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Sample records for 5b affects lysosomal

  1. Depletion of kinesin 5B affects lysosomal distribution and stability and induces peri-nuclear accumulation of autophagosomes in cancer cells

    Cardoso, Carla M P; Groth-Pedersen, Line; Høyer-Hansen, Maria;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enhanced lysosomal trafficking is associated with metastatic cancer. In an attempt to discover cancer relevant lysosomal motor proteins, we compared the lysosomal proteomes from parental MCF-7 breast cancer cells with those from highly invasive MCF-7 cells that express an active form of...... the ErbB2 (DeltaN-ErbB2). METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mass spectrometry analysis identified kinesin heavy chain protein KIF5B as the only microtubule motor associated with the lysosomes in MCF-7 cells, and ectopic DeltaN-ErbB2 enhanced its lysosomal association. KIF5B associated with lysosomes...... also in HeLa cervix carcinoma cells as analyzed by subcellular fractionation. The depletion of KIF5B triggered peripheral aggregations of lysosomes followed by lysosomal destabilization, and cell death in HeLa cells. Lysosomal exocytosis in response to plasma membrane damage as well as fluid phase...

  2. Tityus bahiensis toxin IV-5b selectively affects Na channel inactivation in chick dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Trequattrini, C; Zamudio, F Z; Petris, A; Prestipino, G; Possani, L D; Franciolini, F

    1995-09-01

    A novel toxin was isolated from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus (T.) bahiensis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this toxin was shown to be 80% identical to the corresponding segment of T. serrulatus toxin IV-5. The new toxin was thus named toxin IV-5b. Toxin IV-5b was found to markedly slow inactivation of Na channel in dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryo. By contrast, Na channel activation was only negligibly delayed, and deactivation completely unaffected. Similarly unaffected by the toxin were K and Ca currents. The slowing effect of the toxin starts to appear at concentrations of c. 80 nM, and shows a KD of 143 nM. With a toxin concentration of 2.4 microM, the Na channel inactivation time constant was increased c. 3-fold with respect to the control. The slowing of inactivation was voltage dependent, and increased with depolarization. PMID:7553331

  3. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus affects lysosomal enzymes in rat liver

    It has been previously shown that dextran sulfate administered to diabetic rats accumulates in the liver and kidney, and this could be due to a malfunction of the lysosomal digestive pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression and activities of lysosomal enzymes that act upon proteins and sulfated polysaccharides in the livers of diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin in 26 male Wistar rats (12 weeks old), while 26 age-matched controls received only vehicle. The livers were removed on either the 10th or the 30th day of the disease, weighed, and used to evaluate the activity, expression, and localization of lysosomal enzymes. A 50-60% decrease in the specific activities of cysteine proteases, especially cathepsin B, was observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. Expression (mRNA) of cathepsins B and L was also decreased on the 10th, but not on the 30th day. Sulfatase decreased 30% on the 30th day, while glycosidases did not vary (or presented a transitory and slight decrease). There were no apparent changes in liver morphology, and immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of cathepsin B in hepatocyte granules. The decrease in sulfatase could be responsible for the dextran sulfate build-up in the diabetic liver, since the action of sulfatase precedes glycosidases in the digestive pathway of sulfated polysaccharides. Our findings suggest that the decreased activities of cathepsins resulted from decreased expression of their genes, and not from general lysosomal failure, because the levels of glycosidases were normal in the diabetic liver

  4. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus affects lysosomal enzymes in rat liver

