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Sample records for 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress

  1. Peganum Harmala L. Extract Reduces Oxidative Stress and Improves Symptoms in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    Rezaei, Maryam; Nasri, Sima; Roughani, Mehrdad; Niknami, Zeinab; Ziai, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders. There are many documents about the effects of oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease etiology. Angiotensin II activates NADPH dependent oxidases and causes superoxides formation. Peganum harmala L. extract, which has angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effect, is considered to evaluate oxidative stress inhibition and Parkinson's disease improvement. Male rats weighting 200-250 g were divided into 5 groups: Control, Neurotoxin (injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into left hemisphere substantia nigra), Peganum harmala's seeds aqueous extract (10 mg/kg) and captopril (5 mg/kg). Peganum harmala and captopril were injected intraperitonealy -144, -120, -96, -72, -48, -24, -2, 4 and 24 h relative to 6-hydroxydopamine injection time. Muscle stiffness, apomorphine induced unilateral rotation, amount of brain's protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, ACE activity and histology of substantia nigra were assayed in all groups. Peganum harmala improved Muscle stiffness and one-direction rotation behavior significantly. It also reduced brain's lipid and protein oxidation levels in neurotoxin-injected rats significantly. In Peganum harmala group compared to control group, brain's ACE activity was significantly inhibited. In histological study, Peganum harmala prevented degeneration of dopaminergic neurons, too. In conclusion, aqueous extract of Peganum harmala could prevent symptoms and reduced oxidative stress markers in rats with Parkinson's disease induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. PMID:27610168

  2. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-01

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. PMID:27222379

  3. Luteolin modulates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced transcriptional changes of stress response pathways in PC12 cells.

    Ling-Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, which causes transcriptional changes associated with oxidative and proteotoxic stress, has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. The food-derived compound luteolin has multi-target actions including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic activities. The aim of this study is to investigate how luteolin affects 6-OHDA-mediated stress response pathways. The results showed that when PC12 cells were pre-treated with luteolin (20 µM 30 min prior to 6-OHDA (100 µM exposure, 6-OHDA-induced ROS overproduction, cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activation, and mRNA expression of BIM, TRB3 and GADD34 were significantly attenuated. Moreover, 6-OHDA-mediated cell cycle arrest and transcription of p53 target genes, p21, GADD45α and PUMA, were reduced by luteolin. Luteolin also significantly down-regulated 6-OHDA-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR, leading to decreases in phospho-eIF2α, ATF4, GRP78 and CHOP. In addition, luteolin attenuated 6-OHDA-induced Nrf2-mediated HO-1 and GCLC. Taken together, these results suggest that diminishing intracellular ROS formation and down-regulation of p53, UPR and Nrf2-ARE pathways may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of luteolin.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of dimerumic acid and deferricoprogen from Monascus purpureus NTU 568-fermented rice against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in differentiated pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells.

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Context Oxidative stress plays a key role in neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Rice fermented with Monascus purpureus Went (Monascaceae) NTU 568 (red mould rice) was found to contain antioxidants, including dimerumic acid (DMA) and deferricoprogen (DFC). Objective The effects of DMA and DFC on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cytotoxicity and potential protective mechanisms in differentiated PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells were investigated. Materials and methods DMA (0-60 μM) or DFC (0-10 μM) was co-treated with 6-OHDA (200 μM, 24 h exposure) in differentiated PC-12 cells. Cell viability and intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assays, respectively. Cell apoptosis was determined by DNA fragmentation analysis and propidium iodide staining by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to measure the levels of cell protein expression. Results DMA and DFC significantly increased cell viability to 72% and 81% in 6-OHDA-induced differentiated PC-12 cell cultures, respectively. Furthermore, DMA and DFC reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of extracellular and intercellular ROS by 25% and 20%, respectively, and decreased NADPH oxidase-2 expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and decreased activation of caspase-3 via regulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 protein expression in differentiated PC-12 cells. Conclusion DMA and DFC may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by inhibiting ROS formation and apoptosis. These results showed that the metabolites from M. purpureus NTU 568 fermentation were potential therapeutic agents for PD induced by oxidative damage and should be encouraged for further research. PMID:26794209

  5. Neuroprotective Effects of Erucin against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Oxidative Damage in a Dopaminergic-like Neuroblastoma Cell Line

    Giorgio Cantelli-Forti

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS contributes to the cascade leading to the dysfunction or death of dopaminergic neurons during Parkinson’s disease (PD. A strategy to prevent the OS of dopaminergic neurons may be the use of phytochemicals as inducers of endogenous antioxidants and phase 2 enzymes. In this study, we demonstrated that treatment of the dopaminergic-like neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line with isothiocyanate erucin (ER, a compound of cruciferous vegetables, resulted in significant increases of both total glutathione (GSH levels and total antioxidant capacity at the cytosolic level. The increase of GSH levels was associated with an increase in the resistance of SH-SY5Y cells to neuronal death, in terms of apoptosis, induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. The pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with ER was also shown to prevent the redox status impairment, in terms of intracellular ROS and O2•− formation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, early events that are initiators of the apoptotic process, induced by 6-OHDA. Last, the antiapoptotic and antioxidant effects of ER were abolished by buthionine sulfoximine, supporting the main role of GSH in the neuroprotective effects recorded by ER. These results suggest that ER may prevent the oxidative damage induced by 6-OHDA.

  6. Inhibition of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress by l-carnosine in SH-SY5Y cells.

    Oh, Yun-Mi; Jang, Eun-Hee; Ko, Jeong-Hyeon; Kang, Ju-Hee; Park, Chang-Shin; Han, Seung Baik; Kim, Jun Sig; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Pie, Jae-Eun; Shin, Dong Wun

    2009-07-31

    Conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum malfunction (ER stress) play a key role in the development of various human diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. Carnosine is an endogenous peptide, present in excitable tissues such as brain and skeletal muscle. Although there are reports suggesting that carnosine has a biological role independent of its antioxidant activity, there have been no reports of the effects of carnosine on the ER stress response. We investigated the effects of carnosine on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced cell death and ER stress in SH-SY5Y cells. After assessing control cell viability in serum-free conditions for 24h (100% viability), we found that 50 microM 6-OHDA reduced cell viability to 76.4% of control values, whereas addition of 10mM carnosine significantly reduced cell death to 96.1% viability in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with its cytoprotective action, carnosine markedly inhibited subsequent ER stress responses, including phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) and c-jun, expression of glucose regulatory protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein, and mRNA splicing of X-box protein 1. The measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by 6-OHDA showed that addition of 10mM carnosine slightly but obviously inhibits the 6-OHDA-induced ROS production. In conclusion, our results show that carnosine almost completely inhibits 6-OHDA-induced ER stress responses and cytotoxicity, and that slight antioxidant activity of carnosine against 6-OHDA is observed. Further in vivo studies are needed to investigate clinical uses for carnosine. PMID:19394406

  7. Protective effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells

    Jie Wang; Yanbo Cheng; Jiale Yin; Qian Lu; Xingshun Xu; Xiaoxing Yin

    2011-01-01

    The present study analyzed the protective effects of Ginkgo biloba extract against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced PC12 cell apoptosis in a model of Parkinson's disease. The results showed that Ginkgo biloba extract had a potent cytoprotective action and inhibited apoptosis of PC12 cells induced by 6-hydroxydopamine. Ginkgo biloba extract decreased the ratio of Bax to Bcl-2 and markedly inhibited the activation of p53 and caspase-3. These experimental findings indicate that Ginkgo biloba extract may significantly reduce the effects of oxidative stress induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in PC12 cells and suppress cell apoptosis. The potential effects of Ginkgo biloba extract might be greater than those of levodopa in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  8. Attenuation of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic nigrostriatal lesions in superoxide dismutase transgenic mice

    6-Hydroxydopamine is a neurotoxin that produces degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in rodents. Its toxicity is thought to involve the generation of superoxide anion secondary to its autoxidation. To examine the effects of the overexpression of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase activity on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage, we have measured the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine on striatal and nigral dopamine transporters and nigral tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase transgenic mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (50 μg) in non-transgenic mice produced reductions in the size of striatal area and an enlargement of the cerebral ventricle on both sides of the brains of mice killed two weeks after the injection. In addition, 6-hydroxydopamine caused marked decreases in striatal and nigral [125I]RTI-121-labelled dopamine transporters not only on the injected side but also on the non-injected side of non-transgenic mice; this was associated with decreased cell number and size of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta on both sides in these mice. In contrast, superoxide dismutase transgenic mice were protected against these neurotoxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine, with the homozygous transgenic mice showing almost complete protection.These results provide further support for a role of superoxide anion in the toxic effects of 6-hydroxydopamine. They also provide further evidence that reactive oxygen species may be the main determining factors in the neurodegenerative effects of catecholamines. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  9. Duration of drug action of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-hydroxydopamine-induced lesions.

    Tsuchioka, Akihiro; Oana, Fumiki; Suzuki, Takayuki; Yamauchi, Yuji; Ijiro, Tomoyuki; Kaidoh, Kouichi; Hiratochi, Masahiro

    2015-12-16

    Although 6-hydroxydopamine-induced (6-OHDA-induced) rats are a well-known Parkinson's disease model, the effects of dopamine D2 agonists in mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions are not completely understood. We produced mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions and measured their total locomotion counts following administration of several dopamine D2 agonists (pramipexole, ropinirole, cabergoline, rotigotine, apomorphine, talipexole, and quinelorane). Cabergoline showed the longest duration of drug action, which was in agreement with its long-lived anti-Parkinson effects in rats and humans. In contrast, pramipexole and ropinirole had notably short durations of drug action. We demonstrated that mice with 6-OHDA-induced lesions accompanied with significant lesions in the striatum may be reasonable models to predict the action duration of anti-Parkinson drug candidates in humans. PMID:26559726

  10. Cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity via its antioxidant properties.

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Feng, Yan; Olatunji, Oyenike O; Tang, Jian; Ouyang, Zhen; Su, Zhaoliang

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by degeneration and loss of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. Increasing evidence has indicated that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therapeutic options that target the antioxidant machinery may have potential in the treatment of PD. Cordycepin, a nucleoside isolated from Cordyceps species displayed potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. However, its neuroprotective effect against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity as well as underlying mechanisms is still unclear. In this present study, we investigated the protective effect of cordycepin against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity and its underlying mechanism. We observed that cordycepin effectively inhibited 6-OHDA-induced cell death, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Cordycepin also inhibited cell apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA as observed in the reduction of cytochrome c release from the mitochondrial as well as the inhibition of caspase-3. In addition cordycepin markedly reduced cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) content and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level. Cordycepin also significantly increased the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities in 6-OHDA-treated cells. The results obtained unambiguously demonstrated that cordycepin protects PC12 cells against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity through its potent antioxidant activity. PMID:27261571

  11. Phytic Acid Protects against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Apoptosis in Normal and Iron Excess Conditions in a Cell Culture Model

    Qi Xu; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Reddy, Manju B.

    2011-01-01

    Iron may play an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD) since it can induce oxidative stress-dependent neurodegeneration. The objective of this study was to determine whether the iron chelator, phytic acid (IP6) can protect against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) induced apoptosis in immortalized rat mesencephalic dopaminergic cells under normal and iron-excess conditions. Caspase-3 activity was increased about 6-fold after 6-OHDA treatment (compared to control; < . 0 0 1 ) and 30 μmol/L I...

  12. Enhanced glutamate, IP3 and cAMP activity in the cerebral cortex of Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine induced Parkinson's rats: Effect of 5-HT, GABA and bone marrow cell supplementation

    Romeo Chinthu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parkinson's disease is characterized by progressive cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta, which leads to dopamine depletion in the striatum and indirectly to cortical dysfunction. Increased glutamatergic transmission in the basal ganglia is implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease and glutamate receptor mediated excitotoxicity has been suggested to be one of the possible causes of the neuronal degeneration. In the present study, the effects of serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid and bone marrow cells infused intranigrally to substantia nigra individually and in combination on unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine induced Parkinson's rat model was analyzed. Scatchard analysis of total glutamate and NMDA receptor binding parameters showed a significant increase in Bmax (P

  13. 7-nitroindazole attenuates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced spatial learning deficits and dopamine neuron loss in a presymptomatic animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Haik, Kristi L; Shear, Deborah A; Hargrove, Chad; Patton, Jared; Mazei-Robison, Michelle; Sandstrom, Michael I; Dunbar, Gary L

    2008-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons (>50%) in the substantia nigra (SN) precedes most of the overt motor symptoms, making early diagnosis and treatment interventions difficult. Because PD has been associated with free radicals generated by nitric oxide, this study tested whether treatments of 7-nitroindazole (7NI), a nitric-oxide-synthase inhibitor, could reduce cognitive deficits that often emerge before overt motor symptoms in a presymptomatic rat model of PD. Rats were given intraperitoneal injections of 50 mg/kg 7NI (or vehicle) just before receiving bilateral, intrastriatal injections of the DA-toxin, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The rats were then given a battery of motor tasks, and their learning ability was assessed using a spatial reversal task in a water-T maze. Results indicate that 7NI treatments attenuate 6-OHDA-induced spatial learning deficits and protect against DA cell loss in the SN, suggesting that 7NI may have potential as an early, presymptomatic pharmacotherapy for PD. PMID:18489022

  14. Oxidative stress

    This book contains 18 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Oxidative Stress: Introductory Remarks; Radiolysis of DNA and Model Systems in the Presence of Oxygen; Organic Peroxy Free Radicals as Ultimate Agents in Oxygen Toxicity; Antimalarials; and the Role of Dietary Components in Oxidative Stress in Tissues

  15. Carnosic acid protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in in vivo and in vitro model of Parkinson's disease: involvement of antioxidative enzymes induction.

    Wu, Chi-Rei; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Chia-Yuan; Huang, Li-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The neuroprotective effects of carnosic acid (CA), a phenolic diterpene isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis), have been widely investigated in recent years, however, its protection in in vivo still unclear. In this study, we investigated the behavioral activity and neuroprotective effects of CA in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Rats were treated with 20mg/kg body weight of CA for 3 weeks before 6-OHDA exposure. Results indicated that CA improved the locomotor activity and reduced the apomorphine-caused rotation in 6-OHDA-stimulated rats. Significant protection against lipid peroxidation and GSH reduction was observed in the 6-OHDA rats pretreated with CA. Pretreatment with CA increased the protein expression of γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, γ-glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione reductase compared with 6-OHDA-stimulated rats and SH-SY5Y cells. Immunoblots showed that the reduction of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the induction of caspase 3 cleavage, and the induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage by 6-OHDA was reversed in the presence of SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) in SH-SY5Y cells. Rats treated with CA reversed the 6-OHDA-mediated the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase and p38, the down-regulation of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, the up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3/caspase 3 and cleaved PARP/PARP ratio, and the down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase protein. However, BAM7, an activator of Bax, attenuated the effect of CA on apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that CA protected against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity is attributable to its anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative action. The present findings may help to clarify the possible mechanisms of rosemary in the neuroprotection of PD. PMID:25446857

  16. Oxidative stress

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  17. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  18. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    Bouayed, Jaouad; Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal ...

  19. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    Dolabela, Maria F; Vilhena, Thyago C; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Danilo R. Moreira; Sandro Percário; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Bosch-Morell Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  1. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  2. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26359790

  3. Oxidative Stress and Psychological Disorders

    Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between cellular production of reactive oxygen species and the counteracting antioxidant mechanisms. The brain with its high oxygen consumption and a lipid-rich environment is considered highly susceptible to oxidative stress or redox imbalances. Therefore, the fact that oxidative stress is implicated in several mental disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is not surprising. Although several elegant studies have...

  4. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Yong Weon Yi; Hyo Jin Kang; Insoo Bae

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to tre...

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Dragan Radovanović

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The cells continuously produce free radicals and reactive oxygen species as a part of metabolic processes. Increased aerobic metabolism during exercise is a potential source of oxidative stress. Also, anaerobic physical activity and oxidative stress are interrelated because the intense anaerobic activity leads to damage proteins, lipids and nucleic acids in muscle cells and blood. Complex system of antioxidant defense, which has the enzymatic and non-enzymatic part, has a role in protecting tissues from excessive oxidative damage. Most of the research conducted so far about the impact of various forms of physical activity on levels of oxidative stress is confirmed by changes in biomarkers that indicate lipid peroxidation and proteins modification. Untrained persons, as opposed to trained, are more susceptible to major changes in the body caused by oxidative stress during physical activity. The results of researches have shown that there are no significant differences between the genders in the level of oxidative stress during physical activity and response to antioxidant supplementation possibly applied. It is interesting that, despite of numerous studies, the exact location of oxidative stress origin during physical activity has not been reliably established. In addition, research results provide insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of using antioxidant supplementation to increase the defense against oxidative stress. It is necessary further investigation about the redox status and oxidative stress during physical activity in adolescent athletes.

  6. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Bae, Insoo, E-mail: ib42@georgetown.edu [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC 20057 (United States)

    2014-04-03

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  7. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers

  8. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Jie Li; Wuliji O; Wei Li; Zhi-Gang Jiang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. T...

  9. Oxidative Stress and Major Depression

    Bajpai, Ashutosh; Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Srivastava, Mona; Srivastava, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major causative factor for major depression is inflammation, autoimmune tissue damage and prolonged psychological stress, which leads to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to know the association of free radicals and antioxidant status in subjects suffering from major depression.

  10. [Heme metabolism and oxidative stress].

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T B

    2001-01-01

    The role of heme metabolism in oxidative stress development and defense reactions formation in mammals under different stress factors are discussed in the article. Heme metabolism is considered as the totality of synthesis, degradation, transport and exchange processes of exogenous heme and heme liberated from erythrocyte hemoglobin under erythrocyte aging and hemolysis. The literature data presented display normal heme metabolism including mammals heme-binding proteins and intracellular free heme pool and heme metabolism alterations under oxidative stress development. The main attention is focused to the prooxidant action of heme, the interaction of heme transport and lipid exchange, and to the heme metabolism key enzymes (delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase), serum heme-binding protein hemopexin and intracellular heme-binding proteins participating in metabolism adaptation under the action of factors, which cause oxidative stress. PMID:11599427

  11. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  12. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Moessbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis

  13. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    Jie Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs.

  14. Oxidative Stress Adaptation with Acute, Chronic and Repeated Stress

    Pickering, Andrew. M.; Vojtovich, Lesya; Tower, John; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress adaptation or hormesis is an important mechanism by which cells and organisms respond to, and cope with, environmental and physiological shifts in the level of oxidative stress. Most studies of oxidative stress adaption have been limited to adaptation induced by acute stress. In contrast, many if not most environmental and physiological stresses are either repeated or chronic. In this study we find that both cultured mammalian cells, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,...

  15. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  16. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Fogarasi Erzsébet; Croitoru Mircea Dumitru; Fülöp Ibolya; Muntean Daniela-Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes), of protein oxidation (carbonyl...

  17. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    Sayeeda Ahsanuddin; Minh Lam; Baron, Elma D.

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging occurs through two main pathways, intrinsic and extrinsic. These pathways have significant interaction in contributing to the aging phenotype, which includes skin laxity, wrinkling, pigmentation irregularities, and the appearance of neoplastic skin lesions. Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure. Furthermo...

  18. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases

    Xueping Chen; Chunyan Guo; Jiming Kong

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2-) and hydroxyl radical (OH-), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  19. Ionizing radiations and oxidizing stress

    The normal cell metabolism produces continuously reactive oxygenated species which sometimes are not completely transformed and can lead to a highly reactive form of oxygen: the superoxide anion (characteristic of free radicals). These aggressive molecules are normally eliminated by the enzymatic and biochemical defense systems, but some external factors, like the ionizing radiations, can accelerate their production and saturate the natural defense systems. Such a situation leads to a disorganization of the membrane structures, to the oxidation of the lipo-proteins and proteins and to a degradation and fragmentation of DNA. This oxidative stress affects all kind of tissues and metabolisms and thus participates to a large number of pathologies, in particular cancers. (J.S.)

  20. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    Gábor Csányi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine.

  1. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    Sayeeda Ahsanuddin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Skin aging occurs through two main pathways, intrinsic and extrinsic. These pathways have significant interaction in contributing to the aging phenotype, which includes skin laxity, wrinkling, pigmentation irregularities, and the appearance of neoplastic skin lesions. Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure. Furthermore, we discuss the recent literature surrounding the prevention and treatment of skin aging. Although current research is suggestive of the role of antioxidants in anti-aging skin therapies, further research is much needed to explore its role in humans.

  2. Less Stress : Oxidative stress and glutathione kinetics in preterm infants

    Rook, Denise

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDue to immature antioxidant defenses, preterm infants are at susceptible to oxidative stress, which is associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity and periventricular leukomalacia. The general aim of this thesis was to study oxidative stress in preterm infants and to explore possible options to reduce the impact of oxidative stress in neonatal care. The studies presented in this thesis concern the optimal oxygen concentration for the resuscitation at bir...

  3. Oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stress in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases, Friedreich ataxia, LHON, MELAS, MERRF, and Leigh syndrome (LS), is discussed. Published reports of oxidative stress involvement in the pathomechanisms of these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest evidence for an oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was for Friedreich ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for "oxidative stress" citation count frequency for each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is for Friedreich ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich ataxia. PMID:26073122

  4. Oxidative stress in oral diseases.

    Kesarwala, A H; Krishna, M C; Mitchell, J B

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  5. Oxidative Stress and HPV Carcinogenesis

    Federico De Marco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental work has conclusively demonstrated that infection with certain types of human papillomaviruses, the so-called high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, represent a most powerful human carcinogen. However, neoplastic growth is a rare and inappropriate outcome in the natural history of HPV, and a number of other events have to concur in order to induce the viral infection into the (very rare neoplastic transformation. From this perspective, a number of putative viral, host, and environmental co-factors have been proposed as potential candidates. Among them oxidative stress (OS is an interesting candidate, yet comparatively underexplored. OS is a constant threat to aerobic organisms being generated during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, as well as during inflammation, infections, ionizing irradiation, UV exposure, mechanical and chemical stresses. Epithelial tissues, the elective target for HPV infection, are heavily exposed to all named sources of OS. Two different types of cooperative mechanisms are presumed to occur between OS and HPV: I The OS genotoxic activity and the HPV-induced genomic instability concur independently to the generation of the molecular damage necessary for the emergence of neoplastic clones. This first mode is merely a particular form of co-carcinogenesis; and II OS specifically interacts with one or more molecular stages of neoplastic initiation and/or progression induced by the HPV infection. This manuscript was designed to summarize available data on this latter hypothesis. Experimental data and indirect evidences on promoting the activity of OS in viral infection and viral integration will be reviewed. The anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic role of NO (nitric oxide and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase will be discussed together with the OS/HPV cooperation in inducing cancer metabolism adaptation. Unexplored/underexplored aspects of the OS interplay with the HPV-driven carcinogenesis

  6. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Vaisbich, Maria Helena; Pache de Faria Guimaraes, Luciana; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa Mazzola; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS) and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS) in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p < 0.0001). We detected no significant correlation between plasma TBARS levels and renal function. Conclusion An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients. PMID:22470381

  8. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  9. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    Koskela, Heikki O; Purokivi, Minna K

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods ...

  10. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  11. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    Xiaochun Duan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches.

  12. Cardiac Dysregulation and Myocardial Injury in a 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Rat Model of Sympathetic Denervation.

    Yue-Hua Jiang

    Full Text Available Cardiac sympathetic denervation is found in various cardiac pathologies; however, its relationship with myocardial injury has not been thoroughly investigated.Twenty-four rats were assigned to the normal control group (NC, sympathectomy control group (SC, and a sympathectomy plus mecobalamin group (SM. Sympathectomy was induced by injection of 6-OHDA, after which, the destruction and distribution of sympathetic and vagal nerve in the left ventricle (LV myocardial tissue were determined by immunofluorescence and ELISA. Heart rate variability (HRV, ECG and echocardiography, and assays for myocardial enzymes in serum before and after sympathectomy were examined. Morphologic changes in the LV by HE staining and transmission electron microscope were used to estimate levels of myocardial injury and concentrations of inflammatory cytokines were used to reflect the inflammatory reaction.Injection of 6-OHDA decreased NE (933.1 ± 179 ng/L for SC vs. 3418.1± 443.6 ng/L for NC, P < 0.01 and increased NGF (479.4± 56.5 ng/mL for SC vs. 315.85 ± 28.6 ng/mL for NC, P < 0.01 concentrations. TH expression was reduced, while ChAT expression showed no change. Sympathectomy caused decreased HRV and abnormal ECG and echocardiography results, and histopathologic examinations showed myocardial injury and increased collagen deposition as well as inflammatory cell infiltration in the cardiac tissue of rats in the SC and SM groups. However, all pathologic changes in the SM group were less severe compared to those in the SC group.Chemical sympathectomy with administration of 6-OHDA caused dysregulation of the cardiac autonomic nervous system and myocardial injuries. Mecobalamin alleviated inflammatory and myocardial damage by protecting myocardial sympathetic nerves.

  13. 6-Hydroxydopamine-induced glutathione alteration occurs via glutathione enzyme system in primary cultured astrocytes

    Ji ZHANG; Jun HU; Jian-hua DING; Hong-hong YAO; Gang HU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To define the role of enzymes involved in glutathione metabolism in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced glutathione alteration in primary cultured astrocytes.Methods: Total glutathione (GSx) levels were determined using the modified enzymatic microtiter plate assay.The mRNA levels ofγ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γGCS), γ-glutamyltransferase (γGT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), GR (glutathione reductase), and glutathione transferases (GST) were determined using RT-PCR.γGT activity was determined using γGT assay kits.Results: In primary cultured astrocytes, 6-OHDA induced a significant elevation of cellular GSx levels after treatment for 24 h.However, the GSx levels decreased after 24 h and the values were even lower than the value in the control group without 6-OHDA at 48 h.RT-PCR data showed that the mRNA levels of γGCS, the ratelimiting enzyme of γ-L-glutamyl-L-cysteinylglycine (GSH) synthesis, were increased by 6-OHDA after treatment for 24 h and 48 h; the mRNA levels of GPx, GR, and GST did not alter in 6-OHDA-treated astrocytes after treatment for 24 h and 48 h; and 6-OHDA increased the mRNA levels and the activity of γGT after treatment for 48 h,which induced a decrease in GSx levels, despite the up-regulation of γGCS after exposure to 6-OHDA for 48 h.Conclusion: The change in γGCS correlated with the increase in GSH levels induced by 6-OHDA after treatment for 24 h.GSx levels decreased because of increased γGT mRNA levels and γGT activity induced by 6-OHDA after treatment for 48 h.

  14. R-apomorphine protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostriatal damage in rat.

    Yuan, Hong; Liang, Li-Wu; Chen, Zheng-Jing; Ji, Hui-Ru; Wang, Mei-Kang; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Li, Cao; Xu, Jian-Yang

    2006-11-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was not only to assess the retrograde degenerative changes in the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) after injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, but also to use this 6-OHDA model of Parkinson's disease to explore the possible neuroprotective effect of R-apomorphine (R-APO). Methods The partial lesion was obtained by intrastriatal administration of 6-OHDA. R-APO administration (10 mg/kg, s.c.) started 15 min prior to lesioning and continued daily for another 22 days post surgery. Testing was carried out 5 weeks after lesioning. We investigated the histology and associated behavior and neurochemical changes. Structural and functional deficits were quantified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) / Nissl-staining cell number counting, striatal dopamine (DA) content determination and amphetamine-induced rotation analysis. Results R-APO-treatment attenuated the amphetamine-induced ipsiversive rotation 5 weeks after the lesion induction. R-APO administration for 22 days significantly reduced the size of the lesion at the level of the SN from 50% (control group) to 69%. Moreover, the cell shape resembled that observed in the intact animals. R-APO treatment significantly increased the number of cells in both the lesion and the intact sides of VTA by 60%, suggesting selective neurotrophic effect of R-APO in this area. Finally, R-APO-treatment significantly attenuated the 6-OHDA-induced striatal DA depletion and normalized dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/DA ratios. Conclusion We conclude that R-APO has neuroprotective and possible neurotrophic effect on a striatal lesion with 6-OHDA, suggesting that this drug may have rescuing properties in patients with early stage Parkinson's disease. These effects are more pronounced in VTA and enhance with duration of treatment. PMID:17690718

  15. The Effect of Chronic Administration of Buspirone on 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Catalepsy in Rats

    Hamdolah Sharifi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Several evidences show that serotonergic neurons play a role in the regulation of movements executed by the basal ganglia. Recently we have reported that single dose of buspirone improved 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. This study is aimed to investigate effect of chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of buspirone on 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in male Wistar rats. Methods: Catalepsy was induced by unilateral infusion of 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat into the central region of the SNc and was assayed by the bar-test method 5, 60, 120 and 180 min after drugs administration in 10th day. The effect of buspirone (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 days was assessed in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Results: The results showed that chronic injection of buspirone (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 days decreased catalepsy when compared with the control group. The best anticataleptic effect was observed at the dose of 1 mg/kg. The catalepsy-improving effect of buspirone was reversed by 1-(2-methoxyphenyl- 4-[4-(2-phthalimido butyl]piperazine hydrobromide (NAN-190, 0.5 mg/kg, i.p.,as a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Conclusion: Our study indicates that chronic administration of buspirone improves catalepsy in a 6-OHDA-induced animal model of parkinson's disease (PD. We also suggest that buspirone may be used as an adjuvant therapy to increase effectiveness of antiparkinsonian drugs. In order to prove this hypothesis, further clinical studies should be done.

  16. Inhibition by anandamide of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    Mnich, Katarzyna

    2010-01-01

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a selective neurotoxin that is widely used to investigate cell death and protective strategies in models of Parkinson\\'s disease. Here, we investigated the effects of the endogenous cannabinoid, anandamide, on 6-OHDA-induced toxicity in rat adrenal phaeochromocytoma PC12 cells. Morphological analysis and caspase-3 activity assay revealed that anandamide inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. The protection was not affected by antagonists of either cannabinoid receptors (CB(1) or CB(2)) or the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. Anandamide-dependent protection was reduced by pretreatment with LY294002 (inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, PI3K) and unaffected by U0126 (inhibitor of extracellularly-regulated kinase). Interestingly, phosphorylation of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) in cells exposed to 6-OHDA was strongly reduced by anandamide pre-treatment. Furthermore, 6-OHDA induced c-Jun activation and increased Bim expression, both of which were inhibited by anandamide. Together, these data demonstrate antiapoptotic effects of anandamide and also suggest a role for activation of PI3K and inhibition of JNK signalling in anandamide-mediated protection against 6-OHDA.

  17. Oxidative stress in primary glomerular diseases

    Markan, Suchita; Kohli, Harbir Singh; Sud, Kamal;

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure.......To evaluate the status of oxidative stress in patients with different primary glomerular diseases (PGD) which have differential predisposition to renal failure....

  18. OXIDATIVE STRESS, INSULIN SIGNALING AND DIABETES

    Rains, Justin L.; Jain, Sushil K.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated as a contributor to both the onset and the progression of diabetes and its associated complications. Some of the consequences of an oxidative environment are the development of insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which can lead ultimately to the diabetic disease state. Experimental and clinical data suggest an inverse association between insulin sensitivity and ROS levels. Oxidative stress can ...

  19. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

    Babu Rao; Santhoshi; Sridhar V; Souris; Der, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentra...

  20. Metal-related oxidative stress in birds

    Metals can cause oxidative stress by increasing the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which render antioxidants incapable of defence against growing amounts of free radicals. Metal toxicity is related to their oxidative state and reactivity with other compounds. Our aim is to review the mechanisms on how metals cause oxidative stress and what is known about metal-induced oxidative stress in wildlife. Taking birds as model organisms, we summarize the mechanisms responsible for antioxidant depletion and give a view of how to detect metal-induced oxidative stress in birds by using different biomarkers. The mechanisms producing the harmful effects of oxidative stress are complex with different biomolecular mechanisms associated with ecotoxicological and ecological aspects. The majority of the studies concerning metals and ROS related to oxidative stress have focused on the biomolecular level, but little is known about the effects at the cellular level or at the level of individuals or populations. - Free-living birds can be used as effective indicators of metal-induced oxidative stress.

  1. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

    Babu Rao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentration and a sharp decline in antioxidant defences . [1] Among the causes of enhanced free radical production, hyperglycemia and hyper insulinemia seem to play a major role , [2,3] Hyperglycemia is the more easily modifiable factor among the two and good glycemic control can reduce the oxidative stress. Controversy pers ists regarding the other possible mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and whether oxidative stress normalizes with adequate metabolic control alone. The role of oxidative stress and diabetic complications has been extensively investigated. Oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the genesis of both macro and micro angiopathy [4,5] Prospective trials are now underway addressing the controversial issues of possible role of pharmacological antioxidants in preventing or at least de laying the onset of diabetic complications.

  2. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  3. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases.

  4. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns.

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  5. Stress distributions in growing polycrystalline oxide films

    We analyze the generation of stresses in polycrystalline oxide films formed via the oxidation of a substrate using a new continuum model. The model includes a description of the polycrystalline microstructure in two dimensions. The diffusion of all independent components, the rate of the oxidation reaction and the effect of stresses on these are accounted for in a thermodynamically self-consistent manner. Grain boundaries serve both as high diffusivity paths and as sites for oxide formation. Different diffusion controlled oxidation regimes (rapid oxygen/cation diffusion, comparable oxygen/cation diffusivities) and different grain boundary/bulk diffusivity ratios are examined within this framework. Numerical solutions reveal large lateral stress gradients, with stresses concentrated around the grain boundaries. While the average in-plane stress is compressive and the stress at the film/substrate interface near the grain boundary highly so, large tensile stresses are observed near the grain boundary at the film surface. These predictions are consistent with experimental observations on polycrystalline oxide growth. We also present analytical approximations for the stress distribution in the film that capture the essential features of the numerical results

  6. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  7. Interferon-¿ regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.;

    2002-01-01

    Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress......Neurobiology, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis IFN-d, multiple sclerosis, neurodegeneration, oxidative stress...

  8. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Grune, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner this...... raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some of these...

  9. Wine and oxidative stress in inflammation

    Pavelková, Martina; Gallová, Lucie; López, D.; Mitjavila, M. T.

    Brno, 2003. s. -. [European Workshop on the Analysis of Phagocyte Functions /1./. 07.09.2003-09.09.2003, Brno] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : wine * oxidative stress * rat Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  10. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  11. LINK BETWEEN OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INSULIN RESISTANCE

    Lan-fang Li; Jian Li

    2007-01-01

    Many studies on oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and antioxidant treatment have shown that increased oxidative stress may accelerate the development of diabetic complications through the excessive glucose and free fatty acids metabolism in diabetic and insulin-resistant states. Many pathogenic mechanisms such as insulin receptor substrate phosphorylation are involved in insulin resistance induced by oxidative stress. And antioxidant treatments can show benefits in animal models of diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance. However, negative evidence from large clinical trials suggests that new and more powerful antioxidants need to be studied to demonstrate whether antioxidants can be effective in treating diabetic complications. Furthermore, it appears that oxidative stress is only one of the factors contributing to diabetic complications. Thus, antioxidant treatment would most likely be more effective if it were coupled with other treatments for diabetic complications.

  12. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared wi...

  13. Ethanol-induced oxidative stress: basic knowledge

    Comporti, Mario; Signorini, Cinzia; Leoncini, Silvia; Gardi, Concetta; Ciccoli, Lucia; Giardini, Anna; Vecchio, Daniela; Arezzini, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    After a general introduction, the main pathways of ethanol metabolism (alcohol dehydrogenase, catalase, coupling of catalase with NADPH oxidase and microsomal ethanol-oxidizing system) are shortly reviewed. The cytochrome P450 isoform (CYP2E1) specifically involved in ethanol oxidation is discussed. The acetaldehyde metabolism and the shift of the NAD/NADH ratio in the cellular environment (reductive stress) are stressed. The toxic effects of acetaldehyde are mentioned. The ethanol-induced ox...

  14. Role of Oxidative Stress in Prostate Cancer

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K.

    2009-01-01

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism ...

  15. Roles of oxidative stress in stomach disorders

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Mogami, Sachiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2011-01-01

    The stomach is a sensitive digestive organ that is susceptible and exposed to exogenous pathogens from the diet. In response to such pathogens, the stomach induces oxidative stress, which might be related to the development of gastric organic disorders such as gastritis, gastric ulcers, and gastric cancer, as well as functional disorders such as functional dyspepsia. In particular, the bacterium Helicobacter pylori plays a major role in eliciting and confronting oxidative stress in the stomac...

  16. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira; João Paulo Ferreira Schoffen

    2010-01-01

    Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the fac...

  17. Oxidative Stress, Molecular Inflammation and Sarcopenia

    Si-Jin Meng; Long-Jiang Yu

    2010-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress and molecular inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The two factors may interfere with the balance between protein synthesis and breakdown, cause mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce apoptosis. The purpose of this review is to discuss some of the major signaling pathways that are activated or inactivated during the oxidative stress and molecular inflammation seen...

  18. Chrononutrition against Oxidative Stress in Aging

    Garrido, M; M. P. Terrón; Rodríguez, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress have been recognized as important factors in the biology of aging and in many age-associated degenerative diseases. Antioxidant systems deteriorate during aging. It is, thus, considered that one way to reduce the rate of aging and the risk of chronic disease is to avoid the formation of free radicals and reduce oxidative stress by strengthening antioxidant defences. Phytochemicals present in fruits, vegetables, grains, and other foodstuffs have been linked t...

  19. Oxidative stress and age-related cataract

    Zheng Selin, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Age-related cataract is a clouding of the lens that leads to decreased vision. It increases with age and is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. The only treatment currently available is surgery. Therefore, it is important to identify modifiable risk factors for cataract prevention. The cause of cataract is not fully understood and may be multifactorial, involving oxidative stress, a condition of disrupted balance between oxidants and antioxidants. Oxidative damage to lens protei...

  20. Pathogenesis of Chronic Hyperglycemia: From Reductive Stress to Oxidative Stress

    Liang-Jun Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic overnutrition creates chronic hyperglycemia that can gradually induce insulin resistance and insulin secretion impairment. These disorders, if not intervened, will eventually be followed by appearance of frank diabetes. The mechanisms of this chronic pathogenic process are complex but have been suggested to involve production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress. In this review, I highlight evidence that reductive stress imposed by overflux of NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain is the source of oxidative stress, which is based on establishments that more NADH recycling by mitochondrial complex I leads to more electron leakage and thus more ROS production. The elevated levels of both NADH and ROS can inhibit and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, respectively, resulting in blockage of the glycolytic pathway and accumulation of glycerol 3-phospate and its prior metabolites along the pathway. This accumulation then initiates all those alternative glucose metabolic pathways such as the polyol pathway and the advanced glycation pathways that otherwise are minor and insignificant under euglycemic conditions. Importantly, all these alternative pathways lead to ROS production, thus aggravating cellular oxidative stress. Therefore, reductive stress followed by oxidative stress comprises a major mechanism of hyperglycemia-induced metabolic syndrome.

  1. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Namrata eChaudhari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS. Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturb fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways has been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and others. In this review we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress and mitochondrial signaling events which further induce or exacerbate ER stress.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    Fan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed.

  3. The oxidative stress hypothesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Padurariu, Manuela; Ciobica, Alin; Lefter, Radu; Serban, Ionela Lacramioara; Stefanescu, Cristinel; Chirita, Roxana

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress may be involved in many somatic and psychiatric pathological states including dementia. The hypothesis of oxidative stress involvement in dementia is supported by much scientific data through biochemical, genetic and molecular studies. Thus, there are many reports of an increased level of the markers for oxidative damage, alterations in the specific activity of the antioxidant system, mutations in specific genes, mitochondrial disturbances and also several connections between oxidative stress and amyloid plaques. Despite these evidence and clinical approaches in using antioxidant therapy in dementia treatment, studies have failed to prove a clear benefit for antioxidant treatment in dementia. Hence, there is a need for further research regarding antioxidant therapy in very early stages of dementia. PMID:24247053

  4. Telomerase, mitochondria and oxidative stress

    Saretzki, Gabriele

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Telomerase plays an important role in cellular proliferation capacity and survival under conditions of stress. A large part of this protective function is due to telomere capping and maintenance. Thus it contributes to cellular immortality in stem cells and cancer. Recently, evidence has accumulated that telomerase can contribute to cell survival and stress resistance in a largely telomere-independent manner. Telomerase has been shown to shuttle dynamically between differe...

  5. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health. PMID:26574302

  6. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G; Zarkovic, Neven;

    2015-01-01

    acids. RECENT ADVANCES: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. CRITICAL ISSUES: The literature is very heterogeneous...... using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. FUTURE DIRECTIONS: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers...... still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others...

  7. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases****

    Chunyan Guo; Li Sun; Xueping Chen; Danshen Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. Al these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive thera-peutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in antioxidant therapy

    Wilfredo Mañon Rossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are used regularly in medical practice to provide objective markers of health status of a person, as well as the physiological response of the body to a pharmacological therapeutic intervention. In the specific case of the use of antioxidant products (antioxidant therapy, it is necessary to measure both biomarkers of oxidative stress level of the person as those that are specific to a physiological or pathological progression of a disease disorder. This paper describes the main biomarkers of oxidative general and specific stress as well as laboratory techniques, which should be taken into account when measuring the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies.

  9. Oxidative Stress, Molecular Inflammation and Sarcopenia

    Si-Jin Meng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that oxidative stress and molecular inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The two factors may interfere with the balance between protein synthesis and breakdown, cause mitochondrial dysfunction, and induce apoptosis. The purpose of this review is to discuss some of the major signaling pathways that are activated or inactivated during the oxidative stress and molecular inflammation seen in aged skeletal muscle. Combined interventions that may be required to reverse sarcopenia, such as exercise, caloric restriction, and nutrition, will also be discussed.

  10. DIABETES, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND PHYSICAL EXERCISE

    Mustafa Atalay; David E. Laaksonen

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative stress, an imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defense capacity of the body, is closely associated with aging and a number of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and diabetic complications. Several mechanisms may cause oxidative insult in diabetes, although their exact contributions are not entirely clear. Accumulating evidence points to many interrelated mechanisms that increase production of reactive oxygen and nitro...

  11. Traumatic stress, oxidative stress and posttraumatic stress disorder: neurodegeneration and the accelerated-aging hypothesis

    Miller, Mark W.; Sadeh, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with elevated risk for a variety of age-related diseases and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to the hypothesis that chronic PTSD constitutes a form of persistent life stress that potentiates oxidative stress (OXS) and accelerates cellular aging. We provide an overview of empirical studies that have examined the effects of psychological stress on OXS, discuss the stress-perpetuating characteristics of PTSD, and th...

  12. Peroxisomes,oxidative stress,and inflammation

    Stanley; R; Terlecky; Laura; J; Terlecky; Courtney; R; Giordano

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions.Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species,molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells.Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease.The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function,oxidative stress,and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease.Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented.

  13. Oxidative stress in patients with regular hemodialysis

    Kubala, Lukáš; Číž, Milan; Čížová, Hana; Soška, V.; Studeník, P.; Černý, J.; Lojek, Antonín

    Budapest, 2000. s. 12. [International Workshop on Oxidative Stress in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury /2./. 29.09.2000-01.10.2000, Sümeg] R&D Projects: GA MZd NA4796 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-01-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding...

  15. Genetics of Oxidative Stress in Obesity

    Azahara I. Rupérez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disease characterized by the excessive accumulation of fat in adipose tissue and peripheral organs. Its derived metabolic complications are mediated by the associated oxidative stress, inflammation and hypoxia. Oxidative stress is due to the excessive production of reactive oxygen species or diminished antioxidant defenses. Genetic variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant defense system genes, could alter the efficacy of these enzymes and, ultimately, the risk of obesity; thus, studies investigating the role of genetic variations in genes related to oxidative stress could be useful for better understanding the etiology of obesity and its metabolic complications. The lack of existing literature reviews in this field encouraged us to gather the findings from studies focusing on the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidant enzymes, oxidative stress-producing systems and transcription factor genes concerning their association with obesity risk and its phenotypes. In the future, the characterization of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in obese patients could contribute to the development of controlled antioxidant therapies potentially beneficial for the treatment of obesity-derived metabolic complications.

  16. Mitochondrial oxidative stress causes hyperphosphorylation of tau.

    Simon Melov

    Full Text Available Age-related neurodegenerative disease has been mechanistically linked with mitochondrial dysfunction via damage from reactive oxygen species produced within the cell. We determined whether increased mitochondrial oxidative stress could modulate or regulate two of the key neurochemical hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD: tau phosphorylation, and beta-amyloid deposition. Mice lacking superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2 die within the first week of life, and develop a complex heterogeneous phenotype arising from mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Treatment of these mice with catalytic antioxidants increases their lifespan and rescues the peripheral phenotypes, while uncovering central nervous system pathology. We examined sod2 null mice differentially treated with high and low doses of a catalytic antioxidant and observed striking elevations in the levels of tau phosphorylation (at Ser-396 and other phospho-epitopes of tau in the low-dose antioxidant treated mice at AD-associated residues. This hyperphosphorylation of tau was prevented with an increased dose of the antioxidant, previously reported to be sufficient to prevent neuropathology. We then genetically combined a well-characterized mouse model of AD (Tg2576 with heterozygous sod2 knockout mice to study the interactions between mitochondrial oxidative stress and cerebral Ass load. We found that mitochondrial SOD2 deficiency exacerbates amyloid burden and significantly reduces metal levels in the brain, while increasing levels of Ser-396 phosphorylated tau. These findings mechanistically link mitochondrial oxidative stress with the pathological features of AD.

  17. Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, and arteries.

