Holmes, I H; Ruck, B J

    1976-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a common problem in newborn infants in hospital nurseries. In the past, sporadic diarrhoea was often attributed to dietary indiscretion by the mother, and epidemic diarrhoea was though to be caused by an unknown infectious agent. Techniques with which to locate non-cultivable viruses and untypable enteropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli allow reevaluation of the aetiology of diarrhoea in newborn infants. Preliminary results from Melbourne, Australia, suggest that most diarrhoea in newborn infants is induced by a specific infectious agent. During 1975 the agent most often identified from sporadic and epidemic diarrhoea in hospital nurseries was a reovirus-like particle ("duovirus"). Enterotoxin-producing strains of E. coli were rarely isolated. Future attempts to protect newborn infants from developing diarrhoea must be based on an accurate understanding of the aetiology of this disease. PMID:186236

  19. Young adults' reactions to infant crying

    Hechler, C.H.; Beijers, R.; Weerth, C. de

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether young childless adults show negative emotions and cognitive disturbances when listening to infant crying, compared to other disturbing noises, and whether negative emotions and cognitive disturbances are associated. METHODS: We tested the cognitive performances and emotiona

  20. Infant developmental milestones and adult intelligence

    Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of studies suggest a positive association between faster infant motor development and intellectual function in childhood and adolescence. However, studies investigating the relationship between infant motor development and intelligence in adulthood are lacking. Aims...... Intelligence Scale (WAIS). Associations between motor developmental milestones and IQwere analysed bymultiple linear regression adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results: Later acquisition of infant developmental milestones was associated with lower subsequent IQ, and the majority of significant....... The effects remained significant after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Conclusion: This is the first study to find significant interactions with parental social status, thereby suggesting that associations between early motor development and intelligence are stronger in infants of low social...