    Sun, Qi-An; Runge, Marschall S; Madamanchi, Nageswara R

    2016-05-10

    Atherosclerosis and its major complications - myocardial infarction and stroke - remain major causes of death and disability in the United States and world-wide. Indeed, with dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes mellitus, the prevalence and public health impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) will likely remain high. Major advances have been made in development of new therapies to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis and CVD, in particular for treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Oxidative stress is the common mechanistic link for many CVD risk factors. However, only recently have the tools existed to study the interface between oxidative stress and CVD in animal models. The most important source of reactive oxygen species (and hence oxidative stress) in vascular cells are the multiple forms of enzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Recently published and emerging studies now clearly establish that: 1) NADPH oxidases are of critical importance in atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal models; 2) given the tissue-specific expression of key components of NADPH oxidase, it may be possible to target vascular oxidative stress for prevention of CVD. PMID:25649240

  18. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  19. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ANTI OXIDANTS STATUS IN PELLAGRA

    Desireddy Neelima, Bandi Hari Krishna, Masthan Saheb, Natham Mallikarjuna Reddy.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pellagra was vanished from most parts of the world where it was formerly present due to its dietary modification. However, it is still encountered among the jowar eating populations of India. The information about the role of oxidative stress in pellagra was not established. Therefore, in this study we assessed the oxidative stress status by using malondialdehyde (MDA, total anti oxidant status (TAOS and redox ratio (RER in clinically diagnosed pellagra patients. Materials and methods: Clinically diagnosed pellagra patients aged between 18 to 40 years, both male and females were recruited (n=78 from department of Dermatology. Age and gender matched controls (n=78 were recruited from the student and residents of the hospital. Malondialdehyde (MDA is a marker of lipid peroxidation, Total Anti Oxidant Status (TAOS and Redox Ratio (RER markers were assessed by using commercially available kits. Results: There were no significant differences in the anthropometric parameters. However, the oxidative stress markers MDA (p<0.05, RER (p<0.001 were significantly high and TAOS was low (P<0.001 in pellagra patients in comparison with age and gender matched controls. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the increased MDA, RER levels and decreased TAOS levels. Estimation of these markers at early stage will help to take measures to prevent the progression of disease and develop antioxidant strategies.

  20. APOPTOSIS, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND NEUROLOGICAL DISEASE

    P. Formichi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a selective cell deletion process which requires the triggering of a specific cell death programme. Two main pathways determining cell death have been identified: the extrinsic or receptor-mediated pathway, activated in response to extracellular pro-apoptotic signals, and the intrinsic pathway, activated by extracellular receptor-independent stimuli or by intracellular insults, such as DNA damage and oxidative stress. All these stress signals are integrated by mitochondria which participate by releasing the main effectors of this process: a family of aspartic-specific proteases known as caspase. Today there is much evidence to suggest that deregulation of apoptosis is a key feature of many neurodegenerative disease. Our group sought cell models for the study of apoptotic pathways and for the evaluation of the role of apoptosis in specific neurodegenerative diseases. We focused on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. In our in-vitro model, lymphocytes from patients and control subjects were cultured both in basal conditions and with 2-deoxy-D-ribose (dRib, a reducing sugar which induces apoptosis through oxidative stress. In the last ten years, we evaluated the role of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases: Ataxiatelangiectasia,Rett syndrome, Mitochondrial disease, Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL. Here we report some of our ongoing and recently published articles.

  1. Oxidative stress and immunotoxicity induced by graphene oxide in zebrafish.

    Chen, Minjie; Yin, Junfa; Liang, Yong; Yuan, Shaopeng; Wang, Fengbang; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively explored as a promising nanomaterial for applications in biology because of its unique properties. Therefore, systematic investigation of GO toxicity is essential to determine its fate in the environment and potential adverse effects. In this study, acute toxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity of GO were investigated in zebrafish. No obvious acute toxicity was observed when zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5, 10 or 50mg/L GO for 14 days. However, a number of cellular alterations were detected by histological analysis of the liver and intestine, including vacuolation, loose arrangement of cells, histolysis and disintegration of cell boundaries. As evidence for oxidative stress, malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased and glutathione content was decreased in the liver after treatment with GO. GO treatment induced an immune response in zebrafish, as demonstrated by increased expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 β, and interleukin-6 in the spleen. Our findings demonstrated that GO administration in an aquatic system can cause oxidative stress and immune toxicity in adult zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune toxicity of GO in zebrafish. PMID:26921726

  2. Oxidative stress and stress signaling: menace of diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Loren E WOLD; Asli F CEYLAN-ISIK; Jun REN

    2005-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the diabetic population and is currently one of the leading causes of death in the United States and other industrialized countries. The health care expenses associated with cardiovascular disease are staggering, reaching more than US$350 billion in 2003. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease include high fat/cholesterol levels,alcoholism, smoking, genetics, environmental factors and hypertension, which are commonly used to gauge an individual's risk of cardiovascular disease and to track their progress during therapy. Most recently, these factors have become important in the early prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress, the imbalance between reactive oxygen species production and breakdown by endogenous antioxidants, has been implicated in the onset and progression of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes-associated heart dysfunction (diabetic cardiomyopathy). Antioxidant therapy has shown promise in preventing the development of diabetic heart complications. This review focuses on recent advances in oxidative stress theory and antioxidant therapy in diabetic cardiomyopathy, with an emphasis on the stress signaling pathways hypothesized to be involved. Many of these stress signaling pathways lead to activation of reactive oxygen species, major players in the development and progression of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  3. Oxidative stress in prostate hypertrophy and carcinogenesis

    Waldemar M. Przybyszewski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging, significant impairment of the oxidation/reduction balance, infection, and inflammation are recognized risk factors of benign hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic prostate inflammatory processes generate significantly elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and halogenated compounds. Prostate cancer patients showed significantly higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels in peripheral blood than healthy controls, whereas patients with prostate hyperplasia did not show such symptoms. Oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress causes DNA modifications leading to genome instability that may initiate carcinogenesis; however, it was shown that oxidative damage alone is not sufficient to initiate this process. Peroxidation products induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species seem to take part in epigenetic mechanisms regulating genome activity. One of the most common changes occurring in more than 90�0of all analyzed prostate cancers is the silencing of GSTP1 gene activity. The gene encodes glutathione transferase, an enzyme participating in detoxification processes. Prostate hyperplasia is often accompanied by chronic inflammation and such a relationship was not observed in prostate cancer. The participation of infection and inflammation in the development of hyperplasia is unquestionable and these factors probably also take part in initiating the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Thus it seems that therapeutic strategies that prevent genome oxidative damage in situations involving oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress, i.e. use of antioxidants, plant steroids, antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, could help prevent carcinogenesis.

  4. Role of oxidant stress in rheumatoid arthritis

    GS, Lekshmi; BR, Suchit Roy; K., Parvathy; K., Geetha Damodaran

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen derived free radicals have been implicated in the causation of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) [1].In this study, evidence of free radical injury and oxidative stress in patients with RA is compared with healthy subjects by estimating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, which are anti-oxidant enzymes in RBCs, Glucose 6 Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) in RBCs and serum Malon-di-aldehyde (MDA) levels. Serum MDA levels in RA could be used as a biochemical marker of disease activity and for ...

  5. Endocrine control of oxidative stress in Insects

    Krishnan, N.; Kodrík, Dalibor

    New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell, 2012 - (Farooqui, T.; Farooqui, A.), s. 261-270 ISBN 978-1-118-14814-3 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1215 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : oxidative stress Subject RIV: ED - Physiology http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-111800194X.html

  6. Computer diagnosis in cardiology: Oxidative stress hypothesis

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose; Graham Wilfred Ewing

    2009-01-01

    Background : Virtual scanning is one of the emerging technologies in complementary medicine practice. The diagnostic principle is hinged on perception and ultra weak light emission, while the treatment options associated with it includes diet, flash light, exercise and relaxation. However, a mechanism that links the diagnostic and treatment principles has yet to be elucidated. Aims: The objective here is to further explanation of oxidative stress concept as the biochemical basis of the techno...

  7. Oxidative stress in normal and diabetic rats.

    Torres, M D; Canal, J R; Pérez, C

    1999-01-01

    Parameters related to oxidative stress were studied in a group of 10 Wistar diabetic rats and 10 control rats. The levels of total erythrocyte catalase activity in the diabetic animals were significantly (pvitaminA/TG, vitaminA/PUFA, vitaminA/C 18:2) were higher in the control group. Our work corroborates the findings that fatty acid metabolism presents alterations in the diabetes syndrome and that the antioxidant status is affected. PMID:10523056

  8. Postoperative atrial fibrillation, oxidative stress, and inflammation

    ÖZAYDIN, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation is the most common complication of cardiac surgery. It is associated with increased complication rates. Recent trials have suggested that inflammation and oxidative stress have key roles in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. Current evidence evaluating the use of antiinflammatory and antioxidant agents, including statins, corticosteroids, N-acetylcysteine, vitamin C, and fish oil, to prevent postoperative atrial fibrillation is promising. However, la...

  9. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio; Hill, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both tra...

  10. Oxidant Stress in Renal Inflammation: Mechanisms and Remedies

    Ishola, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Our overall hypothesis was that oxidant stress is a central player in renal inflammation; pharmacological reduction of oxidant stress should therefore relieve renal inflammation. We explored pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in three experimental renal injury models. OXIDANT-DEPENDENT RENAL INFLAMMAT

  11. Oxidative stress and male reproductive health

    Robert J Aitken

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the major causes of defective sperm function is oxidative stress, which not only disrupts the integrity of sperm DNA but also limits the fertilizing potential of these cells as a result of collateral damage to proteins and lipids in the sperm plasma membrane. The origins of such oxidative stress appear to involve the sperm mitochondria, which have a tendency to generate high levels of superoxide anion as a prelude to entering the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Unfortunately, these cells have very little capacity to respond to such an attack because they only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair (BER pathway, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1. The latter successfully creates an abasic site, but the spermatozoa cannot process the oxidative lesion further because they lack the downstream proteins (APE1, XRCC1 needed to complete the repair process. It is the responsibility of the oocyte to continue the BER pathway prior to initiation of S-phase of the first mitotic division. If a mistake is made by the oocyte at this stage of development, a mutation will be created that will be represented in every cell in the body. Such mechanisms may explain the increase in childhood cancers and other diseases observed in the offspring of males who have suffered oxidative stress in their germ line as a consequence of age, environmental or lifestyle factors. The high prevalence of oxidative DNA damage in the spermatozoa of male infertility patients may have implications for the health of children conceivedin vitro and serves as a driver for current research into the origins of free radical generation in the germ line.

  12. Lamins as mediators of oxidative stress

    Highlights: ► The nuclear lamina defines structural and functional properties of the cell nucleus. ► Lamina dysfunction leads to a broad spectrum of laminopathies. ► Recent data is reviewed connecting laminopathies to oxidative stress. ► A framework is proposed to explain interactions between lamins and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The nuclear lamina defines both structural and functional properties of the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins, lead to a broad spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. While different hypotheses have been postulated to explain disease development, there is still no unified view on the mechanistic basis of laminopathies. Recent observations indicate that laminopathies are often accompanied by altered levels of reactive oxygen species and a higher susceptibility to oxidative stress at the cellular level. In this review, we highlight the role of reactive oxygen species for cell function and disease development in the context of laminopathies and present a framework of non-exclusive mechanisms to explain the reciprocal interactions between a dysfunctional lamina and altered redox homeostasis.

  13. Asthmatic cough and airway oxidative stress.

    Koskela, Heikki O; Purokivi, Minna K; Nieminen, Riina M; Moilanen, Eeva

    2012-05-31

    The mechanisms of cough in asthma are unclear. Asthma is associated with an oxidative stress. Many reactive oxygen species sensitize or activate sensory C-fibers which are capable to induce cough. It was hypothesized that oxidative stress in the airways might contribute to the cough severity in asthma. Exhaled breath condensate samples were collected in ten healthy and 26 asthmatic subjects. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the subjects filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent cough provocation tests with dry air hyperpnoea and hypertonic saline, among other measurements. Among the asthmatic subjects, high 8-isoprostane was associated with severe cough response to hyperpnoea (p=0.001), low Leicester Cough Questionnaire values (indicating severe subjective cough, p=0.02), and usage of combination asthma drugs (p=0.03-0.04). However, the 8-isoprostane concentrations did not differ significantly between the healthy and the asthmatic subjects. Airway oxidative stress may be associated with experienced cough severity and measured cough sensitivity in asthma. PMID:22546340

  14. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Taifeng Zhuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iron supplements (e.g., 10× RDA or more for oral supplements or direct iron supplementation via injection or addition to the cell culture medium for a short or long duration will induce DNA damage. Higher heme-iron intake or iron status measured by various biomarkers, especially serum ferritin, might contribute to greater risk of gestational diabetes, which may be mediated by iron oxidative stress though lipid oxidation and/or DNA damage. However, information is lacking about the effect of low dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily on lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and gestational diabetes. Randomized trials of low-dose iron supplementation (≤60 mg daily for pregnant women are warranted to test the relationship between iron oxidative stress and insulin resistance/gestational diabetes, especially for iron-replete women.

  15. Nitric oxide, stomatal closure, and abiotic stress.

    Neill, Steven; Barros, Raimundo; Bright, Jo; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John; Harrison, Judith; Morris, Peter; Ribeiro, Dimas; Wilson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Various data indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous signal in plants that mediates responses to several stimuli. Experimental evidence in support of such signalling roles for NO has been obtained via the application of NO, usually in the form of NO donors, via the measurement of endogenous NO, and through the manipulation of endogenous NO content by chemical and genetic means. Stomatal closure, initiated by abscisic acid (ABA), is effected through a complex symphony of intracellular signalling in which NO appears to be one component. Exogenous NO induces stomatal closure, ABA triggers NO generation, removal of NO by scavengers inhibits stomatal closure in response to ABA, and ABA-induced stomatal closure is reduced in mutants that are impaired in NO generation. The data indicate that ABA-induced guard cell NO generation requires both nitric oxide synthase-like activity and, in Arabidopsis, the NIA1 isoform of nitrate reductase (NR). NO stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and cGMP production. Both these NO-stimulated events are required for ABA-induced stomatal closure. ABA also stimulates the generation of H2O2 in guard cells, and pharmacological and genetic data demonstrate that NO accumulation in these cells is dependent on such production. Recent data have extended this model to maize mesophyll cells where the induction of antioxidant defences by water stress and ABA required the generation of H2O2 and NO and the activation of a MAPK. Published data suggest that drought and salinity induce NO generation which activates cellular processes that afford some protection against the oxidative stress associated with these conditions. Exogenous NO can also protect cells against oxidative stress. Thus, the data suggest an emerging model of stress responses in which ABA has several ameliorative functions. These include the rapid induction of stomatal closure to reduce transpirational water loss and the activation of antioxidant defences

  16. Role of oxidative stress in female reproduction

    Sharma Rakesh K

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a healthy body, ROS (reactive oxygen species and antioxidants remain in balance. When the balance is disrupted towards an overabundance of ROS, oxidative stress (OS occurs. OS influences the entire reproductive lifespan of a woman and even thereafter (i.e. menopause. OS results from an imbalance between prooxidants (free radical species and the body's scavenging ability (antioxidants. ROS are a double-edged sword – they serve as key signal molecules in physiological processes but also have a role in pathological processes involving the female reproductive tract. ROS affect multiple physiological processes from oocyte maturation to fertilization, embryo development and pregnancy. It has been suggested that OS modulates the age-related decline in fertility. It plays a role during pregnancy and normal parturition and in initiation of preterm labor. Most ovarian cancers appear in the surface epithelium, and repetitive ovulation has been thought to be a causative factor. Ovulation-induced oxidative base damage and damage to DNA of the ovarian epithelium can be prevented by antioxidants. There is growing literature on the effects of OS in female reproduction with involvement in the pathophsiology of preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, free radical-induced birth defects and other situations such as abortions. Numerous studies have shown that OS plays a role in the pathoysiology of infertility and assisted fertility. There is some evidence of its role in endometriosis, tubal and peritoneal factor infertility and unexplained infertility. This article reviews the role OS plays in normal cycling ovaries, follicular development and cyclical endometrial changes. It also discusses OS-related female infertility and how it influences the outcomes of assisted reproductive techniques. The review comprehensively explores the literature for evidence of the role of oxidative stress in conditions such as abortions, preeclampsia, hydatidiform mole, fetal

  17. Pathway and mechanism of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    2007-01-01

    Current hypotheses of pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been proposed, including formation of free radicals, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory processes, genetic factors, environmental impact factors, apoptosis, and so on. Especially, oxidative stress plays an essential role in AD pathogenesis by the function of linking agent. Oxidative stress in AD mainly includes lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA oxidation. Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the development and progression of AD. Protein oxidation is an important mechanism in AD. Oxidative damage to DNA may plays an important role in aging and AD.

  18. Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of adverse outcomes throughout the course of transplantation. Transplanted kidneys are prone to oxidative stress-mediated injury by pre-transplant and post-transplant conditions that cause reperfusion injury or imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Besides adversely affecting the allograft, oxidative stress and its constant companion, inflammation, cause cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and other disorders in transplant recipients...

  19. Oxidative Stress, Tumor Microenvironment, and Metabolic Reprogramming: A Diabolic Liaison

    Paola Chiarugi; Tania Fiaschi

    2012-01-01

    Conversely to normal cells, where deregulated oxidative stress drives the activation of death pathways, malignant cells exploit oxidative milieu for its advantage. Cancer cells are located in a very complex microenvironment together with stromal components that participate to enhance oxidative stress to promote tumor progression. Indeed, convincing experimental and clinical evidence underline the key role of oxidative stress in several tumor aspects thus affecting several characteristics of c...

  20. Boolean modeling and fault diagnosis in oxidative stress response

    Sridharan Sriram; Layek Ritwik; Datta Aniruddha; Venkatraj Jijayanagaram

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Oxidative stress is a consequence of normal and abnormal cellular metabolism and is linked to the development of human diseases. The effective functioning of the pathway responding to oxidative stress protects the cellular DNA against oxidative damage; conversely the failure of the oxidative stress response mechanism can induce aberrant cellular behavior leading to diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. Thus, understanding the normal signaling present in ...

  1. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Sha Li; Hor-Yue Tan; Ning Wang; Zhang-Jin Zhang; Lixing Lao; Chi-Woon Wong; Yibin Feng

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn...

  2. Oxidative stress associated with exercise, psychological stress and life-style factors

    Møller, P; Wallin, H; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    1996-01-01

    generation. Here, we review the effect of alcohol, air pollution, cigarette smoke, diet, exercise, non-ionizing radiation (UV and microwaves) and psychological stress on the development of oxidative stress. Regular exercise and carbohydrate-rich diets seem to increase the resistance against oxidative stress....... Air pollution, alcohol, cigarette smoke, non-ionizing radiation and psychological stress seem to increase oxidative stress. Alcohol in lower doses may act as an antioxidant on low density lipoproteins and thereby have an anti-atherosclerotic property....

  3. Oxidative stress in haemodialysis--intradialytic changes.

    Srinivasa Rao, P V; Dakshinamurty, K V; Saibaba, K S; Raghavan, M S; Vijayabhaskar, M; Sreekrishna, V; Ambekar, J G; Jayaseelan, L

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative stress is likely to be involved in the development of complications due to haemodialysis. Though there is evidence for production of oxygen free radicals during haemodialysis, reports on net oxidative imbalance due to a single dialysis session are conflicting. Hence, a time-course analysis of changes in lipid peroxides (LPO) along with antioxidant enzymes and vitamins was carried out. Hourly changes in LPO and antioxidants were studied during a first-use cuprophan membrane and acetate dialysis in 20 patients on regular haemodialysis treatment. Data were corrected for haemoconcentration and standardised to measure the rate of change before statistical evaluation using analysis of variance for repeated measures. The results of the study showed a net oxidative stress due to a single dialysis session in the form of increased plasma and erythrocyte lipid peroxidation, decrease in plasma vitamin E, slight increase in plasma superoxide dismutase and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and no change in plasma glutathione peroxidase. erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and plasma vitamin A levels. The oxygen radical production was found to be maximum in the first hour of dialysis. PMID:11778848

  4. Oxidative stress and antioxidant vitamins in leprosy

    Sangeeta B. Trimbake

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leprosy is a disease of great antiquity and it still continues to be a significant public health problem in few countries including India .Of the various mechanisms that influence the pathogenesis of leprosy, oxidative stress is important which occurs due to derangement in the balance between ROS and natural antioxidants. Hence this study attempted to assess the oxidative stress and antioxidant status in terms of MDA and vitamin E, vitamin C respectively in leprosy. Methods: Hundred untreated leprosy patients (50 PB and 50 MB were studied and compared with 50 healthy controls. Serum Malondialdehyde (MDA and vitamin E, vitamin C was measured by spectrophotometric method. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA was measured as an indicator of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status was assessed by estimating serum vitamin E and vitamin C levels. Results: Significant rise in serum MDA (P <0.001 in both PB and MB leprosy was seen when compared with controls. The vitamin E level was significantly decreased in both PB and MB leprosy patients as compared to controls. The vitamin C level was significantly decrease (P<0.001 in MB leprosy patients as compared to controls. Conclusions: Elevated MDA levels indicate oxidative stress in leprosy patients, denoting its crucial involvement in the pathogenesis and tissue damage in leprosy. Hence MDA levels can be used to monitor prognosis, treatment and control of leprosy. Decreased vitamin E, C levels in leprosy can be improved by oral vitamin E, C supplementation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2013; 1(3.000: 226-229

  5. The Role of Metallothionein in Oxidative Stress

    Rene Kizek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals are chemical particles containing one or more unpaired electrons, which may be part of the molecule. They cause the molecule to become highly reactive. The free radicals are also known to play a dual role in biological systems, as they can be either beneficial or harmful for living systems. It is clear that there are numerous mechanisms participating on the protection of a cell against free radicals. In this review, our attention is paid to metallothioneins (MTs as small, cysteine-rich and heavy metal-binding proteins, which participate in an array of protective stress responses. The mechanism of the reaction of metallothioneins with oxidants and electrophilic compounds is discussed. Numerous reports indicate that MT protects cells from exposure to oxidants and electrophiles, which react readily with sulfhydryl groups. Moreover, MT plays a key role in regulation of zinc levels and distribution in the intracellular space. The connections between zinc, MT and cancer are highlighted.

  6. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  7. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    Xiao-Xin Dai

    Full Text Available Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  8. Oxidative stress action in cellular aging

    Monique Cristine de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Various theories try to explain the biological aging by changing the functions and structure of organic systems and cells. During lifetime, free radicals in the oxidative stress lead to lipid peroxidation of cellular membranes, homeostasis imbalance, chemical residues formation, gene mutations in DNA, dysfunction of certain organelles, and the arise of diseases due to cell death and/or injury. This review describes the action of oxidative stress in the cells aging process, emphasizing the factors such as cellular oxidative damage, its consequences and the main protective measures taken to prevent or delay this process. Tests with antioxidants: vitamins A, E and C, flavonoids, carotenoids and minerals, the practice of caloric restriction and physical exercise, seeking the beneficial effects on human health, increasing longevity, reducing the level of oxidative stress, slowing the cellular senescence and origin of certain diseases, are discussed.Diferentes teorias tentam explicar o envelhecimento biológico através da alteração das funções e estrutura dos sistemas orgânicos e células. Ao longo da vida, os radicais livres presentes no estresse oxidativo conduzem à peroxidação dos lipídios das membranas celulares, desequilíbrio da homeostase, formação de resíduos químicos, mutações gênicas no DNA, disfunção de certas organelas, bem como ao surgimento de doenças devido à lesão e/ou morte celular. Nesta revisão descreve-se a ação do estresse oxidativo no processo de envelhecimento das células, enfatizando fatores como os danos oxidativos celulares, suas conseqüências e as principais medidas protetoras adotadas para se prevenir ou retardar este processo. Testes com antioxidantes: vitaminas A, E e C, flavonóides, carotenóides e minerais; a prática de restrição calórica e exercícios físicos, que buscam efeitos benéficos sobre a saúde humana, aumentando a longevidade, reduzindo o nível de estresse oxidativo

  9. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    María Muriach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB, a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  10. Oxidative stress in psoriasis and potential therapeutic use of antioxidants.

    Lin, Xiran; Huang, Tian

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology of psoriasis is complex and dynamic. Recently, the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the oxidants, leading to a disruption of redox signaling and control and/or molecular damage. In this article, the published studies on the role of oxidative stress in psoriasis pathogenesis are reviewed, focusing on the impacts of oxidative stress on dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and keratinocytes, on angiogenesis and on inflammatory signaling (mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription). As there is compelling evidence that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the possibility of using this information to develop novel strategies for treatment of patients with psoriasis is of considerable interest. In this article, we also review the published studies on treating psoriasis with antioxidants and drugs with antioxidant activity. PMID:27098416

  11. Reduced resistance to oxidative stress during reproduction as a cost of early-life stress

    Zimmer, C; Spencer, K A

    2015-01-01

    This study was funded by a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellowship to K.A. Spencer. Stress exposure during early-life development can have long-term consequences for a variety of biological functions including oxidative stress. The link between early-life stress and oxidative balance is beginning to be explored and previous studies have focused on this link in adult non-breeding or immature individuals. However, as oxidative stress is considered as the main physiological mechanism underly...

  12. Multistep Phosphorelay Proteins Transmit Oxidative Stress Signals to the Fission Yeast Stress-activated Protein Kinase

    Nguyen, Aaron Ngocky; Lee, Albert; Place, Warren; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2000-01-01

    In response to oxidative stress, eukaryotic cells induce transcription of genes required for detoxification of oxidants. Here we present evidence that oxidative stress stimuli are transmitted by a multistep phosphorelay system to the Spc1/Sty1 stress-activated protein kinase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The fission yeast mpr1+ gene encodes a novel protein with a histidine-containing phosphotransfer domain homologous to the budding yeast Ypd1. Spc1 activation upon oxidative ...

  13. Dietary grape poliphenols modulate oxidative stress in ageing rabbits

    R. Della Loggia; G. Altimer; S. Sgorlon; Stefanon, B.; G. Stradaioli

    2010-01-01

    The imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant capacity of the organism leads to a condition of oxidative stress (Urso and Clarkson, 2003). Studies in humans and laboratory animals have reported that oxidative stress is related to some common degenerative diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular pathologies (Pellegrini et al., 2003). Oxidative stress has also been identified as causative agent for diseases, such as decline of immune function and atherosclerosis (Meydan...

  14. Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Implications for Vascular and Other Complications

    Dario Pitocco; Manfredi Tesauro; Rizzi Alessandro; Giovanni Ghirlanda; Carmine Cardillo

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, oxidative stress has become a focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on these studies, an emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway” through which the risk factor...

  15. Fatty acids and oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders

    Tonello Lucio; Cocchi Massimo; Tsaluchidu Sofia; Puri Basant K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine whether there is published evidence for increased oxidative stress in neuropsychiatric disorders. Methods A PubMed search was carried out using the MeSH search term 'oxidative stress' in conjunction with each of the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic categories of the American Psychiatric Association in order to identify potential studies. Results There was published evidence of increased oxidative stress in the following DSM-IV-TR diagnostic categ...

  16. The Role of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress in Epilepsy

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds. Oxidative stress can result from excessive free-radical production and it is likely implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the initiation and progression of epileptogenesis. Flavonoids can protect the brain from oxidative stress. In the central nervous system (CNS) several flavonoids bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in anticonvulsive effects. Objective. This review provides an overview about the role of flavonoids in oxidative stress in epil...

  17. Postprandial Oxidative Stress in Exercise Trained and Sedentary Cigarette Smokers

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smokers experience an exaggerated triglyceride (TAG and oxidative stress response to high fat feeding. Exercise training may serve to attenuate the rise in these variables, by improving TAG clearance and antioxidant defense. We compared blood TAG, antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress biomarkers in exercise trained (>2 hrs per wk and untrained smokers matched for age, in response to a high fat test meal. We report here that low volume exercise training can attenuate postprandial lipid peroxidation, but has little impact on blood TAG and other markers of oxidative stress. Higher volumes of exercise may be needed to allow for clinically meaningful adaptations in postprandial lipemia and oxidative stress.

  18. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophili...

  19. Melanocytes as Instigators and Victims of Oxidative Stress

    Denat, L.; Kadekaro, A.L.; Marrot, L; Leachman, S; Abdel-Malek, Z.A.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal melanocytes are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to the pro-oxidant state generated during melanin synthesis, and to intrinsic antioxidant defences that are compromised in pathologic conditions. Melanoma is thought to be oxidative stress-driven, and melanocyte death in vitiligo is thought to be instigated by a highly pro-oxidant state in the epidermis. We review the current knowledge about melanin and the redox state of melanocytes, how paracrine factors help countera...

  20. Oxidative Stress and Anxiety: Relationship and Cellular Pathways

    Jaouad Bouayed; Hassan Rammal; Rachid Soulimani

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal ...

  1. Update on the oxidative stress theory of aging: Does oxidative stress play a role in aging or healthy aging?

    Salmon, Adam B.; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging predicts that manipulations that alter oxidative stress/damage will alter aging. The gold standard for determining whether aging is altered is lifespan, i.e., does altering oxidative stress/damage change lifespan? Mice with genetic manipulations in the antioxidant defense system designed to directly address this prediction have, with few exceptions, shown no change in lifespan. However, when these transgenic/knockout mice are tested using models that devel...

  2. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Inflammation is a common response in the human liver. It is involved in chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, steatosis, ischemiareperfusion damage, hepatocarcinomas and in the development of metastasis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS production is part of the inflammatory processes. It is implicated in many physiological and pathological situations and can induce mutations in key cancer genes. Normally, this process is prevented by DNA repair enzymatic systems that maintain sequence fidelity during DNA replication. However, overproduction of free radicals in chronic inflammatory diseases is thought to saturate the ability of the cell to repair DNA damage prior to replications. Inflammation-induced genetic damage is not unique to the liver, and it might contribute to the development of mutations in several organs. An example is the chronic inflammatory response in ulcerative colitis that ultimately could lead to neoplasia.

    There is compelling evidence to suggest that most known environmental risk factors for HCC development lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Indeed, hepatitis C virus (HCV, alcohol and hepatitis B virus (HBV have all been associated with oxidative stress. Direct production of oxidative stress by HCV core protein has been shown. A link between oxidative stress and liver pathogenesis is also supported by the successful use of antioxidant therapy to treat liver injury caused by chronic HCV infection, although it is not currently used for effective therapy. Ethanol metabolism via the alcohol dehydrogenase pathway and microsomal ethanol oxidizing system contribute substantially to the production of acetaldehyde and generation of ROS. HBx via its association with mitochondria has been shown to induce oxidative stress which in turn leads to activation of a

  3. Human albumin prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase in in vitro and in vivo.

    Li-Juan Zhang

    Full Text Available Human albumin has recently been demonstrated to protect brain neurons from injury in rat ischemic brain. However, there is no information available about whether human albumin can prevent loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression of dopaminergic (DA neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA toxicity that is most commonly used to create a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD. In the present study, two microliters of 1.25% human albumin were stereotaxically injected into the right striatum of rats one day before or 7 days after the 6-OHDA lesion in the same side. D-Amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry was measured 7 days, 3 and 10 weeks after 6-OHDA lesion. We observed that intrastriatal administration of human albumin significantly reduced the degree of rotational asymmetry. The number of TH-immunoreactive neurons present in the substantia nigra was greater in 6-OHDA lesioned rats following human albumin-treatment than non-human albumin treatment. TH-immunoreactivity in the 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum was also significantly increased in the human albumin-treated rats. To examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of human albumin, we challenged PC12 cells with 6-OHDA as an in vitro model of PD. Incubation with human albumin prevented 6-OHDA-induced reduction of cell viability in PC12 cell cultures, as measured by MTT assay. Furthermore, human albumin reduced 6-OHDA-induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and apoptosis in cultured PC12 cells, as assessed by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that human albumin inhibited 6-OHDA-induced activation of JNK, c-Jun, ERK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling in PC12 cultures challenged with 6-OHDA. Human albumin may protect against 6-OHDA toxicity by influencing MAPK pathway followed by anti-ROS formation and anti-apoptosis.

  4. Neuroprotection of microglial conditioned medium on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death: role of transforming growth factor beta-2.

    Polazzi, Elisabetta; Altamira, Luis Emiliano Peña; Eleuteri, Simona; Barbaro, Raffaella; Casadio, Chiara; Contestabile, Antonio; Monti, Barbara

    2009-07-01

    Microglia, the immune cells of the CNS, play essential roles in both physiological and pathological brain states. Here we have used an in vitro model to demonstrate neuroprotection of a 48 h-microglial conditioned medium (MCM) towards cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) challenged with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine, which induces a Parkinson-like neurodegeneration, and to identify the protective factor(s). MCM nearly completely protects CGNs from 6-hydroxydopamine neurotoxicity and at least some of the protective factor(s) are peptidic in nature. While the fraction of the medium containing molecules 10 kDa are not neuroprotective. We further demonstrate that microglia release high amounts of transforming growth factor-beta2 (TGF-beta2) and that its exogenous addition to the fraction of the medium not containing it (< 10 kDa) fully restores the neuroprotective action. Moreover, MCM neuroprotection is significantly counteracted by an inhibitor of TGF-beta2 transduction pathway. Our results identify TGF-beta2 as an essential neuroprotective factor released by microglia in its culture medium that requires to be fully effective the concomitant presence of other factor(s) of low molecular weight. PMID:19457129

  5. Treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment in 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson’s rats

    Cho, Han-Sam; Shin, Mal-Soon; Song, Wook; Jun, Tae-Won; Lim, Baek-Vin; Kim, Young-Pyo; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra is a key pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on short-term memory, apoptotic dopaminergic neuronal cell death and fiber loss in the nigrostriatum, and cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of Parkinson’s rats. Parkinson’s rats were made by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum using stereotaxic instrument. Four weeks after 6-OH...

  6. Hydroxytyrosol induces phase II detoxifying enzyme expression and effectively protects dopaminergic cells against dopamine- and 6-hydroxydopamine induced cytotoxicity.

    Yu, Guohua; Deng, Ajun; Tang, Wanbin; Ma, Junzhi; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common late-age onset neurodegenerative disease. Except for the symptomatic alleviating treatment, no disease modifying therapy is currently available. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective role of hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major phenolic compound present in olive oil, against dopaminergic cell death. We found that HT effectively protected dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells against dopamine (DA) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced cell death, but had no apparent effect on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we have shown that HT efficiently induced the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Using an NQO1 inhibitor, we revealed that increased NQO1 expression contributed to the protective effect of HT against dopaminergic cell death. Together, our findings suggest that HT has a protective effect against DA- and 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death, supporting the beneficial effect of olive oil in preventing DA-metabolism related dopaminergic neuron dysfunction. PMID:26970393

  7. Strategies for Reducing or Preventing the Generation of Oxidative Stress

    B. Poljsak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of oxidative stress could be achieved in three levels: by lowering exposure to environmental pollutants with oxidizing properties, by increasing levels of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants, or by lowering the generation of oxidative stress by stabilizing mitochondrial energy production and efficiency. Endogenous oxidative stress could be influenced in two ways: by prevention of ROS formation or by quenching of ROS with antioxidants. However, the results of epidemiological studies where people were treated with synthetic antioxidants are inconclusive and contradictory. Recent evidence suggests that antioxidant supplements (although highly recommended by the pharmaceutical industry and taken by many individuals do not offer sufficient protection against oxidative stress, oxidative damage or increase the lifespan. The key to the future success of decreasing oxidative-stress-induced damage should thus be the suppression of oxidative damage without disrupting the wellintegrated antioxidant defense network. Approach to neutralize free radicals with antioxidants should be changed into prevention of free radical formation. Thus, this paper addresses oxidative stress and strategies to reduce it with the focus on nutritional and psychosocial interventions of oxidative stress prevention, that is, methods to stabilize mitochondria structure and energy efficiency, or approaches which would increase endogenous antioxidative protection and repair systems.

  8. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    Sha Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  9. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  10. Oxidative and nitrative stress in neurodegeneration.

    Cobb, Catherine A; Cole, Marsha P

    2015-12-01

    Aerobes require oxygen for metabolism and normal free radical formation. As a result, maintaining the redox homeostasis is essential for brain cell survival due to their high metabolic energy requirement to sustain electrochemical gradients, neurotransmitter release, and membrane lipid stability. Further, brain antioxidant levels are limited compared to other organs and less able to compensate for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generation which contribute oxidative/nitrative stress (OS/NS). Antioxidant treatments such as vitamin E, minocycline, and resveratrol mediate neuroprotection by prolonging the incidence of or reversing OS and NS conditions. Redox imbalance occurs when the antioxidant capacity is overwhelmed, consequently leading to activation of alternate pathways that remain quiescent under normal conditions. If OS/NS fails to lead to adaptation, tissue damage and injury ensue, resulting in cell death and/or disease. The progression of OS/NS-mediated neurodegeneration along with contributions from microglial activation, dopamine metabolism, and diabetes comprise a detailed interconnected pathway. This review proposes a significant role for OS/NS and more specifically, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and other lipid modifications, by triggering microglial activation to elicit a neuroinflammatory state potentiated by diabetes or abnormal dopamine metabolism. Subsequently, sustained stress in the neuroinflammatory state overwhelms cellular defenses and prompts neurotoxicity resulting in the onset or amplification of brain damage. PMID:26024962

  11. A Theoretical Framework for Predicting the Oxidative Stress Potential of Oxide Nanoparticles

    BURELLO ENRICO; Worth, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a theoretical model that predicts the oxidative stress potential of oxide nanoparticles by looking at the ability of these materials to perturb the intracellular redox state. The model uses reactivity descriptors to build the energy band structure of oxide nanoparticles and predicts their ability to induce an oxidative stress by comparing the redox potentials of relevant intracellular reactions with the oxides' energy structure. We find that nanoparticles displaying b...

  12. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  13. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:27423629

  14. Evaluation of oxidative stress in brucella infected cows

    N. Kataria

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress can influence the metabolism of cells in vital organs of the body. Oxidative stress is extremely dangerous as it does not exhibit any symptom and is recognisable with great difficulty by means of laboratory methods. It can be monitored with several biomarkers like antioxidants and pro-oxidants which can be assessed in serum. The inexorableness of exposure of cows to brucella infection makes oxidative stress associated with this infection an appropriate field of investigation. There is paucity of work to detect stress, which is essential to take timely corrective measures and to save the animal population. Therefore the investigation was carried out to evaluate oxidative stress in the cows suffering from brucellosis. For this serum iomarkers of oxidative stress viz. vitamin C, vitamin E, catalase, monoamine oxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, xanthine oxidase, oxidase and peroxidase were determined. Results indicated that vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione activity decreased significantly in affected cows as compared to healthy cows. Serum catalase, superoxide dismutase, monoamine oxidase, glutathione reductase, xanthine oxidase, oxidase and peroxidase activities increased significantly in affected cows as compared to healthy cows. Decreased activity of vitamin C, vitamin E and glutathione indicated towards their depletion which generally occurs in the oxidative stress to scavenge the free radicals. It was concluded that oxidative stress was there in the animals. This study recommends the use of antioxidants in affected cows

  15. Antioxidant status and biomarkers of oxidative stress in canine lymphoma

    Background – Oxidative stress might play a role in carcinogenesis, as well as impacting morbidity and mortality of veterinary cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antioxidant concentrations and biomarkers of oxidative stress in dogs with newly-diagnosed lymphoma prior to treatm...

  16. Nanoparticles, lung injury, and the role of oxidant stress.

    Madl, Amy K; Plummer, Laurel E; Carosino, Christopher; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of engineered nanoscale materials has provided significant advancements in electronic, biomedical, and material science applications. Both engineered nanoparticles and nanoparticles derived from combustion or incidental processes exhibit a range of physical and chemical properties that induce inflammation and oxidative stress in biological systems. Oxidative stress reflects the imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species and the biochemical mechanisms to detoxify and repair the damage resulting from reactive intermediates. This review examines current research on incidental and engineered nanoparticles in terms of their health effects on lungs and the mechanisms by which oxidative stress via physicochemical characteristics influences toxicity or biocompatibility. Although oxidative stress has generally been thought of as an adverse biological outcome, this review also briefly discusses some of the potential emerging technologies to use nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress to treat disease in a site-specific fashion. PMID:24215442

  17. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Highlights: ► Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. ► Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in Δyfh1 cells. ► Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. ► Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in Δyfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron–sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin (Δyfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in Δyfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  18. Oxidative stress signaling to chromatin in health and disease

    Kreuz, Sarah

    2016-06-20

    Oxidative stress has a significant impact on the development and progression of common human pathologies, including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidative stress globally influences chromatin structure, DNA methylation, enzymatic and non-enzymatic post-translational modifications of histones and DNA-binding proteins. The effects of oxidative stress on these chromatin alterations mediate a number of cellular changes, including modulation of gene expression, cell death, cell survival and mutagenesis, which are disease-driving mechanisms in human pathologies. Targeting oxidative stress-dependent pathways is thus a promising strategy for the prevention and treatment of these diseases. We summarize recent research developments connecting oxidative stress and chromatin regulation.

  19. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic

  20. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    Malaviya, Rama [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  1. Oxidative stress response after laparoscopic versus conventional sigmoid resection

    Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Kücükakin, Bülent; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Rosenberg, Jacob; Gögenur, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is accompanied by a surgical stress response, which results in increased morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress is a part of the surgical stress response. Minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery may result in reduced oxidative stress compared with open surgery. Nineteen patients......, 1 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h postoperatively). There were no statistical significant differences between laparoscopic and open surgery for any of the 3 oxidative stress parameters. Malondialdehyde was reduced 1 hour postoperatively (P...... scheduled for sigmoid resection were randomly allocated to open or laparoscopic sigmoid resection in a double-blind, prospective clinical trial. Three biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, ascorbic acid, and dehydroascorbic acid) were measured at 6 different time points (preoperatively...

  2. Oxidative stress and psychological functioning among medical students

    Rani Srivastava; Jyoti Batra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has gained attention recently in behavioral medicine and has been reported to be associated with various psychological disturbances and their prognoses. Objectives: Study aims to evaluate the oxidative stress (malonylaldehyde (MDA) levels) and its relation with psychological factors (dimensions of personality, levels of anxiety, stress, and depression) among medical/paramedical students of 1 st and 3 rd year). Materials and Methods: A total of 150 students; 75 fro...

  3. Increased Serum Oxidative Stress Markers in Women with Uterine Leiomyoma

    Santulli, Pietro; Borghese, Bruno; Lemaréchal, Herve; Leconte, Mahaut; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Batteux, Frédéric; Chapron, Charles; Borderie, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are the most common gynaecological benign tumors in premenopausal women. Evidences support the role of oxidative stress in the development of uterine leiomyoma. We have analysed oxidative stress markers (thiols, advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP), protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites) in preoperative sera from women with histologically proven uterine leiomyoma. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a laboratory study in a tertiary-care ...

  4. Oxidative stress in chronic vascular disease: From prediction to prevention.

    Santilli, Francesca; D'Ardes, Damiano; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    This review article is intended to describe the strong relationship between oxidative stress and vascular disease. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular disease: oxidative stress is intimately linked to atherosclerosis, through oxidation of LDL and endothelial dysfunction, to diabetes, mainly through advanced glycation end-products (AGEs)/receptor for AGE (RAGE) axis impairment, protein kinase C (PKC), aldose reductase (AR) and NADPH oxidase (NOX) dysfunction, and to hypertension, through renin–angiotensin system(RAS) dysfunction. Several oxidative stress biomarkers have been proposed to detect oxidative stress levels and to improve our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying vascular disease. These biomarkers include ROS-generating and quenching molecules, and ROS-modified compounds, such as F2-isoprostanes. An efficient therapeutic approach to vascular diseases cannot exclude evaluation and treatment of oxidative stress. In fact, oxidative stress represents an important target of several drugs and nutraceuticals, including antidiabetic agents, statins, renin-angiotensin system blockers, polyphenols and other antioxidants. A better understanding of the relations between atherosclerosis, diabetes, hypertension and ROS and the discovery of new oxidative stress targets will translate into consistent benefits for effective vascular disease treatment and prevention. PMID:26363473

  5. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Fu-Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system.

  6. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  7. Oxidative Stress and Neurobiology of Demyelination.

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan

    2016-01-01

    Despite a large amount of research which aims at defining the pathophysiology of human demyelination (i.e., multiple sclerosis), etiological bases of disease have been unknown so far. The point of intersection of all assumed etiological factors, which are mainly based upon immunological cascades, is neuroinflammation. The precise definition of the place and role of all pathogenetic factors in the occurrence and development of the disease is of crucial importance for understanding the clinical nature and for finding more effective therapeutic options. There are few studies whose results give more precise data about the role and the importance of other factors in neuroinflammation, besides immunological ones, with regard to clinical and paraclinical correlates of the disease. The review integrates results found in previously performed studies which have evaluated oxidative stress participation in early and late neuroinflammation. The largest number of studies indicates that the use of antioxidants affects the change of neuroinflammation course under experimental conditions, which is reflected in the reduction of the severity and the total reversibility in clinical presentation of the disease, the faster achieving of remission, and the delayed and slow course of neuroinflammation. Therapies based on the knowledge of redox biology targeting free radical generation hold great promise in modulation of the neuroinflammation and its clinical presentations. PMID:25502298

  8. Computer diagnosis in cardiology: Oxidative stress hypothesis

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Virtual scanning is one of the emerging technologies in complementary medicine practice. The diagnostic principle is hinged on perception and ultra weak light emission, while the treatment options associated with it includes diet, flash light, exercise and relaxation. However, a mechanism that links the diagnostic and treatment principles has yet to be elucidated. Aims: The objective here is to further explanation of oxidative stress concept as the biochemical basis of the technology. Materials and Methods: Using available literature and basic science textbook, the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenalin axis as neuro-endocrine physiological system that is strongly linked to the rate of alterations in biochemical processes through to cardiovascular complications is articulated. Results: The hypothesis brings to fore the potential of using the alterations in biochemical processes associated with cognition as tool to validate the Virtual Scanning technology for possible incorporation into clinical practice. Or vice versa to use Virtual Scanning technology to determine the chemiluminescence-related biochemical changes resulting from pathologies that could benefit from relaxation, light therapy, exercise and antioxidant nutrition. Conclusions: This article advances the applicability of cognitive test procedure for indication of the disease(s affecting heart function. The implication for some laboratory indices that are already available in clinical practice is highlighted. Investigation of this hypothesis will help provide clear link between plausible mechanism and the theory proposed.

  9. Computer diagnosis in cardiology: Oxidative stress hypothesis

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Virtual scanning is one of the emerging technologies in complementary medicine practice. The diagnostic principle is hinged on perception and ultra weak light emission, while the treatment options associated with it includes diet, flash light, exercise and relaxation. However, a mechanism that links the diagnostic and treatment principles has yet to be elucidated. Aims: The objective here is to further explanation of oxidative stress concept as the biochemical basis of the technology. Materials and Methods: Using available literature and basic science textbook, the function of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenalin axis as neuro-endocrine physiological system that is strongly linked to the rate of alterations in biochemical processes through to cardiovascular complications is articulated. Results: The hypothesis brings to fore the potential of using the alterations in biochemical processes associated with cognition as tool to validate the Virtual Scanning technology for possible incorporation into clinical practice. Or vice versa to use Virtual Scanning technology to determine the chemiluminescence-related biochemical changes resulting from pathologies that could benefit from relaxation, light therapy, exercise and antioxidant nutrition. Conclusions: This article advances the applicability of cognitive test procedure for indication of the disease(s affecting heart function. The implication for some laboratory indices that are already available in clinical practice is highlighted. Investigation of this hypothesis will help provide clear link between plausible mechanism and the theory proposed.

  10. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    Faiza Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98% on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  11. Oxidative stress and psychological functioning among medical students

    Rani Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress has gained attention recently in behavioral medicine and has been reported to be associated with various psychological disturbances and their prognoses. Objectives: Study aims to evaluate the oxidative stress (malonylaldehyde (MDA levels and its relation with psychological factors (dimensions of personality, levels of anxiety, stress, and depression among medical/paramedical students of 1 st and 3 rd year. Materials and Methods: A total of 150 students; 75 from 1 st year (2010-2011 and75 from 3 rd year (2009-2010; of medical and paramedical background were assessed on level of MDA (oxidative stress and personality variables, that is, level of anxiety, stress, and depression. These psychological variables were correlated with the level of their oxidative stress. Results: Findings revealed that both groups are influenced by oxidative stress and their psychological variables are also compatible in order to confirm their vulnerabilities to stress. Conclusions: Stress in 3 rd year students was significantly higher and it was noted that it adversely affects the psychological parameters. Hence, special attention on mental health aspect in these students may be given.

  12. Impact of oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome in albino rats

    R.S. Al-Naemi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulative reports documented that oxidative stress is implicated in many human and animal diseases. However, the reports concerning the effect of oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome are limited and scarce. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome and to assess the antioxidant effect of vitamin C and E on oxidative stress parameters in blood and placental tissue samples in experimental pregnant animals model exposed to oxidative stress. Wister Albino rats were used in this work to investigate the effects of oxidative stress exposure (addition of H2O2 to the drinking water on pregnancy outcome. Rats were divided into 5 groups, as follows: Group I (included 7 normal pregnant rats which served as control group. Group II (exposed to 1 % H2O2 included 7 pregnant rats, the rats were allowed to become pregnant and received (1% H2O2 in drinking water from day 7th till the day 19th of pregnancy. Group III (exposed to 3% H2O2 included 8 pregnant rats. Same as group 2, but the rats were exposed to a higher concentration of H2O2 (3% in drinking water. Group IV (included 8 pregnant rats. Pregnant rats received vitamins C and E without induction of oxidative stress. Group V (included 8 pregnant rats.induction of oxidative stress by 1% H2O2 with vitamins supplementation in the pregnant rats. Serum total antioxidants capacity (TAC, serum and placental tissue oxidative stress biomarker; 8-iso prostaglandin F2α (8-Isoprostane were measured using specific ELISA kits. Also placental tissues of pregnant rats were isolated and put directly in 10% formalin prepared for histopathological examination. Results revealed a significant decrease in the median values of the body weight and total serum antioxidants capacity (TAC in groups II and III of rats compared with the control group. A significant higher median value of TAC obtained in the groups IV and V when compared with the control group. Significant higher

  13. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related modelsof oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

    Heidari, Himan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Noubarani, Maryam; Rahmati, Mokhtar; Jafarian, Iman; Adiban, Hasan; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oxidative stress and carbonyl stress have essential mediatory roles in the development of diabetes and its related complications through increasing free radicals production and impairing antioxidant defense systems. Different chemical and natural compounds have been suggested for decreasing such disorders associated with diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the protective effects of Cucumis sativus (C. sativus) fruit (cucumber) in oxidative and carbonyl stress models. These diabetes-related models with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) simulate conditions observed in chronic hyperglycemia. Methods: Cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonyl stress model) were measured and the protective effects of C. sativus were evaluated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results: Aqueous extract of C. sativus fruit (40 μg/mL) prevented all cytotoxicity markers in both the oxidative and carbonyl stress models including cell lysis, ROS formation, membrane lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential decline, lysosomal labialization, and proteolysis. The extract also protected hepatocytes from protein carbonylation induced by glyoxal. Our results indicated that C. sativus is able to prevent oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in the isolated hepatocytes. Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus.

  14. Reduced resistance to oxidative stress during reproduction as a cost of early-life stress.

    Zimmer, Cédric; Spencer, Karen A

    2015-05-01

    Stress exposure during early-life development can have long-term consequences for a variety of biological functions including oxidative stress. The link between early-life stress and oxidative balance is beginning to be explored and previous studies have focused on this link in adult non-breeding or immature individuals. However, as oxidative stress is considered as the main physiological mechanism underlying the trade-off between self-maintenance and investment in reproduction, it is necessary to look at the consequences of early-life stress on oxidative status during reproduction. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to pre- and/or post-natal stress on oxidative balance during reproduction under benign or stressful environmental conditions in an avian model species, the Japanese quail. We determined total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and resistance to a free-radical attack in individual exposed to pre-natal stress, post-natal stress or both and in control individuals exposed to none of the stressors. TAS levels decreased over time in all females that reproduced under stressful conditions. TOS decreased between the beginning and the end of reproductive period in pre-natal control females. In all females, resistance to a free-radical attack decreased over the reproductive event but this decrease was more pronounced in females from a pre-natal stress development. Our results suggest that pre-natal stress may be associated with a higher cost of reproduction in terms of oxidative stress. These results also confirm that early-life stress can be associated with both benefits and costs depending of the life-history stage or environmental context. PMID:25542633

  15. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  16. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  17. A meta-analysis of oxidative stress markers in schizophrenia

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been identified as a possible element in the neuropathological processes of schizophrenia(SCZ).Alteration of oxidative stress markers has been reported in SCZ studies,but with inconsistent results.To evaluate the risk of oxidative stress to schizophrenia,a meta-analysis was conducted,including five markers of oxidative stress [thiobarbituric reactive substances(TBARS),nitric oxide(NO),catalase(CAT),glutathione peroxidase(GP) and superoxide dismutase(SOD)] in SCZ patients versus healthy controls.This study showed that TBARS and NO significantly increased in SCZ,while SOD activity significantly decreased in the disorganized type of SCZ patients.No significant effect size was found for the activities of GP and CAT in SCZ patients(P>0.05).Egger’s regression test observed no significant publication bias across the oxidative stress markers,but found high heterogeneities in all the 5 markers.The subgroup analysis suggested that the ethnicity,sample size of patients and sample sources may contribute to the heterogeneity of the results for TBARS,NO and SOD.The result further demonstrated the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  18. Neuroendocrine Profile in a Rat Model of Psychosocial Stress: Relation to Oxidative Stress

    Colaianna, Marilena; Schiavone, Stefania; Zotti, Margherita; Tucci, Paolo; Morgese, Maria Grazia; Bäckdahl, Liselotte; Holmdahl, Rikard; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Trabace, Luigia

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Psychosocial stress alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis). Increasing evidence shows a link between these alterations and oxidant elevation. Oxidative stress is implicated in the stress response and in the pathogenesis of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the central nervous system. Here, we investigated the contributory role of NOX2-derived ROS to the development of neuroendocrine altera...

  19. Salivary Nitric Oxide, a Biomarker for Stress and Anxiety?

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala Fawzi; Al-Awaida, Wajdy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if salivary nitrate correlates to the daily psychological stress and anxiety in a group of human subjects. Methods The convenient sample recruitment method was employed; data from seventy three subjects were analyzed. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) inventories were used to determine stress and anxiety scores respectively. Salivary nitric oxide was measured through nitrate (NOx) levels using the Griess reaction method. Results Although stress and anxiety were correlated. No significant correlation exists between salivary nitrate and daily psychological stress and anxiety in the study's participants. Conclusion While all previous studies focused NOx levels in acute stress models. This is the first study to investigate the correlation between salivary nitrates and daily psychological stress and anxiety. Although stress and anxiety were correlated, there is no correlation between salivary nitrates and daily psychological stress and anxiety. Further studies are required to investigate this correlation using other biological samples such as plasma. PMID:27247597

  20. OXIDATIVE STRESS STATUS IN HUMANS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Each component of the constellation of Metabolic Syndrome signs - dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and obesity - has been associated, though not unequivocally, with an elevation of oxidative stress. Moreover, reductions in these conditions appear generally associated with attenuation of b...

  1. The influence of homocysteine and oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome

    Micle, O; Muresan, M; Antal, L; Bodog, F; Bodog, A

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress in utero–placental tissues plays an important role in the development of placental-related diseases. Maternal hiperhomocysteinemia is associated with placental mediated diseases, such as preeclampsia, spontaneous abortion and placental abruption. The aim of our study is to appreciate the clinical usefulness of the dosage serum homocysteine and malondialdehyde, as an oxidative stress marker, in the pregnancies complicated with risk of abortion or preterm birth. The study was p...

  2. Mycotoxin-Containing Diet Causes Oxidative Stress in the Mouse

    Hou, Yan-Jun; Zhao, Yong-yan; Xiong, Bo; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xu, Yin-xue; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins which mainly consist of Aflatoxin (AF), Zearalenone (ZEN) and Deoxynivalenol (DON) are commonly found in many food commodities. Although each component has been shown to cause liver toxicity and oxidative stress in several species, there is no evidence regarding the effect of naturally contained multiple mycotoxins on tissue toxicity and oxidative stress in vivo. In the present study, mycotoxins-contaminated maize (AF 597 µg/kg, ZEN 729 µg/kg, DON 3.1 mg/kg maize) was incorporated ...

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous biomarker of oxidative stress.

    Rupsa Datta; Alba Alfonso-García; Rachel Cinco; Enrico Gratton

    2015-01-01

    Presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in excess of normal physiological level results in oxidative stress. This can lead to a range of pathological conditions including inflammation, diabetes mellitus, cancer, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease. Biomarkers of oxidative stress play an important role in understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases. A number of fluorescent biomarkers exist. However, a non-invasive and label-free identification technique would be a...

  4. Glucose deprivation-induced metabolic oxidative stress and cancer therapy

    Simons Andrean; Mattson David; Dornfeld Ken; Spitz Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Cancer cells (vs. normal cells) demonstrate evidence of oxidative stress, increased glycolysis, and increased pentose cycle activity. The oxidative stress in cancer cells has been hypothesized to arise from mitochondrial dysfunction leading to increased levels of hydroperoxides, and cancer cells have been proposed to compensate for this defect by increasing glucose metabolism. Glucose metabolism has also been shown to play a role in hydroperoxide detoxification via the formation of pyruvate (...

  5. Introduction to Oxidative Stress in Biomedical and Biological Research

    Michael Breitenbach; Peter Eckl

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is now a well-researched area with thousands of new articles appearing every year. We want to give the reader here an overview of the topics in biomedical and basic oxidative stress research which are covered by the authors of this thematic issue. We also want to give the newcomer a short introduction into some of the basic concepts, definitions and analytical procedures used in this field.

  6. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melo...

  7. Voluntary Exercise Protects Heart from Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats

    Roya Naderi; Gisou Mohaddes; Mustafa Mohammadi; Rana Ghaznavi; Rafigheh Ghyasi; Amir Mansour Vatankhah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Oxidative stress plays a key role in the onset and development of diabetes complications. In this study, we evaluated whether voluntary exercise could alleviate oxidative stress in the heart and blood of streptozotocin - induced diabetic rats. Methods: 28 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=7): control, exercise, diabetes and exercise + diabetes. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin in male rats. Rats in the trained groups were sub...

  8. Ageing, oxidative stress and cancer: paradigms in parallax

    Benz, Christopher C.; Yau, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Two paradigms central to geroscience research are that aging is associated with increased oxidative stress and increased cancer risk. Therefore, it could be deduced that cancers arising with ageing will show evidence of increased oxidative stress. Recent studies of gene expression in age-controlled breast cancer cases indicate that this deduction is false, posing parallax views of these two paradigms, and highlighting the unanswered question: does ageing cause or simply permit cancer developm...

  9. Oxidative Stress in Lead and Cadmium Toxicity and Its Amelioration

    R. C. Patra; Amiya K. Rautray; D. Swarup

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a role, at least in part, in pathogenesis of many disease conditions and toxicities in animals. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species and free radicals beyond the cells intrinsic capacity to neutralize following xenobiotics exposure leads to a state of oxidative stress and resultant damages of lipids, protein, and DNA. Lead and cadmium are the common environmental heavy metal pollutants and have widespread distribution. Both natural and anthrop...

  10. An Antioxidant Phytotherapy to Rescue Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    Pingniang Shen; Boyang Yu; Qiujuan Wang; Yongqing Yan; Danni Zhu; Zhihong Lin; Kefeng Ruan

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic neuronal injury. A Chinese herbal formula composed of Poria cocos (Chinese name: Fu Ling), Atractylodes macrocephala (Chinese name: Bai Zhu) and Angelica sinensis (Chinese names: Danggui, Dong quai, Donggui; Korean name: Danggwi) (FBD), has been proved to be beneficial in the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R).This study was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of FBD against neuronal oxidative stress in vivo ...

  11. Food-Derived Bioactive Peptides on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Subhadeep Chakrabarti; Forough Jahandideh; Jianping Wu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Inflammatory processes and oxidative stress underlie the pathogenesis of these pathological conditions. Bioactive peptides derived from food proteins have been evaluated for various beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this review, we summarize the roles of various food-derived bioactive peptides in inflammation and oxidative stress and...

  12. Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease: Why Did Antioxidant Therapy Fail?

    Torbjörn Persson; Popescu, Bogdan O; Angel Cedazo-Minguez

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly, with increasing prevalence and no disease-modifying treatment available yet. A remarkable amount of data supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress is an early and important pathogenic operator in AD. However, all clinical studies conducted to date did not prove a clear beneficial effect of antioxidant treatment in AD patients. In the current work, we review the current knowledge about oxidative stress in AD patho...

  13. Bridges between mitochondrial oxidative stress, ER stress and mTOR signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic β cell dysfunction, i.e., failure to provide insulin in concentrations sufficient to control blood sugar, is central to the etiology of all types of diabetes. Current evidence implicates mitochondrial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic β cell loss and impaired insulin secretion. Oxidative and ER stress are interconnected so that misfolded proteins induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; likewise, oxidative stress disturbs the ER redox state thereby disrupting correct disulfide bond formation and proper protein folding. mTOR signaling regulates many metabolic processes including protein synthesis, cell growth, survival and proliferation. Oxidative stress inhibits mTORC1, which is considered an important suppressor of mitochondrial oxidative stress in β cells, and ultimately, controls cell survival. The interplay between ER stress and mTORC1 is complicated, since the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation can occur upstream or downstream of mTORC1. Persistent activation of mTORC1 initiates protein synthesis and UPR activation, while in the later phase induces ER stress. Chronic activation of ER stress inhibits Akt/mTORC1 pathway, while under particular settings, acute activation of UPR activates Akt-mTOR signaling. Thus, modulating mitochondrial oxidative stress and ER stress via mTOR signaling may be an approach that will effectively suppress obesity- or glucolipotoxicity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this review, we focus on the regulations between mTOR signaling and mitochondrial oxidative or ER stress in pancreatic β cells. PMID:27185188

  14. Mycotoxin-containing diet causes oxidative stress in the mouse.

    Yan-Jun Hou

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins which mainly consist of Aflatoxin (AF, Zearalenone (ZEN and Deoxynivalenol (DON are commonly found in many food commodities. Although each component has been shown to cause liver toxicity and oxidative stress in several species, there is no evidence regarding the effect of naturally contained multiple mycotoxins on tissue toxicity and oxidative stress in vivo. In the present study, mycotoxins-contaminated maize (AF 597 µg/kg, ZEN 729 µg/kg, DON 3.1 mg/kg maize was incorporated into the diet at three different doses (0, 5 and 20% to feed the mice, and blood and tissue samples were collected to examine the oxidative stress related indexes. The results showed that the indexes of liver, kidney and spleen were all increased and the liver and kidney morphologies changed in the mycotoxin-treated mice. Also, the treatment resulted in the elevated glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity and malondialdehyde (MDA level in the serum and liver, indicating the presence of the oxidative stress. Moreover, the decrease of catalase (CAT activity in the serum, liver and kidney as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD activity in the liver and kidney tissue further confirmed the occurrence of oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data indicate that the naturally contained mycotoxins are toxic in vivo and able to induce the oxidant stress in the mouse.

  15. Oxidative Stress: A Potential Recipe For Anxiety, Hypertension and Insulin Resistance

    Salim, Samina; Asghar, Mohammad; Chugh, Gaurav; Taneja, Manish; Xia, Zhilian; Saha, Kaustav

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported involvement of oxidative stress in anxiety-like behavior of rats. Others in separate studies have demonstrated a link between oxidative stress and hypertension as well as with type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance. In the present study, we have tested a putative role of oxidative stress in anxiety-like behavior, hypertension and insulin resistance using a rat model of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress in rats was produced by xanthine (0.1%; drinking water) and xanthine oxid...

  16. Oxidation stress evolution and relaxation of oxide film/metal substrate system

    Dong, Xuelin; Feng, Xue; Hwang, Keh-Chih

    2012-07-01

    Stresses in the oxide film/metal substrate system are crucial to the reliability of the system at high temperature. Two models for predicting the stress evolution during isothermal oxidation are proposed. The deformation of the system is depicted by the curvature for single surface oxidation. The creep strain of the oxide and metal, and the lateral growth strain of the oxide are considered. The proposed models are compared with the experimental results in literature, which demonstrates that the elastic model only considering for elastic strain gives an overestimated stress in magnitude, but the creep model is consistent with the experimental data and captures the stress relaxation phenomenon during oxidation. The effects of the parameter for the lateral growth strain rate are also analyzed.

  17. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia: the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide.

    Ozgocmen, Salih; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sogut, Sadik; Akyol, Omer

    2006-05-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common chronic pain syndrome with an unknown etiology. Recent years added new information to our understanding of FM pathophysiology. Researches on genetics, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones, oxidative stress, and mechanisms of pain modulation, central sensitization, and autonomic functions in FM revealed various abnormalities indicating that multiple factors and mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of FM. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide may play an important role in FM pathophysiology, however it is still not clear whether oxidative stress abnormalities documented in FM are the cause or the effect. This should encourage further researches evaluating the potential role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in the pathophysiology of FM and the efficacy of antioxidant treatments (omega-3 and -6 fatty acids, vitamins and others) in double blind and placebo controlled trials. These future researches will enhance our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of this disorder. PMID:16328420

  18. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Namrata eChaudhari; Priti eTalwar; Avinash eParimisetty; Christian eLefebvre d'Hellencourt; Palaniyandi eRavanan

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse b...

  19. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse b...

  20. Analysis of deposition stresses in sputtered metal oxides

    The intrinsic stress has been measured for various metal oxides including ZnOx, ZrOx, NbOx, MoOx, and TaOx. The measurements have been performed using both ex- and in-situ wafer curvature methods. The wafer curvature method utilises the change of curvature in a film-substrate combination upon changing stress in the film. Our analysis shows that the stresses arising during reactive sputter deposition depend on the oxygen flow, the total pressure during deposition and the deposited material itself. Stresses in these oxides can easily reach the order of GPa. These stresses have e.g. been observed in ZnO, where the maximum state of stress reached 1.4 GPa for low total pressure. (Authors)

  1. Determination of oxidative and occupational stress in palliative care workers

    Casado Moragón, Ángela; Castellanos Asenjo, Alberto; López-Fernández, M.E.; Ruíz, R.; Imedio, E.L.; Castillo, C.; Fernández-Nieto, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: In previous work, we demonstrated that some occupational workers in stressful conditions can have increases in several markers of oxidative stress when compared to other workers. We investigated two antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations, according to demographics, lifestyle and occupational parameters in palliative care unit workers, and analyzed the relationship with occupational burnout. Methods: F...

  2. Oxidative stress and antioxidant indices of marine alga Porphyra vietnamensis

    Pise, N.M.; Gaikwad, D.K.; Jagtap, T.G.

    Oxidative stress and antioxidant defence systems were assessed in a marine red alga Porphyra vietnamensis Tanaka et Pham-Hoang Ho, from India. Lipid peroxidation (LPX) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were measured as oxidative...

  3. Infrared Dielectric Properties of Low-Stress Silicon Oxide

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Wollack, Edward J.; Brown, Ari D.; Miller, Kevin H.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  4. Residual stress distribution in oxide films formed on Zircaloy-2

    Sawabe, T.; Sonoda, T.; Furuya, M.; Kitajima, S.; Takano, H.

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate residual the stress distribution in oxides formed on zirconium alloys, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed on the oxides formed on Zircaloy-2 after autoclave treatment at a temperature of 360° C in pure water. The use of a micro-beam XRD and a micro-sized cross-sectional sample achieved the detailed local characterization of the oxides. The oxide microstructure was observed by TEM following the micro-beam XRD measurements. The residual compressive stress increased in the vicinity of the oxide/metal interface of the pre-transition oxide. Highly oriented columnar grains of a monoclinic phase were observed in that region. Furthermore, at the interface of the post-first transition oxide, there was only a small increase in the residual compressive stress and the columnar grains had a more random orientation. The volume fraction of the tetragonal phase increased with the residual compressive stress. The results are discussed in terms of the formation and transition of the protective oxide.

  5. Infrared dielectric properties of low-stress silicon oxide

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Brown, Ari D; Miller, Kevin H

    2016-01-01

    Silicon oxide thin films play an important role in the realization of optical coatings and high-performance electrical circuits. Estimates of the dielectric function in the far- and mid-infrared regime are derived from the observed transmittance spectrum for a commonly employed low-stress silicon oxide formulation. The experimental, modeling, and numerical methods used to extract the dielectric function are presented.

  6. Salivary Nitric Oxide, a Biomarker for Stress and Anxiety?

    Gammoh, Omar Salem; Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala Fawzi; Al-Awaida, Wajdy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if salivary nitrate correlates to the daily psychological stress and anxiety in a group of human subjects. Methods The convenient sample recruitment method was employed; data from seventy three subjects were analyzed. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) inventories were used to determine stress and anxiety scores respectively. Salivary nitric oxide was measured through nitrate (NOx) levels using the Griess reaction method. Result...

  7. Does reproduction cause oxidative stress? An open question

    Metcalfe, N.B.; Monaghan, P.

    2013-01-01

    There has been substantial recent interest in the possible role of oxidative stress as a mechanism underlying life-history trade-offs, particularly with regard to reproductive costs. Several recent papers have found no evidence that reproduction increases oxidative damage and so have questioned the basis of the hypothesis that oxidative damage mediates the reproduction–lifespan trade-off. However, we suggest here that the absence of the predicted relationships could be due to a fundamental pr...

  8. Oxidative stress as a predictor of cataract surgery outcomes

    M. A. Kovalevskaya; N. V. Vedrintseva

    2015-01-01

    Exhaustion of anti-oxidative potential and oxidative stress are considered as trigger mechanisms of cataract development. Products of free radical oxidation are accumulated in lens. Decrease in water solubility of proteins results in the sorption of uncharged proteins on cellular membranes. This affects regular lenticular membrane folding. Light scattering on folded membranes of lenticular fibers is considered as a primary cause of lens opacities in cataract. Most problems occur in complicate...

  9. Oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage in psychological stress states

    Jørgensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    age-related somatic disorders. The overall aim of the PhD project was to investigate the relation between psychopathology, psychological stress, stress hormone secretion and oxidatively generated DNA and RNA damage, as measured by the urinary excretion of markers of whole-body DNA/RNA oxidation (8......-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo, respectively). The main hypothesis was that psychological stress states are associated with increased DNA/RNA damage from oxidation. In a study of 40 schizophrenia patients and 40 healthy controls matched for age and gender, we found that 8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo excretion was increased in...... schizophrenia patients, providing a possible molecular link between schizophrenia and its associated signs of accelerated aging. We found no association between psychopathology, perceived stress or cortisol secretion and 8-oxodG/8-oxoGuo excretion in the patients. In the controls, there were positive...

  10. Signaling Pathways and Molecular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress in Skeletal Muscle

    Haibing HU; Wenjing LI; Zhi FANG; Bo XUE; Longzhou LIU; Ye YANG

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major factor affecting animal health and production performance. This paper briefly introduced the signaling pathways(i.e. NF-κB signal-ing pathway, MAPK, AP-1 and PGC-1α) of oxidative stress and the main genes regulating the signals of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, providing a theoretical basis for reducing oxidative stress damage.

  11. Oxidative stress treatment for clinical trials in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; LoGerfo, Annalisa; Carlesi, Cecilia; Orsucci, Daniele; Ricci, Giulia; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a metabolic condition arising from imbalance between the production of potentially reactive oxygen species and the scavenging activities. Mitochondria are the main providers but also the main scavengers of cell oxidative stress. The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases is well documented. Therefore, therapeutic approaches targeting mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage hold great promise in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite this evidence, human experience with antioxidant neuroprotectants has generally been negative with regards to the clinical progress of disease, with unclear results in biochemical assays. Here we review the antioxidant approaches performed so far in neurodegenerative diseases and the future challenges in modern medicine. PMID:21422516

  12. Retinopathy of prematurity: an oxidative stress neonatal disease.

    Stone, William L; Shah, Darshan; Hollinger, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics is the global study of proteins in an organism or a tissue/fluid and is clinically relevant since most disease states are accompanied by specific alterations in an organism's proteome. This review focuses on the application of proteomics to neonatology with particular emphasis on retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), which is a disease in which oxidative stress plays a key pathophysiological role. Oxidative stress is a physiologically relevant redox imbalance caused by an excess of reactive oxygen (ROS) or reactive nitrogen oxide species (RNOS). A major conclusion of this review is that proteomics may be the optimal technology for studying neonatal diseases such as ROP, particularly in the setting of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Proteomics has already identified a number of ROP serum biomarkers. This review will also suggest novel therapeutic approaches to ROP and other neonatal oxidative stress diseases (NOSDs) based on a systems medicine approach. PMID:26709767

  13. Residual stresses in planar solid oxide fuel cells

    Fischer, W.; Malzbender, J.; Blass, G.; Steinbrech, R. W.

    The in-plane residual stress distribution in the electrolyte of an anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell has been determined using X-ray powder diffraction. Measurements have been carried out with half cells in green state, after co-firing and after anode reduction. The residual stress in the electrolyte is compressive. Values of about -560 MPa are determined at room temperature for an approximately 10 μm thick electrolyte layer on an oxidized ˜1.5 mm thick anode substrate, independent of location. Chemical reduction of the anode leads to a slight decrease of the compressive electrolyte stress to -520 MPa. At operation temperature (800 °C) the stress is by a factor of about two lower, but remains compressive. The electrolyte results are used to calculate the residual stress in the oxidized and in the reduced anode. Independent of the oxidation state a tensile stress of about 4 MPa is calculated. Implications for anode failure are discussed by comparing this value with the fracture stress of large 200 mm × 200 mm cells at a failure probability of 10 -6.

  14. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described. PMID:26607273

  15. Stress in photochromic and electrochromic effects on tungsten oxide film

    Scarminio, J. [Depto. de Fisica, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina PR 86051-990 (Brazil)

    2003-09-15

    Optical absorbance at 632.8nm and the stress generated in tungsten oxide film due to photochromic and electrochromic effects were measured. WO{sub 3} thin films were deposited by reactive sputtering and the absorbance was obtained by measuring the optical transmittance of a laser beam through the film. The stress was calculated by measuring the substrate curvature and using the Stoney equation for multilayered films, since two layers are deposited onto a substrate for the electrochromism studies. The optical absorbance and the stress in the tungsten oxide film, as a function of UV irradiation time in photochromism and of inserted charge in electrochromism, are showed and discussed. In both effects the stresses generated were rendered as due to cation insertions into the film: H{sup +} protons in photochromism and Li{sup +} ions in electrochromism. The accuracy of the Stoney equation used for the stress calculation was also discussed.

  16. Characterization of RNA damage under oxidative stress in Escherichia coli

    Liu, Min; Gong, Xin; Alluri, Ravi Kumar; Wu, Jinhua; Sablo, Tene’; Li, Zhongwei

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the level of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxo-G), an oxidized form of guanosine, in RNA in Escherichia coli under normal and oxidative stress conditions. The level of 8-oxo-G in RNA rises rapidly and remains high for hours in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) challenge in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 induced elevation of 8-oxo-G content is much higher in RNA than that of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA. Under normal conditions, the 8-oxo-G level is low in RNA isolated from the ribosome and it is nearly three times higher in non-ribosomal RNAs. In contrast, 8-oxo-G generated by a short exposure to H2O2 is almost equally distributed in various RNA species, suggesting that although ribosomal RNAs are normally less oxidized, they are not protected against exogenous H2O2. Interestingly, highly folded RNA is not protected from oxidation because 8-oxo-G generated by H2O2 treatment in vitro increases to approximately the same levels in tRNA and rRNA in both native and denatured forms. Lastly, increased RNA oxidation is closely associated with cell death by oxidative stress. Our data suggests that RNA is a primary target for reactive oxygen species and RNA oxidation is part of the paradox that cells have to deal with under oxidative stress. PMID:22718628

  17. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Plant Responses to Abiotic Stresses

    Weihua Qiao; LiuMin Fan

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays important roles in diverse physiological processes In plants. NO can provoke both beneficial and harmful effects, which depend on the concentration and location of NO in plant cells. This review is focused on NO synthesis and the functions of NO in plant responses to abiotic environmental stresses. Abiotic stresses mostly induce NO production in plants. NO alleviates the harmfulness of reactive oxygen species, and reacts with other target molecules, and regulates the expression of stress responsive genes under various stress conditions.

  18. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Gurunathan S

    2012-11-01

    cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation.Conclusion: The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P. aeruginosa viability increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Exposure to GO and rGO induced significant production of superoxide radical anion compared to control. GO and rGO showed dose-dependent antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa cells through the generation of reactive oxygen species, leading to cell death, which was further confirmed through resulting nuclear fragmentation. The data presented here are novel in that they prove that GO and rGO are effective bactericidal agents against P. aeruginosa, which would be used as a future antibacterial agent.Keywords: graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, beta-mercaptoethanol, oxidative stress, antimicrobial activity

  19. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes. PMID:27251462

  20. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    Lefevre, Sophie [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); ED515 UPMC, 4 place Jussieu 75005 Paris (France); Sliwa, Dominika [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Rustin, Pierre [Inserm, U676, Physiopathology and Therapy of Mitochondrial Disease Laboratory, 75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris-Diderot, Faculte de Medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Camadro, Jean-Michel [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Santos, Renata, E-mail: santos.renata@ijm.univ-paris-diderot.fr [Mitochondria, Metals and Oxidative Stress Laboratory, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS-Universite Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite, 15 rue Helene Brion, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  1. A study of oxidative stress in paucibacillary and multibacillary leprosy

    Jyothi P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study and assessment of oxidative stress plays a significant role in the arena of leprosy treatment. Once the presence of oxidative stress is proved, antioxidant supplements can be provided to reduce tissue injury and deformity. Aim: To study oxidative stress in paucibacillary (PB and multibacillary (MB leprosy and to compare it with that in a control group. Methods: Fifty-eight untreated leprosy patients (23 PB and 35 MB cases were studied and compared with 58 healthy controls. Superoxide dismutase (SOD level as a measure of antioxidant status; malondialdehyde (MDA level, an indicator of lipid peroxidation; and MDA/SOD ratio, an index of oxidative stress were estimated in the serum. Results: The SOD level was decreased in leprosy patients, especially in MB leprosy. The MDA level was increased in PB and MB leprosy. The MDA/SOD ratio was significantly elevated in MB patients. There was a steady increase in this ratio along the spectrum from tuberculoid to lepromatous leprosy (LL. Conclusion: There is increased oxidative stress in MB leprosy, especially in LL. This warrants antioxidant supplements to prevent tissue injury.

  2. Myocardial Oxidative Stress in Infants Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Sznycer-Taub, Nathaniel; Mackie, Stewart; Peng, Yun-Wen; Donohue, Janet; Yu, Sunkyung; Aiyagari, Ranjit; Charpie, John

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease often necessitates a period of myocardial ischemia during cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, followed by reperfusion after aortic cross-clamp removal. In experimental models, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion is associated with significant oxidative stress and ventricular dysfunction. A prospective observational study was conducted in infants (tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Blood samples were drawn following anesthetic induction (baseline) and directly from the coronary sinus at 1, 3, 5, and 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal. Samples were analyzed for oxidant stress using assays for thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity. For each subject, raw assay data were normalized to individual baseline samples and expressed as fold-change from baseline. Results were compared using a one-sample t test with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Sixteen patients (ten with TOF and six with VSD) were enrolled in the study, and there were no major postoperative complications observed. For the entire cohort, there was an immediate, rapid increase in myocardial oxidative stress that was sustained for 10 min following aortic cross-clamp removal in all biomarker assays (all P < 0.01), except total antioxidant capacity. Infant cardiac surgery is associated with a rapid, robust, and time-dependent increase in myocardial oxidant stress as measured from the coronary sinus in vivo. Future studies with larger enrollment are necessary to assess any association between myocardial oxidative stress and early postoperative outcomes. PMID:26843460

  3. Chronic unpredictable stress deteriorates the chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway.

    Hasan, Shirin; Suhail, Nida; Bilal, Nayeem; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; AlNohair, Sultan; Banu, Naheed

    2016-05-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) can influence the risk and progression of cancer through increased oxidative stress. Pomegranate is known to protect carcinogenesis through its anti-oxidative properties. This study is carried out to examine whether CUS affects the chemopreventive potential of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway. Role of CUS on early stages of 7, 12 dimethyl benz(a) anthracene (DMBA) induced carcinogenesis, and its pre-exposure effect on chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate juice (PJ) was examined in terms of in vivo antioxidant and biochemical parameters in Swiss albino rats. Rats were divided in various groups and were subjected to CUS paradigm, DMBA administration (65 mg/kg body weight, single dose), and PJ treatment. Exposure to stress (alone) and DMBA (alone) led to increased oxidative stress by significantly decreasing the antioxidant enzymes activities and altering the glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels. A significant increase in DNA damage demonstrated by comet assay was seen in the liver cells. Stress exposure to DMBA-treated rats further increased the oxidative stress and disturbed the biochemical parameters as compared to DMBA (alone)-treated rats. Chemoprevention with PJ in DMBA (alone)-treated rats restored the altered parameters. However, in the pre-stress DMBA-treated rats, the overall antioxidant potential of PJ was significantly diminished. Our results indicate that chronic stress not only increases the severity of carcinogenesis but also diminishes the anti-oxidative efficacy of PJ. In a broader perspective, special emphasis should be given to stress management and healthy diet during cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26596837

  4. Diaphragmatic Breathing Reduces Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Daniele Martarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxidant; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diaphragmatic breathing on exercise-induced oxidative stress and the putative role of cortisol and melatonin hormones in this stress pathway. We monitored 16 athletes during an exhaustive training session. After the exercise, athletes were divided in two equivalent groups of eight subjects. Subjects of the studied group spent 1 h relaxing performing diaphragmatic breathing and concentrating on their breath in a quiet place. The other eight subjects, representing the control group, spent the same time sitting in an equivalent quite place. Results demonstrate that relaxation induced by diaphragmatic breathing increases the antioxidant defense status in athletes after exhaustive exercise. These effects correlate with the concomitant decrease in cortisol and the increase in melatonin. The consequence is a lower level of oxidative stress, which suggests that an appropriate diaphragmatic breathing could protect athletes from long-term adverse effects of free radicals.

  5. Diaphragmatic breathing reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    Martarelli, Daniele; Cocchioni, Mario; Scuri, Stefania; Pompei, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxidant; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diaphragmatic breathing on exercise-induced oxidative stress and the putative role of cortisol and melatonin hormones in this stress pathway. We monitored 16 athletes during an exhaustive training session. After the exercise, athletes were divided in two equivalent groups of eight subjects. Subjects of the studied group spent 1 h relaxing performing diaphragmatic breathing and concentrating on their breath in a quiet place. The other eight subjects, representing the control group, spent the same time sitting in an equivalent quite place. Results demonstrate that relaxation induced by diaphragmatic breathing increases the antioxidant defense status in athletes after exhaustive exercise. These effects correlate with the concomitant decrease in cortisol and the increase in melatonin. The consequence is a lower level of oxidative stress, which suggests that an appropriate diaphragmatic breathing could protect athletes from long-term adverse effects of free radicals. PMID:19875429

  6. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses.

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10-30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. PMID:26934977

  7. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress in Colorectal Cancer Patients

    DONG CHANG; FAN WANG; YA-SHUANG ZHAO; HONG-ZHI PAN

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with colorectal cancer and to investigate the relationship between oxidative stress and colorectal cancer. Methods Seventy-six subjects were divided into two groups (36 colorectal cancerpatients as the study group and 40 normal healthy individuals as the control group). Their protein oxidation, DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and antioxidants, vitamin C, vitamin E, glutathione (GSH), and antioxidative enzymes in serum were detected. Results The levels of protein carbonyl and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) were significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P<0.01). Serum 8-OHdG was significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group (P<0.01). However, the mean serum level of MDA and conjugated diene was lower in the study group than in the control group (P<0.01). The activity of antioxidative enzymes was significantly decreased in the study group compared to the control group (P<0.01). Serum vitamins C and E concentrations were significantly reduced in the study group compared to the control group (P<0.01). Conclusion Colorectal cancer is associated with oxidative stress, and assessment of oxidative stress and given antioxidants is important for the treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer.

  8. Causes and consequences of oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

    Aitken, Robert John; Gibb, Zamira; Baker, Mark A; Drevet, Joel; Gharagozloo, Parviz

    2015-02-01

    Spermatozoa are highly vulnerable to oxidative attack because they lack significant antioxidant protection due to the limited volume and restricted distribution of cytoplasmic space in which to house an appropriate armoury of defensive enzymes. In particular, sperm membrane lipids are susceptible to oxidative stress because they abound in significant amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Susceptibility to oxidative attack is further exacerbated by the fact that these cells actively generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in order to drive the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation associated with sperm capacitation. However, this positive role for ROS is reversed when spermatozoa are stressed. Under these conditions, they default to an intrinsic apoptotic pathway characterised by mitochondrial ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exposure and oxidative DNA damage. In responding to oxidative stress, spermatozoa only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair pathway, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase. This enzyme catalyses the formation of abasic sites, thereby destabilising the DNA backbone and generating strand breaks. Because oxidative damage to sperm DNA is associated with both miscarriage and developmental abnormalities in the offspring, strategies for the amelioration of such stress, including the development of effective antioxidant formulations, are becoming increasingly urgent. PMID:27062870

  9. Oxidative stress and life histories: unresolved issues and current needs.

    Speakman, John R; Blount, Jonathan D; Bronikowski, Anne M; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Isaksson, Caroline; Kirkwood, Tom B L; Monaghan, Pat; Ozanne, Susan E; Beaulieu, Michaël; Briga, Michael; Carr, Sarah K; Christensen, Louise L; Cochemé, Helena M; Cram, Dominic L; Dantzer, Ben; Harper, Jim M; Jurk, Diana; King, Annette; Noguera, Jose C; Salin, Karine; Sild, Elin; Simons, Mirre J P; Smith, Shona; Stier, Antoine; Tobler, Michael; Vitikainen, Emma; Peaker, Malcolm; Selman, Colin

    2015-12-01

    Life-history theory concerns the trade-offs that mold the patterns of investment by animals between reproduction, growth, and survival. It is widely recognized that physiology plays a role in the mediation of life-history trade-offs, but the details remain obscure. As life-history theory concerns aspects of investment in the soma that influence survival, understanding the physiological basis of life histories is related, but not identical, to understanding the process of aging. One idea from the field of aging that has gained considerable traction in the area of life histories is that life-history trade-offs may be mediated by free radical production and oxidative stress. We outline here developments in this field and summarize a number of important unresolved issues that may guide future research efforts. The issues are as follows. First, different tissues and macromolecular targets of oxidative stress respond differently during reproduction. The functional significance of these changes, however, remains uncertain. Consequently there is a need for studies that link oxidative stress measurements to functional outcomes, such as survival. Second, measurements of oxidative stress are often highly invasive or terminal. Terminal studies of oxidative stress in wild animals, where detailed life-history information is available, cannot generally be performed without compromising the aims of the studies that generated the life-history data. There is a need therefore for novel non-invasive measurements of multi-tissue oxidative stress. Third, laboratory studies provide unrivaled opportunities for experimental manipulation but may fail to expose the physiology underpinning life-history effects, because of the benign laboratory environment. Fourth, the idea that oxidative stress might underlie life-history trade-offs does not make specific enough predictions that are amenable to testing. Moreover, there is a paucity of good alternative theoretical models on which contrasting

  10. Correlation Studies of Trehalose with Oxidative Stress in Ethanol Stressed Yeast Pachysolen tannophilus

    R.K. Saharan; S C Sharma

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of trehalose in ethanol induced oxidative stress condition in yeast Pachysolen tannophilus. The laboratory experiments were carried out during 2009 and 2010 at the Yeast Stress Response Study Laboratory of Biochemistry Department in Panjab University at Chandigarh, India. R esistance of the yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to ethanol stress was studied under 10% (v/v) ethanol concentrations for different time periods (0, 60 and 120 min). After trea...

  11. Novel biomarker pipeline to probe the oxidation sites and oxidation degrees of hemoglobin in bovine erythrocytes exposed to oxidative stress.

    Zong, Wansong; Wang, Xiaoning; Yang, Chuanxi; Du, Yonggang; Sun, Weijun; Xu, Zhenzhen

    2016-06-01

    Research on biomarkers for protein oxidation might give insight into the mechanistic mode of oxidative stress. In the work present here, a novel pipeline was established to probe the oxidation mechanism of bovine hemoglobin (Hb) with its oxidation products serving as the biomarkers. Reactive oxygen species generated by irradiation were used to mimic oxidative stress conditions to oxidize Hb in bovine erythrocytes. After Hb extraction and digestion, oxidized peptides in the tryptic fragments were assigned by comparison with the extracted ion chromatography spectra of native peptide from the control sample. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometry analysis of these peptides proved that oxidation was limited to partially exposed amino acid residues (α-Phe36 , β-Met1 , β-Trp14 , for instance) in Hb. Quantitation analysis on these oxidized peptides showed that oxidation degrees of target sites had positive correlations with the extended oxidation dose and the oxidation processes were also controlled by residues types. Compared with the conventional protein carbonyl assay, the identified oxidized products were feasibility biomarkers for Hb oxidation, indicating that the proposed biomarker pipeline was suitable to provide specific and valid information for protein oxidation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26348117

  12. [Advance on oxidative stress mechanism of arsenic toxicology].

    Li, Zhen; An, Yan

    2009-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic is one of proven human carcinogens, which there are so far no sound laboratory-based evidences and there are very few reports in the literature regarding arsenic carcinogenic effects in in vivo animal experiment. Because of this lack of adequate evidences, the mechanism for understanding arsenic toxicology remains vague. Recently, many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, oxidative stress is one of the stronger theories of arsenic action modes which have a substantial mass of supporting data. Further more, many researchers have pointed out that induction of oxidative stress by methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics plays an important role in the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenics. The role of oxidative stress induced by arsenic in arsenic toxicology was reviewed. PMID:19877531

  13. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Obesity-Related Glomerulopathy

    Jinhua Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity-related glomerulopathy is an increasing cause of end-stage renal disease. Obesity has been considered a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and chronic oxidative stress. Augmented inflammation in adipose and kidney tissues promotes the progression of kidney damage in obesity. Adipose tissue, which is accumulated in obesity, is a key endocrine organ that produces multiple biologically active molecules, including leptin, adiponectin, resistin, that affect inflammation, and subsequent deregulation of cell function in renal glomeruli that leads to pathological changes. Oxidative stress is also associated with obesity-related renal diseases and may trigger the initiation or progression of renal damage in obesity. In this paper, we focus on inflammation and oxidative stress in the progression of obesity-related glomerulopathy and possible interventions to prevent kidney injury in obesity.

  14. Voluntary Exercise Protects Heart from Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats

    Naderi, Roya; Mohaddes, Gisou; Mohammadi, Mustafa; Ghaznavi, Rana; Ghyasi, Rafigheh; Vatankhah, Amir Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Oxidative stress plays a key role in the onset and development of diabetes complications. In this study, we evaluated whether voluntary exercise could alleviate oxidative stress in the heart and blood of streptozotocin - induced diabetic rats. Methods: 28 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups (n=7): control, exercise, diabetes and exercise + diabetes. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin in male rats. Rats in the trained groups were subjected to voluntary running wheel exercise for 6 weeks. At the end of six weeks blood and heart tissue samples were collected and used for determination of antioxidant enzymes (including SOD, GPX and CAT activities) and MDA level. Results: Exercise significantly reduced MDA levels both in the heart tissue (pdiabetic rats. It also accentuates activities of SOD, GPX and CAT. Therefore, it may be considered a useful tool for the reduction of oxidative stress in diabetes. PMID:26236662

  15. Tobacco smoking and oxidative stress to DNA

    Ellegaard, Pernille Kempel; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2016-01-01

    studies on 3668 persons using ELISA methodology showed a non-significant effect of 8.7% [95% CL −1.2;18.6]. Tobacco smoke induces oxidative damage to DNA; however, this is not detected with ELISA methodology. Currently, the use of existing ELISA methodology to measure urinary excretion of 8-oxo-7...

  16. Markers of oxidative stress in exhaled breath of workers exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles are elevated

    Pelclová, D.; Fenclová, Z.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Vlčková, Š.; Syslová, K.; Kuzma, Marek; Ždímal, Vladimír; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Pušman, Jan; Zíková, Naděžda; Zakharov, S.; Machajová, M.; Kačer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 7, Suppl. 1 (2014), s. 69-70. ISSN 1337-6853 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:61388955 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : oxidative stress * exhaled breath * nanoparticles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  17. Oxidative stress impairs the heat stress response and delays unfolded protein recovery.

    Masaaki Adachi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental changes, air pollution and ozone depletion are increasing oxidative stress, and global warming threatens health by heat stress. We now face a high risk of simultaneous exposure to heat and oxidative stress. However, there have been few studies investigating their combined adverse effects on cell viability. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pretreatment of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 specifically and highly sensitized cells to heat stress, and enhanced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. H(2O(2 exposure impaired the HSP40/HSP70 induction as heat shock response (HSR and the unfolded protein recovery, and enhanced eIF2alpha phosphorylation and/or XBP1 splicing, land marks of ER stress. These H(2O(2-mediated effects mimicked enhanced heat sensitivity in HSF1 knockdown or knockout cells. Importantly, thermal preconditioning blocked H(2O(2-mediated inhibitory effects on refolding activity and rescued HSF1 +/+ MEFs, but neither blocked the effects nor rescued HSF1 -/- MEFs. These data strongly suggest that inhibition of HSR and refolding activity is crucial for H(2O(2-mediated enhanced heat sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS: H(2O(2 blocks HSR and refolding activity under heat stress, thereby leading to insufficient quality control and enhancing ER stress. These uncontrolled stress responses may enhance cell death. Our data thus highlight oxidative stress as a crucial factor affecting heat tolerance.

  18. Work at high altitude and oxidative stress: antioxidant nutrients.

    Askew, E W

    2002-11-15

    A significant portion of the world's geography lies above 10,000 feet elevation, an arbitrary designation that separates moderate and high altitude. Although the number of indigenous people living at these elevations is relatively small, many people travel to high altitude for work or recreation, exposing themselves to chronic or intermittent hypoxia and the associated risk of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and less frequently, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). The symptoms of AMS (headache, nausea, anorexia, fatigue, lassitude) occur in those who travel too high, too fast. Some investigators have linked the development of these symptoms with the condition of altered blood-brain barrier permeability, possibly related to hypoxia induced free radical formation. The burden of oxidative stress increases during the time spent at altitude and may even persist for some time upon return to sea level. The physiological and medical consequences of increased oxidative stress engendered by altitude is unclear; indeed, hypoxia is believed to be the trigger for the cascade of signaling events that ultimately leads to adaptation to altitude. These signaling events include the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may elicit important adaptive responses. If produced in excess, however, these ROS may contribute to impaired muscle function and reduced capillary perfusion at altitude or may even play a role in precipitating more serious neurological and pulmonary crisis. Oxidative stress can be observed at altitude without strenuous physical exertion; however, environmental factors other than hypoxia, such as exercise, UV light exposure and cold exposure, can also contribute to the burden. Providing antioxidant nutrients via the diet or supplements to the diet can reduce oxidative stress secondary to altitude exposure. In summary, the significant unanswered question concerning altitude exposure and antioxidant supplementation is

  19. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    Tomoko Kurita-Ochiai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease—Effect of Oxidative Stress

    Subha Palaneeswari Meenakshi Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing health problem with increasing incidence. The annual mortality of end-stage renal disease patients is about 9%, which is 10–20 fold higher than the general population, approximately 50% of these deaths are due to cardiovascular (CV disease. CV risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are strongly associated with poor outcome. Many other nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation, infection, oxidative stress, anemia, and malnutrition are also present. In this review we will focus on the role of oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease.

  1. Food-Derived Bioactive Peptides on Inflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Subhadeep Chakrabarti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer are now the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Inflammatory processes and oxidative stress underlie the pathogenesis of these pathological conditions. Bioactive peptides derived from food proteins have been evaluated for various beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. In this review, we summarize the roles of various food-derived bioactive peptides in inflammation and oxidative stress and discuss the potential benefits and limitations of using these compounds against the burden of chronic diseases.

  2. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  3. OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCED ULCER PROTECTED BY NATURAL ANTIOXIDANTS: A REVIEW

    Gupta Priya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen and a biological system's ability to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates, which ultimately leads to oxidative deterioration of protein, lipid and DNA. In humans, oxidative stress is involved in pathology of many diseases, such as atherosclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, heart failure, myocardial infarction, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can be beneficial, as they are used by the immune system as a way to attack and kill pathogens. To counteract oxidative stress, the body produces an armory of antioxidants to defend itself. It's the job of antioxidants to neutralize free radicals that can harm the cells. Body's internal production of antioxidants is not enough to neutralize all the free radicals. It’s a well-known fact that ROS are involved in the aetio-pathogenesis of the inflammatory and ulcerative lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The present review focuses on the studies where oxidative damage due to stress has been linked causally to loss of cell integrity mainly in peptic ulcer cured by natural antioxidants.

  4. Nitric Oxide(NO)and Plant Stress

    CHENG Shun-chang; REN Xiao-Lin; GUAN Qing-mei

    2005-01-01

    In depth study of NO reveals that NO is a bioactive molecule that exerts a number of roles in many physiological and pathological process.NO is produced in response to drought,salinity,temperature shock and pathogen attack.NO rapidly reacts with ROS,ABA and other hormones and directly or indirectly regulate ethylene biosynthesis.The authors review the response of between plant NO and kinds of stresses,and possible mechanism was discussed.

  5. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6–10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere

  6. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    David Henry, M.; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6-10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  7. Oxidative Stress Inhibits Vascular KATP Channels by S-Glutathionylation*

    Yang, Yang; Shi, Weiwei; Cui, Ningren; Wu, Zhongying; Jiang, Chun

    2010-01-01

    The KATP channel is an important player in vascular tone regulation. Its opening and closure lead to vasodilation and vasoconstriction, respectively. Such functions may be disrupted in oxidative stress seen in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, while the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that S-glutathionylation was a modulation mechanism underlying oxidant-mediated vascular KATP channel regulation. An exposure of isolated mesenteric rings to hydrogen peroxide (H2...

  8. Protein-bound acrolein: Potential markers for oxidative stress

    Uchida, Koji; Kanematsu, Masamichi; Sakai, Kensuke; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Hattori, Nobutaka; Mizuno, Yoshikuni; Suzuki, Daisuke; Miyata, Toshio; Noguchi, Noriko; Niki, Etsuo; Osawa, Toshihiko

    1998-01-01

    Acrolein (CH2=CH—CHO) is known as a ubiquitous pollutant in the environment. Here we show that this notorious aldehyde is not just a pollutant, but also a lipid peroxidation product that could be ubiquitously generated in biological systems. Upon incubation with BSA, acrolein was rapidly incorporated into the protein and generated the protein-linked carbonyl derivative, a putative marker of oxidatively modified proteins under oxidative stress. To verify the presence of protein-bound acrolein ...

  9. Novel Approaches to Treat Oxidative Stress and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Berk, Bradford C.

    2007-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) reactions that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide have been identified as important chemical processes that regulate signal transduction. The findings of increased ROS in association with endothelial dysfunction has given rise to the “antioxidant hypothesis”: since ROS are increased in hypertension, atherosclerosis and vascular injury, then inhibiting oxidative stress with antioxidants should decrease cardiovascular even...

  10. Oxidative Stress and DNA Methylation in Prostate Cancer

    Krishna Vanaja Donkena; Young, Charles Y. F.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    The protective effects of fruits, vegetables, and other foods on prostate cancer may be due to their antioxidant properties. An imbalance in the oxidative stress/antioxidant status is observed in prostate cancer patients. Genome oxidative damage in prostate cancer patients is associated with higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels. Oxygen radicals are associated with different steps of carcinogenesis, including structural DNA damage, epigenetic changes, and protein and lipid al...

  11. Mitochondria and Oxidative Stress in the Cardiorenal Metabolic Syndrome

    Aroor, Annayya R.; Mandavia, Chirag; Ren, Jun; Sowers, James R.; Pulakat, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria play a fundamental role in the maintenance of normal structure, function, and survival of tissues. There is considerable evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in association with metabolic diseases including insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes, and the cardiorenal metabolic syndrome. The phenomenon of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced ROS release through interactions between cytosolic and mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to a vicious cycle of enhanced oxidative s...

  12. Battles with Iron: Manganese in Oxidative Stress Protection*

    Aguirre, J. Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C.

    2012-01-01

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton c...

  13. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    Farina, Marcelo, E-mail: farina@ccb.ufsc.br [Departamento de Bioquimica, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Aschner, Michael [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Rocha, Joao B.T., E-mail: jbtrocha@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Exatas, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have been reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the classically

  14. Oxidative Stress and Skin Cancer: An Overview

    Narendhirakannan, R. T.; Hannah, M. Angeline Christie

    2012-01-01

    Skin is the largest body organ that serves as an important environmental interface providing a protective envelope that is crucial for homeostasis. On the other hand, it is a major target for toxic insult by a broad spectrum of physical and chemical agents that are capable of altering its structure and function. There are a large number of dietary contaminants and drugs can manifest their toxicity in skin. These environmental toxicants or their metabolites are inherent oxidants and/or directl...

  15. Iron, Oxidative Stress and Gestational Diabetes

    Taifeng Zhuang; Huijun Han; Zhenyu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Both iron deficiency and hyperglycemia are highly prevalent globally for pregnant women. Iron supplementation is recommended during pregnancy to control iron deficiency. The purposes of the review are to assess the oxidative effects of iron supplementation and the potential relationship between iron nutrition and gestational diabetes. High doses of iron (~relative to 60 mg or more daily for adult humans) can induce lipid peroxidation in vitro and in animal studies. Pharmaceutical doses of iro...

  16. Statins Decrease Oxidative Stress and ICD Therapies

    Heather L. Bloom

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrate that statins decrease ventricular arrhythmias in internal cardioverter defibrillator (ICD patients. The mechanism is unknown, but evidence links increased inflammatory and oxidative states with increased arrhythmias. We hypothesized that statin use decreases oxidation. Methods. 304 subjects with ICDs were surveyed for ventricular arrhythmia. Blood was analyzed for derivatives of reactive oxygen species (DROMs and interleukin-6 (IL-6. Results. Subjects included 252 (83% men, 58% on statins, 20% had ventricular arrhythmias. Average age was 63 years and ejection fraction (EF 20%. ICD implant duration was 29 ± 27 months. Use of statins correlated with lower ICD events (r=0.12, P=.02. Subjects on statins had lower hsCRP (5.2 versus 6.3; P=.05 and DROM levels (373 versus 397; P=.03. Other factors, including IL-6 and EF did not differ between statin and nonstatin use, nor did beta-blocker or antiarrhythmic use. Multivariate cross-correlation analysis demonstrated that DROMs, statins, IL-6 and EF were strongly associated with ICD events. Multivariate regression shows DROMs to be the dominant predictor. Conclusion. ICD event rate correlates with DROMs, a measure of lipid peroxides. Use of statins is associated with reduced DROMs and fewer ICD events, suggesting that statins exert their effect through reducing oxidation.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Lead and Cadmium Toxicity and Its Amelioration

    R. C. Patra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a role, at least in part, in pathogenesis of many disease conditions and toxicities in animals. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species and free radicals beyond the cells intrinsic capacity to neutralize following xenobiotics exposure leads to a state of oxidative stress and resultant damages of lipids, protein, and DNA. Lead and cadmium are the common environmental heavy metal pollutants and have widespread distribution. Both natural and anthropogenic sources including mining, smelting, and other industrial processes are responsible for human and animal exposure. These pollutants, many a times, are copollutants leading to concurrent exposure to living beings and resultant synergistic deleterious health effects. Several mechanisms have been explained for the damaging effects on the body system. Of late, oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the lead- and cadmium-induced pathotoxicity. Several ameliorative measures to counteract the oxidative damage to the body system aftermath or during exposure to these toxicants have been assessed with the use of antioxidants. The present review focuses on mechanism of lead- and cadmium-induced oxidate damages and the ameliorative measures to counteract the oxidative damage and pathotoxicity with the use of supplemented antioxidants for their beneficial effects.

  18. Molecular and biochemical responses of Volvox carteri to oxidative stress

    Lingappa, U.; Rankin-Gee, E. K.; Lera, M.; Bebour, B.; Marcu, O.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the intracellular response to environmental stresses is a key aspect to understanding the limits of habitability for life as we know it. A wide range of relevant stressors, from heat shock to radiation, result in the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are used physiologically as signaling molecules to cause changes in gene expression and metabolism. However, ROS, including superoxide (O2-) and peroxides, are also highly reactive molecules that cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. Here we studied stress response in the multicellular, eukaryotic green alga Volvox carteri, after exposure to heat shock conditions. We show that the ROS response to heat stress is paralleled by changes in photosynthetic metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression, and fluctuations in the elemental composition of cells. Metabolism, as measured by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry over two hours of heat stress, showed a linear decrease in the photosynthetic efficiency of Volvox. ROS quantification uncovered an increase in ROS in the culture medium, paralleled by a decrease in ROS within the Volvox colonies, suggesting an export mechanism is utilized to mitigate stress. Enzyme kinetics indicated an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity over the heat stress timecourse. Using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, we show that these changes coincide with cell-specific import/export and intracellular redistribution of transition elements and halides, suggesting that the cellular metallome is also engaged in mediating oxidative stress in Volvox.

  19. Reproductive Benefit of Oxidative Damage: An Oxidative Stress “Malevolence”?

    B. Poljsak; Milisav, I.; Lampe, T.; Ostan, I.

    2011-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to antioxidant defenses are considered to play a major role in diverse chronic age-related diseases and aging. Here we present an attempt to synthesize information about proximate oxidative processes in aging (relevant to free radical or oxidative damage hypotheses of aging) with an evolutionary scenario (credited here to Dawkins hypotheses) involving tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of oxidative stress to reproducing organisms. Ox...

  20. Oxidative stress can alter the antigenicity of immunodominant peptides

    Weiskopf, Daniela; Schwanninger, Angelika; Weinberger, Birgit; Almanzar, Giovanni; Parson, Walther; Buus, Søren; Lindner, Herbert; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2010-01-01

    APCs operate frequently under oxidative stress induced by aging, tissue damage, pathogens, or inflammatory responses. Phagocytic cells produce peroxides and free-radical species that facilitate pathogen clearance and can in the case of APCs, also lead to oxidative modifications of antigenic...... proteins and peptides. Little information is available presently about the consequences of such modifications on the immune response. To model oxidative modification of an immunodominant antigenic peptide, we oxidized the methionine residue of the human CMV pp65(495-503) (NLVPMVATV) peptide. Such...... modifications of an antigenic peptide can affect MHC binding or TCR recognition. Using binding and dissociation assays, we demonstrate that oxidative modification of the CMVpp65(495-503) peptide leads to a decreased binding of the pMHC complex to the TCR, whereas binding of the peptide to the MHC class I...

  1. Oxidative stress and DNA damages induced by cadmium accumulation

    LIN Ai-jun; ZHANG Xu-hong; CHEN Mei-mei; CAO Qing

    2007-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows that cadmium (Cd) could induce oxidative stress and then causes DNA damage in animal cells, however, whether such effect exists in plants is still unclear. In the present study, Vicia faba plants was exposed to 5 and 10 mg/L Cd for 4 d to investigate the distribution of Cd in plant, the metal effects on the cell lipids, antioxidative enzymes and DNA damages in leaves. Cd induced an increase in Cd concentrations in plants. An enhanced level of lipid peroxidation in leaves and an enhanced concentration of H2O2 in root tissues suggested that Cd caused oxidative stress in Vicia faba. Compared with control, Cd-induced enhancement in superoxide dismutase activity was significant at 5 mg/L than at 10 mg/kg in leaves, by contrast, catalase and peroxidaseactivities were significantly suppressed by Cd addition. DNA damage was detected by neutral/neutral, alkaline/neutral and alkaline/alkaline Comet assay. Increased levels of DNA damages induced by Cd occurred with reference to oxidative stress in leaves, therefore, oxidative stress induced by Cd accumulation in plants contributed to DNA damages and was possibly an important mechanism of Cd-phytotoxicity in Vicia faba plants.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Patients with Regular Hemodialysis Measured by Chemiluminescence

    Kubala, Lukáš; Číž, Milan; Lojek, Antonín; Studeník, P.; Černý, J.; Soška, V.

    Dresden : SCHWEDAWERBEDRUCK GmbH, Druckerei and Verlag, 2001 - (Albrecht, S.; Zimmermann, T.; Brandl, H.), s. 264-269 ISBN 3-9807853-0-0 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5004009; GA MZd NA4796 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : oxidative stress * chemiluminescence Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  3. Thoracic radiography and oxidative stress indices in heartworm affected dogs

    P. K. Rath

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the pathomorphological changes through thoracic radiography and status of oxidative stress parameters in heartworm affected dogs in Odisha. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 dogs with clinically established diagnosis of dirofilariasis by wet blood smear and modified Knott’s test and equal numbers of dogs as control were included in this study. The present study was conducted in heartworm affected dogs to see the pathomorphological changes through thoracic radiography. Similarly, the evaluation was undertaken for observing any alterations in oxidative stress status in affected as well as non-affected, but healthy control dogs by adopting standard procedure. Results: Thoracic radiography revealed cardiac enlargement, round heart appearance suggestive of right ventricular hypertrophy, tortuous pulmonary artery and darkening of lungs. Alterations in oxidative stress indices showed a significant rise of lipid peroxidase activity, non-significant rise of superoxide dismutase and a significant although reverse trend for catalase levels in affected dogs in comparison to Dirofilaria negative control but apparently healthy dogs. Conclusions: Radiographic changes, as well as alterations in oxidative stress parameters, may not be diagnostic for heartworm infection, but useful for detecting heartworm disease, assessing severity and evaluating cardiopulmonary parenchyma changes and gives a fair idea about the degree of severity of the disease. It aids as contributing factors in disease pathogenesis.

  4. Effect of antioxidants on the oxidative stress in cataract patients

    To determine the relationship between oxidative stress and eye disease, and the impact of antioxidant supplementation, forty subjects (50-70 y, F25, M15) were enrolled in a double blinded randomized study. Subjects were randomized to receive either 1) lutein (12 mg) or 2) lutein (12 mg) + green tea...

  5. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  6. Oxidation stress role in age-related cataractogenesis

    Žorić Lepša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Age-related cataract not only diminishes human life quality but it also represents a big impact on healthcare budget of almost every country as the population ages globally. Hence, cataract prevention is a big and true challenge, but a very difficult task to be accomplished. Nowadays cataract is more than a routinely recognized and almost always successfully operated ophthalmologic disease. The diagnosis of age-related cataract diagnosis might alert doctors to some systemic disorders on the whole body level. Increasing age is certainly the most essential age-related cataract risk factor. However, it seems that cataract could be a multifactor disease because of its individual, familiar, racial and gender expression differences. Oxidation stress. Oxidation stress and its form caused by ultraviolet light-photo-oxidative stress - are considered to be crucial in the etiopatho­genesis of cataract. All biomolecules suffer damages during cataract formation. On the other side, the lens posses a range of antioxidant elements and mechanisms of their action, which enable long lasting maintenance of lens transparency and functioning. Although they are primary characteristics of the lens, these antioxidant elements also depend on their systemic availability and consumption. This paper is a short literature review of the relation between oxidation stress and age-related cataract.

  7. Oxidative stress and chromosomal aberrations in an environmentally exposed population

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Rössnerová, Andrea; Šrám, Radim

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 707, 1-2 (2011), s. 34-41. ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B3/8/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : air pollution * oxidative stress * chromosomal aberrations Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.850, year: 2011

  8. Propofol and in vivo oxidative stress: effects of preservative.

    Brown, Robert H; Wagner, Elizabeth M; Cope, Keary A; Risby, Terence H

    2009-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species are associated with tissue inflammation and injury. Our laboratory has demonstrated that ethane, a stable product of lipid peroxidation, in exhaled breath can be used to measure total body oxidative stress. An ischemia-reperfusion model of lung injury in sheep has been studied in which pulmonary and bronchial lung perfusion could be interrupted and restored. The goal of this study was to investigate whether two commercial formulations of propofol and the individual components of the commercial formulations attenuated the oxidative stress produced in this model. Breath ethane and breath carbon monoxide were measured as biomarkers of oxidative stress that occur at reperfusion of ischemic tissue. Data were analyzed by a standard least-squares-fit model. One of the formulations for propofol, which contained the preservative ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), was found to decrease the overall level of oxidative stress in sheep. Furthermore, while several models of severe lung injury demonstrate additional production of reactive oxygen species, our model of ischemia/reperfusion of lung tissue did not. PMID:21383451

  9. Dietary Antioxidant and Oxidative Stress: Interaction between Vitamins and Genetics

    Aline Marcadenti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress promotes DNA damage and may also contribute to the development of chronic disease, including type 2 diabetes (T2DM, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Oxidative stress is a result of an imbalance between the production and accumulation of reactive species and the organism´s capacity to manage those using endogenous and exogenous antioxidants. Exogenous antioxidants obtained from the diet, mainly vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, selenium and carotenoids have an important role in reducing oxidative stress and also DNA damage. Endogenous antioxidants include the enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Nutrigenetics is a field of science that examines the interactions between diet and genetic variation. Individual genetic variation can affect proteins involved in the uptake, utilization and metabolism of dietary antioxidants. It may alter their serum levels and subsequent contribution to modulation of oxidative stress. The elucidation of interaction between genetic variations and antioxidant status may have important implications for public health through the identification of individuals and populations who could benefit from dietary intervention and supplementation with antioxidants. A greater understanding of which antioxidants could promote more protection and increase DNA repair may be important as a strategy to avoid the earlier development of chronic diseases.

  10. The role of oxidative stress in corneal diseases and injuries

    Čejková, Jitka; Čejka, Čestmír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 8 (2015), s. 893-900. ISSN 0213-3911 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12580S Keywords : Diseased corneas * Immunohistochemistry * Oxidative stress Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.236, year: 2013

  11. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND VASCULAR DAMAGE IN HYPOXIA PROCESSES. MALONDIALDEHYDE (MDA AS BIOMARKER FOR OXIDATIVE DAMAGE

    Muñiz P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the levels oxidative stress biomarkers are related with different diseases such as ischemia/reperfusion, cardiovascular, renal, aging, etc. One of these biomarkers is the malondialdehyde (MDA generated as resulted of the process of lipid peroxidation. This biomarker is increased under conditions of the oxidative stress. Their levels, have been frequently used to measure plasma oxidative damage to lipids by their atherogenic potential. Its half-life high and their reactivity allows it to act both inside and outside of cells and interaction with proteins and DNA involve their role in different pathophysiological processes. This paper presents an analysis of the use of MDA as a biomarker of oxidative stress and its implications associated pathologies such as cardiovascular diseases ago.

  12. Oxidative stress in songbirds exposed to dietary methylmercury.

    Henry, Katie A; Cristol, Daniel A; Varian-Ramos, Claire W; Bradley, Eric L

    2015-04-01

    Long-term, sublethal methylmercury exposure can cause reproductive depression, immune suppression, endocrine disruption and other problems in birds. We used two biomarkers to detect oxidative stress in livers of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) developmentally exposed to sublethal levels of dietary methylmercury (0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, or 2.4 μg/g wet weight in diet). Our findings indicate that young adult finches exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of mercury in ovo and through their diets, exhibited oxidative stress in their livers. We measured the ratio of the antioxidant glutathione in its reduced form (GSH) versus its oxidized form (GSSG) and the activity of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme suite. Blood total mercury served as a proxy for liver mercury concentration, and was on average 8.4 times the dietary dose (e.g., birds consuming 0.6 μg/g had blood mercury levels of ~5 μg/g on a wet weight basis). Consistent with what is known from large, aquatic bird species, there was a significant, negative relationship between GSH/GSSG ratios and tissue mercury concentrations, which is indicative of oxidative stress. This relationship was driven by a significant increase in the oxidized glutathione in the livers of birds with higher blood mercury levels. SOD activity was also found to have a significant, negative relationship with blood mercury. PMID:25519780

  13. Cocoa Phenolic Extract Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells against Oxidative Stress

    Laura Bravo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is associated with reductions in glutathione, supporting the critical role of oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. Antioxidant food components such as flavonoids have a protective role against oxidative stress-induced degenerative and age-related diseases. Flavonoids constitute an important part of the human diet; they can be found in most plant foods, including green tea, grapes or cocoa and possess multiple biological activities. This study investigates the chemo-protective effect of a cocoa phenolic extract (CPE containing mainly flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BOOH on Ins-1E pancreatic beta cells. Cell viability and oxidative status were evaluated. Ins-1E cells treatment with 5–20 μg/mL CPE for 20 h evoked no cell damage and did not alter ROS production. Addition of 50 μM t-BOOH for 2 h increased ROS and carbonyl groups content and decreased reduced glutathione level. Pre-treatment of cells with CPE significantly prevented the t-BOOH-induced ROS and carbonyl groups and returned antioxidant defences to adequate levels. Thus, Ins-1E cells treated with CPE showed a remarkable recovery of cell viability damaged by t-BOOH, indicating that integrity of surviving machineries in the CPE-treated cells was notably protected against the oxidative insult.

  14. Reproductive Benefit of Oxidative Damage: An Oxidative Stress “Malevolence”?

    B. Poljsak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS compared to antioxidant defenses are considered to play a major role in diverse chronic age-related diseases and aging. Here we present an attempt to synthesize information about proximate oxidative processes in aging (relevant to free radical or oxidative damage hypotheses of aging with an evolutionary scenario (credited here to Dawkins hypotheses involving tradeoffs between the costs and benefits of oxidative stress to reproducing organisms. Oxidative stress may be considered a biological imperfection; therefore, the Dawkins' theory of imperfect adaptation of beings to environment was applied to the role of oxidative stress in processes like famine and infectious diseases and their consequences at the molecular level such as mutations and cell signaling. Arguments are presented that oxidative damage is not necessarily an evolutionary mistake but may be beneficial for reproduction; this may prevail over its harmfulness to health and longevity in evolution. Thus, Dawkins' principle of biological “malevolence” may be an additional biological paradigm for explaining the consequences of oxidative stress.

  15. Non-thermal Plasma and Oxidative Stress

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2015-09-01

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP; non-thermal plasma) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, few research projects have been conducted to merge this technique with conventional free radical biology. Recently, Prof. Masaru Hori's group (Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University) developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Here electron spin resonance revealed hydroxyl radicals as a major product. To merge non-thermal plasma biology with the preexisting free radical biology, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and alfa-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also increased after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in medium produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment. Other recent advancements in the related studies of non-thermal plasma in Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine will also be discussed.

  16. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  17. Interferon-gamma regulates oxidative stress during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Espejo, Carmen; Penkowa, Milena; Sáez-Torres, Irene;

    2002-01-01

    . Here we analyze the role of IFN-gamma during EAE by using both IFN-gamma receptor-knockout (IFN-gamma R(-/-)) and wild-type mice, both strains immunized with peptide 40-55 from rat myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. The levels of oxidative stress were determined through the analysis of...... stress, MT-I+II, and apoptotic cell death by EAE were significantly increased in all mice, though more so in IFN-gamma R(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. These data support the notion that IFN-gamma has a protective role against EAE....... disease eliciting secretion of proinflammatory cytokines like IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha, and it has been suggested that cytokine-induced oxidative stress could have a role in EAE neuropathology. However, the individual roles of these and other cytokines in the pathogenesis of the disease are still uncertain...

  18. ER Protein Processing Under Oxidative Stress: Implications and Prevention.

    Khalil, Mahmoud F; Valenzuela, Carlos; Sisniega, Daniella; Skouta, Rachid; Narayan, Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of mitochondrial nitrosative stress have been associated with the pathogenesis of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The mechanism involves catalytic poisoning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident oxidoreductase chaperone, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the subsequent accumulation of ER-processed substrate proteins. Using a model system to mimic mitochondrial oxidative and nitrosative stress, we demonstrate a PDI-independent mechanism whereby reactive oxygen species (ROS) compromise regeneration rates of disulfide bond-containing ER-processed proteins. Under ROS-duress, the secretion-destined traffic adopts disulfide-exposed structures making the protein flux retrotranslocation biased. We also demonstrate that ROS-compromised protein maturation rates can be rescued by the polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). Our results are significant in that they reveal an additional mechanism which could promote neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, our data reveal that EA possesses therapeutic potential as a lead prophylactic agent against oxidative/nitrosative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26983927

  19. Protection by 6-aminonicotinamide against oxidative stress in cardiac cells

    Hofgaard, Johannes P; Sigurdardottir, Kristin Sigridur; Treiman, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress at the time of reperfusion is a major aspect of ischemia-reperfusion injury in heart as well as in other organs. There is a continuing interest in development of pharmacological approaches to alleviate this injury. 6-Aminonicotinamide (6AN) has been shown to diminish myocardial...... necrosis following global ischemia in an isolated rat heart, apparently by limiting the oxidative injury component. We therefore explored the antioxidative potential of 6AN in a model using H9C2(2-1) rat cardiac myoblasts exposed to H2O2 stress. Dependent on the specific protocol, 6AN pretreatment for 6...... protective effect of 6AN was associated with a decrease in total cell content of the reduced glutathione (GSH) by 15-44%, indicative of an oxidative shift in the GSH/GSSG system redox potential. We propose that this redox shift caused an increased Ca2+ leak through ryanodine receptors, reflecting their known...

  20. [Neuroprotection strategies: effect of vinpocetine in vitro oxidative stress models].

    Pereira, Cláudia; Agostinho, Paula; Moreira, Paula I; Duarte, Ana I; Santos, Maria S; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in neuronal damage and death that occurs in several neurodegenerative disorders, namely in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The observation that ROS neutralization may slow or reduce the neurodegenerative process associated with those pathologies stimulates the development of new drugs, more efficient and well tolerated, with antioxidant properties. Vinpocetine [14-etoxicarbonyl-3alpha,16alpha-ethyl)-14,15-eburnamine], a vincamine derivative, efficiently protects cells from ROS attack. Recently, the protective effect of vinpocetine was demonstrated using in vitro models of oxidative stress induced by the oxidant pair ascorbate/Fe2+ and by synthetic peptides of the AD-associated b-amyloid protein (Abeta). Results obtained from these in vitro experiences support that additional clinical trials should be carried out using vinpocetine, or vinpocetine derivatives, in order to test its therapeutical or preventive effects in diseases where oxidative stress plays a crucial role. PMID:15631851

  1. Targeting Oxidative Stress in Central Nervous System Disorders.

    Patel, Manisha

    2016-09-01

    There is widespread recognition that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in normal brain function and pathology in the context of neurological disease. Oxidative stress continues to be a key therapeutic target for neurological diseases. In developing antioxidant therapies for neurological disease, special attention should be given to the brain's unique vulnerability to oxidative insults and its architecture. Consideration of antioxidant therapy should be guided by a strong rationale for oxidative stress in a given neurological disease. This review provides an overview of processes that can guide the development of antioxidant therapies in neurological diseases, such as knowledge of basic redox mechanisms, unique features of brain pathophysiology, mechanisms and classes of antioxidants, and desirable properties of drug candidates. PMID:27491897

  2. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2diabetes mellitus

    Surapon Tangvarasittichai

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndromeand type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appearsto underlie the development of cardiovascular disease,T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidativestress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM.

  3. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Aging and Dementia

    Joana Teixeira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Biologic aging is a process, and oxidative stress theory, which is one of the most accepted biological theories for aging, states that oxidative stress causes cumulative damage to mitochondrial DNA resulting in cellular senescence. Dementia is a neurodegenerative disorder whose major risk factor is aging. Although the exact neuronal lesion mechanisms underlying neurodegenerative disorders, including dementia, are not yet known, most recent studies suggest oxidative stress and mitochondrial dynamics’ role in the process.Objective: Literature review on the role of oxidative stress’ role in aging and dementia.Methods: Literature review of selected arti-cles and books deemed relevant by the authors, supplemented by Medline/Pubmed database search using combinations of the following key-words: “oxidative stress”, “de-mentia”, “aging” and “pathogenesis”, published between 1950 and 2013. References of the selected articles and books were also considered.Results: In the last five years new research has been undertaken that enlightens the relation between oxidative stress and aging. One of the considered hypotheses states that during aging, the homeostatic regulation of biogenesis, dynamics and autophagic turnover of mitochondria disturbs their functioning, resulting in cellular senescence. Consequently, the oxidative burden may reach a critical threshold above which apoptosis is triggered, leading to irreversible mitochondrial derangement and cellular death. Although the exact neuronal lesion mechanisms underlying dementias are not known, multiple studies have consistently found increased oxidative damage in brain of patients with Alzheimer disease and recent data suggests involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in dementia processes, such as in aging.Conclusions: Most recent studies suggest the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dynamics’ in aging and dementia, either directly or

  4. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism. PMID:24384982

  5. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in human hepatoma cells exposed to stavudine

    The toxicity of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) is linked to altered mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and subsequent disruption of cellular energetics. This manifests clinically as elevated concentrations of lactate in plasma. The mechanism(s) underlying how the changes in mtDNA replication lead to lactic acidosis remains unclear. It is hypothesized that mitochondrial oxidative stress links the changes in mtDNA replication to mitochondrial dysfunction and ensuing NRTIs toxicity. To test this hypothesis, changes in mitochondrial function, mtDNA amplification efficiency, and oxidative stress were assessed in HepG2-cultured human hepatoblasts treated with the NRTI stavudine (2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-deoxythymidine or d4T) for 48 h. d4T produced significant mitochondrial dysfunction with a 1.5-fold increase in cellular lactate to pyruvate ratios. In addition, d4T caused a dose-dependent decrease in mtDNA amplification and a correlative increase in abundance of markers of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (4-benzoic acid) porphyrin, MnTBAP, a catalytic antioxidant, ameliorated or reversed d4T-induced changes in cell injury, energetics, mtDNA amplification, and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In conclusion, d4T treatment elevates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), enhances mitochondrial oxidative stress, and contributes mechanistically to NRTI-induced toxicity. These deleterious events may be potentiated in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection itself, coinfection (e.g., viral hepatitis), aging, substance, and alcohol use

  6. Effect of sodium salicylate on oxidative stress andinsulinresistanceinducedbyfreefattyacids

    Bing He; Sheng Zhao; Wei Zhang; Yan Li; Ping Han

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been reported that high-dose salicy-lates improve free fatty acids (FFAs)-induced insulin resistance andβ-cell dysfunction in vitro, but the mechanism remains uncertain. In insulin-resistant rats, we found that the supplementation of sodium salicylate is associated with a reduction of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of oxidative stress. Few studies have investigated the effects of salicylates on oxidative stress levels in insulin-resistant animal models. This study aimed to assess the effect of sodium salicylate on insulin sensitivity and to explore the potential mechanism by which it improves hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance. METHODS: Intralipid+heparin (IH), saline (SAL), or intralipid+heparin+sodium salicylate (IHS) were separately infused for 7 hours in normal Wistar rats. During the last 2 hours of the infusion, hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamping was performed with [6-3H] glucose tracer. Plasma glucose was measured using the glucose oxygenase method. Plasma insulin and C-peptide were determined by radioimmunoassay. MDA levels and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) activity in the liver and skeletal muscle were measured with colorimetric kits. RESULTS: Compared with infusion of SAL, IH infusion increased hepatic glucose production (HGP), and decreased glucose utilization (GU) (P CONCLUSIONS: Short-term elevation of fatty acids induces insulin resistance by enhancing oxidative stress levels in the liver and muscle. The administration of the anti-inlfammatory drug sodium salicylate reduces the degree of oxidative stress, therefore improving hepatic and peripheral insulin resistance. IKK-β and NF-κB provide potential pathogenic links to oxidative stress.

  7. Linking phosphorus availability with photo-oxidative stress in plants.

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of mechanisms to circumvent the potential damaging effects of living under low phosphorus availability in the soil. These mechanisms include different levels of organization, from root-shoot signalling at the whole-plant level to specific biochemical responses at the subcellular level, such as reductions in photosynthesis and the consequent activation of photo- and antioxidant mechanisms in chloroplasts. Some recent studies clearly indicate that severe phosphorus deficiency can lead to alterations in the photosynthetic apparatus, including reductions in CO2 assimilation rates, a down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes and photoinhibition at the photosystem II level, thus causing potential photo-oxidative stress. Photo-oxidative stress is characterized by an increased production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which at low concentrations can serve a signalling, protective role, but when present at high concentrations can cause damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, thus leading to irreversible injuries. We discuss here the mechanisms that phosphate-starved plants have evolved to withstand photo-oxidative stress, including changes at the subcellular level (e.g. activation of photo- and antioxidant protection mechanisms in chloroplasts), cellular and tissular levels (e.g. activation of photorespiration and anthocyanin accumulation) and whole-plant level (alterations in source-sink relationships modulated by hormones). Of particular importance is the current evidence demonstrating that phosphate-starved plants activate simultaneous responses at multiple levels, from transcriptional changes to root-shoot signalling, to prevent oxidative damage. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the occurrence of photo-oxidative stress in phosphate-starved plants and highlight the mechanisms these plants have evolved to prevent oxidative damage under phosphorus limitation at the subcellular, cellular and whole

  8. Oxidative stress homeostasis in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.

    Luisa C Carvalho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants can maintain growth and reproductive success by sensing changes in the environment and reacting through mechanisms at molecular, cellular, physiological and developmental levels. Each stress condition prompts a unique response although some overlap between the reactions to abiotic stress (drought, heat, cold, salt or high light and to biotic stress (pathogens does occur. A common feature in the response to all stresses is the onset of oxidative stress, through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. As hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are involved in stress signaling, a tight control in ROS homeostasis requires a delicate balance of systems involved in their generation and degradation. If the plant lacks the capacity to generate scavenging potential, this can ultimately lead to death. In grapevine, antioxidant homeostasis can be considered at whole plant levels and during the development cycle. The most striking example lies in berries and their derivatives, such as wine, with nutraceutical properties associated with their antioxidant capacity. Antioxidant homeostasis is tightly regulated in leaves, assuring a positive balance between photosynthesis and respiration, explaining the tolerance of many grapevine varieties to extreme environments.In this review we will focus on antioxidant metabolites, antioxidant enzymes, transcriptional regulation and cross-talk with hormones prompted by abiotic stress conditions. We will also discuss three situations that require specific homeostasis balance: biotic stress, the oxidative burst in berries at veraison and in vitro systems. The genetic plasticity of the antioxidant homeostasis response put in evidence by the different levels of tolerance to stress presented by grapevine varieties will be addressed. The gathered information is relevant to foster varietal adaptation to impending climate changes, to assist breeders in choosing the more adapted varieties and to suitable viticulture

  9. A theoretical framework for predicting the oxidative stress potential of oxide nanoparticles.

    Burello, Enrico; Worth, Andrew P

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we propose a theoretical model that predicts the oxidative stress potential of oxide nanoparticles by looking at the ability of these materials to perturb the intracellular redox state. The model uses reactivity descriptors to build the energy band structure of oxide nanoparticles, assuming a particle diameter larger than 20-30 nm and no surface states in the band gap, and predicts their ability to induce an oxidative stress by comparing the redox potentials of relevant intracellular reactions with the oxides' energy structure. Nanoparticles displaying band energy values comparable with redox potentials of antioxidants or radical formation reactions have the ability to cause an oxidative stress and a cytotoxic response in vitro. We discuss the model's predictions for six relevant oxide nanoparticles (TiO(2), CuO, ZnO, FeO, Fe(2)O(3), Fe(3)O(4)) with literature in vitro studies and calculate the energy structure for 64 additional oxide nanomaterials. Such a framework would guide the development of more rational and efficient screening strategies avoiding random or exhaustive testing of new nanomaterials. PMID:21609138

  10. Oxidative Stress to the Cornea, Changes in Corneal Optical Properties, and Advances in Treatment of Corneal Oxidative Injuries

    Cestmir Cejka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown.

  11. Oxidative stress to the cornea, changes in corneal optical properties, and advances in treatment of corneal oxidative injuries.

    Cejka, Cestmir; Cejkova, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress) leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger from potential oxidative damage evoked by them. Oxidative stress may initiate or develop ocular injury resulting in decreased visual acuity or even vision loss. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases with particular attention to oxidative stress in the cornea and changes in corneal optical properties are discussed. Advances in the treatment of corneal oxidative injuries or diseases are shown. PMID:25861412

  12. An Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Its Associated Diseases

    Bidur Bhandary

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the major site of calcium storage and protein folding. It has a unique oxidizing-folding environment due to the predominant disulfide bond formation during the process of protein folding. Alterations in the oxidative environment of the ER and also intra-ER Ca2+ cause the production of ER stress-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Protein disulfide isomerases, endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1, reduced glutathione and mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins also play crucial roles in ER stress-induced production of ROS. In this article, we discuss ER stress-associated ROS and related diseases, and the current understanding of the signaling transduction involved in ER stress.

  13. Quinolinic Acid: Neurotoxin or Oxidative Stress Modulator?

    Lenka Kubicova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, QUIN is a well-known neurotoxin. Consequently, QUIN could produce reactive oxygen species (ROS. ROS are generated in reactions catalyzed by transition metals, especially iron (Fe. QUIN can form coordination complexes with iron. A combination of differential pulse voltammetry, deoxyribose degradation and Fe(II autoxidation assays was used for explorating ROS formation in redox reactions that are catalyzed by iron in QUIN-Fe complexes. Differential pulse voltammetry showed an anodic shift of the iron redox potential if iron was liganded by QUIN. In the H2O2/FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant of the deoxyribose degradation assay, the dose-response curve was U-shaped. In the FeCl3/ascorbic acid variant, QUIN unambiguously showed antioxidant effects. In the Fe(II autoxidation assay, QUIN decreased the rate of ROS production caused by Fe(II oxidation. Our study confirms that QUIN toxicity may be caused by ROS generation via the Fenton reaction. This, however, applies only for unnaturally high concentrations that were used in attempts to provide support for the neurotoxic effect. In lower concentrations, we show that by liganding iron, QUIN affects the Fe(II/Fe(III ratios that are beneficial to homeostasis. Our results support the notion that redox chemistry can contribute to explaining the hormetic dose-response effects.

  14. Atorvastatin attenuates oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    Cai Zhiyou; Yan Yong; Wang Yonglong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate serum level of SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE and Ach in AD, to study atorvastatin influence on serum level of SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE and Acb in AD and its neuroprotection mechanisms. Methods Subjects were divided into: normal blood lipid level group with Alzheimer's disease (A), higher blood lipid level group with Alzheimer's disease (AH), normal blood lipid level Alzheimer's disease group with atorvastatin treeatment (AT),higher blood lipid level Alzheimer's disease group with atorvastatin treeatment(AHT). Ox-LDL was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; SOD, MDA, ox-LDL, AchE, Ach and blood lipid level in AD was measured by biochemistry. Results: The serum level of MDA, AchE in AH group after atorvastatin treatment is lower ;The serum level of SOD, Ach in AH group is more increased than that of in A group; The serum level of ox-LDL in AH, A groups is lower than that of in A group; The dementia degree is lower after atorvastatin treatment. Conclusion: Atorvastatin can decrease serum level of MDA, AchE and ox-LDL, and increase that of SOD, Acb, and attenuate dementia symptom in AD, especially, with hyperlipemia. The hypothesis of atorvastatin neuroprotection is concluded that atorvastatin may restrain free radical reaction and retard oxidation in AD.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress are involved in ZnO nanoparticle-induced hepatotoxicity

    Yang, Xia; Shao, Huali; Liu, Weirong; Gu, Weizhong; Shu, Xiaoli; Mo, Yiqun; Chen, Xuejun; Zhang, Qunwei; Jiang, Mizu

    2015-01-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (Nano-ZnO) are widely used in sunscreens, clothes, medicine and electronic devices. However, the potential risks of human exposure and the potential for adverse health impacts are not well understood. Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused liver damage and hepatocyte apoptosis through oxidative stress, but the molecular mechanisms that are involved in Nano-ZnO-induced hepatotoxicity are still unclear. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is sensitive to oxidative stress, and also plays a crucial role in oxidative stress-induced damage. Previous studies showed that ER stress was involved in many chemical-induced liver injuries. We hypothesized that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused oxidative stress and ER stress that were involved in Nano-ZnO-induced liver injury. To test our hypothesis, mice were gavaged with 200 mg/kg or 400 mg/kg of Nano-ZnO once a day for a period of 90 days, and blood and liver tissues were obtained for study. Our results showed that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused liver injury that was reflected by focal hepatocellular necrosis, congestive dilation of central veins, and significantly increased alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels. Exposure to Nano-ZnO also caused depletion of glutathione (GSH) the liver tissues. In addition, our electron microscope results showed that ER swelling and ribosomal degranulation were observed in the liver tissues from mice treated with Nano-ZnO. The mRNA expression levels of ER stress-associated genes (grp78, grp94, pdi-3, xbp-1) were also up-regulated in Nano-ZnO-treated mice. Nano-ZnO caused increased phosphorylation of RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). Finally, we found that exposure to Nano-ZnO caused increased ER stress-associated apoptotic protein levels, such as caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-12, phosphorylation of JNK, and CHOP/GADD153, and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (chop

  16. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    Alessandra da Silva Dantas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen.

  17. Oxidative stress modulation in hepatitis C virus infectedcells

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication is associated withthe endoplasmic reticulum, where the virus can inducecellular stress. Oxidative cell damage plays an importantrole in HCV physiopathology. Oxidative stress is triggeredwhen the concentration of oxygen species inthe extracellular or intracellular environment exceedsantioxidant defenses. Cells are protected and modulateoxidative stress through the interplay of intracellularantioxidant agents, mainly glutathione system (GSH)and thioredoxin; and antioxidant enzyme systems suchas superoxide dismutase, catalase, GSH peroxidase,and heme oxygenase-1. Also, the use of natural andsynthetic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, N-acetylcysteine,glycyrrhizin, polyenylphosphatidyl choline, mitoquinone,quercetin, S-adenosylmethionine and silymarin) hasalready shown promising results as co-adjuvants inHCV therapy. Despite all the available information, it isnot known how different agents with antiviral activitycan interfere with the modulation of the cell redoxstate induced by HCV and decrease viral replication.This review describes an evidence-based consensus onmolecular mechanisms involved in HCV replication andtheir relationship with cell damage induced by oxidativestress generated by the virus itself and cell antiviralmachinery. It also describes some molecules thatmodify the levels of oxidative stress in HCV-infectedcells.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Children with Chronic Spontaneous Urticaria

    Fatih Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU has not been fully understood; nevertheless, significant progress has been achieved in recent years. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the pathogenesis of CSU. Sixty-two children with CSU and 41 healthy control subjects were enrolled in the study. An extensive evaluation of demographic and clinical features was done, and serum oxidative stress was evaluated by plasma total oxidant status (TOS and total antioxidant status (TAS measurements. The median value of plasma TOS was found to be 10.49 μmol H2O2 equiv./L (interquartile range, 7.29–17.65 in CSU patients and 7.68 μmol H2O2 equiv./L (5.95–10.39 in the control group. The difference between the groups was statistically significant (p=0.003. Likewise, the median plasma TAS level in the CSU group was decreased significantly compared to that of the control group (2.64 [2.30–2.74] versus 2.76 [2.65–2.86] mmol Trolox equiv./L, resp., p = 0,001. Our results indicated that plasma oxidative stress is increased in children with CSU when compared to healthy subjects, and plasma oxidative stress markers are positively correlated with disease activity.

  19. Toxicological and pharmacological concerns on oxidative stress and related diseases

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh [Medicinal Plants Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417614411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad@TUMS.Ac.Ir [Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 1417614411 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are generated as the natural byproduct of normal oxygen metabolism, they can create oxidative damage via interaction with bio-molecules. The role of oxidative stress as a remarkable upstream part is frequently reported in the signaling cascade of inflammation as well as chemo attractant production. Even though hydrogen peroxide can control cell signaling and stimulate cell proliferation at low levels, in higher concentrations it can initiate apoptosis and in very high levels may create necrosis. So far, the role of ROS in cellular damage and death is well documented with implicating in a broad range of degenerative alterations e.g. carcinogenesis, aging and other oxidative stress related diseases (OSRDs). Reversely, it is cleared that antioxidants are potentially able to suppress (at least in part) the immune system and to enhance the normal cellular protective responses to tissue damage. In this review, we aimed to provide insights on diverse OSRDs, which are correlated with the concept of oxidative stress as well as its cellular effects that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Resveratrol, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statins, nebivolol and carvedilol, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, and plant-derived drugs (alone or combined) are the potential medicines that can be used to control OSRD.

  20. Toxicological and pharmacological concerns on oxidative stress and related diseases

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are generated as the natural byproduct of normal oxygen metabolism, they can create oxidative damage via interaction with bio-molecules. The role of oxidative stress as a remarkable upstream part is frequently reported in the signaling cascade of inflammation as well as chemo attractant production. Even though hydrogen peroxide can control cell signaling and stimulate cell proliferation at low levels, in higher concentrations it can initiate apoptosis and in very high levels may create necrosis. So far, the role of ROS in cellular damage and death is well documented with implicating in a broad range of degenerative alterations e.g. carcinogenesis, aging and other oxidative stress related diseases (OSRDs). Reversely, it is cleared that antioxidants are potentially able to suppress (at least in part) the immune system and to enhance the normal cellular protective responses to tissue damage. In this review, we aimed to provide insights on diverse OSRDs, which are correlated with the concept of oxidative stress as well as its cellular effects that can be inhibited by antioxidants. Resveratrol, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, statins, nebivolol and carvedilol, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, and plant-derived drugs (alone or combined) are the potential medicines that can be used to control OSRD

  1. Increased serum oxidative stress markers in women with uterine leiomyoma.

    Pietro Santulli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids are the most common gynaecological benign tumors in premenopausal women. Evidences support the role of oxidative stress in the development of uterine leiomyoma. We have analysed oxidative stress markers (thiols, advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites in preoperative sera from women with histologically proven uterine leiomyoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a laboratory study in a tertiary-care university hospital. Fifty-nine women with histologically proven uterine leiomyoma and ninety-two leiomyoma-free control women have been enrolled in this study. Complete surgical exploration of the abdominopelvic cavity was performed in each patient. Preoperative serum samples were obtained from all study participants to assay serum thiols, AOPP, protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites. Concentrations of serum protein carbonyl groups and AOPP were higher in leiomyoma patients than in the control group (p=0.005 and p<0.001, respectively. By contrast, serum thiol levels were lower in leiomyoma patients (p<0.001. We found positive correlations between serum AOPP concentrations and total fibroids weight (r=0.339; p=0.028, serum AOPP and serum protein carbonyls with duration of infertility (r=0.762; p=0.006 and r=0.683; p=0.021, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study, for the first time, reveals a significant increase of protein oxidative stress status and reduced antioxidant capacity in sera from women with uterine leiomyoma.

  2. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli

    Xi-Feng Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH and adenosine triphosphate (ATP significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, glutathione S-transferase (GST, super oxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT. These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and

  3. Biologically Synthesized Gold Nanoparticles Ameliorate Cold and Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli.

    Zhang, Xi-Feng; Shen, Wei; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique physical, chemical, and optical properties, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have recently attracted much interest in the field of nanomedicine, especially in the areas of cancer diagnosis and photothermal therapy. Because of the enormous potential of these nanoparticles, various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted for their synthesis. Synthetic antioxidants are dangerous to human health. Thus, the search for effective, nontoxic natural compounds with effective antioxidative properties is essential. Although AuNPs have been studied for use in various biological applications, exploration of AuNPs as antioxidants capable of inhibiting oxidative stress induced by heat and cold stress is still warranted. Therefore, one goal of our study was to produce biocompatible AuNPs using biological methods that are simple, nontoxic, biocompatible, and environmentally friendly. Next, we aimed to assess the antioxidative effect of AuNPs against oxidative stress induced by cold and heat in Escherichia coli, which is a suitable model for stress responses involving AuNPs. The response of aerobically grown E. coli cells to cold and heat stress was found to be similar to the oxidative stress response. Upon exposure to cold and heat stress, the viability and metabolic activity of E. coli was significantly reduced compared to the control. In addition, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and leakage of proteins and sugars were significantly elevated, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) significantly lowered compared to in the control. Concomitantly, AuNPs ameliorated cold and heat-induced oxidative stress responses by increasing the expression of antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), super oxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). These consistent physiology and biochemical data suggest that AuNPs can ameliorate cold and heat stress

  4. Oxidative stress and mechanisms of ochronosis in alkaptonuria.

    Braconi, Daniela; Millucci, Lia; Bernardini, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2015-11-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare metabolic disease due to a deficient activity of the enzyme homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD), involved in Phe and Tyr catabolism. Due to such a deficiency, AKU patients undergo accumulation of the metabolite homogentisic acid (HGA), which is prone to oxidation/polymerization reactions causing the production of a melanin-like pigment. Once the pigment is deposited onto connective tissues (mainly in joints, spine, and cardiac valves), a classical bluish-brown discoloration is imparted, leading to a phenomenon known as "ochronosis", the hallmark of AKU. A clarification of the molecular mechanisms for the production and deposition of the ochronotic pigment in AKU started only recently with a range of in vitro and ex vivo human models used for the study of HGA-induced effects. Thanks to redox-proteomic analyses, it was found that HGA could induce significant oxidation of a number of serum and chondrocyte proteins. Further investigations allowed highlighting how HGA-induced proteome alteration, lipid peroxidation, thiol depletion, and amyloid production could contribute to oxidative stress generation and protein oxidation in AKU. This review briefly summarizes the most recent findings on HGA-induced oxidative stress in AKU, helping in the clarification of the molecular mechanisms of ochronosis and potentially providing the basis for its pharmacological treatment. Future work should be undertaken in order to validate in vivo the results so far obtained in in vitro AKU models. PMID:25733348

  5. Characterization of RNA damage under oxidative stress in Escherichia coli

    Liu, Min; Gong, Xin; Alluri, Ravi Kumar; Wu, Jinhua; Sablo, Tene’; Li, Zhongwei

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the level of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxo-G), an oxidized form of guanosine, in RNA in Escherichia coli under normal and oxidative stress conditions. The level of 8-oxo-G in RNA rises rapidly and remains high for hours in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) challenge in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 induced elevation of 8-oxo-G content is much higher in RNA than that of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA. Under normal conditions, the 8-oxo-G level is low in RNA isolated ...

  6. Oxidative stress in cases of chronic fluoride intoxication

    Ailani, Vinita; R. C. Gupta; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Kapil

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to find out the level of oxidative stress and effect of supplementation of vitamin C, D and Calcium on levels of SOD, serum and urinary fluoride in children residing in endemic fluorosis area. For this the fluoride belt of Jaipur district was selected. The parameters selected were Super oxide dismutase, serum fluoride and urinary fluoride. The study was conducted on one hundred children, selected from four areas (25 from each area) consuming water containing 1.2, 2.4,...

  7. Excessive Selenium Supplementation Induced Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Chicken Spleen.

    Wang, Yachao; Jiang, Li; Li, Yuanfeng; Luo, Xuegang; He, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Excessive selenium (Se) intake is harmful for animals and humans. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term excessive Se supplementation on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related injuries in chicken spleen. A total of 180 1-day-old chickens were randomly divided into four groups with different Se dietary contents (0.2 mg/kg Se, 5 mg/kg Se, 10 mg/kg Se, or 15 mg/kg Se) for 45 days. Then, the levels of antioxidative enzymes, GPx, SOD, and MDA as well as the expression levels of GRP78, ARF6, caspase 3, caspase 12, and Bcl 2 in the spleen were determined at days 15, 30, and 45, respectively. The results showed that excessive Se treatment decreased the activities of GPx and SOD (P < 0.05) but increased the levels of MDA (P < 0.05) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the ER stress genes GRP78 and ATF6 were highly expressed (P < 0.05), and the apoptosis genes caspase 3 and caspase 12 were increased, but Bcl 2 was decreased by Se treatment (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis showed that there was a high correlation between these biomarkers, which indicated that ER stress and ER stress-related apoptosis were correlated with oxidative stress. These results showed the important role of oxidative stress and ER stress in Se-related immune injuries in chicken. PMID:26740217

  8. Assessment of Eccentric Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Using Oxidation-Reduction Potential Markers

    Dimitrios Stagos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of static (sORP and capacity ORP (cORP oxidation-reduction potential markers as measured by the RedoxSYS Diagnostic System in plasma, for assessing eccentric exercise-induced oxidative stress. Nineteen volunteers performed eccentric exercise with the knee extensors. Blood was collected before, immediately after exercise, and 24, 48, and 72 h after exercise. Moreover, common redox biomarkers were measured, which were protein carbonyls, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, total antioxidant capacity in plasma, and catalase activity and glutathione levels in erythrocytes. When the participants were examined as one group, there were not significant differences in any marker after exercise. However, in 11 participants there was a high increase in cORP after exercise, while in 8 participants there was a high decrease. Thus, the participants were divided in low cORP group exhibiting significant decrease in cORP after exercise and in high cORP group exhibiting significant increase. Moreover, only in the low cORP group there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation after exercise suggesting induction of oxidative stress. The results suggested that high decreases in cORP values after exercise may indicate induction of oxidative stress by eccentric exercise, while high increases in cORP values after exercise may indicate no existence of oxidative stress.

  9. Reproduction is not costly in terms of oxidative stress.

    Ołdakowski, Łukasz; Wasiluk, Aleksandra; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł; Taylor, Jan R E

    2015-12-01

    One of the core assumptions of life-history theory is the negative trade-off between current and future reproduction. Investment in current reproduction is expected to decrease future reproductive success or survival, but the physiological mechanisms underlying these costs are still obscure. To test for a role of oxidative stress, we measured oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in liver, heart, kidneys and muscles, as well as the level of antioxidants (total glutathione and catalase), in breeding and non-breeding bank voles. We used females from lines selected for high aerobic metabolism and non-selected control lines and manipulated their reproductive investment by decreasing or increasing litter size. Unlike in most previous studies, the females reared four consecutive litters (the maximum possible during a breeding season). Contrary to predictions, oxidative damage in reproducing females was decreased or not changed, and did not differ between the selected and control lines. Oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in the liver was lower in females that weaned enlarged litters than in non-breeding ones, and was intermediate in those with reduced litters. Oxidative damage to proteins in the heart also tended to be lower in breeding females than in non-breeding ones. A negative relationship between the level of oxidative damage and activity of catalase in kidneys indicated a protective action of antioxidants. In conclusion, our study falsified the hypothesis that oxidative stress is a part of the proximate physiological mechanism underlying the fundamental life-history trade-off between current and future reproduction. PMID:26519508

  10. Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Circadian Rhythms, and AMD

    Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews concepts regarding oxidative stress and the mechanisms by which endogenous and exogenous factors produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also surveys the relationships between oxidative stress, circadian rhythms, and retinal damage in humans, particularly those related to light and photodamage. In the first section, the production of ROS by different cell organelles and biomolecules and the antioxidant mechanisms that antagonize this damage are reviewed. The second section includes a brief review of circadian clocks and their relationship with the cellular redox state. In the third part of this work, the relationship between retinal damage and ROS is described. The last part of this work focuses on retinal degenerative pathology, age-related macular degeneration, and the relationships between this pathology, ROS, and light. Finally, the possible interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), circadian rhythms, and this pathology are discussed. PMID:26885250

  11. EVALUATION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS, HYPOALBUMINEMIA AND ANEMIA IN CANCER

    Lakshmana Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: - BACKGROUND: An attempt was made to study the role of Oxidative stress, Total protein, Albumin, A:G ratio & Hemoglobin in cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Malondialdehyde (MDA, Total proteins, Albumin: Glo bulin, Hemoglobin was measured in fifty (50 cases of cancer and fifty (50 controls RESULTS: There is significant increase in the MDA level in the case group compare to the control (p 0.05 Albumin level in cases was significantly les s compared to control group (p < 0.05, and there was a tendency towards the reversal of A-G ratio. Hemoglobin was significantly less in the case group compare to control (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Malondialdehyde (MDA an end product of lipid perox idation and oxidative stress was significantly increased in all cancer cases. Serum total proteins , especially albumin which act as reserve fuel in the body was decreased in cancer cases. The hemoglo bin levels were also decreased in cancer cases.

  12. Oxidative Stress after Surgery on the Immature Heart

    Daniel Fudulu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric heart surgery is associated with increased inflammation and the production of reactive oxygen species. Use of the extracorporeal cardiopulmonary bypass during correction of congenital heart defects generates reactive oxygen species by various mechanisms: haemolysis, neutrophil activation, ischaemia reperfusion injury, reoxygenation injury, or depletion of the endogenous antioxidants. The immature myocardium is more vulnerable to reactive oxygen species because of developmental differences compared to the adult heart but also because of associated congenital heart diseases that can deplete its antioxidant reserve. Oxidative stress can be manipulated by various interventions: exogenous antioxidants, use of steroids, cardioplegia, blood prime strategies, or miniaturisation of the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit. However, it is unclear if modulation of the redox pathways can alter clinical outcomes. Further studies powered to look at clinical outcomes are needed to define the role of oxidative stress in paediatric patients.

  13. Oxidative costs of reproduction: Oxidative stress in mice fed standard and low antioxidant diets.

    Vaanholt, L M; Milne, A; Zheng, Y; Hambly, C; Mitchell, S E; Valencak, T G; Allison, D B; Speakman, J R

    2016-02-01

    Lactation is one of the most energetically expensive behaviours, and trade-offs may exist between the energy devoted to it and somatic maintenance, including protection against oxidative damage. However, conflicting data exist for the effects of reproduction on oxidative stress. In the wild, a positive relationship is often observed, but in laboratory studies oxidative damage is often lower in lactating than in non-breeding animals. We hypothesised that this discrepancy may exist because during lactation food intake increases many-fold resulting in a large increase in the intake of dietary antioxidants which are typically high in laboratory rodent chow where they are added as a preservative. We supplied lactating and non-breeding control mice with either a standard or low antioxidant diet and studied how this affected the activity of endogenous antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase; SOD, and glutathione peroxidise; GPx) and oxidative damage to proteins (protein carbonyls, PC) in liver and brain tissue. The low antioxidant diet did not significantly affect activities of antioxidant enzymes in brain or liver, and generally did not result in increased protein damage, except in livers of control mice on low antioxidant diet. Catalase activity, but not GPx or SOD, was decreased in both control and lactating mice on the low antioxidant diet. Lactating mice had significantly reduced oxidative damage to both liver and brain compared to control mice, independent of the diet they were given. In conclusion, antioxidant content of the diet did not affect oxidative stress in control or reproductive mice, and cannot explain the previously observed reduction in oxidative stress in lactating mammals studied in the laboratory. The reduced oxidative stress in the livers of lactating mice even under low antioxidant diet treatment was consistent with the 'shielding' hypothesis. PMID:26569452

  14. Cerebrolysin protects against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration

    Abdel-Salam, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Omar ME Abdel-Salam,1 Nadia A Mohammed,2 Eman R Youness,2 Yasser A Khadrawy,3 Enayat A Omara,4 Amany A Sleem51Department of Toxicology and Narcotics, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Pharmacology, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: We investigated the effect of cerebrolysin, a peptide mixture used for promoting memory and recovery from cerebral stroke, on the development of oxidative stress and nigrost...

  15. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh; Krishnananda Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can intera...

  16. Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Obesity-Related Glomerulopathy

    Jinhua Tang; Haidong Yan; Shougang Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-related glomerulopathy is an increasing cause of end-stage renal disease. Obesity has been considered a state of chronic low-grade systemic inflammation and chronic oxidative stress. Augmented inflammation in adipose and kidney tissues promotes the progression of kidney damage in obesity. Adipose tissue, which is accumulated in obesity, is a key endocrine organ that produces multiple biologically active molecules, including leptin, adiponectin, resistin, that affect inflammation, and ...

  17. Power of Proteomics in Linking Oxidative Stress and Female Infertility

    Sajal Gupta; Jana Ghulmiyyah; Rakesh Sharma; Jacques Halabi; Ashok Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis, PCOS, and unexplained infertility are currently the most common diseases rendering large numbers of women infertile worldwide. Oxidative stress, due to its deleterious effects on proteins and nucleic acids, is postulated to be the one of the important mechanistic pathways in differential expression of proteins and in these diseases. The emerging field of proteomics has allowed identification of proteins involved in cell cycle, as antioxidants, extracellular matrix (ECM), cytosk...

  18. The influence of homocysteine and oxidative stress on pregnancy outcome.

    Micle, O; Muresan, M; Antal, L; Bodog, F; Bodog, A

    2012-02-22

    Oxidative stress in utero-placental tissues plays an important role in the development of placental-related diseases. Maternal hiperhomocysteinemia is associated with placental mediated diseases, such as preeclampsia, spontaneous abortion and placental abruption. The aim of our study is to appreciate the clinical usefulness of the dosage serum homocysteine and malondialdehyde, as an oxidative stress marker, in the pregnancies complicated with risk of abortion or preterm birth. The study was performed at the Obstetric Gynecology Clinical Hospital Oradea from December 2009 until April 2010. It included 18 patients with risk of abortion (group 1), 22 with preterm birth (group 2). The results were compared with a control group composed by 14 healthy pregnant women. Serum homocysteine level was measured by an enzymatic method, on the instrument Hitachi 912, Roche, reagent: Axis-Shield Enzymatic. For proving the oxidative stress we established the level of malondialdehyde using a method with thiobarbituric acid TBA (Kei Satoh 1978) and the level of ceruloplasmin with the Ravin method .Also AST, ALT,CRP, iron, uric acid, urea were assessed.High level of homocysteine in both groups of study in comparison with the control group was found. The concentration of MDA was significantly higher in pregnancies complicated with risk of abortion and preterm birth compared to the control group (p=0.040, p=0.031). Considerable differences of ceruloplasmin concentration between group 1 and group 2 (p=0.045), and between group 2 and control group (p=0.034), was noticed but not any important differences between group 1 and control group (p=0.683). In women with risk of abortion or with preterm birth an oxidative stress and a hyperhomocysteinemia are present. PMID:22574089

  19. Diethyl Phthalate Causes Oxidative Stress: An in Vitro Study

    Heena Prajapati; Ramtej Jayram Verma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Phthalates are a group of multifunctional chemicals. Diethyl phthalate (DEP) is one of the most frequently used phthalates in solvents and fixatives for numerous industrial products. Method: The present experiment was designed to assess oxidative stress, if any, caused by diethyl phthalate. For this the homogenates of liver and kidney were treated with different concentrations ( 10-40 µg/mL) of DEP. 10% liver and kidney homogenates were prepared in phosphate buffered saline an...

  20. Oxidative Stress and Transcriptional Regulation in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Shi, Q; Gibson, G. E

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is defined by progressive impairments in memory and cognition and by the presence of extra-cellular neuritic plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. However, oxidative stress and impaired mitochondrial function always accompany AD. Mitochondria are a major site of production of free radicals [i.e., reactive oxygen species (ROS)] and primary targets of ROS. ROS are cytotoxic, and evidence of ROS-induced damage to cell membranes, proteins and DNA in AD is ove...

  1. Systemic Oxidative Stress In Patients With Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    Koutsokera, Angela; Andriana I Papaioannou; Malli, Foteini; Kiropoulos, Theodoros S.; Katsabeki, Alexandra; Kerenidi, Theodora; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Daniil, Zoe D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background A local redox imbalance has been reported in pulmonary sarcoidosis. However, so far no study has described a systemic redox imbalance in this context. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the systemic oxidative stress in patients with sarcoidosis and determine its relationship to treatment and indices of disease severity. Methods 35 patients with histologically proven pulmonary sarcoidosis and 13 healthy volunteers were i...

  2. Oxidative Stress Responses and NRF2 in Human Leukaemia

    Amina Abdul-Aziz; MacEwan, David J; Bowles, Kristian M.; Rushworth, Stuart A

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress as a result of elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been observed in almost all cancers, including leukaemia, where they contribute to disease development and progression. However, cancer cells also express increased levels of antioxidant proteins which detoxify ROS. This includes glutathione, the major antioxidant in human cells, which has recently been identified to have dysregulated metabolism in human leukaemia. This suggests that critical balance of intra...

  3. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    Kacprzak, Dorota; Pawliczak, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflamm...

  4. The Bad, the Good, and the Ugly about Oxidative Stress

    Marlene Jimenez-Del-Rio; Carlos Velez-Pardo

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and cancer (e.g., leukemia) are the most devastating disorders affecting millions of people worldwide. Except for some kind of cancers, no effective and/or definitive therapeutic treatment aimed to reduce or to retard the clinic and pathologic symptoms induced by AD and PD is presently available. Therefore, it is urgently needed to understand the molecular basis of these disorders. Since oxidative stress (OS) is an important etiologic factor...

  5. Oxidative Stress in Fanconi Anemia Hematopoiesis and Disease Progression

    Du, Wei; Adam, Zsuzsanna; Rani, Reena; Zhang, Xiaoling; Pang, Qishen

    2008-01-01

    Patients with the genomic instability syndrome Fanconi anemia (FA) commonly develop progressive bone marrow failure and have a high risk of cancer. The prominent role of the FA protein family involves DNA damage response and/or repair. Oxidative stress, defined as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defense, is considered to be an important pathogenic factor in leukemia-prone bone marrow diseases such as FA. Cellular responses inducing resistance to ...

  6. Evidence of Oxidative Stress in Autism Derived from Animal Models

    Xue Ming

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a pervasive neurodevelopmental disorder that leads to deficits in social interaction, communication and restricted, repetitive motor movements. Autism is a highly heritable disorder, however, there is mounting evidence to suggest that toxicant-induced oxidative stress may play a role. The focus of this article will be to review our animal model of autism and discuss our evidence that oxidative stress may be a common underlying mechanism of neurodevelopmental damage. We have shown that mice exposed to either methylmercury (MeHg or valproic acid (VPA in early postnatal life display aberrant social, cognitive and motor behavior. Interestingly, early exposure to both compounds has been clinically implicated in the development of autism. We recently found that Trolox, a water-soluble vitamin E derivative, is capable of attenuating a number of neurobehavioral alterations observed in mice postnatally exposed to MeHg. In addition, a number of other investigators have shown that oxidative stress plays a role in neural injury following MeHg exposure both in vitro and in vivo. New data presented here will show that VPA-induced neurobehavioral deficits are attenuated by vitamin E as well and that the level of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of astrocytic neural injury, is altered following VPA exposure. Collectively, these data indicate that vitamin E and its derivative are capable of protecting against neurobehavioral deficits induced by both MeHg and VPA. This antioxidant protection suggests that oxidative stress may be a common mechanism of injury leading to aberrant behavior in both our animal model as well as in the human disease state.

  7. Oxidative stress and lung pathology following geogenic dust exposure.

    Leetham, M; DeWitt, J; Buck, B; Goossens, D; Teng, Y; Pollard, J; McLaurin, B; Gerads, R; Keil, D

    2016-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate markers of systemic oxidative stress and lung histopathology following subacute exposure to geogenic dust with varying heavy metal content collected from a natural setting prone to wind erosion and used heavily for off-road vehicle recreation. Adult female B6C3F1 mice were exposed to several concentrations of dust collected from seven different types of surfaces at the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area in Clark County, Nevada, designated here as CBN 1-7. Dust representing each of the seven surface types, with an average median diameter of 4.2 μm, was selected and administered via oropharyngeal aspiration to mice at concentrations from 0.01 to 100 mg of dust kg(-1) of body weight. Exposures were given four times spaced a week apart over a 28 day period to mimic a month of weekend exposures. Lung pathology was evaluated while plasma markers of oxidative stress included levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and total glutathione. Overall, results of these assays to evaluate markers of oxidative stress indicate that no single CBN surface type was able to consistently induce markers of systemic oxidative stress at a particular dose or in a dose-response manner. All surface types were able to induce some level of lung inflammation, typically at the highest exposure levels. These data suggest that dust from the Nellis Dunes Recreation Area may present a potential health risk, but additional studies are necessary to characterize the full extent of health risks to humans. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26922875

  8. Oxidative stress and astaxanthin: The novel supernutrient carotenoid

    Sasmita Biswal

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress and inflammation leads to, generation and overproduction of the reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species and hence are responsible for many diseases such as Alzheimer′s disease, Parkinson′s disease, diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, and neurodegenerative motor neuron diseases. Antioxidants are found in varying amounts in vegetables, fruits, grain cereals, eggs, meat, legumes and nuts. However, there is always a search for antioxidants that can ...

  9. Impact of Oxidative Stress on Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    Peter Steinbacher; Peter Eckl

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that muscle contractions during exercise lead to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscle. These highly reactive molecules have many deleterious effects, such as a reduction of force generation and increased muscle atrophy. Since the discovery of exercise-induced oxidative stress several decades ago, evidence has accumulated that ROS produced during exercise also have positive effects by influencing cellular processes that lead to increased ex...

  10. Oxidative and nitrosative stress markers in bus drivers

    Rössner ml., Pavel; Švecová, Vlasta; Milcová, Alena; Lněničková, Zdena; Solanský, I.; Santella, R. M.; Šrám, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 617, - (2007), s. 23-32. ISSN 0027-5107 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05; GA AV ČR 1QS500390506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : oxidative stress * bus drivers * air pollution Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.159, year: 2007

  11. Creatine supplementation and oxidative stress in rat liver

    Araújo, Michel B; Moura, Leandro P; Junior, Roberto C Vieira; Junior, Marcelo C; Dalia, Rodrigo A; Sponton, Amanda C; Ribeiro, Carla; Mello, Maria Alice R

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine the effects of creatine supplementation on liver biomarkers of oxidative stress in exercise-trained rats. Methods Forty 90-day-old adult male Wistar rats were assigned to four groups for the eight-week experiment. Control group (C) rats received a balanced control diet; creatine control group (CCr) rats received a balanced diet supplemented with 2% creatine; trained group (T) rats received a balanced diet and intense exercise training eq...

  12. Relationships between inflammation, adiponectin, and oxidative stress in metabolic syndrome.

    Shu-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MS represents a cluster of physiological and anthropometric abnormalities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between the levels of inflammation, adiponectin, and oxidative stress in subjects with MS. The inclusion criteria for MS, according to the Taiwan Bureau of Health Promotion, Department of Health, were applied to the case group (n = 72. The control group (n = 105 comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The levels of inflammatory markers [high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and interleukin-6 (IL-6, adiponectin, an oxidative stress marker (malondialdehyde, and antioxidant enzymes activities [catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx] were measured. Subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of inflammatory markers and lower adiponectin level, and lower antioxidant enzymes activities than the control subjects. The levels of inflammatory markers and adiponectin were significantly correlated with the components of MS. The level of hs-CRP was significantly correlated with the oxidative stress marker. The IL-6 level was significantly correlated with the SOD and GPx activities, and the adiponectin level was significantly correlated with the GPx activity. A higher level of hs-CRP (≥1.00 mg/L, or IL-6 (≥1.50 pg/mL or a lower level of adiponectin (<7.90 µg/mL were associated with a significantly greater risk of MS. In conclusion, subjects suffering from MS may have a higher inflammation status and a higher level of oxidative stress. A higher inflammation status was significantly correlated with decreases in the levels of antioxidant enzymes and adiponectin and an increase in the risk of MS.

  13. Oxidative stress and cell adhesion in skin cancer

    Hintsala, H.-R. (Hanna-Riikka)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skin is the largest organ in our body protecting us from ultraviolet radiation and xenobiotics. UV-radiation is a common cause of squamocellular carcinoma and melanoma of the skin that cause morbidity and mortality world wide. Reactive oxygen species are constantly formed by, for example, cellular respiration and UV-radiation, and they can readily react with virtually any macromolecule within cell structures causing damage to DNA, proteins and lipids. Oxidative stress (OS) is a h...

  14. Oxidative Stress in Autism: Elevated Cerebellar 3-nitrotyrosine Levels

    Elizabeth M. Sajdel-Sulkowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that oxidative stress and/or mercury compounds play an important role in the pathophysiology of autism. This study compared for the first time the cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT, mercury (Hg and the antioxidant selenium (Se levels between control and autistic subjects. Tissue homogenates were prepared in the presence of protease inhibitors from the frozen cerebellar tissue of control (n=10; mean age, 15.5 years; mean PMI, 15.5 hours and autistic (n=9; mean age 12.1 years; mean PMI, 19.3 hours subjects. The concentration of cerebellar 3-NT, determined by ELISA, in controls ranged from 13.69 to 49.04 pmol g-1 of tissue; the concentration of 3-NT in autistic cases ranged from 3.91 to 333.03 pmol g-1 of tissue. Mean cerebellar 3-NT was elevated in autism by 68.9% and the increase was statistically significant (p=0.045. Cerebellar Hg, measured by atomic absorption spectrometry ranged from 0.9 to 35 pmol g-1 tissue in controls (n=10 and from 3.2 to 80.7 pmol g-1 tissue in autistic cases (n=9; the 68.2% increase in cerebellar Hg was not statistically significant. However, there was a positive correlation between cerebellar 3-NT and Hg levels (r=0.7961, p=0.0001. A small decrease in cerebellar Se levels in autism, measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy, was not statistically significant but was accompanied by a 42.9% reduction in the molar ratio of Se to Hg in the autistic cerebellum. While preliminary, the results of the present study add elevated oxidative stress markers in brain to the growing body of data reflecting greater oxidative stress in autism.

  15. Oxidative stress causes reversible changes in mitochondrial permeability and structure

    Cole, Nelson B.; Daniels, Mathew P.; LEVINE, RODNEY L.; Kim, Geumsoo

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are a primary source as well a principal target of reactive oxygen species within cells. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we have found that a number of mitochondrial matrix proteins are normally undetectable in formaldehyde fixed cells permeabilized with the cholesterol-binding detergent saponin. However, exogenous or endogenous oxidative stress applied prior to fixation altered the permeability of mitochondria, rendering these matrix proteins accessible to antibodies. Elect...

  16. Regulatory role of mitochondria in oxidative stress and atherosclerosis

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Kou, Shou-Jen; Lin, Wei-Ting; Liu, Chin-San

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial physiology and biogenesis play a crucial role in the initiation and progression of cardiovascular disease following oxidative stress-induced damage such as atherosclerosis (AST). Dysfunctional mitochondria caused by an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA damage, and respiratory chain deficiency induces death of endothelial/smooth muscle cells and favors plaque formation/rupture via the regulation of mitochondrial ...

  17. Oxidative Stress and Cytokines in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

    Yu, Ji Hoon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive, drug-resistant and lethal types of cancer with poor prognosis. Various factors including reactive oxygen species, cytokines, growth factors, and extracellular matrix proteins are reported to be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. However, the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer has not been completely elucidated. Oxidative stress has been shown to contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer. Evidences supporting the role of r...

  18. Cocoa intake attenuates oxidative stress associated with rat adjuvant arthritis

    Ramos Romero, Sara; Pérez-Cano, Francisco J.; Ramiro Puig, Emma; Franch i Masferrer, Àngels; Castell, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Cocoa contains flavonoids with antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of cocoa intake on oxidative stress associated with a model of chronic inflammation such as adjuvant arthritis. Female Wistar rats were fed with a 5 or 10% cocoa enriched diet or were given p.o. a quercetin suspension every other day for 10 days. Arthritis was induced by a heat killed Mycobacterium butyricum suspension. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by macrophages, and splenic sup...

  19. Use of Carnosine for Oxidative Stress Reduction in Different Pathologies

    V. D. Prokopieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main properties and biological effects of the antioxidant carnosine, the natural dipeptide β-alanyl-L-histidine, are considered. Data on the effective use of carnosine in different pathologies are presented. Special attention is paid to issues of use of carnosine in neurologic and mental diseases, in alcoholism as well as in physiological states accompanied by activation of free-radical processes and formation of oxidative stress.

  20. Use of Carnosine for Oxidative Stress Reduction in Different Pathologies.

    Prokopieva, V D; Yarygina, E G; Bokhan, N A; Ivanova, S A

    2016-01-01

    The main properties and biological effects of the antioxidant carnosine, the natural dipeptide β-alanyl-L-histidine, are considered. Data on the effective use of carnosine in different pathologies are presented. Special attention is paid to issues of use of carnosine in neurologic and mental diseases, in alcoholism as well as in physiological states accompanied by activation of free-radical processes and formation of oxidative stress. PMID:26904160

  1. Use of Carnosine for Oxidative Stress Reduction in Different Pathologies

    Prokopieva, V. D.; Yarygina, E. G.; Bokhan, N. A.; Ivanova, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    The main properties and biological effects of the antioxidant carnosine, the natural dipeptide β-alanyl-L-histidine, are considered. Data on the effective use of carnosine in different pathologies are presented. Special attention is paid to issues of use of carnosine in neurologic and mental diseases, in alcoholism as well as in physiological states accompanied by activation of free-radical processes and formation of oxidative stress.

  2. Oxidative Stress and Immune System in Vitiligo and Thyroid Diseases

    Roberta Colucci; Federica Dragoni; Silvia Moretti

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired dermatological disease frequently associated with autoimmune thyroid disorders. Several theories have been proposed so far to unravel the complex vitiligo pathogenesis. Currently, the autocytotoxic and the autoimmune theories are the most accredited hypothesis, since they are sustained by several important clinical and experimental evidences. A growing body of evidences shows that autoimmunity and oxidative stress strictly interact to finally determine melanocyte loss....

  3. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent. PMID:26710178

  4. Overweight and Obesity-Induced Oxidative Stress in Children

    YOU-GEN ZHU; SHU-MEI ZHANG; JI-YUE WANG; WEI-QIANG XIAO; XIN-YU WANG; JUN-FU ZHOU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether overweight and obesity might cause oxidative stress and potential oxidative damage in overweight and obese children, and to explore its possible mechanism. Methods Eighty-five overweight and obese children(OOC), and eighty-five age-matched healthy children (HC) were recruited in this case-control study. The present study analyzed spectrophotometrically vitamin C (VC), vitamin E (VE), and β-carotene (β-CAR) in plasma, as well as the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) in erythrocytes. Results Compared with those of VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, CAT and MDA in the HC group, the average values of VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, and CAT in the OOC group were significantly decreased (P<0.001), while the average value of MDA in the OOC group was significantly increased (P<0.001). The regression analysis demonstrated that VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, and CAT were negatively correlated (P<0.05-0.01), and MDA was positively correlated with BMI (P<0.05). Fitting to the model of multiple stepwise regression of BMI on VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, CAT, and MDA in 85 OOC was Y = 27.0041 + 0.2541MDA - 2.1448β-CAR - 0.0090CAT, where F =43.8088, P<0.001, r= 0.7866, r2= 0.6187, adjusted r2= 0.6046. The findings from the reliability analysis for VC, VE, β-CAR, SOD, CAT, and MDA used to reflect increased oxidative stress and potential oxidative damage in the OOC showed that the reliability coefficients (alpha, 6 items) = 0.7231, P<0.0001, and that the standardized item alpha = 0.9207, P<0.0001. Conclusion The present study suggests that there exists an increased oxidative stress in overweight and obese children.

  5. Cordycepin prevents oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenesis.

    Wang, Feng; Yin, Peipei; Lu, Ye; Zhou, Zubin; Jiang, Chaolai; Liu, Yingjie; Yu, Xiaowei

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in impairment of osteogenesis and age-related osteoporosis. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris that has been shown to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, there are few reports available regarding the effects of cordycepin on osteogenesis and the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated the potential osteoprotective effects of cordycepin and its mechanism systematically using both in vitro model as well as in vivo mouse models. We discovered that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenesis which was rescued by cordycepin treatment in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Cordycepin exerted its protective effects partially by increasing or decreasing expression of osteogenic and osteoclastogenesis marker genes. Treatment with cordycepin increased Wnt-related genes' expression whereas supplementation of Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed its protective effects. In addition, administration of cordycepin promoted osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs by reducing oxidative stress in both ovariectomized and aged animal models. Taken together, these results support the protective effects of cordycepin on oxidative stress induced inhibition of osteogenesis by activation of Wnt pathway. PMID:26462178

  6. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Diabetic Complications

    Fatmah A Matough

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is considered to be one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. There is a growing scientific and public interest in connecting oxidative stress with a variety of pathological conditions including diabetes mellitus (DM as well as other human diseases. Previous experimental and clinical studies report that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis and development of complications of both types of DM. However, the exact mechanism by which oxidative stress could contribute to and accelerate the development of complications in diabetic mellitus is only partly known and remains to be clarified. On the one hand, hyperglycemia induces free radicals; on the other hand, it impairs the endogenous antioxidant defense system in patients with diabetes. Endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms include both enzymatic and non-enzymatic pathways. Their functions in human cells are to counterbalance toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. Common antioxidants include the vitamins A, C, and E, glutathione (GSH, and the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and glutathione reductase (GRx. This review describes the importance of endogenous antioxidant defense systems, their relationship to several pathophysiological processes and their possible therapeutic implications in vivo.

  7. Markers of Oxidative stress in Smoker and Nonsmoker Athletes

    To Investigate the effect of smoking on oxidative stress in male athletes. Plasma levels of nitric oxide (NO), apoptosis % in circulating lymphocytes and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA (iNOS mRNA) expression in neutrophils, erythrocytes antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were measured in the blood of 40 non smoker and 25 smoker athletes compared to age and socioeconomic class matching 20 smoker and 20 non-smoker non-athlete controls. Plasma levels NO, apoptosis % in circulating lymphocytes and inducible iNOS mRNA expression in neutrophils were significantly higher among athletes compared to non athletes and exhibited the highest levels in athlete smokers followed by control smokers. Concurrently, erythrocytes SOD was significantly higher among athletes compared to non athletes and exhibited highest levels in athlete smokers followed by control smokers. Conclusion: The results of this work demonstrate the impact of smoking on the health of athletes

  8. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK Channels

    Anton Hermann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma and inner (organelle membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells, alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences.

  9. Anti-Oxidative Effects of Rooibos Tea (Aspalathus linearis) on Immobilization-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    Hong, In-Sun; Lee, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to chronic psychological stress may be related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals, and thus, long-term exposure to high levels of oxidative stress may cause the accumulation of oxidative damage and eventually lead to many neurodegenerative diseases. Compared with other organs, the brain appears especially susceptible to excessive oxidative stress due to its high demand for oxygen. In the case of excessive ROS production, endogenous defense mechanisms against ...

  10. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Quaroni, Andrea [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Cornell University, Veterinary Research Tower, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853–6401 (United States); Autore, Giuseppina [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy); Severino, Lorella [Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Division of Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Delpino 1, 80137 Naples (Italy); Marzocco, Stefania, E-mail: smarzocco@unisa.it [Department of Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II, 132–84084 Fisciano, Salerno (Italy)

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  11. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination

  12. Sea buckthorn seed oil protects against the oxidative stress produced by thermally oxidized lipids.

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Sana

    2015-11-01

    Thermally oxidized vegetable ghee was fed to the rabbits for 14 days with specific doses of sea buckthorn seed oil (SO). The ghee and SO were characterized for quality parameters and fatty acid composition using GC-MS. Rabbits serum lipid profile, hematology and histology were investigated. Major fatty acids were palmitic acid (44%) and oleic acid (46%) in ghee, while SO contains oleic acid (56.4%) and linoleic acid (18.7%). Results showed that oxidized vegetable ghee increases the serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and decrease the serum glucose. Oxidized ghee produced toxic effects in the liver and hematological parameters. Sea buckthorn oil supplementation significantly lowered the serum LDL-cholesterols, triglycerides and increased serum glucose and body weight of the animals. Sea buckthorn oil was found to reduce the toxic effects and degenerative changes in the liver and thus provides protection against the thermally oxidized lipids induced oxidative stress. PMID:25976784

  13. Chronic unpredictable mild stress generates oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in rats.

    López-López, Ana Laura; Jaime, Herlinda Bonilla; Escobar Villanueva, María Del Carmen; Padilla, Malinalli Brianza; Palacios, Gonzalo Vázquez; Aguilar, Francisco Javier Alarcón

    2016-07-01

    Stress is considered to be a causal agent of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, arthritis and Alzheimer's. Chronic glucocorticoid and catecholamine release into the circulation during the stress response has been suggested to activate damage mechanisms, which in the long term produce metabolic alterations associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. However, the consequences of stress in animal models for periods longer than 40days have not been explored. The goal of this work was to determine whether chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) produced alterations in the redox state and the inflammatory profile of rats after 20, 40, and 60days. CUMS consisted of random exposure of the animals to different stressors. The following activities were measured in the liver and pancreas: reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and protein oxidation. Similarly, serum cytokine levels (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-10) were determined. CUMS activated the stress response from day 20 until day 60. In the liver and pancreas, GHS levels were decreased from day 40, whereas protein lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation were increased. This is the first work to report that the pancreas redox state is subject to chronic stress conditions. The TAC was constant in the liver and reduced in the pancreas. An increase in the TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 inflammatory markers and a decrease in the IL-10 level due to CUMS was shown, thereby resulting in the generation of a systemic inflammation state after 60days of treatment. Together, the CUMS consequences on day 60 suggest that both processes can contribute to the development of chronic degenerative diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. CUMS is an animal model that in addition to avoiding habituation activates damage mechanisms such as oxidative stress and low-grade chronic

  14. Cerebrolysin protects against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neurodegeneration

    Abdel-Salam OME

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar ME Abdel-Salam,1 Nadia A Mohammed,2 Eman R Youness,2 Yasser A Khadrawy,3 Enayat A Omara,4 Amany A Sleem51Department of Toxicology and Narcotics, 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Pharmacology, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo, EgyptAbstract: We investigated the effect of cerebrolysin, a peptide mixture used for promoting memory and recovery from cerebral stroke, on the development of oxidative stress and nigrostriatal cell injury induced by rotenone administration in rats. Rotenone 1.5 mg/kg was given subcutaneously three times weekly either alone or in combination with cerebrolysin at 21.5, 43, or 86 mg/kg. Rats were euthanized 14 days after starting the rotenone injection. Lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH, nitric oxide (nitrite concentrations, paraoxonase 1 (PON1, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activities – as well as the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 – were measured in the brain. Histopathology, tyrosine hydroxylase, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and cleaved caspase-3 immunohistochemistry were also performed. Rotenone caused a significantly elevated oxidative stress and proinflammatory response in the different brain regions. Malondialdehyde and nitric oxide concentrations were significantly increased, while GSH markedly decreased in the cerebral cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and in the rest of the brain. PON1 and AChE activities significantly decreased with respect to the control levels after rotenone application. Striatal Bcl-2 was significantly decreased while MCP-1 increased following rotenone injection. Rotenone caused prominent iNOS, TNF-α, and caspase-3 immunostaining in the striatum and resulted in markedly decreased tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra and striatum. Cerebrolysin coadministered with

  15. Oxidative Stress to the Cornea, Changes in Corneal Optical Properties, and Advances in Treatment of Corneal Oxidative Injuries

    Cestmir Cejka; Jitka Cejkova

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in many ocular diseases and injuries. The imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favour of oxidants (oxidative stress) leads to the damage and may be highly involved in ocular aging processes. The anterior eye segment and mainly the cornea are directly exposed to noxae of external environment, such as air pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke, vapors or gases from household cleaning products, chemical burns from splashes of industrial chemicals, and danger...

  16. Caspase-2 protects against oxidative stress in vivo.

    Shalini, S; Puccini, J; Wilson, C H; Finnie, J; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2015-09-17

    Caspase-2 belongs to the caspase family of cysteine proteases with established roles in apoptosis. Recently, caspase-2 has been implicated in nonapoptotic functions including maintenance of genomic stability and tumor suppression. Our previous studies demonstrated that caspase-2 also regulates cellular redox status and delays the onset of several ageing-related traits. In the current study, we tested stress tolerance ability in caspase-2-deficient (Casp2(-/-)) mice by challenging both young and old mice with a low dose of the potent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator, PQ that primarily affects lungs. In both groups of mice, PQ induced pulmonary damage. However, the lesions in caspase-2 knockout mice were consistently and reproducibly more severe than those in wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, serum interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 levels were higher in PQ-exposed aged Casp2(-/-) mice indicating increased inflammation. Interestingly, livers from Casp2(-/-) mice displayed karyomegaly, a feature commonly associated with ageing and aneuploidy. Given that Casp2(-/-) mice show impaired antioxidant defense, we tested oxidative damage in these mice. Protein oxidation significantly increased in PQ-injected old Casp2(-/-) mice. Moreover, FoxO1, SOD2 and Nrf2 expression levels were reduced and induction of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase activity was not observed in PQ-treated Casp2(-/-) mice. Strong c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was observed in Casp2(-/-) mice, indicative of increased stress. Together, our data strongly suggest that caspase-2 deficiency leads to increased cellular stress largely because these mice fail to respond to oxidative stress by upregulating their antioxidant defense mechanism. This makes the mice more vulnerable to exogenous challenges and may partly explain the shorter lifespan of Casp2(-/-) mice. PMID:25531319

  17. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  18. DNA damage responses and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita.

    Larisa Pereboeva

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is an inherited multisystem disorder of premature aging, cancer predisposition, and bone marrow failure caused by selective exhaustion of highly proliferative cell pools. DC patients also have a poor tolerance to chemo/radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Although critically shortened telomeres and defective telomere maintenance contribute to DC pathology, other mechanisms likely exist. We investigate the link between telomere dysfunction and oxidative and DNA damage response pathways and assess the effects of antioxidants. In vitro studies employed T lymphocytes from DC subjects with a hTERC mutation and age-matched controls. Cells were treated with cytotoxic agents, including Paclitaxel, Etoposide, or ionizing radiation. Apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS were assessed by flow cytometry, and Western blotting was used to measure expression of DNA damage response (DDR proteins, including total p53, p53S15, and p21(WAF. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant, was used to modulate cell growth and ROS. In stimulated culture, DC lymphocytes displayed a stressed phenotype, characterized by elevated levels of ROS, DDR and apoptotic markers as well as a proliferative defect that was more pronounced after exposure to cytotoxic agents. NAC partially ameliorated the growth disadvantage of DC cells and decreased radiation-induced apoptosis and oxidative stress. These findings suggest that oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of DC and that pharmacologic intervention to correct this pro-oxidant imbalance may prove useful in the clinical setting, potentially alleviating untoward toxicities associated with current cytotoxic treatments.

  19. Oxidative stress at high altitude: genotype–phenotype correlations

    Pandey P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Pandey,1,2 MA Qadar Pasha1,2 1CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, India; 2Department of Biotechnology, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune, India Abstract: It has been well-documented that the hypobaric hypoxic environment at high altitude (HA causes stress to both the permanent residents of HA and the sojourners. This oxidative stress primarily disturbs the oxygen-sensing and vascular homeostasis pathways, thereby upsetting normal human physiology, especially in sojourners. These environmental challenges have caused dynamic evolutionary changes within natives of HA, allowing them to develop adaptive plasticity. This review focuses on the genomic and biochemical features of the molecules involved in the oxygen-sensing and vascular homeostasis pathways with respect to HA pulmonary edema (HAPE and adaptation. We review the role of genetic markers such as HIF-prolyl hydroxylase 2, endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1, endothelial nitric oxide synthase, endothelin 1, cytochrome b-245 alpha polypeptide, and glutathione S-transferase pi 1, as well as three circulatory biomarkers (nitric oxide, endothelin 1, and 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, by highlighting approaches such as candidate gene and genome-wide, adopted in deciphering the pathways. A disagreement between the two approaches has also been highlighted. In addition, we discuss that an overrepresentation of wild-type alleles in HA natives and mutant alleles of same polymorphisms in HAPE patients implies that the allelic variants at the same locus are involved in adaptation and HAPE, respectively. Moreover, healthy sojourners present a number of genomic features similar to HA natives, further strengthening the concept of genetic predisposition. A trend in correlation between protective and risk alleles and altered levels of circulatory markers clearly documents the phenomenon of genotype–phenotype correlations. We conclude that the genetic and biochemical

  20. Influence of Turmeric Rhizome Powder diets on decreasing oxidative stress caused by heat stress inbroiler model

    Seyyed Javad Hosseini-Vashan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS increases during oxidative stress conditions, which stimulates diabetes, inflammatory reactions, rheumatism and anemia. Some antioxidant properties of turmeric rhizome powder (TRP were revealed by previous researchers. The present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of TRP on decreasing effects of oxidative stress resulted from heat stress in broiler chickens.   Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two-hundred-sixty-four 1-day-old broilers were divided into 3 dietary treatments. The dietary treatments involved 0(control, 0.4 and 0.8% turmeric rhizome powder (cases. In order to create oxidative stress, the ambient temperature was daily raised from 21 to 33oc for 5 hours (11a.m-4p.m throughout the 28th-42nd days. Blood lipids, Glutathione peroxidase (GPx ,superoxide dismutase (SOD, and Tiobarbituric acid reaction score (TBARS were determined at the end of the experiment.   Results: The results revealed that total cholesterol and triglyceride were not affected. The 0.4 TRP diet decreased blood LDL (46.7±3.01 compared to basal group (52.0±2.17. HDL increased in broilers fed 0.8% TRP (74.0 ± 3.87 compared to chickens with basal diet (63.7± 2.98. Enzyme activity of GPx improved in broilers fed TRP diets (225.9± 11.52 as compared to chickens with basal diet(183.1± 8.52 however, the TRP diet did not affect enzyme activity of SOD (P > 0.05. The TBARS index decreased in broilers fed TRP (0.76 ± 0.0052 in basal vs.0.49 ± 0.0032 in 0.8% TRP.   Conclusion: The major bioactive component of TRP is Curcumin that can improve the antioxidant properties under oxidative stress and high ambient temperature.

  1. Oxidative Stress Tolerance by Calcium and Histidine in Two Tomato Cultivars Under Nickel Stress

    Mozafari H.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated calcium (Ca and L-histidine (His interaction on nickel (Ni-induced oxidative stress tolerance in two tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cultivars including Cal-J N3 and Petoearly CH. CaCl2 (0 and 300 µM and L-histidine (0 and 300 µM effects on the oxidative responses in these cultivars cultured were compared in the hydroponic media under Ni stress (NiSO4; 0,150 and 300 µM. The activities of antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT, guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, superoxide dismutase (SOD and total content of proteins, malondialdehyde (MDA, other aldehydes, H2O2, Ca2+, Ni2+, ascorbate (ASC, dehydroascorbate (DHA and electrolytes leakage (EL were determined. The obtained results indicated that the application of Ca and His generally reduced oxidative markers such as the contents of EL, H2O2, MDA and activity of CAT as well as the Ni2+content of root and shoot organs under nickel toxicity, while application of Ni treatment without Ca+His increased these oxidative parameters and accumulation of Ni2+, compared to the control. Applying Ni without Ca and His has resulted in reduction of GPX, APX and SOD activities as well as concentrations of root and shoot Ca2+and ASC in the two mentioned cultivars. Application of Ca and His lead to the elevated contents of Ca2+ and ASC, increased activities of GPX, APX and SOD as well as inhibition of Ni2+ accumulation differently in both cultivars. Ca and His also alleviated the adverse effects of Ni stress on the selected investigated parameters especially in Petoearly CH cultivar. Thus, interaction of Ca and His appeared to improve adaptive responses to Ni stress leading to decreasing Ni-induced oxidative stress in the tomato plants. Therefore, our results suggest that Ca+His alleviated nickel-induced oxidative stress by uptake and inhibition of translocation of Ni2+ plus Ni chelating mechanism improvement in the tomato cultivars.

  2. Influence of humidity on high temperature oxidation of Inconel 600 alloy: Oxide layers and residual stress study

    In order to understand the influence of humidity on high temperature oxidation of Inconel 600 alloy, in this work, water vapour (absolute humidity varying from 0% to 19%) was introduced in the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) system under artificial air between 600 °C and 900 °C. The oxides identification and the residual stress in the oxide layers have been studied by X-ray diffraction method in each of two oxide phases, simultaneously. The oxide surface morphology, cross-section microstructure and the chemical composition of the oxide layers were determined by FEG-SEM (Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope) observation and FEG-SEM EDS (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) analysis. Depending on the oxidation temperature, the humidity and the oxidation duration, the oxide layer differed significantly. The residual stress levels in the different oxide layers (NiO-type layer and Cr2O3-type layer) have also been affected by the introduction of the water vapour. According to the analysis results, the residual stresses on oxide mainly came from the growth stress and thermomechanical stress; and the oxide growth stress was especially affected by humidity at high temperature.

  3. Oxidative stress and antibacterial properties of a graphene oxide-cystamine nanohybrid

    Nanda SS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sitansu Sekhar Nanda,1 Seong Soo A An,1 Dong Kee Yi2,3 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Seongnam, South Korea; 2Department of Chemistry, 3Department of Environmental Engineering, Myongji University, Yongin, South Korea Abstract: Oxidative stress can damage proteins, DNA, and lipids, and is involved in the progression of many diseases. Damage to infected cells caused by oxidative stress is related to increased levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. During oxidative stress, hydrogen peroxide levels are often increased and catalase level decreased inside cells. This can lead to the death of skin and other cells. Hydrophobic low molecular weight compounds are useful in treating hemorrhagic conditions of the skin. To this end, cystamine has been successfully conjugated with graphene oxide (GO as a drug carrier. The current study used the microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cystamine-conjugated GO against four types of pathogenic bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentrations values were 1 µg/mL against Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, 6 µg/mL against Enterococcus faecalis, and 4 µg/mL against Bacillus subtilis. Toxicity of the conjugate against squamous cell carcinoma 7 cells was minimal at low concentrations, but increased in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that our protocol produced a cystamine-conjugated GO with low cytotoxicity, but strong reactive oxygen species effects and high antibacterial activity. This nanohybrid may be useful in the treatment of dermatological disorders. Moreover, this class of nanohybrid may have other biomedical applications due to their low cytotoxicity and high antibacterial activity. Keywords: graphene, oxide, cystamine conjugate, reactive oxygen species, antibacterial, oxidative stress

  4. The LEC rat: a useful model for studying liver carcinogenesis related to oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Marquez Quinones, Adriana; Villa-Treviño, Saul; Gueraud, Francoise

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates oxidative stress as a mechanism of several diseases including cancer. Oxidative stress can be defined as the imbalance between cellular oxidant species production and antioxidant capability shifted towards the former. Lipid peroxidation is one of the processes that takes place during oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation products, such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), are closely related to carcinogenesis as they are potent mutagens and they ha...

  5. Protective Effect of Arginine on Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Sickle Mouse Models

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Hebbel, Robert P.; Kaul, Dhananjay K.

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by reperfusion injury and chronic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress and hemolysis in SCD result in inactivation of nitric oxide (NO) and depleted arginine levels. We hypothesized that augmenting NO production by arginine supplementation will reduce oxidative stress in SCD. To this end, we measured the effect of arginine (5% in mouse chow) on NO metabolites (NOx), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and selected antioxidants in transgenic sickle mouse models. U...

  6. Oxidative Stress and Benefits of Antioxidant Agents in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis

    Mukaddes Esrefoglu

    2012-01-01

    Context: Oxidative damage due to oxidative stress is the failure of the cell's defense against the deleterious effects of harmful agents by means of its numerous autoprotective mechanisms. oxidative stress is a key impairment induced by various conditions, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, ischemia-reperfusion, hepatitis, pancreatitis, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases.Evidence Acquisition: Oxidative stress is a common pathogenetic mechanism contributing to the initiation and prog...

  7. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  8. Increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant response in Lafora disease.

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Aguado, Carmen; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibáñez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V; Knecht, Erwin; Sanz, Pascual

    2014-10-01

    Lafora Disease (LD, OMIM 254780, ORPHA501) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of glycogen-like intracellular inclusions called Lafora bodies and caused, in the vast majority of cases, by mutations in either EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding respectively laforin and malin. In the last years, several reports have revealed molecular details of these two proteins and have identified several processes affected in LD, but the pathophysiology of the disease still remains largely unknown. Since autophagy impairment has been reported as a characteristic treat in both Lafora disease cell and animal models, and as there is a link between autophagy and mitochondrial performance, we sought to determine if mitochondrial function could be altered in those models. Using fibroblasts from LD patients, deficient in laforin or malin, we found mitochondrial alterations, oxidative stress and a deficiency in antioxidant enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Similar results were obtained in brain tissue samples from transgenic mice deficient in either the EPM2A or EPM2B genes. Furthermore, in a proteomic analysis of brain tissue obtained from Epm2b-/- mice, we observed an increase in a modified form of peroxirredoxin-6, an antioxidant enzyme involved in other neurological pathologies, thus corroborating an alteration of the redox condition. These data support that oxidative stress produced by an increase in ROS production and an impairment of the antioxidant enzyme response to this stress play an important role in development of LD. PMID:26461389

  9. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  10. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  11. Oxidative stress in normal-weight obese syndrome.

    Di Renzo, Laura; Galvano, Fabio; Orlandi, Carmine; Bianchi, Alessia; Di Giacomo, Claudia; La Fauci, Luca; Acquaviva, Rosaria; De Lorenzo, Antonino

    2010-11-01

    The normal-weight obese (NWO) syndrome was identified in women whose body weight (BW) and BMI are normal but whose fat mass (FM) is >30%. In these subjects, an early inflammatory status has been demonstrated. The aim was to verify whether oxidative stress occurs in NWO. Sixty age-matched white Italian women were studied and subdivided as follows: 20 normal-weight individuals (NW) (BMI NWO (BMI 30%); 20 preobese-obese (OB) (BMI >25 kg/m(2); FM% >30%). Anthropometric, body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) variables, plasma levels of some cytokines, reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH), nitric oxide (NO) metabolites (NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-)), antioxidant nonproteic capacity (ANPC) were measured and compared between groups. Glucose and lipid metabolism parameters were assessed. GSH and NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels resulted lower in OB and NWO compared to NW (P NWO (P NWO was lower than NW but higher with respect to OB (P NWO, besides being in early inflammatory status, are contextually exposed to an oxidative stress related to metabolic abnormalities occurring in obesity. PMID:20339360

  12. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 ± 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  13. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    Tedesco, Sara [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Doyle, Hugh [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Blasco, Julian [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Marine Science Institute of Andalusia, Cadiz (Spain); Redmond, Gareth [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 {+-} 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  14. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health.

    Gammone, Maria Alessandra; Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol) have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:26437420

  15. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Reduce Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Tao Ma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups, i.e., one control group and three LBP treated groups. The animals received an oral administration of physiological saline or LBP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. On the day of the exercise test, rats were required to run to exhaustion on the treadmill. Body weight, endurance time, malondialdehyde (MDA, super oxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX level of rats were measured. The results showed that the body weight of rats in LBP treated groups were not significantly different from that in the normal control group before and after the experiment (P > 0.05. After exhaustive exercise, the mean endurance time of treadmill running to exhaustion of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly prolonged compared with that in the normal control group. MDA levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly decreased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05. SOD and GPX levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly increased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05. Together, these results indicate that LBP was effective in preventing oxidative stress after exhaustive exercise.

  16. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    Gharib Ola

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trichloroethylene (TCE may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1 the control group treated with vehicle, (2 Kombucha (KT-treated group, (3 TCE-treated group and (4 KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment.

  17. Chemiluminescent examination of abiotic oxidative stress of watercress.

    Beals, Christopher; Byl, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale) is an aquatic plant that readily bioaccumulates heavy metals that may be found in contaminated aquatic systems. Toxic effects of contaminants on the physiological processes cause changes in oxidase enzymatic activity in watercress, which can be measured with a luminometer. The luminometer uses the reaction produced when peroxidases break down hydrogen peroxide into water and an oxygen radical. The resulting oxyradical binds to and oxidizes phenolic groups, producing a measureable luminescent reaction. Nasturtium officinale plants were exposed to 3 different concentrations of heavy metals, including lead, nickel, copper, and manganese for 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Aquatic exposure to the 4 heavy metals caused a significant increase in oxidative enzyme production. Fluorometric and morphometric measurements were also conducted to compare plant stress with the oxidative enzyme analyses. Fluorometric measurements performed on plants stressed by exposure to heavy metals revealed no significant decreases in photosystem II efficiency. Morphometric measurements of root length showed decreased root growth resulting from exposures to Ni, Cu, and Mn. PMID:24306856

  18. Marine Carotenoids against Oxidative Stress: Effects on Human Health

    Maria Alessandra Gammone

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids are lipid-soluble pigments that are produced in some plants, algae, fungi, and bacterial species, which accounts for their orange and yellow hues. Carotenoids are powerful antioxidants thanks to their ability to quench singlet oxygen, to be oxidized, to be isomerized, and to scavenge free radicals, which plays a crucial role in the etiology of several diseases. Unusual marine environments are associated with a great chemical diversity, resulting in novel bioactive molecules. Thus, marine organisms may represent an important source of novel biologically active substances for the development of therapeutics. In this respect, various novel marine carotenoids have recently been isolated from marine organisms and displayed several utilizations as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. Marine carotenoids (astaxanthin, fucoxanthin, β-carotene, lutein but also the rare siphonaxanthin, sioxanthin, and myxol have recently shown antioxidant properties in reducing oxidative stress markers. This review aims to describe the role of marine carotenoids against oxidative stress and their potential applications in preventing and treating inflammatory diseases.

  19. Oxidative stress and signal transduction pathways in alcoholic liver disease.

    Zima, Tomás; Kalousová, Marta

    2005-11-01

    Ethanol is linked to several pathologies like alcohol liver injury, neurotoxicity, cardiomyopathy, fetal alcoholic syndrome or cancer. It is generally accepted that oxidative stress plays a central role in their pathogenesis. After chronic and excessive consumption, alcohol may accelerate oxidative mechanisms both directly via increased production of reactive oxygen species and indirectly by impairing protective mechanisms against them. Ethanol, its metabolites arising during its metabolic degradation as well as novel compounds formed via ethanol induced oxidative stress, especially during the action of the ethanol inducible microsomal cytochrome CYP2E1, may apart from direct damage to biological structures affect signal transduction pathways thus modulating and potentiating damage. Alteration of the redox status of cells following chronic ethanol misuse may have profound effects on cellular function and viability and lead to cell death and tissue damage. These changes linked to pathologic processes in the organism, are related to alteration of intracellular signaling pathways associated with protein kinases and transcription factor activation. Mainly mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, transcription factors-nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and activating protein 1 (AP-1) are involved in the deterioration of cells and organs. The response is cell-type specific and depends on the dose of ethanol. Oxido-reduction balance, regulatory disturbances and signal transduction cascades responsible for alcoholic damage have been partially described, nevertheless, further studies are required to allow future novel diagnostic and therapeutical strategies. We are only at the beginning ... PMID:16344594

  20. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate

  1. The conduction mechanism of stress induced leakage current through ultra-thin gate oxide under constant voltage stresses

    Wang Yan-Gang; Xu Ming-Zhen; Tan Chang-Hua; Zhang Zhang J.F; Duan Xiao-Rong

    2005-01-01

    The conduction mechanism of stress induced leakage current (SILC) through 2nm gate oxide is studied over a gate voltage range between 1.7V and stress voltage under constant voltage stress (CVS). The simulation results show that the SILC is formed by trap-assisted tunnelling (TAT) process which is dominated by oxide traps induced by high field stresses. Their energy levels obtained by this work are approximately 1.9eV from the oxide conduction band, and the traps are believed to be the oxygen-related donor-like defects induced by high field stresses. The dependence of the trap density on stress time and oxide electric field is also investigated.

  2. Protective Effects of Carvacrol against Oxidative Stress Induced by Chronic Stress in Rat's Brain, Liver, and Kidney

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz; Borji, Abasalt

    2016-01-01

    Restraint stress may be associated with elevated free radicals, and thus, chronic exposure to oxidative stress may cause tissue damage. Several studies have reported that carvacrol (CAR) has a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CAR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver, and kidney. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 6 h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CAR daily for 21 days. To evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the brain, liver, and kidney. In the stressed animals that received vehicle, the MDA level was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower than the nonstressed animals (P < 0.001). CAR ameliorated the changes in the stressed animals as compared with the control group (P < 0.001). This study indicates that CAR can prevent restraint stress induced oxidative damage. PMID:26904286

  3. Endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in polycystic kidney disease.

    Klawitter, Jelena; Reed-Gitomer, Berenice Y; McFann, Kim; Pennington, Alexander; Klawitter, Jost; Abebe, Kaleab Z; Klepacki, Jacek; Cadnapaphornchai, Melissa A; Brosnahan, Godela; Chonchol, Michel; Christians, Uwe; Schrier, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of premature mortality in ADPKD patients. The aim was to identify potential serum biomarkers associated with the severity of ADPKD. Serum samples from a homogenous group of 61 HALT study A ADPKD patients [early disease group with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)] were compared with samples from 49 patients from the HALT study B group with moderately advanced disease (eGFR 25-60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)). Targeted tandem-mass spectrometry analysis of markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress was performed and correlated with eGFR and total kidney volume normalized to the body surface area (TKV/BSA). ADPKD patients with eGFR >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2) showed higher levels of CVD risk markers asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA and SDMA), homocysteine, and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) compared with the healthy controls. Upon adjustments for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and creatinine, SDMA, homocysteine, and SAH remained negatively correlated with eGFR. Resulting cellular methylation power [S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)/SAH ratio] correlated with the reduction of renal function and increase in TKV. Concentrations of prostaglandins (PGs), including oxidative stress marker 8-isoprostane, as well as PGF2α, PGD₂, and PGE₂, were markedly elevated in patients with ADPKD compared with healthy controls. Upon adjustments for age, sex, systolic blood pressure, and creatinine, increased PGD₂ and PGF₂α were associated with reduced eGFR, whereas 8-isoprostane and again PGF₂α were associated with an increase in TKV/BSA. Endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress are evident early in ADPKD patients, even in those with preserved kidney function. The identified pathways may provide potential therapeutic targets for slowing down the disease progression. PMID:25234311

  4. Urinary biopyrrins: A new marker of oxidative stress in psoriasis

    Ola Ahmed Bakry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis is a common chronic, relapsing, immune-mediated disease involving skin and joints of genetically predisposed individuals. Oxidative stress has been found to play many important roles in cellular damage and loss of function in a number of tissues and organs and is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Urinary biopyrrin levels have gained attention as an indicator of oxidative stress. Aim and Objective: To measure urinary biopyrrins excretion as a marker of oxidative stress in psoriasis. Patients and Methods: This case–control study was carried out on 85 subjects; 55 cases with chronic plaque psoriasis and 30 age, gender and body mass index-matched normal subjects as a control group. Urinary biopyrrin levels were measured using enzyme immunoassay. Results: There was a highly significant difference between cases and controls regarding urinary biopyrrins level (P < 0.001. There was significant positive correlation between biopyrrins level and both the age of cases (r = 0.28, P = 0.01 and psoriasis area and severity index score (r = 0.99, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Urinary biopyrrins are increased in patients with psoriasis, and the level is correlated with disease severity. Further large-scale studies involving different ages and different clinical varieties of the disease are needed to expand and validate current findings. The clinical usefulness of antioxidants in psoriasis treatment needs to be evaluated in future research. Furthermore, the value of biopyrrins as biomarkers for monitoring response to therapy needs to be evaluated.

  5. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (pAsparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent. PMID:25730806

  6. Protective Activity Against Oxidative Stress of Plants Indigenous to Korea

    We have screened the cytoprotective effect against Ha, Oa, and γ-ray radiation induced oxidative stress from 32 Korean plants. Betula ermani var, saitoana (caulis, leaves), Rosa wichuraiana (caulis), Sorbus commixta (caulis), Weigela florida (leaves), Cirsium rhinoceros (whole plant), and Viburnum erosum (caulis) were found to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). As a result, extracts of six plants reduced cell death of Chinese hamster lung fibroblast (V79-4) cells induced by Ha,Oa, treatment. In addition, these extracts protected cell death of V79-4 cells damaged by γ-ray radiation. In addition, these extracts scavenged ROS generated by radiation. Taken together, the results suggest that Betula ermani var. saitoana, Rosa wichuraiana, Sorbus commixta, Weigela florida, Cirsium rhinoceros, and Viburnum erosum protect V79-4 cells against oxidative damage by radiation through scavenging ROS

  7. Oxidative stress in immature brain following experimentally-induced seizures

    Folbergrová, Jaroslava

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, Suppl.1 (2013), S39-S48. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/2015; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/08/0292; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0999; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0971; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : immature rats * experimentally-induced seizures * oxidative stress * mitochondrial dysfunction * antioxidant defense Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  8. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Reduce Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Tao Ma; Qiongxia Chai; Junlai Zhou; Xiaozhong Shan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups, i.e., one control group and three LBP treated groups. The animals received an oral administration of physiological saline or LBP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. On the day of the exercise test, rats were required to run to exhaustion on the treadmill. Body weight, endurance time, malondialde...

  9. Perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) affect oxidative stress biomarkers in vitro

    Wielsøe, Maria; Long, Manhai; Ghisari, Mandana;

    2015-01-01

    mode of action is through generation of oxidative stress. Seven long-chained PFAS found in human serum were investigated for the potential to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), induce DNA damage and disturb the total antioxidant capacity (TAC). The tested PFAS were perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHx......Perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) have been widely used since 1950s and humans are exposed through food, drinking water, consumer products, dust, etc. The long-chained PFAS are persistent in the environment and accumulate in wildlife and humans. They are suspected carcinogens and a potential...

  10. Ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid as reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Lack of post-sampling stability of ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid and failure to block their in vivo equilibrium have lowered their value as biomarkers of oxidative stress and limited the ability to further investigate their possible role in disease prevention. In the present paper, the...... analytical reproducibility was tested by repeated analysis of plasma aliquots from one individual over four years. The plasma was subjected to acidic deproteinization with an equal volume of 10% meta-phosphoric acid containing 2 mM EDTA and analyzed for ascorbate and dehydroascorbic acid by high-performance...

  11. Effects of creatine supplementation on oxidative stress profile of athletes

    Percário Sandro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine (Cr supplementation has been widely used among athletes and physically active individuals. Secondary to its performance-enhancing ability, an increase in oxidative stress may occur, thus prompting concern about its use. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of Cr monohydrate supplementation and resistance training on muscle strength and oxidative stress profile in healthy athletes. Methods A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled method was used to assess twenty-six male elite Brazilian handball players divided into 3 groups: Cr monohydrate supplemented group (GC, N = 9, placebo group (GP, N = 9, no treatment group (COT, N = 8 for 32 days. All subjects underwent a resistance training program. Blood samples were drawn on 0 and 32 days post Cr supplementation to analyze the oxidative stress markers, thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS, total antioxidant status (TAS, and uric acid. Creatine phosphokinase, urea, and creatinine were also analyzed, as well. Fitness tests (1 repetition maximum - 1RM and muscle endurance were performed on the bench press. Body weight and height, body fat percentage (by measuring skin folds and upper muscular area were also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA. Results Only GC group showed increase in 1RM (54 ± 9 vs. 63 ± 10 kg; p = 0.0356 and uric acid (4.6 ± 1.0 vs. 7.4 ± 1.6 mg/dl; p = 0.025, with a decrease in TAS (1.11 ± 0.34 vs. 0.60 ± 0.19 mmol/l; p = 0.001. No differences (pre- vs. post-training in TBARS, creatine phosphokinase, urea, creatinine, body weight and height, body fat percentage, or upper muscular area were observed in any group. When compared to COT, GC group showed greater decrease in TAS (−0.51 ± 0.36 vs. -0.02 ± 0.50 mmol/l; p = 0.0268, higher increase in 1RM (8.30 ± 2.26 vs. 5.29 ± 2.36 kg; p = 0.0209 and uric acid (2.77 ± 1.70 vs. 1.00 ± 1.03 mg/dl; p = 0.0276. Conclusion We conclude that Cr

  12. Isoprostanes – A novel major group of oxidative stress markers

    Marta Czerska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Isoprostanes are a recently discovered group of prostaglandin isomers. Results of previous studies suggest that they can be used as oxidative stress markers, because in a number of cardiovascular, pulmonary and neurological diseases their levels in biological samples considerably increase. It has been found that people suffering from diabetes, obesity, homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, moderate hypercholesterolemia, and smokers have higher levels of isoprostanes in urine. The same refers to patients with asthma, Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. This paper reviews the results of relevant studies.

  13. Qualitative model of stress distribution in Zr alloys oxidized under high temperatures

    The results are summed up of an experimental study of oxide layers and metal substrate for different types of zirconium alloys with Cu, Fe, Mo, V. and Cr additions oxidized at high temperatures. The state of stress in oxidized samples of different zirconium alloy samples was studied by determining the average stress in oxide layers of different thicknesses, the course of stress in an oxide layer of a certain thickness, and by determining the course of residual deformation in a metal layer adjacent to the oxide/metal interface. A qualitative model was proposed for stress distribution in both components of the metal/oxide system at oxidation and room temperatures. The hypothetical stress distribution qualitatively agrees with experimental results and literature data based on elastic-plastic behaviour of zirconium alloys. (Z.M.)

  14. 51Cr release and oxidative stress in the lens

    Examination of the opaque areas of human cortical cataracts has shown that a large portion of the opacity could be attributed to the globules found there. We tested models involving globule formation as a result of oxidative damage to rat lens cells in culture and whole chick embryo lenses. When cell monolayers from a lens cell line were exposed to oxidizing conditions they developed globules on the cell surface. The cells were protected from damage by the addition of glutathione and vitamin C. Thirteen-day chick embryo lenses were also incubated in oxidizing conditions and the amount of cellular damage was assessed using a chromium-51 release assay we have developed. After 24 hr the percent 51Cr in the medium increased by an average of 20% as a result of 10 mM hydrogen peroxide treatment. The addition of the 10 mM vitamin C to the hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the 51Cr leakage to the control level. Light microscopy of sections of the lens showed a breakdown of the equatorial fibre arrangement in the presence of H2O2, while addition of vitamin C restored the fibre organization to almost normal. The findings suggest that oxidative stress is an important step in cataractogenesis and point towards the use of water soluble antioxidants as protective agents

  15. Oxidative stress and hypoxia in normal and leukemic stem cells.

    Testa, Ugo; Labbaye, Catherine; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-07-01

    The main hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) functions, self-renewal and differentiation, are finely regulated by both intrinsic mechanisms such as transcriptional and epigenetic regulators and extrinsic signals originating in the bone marrow microenvironment (HSC niche) or in the body (humoral mediators). The interaction between regulatory signals and cellular metabolism is an emerging area. Several metabolic pathways function differently in HSCs compared with progenitors and differentiated cells. Hypoxia, acting through hypoxia-inducing factors, has emerged as a key regulator of stem cell biology and acts by maintaining HSC quiescence and a condition of metabolic dormancy based on anaerobic glycolytic energetic metabolism, with consequent low production reactive oxygen species (ROS) and high antioxidant defense. Hematopoietic cell differentiation is accompanied by changes in oxidative metabolism (decrease of anaerobic glycolysis and increase of oxidative phosphorylation) and increased levels of ROS. Leukemic stem cells, defined as the cells that initiate and maintain the leukemic process, show peculiar metabolic properties in that they are more dependent on oxidative respiration than on glycolysis and are more sensitive to oxidative stress than normal HSCs. Several mitochondrial abnormalities have been described in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, explaining the shift to aerobic glycolysis observed in these cells and offering the unique opportunity for therapeutic metabolic targeting. Finally, frequent mutations of the mitochondrial isocitrate dehydrogenase-2 (IDH2) enzyme are observed in AML cells, in which the mutated enzyme acts as an oncogenic driver and can be targeted using specific inhibitors under clinical evaluation with promising results. PMID:27179622

  16. Rutin inhibits amylin-induced neurocytotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    Yu, Xiao-Lin; Li, Ya-Nan; Zhang, He; Su, Ya-Jing; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zi-Ping; Wang, Shao-Wei; Xu, Peng-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jiong; Liu, Rui-Tian

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence showed that amylin deposition is not only found in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, but also in other peripheral organs, such as kidneys, heart and brain. Circulating amylin oligomers that cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain may be an important contributor to diabetic cerebral injury and neurodegeneration. Moreover, increasing epidemiological studies indicate that there is a significant association between T2DM and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amylin and β-amyloid (Aβ) may share common pathophysiology and show strikingly similar neurotoxicity profiles in the brain. To explore the potential effects of rutin on AD, we here investigated the effect of rutin on amylin aggregation by thioflavin T dyeing, evaluated the effect of rutin on amylin-induced neurocytotoxicity by the MTT assay, and assessed oxidative stress, as well as the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuronal cells. Our results showed that the flavonoid antioxidant rutin inhibited amylin-induced neurocytotoxicity, decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), NO, glutathione disulfide (GSSG), malondialdehyde (MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, attenuated mitochondrial damage and increased the GSH/GSSG ratio. These protective effects of rutin may have resulted from its ability to inhibit amylin aggregation, enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduce inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity. These in vitro results indicate that rutin is a promising natural product for protecting neuronal cells from amylin-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress, and rutin administration could be a feasible therapeutic strategy for preventing AD development and protecting the aging brain or slowing neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26242245

  17. Differences in oxidative stress dependence between gastric adenocarcinoma subtypes

    Brigitte Bancel; Jacques Estève; Jean-Christophe Souquet; Shinya Toyokuni; Hiroshi Ohshima; Brigitte Pignatelli

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the extent of oxidative stress in preneoplastic and neoplastic gastric mucosa in relation to their pathological criteria and histological subtypes.METHODS: A total of 104 gastric adenocarcinomas from 98 patients (88 infiltrative and 16 intraepithelial tumors)were assessed immunohistochemically for expression of iNOS and occurrence of nitrotyrosine (NTYR)-containing proteins and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-containing DNA, as markers of NO production and damages to protein and DNA.RESULTS: Tumor cells staining for iNOS, NTYR and 8-OH-dG were detected in 41%, 62% and 50% of infiltrative carcinoma, respectively. The three markers were shown for the first time in intraepithelial carcinoma.The expression of iNOS was significantly more frequent in tubular carcinoma (TC) compared to diffuse carcinoma (DC) (54% vs 18%; P=0.008) or in polymorphous carcinoma (PolyC) (54% vs 21%; P=0.04). NTYR staining was obviously more often found in TC than that in PolyC (72% vs 30%; P=0.03). There was a tendency towards a higher rate of iNOS staining when distant metastasis (pM) was present. In infiltrative TC, the presence of oxidative stress markers was not significantly correlated with histological grade, density of inflammation, the depth of infiltration (pT), lymph nodes dissemination (pN) and pathological stages (pTNM).CONCLUSION: The iNOS-oxidative pathway may play an important role in TC, but moderately in PolyC and DC.DNA oxidation and protein nitration occur in the three subtypes. Based on the significant differences of NTYR levels, TC and PolyC appear as two distinct subtypes.

  18. Role of malaria induced oxidative stress on anaemia in pregnancy

    Akanbi OM; Odaibo AB; Olatoregun R; Ademowo AB

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To assess the role of oxidative stress on anaemia in pregnancy.Methods:Blood samples were collected from pregnant and non-pregnant women who came for antenatal clinic and medical check at Comprehensive Health Center, Akungba-Akoko and Iwaro General Hospital in Akoko Area of Ondo State, Nigeria. Thick and thin blood films were prepared and used for malaria parasite counts. Haemoglobin level was determined by colorimetric method using Drabkin's solution. Oxidative status was determined using malondiadelhyde level as an indicator of lipid peroxidation, while ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione levels were measured by standard spectrophotometric methods.Results: Mean parasite density was significantly higher in pregnant women than non-pregnant women (P<0.05). Haemoglobin level was significantly reduced in malaria positive pregnant and non-pregnant women than malaria negative (8.3-10.0 g/dL) (P<0.05). The oxidative status indicated that malondialdehyde(MDA) was significantly increased in pregnant [(2.5±0.7) nmol/mL] than non-pregnant women [(1.8±0.1) nmol/mL] (P<0.05), while Vit C and superoxide dismutase(SOD) levels were significantly reduced in pregnant than non-pregnant women(P<0.05). There was an inverse correlation between Hb and MDA levels in pregnant women studied. Positive correlation was observed between the mean MDA level and parasite density (r = 0.53). The Hb level decreased as the parasite density and MDA level increased in pregnant women.Conclusions:This study shows that oxidative stress, caused by malaria infection could be part of the contributing factors responsible for anaemia in pregnancy.

  19. Molecular biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with bromate carcinogenicity

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a chemical oxidizing agent found in drinking water as a disinfection byproduct of surface water ozonation. Chronic exposures to KBrO3 cause renal cell tumors in rats, hamsters and mice and thyroid and testicular mesothelial tumors in rats. Experimental evidence indicates that bromate mediates toxicological effects via the induction of oxidative stress. To investigate the contribution of oxidative stress in KBrO3-induced cancer, male F344 rats were administered KBrO3 in their drinking water at multiple concentrations for 2-100 weeks. Gene expression analyses were performed on kidney, thyroid and mesothelial cell RNA. Families of mRNA transcripts differentially expressed with respect to bromate treatment included multiple cancer, cell death, ion transport and oxidative stress genes. Multiple glutathione metabolism genes were up-regulated in kidney following carcinogenic (400 mg/L) but not non-carcinogenic (20 mg/L) bromate exposures. 8-Oxodeoxyguanosine glycosylase (Ogg1) mRNA was up-regulated in response to bromate treatment in kidney but not thyroid. A dramatic decrease in global gene expression changes was observed following 1 mg/L compared to 20 mg/L bromate exposures. In a separate study oxygen-18 (18O) labeled KBrO3 was administered to male rats by oral gavage and tissues were analyzed for 18O deposition. Tissue enrichment of 18O was observed at 5 and 24 h post-KBr18O3 exposure with the highest enrichment occurring in the liver followed by the kidney, thyroid and testes. The kidney dose response observed was biphasic showing similar statistical increases in 18O deposition between 0.25 and 50 mg/L (equivalent dose) KBr18O3 followed by a much greater increase above 50 mg/L. These results suggest that carcinogenic doses of potassium bromate require attainment of a threshold at which oxidation of tissues occurs and that gene expression profiles may be predictive of these physiological changes in renal homeostasis

  20. Hepatic oxidative stress, genotoxicity and vascular dysfunction in lean or obese zucker rats

    Løhr, Mille; Folkmann, Janne Kjærsgaard; Sheykhzade, Majid;

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, which could be related to oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the associations between hepatic oxidative stress and vascular function in pressurized mesenteric arteries from lean and obese Zucker rats at 14, 24 an...... stress-generated DNA damage despite substantial hepatic steatosis....

  1. Adipose Fatty Acid Oxidation Is Required for Thermogenesis and Potentiates Oxidative Stress-Induced Inflammation

    Jieun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the contribution of adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation to whole-body metabolism, we generated mice with an adipose-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2A−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation. CPT2A−/− mice became hypothermic after an acute cold challenge, and CPT2A−/− brown adipose tissue (BAT failed to upregulate thermogenic genes in response to agonist-induced stimulation. The adipose-specific loss of CPT2 resulted in diet-dependent changes in adiposity but did not result in changes in body weight on low- or high-fat diets. Additionally, CPT2A−/− mice had suppressed high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in visceral white adipose tissue (WAT; however, high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance was not improved. These data show that fatty acid oxidation is required for cold-induced thermogenesis in BAT and high-fat diet-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in WAT.

  2. Nitric Oxide Synthetic Pathway in Patients with Microvascular Angina and Its Relations with Oxidative Stress

    Benedetta Porro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability and an increased oxidative stress play a pivotal role in different cardiovascular pathologies. As red blood cells (RBCs participate in NO formation in the bloodstream, the aim of this study was to outline the metabolic profile of L-arginine (Arg/NO pathway and of oxidative stress status in RBCs and in plasma of patients with microvascular angina (MVA, investigating similarities and differences with respect to coronary artery disease (CAD patients or healthy controls (Ctrl. Analytes involved in Arg/NO pathway and the ratio of oxidized and reduced forms of glutathione were measured by LC-MS/MS. The arginase and the NO synthase (NOS expression were evaluated by immunofluorescence staining. RBCs from MVA patients show increased levels of NO synthesis inhibitors, parallel to that found in plasma, and a reduction of NO synthase expression. When summary scores were computed, both patient groups were associated with a positive oxidative score and a negative NO score, with the CAD group located in a more extreme position with respect to Ctrl. This finding points out to an impairment of the capacity of RBCs to produce NO in a pathological condition characterized mostly by alterations at the microvascular bed with no significant coronary stenosis.

  3. Evaluation of oxidative stress in D-serine induced nephrotoxicity.

    Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Sánchez-González, Dolores Javier; Martínez-Martínez, Claudia María; Floriano-Sánchez, Esaú; Santamaría, Abel; Ramirez, Victoria; Bobadilla, Norma A; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress is involved in d-serine-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess if oxidative stress is involved in this experimental model using several approaches including (a) the determination of several markers of oxidative stress and the activity of some antioxidant enzymes in kidney and (b) the use of compounds with antioxidant or prooxidant effects. Rats were sacrificed at several periods of time (from 3 to 24h) after a single i.p. injection of d-serine (400mg/kg). Control rats were injected with l-serine (400mg/kg) and sacrificed 24h after. The following markers were used to assess the temporal aspects of renal damage: (a) urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine in blood serum, (b) kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) mRNA levels, and (c) tubular necrotic damage. In addition, creatinine clearance, proteinuria, and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase (NAG) were measured 24h after d-serine injection. Protein carbonyl content, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) content, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were measured as markers of oxidative stress in the kidney. Additional experiments were performed using the following compounds with antioxidant or pro-oxidant effects before d-serine injection: (a) alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN), a spin trapping agent; (b) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato iron(III) (FeTPPS), a soluble complex able to metabolize peroxynitrite; (c) aminotriazole (ATZ), a catalase (CAT) inhibitor; (d) stannous chloride (SnCl(2)), an HO-1 inductor; (e) tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO inhibitor. In the time-course study, serum creatinine and BUN increased significantly on 15-24 and 20-24h, respectively, and KIM-1 mRNA levels increased significantly on 6-24h. Histological analyses revealed tubular necrosis at 12h. The activity of antioxidant enzymes

  4. Evaluation of oxidative stress in D-serine induced nephrotoxicity

    It has been suggested that oxidative stress is involved in D-serine-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to assess if oxidative stress is involved in this experimental model using several approaches including (a) the determination of several markers of oxidative stress and the activity of some antioxidant enzymes in kidney and (b) the use of compounds with antioxidant or prooxidant effects. Rats were sacrificed at several periods of time (from 3 to 24 h) after a single i.p. injection of D-serine (400 mg/kg). Control rats were injected with L-serine (400 mg/kg) and sacrificed 24 h after. The following markers were used to assess the temporal aspects of renal damage: (a) urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine in blood serum, (b) kidney injury molecule (KIM-1) mRNA levels, and (c) tubular necrotic damage. In addition, creatinine clearance, proteinuria, and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) were measured 24 h after D-serine injection. Protein carbonyl content, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), fluorescent products of lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) content, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were measured as markers of oxidative stress in the kidney. Additional experiments were performed using the following compounds with antioxidant or pro-oxidant effects before D-serine injection: (a) α-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN), a spin trapping agent; (b) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrinato iron(III) (FeTPPS), a soluble complex able to metabolize peroxynitrite; (c) aminotriazole (ATZ), a catalase (CAT) inhibitor; (d) stannous chloride (SnCl2), an HO-1 inductor; (e) tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an HO inhibitor. In the time-course study, serum creatinine and BUN increased significantly on 15-24 and 20-24 h, respectively, and KIM-1 mRNA levels increased significantly on 6-24 h. Histological analyses revealed tubular necrosis at 12 h. The activity of antioxidant enzymes

  5. 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine: Not mere biomarker for oxidative stress, but remedy for oxidative stress-implicated gastrointestinal diseases

    Chan-Young Ock; Eun-Hee Kim; Duck Joo Choi; Ho Jae Lee; Ki-Baik Hahm; Myung Hee Chung

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack guanine bases in DNA easily and form 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), which can bind to thymidine rather than cytosine, based on which, the level of 8-OHdG is generally regarded as a biomarker of mutagenesis consequent to oxidative stress. For example, higher levels of 8-OHdG are noted in Helicobacter pylori -associated chronic atrophic gastritis as well as gastric cancer. However, we have found that exogenous 8-OHdG can paradoxically reduce ROS production, attenuate the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway, and ameliorate the expression of proinflammatory mediators such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, cyclo-oxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase in addition to expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX)-1, NOX organizer-1 and NOX activator-1 in various conditions of inflammation-based gastrointestinal (GI) diseases including gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, and even colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Our recent finding that exogenous 8-OHdG was very effective in either inflammation-based or oxidative-stress-associated diseases of stress-related mucosal damage has inspired the hope that synthetic 8-OHdG can be a potential candidate for the treatment of inflammation-based GI diseases, as well as the prevention of inflammation-associated GI cancer. In this editorial review, the novel fact that exogenous 8-OHdG can be a functional molecule regulating oxidativestress-induced gastritis through either antagonizing Rac-guanosine triphosphate binding or blocking the signals responsible for gastric inflammatory cascade is introduced.

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates physical stress-induced lung hyper-responsiveness and oxidative stress in animals with lung inflammation.

    Marques, Ricardo Henrique; Reis, Fabiana G; Starling, Claudia M; Cabido, Claudia; de Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Dohlnikoff, Marisa; Prado, Carla M; Leick, Edna A; Martins, Mílton A; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in stress-induced asthmatic alterations have been poorly characterised. We assessed whether inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition modulates the stress-amplified lung parenchyma responsiveness, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix remodelling that was previously increased by chronic lung inflammation. Guinea pigs were subjected to 7 exposures to ovalbumin (1-5 mg/ml) or saline (OVA and SAL groups) over 4 weeks. To induce behavioural stress, animals were subjected to a forced swimming protocol (5 times/week, over 2 weeks; SAL-Stress and OVA-Stress groups) 24 h after the 4th inhalation. 1400W (iNOS-specific inhibitor) was administered intraperitoneally in the last 4 days of the protocol (SAL-1400W, OVA-1400W, SAL-Stress+1400W and OVA-Stress+1400W groups). Seventy-two hours after the last inhalation, animals were anaesthetised and exsanguinated, and adrenal glands were removed. Lung tissue resistance and elastance were evaluated by oscillatory mechanics and submitted for histopathological evaluation. Stressed animals had higher adrenal weights compared to non-stressed groups, which were reduced by 1400W treatment. Behavioural stress in sensitised animals amplified the resistance and elastance responses after antigen challenge, numbers of eosinophils and iNOS+ cells, actin content and 8-iso-PGF2α density in the distal lung compared to the OVA group. 1400W treatment in ovalbumin-exposed and stressed animals reduced lung mechanics, iNOS+ cell numbers and 8-iso-PGF2α density compared to sensitised and stressed animals that received vehicle treatment. We concluded that stress amplifies the distal lung constriction, eosinophilic inflammation, iNOS expression, actin content and oxidative stress previously induced by chronic lung inflammation. iNOS-derived NO contributes to stress-augmented lung tissue functional alterations in this animal model and is at least partially due to activation of the oxidative stress pathway. PMID:22262048

  7. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H2O2 and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu2+-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H2O2 or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall

  8. AVE 0991 attenuates cardiac hypertrophy through reducing oxidative stress.

    Ma, Yuedong; Huang, Huiling; Jiang, Jingzhou; Wu, Lingling; Lin, Chunxi; Tang, Anli; Dai, Gang; He, Jiangui; Chen, Yili

    2016-06-10

    AVE 0991, the nonpeptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) analog, is recognized as having beneficial cardiovascular effects. However, the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. This study was designed to investigate the effects of AVE 0991 on cardiac hypertrophy and the mechanisms involved. Mice were underwent aortic banding to induce cardiac hypertrophy followed by the administration of AVE 0991 (20 mg kg·day (-1)) for 4 weeks. It was shown that AVE 0991 reduced left ventricular hypertrophy and improved heart function, characterized by decreases in left ventricular weight and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter, and increases in ejection fraction. Moreover, AVE 0991 significantly down-regulated mean myocyte diameter and attenuate the gene expression of the hypertrophic markers. Furthermore, AVE 0991 inhibited the expression of NOX 2 and NOX 4, meaning that AVE 0991 reduced oxidative stress of cardiac hypertrophy mice. Our data showed that AVE 0991 treatment could attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and improve heart function, which may be due to reduce oxidative stress. PMID:26403967

  9. Oxidative stress markers in preovulatory follicular fluid in humans.

    Jozwik, M; Wolczynski, S; Jozwik, M; Szamatowicz, M

    1999-05-01

    Intensified peroxidation in the Graafian follicle may be a factor compromising the normal development of the oocyte. The aim of this study was to measure concentrations of three oxidative stress markers: conjugated dienes, lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, in preovulatory follicular fluids and sera of 145 women attending an in-vitro fertilization programme, and to correlate these concentrations with pregnancy outcome. Determinations were conducted either with or without an antioxidant (10 microM butylated hydroxytoluene) and an iron chelate (10 microM deferoxamine mesylate) to examine peroxidation associated with the methods used. Concentrations of conjugated dienes, lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in follicular fluid were all significantly lower than those in serum, both in the presence or absence of the antioxidant and iron chelate. These concentrations did not correlate with pregnancy outcome. In conclusion, the intensity of peroxidation in the Graafian follicle is much lower than that in serum. This gradient is the result of the lower rate of initiation of peroxidation in the follicular fluid, suggestive of the presence of efficient antioxidant defence systems in the direct milieu of the oocyte before ovulation. The concentrations of investigated oxidative stress markers in follicular fluid do not reflect the reproductive potential of oocytes. PMID:10338363

  10. Diethyl Phthalate Causes Oxidative Stress: An in Vitro Study

    Heena Prajapati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Phthalates are a group of multifunctional chemicals. Diethyl phthalate (DEP is one of the most frequently used phthalates in solvents and fixatives for numerous industrial products. Method: The present experiment was designed to assess oxidative stress, if any, caused by diethyl phthalate. For this the homogenates of liver and kidney were treated with different concentrations ( 10-40 µg/mL of DEP. 10% liver and kidney homogenates were prepared in phosphate buffered saline and used for estimation of lipid peroxidation.In final step lipid peroxidation and total protein content were analyzed. Results: The result revealed significant and dose - dependent increase in lipid peroxidation, whereas protein content reduced significantly. Maximum increase in LPO and decrease in protein content was observed at 40 µg/mL of DEP concentration. Conclusion: From this study, it can be concluded that different concentrations of DEP leads to dose- dependent significant increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease protein content.So at the different concentration of DEP cause oxidative stress.

  11. Evaluating the Oxidative Stress in Inflammation: Role of Melatonin

    Aroha Sánchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is used by eukaryotic cells for metabolic transformations and energy production in mitochondria. Under physiological conditions, there is a constant endogenous production of intermediates of reactive oxygen (ROI and nitrogen species (RNI that interact as signaling molecules in physiological mechanisms. When these species are not eliminated by antioxidants or are produced in excess, oxidative stress arises. Oxidative stress can damage proteins, lipids, DNA, and organelles. It is a process directly linked to inflammation; in fact, inflammatory cells secrete a large number of cytokines and chemokines responsible for the production of ROI and RNI in phagocytic and nonphagocytic cells through the activation of protein kinases signaling. Currently, there is a wide variety of diseases capable of producing inflammatory manifestations. While, in the short term, most of these diseases are not fatal they have a major impact on life quality. Since there is a direct relationship between chronic inflammation and many emerging disorders like cancer, oral diseases, kidney diseases, fibromyalgia, gastrointestinal chronic diseases or rheumatics diseases, the aim of this review is to describe the use and role of melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, that works directly and indirectly as a free radical scavenger, like a potent antioxidant.

  12. Relationship between acrosin activity of human spermatozoa and oxidative stress

    AdelA.Zalata; AshrafH.Ahmed; ShyamS.R.Allamaneni; H.Comhaire; AshokAgarwal

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To study the association between seminal oxidative stress and human sperm acrosin activity.Methods: It is a prospective study consisting of 30 infertile men and 12 fertile normozoospermic volunteers. A full history, clinical examination and scrotal ultrasound were done to exclude other related factors such as smoking and varicocele. Presence of white blood cells (WBCs) in semen samples was evaluated by peroxidase staining. Lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa was induced after incubating with ferrous sulphate (4mmol/L) and sodium ascorbate (20 mmol/L). Induced peroxidation of spermatozoa was assessed by determining the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Acrosin activity was measured using the gelatinolysis technique. The halo diameters around the sperm heads and the percentages of spermatozoa showing halo formation were evaluated. An acrosin activity index was calculated by multiplying the halo diameter by the halo formation rate. Results: A significant difference was observed in acrosin activity parameters and TBARS levels between samples with WBCs (>1×106/mL of ejaculate) and those without. This difference was also noted between the normozoospermic and the oligoasthenoteratozoospermic semen samples. The TBARS production by spermatozoa had a significant negativecorrelation with the acrosin activity index (r=-0.89, P<0.001). Conclusion: The presence of oxidative stress in an individual with leukocytospermia and/or abnormal semen parameters is associated with impaired sperm function as measured by its acrosin activity. (Asian J Androl 2004 Dec; 6:313-318)

  13. Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Mediators in Gliomas

    Conti, Alfredo, E-mail: alfredo.conti@unime.it; Gulì, Carlo; La Torre, Domenico; Tomasello, Chiara; Angileri, Filippo F.; Aguennouz, M’Hammed [Department of Neuroscience and Department of Oncology, University of Messina, Policlinico Universitario, Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98125, Messina (Italy)

    2010-04-26

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system. Despite relevant progress in conventional treatments, the prognosis of such tumors remains almost invariably dismal. The genesis of gliomas is a complex, multistep process that includes cellular neoplastic transformation, resistance to apoptosis, loss of control of the cell cycle, angiogenesis, and the acquisition of invasive properties. Among a number of different biomolecular events, the existence of molecular connections between inflammation and oxidative stress pathways and the development of this cancer has been demonstrated. In particular, the tumor microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory molecules, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, promoting proliferation, survival and migration of such tumors. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma, as well as chemokines and prostaglandins, are synthesized by resident brain cells and lymphocytes invading the affected brain tissue. Key mediators of cancer progression include nuclear factor-kappaB, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and specific microRNAs. The collective activity of these mediators is largely responsible for a pro-tumorigenic response through changes in cell proliferation, cell death, cellular senescence, DNA mutation rates, DNA methylation and angiogenesis. We provide a general overview of the connection between specific inflammation and oxidative stress pathway molecules and gliomas. The elucidation of specific effects and interactions of these factors may provide the opportunity for the identification of new target molecules leading to improved diagnosis and treatment.

  14. CIRRHOSIS INDUCES APOPTOSIS IN RENAL TISSUE THROUGH INTRACELLULAR OXIDATIVE STRESS

    Keli Cristina Simões da SILVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Renal failure is a frequent and serious complication in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the renal oxidative stress, cell damage and impaired cell function in animal model of cirrhosis. Methods Secondary biliary cirrhosis was induced in rats by ligation of the common bile duct. We measured TBARS, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in kidney as markers of oxidative stress, and activities of the antioxidant enzymes. Relative cell viability was determined by trypan blue dye-exclusion assay. Annexin V-PE was used with a vital dye, 7-AAD, to distinguish apoptotic from necrotic cells and comet assay was used for determined DNA integrity in single cells. Results In bile duct ligation animals there was significant increase in the kidney lipoperoxidation and an increase of the level of intracellular ROS. There was too an increase in the activity of all antioxidant enzymes evaluated in the kidney. The percentage viability was above 90% in the control group and in bile duct ligation was 64.66% and the dominant cell death type was apoptosis. DNA damage was observed in the bile duct ligation. There was a decreased in the mitochondrial membrane potential from 71.40% ± 6.35% to 34.48% ± 11.40% in bile duct ligation. Conclusions These results indicate that intracellular increase of ROS cause damage in the DNA and apoptosis getting worse the renal function in cirrhosis.

  15. Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Mediators in Gliomas

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system. Despite relevant progress in conventional treatments, the prognosis of such tumors remains almost invariably dismal. The genesis of gliomas is a complex, multistep process that includes cellular neoplastic transformation, resistance to apoptosis, loss of control of the cell cycle, angiogenesis, and the acquisition of invasive properties. Among a number of different biomolecular events, the existence of molecular connections between inflammation and oxidative stress pathways and the development of this cancer has been demonstrated. In particular, the tumor microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory molecules, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, promoting proliferation, survival and migration of such tumors. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma, as well as chemokines and prostaglandins, are synthesized by resident brain cells and lymphocytes invading the affected brain tissue. Key mediators of cancer progression include nuclear factor-kappaB, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and specific microRNAs. The collective activity of these mediators is largely responsible for a pro-tumorigenic response through changes in cell proliferation, cell death, cellular senescence, DNA mutation rates, DNA methylation and angiogenesis. We provide a general overview of the connection between specific inflammation and oxidative stress pathway molecules and gliomas. The elucidation of specific effects and interactions of these factors may provide the opportunity for the identification of new target molecules leading to improved diagnosis and treatment

  16. Exposure of rat hippocampal astrocytes to Ziram increases oxidative stress.

    Matei, Ann-Marie; Trombetta, Louis D

    2016-04-01

    Pesticides have been shown in several studies to be the leading candidates of environmental toxins and may contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Ziram (zinc-bis(dimethyldithiocarbamate)) is an agricultural dithiocarbamate fungicide that is used to treat a variety of plant diseases. In spite of their generally acknowledged low toxicity, dithiocarbamates are known to cause a wide range of neurobehavioral effects as well as neuropathological changes in the brain. Astrocytes play a key role in normal brain physiology and in the pathology of the nervous system. This investigation studied the effects of 1.0 µM Ziram on rat hippocampal astrocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance assay performed showed a significant increase in malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation, in the Ziram-treated cells. Biochemical analysis also revealed a significant increase in the induction of 70 kDa heat shock and heme oxygenase 1 stress proteins. In addition, an increase of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were observed in the Ziram-treated cells. The ratio GSH to GSSG calculated from the treated cells was also decreased. Light and transmission electron microscopy supported the biochemical findings in Ziram-treated astrocytes. This data suggest that the cytotoxic effects observed with Ziram treatments may be related to the increase of oxidative stress. PMID:24193059

  17. Mitophagy in TGEV infection counteracts oxidative stress and apoptosis.

    Zhu, Liqi; Mou, Chunxiao; Yang, Xing; Lin, Jian; Yang, Qian

    2016-05-10

    The intestinal epithelial cells contain a large number of mitochondria for persisting absorption and barrier function. Selective autophagy of mitochondria (mitophagy) plays an important role in the quality control of mitochondria and maintenance of cell homeostasis. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) is a porcine enteropathogenic coronavirus which induces malabsorption and lethal watery diarrhea in suckling piglets. The role of mitophagy in the pathological changes caused by TGEV infection is unclear. Here, we report that TGEV induces mitophagy to suppress oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by viral infection in porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2). We observe that TGEV infection induce mitochondrial injury, abnormal morphology, complete mitophagy, and without obvious apoptosis after TGEV infection. Meanwhile, TGEV also induces DJ-1 and some antioxidant genes upregulation to suppress oxidative stress induced by viral infection. Furthermore, silencing DJ-1 inhibit mitophagy and increase apoptosis after TGEV infection. In addition, we demonstrate for the first time that viral nucleocapsid protein (N) is located in mitochondria and mitophagosome during virus infection or be expressed alone. Those results provide a novel perspective for further improvement of prevention and treatment in TGEV infection. These results suggest that TGEV infection induce mitophagy to promote cell survival and possibly viral infection. PMID:27027356

  18. Oxidative stress and dysfunctional NRF2 underlie pachyonychia congenita phenotypes.

    Kerns, Michelle L; Hakim, Jill M C; Lu, Rosemary G; Guo, Yajuan; Berroth, Andreas; Kaspar, Roger L; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2016-06-01

    Palmoplantar keratoderma (PPK) are debilitating lesions that arise in individuals with pachyonychia congenita (PC) and feature upregulation of danger-associated molecular patterns and skin barrier regulators. The defining features of PC-associated PPK are reproduced in mice null for keratin 16 (Krt16), which is commonly mutated in PC patients. Here, we have shown that PPK onset is preceded by oxidative stress in footpad skin of Krt16-/- mice and correlates with an inability of keratinocytes to sustain nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2 related factor 2-dependent (NRF2-dependent) synthesis of the cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Additionally, examination of plantar skin biopsies from individuals with PC confirmed the presence of high levels of hypophosphorylated NRF2 in lesional tissue. In Krt16-/- mice, genetic ablation of Nrf2 worsened spontaneous skin lesions and accelerated PPK development in footpad skin. Hypoactivity of NRF2 in Krt16-/- footpad skin correlated with decreased levels or activity of upstream NRF2 activators, including PKCδ, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), and p21. Topical application of the NRF2 activator sulforaphane to the footpad of Krt16-/- mice prevented the development of PPK and normalized redox balance via regeneration of GSH from existing cellular pools. Together, these findings point to oxidative stress and dysfunctional NRF2 as contributors to PPK pathogenesis, identify K16 as a regulator of NRF2 activation, and suggest that pharmacological activation of NRF2 should be further explored for PC treatment. PMID:27183391

  19. Oxidative Stress in Shiga Toxin Production by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli

    Katarzyna Licznerska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Virulence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC strains depends on production of Shiga toxins. These toxins are encoded in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages (Shiga toxin-converting phages, present in EHEC cells as prophages. The genes coding for Shiga toxins are silent in lysogenic bacteria, and prophage induction is necessary for their efficient expression and toxin production. Under laboratory conditions, treatment with UV light or antibiotics interfering with DNA replication are commonly used to induce lambdoid prophages. Since such conditions are unlikely to occur in human intestine, various research groups searched for other factors or agents that might induce Shiga toxin-converting prophages. Among other conditions, it was reported that treatment with H2O2 caused induction of these prophages, though with efficiency significantly lower relative to UV-irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. A molecular mechanism of this phenomenon has been proposed. It appears that the oxidative stress represents natural conditions provoking induction of Shiga toxin-converting prophages as a consequence of H2O2 excretion by either neutrophils in infected humans or protist predators outside human body. Finally, the recently proposed biological role of Shiga toxin production is described in this paper, and the “bacterial altruism” and “Trojan Horse” hypotheses, which are connected to the oxidative stress, are discussed.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Shiga Toxin Production by Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Licznerska, Katarzyna; Nejman-Faleńczyk, Bożena; Bloch, Sylwia; Dydecka, Aleksandra; Topka, Gracja; Gąsior, Tomasz; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Virulence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) strains depends on production of Shiga toxins. These toxins are encoded in genomes of lambdoid bacteriophages (Shiga toxin-converting phages), present in EHEC cells as prophages. The genes coding for Shiga toxins are silent in lysogenic bacteria, and prophage induction is necessary for their efficient expression and toxin production. Under laboratory conditions, treatment with UV light or antibiotics interfering with DNA replication are commonly used to induce lambdoid prophages. Since such conditions are unlikely to occur in human intestine, various research groups searched for other factors or agents that might induce Shiga toxin-converting prophages. Among other conditions, it was reported that treatment with H2O2 caused induction of these prophages, though with efficiency significantly lower relative to UV-irradiation or mitomycin C treatment. A molecular mechanism of this phenomenon has been proposed. It appears that the oxidative stress represents natural conditions provoking induction of Shiga toxin-converting prophages as a consequence of H2O2 excretion by either neutrophils in infected humans or protist predators outside human body. Finally, the recently proposed biological role of Shiga toxin production is described in this paper, and the "bacterial altruism" and "Trojan Horse" hypotheses, which are connected to the oxidative stress, are discussed. PMID:26798420

  1. Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Mediators in Gliomas

    Alfredo Conti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors of the central nervous system. Despite relevant progress in conventional treatments, the prognosis of such tumors remains almost invariably dismal. The genesis of gliomas is a complex, multistep process that includes cellular neoplastic transformation, resistance to apoptosis, loss of control of the cell cycle, angiogenesis, and the acquisition of invasive properties. Among a number of different biomolecular events, the existence of molecular connections between inflammation and oxidative stress pathways and the development of this cancer has been demonstrated. In particular, the tumor microenvironment, which is largely orchestrated by inflammatory molecules, is an indispensable participant in the neoplastic process, promoting proliferation, survival and migration of such tumors. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interferon-gamma, as well as chemokines and prostaglandins, are synthesized by resident brain cells and lymphocytes invading the affected brain tissue. Key mediators of cancer progression include nuclear factor-kappaB, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and specific microRNAs. The collective activity of these mediators is largely responsible for a pro-tumorigenic response through changes in cell proliferation, cell death, cellular senescence, DNA mutation rates, DNA methylation and angiogenesis. We provide a general overview of the connection between specific inflammation and oxidative stress pathway molecules and gliomas. The elucidation of specific effects and interactions of these factors may provide the opportunity for the identification of new target molecules leading to improved diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Fluorosis Caused Cellular Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress of Rat Kidneys

    SONG Yang; WANG Jin-cheng; XU Hui; DU Zhen-wu; ZHANG Gui-zhen; SELIM Hamid Abdu; LI Guang-sheng

    2013-01-01

    As the strongest electronegative element,fluorine can stimulate the production of superoxide radicals in cells.In view of the important roles of kidneys in bone metabolism,the authors analyzed the quantitative pathomorphological characteristics of renal damage and the potential cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress mechanisms in rats treated with excessive fluoride.Wistar rats were exposed to 50 mg F-(110.5 mg NaF)/L,100 mg F-(221.0 mg NaF)/Land 150 mg F (331.5 mg NaF)/L in drinking water for 70 and 140 d,respectively.Microscope with image analysis was used to quantitate pathomorphological changes in renal tissues of the rats.Reactive oxygen species(ROS),the cell cycle and apoptosis of renal cells were measured by flow cytometry and TUNEL technique(terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling),respectively.The ion concentrations in serum and renal functional parameters were detected by automatic biochemical analyzer.Quantitative analysis results demonstrate the expanded Bowman's space of glomerulus and obvious dilatation of renal tubule.TUNEL technique revealed that NBT/BCIP (nitro blue tetrazoliurn/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate,p-toluidine salt)-staining positive apoptotic cells selectively located in medullocortical junction areas.The data suggest that renal damage in chronic fluorostic rats is associated with the cellular apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  3. Uranium induces oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, antitank weapons, tank armor, and also as a pigment to color ceramics and glass. Effective management of waste uranium compounds is necessary to prevent exposure to avoid adverse health effects on the population. Health risks associated with uranium exposure includes kidney disease and respiratory disorders. In addition, several published results have shown uranium or depleted uranium causes DNA damage, mutagenicity, cancer and neurological defects. In the current study, uranium toxicity was evaluated in rat lung epithelial cells. The study shows uranium induces significant oxidative stress in rat lung epithelial cells followed by concomitant decrease in the antioxidant potential of the cells. Treatment with uranium to rat lung epithelial cells also decreased cell proliferation after 72 h in culture. The decrease in cell proliferation was attributed to loss of total glutathione and superoxide dismutase in the presence of uranium. Thus the results indicate the ineffectiveness of antioxidant system's response to the oxidative stress induced by uranium in the cells. (orig.)

  4. Magnetite induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in lung epithelial cells.

    Ramesh, Vani; Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Copeland, Clinton L; Gopikrishnan, Ramya; Biradar, Santhoshkumar; Goornavar, Virupaxi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Hall, Joseph C

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing concern regarding the biocompatibility of nanoparticles with sizes less than 100 nm as compared to larger particles of the same nominal substance. In this study, we investigated the toxic properties of magnetite stabilized with polyacrylate sodium. The magnetite was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and the mean particle diameter was calculated using the Scherrer formula and was found to be 9.3 nm. In this study, we treated lung epithelial cells with different concentrations of magnetite and investigated their effects on oxidative stress and cell proliferation. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in magnetite-treated cells with a significant dose-dependent activation and induction of reactive oxygen species. Also, we observed a depletion of antioxidants, glutathione, and superoxide dismutase, respectively, as compared with control cells. In addition, apoptotic-related protease/enzyme such as caspase-3 and -8 activities, were increased in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in magnetite-treated cells compared to than control cells. Together, the present study reveals that magnetite exposure induces oxidative stress and depletes antioxidant levels in the cells to stimulate apoptotic pathway for cell death. PMID:22147200

  5. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmune response

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are implicated in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases. Also, increased lipid peroxidation and protein nitration are reported in systemic autoimmune diseases. Lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes (LPDAs) such as malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) are highly reactive and bind proteins covalently, but their potential to elicit an autoimmune response and contribution to disease pathogenesis remain unclear. Similarly, nitration of protein could also contribute to disease pathogenesis. To assess the status of lipid peroxidation and/or RONS, autoimmune-prone female MRL+/+ mice (5-week old) were treated with trichloroethene (TCE), an environmental contaminant known to induce autoimmune response, for 48 weeks (0.5 mg/ml via drinking water), and formation of antibodies to LPDA-protein adducts was followed in the sera of control and TCE-treated mice. TCE treatment led to greater formation of both anti-MDA- and -HNE-protein adduct antibodies and higher serum iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels. The increase in TCE-induced oxidative stress was associated with increases in anti-nuclear-, anti-ssDNA- and anti-dsDNA-antibodies. These findings suggest that TCE exposure not only leads to oxidative/nitrosative stress, but is also associated with induction/exacerbation of autoimmune response in MRL+/+ mice. Further interventional studies are needed to establish a causal role of RONS in TCE-mediated autoimmunity

  6. Iron accumulation with age, oxidative stress and functional decline.

    Jinze Xu

    Full Text Available Identification of biological mediators in sarcopenia is pertinent to the development of targeted interventions to alleviate this condition. Iron is recognized as a potent pro-oxidant and a catalyst for the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems. It is well accepted that iron accumulates with senescence in several organs, but little is known about iron accumulation in muscle and how it may affect muscle function. In addition, it is unclear if interventions which reduced age-related loss of muscle quality, such as calorie restriction, impact iron accumulation. We investigated non-heme iron concentration, oxidative stress to nucleic acids in gastrocnemius muscle and key indices of sarcopenia (muscle mass and grip strength in male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL or a calorie restricted diet (60% of ad libitum food intake starting at 4 months of age at 8, 18, 29 and 37 months of age. Total non-heme iron levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats increased progressively with age. Between 29 and 37 months of age, the non-heme iron concentration increased by approximately 200% in AL-fed rats. Most importantly, the levels of oxidized RNA in gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats were significantly increased as well. The striking age-associated increase in non-heme iron and oxidized RNA levels and decrease in sarcopenia indices were all attenuated in the calorie restriction (CR rats. These findings strongly suggest that the age-related iron accumulation in muscle contributes to increased oxidative damage and sarcopenia, and that CR effectively attenuates these negative effects.

  7. Assessment of oxidative stress parameters of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice in acute stress model

    Gulay Hacioglu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Exposing to stress may be associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Therefore, high level of oxidative stress may eventually give rise to accumulation of oxidative damage and development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. It has been presented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF supports neurons against various neurodegenerative conditions. Lately, there has been growing evidence that changes in the cerebral neurotrophic support and especially in the BDNF expression and its engagement with ROS might be important in various disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we aimed to investigate protective effects of BDNF against stress-induced oxidative damage. Materials and Methods: Five- to six-month-old male wild-type and BDNF knock-down mice were used in this study. Activities of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD enzymes, and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA were assessed in the cerebral homogenates of studied groups in response to acute restraint stress. Results: Exposing to acute physiological stress led to significant elevation in the markers of oxidative stress in the cerebral cortexes of experimental groups. Conclusion: As BDNF-deficient mice were observed to be more susceptible to stress-induced oxidative damage, it can be suggested that there is a direct interplay between oxidative stress indicators and BDNF levels in the brain.

  8. No Influence of Type 2 Diabetes on Chronic Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Obese Patients

    Adriana Florinela CĂTOI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity per se carries the features of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress that interrelate in a complex network and exert an important role in the onset of several complications such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. On the other hand, it seems that hyperglycemia per se as well as insulin resistance (independent of hyperglycemia, both induce increased oxidative stress. The aim of our study was to analyze proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers in obese patients with and without type 2 diabetes and to verify the hypothesis that type 2 diabetes associated with obesity would promote a higher chronic inflammation and oxidative stress state as compared to obesity alone. We found no differences between the two groups of patients regarding chronic inflammation and oxidative stress markers. Therefore we may conclude that there is no influence of type 2 diabetes on chronic inflammation and oxidative stress in obese patients.

  9. Oxidative stress modulates PPAR gamma in vascular endothelial cells.

    Blanquicett, Carmelo; Kang, Bum-Yong; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Jones, Dean P; Hart, C Michael

    2010-06-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) plays an important role in vascular regulation. However, the impact of oxidative stress on PPAR gamma expression and activity has not been clearly defined. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to graded concentrations of H(2)O(2) for 0.5-72h, or bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) were exposed to alterations in extracellular thiol/disulfide redox potential (E(h)) of the cysteine/cystine couple. Within 2h, H(2)O(2) reduced HUVEC PPAR gamma mRNA and activity and reduced the expression of two PPAR gamma-regulated genes without altering PPAR gamma protein levels. After 4h H(2)O(2) exposure, mRNA levels remained reduced, whereas PPAR gamma activity returned to control levels. PPAR gamma mRNA levels remained depressed for up to 72 h after exposure to H(2)O(2), without any change in PPAR gamma activity. Catalase prevented H(2)O(2)-induced reductions in PPAR gamma mRNA and activity. H(2)O(2) (1) reduced luciferase expression in HUVECs transiently transfected with a human PPAR gamma promoter reporter, (2) failed to alter PPAR gamma mRNA half-life, and (3) transiently increased expression and activity of c-Fos and phospho-c-Jun. Treatment with the AP1 inhibitor curcumin prevented H(2)O(2)-mediated reductions in PPAR gamma expression. In addition, medium having an oxidized E(h) reduced BAEC PPAR gamma mRNA and activity. These findings demonstrate that oxidative stress, potentially through activation of inhibitory redox-regulated transcription factors, attenuates PPAR gamma expression and activity in vascular endothelial cells through suppression of PPAR gamma transcription. PMID:20302927

  10. Eales′ disease: Oxidant stress and weak antioxidant defence

    Ramakrishnan S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Eales′ disease (ED is an idiopathic retinal periphlebitis characterized by capillary non-perfusion and neovascularization. In addition to the existing system, a new staging system has been proposed by Saxena et al . Immunological, molecular biological and biochemical studies have indicated the role of human leucocyte antigen, retinal S antigen autoimmunity, Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, free radical damage and possibly hyperhomocysteinemia in its etiopathogenesis, which appears multifactorial. Oxidant stress has been shown by increase in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (lipid oxidation in the vitreous, erythrocytes, platelets, and monocytes. A decrease in vitamins E and C both in active and healed vasculitis, superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase showed a weakened antioxidant defence. Epiretinal membrane from patients of ED who underwent surgery showed, by immunolocalization, presence of carboxy methyl lysine, an advanced glycation end product formed by glycoxidation and is involved in angiogenesis. OH· free radical accumulation in monocytes has been directly shown by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Free radical damage to DNA and of protein was shown by the accumulation of 8 hydroxy 2 deoxyguanosine (in leucocytes and nitrotyrosine (in monocytes, respectively. Nitrosative stress was shown by increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in monocytes in which levels of iron and copper were increased while those of zinc decreased. A novel 88 kDa protein was found in serum and vitreous in inflammatory condition and had antioxidant function. Platelet fluidity was also affected. Oral, methotrexate in low dosage (12.5 mg/week for 12 weeks as well as oral vitamin E (400 IU and C (500 mg daily for 8 weeks are reported to have beneficial effects.

  11. Starved Escherichia coli preserve reducing power under nitric oxide stress.

    Gowers, Glen-Oliver F; Robinson, Jonathan L; Brynildsen, Mark P

    2016-07-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) detoxification enzymes, such as NO dioxygenase (NOD) and NO reductase (NOR), are important to the virulence of numerous bacteria. Pathogens use these defense systems to ward off immune-generated NO, and they do so in environments that contain additional stressors, such as reactive oxygen species, nutrient deprivation, and acid stress. NOD and NOR both use reducing equivalents to metabolically deactivate NO, which suggests that nutrient deprivation could negatively impact their functionality. To explore the relationship between NO detoxification and nutrient deprivation, we examined the ability of Escherichia coli to detoxify NO under different levels of carbon source availability in aerobic cultures. We observed failure of NO detoxification under both carbon source limitation and starvation, and those failures could have arisen from inabilities to synthesize Hmp (NOD of E. coli) and/or supply it with sufficient NADH (preferred electron donor). We found that when limited quantities of carbon source were provided, NO detoxification failed due to insufficient NADH, whereas starvation prevented Hmp synthesis, which enabled cells to maintain their NADH levels. This maintenance of NADH levels under starvation was confirmed to be dependent on the absence of Hmp. Intriguingly, these data show that under NO stress, carbon-starved E. coli are better positioned with regard to reducing power to cope with other stresses than cells that had consumed an exhaustible amount of carbon. PMID:27207837

  12. Folic acid supplementation reduces oxidative stress and hepatic toxicity in rats treated chronically with ethanol

    Lee, Soo-Jung; Kang, Myung-Hee; Min, Hyesun

    2011-01-01

    Folate deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia are found in most patients with alcoholic liver disease. Oxidative stress is one of the most important mechanisms contributing to homocysteine (Hcy)-induced tissue injury. However it has not been examined whether exogenous administration of folic acid attenuates oxidative stress and hepatic toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo effect of folic acid supplementation on oxidative stress and hepatic toxicity induced by chronic et...

  13. Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Pathologies: From an Adipocentric Point of View

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pathological role in the development of various diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis, or cancer. Systemic oxidative stress results from an imbalance between oxidants derivatives production and antioxidants defenses. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally considered to be detrimental for health. However, evidences have been provided that they can act as second messengers in adaptative responses to stress. Obesity represents a major risk factor for deleteri...

  14. EVALUATION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS MARKERS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURES OF SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Kemidi Ilaiah; V Chandrashekar; K.B.Prusty; H.N.Viswas; J.Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress defines an imbalance between the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. The existence of oxidative stress and higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in association with uraemia is proven from studies on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. Non traditional risk factors like oxidative stress are being given special emphasis to explain high incidence and identification of new therapeutic interventions. Excess Reactive oxygen Species levels have been ...

  15. Erlotinib-mediated Inhibition of EGFR Signaling Induces Metabolic Oxidative Stress through NOX4

    Orcutt, Kevin P.; Parsons, Arlene D.; Sibenaller, Zita A.; Scarbrough, Peter M.; Zhu, Yueming; Sobhakumari, Arya; Wilke, Werner W.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Goswami, Prabhat; Miller, Francis J.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Simons, Andrean L.

    2011-01-01

    Redox regulation of EGFR signaling helps protect cells against oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether the cytotoxicity of an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib (ERL), was mediated by induction of oxidative stress in human head and neck cancer (HNSCC) cells. ERL elicited cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo while increasing a panel of oxidative stress parameters which were all reversible by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine. Knockdown of EGFR using siRNA similarly increas...

  16. Differential gene expression in normal and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in response to oxidative stress

    Cortes, Diego F.; Sha, Wei; Hower, Valerie; Blekherman, Greg; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Akman, Steven; Torti, Suzy V; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in breast carcinogenesis. To investigate whether normal and malignant breast epithelial cells differ in their responses to oxidative stress, we examined the global gene expression profiles of three cell types, representing cancer progression from a normal to a malignant stage, under oxidative stress. Normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), an immortalized cell line (HMLER-1), and a tumorigenic cell line (HMLER-5), were exposed to increased levels of rea...

  17. Increased oxidative stress in patients with depression and its relationship to treatment

    Chung, Cecilia P.; Schmidt, Dennis; Stein, C. Michael; Morrow, Jason D.; Salomon, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of depression. We tested the hypothesis that urinary F2 isoprostane, a robust marker of oxidative stress, was increased in patients with depression and associated with symptoms and response to treatment. Urinary F2 isoprostane was compared in 18 patients with depression and 36 age and sex matched control subjects. In patients, we tested the association between oxidative stress, depression questionnaires and antidepressant treatment. Urinary...

  18. Vascular oxidative stress upregulates angiotensin II type I receptors via mechanisms involving nuclear factor kappa B

    Bhatt, Siddhartha R.; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F.; Banday, Anees Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The association of oxidative stress with hypertension is well known. However, a causal role of oxidative stress in hypertension is unclear. Vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) upregulation is a prominent contributor to pathogenesis of hypertension. However, the mechanisms causing this upregulation are unknown. Oxidative stress is an important regulator of protein expression via activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). The present study was carried ...

  19. Impact of Ramadan Intermittent Fasting on Oxidative Stress Measured by Urinary 15--Isoprostane

    Mo'ez Al-Islam Ezzat Faris; Rand Nidal Hussein; Ref'at Ahmad Al-Kurd; Mohammed Ahmed Al-Fararjeh; Yasser Khalil Bustanji; Mohammad Khalil Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Fasting and caloric restriction have been associated with reduced incidence of chronic diseases and cancers. These effects have been attributed to reduced oxidative stress. Since Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) has been associated with reduced caloric intake, it was hypothesized that RIF would alleviate oxidative stress in healthy volunteers. The study was designed to elucidate the impact of RIF on oxidative stress measured by 15-F2t-Isoprostane (15FIP). Fifty healthy subjects (23 men and ...

  20. Toxicity and biocompatibility of nanoparticles, and studies on oxidative stress and DNA damage

    Rodhe, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with several diseases, either as a cause or a consequence. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is one example of a disease in which elevated levels of oxidative stress are frequently reported. Oxidative stress, inflammation and malnutrition are risk factors that contribute to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease and a higher morbidity and mortality in CKD patients. In addition, oral complaints such as periodontitis and mouth dryness are recurrent...

  1. Preconditioning L6 Muscle Cells with Naringin Ameliorates Oxidative Stress and Increases Glucose Uptake

    R. Dhanya; K B Arun; Nisha, V. M.; Syama, H. P.; Nisha, P.; Santhosh Kumar, T. R.; Jayamurthy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to pathological changes in diabetes and its complications. Thus, strategies to reduce oxidative stress may alleviate these pathogenic processes. Herein, we have investigated Naringin mediated regulation of glutathione (GSH) & intracellular free radical levels and modulation of glucose uptake under oxidative stress in L6 cell lines. The results from the study demonstrated a marked decrease in glutathione with a subsequent increase in free radical levels, w...

  2. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (acetovanillone) induces oxidative stress

    Apocynin (acetovanillone) is often used as a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In N11 glial cells, apocynin induced, in a dose-dependent way, a significant increase of both malonyldialdehyde level (index of lipid peroxidation) and lactate dehydrogenase release (index of a cytotoxic effect). Apocynin evoked also, in a significant way, an increase of H2O2 concentration and a decrease of the intracellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio, accompanied by augmented efflux of glutathione and glutathione disulfide. Apocynin induced the activation of both pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle, which was blocked when the cells were incubated with glutathione together with apocynin. The cell incubation with glutathione prevented also the apocynin-induced increase of malonyldialdehyde generation and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Apocynin exerted an oxidant effect also in a cell-free system: indeed, in aqueous solution, it evoked a faster oxidation of the thiols glutathione and dithiothreitol, and elicited the generation of reactive oxygen species, mainly superoxide anions. Our results suggest that apocynin per se can induce an oxidative stress and exert a cytotoxic effect in N11 cells and other cell types, and that some effects of apocynin in in vitro and in vivo experimental models should be interpreted with caution

  3. Oxidative stress fuels Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

    Paiva, Claudia N.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Dutra, Fabianno F.; Carneiro, Vitor C.; Freitas, Guilherme B.; Alves, Letícia S.; Mesquita, Jacilene; Fortes, Guilherme B.; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T.; Souza, Heitor S.P.; Fantappié, Marcelo R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage contributes to microbe elimination during macrophage respiratory burst. Nuclear factor, erythroid-derived 2, like 2 (NRF2) orchestrates antioxidant defenses, including the expression of heme-oxygenase–1 (HO-1). Unexpectedly, the activation of NRF2 and HO-1 reduces infection by a number of pathogens, although the mechanism responsible for this effect is largely unknown. We studied Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice in which NRF2/HO-1 was induced with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). CoPP reduced parasitemia and tissue parasitism, while an inhibitor of HO-1 activity increased T. cruzi parasitemia in blood. CoPP-induced effects did not depend on the adaptive immunity, nor were parasites directly targeted. We also found that CoPP reduced macrophage parasitism, which depended on NRF2 expression but not on classical mechanisms such as apoptosis of infected cells, induction of type I IFN, or NO. We found that exogenous expression of NRF2 or HO-1 also reduced macrophage parasitism. Several antioxidants, including NRF2 activators, reduced macrophage parasite burden, while pro-oxidants promoted it. Reducing the intracellular labile iron pool decreased parasitism, and antioxidants increased the expression of ferritin and ferroportin in infected macrophages. Ferrous sulfate reversed the CoPP-induced decrease in macrophage parasite burden and, given in vivo, reversed their protective effects. Our results indicate that oxidative stress contributes to parasite persistence in host tissues and open a new avenue for the development of anti–T. cruzi drugs. PMID:22728935

  4. Statins as Pleiotropic Modifiers of Vascular Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Psarros Costas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the industrialized world and in the future is expected to be the number one killer worldwide. The main cause underlying CVD is atherosclerosis. A key event in atherosclerosis initiation and progression is oxidative stress through the production of reactive oxygen species as well as endothelial dysfunction. Several pro- inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and proteins are involved in this process, complemented by activation of adhesion molecules that promote leukocyte rolling, tethering and infiltration into the sub-endothelial space. Statins represent the agent of choice since numerous clinical trials have verified that their pharmacological action extends beyond lipid lowering. Statins demonstrate direct anti-oxidant effects by scavenging free radicals and stimulating anti-oxidant enzymes while acting as regulators for cytokine, protein and adhesion molecule expression, all of which are involved in the atherosclerotic process. Statin use is considered one of the most efficient currently used interventions in managing CVD with the likely hood of remaining so in the near future.

  5. Simvastatin Attenuates Contrast-Induced Nephropathy through Modulation of Oxidative Stress, Proinflammatory Myeloperoxidase, and Nitric Oxide

    Ketab E. Al-Otaibi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contrast media- (CM- induced nephropathy is a serious complication of radiodiagnostic procedures. Available data suggests that the development of prophylaxis strategies is limited by poor understanding of pathophysiology of CM-induced nephropathy. Present study was designed to determine the role of oxidative stress, myeloperoxidase, and nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of iohexol model of nephropathy and its modification with simvastatin (SSTN. Adult Sprague Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. After 24 h of water deprivation, all the rats except in control and SSTN-only groups were injected (10 ml/kg with 25% glycerol. After 30 min, SSTN (15, 30, and 60 mg/kg was administered orally, daily for 4 days. Twenty-four hours after the glycerol injection, iohexol was infused (8 ml/kg through femoral vein over a period of 2 min. All the animals were sacrificed on day 5 and blood and kidneys were collected for biochemical and histological studies. The results showed that SSTN dose dependently attenuated CM-induced rise of creatinine, urea, and structural abnormalities suggesting its nephroprotective effect. A significant increase in oxidative stress (increased lipid hydroperoxides and reduced glutathione levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO and decreased nitric oxide in CM group were reversed by SSTN. These findings support the use of SSTN to combat CM-induced nephrotoxicity.

  6. Glycated Hemoglobin, Gastric Juice Nitric Oxide and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Patients Infected by Helicobacter Pylori

    Puramini, N. (BSc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Recently, diabetes mellitus has been known as one of the main cause of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Since a high prevalence of H. Pylori in diabetic patients has been reported, we aimed to evaluate the level of gastric juice Nitric Oxide (NO°, Oxidative Stress and Glycated Hemoglobin. Material and Methods: In case group, the participants were 60 diabetic patients infected with H. Pylori, and in control groups 60 diabetic patients without H. Pylori and 60 healthy individuals. The level of NO° in gastric juice was measured calorimetrically and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX in gastric biopsy was determined using standard methods. The percentage of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1C was measured by ion exchange chromatography. Results: In case group compared to controls, significantly increased level of blood HbA1C, nitric oxide in gastric juice, activity of SOD and GPX in the gastric mucosa were observed (p<0.0001. Conclusion: A significant increase of glycated hemoglobin in diabetic patients with H. Pylori and high activity of antioxidant enzymes in the case group may indicate a high production of reactive oxygen species and the presence of oxidative stress in these patients.

  7. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. PMID:27422326

  8. Serum Levels of Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress Biomarkers Differ according to Sasang Constitutional Type

    Kim, Hyeong Geug; Kim, Yoon Jung; Ahn, Yo Chan; Son, Chang Gue

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study investigated whether Sasang constitutional type is associated with differences in the serum levels of stress hormones and oxidative stress. Methods. A total of 236 participants (77 males and 159 females) were enrolled. The serum levels of cortisol, adrenaline, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were analyzed. Results. The distribution of Sasang constitutional types was as follows: Taeumin, 35.6%; Soumin, 33.0%; and Soyangin, 31.4%. The serum cortisol levels of Taeumin were significantly lower than Soumin (p < 0.1 in both sexes) and Soyangin (p < 0.05 in males and p < 0.1 in females). The adrenaline levels were also significantly lower in Taeumin than in Soumin (p < 0.05 in males and p < 0.1 in females) and Soyangin (p < 0.1 in males). Serum ROS levels were significantly higher in Soyangin than in Taeumin and Soumin (p < 0.05 in males), whereas MDA levels were significantly lower in Taeumin compared with Soumin and Soyangin (p < 0.05 in males and p < 0.1 in females). Conclusion. Taeumin type may tolerate psychological or oxidative stress better than other types, which suggests a biological mechanism to explain the different pathophysiological features of Sasang constitutional types. PMID:26539232

  9. Oxidative Stress in Aging-Matters of the Heart and Mind

    Tai, T. C.; Krishnan Venkataraman; Sandhya Khurana

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative damage is considered to be the primary cause of several aging associated disease pathologies. Cumulative oxidative damage tends to be pervasive among cellular macromolecules, impacting proteins, lipids, RNA and DNA of cells. At a systemic level, events subsequent to oxidative damage induce an inflammatory response to sites of oxidative damage, often contributing to additional oxidative stress. At a cellular level, oxidative damage to mitochondria results in acidification of the cyto...

  10. Chronic antioxidant therapy reduces oxidative stress in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Siedlak, Sandra L.; Casadesus, Gemma; Webber, Kate M; Pappolla, Miguel A.; Atwood, Craig S.; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative modifications are a hallmark of oxidative imbalance in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases and their respective animal models. While the causes of oxidative stress are relatively well-documented, the effects of chronically reducing oxidative stress on cognition, pathology and biochemistry require further clarification. To address this, young and aged control and amyloid-β protein precursor-over-expressing mice were fed a diet with added R-alpha...

  11. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Markers of Oxidative Stress in Healthy Women

    Minlikeeva, Albina N.; Browne, Richard W.; Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Catalin Marian; Shields, Peter G.; Maurizio Trevisan; Shiva Krishnan; Ramakrishna Modali; Michael Seddon; Teresa Lehman; Freudenheim, Jo L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is accumulating evidence that oxidative stress is an important contributor to carcinogenesis. We hypothesized that genetic variation in genes involved in maintaining antioxidant/oxidant balance would be associated with overall oxidative stress. Methods We examined associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MnSOD, GSTP1, GSTM1, GPX1, GPX3, and CAT genes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), a blood biomarker of oxidative damage, in healthy white...

  12. Oxidative Stress and Exhaled Breath Analysis: A Promising Tool for Detection of Lung Cancer

    Thomas, Paul S.; Craig Lewis; Hiang Ping Chan

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the few neoplasia in which the principal aetiology is known, with cigarette smoke donating a considerable oxidative burden to the lungs. This may be part of the aetiology of lung cancer, but the neoplastic process is also associated with increased oxidative stress. Nonetheless, it is difficult to study the mechanisms behind the induction of lung cancer in smokers, but newer techniques of breath analysis targeting markers of oxidative stress and anti-oxidant capacity show...

  13. Obesity-Related Oxidative Stress: the Impact of Physical Activity and Diet Manipulation

    Huang, Chun-Jung; McAllister, Matthew J.; Slusher, Aaron L.; Webb, Heather E.; Mock, J. Thomas; Acevedo, Edmund O.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-related oxidative stress, the imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants (e.g., nitric oxide), has been linked to metabolic and cardiovascular disease, including endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for physiological functions including gene expression, cellular growth, infection defense, and modulating endothelial function. However, elevated ROS and/or diminished antioxidant capacity leading to oxidative stress can lead to dysf...

  14. Peripheral markers of oxidative stress in chronic mercuric chloride intoxication

    Gutierrez L.L.P.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the time course changes in peripheral markers of oxidative stress in a chronic HgCl2 intoxication model. Twenty male adult Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously daily for 30 days and divided into two groups of 10 animals each: Hg, which received HgCl2 (0.16 mg kg-1 day-1, and control, receiving the same volume of saline solution. Blood was collected at the first, second and fourth weeks of Hg administration to evaluate lipid peroxidation (LPO, total radical trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP, and superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, and catalase (CAT. HgCl2 administration induced a rise (by 26% in LPO compared to control (143 ± 10 cps/mg hemoglobin in the second week and no difference was found at the end of the treatment. At that time, GST and GPx were higher (14 and 24%, respectively in the Hg group, and Cu,Zn-SOD was lower (54% compared to control. At the end of the treatment, Cu,Zn-SOD and CAT were higher (43 and 10%, respectively in the Hg group compared to control (4.6 ± 0.3 U/mg protein; 37 ± 0.9 pmol/mg protein, respectively. TRAP was lower (69% in the first week compared to control (43.8 ± 1.9 mM Trolox. These data provide evidence that HgCl2 administration is accompanied by systemic oxidative damage in the initial phase of the process, which leads to adaptive changes in the antioxidant reserve, thus decreasing the oxidative injury at the end of 30 days of HgCl2 administration. These results suggest that a preventive treatment with antioxidants would help to avoid oxidative damage in subjects with chronic intoxication.

  15. The effects of oxidative stress on female reproduction: a review

    Agarwal Ashok

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oxidative stress (OS, a state characterized by an imbalance between pro-oxidant molecules including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and antioxidant defenses, has been identified to play a key role in the pathogenesis of subfertility in both males and females. The adverse effects of OS on sperm quality and functions have been well documented. In females, on the other hand, the impact of OS on oocytes and reproductive functions remains unclear. This imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants can lead to a number of reproductive diseases such as endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, and unexplained infertility. Pregnancy complications such as spontaneous abortion, recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia, can also develop in response to OS. Studies have shown that extremes of body weight and lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and recreational drug use can promote excess free radical production, which could affect fertility. Exposures to environmental pollutants are of increasing concern, as they too have been found to trigger oxidative states, possibly contributing to female infertility. This article will review the currently available literature on the roles of reactive species and OS in both normal and abnormal reproductive physiological processes. Antioxidant supplementation may be effective in controlling the production of ROS and continues to be explored as a potential strategy to overcome reproductive disorders associated with infertility. However, investigations conducted to date have been through animal or in vitro studies, which have produced largely conflicting results. The impact of OS on assisted reproductive techniques (ART will be addressed, in addition to the possible benefits of antioxidant supplementation of ART culture media to increase the likelihood for ART success. Future randomized controlled clinical trials on humans are necessary to elucidate the precise mechanisms

  16. Lutein as protective agent against neonatal oxidative stress

    Giuseppe Buonocore

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals (FR are important for a correct development of neonatal organs and tissues. However, newborn and fetus have profoundly impaired antioxidant system. In these subjects, oxidative stress (OS may be detrimental by activating deleterious cellular processes. Decreasing FR and restoring oxidative imbalance certainly appear to be beneficial in perinatal period. Among the therapeutic antioxidant approaches in newborns, lutein, a compound belonging to the xanthophyll family of carotenoids, is one of the emerging strategies. Humans cannot synthesize lutein, hence the intake primarily depends on diet. In the neonatal period, fresh, non-processed human milk is the main dietary source of lutein, while infant formula is lacking it. Lutein has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Lutein supplementation in human newborns during the first days of life has been demonstrated to decrease plasma biomarkers of OS and increase antioxidant capacities. Numerous experimental study have demonstrated that lutein effectively neutralizes oxidants and modulates inflammatory processes, showing particular protective effects on macula and photoreceptors against phototoxicity and oxidative injury. Only few clinical studies evaluated the effectiveness of lutein in reducing preterm and term infant morbidity, reporting no definitive results. The challenge for the future is to better clarify the timing, the optimal dose and the duration of lutein intervention in perinatal period and to verify its impact on infants’ health. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  17. 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease-like degeneration generates acute microgliosis and astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system but no bioluminescence imaging-detectable alteration in adult neurogenesis.

    Fricke, Inga B; Viel, Thomas; Worlitzer, Maik M; Collmann, Franziska M; Vrachimis, Alexis; Faust, Andreas; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Faber, Cornelius; Dollé, Frédéric; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Schäfers, Klaus; Hermann, Sven; Schwamborn, Jens C; Jacobs, Andreas H

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder caused by loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), leading to severe impairment in motor and non-motor functions. Endogenous subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells constantly give birth to new cells that might serve as a possible source for regeneration in the adult brain. However, neurodegeneration is accompanied by neuroinflammation and dopamine depletion, potentially compromising regeneration. We therefore employed in vivo imaging methods to study striatal deafferentation (N-ω-fluoropropyl-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)nortropane single photon emission computed tomography, DaTscan(™) ) and neuroinflammation in the SN and striatum (N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide positron emission tomography, [(18) F]DPA-714 PET) in the intranigral 6-hydroxydopamine Parkinson's disease mouse model. Additionally, we transduced cells in the SVZ with a lentivirus encoding firefly luciferase and followed migration of progenitor cells in the SVZ-olfactory bulb axis via bioluminescence imaging under disease and control conditions. We found that activation of microglia in the SN is an acute process accompanying the degeneration of dopaminergic cell bodies in the SN. Dopaminergic deafferentation of the striatum does not influence the generation of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts in the SVZ, but generates chronic astrogliosis in the nigrostriatal system. PMID:26950181

  18. Ethanol withdrawal increases oxidative stress and reduces nitric oxide bioavailability in the vasculature of rats.

    Gonzaga, Natalia A; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; De Martinis, Bruno S; Padovan, Claudia M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the effects of ethanol withdrawal on the vascular and systemic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and vascular oxidative stress. Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol 3-9% (v/v) for a period of 21 days. Ethanol withdrawal was induced by abrupt discontinuation of the treatment. Experiments were performed 48 h after ethanol discontinuation. Rats from the ethanol withdrawal group showed decreased exploration of the open arms of the elevated-plus maze (EPM) and increased plasma corticosterone levels. Ethanol withdrawal significantly increased systolic blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II (ANG II) levels without an effect on plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, or plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) levels. No differences in vascular ANG I, ANG II levels, and ACE activity/expression and AT1 and AT2 receptor expression were detected among the experimental groups. Plasma osmolality, as well as plasma sodium, potassium, and glucose levels were not affected by ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol withdrawal induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels and the vascular generation of superoxide anion. Ethanol withdrawal significantly decreased plasma and vascular nitrate/nitrite levels. Major new findings of the present study are that ethanol withdrawal induces vascular oxidative stress and reduces nitric oxide (NO) levels in the vasculature. Additionally, our study provides novel evidence that ethanol withdrawal does not affect the vascular ANG II generating system while stimulating systemic RAS. These responses could predispose individuals to the development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25557835

  19. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Wei Fan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD. Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory

  20. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  1. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Gurunathan S; Han JW; Dayem AA; Eppakayala V; Kim JH

    2012-01-01

    Sangiliyandi Gurunathan, Jae Woong Han, Ahmed Abdal Dayem, Vasuki Eppakayala, Jin-Hoi KimDepartment of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, South KoreaBackground: Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxid...

  2. Oxidative stress, metabolism of ethanol and alcohol-related diseases.

    Zima, T; Fialová, L; Mestek, O; Janebová, M; Crkovská, J; Malbohan, I; Stípek, S; Mikulíková, L; Popov, P

    2001-01-01

    Alcohol-induced oxidative stress is linked to the metabolism of ethanol. Three metabolic pathways of ethanol have been described in the human body so far. They involve the following enzymes: alcohol dehydrogenase, microsomal ethanol oxidation system (MEOS) and catalase. Each of these pathways could produce free radicals which affect the antioxidant system. Ethanol per se, hyperlactacidemia and elevated NADH increase xanthine oxidase activity, which results in the production of superoxide. Lipid peroxidation and superoxide production correlate with the amount of cytochrome P450 2E1. MEOS aggravates the oxidative stress directly as well as indirectly by impairing the defense systems. Hydroxyethyl radicals are probably involved in the alkylation of hepatic proteins. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key factors contributing to the vessel wall homeostasis, an important mediator of the vascular tone and neuronal transduction, and has cytotoxic effects. Stable metabolites--nitrites and nitrates--were increased in alcoholics (34.3 +/- 2.6 vs. 22.7 +/- 1.2 micromol/l, p concentration could be discussed for its excitotoxicity and may be linked to cytotoxicity in neurons, glia and myelin. Formation of NO has been linked to an increased preference for and tolerance to alcohol in recent studies. Increased NO biosynthesis also via inducible NO synthase (NOS, chronic stimulation) may contribute to platelet and endothelial dysfunctions. Comparison of chronically ethanol-fed rats and controls demonstrates that exposure to ethanol causes a decrease in NADPH diaphorase activity (neuronal NOS) in neurons and fibers of the cerebellar cortex and superior colliculus (stratum griseum superficiale and intermedium) in rats. These changes in the highly organized structure contribute to the motor disturbances, which are associated with alcohol abuse. Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) in alcoholic patients seem to reflect membrane lesions, impairment of immunological reactivity, liver disease

  3. Function of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols during oxidative stress in plants.

    Kruk, Jerzy; Szymańska, Renata; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Dłużewska, Jolanta

    2016-09-25

    Isoprenoid quinones and chromanols in plants fulfill both signaling and antioxidant functions under oxidative stress. The redox state of the plastoquinol pool (PQ-pool), which is modulated by interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) during oxidative stress, has a major regulatory function in both short- and long-term acclimatory responses. By contrast, the scavenging of ROS by prenyllipids affects signaling pathways where ROS play a role as signaling molecules. As the primary antioxidants, isoprenoid quinones and chromanols are synthesized under high-light stress in response to any increased production of ROS. During photo-oxidative stress, these prenyllipids are continuously synthesized and oxidized to other compounds. In turn, their oxidation products (hydroxy-plastochromanol, plastoquinol-C, plastoquinone-B) can still have an antioxidant function. The oxidation products of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols formed specifically in the face of singlet oxygen, can be indicators of singlet oxygen stress. PMID:26970272

  4. Phytotoxicity by Lead as Heavy Metal Focus on Oxidative Stress

    Sónia Pinho

    2012-01-01

    since it can be prejudicial to human health through food chain. Pb is a common environmental contaminant, which originate numerous disturbances in plant physiological processes due to the bioacummulation of this metal pollutant in plant tissues. This review, focus on the uptake and interaction of lead by plants and how it can be introduced in food chain. Special attention was taken to address the oxidative stress by lead regarding the effects produced in plant physiological and biochemical processes. Furthermore, the antioxidant defence system was taken into consideration. Phytoremediation is applied on site or chronic polluted soils. This emerging technique is useful to bioaccumulate, degrade or decrease risks associated with contaminants in soils, water or air through the use of hyperaccumulaters. In addition, the impact of nanoparticles in plant science was also focused in this article since some improving properties in plants have been increasingly investigated.

  5. No effect of melatonin on oxidative stress after laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Kücükakin, B.; Klein, M.; Lykkesfeldt, Jens;

    2010-01-01

    Background Melatonin, an endogenous circadian regulator, also has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effect of melatonin in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods Patients were randomized to receive 10 mg...... melatonin or placebo during surgery. Blood samples for analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA), ascorbic acid (AA), total ascorbic acid (TAA) dehydroascorbic acid (DHA) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were collected pre-operatively and at 5 min, 6 h and 24 h after operation. Results Twenty patients received...... melatonin and 21 patients received placebo during surgery. No significant differences were observed between the groups in the oxidative stress variables MDA, TAA, AA and DHA or in the inflammatory variable CRP (repeated-measures ANOVA, P > 0.05 for all variables). Conclusions Administration of 10 mg...

  6. Oxidative stress induced expression of monodehydroascorbate reductase gene in Eleusine coracana.

    Sudan, Jebi; Negi, Bhawana; Arora, Sandeep

    2015-10-01

    Abiotic stresses constitute a serious threats to the world food security as they cause significant economic losses in terms of reduction in crop productivity and also greatly limit the geographical locations where crops can be grown. Exposure to abiotic stress causes over-production of reactive oxygen species, leading to oxidative stress in plants. Induction of oxidative stress is primarily responsible for a variety of detrimental changes in the cellular physiology. However, plants have evolved intricate anti-oxidative defence machinery, for their survival under stress. Plant defence strategies for stress tolerance rely on the expression of anti-oxidative genes required for scavenging the toxic reactive oxygen species. Monodehydroascorbate reductase is one of the key anti-oxidant enzyme responsible for scavenging reactive oxygen species. In the present study, efforts have been made to understand the role of monodehydroascorbate reductase in finger millet under different abiotic stresses (drought, salt and UV radiation). The study establishes a differential link between mdar gene expression and enzyme activity under oxidative stress that is validated under different types of imposed stresses. Alteration in correlation between gene expression and enzyme activities under varying magnitude of oxidative stress is elucidated. PMID:26600681

  7. Role of selenium toxicity and oxidative stress in aquatic birds.

    Hoffman, David J

    2002-04-01

    Adverse effects of selenium (Se) in wild aquatic birds have been documented as a consequence of pollution of the aquatic environment by subsurface agricultural drainwater and other sources. These effects include mortality, impaired reproduction with teratogenesis, reduced growth, histopathological lesions and alterations in hepatic glutathione metabolism. A review is provided, relating adverse biological effects of Se in aquatic birds to altered glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress. Laboratory studies, mainly with an organic form of Se, selenomethionine, have revealed oxidative stress in different stages of the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) life cycle. As dietary and tissue concentrations of Se increase, increases in plasma and hepatic GSH peroxidase activities occur, followed by dose-dependent increases in the ratio of hepatic oxidized to reduced glutathione (GSSG:GSH) and ultimately hepatic lipid peroxidation measured as an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). One or more of these oxidative effects were associated with teratogenesis (4.6 ppm wet weight Se in eggs), reduced growth in ducklings (15 ppm Se in liver), diminished immune function (5 ppm Se in liver) and histopathological lesions (29 ppm Se in liver) in adults. Manifestations of Se-related effects on glutathione metabolism were also apparent in field studies in seven species of aquatic birds. Reduced growth and possibly immune function but increased liver:body weight and hepatic GSSG:GSH ratios were apparent in american avocet (Recurvirostra americana) hatchlings from eggs containing 9 ppm Se. In black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus), which contained somewhat lower Se concentrations, a decrease in hepatic GSH was apparent with few other effects. In adult American coots (Fulica americana), signs of Se toxicosis included emaciation, abnormal feather loss and histopathological lesions. Mean liver concentrations of 28 ppm Se (ww) in the coots were associated with elevated

  8. Oxidative stress response of Inonotus obliquus induced by hydrogen peroxide.

    Zheng, Weifa; Zhao, Yanxia; Zhang, Meimei; Wei, Zhiwen; Miao, Kangjie; Sun, Weiguo

    2009-12-01

    While the medicinal fungus Inonotus obliquus produces polyphenols as one of its main metabolites in natural habitats, it accumulates less polyphenols under laboratory conditions. In this study we found that the continuous addition of 1 mM H(2)O(2) at a rate of 1.6 ml/h into a submerged culture of the fungus enhanced its production of mycelia, melanins, flavonoids and hispidin analogs (HA). Simultaneous exposure of the fungus to both H(2)O(2) and arbutin resulted in reduced production of mycelia, glycosylated flavonoids (GF) and HA, and inhibition of melanogenesis. However, superoxide dismutases (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity were enhanced following the addition of H(2)O(2) or H(2)O(2) plus arbutin. The maximum levels of SOD and CAT activities reached 355.2 U/mg protein and 39.8 U/mg protein respectively in H(2)O(2)-added medium, and 264 U/mg protein and 35.9 U/mg protein respectively in H(2)O(2) plus arbutin medium. Thus, detoxification of H(2)O(2) is conducted mainly by polyphenols under normal physiological conditions, and by both polyphenols and antioxidant enzymes under oxidative stress when melanogenesis is inhibited. Although enhanced HA production occurred after melanogenesis inactivation, total extracellular polyphenol levels were reduced. These findings suggest that enzymatic activities convert superoxide to H(2)O(2), and non-enzymatic mechanisms are largely responsible for detoxifying H(2)O(2). Enhanced production of melanins is the most important non-enzymatic response of this fungus against oxidative stress. PMID:19184774

  9. Arterial stiffness and sedentary lifestyle: Role of oxidative stress.

    Lessiani, Gianfranco; Santilli, Francesca; Boccatonda, Andrea; Iodice, Pierpaolo; Liani, Rossella; Tripaldi, Romina; Saggini, Raoul; Davì, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    Sedentary lifestyle is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, and leads to a quantifiable impairment in vascular function and arterial wall stiffening. We tested the hypothesis of oxidative stress as a determinant of arterial stiffness (AS) in physically inactive subjects, and challenged the reversibility of these processes after the completion of an eight-week, high-intensity exercise training (ET). AS was assessed before and after ET, measuring carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) with a Vicorder device. At baseline and after ET, participants performed urine collection and underwent fasting blood sampling. Urinary 8-iso-PGF2α, an in vivo marker of lipid peroxidation, total, HDL and LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. ET was associated with significantly reduced urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(p<0.0001) levels. PWV was significantly reduced after ET completion (p<0.0001), and was directly related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α(Rho=0.383, p=0.021). After ET, cardiovascular fitness improved [peak oxygen consumption (p<0.0001), peak heart rate (p<0.0001)]. However, no improvement in lipid profile was observed, apart from a significant reduction of triglycerides (p=0.022). PWV and triglycerides were significantly related (Rho=0.466, p=0.005) throughout the study period. PWV levels were also related to urinary 8-iso-PGF2α in our previously sedentary subjects. We conclude that regular physical exercise may be a natural antioxidant strategy, lowering oxidant stress and thereby the AS degree. PMID:26044182

  10. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  11. Assessment of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by titanium oxide nanoparticles on Chinook salmon cells.

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rao, Janapala Venkateswara

    2015-10-01

    Titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have received wide attention in diverse application, but the potential impact of these nanomaterials on the environment, aquatic life and especially on fish cell lines is lacking. The present study aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by TiO2 NPs on Chinook salmon cells derived from Oncorhynchus tshawytscha embryos (CHSE-214). The The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] and neutral red (NR) assays in CHSE-214 cells exposed to TiO2 NPs revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect in the range of 10 to 60 μg/ml for 24 h. CHSE-214 cells exposed to TiO2 NPs (10-60 μg/ml) exhibited significant decline in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione (GSH) content and increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in a concentration-dependent manner. TiO2 NPs induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in CHSE-214 cells which serve as a base line studies for future studies. PMID:26013742

  12. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  13. Acrolein cytotoxicity in hepatocytes involves endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    Mohammad, Mohammad K. [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Avila, Diana [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Zhang, Jingwen [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Barve, Shirish [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Arteel, Gavin [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); McClain, Craig [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States); Robley Rex VAMC, Louisville, KY (United States); Joshi-Barve, Swati, E-mail: s0josh01@louisville.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Louisville (United States); Alcohol Research Center, University of Louisville (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Acrolein is a common environmental, food and water pollutant and a major component of cigarette smoke. Also, it is produced endogenously via lipid peroxidation and cellular metabolism of certain amino acids and drugs. Acrolein is cytotoxic to many cell types including hepatocytes; however the mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the molecular mechanisms underlying acrolein hepatotoxicity in primary human hepatocytes and hepatoma cells. Acrolein, at pathophysiological concentrations, caused a dose-dependent loss of viability of hepatocytes. The death was apoptotic at moderate and necrotic at high concentrations of acrolein. Acrolein exposure rapidly and dramatically decreased intracellular glutathione and overall antioxidant capacity, and activated the stress-signaling MAP-kinases JNK, p42/44 and p38. Our data demonstrate for the first time in human hepatocytes, that acrolein triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activated eIF2α, ATF-3 and -4, and Gadd153/CHOP, resulting in cell death. Notably, the protective/adaptive component of ER stress was not activated, and acrolein failed to up-regulate the protective ER-chaperones, GRP78 and GRP94. Additionally, exposure to acrolein disrupted mitochondrial integrity/function, and led to the release of pro-apoptotic proteins and ATP depletion. Acrolein-induced cell death was attenuated by N-acetyl cysteine, phenyl-butyric acid, and caspase and JNK inhibitors. Our data demonstrate that exposure to acrolein induces a variety of stress responses in hepatocytes, including GSH depletion, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress (without ER-protective responses) which together contribute to acrolein toxicity. Our study defines basic mechanisms underlying liver injury caused by reactive aldehyde pollutants such as acrolein. -- Highlights: ► Human primary hepatocytes and cultured cell lines are used. ► Multiple cell death signaling pathways are activated by acrolein. ► Novel finding of

  14. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in breast cancer: Oxidative stress: its effects on the growth, metastatic potential and response to therapy of breast cancer

    Brown, Nicholas S; Bicknell, Roy

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage DNA, but the role of ROS in breast carcinoma may not be limited to the mutagenic activity that drives carcinoma initiation and progression. Carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo are frequently under persistent oxidative stress. In the present review, we outline potential causes of oxygen radical generation within carcinoma cells and explore the possible impact of oxidative stress on the clinical outcome of breast carcinoma.

  15. Hypoxia and oxidative stress in breast cancer: Oxidative stress: its effects on the growth, metastatic potential and response to therapy of breast cancer

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage DNA, but the role of ROS in breast carcinoma may not be limited to the mutagenic activity that drives carcinoma initiation and progression. Carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo are frequently under persistent oxidative stress. In the present review, we outline potential causes of oxygen radical generation within carcinoma cells and explore the possible impact of oxidative stress on the clinical outcome of breast carcinoma

  16. Natural resistance to ascorbic acid induced oxidative stress is mainly mediated by catalase activity in human cancer cells and catalase-silencing sensitizes to oxidative stress

    Klingelhoeffer Christoph; Kämmerer Ulrike; Koospal Monika; Mühling Bettina; Schneider Manuela; Kapp Michaela; Kübler Alexander; Germer Christoph-Thomas; Otto Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Ascorbic acid demonstrates a cytotoxic effect by generating hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in oxidative cell stress. A panel of eleven human cancer cell lines, glioblastoma and carcinoma, were exposed to serial dilutions of ascorbic acid (5-100 mmol/L). The purpose of this study was to analyse the impact of catalase, an important hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzyme, on the resistance of cancer cells to ascorbic acid mediated oxidative stress. ...

  17. Temporal evolution of the Arabidopsis oxidative stress response.

    Mahalingam, Ramamurthy; Shah, Nigam; Scrymgeour, Alexandra; Fedoroff, Nina

    2005-03-01

    We have carried out a detailed analysis of the changes in gene expression levels in Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia (Col-0) plants during and for 6 h after exposure to ozone (O3) at 350 parts per billion (ppb) for 6 h. This O3 exposure is sufficient to induce a marked transcriptional response and an oxidative burst, but not to cause substantial tissue damage in Col-0 wild-type plants and is within the range encountered in some major metropolitan areas. We have developed analytical and visualization tools to automate the identification of expression profile groups with common gene ontology (GO) annotations based on the sub-cellular localization and function of the proteins encoded by the genes, as well as to automate promoter analysis for such gene groups. We describe application of these methods to identify stress-induced genes whose transcript abundance is likely to be controlled by common regulatory mechanisms and summarized our findings in a temporal model of the stress response. PMID:15988565

  18. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can interact with the intracellular environment.The process of protection of the cell against an oxidative damage occur by thiol and cystein residue that has a low molecular weight. These residue are present in the active sites of a protein like, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin. Apart from intracellular antioxidant defense mechanism by protein thiol, there are presence of thiol in outer surface of protein that are not involved with the function of protein, even though they can interact with intracellular part of the cell. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 443-456

  19. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    Shan, Xiaozhong; Zhou, Junlai; Ma, Tao; Chai, Qiongxia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups, i.e., one control group and three LBP treated groups. The animals received an oral administration of physiological saline or LBP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. On the day of the exercise test, rats were required to run to exhaustion on the treadmill. Body weight, endurance time, malondialdehyde (MDA), super oxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) level of rats were measured. The results showed that the body weight of rats in LBP treated groups were not significantly different from that in the normal control group before and after the experiment (P > 0.05). After exhaustive exercise, the mean endurance time of treadmill running to exhaustion of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly prolonged compared with that in the normal control group. MDA levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly decreased compared with that in the normal control group (P rats in LBP treated groups were significantly increased compared with that in the normal control group (P exhaustive exercise. PMID:21541044

  20. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products. PMID:27295259

  1. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  2. Roles of Oxidative Stress in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Cancers

    Tao Zuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS has received extensive attention in the last two decades, because of the discovery that abnormal oxidation status was related to patients with chronic diseases, such as diabetes, cardiovascular, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, cancer, and neurological diseases. OS is considered as a potential inducing factor in the pathogenesis of PCOS, which is one of the most common complex endocrine disorders and a leading cause of female infertility, affecting 4%–12% of women in the world, as OS has close interactions with PCOS characteristics, just as insulin resistance (IR, hyperandrogenemia, and chronic inflammation. It has also been shown that DNA mutations and alterations induced by OS are involved in cancer pathogenesis, tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and so on. Furthermore, recent studies show that the females with PCOS are reported to have an increasing risk of cancers. As a result, the more serious OS in PCOS is regarded as an important potential incentive for the increasing risk of cancers, and this study aims to analyze the possibility and potential pathogenic mechanism of the above process, providing insightful thoughts and evidences for preventing cancer potentially caused by PCOS in clinic.

  3. Chlorpyrifos induces oxidative stress in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    There are increasing concerns regarding the relative safety of chlorpyrifos (CPF) to various facets of the environment. Although published works suggest that CPF is relatively safe in adult animals, recent evidence indicates that juveniles, both animals and humans, may be more sensitive to CPF toxicity than adults. In young animals, CPF is neurotoxic and mechanistically interferes with cellular replication and cellular differentiation, which culminates in the alteration of synaptic neurotransmission in neurons. However, the effects of CPF on glial cells are not fully elucidated. Here we report that chlorpyrifos is toxic to oligodendrocyte progenitors. In addition, CPF produced dose-dependent increases in 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA) and dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence intensities relative to the vehicle control. Moreover, CPF toxicity is associated with nuclear condensation and elevation of caspase 3/7 activity and Heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression. Pan-caspase inhibitor QVDOPh and cholinergic receptor antagonists' atropine and mecamylamine failed to protect oligodendrocyte progenitors from CPF-induced injury. Finally, glutathione (GSH) depletion enhanced CPF-induced toxicity whereas nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor L-NAME partially protected progenitors and the non-specific antioxidant vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) completely spared cells from injury. Collectively, this data suggests that CPF induced toxicity is independent of cholinergic stimulation and is most likely caused by the induction of oxidative stress.

  4. Role of oxidative stress in endothelial insulin resistance

    Francesco Paneni; Sarah Costantino; Francesco Cosentino

    2015-01-01

    The International Diabetes Federation estimates that 316 million people are currently affected by impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Most importantly, recent forecasts anticipate a dramatic IGT increase with more that 470 million people affected by the year 2035. Impaired insulin sensitivity is major feature of obesity and diabetes and is strongly linked with adverse cardiometabolic phenotypes. However, the etiologic pathway linking impaired glucose tolerance and cardiovascular disease remains to be deciphered. Although insulin resistance has been attributed to inflammatory programs starting in adipose tissue, emerging evidence indicates thatendothelial dysfunction may represent the upstreamevent preceding peripheral impairment of insulinsensitivity. Indeed, suppression of reactive oxygenspecies-dependent pathways in the endothelium hasshown to restore insulin delivery to peripheral organsby preserving nitric oxide (NO) availability. Here wedescribe emerging theories concerning endothelialinsulin resistance, with particular emphasis on the roleoxidative stress. Complex molecular circuits includingendothelial nitric oxide synthase, prostacyclin synthase,mitochondrial adaptor p66Shc, nicotinamide adeninedinucleotide phosphate-oxidase oxidase and nuclearfactor kappa-B are discussed. Moreover, the reviewprovides insights on the effectiveness of availablecompounds (i.e. , ruboxistaurin, sildenafil, endothelinreceptor antagonists, NO donors) in restoring endothelialinsulin signalling. Taken together, these aspects maysignificantly contribute to design novel therapeuticapproaches to restore glucose homeostasis in patientswith obesity and diabetes.

  5. Oxidative stress and total antioxidant capacity in handball players

    Gholamreza Sharifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exercise training increases oxygen consumption, which was associated with the high generation of reactive oxygen species and markers of lipid peroxidation in the blood. The aim of this study was to assess the responses of total antioxidant capacity (TAC, biomarker of oxidative stress and erythrocyte, leukocyte and hematocrit (Hct levels in plasma in athlete girls (handball players and non-athlete girls. Materials and Methods: We evaluated two groups, which known as athlete and non-athlete women and they were similar in anthropometric characteristics. The athletic women engaged in the regular handball training 3 times a week for at least 6 months. However, non-athletic women didn′t have any regular activity over the last 6 months. Each subject referred to the lab and after 12 h fasting, the blood samples were taken for measuring all variables. Independent sample t-tests were used to identify the differences. Result: Significant differences were observed in malondehyde (P = 0.00, red blood (P = 0.00 cell and hemoglobin (P = 0.00. However, other evaluated factors such as of TAC, white blood cell, Hct and the mean corpuscular volume were higher in athletes than in non-athletes, but statistical significant differences weren′t seen in these variables between two groups. Conclusion: Regular exercise training for handball players may increase the activity of antioxidant enzymes and blood cells and reduces oxidant production.

  6. Degradation of Ultra-Thin Gate Oxide NMOSFETs under CVDT and SHE Stresses

    HU Shi-Gang; CAO Yan-Rong; HAO Yue; MA Xiao-Hua; CHEN Chi; WU Xiao-Feng; ZHOU Qing-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Degradation of device under substrate hot-electron (SHE) and constant voltage direct-tunnelling (CVDT) stresses are studied using NMOSFET with 1.4-nm gate oxides. The degradation of device parameters and the degradation of the stress induced leakage current (SILC) under these two stresses are reported. The emphasis of this paper is on SILC and breakdown of ultra-thin-gate-oxide under these two stresses. SILC increases with stress time and several soft breakdown events occur during direct-tunnelling (DT) stress. During SHE stress, SILC firstly decreases with stress time and suddenly jumps to a high level, and no soft breakdown event is observed. For DT injection, the positive hole trapped in the oxide and hole direct-tunnelling play important roles in the breakdown.For SHE injection, it is because injected hot electrons accelerate the formation of defects and these defects formed by hot electrons induce breakdown.

  7. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs. PMID:26493272

  8. Nitric oxide reduces oxidative damage induced by water stress in sunflower plants

    Inês Cechin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the main environmental constraints that can reduce plant yield. Nitric oxide (NO is a signal molecule involved in plant responses to several environmental stresses. The objective of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective effect of a single foliar application of 0, 1, 10 or 100 µM of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP in sunflower plants under water stress. Water stressed plants treated with 1μM SNP showed an increase in the relative water content compared with 0 μM SNP. Drought reduced the shoot dry weight but SNP applications did not result in alleviation of drought effects. Neither drought nor water stress plus SNP applications altered the content of photosynthetic pigments. Stomatal conductance was reduced by drought and this reduction was accompanied by a significant reduction in intercellular CO2 concentration and photosynthesis. Treatment with SNP did not reverse the effect of drought on the gas exchange characteristics. Drought increased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA and proline and reduced pirogalol peroxidase (PG-POD activity, but did not affect the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD. When the water stressed plants were treated with 10 μM SNP, the activity of PG-POD and the content of proline were increased and the level of MDA was decreased. The results show that the adverse effects of water stress on sunflower plants are dependent on the external NO concentration. The action of NO may be explained by its ability to increase the levels of antioxidant compounds and the activity of ROS-scavenging enzymes.

  9. Immunology and Oxidative Stress in Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Basic Approach

    Genaro G. Ortiz

    2013-01-01

    tissue injury in the pathogenesis of MS. The inflammatory environment in demyelinating lesions leads to the generation of oxygen- and nitrogen-free radicals as well as proinflammatory cytokines which contribute to the development and progression of the disease. Inflammation can lead to oxidative stress and vice versa. Thus, oxidative stress and inflammation are involved in a self-perpetuating cycle.

  10. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway

    Yao Zhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL, one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 and NAD(PH dehydrogenase (quinone1 (NQO1. However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA, and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT, resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  11. Oxidative stress and detoxification in reproduction with emphasis on glutathione and preeclampsia

    Raijmakers, Maarten Theodorus Maria

    2003-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with several diseases including reproductive disorders and preeclampsia. Defence against oxidative stress is provided by numerous exogenous antioxidants (e.g. vitamins E and C) or endogenous enzyme systems (e.g. catalase and glutathione-related enzymes). When during pr

  12. Relationship between oxidative stress and circulating testosterone and cortisol in pre-spawning female brown trout

    Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Metcalfe, Neil B.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; de Vries, Bonnie; Costantini, David

    2012-01-01

    Reproduction in vertebrates is an energy-demanding process that is mediated by endogenous hormones and potentially results in oxidative stress. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the relationship between oxidative stress parameters (antioxidant capacity and levels of reactive oxygen metab

  13. Physiological responses of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivars to water deficit stress: status of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Singh, Amrit L.; Kalariya, Kuldeep A.; Goswami, Nisha

    2015-01-01

    From a field experiment, the changes in oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities was studied in six Spanish peanut cultivars subjected to water deficit stress at two different stages viz. pegging and pod development stages. Imposition of water deficit stress significantly reduced relative water content, membrane stability and total carotenoid content in all the cultivars, whereas total chlorophyll content increased at initially and decreased at later stage. Chlorophyll a/b ratio inc...

  14. Anti-oxidative effects of Rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    In-Sun Hong

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic psychological stress may be related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS or free radicals, and thus, long-term exposure to high levels of oxidative stress may cause the accumulation of oxidative damage and eventually lead to many neurodegenerative diseases. Compared with other organs, the brain appears especially susceptible to excessive oxidative stress due to its high demand for oxygen. In the case of excessive ROS production, endogenous defense mechanisms against ROS may not be sufficient to suppress ROS-associated oxidative damage. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to protect neurons against a variety of experimental neurodegenerative conditions. In particular, Rooibos tea might be a good source of antioxidants due to its larger proportion of polyphenolic compounds. An optimal animal model for stress should show the features of a stress response and should be able to mimic natural stress progression. However, most animal models of stress, such as cold-restraint, electric foot shock, and burn shock, usually involve physical abuse in addition to the psychological aspects of stress. Animals subjected to chronic restraint or immobilization are widely believed to be a convenient and reliable model to mimic psychological stress. Therefore, in the present study, we propose that immobilization-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by treatment with Rooibos tea. This conclusion is demonstrated by Rooibos tea's ability to (i reverse the increase in stress-related metabolites (5-HIAA and FFA, (ii prevent lipid peroxidation (LPO, (iii restore stress-induced protein degradation (PD, (iv regulate glutathione metabolism (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, and (v modulate changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT.

  15. Oxidative Stress in Non-Obese Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

    Desai, Varalakshmi; Prasad, Namburi Rajendra; Manohar, Suchitra Musturu; Sachan, Alok; Narasimha, Srinivasa Rao Pemmaraju Venkata Lakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine diseases of women. Oxidative stress is an important component of the cardio-metabolic risk seen in these women. Oxidative stress has been reported in obese PCOS women. This study is taken up to study oxidative stress in non-obese PCOS women. Materials and Methods: Twenty five non-obese women with PCOS attending the Endocrinology outpatient Department of Sri Venkateswara Institute of Medical Sciences, Tirupati, India along with 25 healthy BMI matched controls were included in the study. The changes in the lipid peroxidation products (MDA), and total anti oxidant capacity (FRAP) as an index of anti oxidant status along with fasting glucose, insulin and uric acid levels were measured in both groups. Insulin resistance was evaluated by using homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance [HOMA-IR)= [FPG (mg/dl) × insulin (mIU/L)]/ 405] in both groups. Results: Serum MDA and uric acid levels were increased in the study group compared with controls and FRAP levels were decreased in the study group compared to controls though statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Oxidative stress is also present in non-obese women with PCOS. Oxidative stress further increases the CVD risk in these women.Correcting oxidative stress with antioxidants along with monitoring the antioxidant status using a simple assay like FRAP could have a beneficial effect on oxidative stress induced insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism seen in these women. PMID:25177558

  16. Irradiation increased oxidative stress levels in thymocytes in B6 mice

    It is generally accepted that radiation induces genetic instability in progenitor cells, accumulation of somatic mutations in descendant cells and finally increases transformation frequency, although the mechanism is still elusive. In addition to cancer, RERF reported that A-bomb exposure increased the incidence of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Since oxidative stress is one of causes of atherosclerosis, and because alpha-ray irradiation elevated oxidative stress levels for prolonged period in cultured cells, we asked whether radiation might induce long-lasting oxidative stress in mice. Four weeks old B6 female mice were X-irradiated by 1.6 Gy once a week for 4 successive weeks. This radiation protocol is a standard one that induces thymic lymphoma effectively in B6 mice. Oxidative stress levels were measured 8-10 weeks after the final irradiation by two methods. One was the staining of thymocytes with dihydro-rhodamine-123 (DHR) that accumulated in mitochondria and converted into a fluorescent dye, rhodamine-123, upon oxidation. Another was an EIA measurement of an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-isoprostane, which reflected the oxidation of lipid membranes. Oxidative stress levels in thymocytes increased in 9 out of 15 irradiated mice, especially those mice showing abnormal thymic regeneration. The levels of urinary 8-isoprastane increased in irradiated mice. These results support an idea that radiation induces long-lasting oxidative stress in vivo and at least in part through this mechanism induces cardiovascular diseases

  17. Quantitative combination of natural anti-oxidants prevents metabolic syndrome by reducing oxidative stress.

    Gao, Mingjing; Zhao, Zhen; Lv, Pengyu; Li, YuFang; Gao, Juntao; Zhang, Michael; Zhao, Baolu

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance and abdominal obesity are present in the majority of people with the metabolic syndrome. Antioxidant therapy might be a useful strategy for type 2 diabetes and other insulin-resistant states. The combination of vitamin C (Vc) and vitamin E has synthetic scavenging effect on free radicals and inhibition effect on lipid peroxidation. However, there are few studies about how to define the best combination of more than three anti-oxidants as it is difficult or impossible to test the anti-oxidant effect of the combination of every concentration of each ingredient experimentally. Here we present a math model, which is based on the classical Hill equation to determine the best combination, called Fixed Dose Combination (FDC), of several natural anti-oxidants, including Vc, green tea polyphenols (GTP) and grape seed extract proanthocyanidin (GSEP). Then we investigated the effects of FDC on oxidative stress, blood glucose and serum lipid levels in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes, high fat diet (HFD)-fed rats which serve as obesity model, and KK-ay mice as diabetic model. The level of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) in the treated rats was studied and Hematoxylin-Eosin (HE) staining or Oil red slices of liver and adipose tissue in the rats were examined as well. FDC shows excellent antioxidant and anti-glycation activity by attenuating lipid peroxidation. FDC determined in this investigation can become a potential solution to reduce obesity, to improve insulin sensitivity and be beneficial for the treatment of fat and diabetic patients. It is the first time to use the math model to determine the best ratio of three anti-oxidants, which can save much more time and chemical materials than traditional experimental method. This quantitative method represents a potentially new and useful strategy to screen all possible combinations of many natural anti-oxidants, therefore may help develop novel therapeutics with the potential to ameliorate the worldwide metabolic

  18. Oxidant stress, antioxidants and nitric oxide in traffic police of Hyderabad, India.

    Suresh, Y; Sailaja Devi, M M; Manjari, V; Das, U N

    2000-08-01

    Exposure to environmental pollutants is known to be harmful to health, in general, and to lungs in particular. In this respect, traffic police are at particular risk due to the nature of their job, since they are exposed to emissions from the vehicles. Here, we show that in the traffic police of Hyderabad city, India, the plasma levels of lipid peroxides are high, whereas the concentrations of the nitric oxide are low. In addition, the levels of various antioxidants in the RBC lysate such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were found to be low with no significant alteration in plasma ceruloplasmin levels. These results suggest that exposure to air pollutants, a major portion of which is due to emissions from the vehicles, can increase oxidant stress, decrease the levels of antioxidants and nitric oxide. This imbalance in the oxidant/antioxidant system may lead to lung damage and is likely to cause respiratory problems in individuals exposed to air pollution. PMID:15092903

  19. The response of Paracoccus sp. SKG to acetonitrile-induced oxidative stress.

    Kirankumar, B; Guruprasad, B Kulkarni; Santoshkumar, M; Anand, S Nayak; Karegoudar, T B

    2013-11-01

    Organic solvents enhance intracellular oxidative stress and induce various physiological responses in bacteria. The study shows the morphological changes in Paracoccus sp. SKG when exposed to higher concentrations of acetonitrile, which alter the composition of the membrane fatty acid that accompanies the increase in K(+) efflux. This enhances the oxidative stress with greater activities of catalase and super oxide dismutase (SOD). The increased oxidative stress results in the generation of free radicals, which was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. The free radical scavenging activities were measured by ABTS and DPPH to understand the non-enzymatic defensive system during oxidative stress. The studies demonstrate the increase in free radicals in association with enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense systems under solvent stress. PMID:24092001

  20. Nitric Oxide Reduces Hydrogen Peroxide Accumulation Involved in Water Stress-induced Subcellular Anti-oxidant Defense in Maize Plants

    Jianrong Sang; Mingyi Jiang; Fan Lin; Shucheng Xu; Aying Zhang; Mingpu Tan

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) Is a bioactive molecule involved in many biological events, and has been reported as pro-oxidant as well as anti-oxidant in plants. In the present study, the sources of NO production under water stress, the role of NO in water stress-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation and subcellular activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in leaves of maize (Zea mays L.) plants were investigated. Water stress Induced defense increases in the generation of NO In maize mesphyll cells and the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cytosolic and microsomal fractions of maize leaves. Water stress-induced defense increases in the production of NO were blocked by pretreatments with Inhibitors of NOS and nitrate reductase (NR), suggesting that NO is produced from NOS and NR in leaves of maize plants exposed to water stress. Water stress also induced increases in the activities of the chloroplastic and cytosolic anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidass (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR), and the increases in the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes were reduced by pretreatments with inhibitors of NOS and NR. Exogenous NO increases the activities of water stress-induced subcellular anti-oxidant enzymes, which decreases accumulation of H2O2. Our results suggest that NOS and NR are involved in water strese-induced NO production and NOS is the major source of NO. The potential ability of NO to scavenge H2O2 is, at least in part, due to the induction of a subcellular anti-oxidant defense.