    Peres, G.B. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Bioquímica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Juliano, M.A. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Biofísica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Biofísica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Aguiar, J.A.K.; Michelacci, Y.M. [Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Bioquímica, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    It has been previously shown that dextran sulfate administered to diabetic rats accumulates in the liver and kidney, and this could be due to a malfunction of the lysosomal digestive pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression and activities of lysosomal enzymes that act upon proteins and sulfated polysaccharides in the livers of diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin in 26 male Wistar rats (12 weeks old), while 26 age-matched controls received only vehicle. The livers were removed on either the 10{sup th} or the 30{sup th} day of the disease, weighed, and used to evaluate the activity, expression, and localization of lysosomal enzymes. A 50-60% decrease in the specific activities of cysteine proteases, especially cathepsin B, was observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. Expression (mRNA) of cathepsins B and L was also decreased on the 10{sup th}, but not on the 30{sup th} day. Sulfatase decreased 30% on the 30{sup th} day, while glycosidases did not vary (or presented a transitory and slight decrease). There were no apparent changes in liver morphology, and immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of cathepsin B in hepatocyte granules. The decrease in sulfatase could be responsible for the dextran sulfate build-up in the diabetic liver, since the action of sulfatase precedes glycosidases in the digestive pathway of sulfated polysaccharides. Our findings suggest that the decreased activities of cathepsins resulted from decreased expression of their genes, and not from general lysosomal failure, because the levels of glycosidases were normal in the diabetic liver.

  5. Alteration of Dynein Function Affects α-Synuclein Degradation via the Autophagosome-Lysosome Pathway

    Da Li; Ji-Jun Shi; Cheng-Jie Mao; Sha Liu; Jian-Da Wang; Jing Chen; Fen Wang; Ya-Ping Yang; Wei-Dong Hu; Li-Fang Hu; Chun-Feng Liu

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that dynein dysfunction may be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. It plays a central role in aggresome formation, the delivery of autophagosome to lysosome for fusion and degradation, which is a pro-survival mechanism essential for the bulk degradation of misfolded proteins and damaged organells. Previous studies reported that dynein dysfuntion was associated with aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein, which is a major component of inclusion bodies in...

  6. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus affects lysosomal enzymes in rat liver

    G.B. Peres

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been previously shown that dextran sulfate administered to diabetic rats accumulates in the liver and kidney, and this could be due to a malfunction of the lysosomal digestive pathway. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression and activities of lysosomal enzymes that act upon proteins and sulfated polysaccharides in the livers of diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by streptozotocin in 26 male Wistar rats (12 weeks old, while 26 age-matched controls received only vehicle. The livers were removed on either the 10th or the 30th day of the disease, weighed, and used to evaluate the activity, expression, and localization of lysosomal enzymes. A 50-60% decrease in the specific activities of cysteine proteases, especially cathepsin B, was observed in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. Expression (mRNA of cathepsins B and L was also decreased on the 10th, but not on the 30th day. Sulfatase decreased 30% on the 30th day, while glycosidases did not vary (or presented a transitory and slight decrease. There were no apparent changes in liver morphology, and immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of cathepsin B in hepatocyte granules. The decrease in sulfatase could be responsible for the dextran sulfate build-up in the diabetic liver, since the action of sulfatase precedes glycosidases in the digestive pathway of sulfated polysaccharides. Our findings suggest that the decreased activities of cathepsins resulted from decreased expression of their genes, and not from general lysosomal failure, because the levels of glycosidases were normal in the diabetic liver.

  7. Burden of lysosomal storage disorders in India: experience of 387 affected children from a single diagnostic facility.

    Sheth, Jayesh; Mistri, Mehul; Sheth, Frenny; Shah, Raju; Bavdekar, Ashish; Godbole, Koumudi; Nanavaty, Nidhish; Datar, Chaitanya; Kamate, Mahesh; Oza, Nrupesh; Ankleshwaria, Chitra; Mehta, Sanjeev; Jackson, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are considered to be a rare metabolic disease for the national health forum, clinicians, and scientists. This study aimed to know the prevalence of different LSDs, their geographical variation, and burden on the society. It included 1,110 children from January 2002 to December 2012, having coarse facial features, hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly, skeletal dysplasia, neuroregression, leukodystrophy, developmental delay, cerebral-cerebellar atrophy, and abnormal ophthalmic findings. All subjects were screened for I-cell disease, glycolipid storage disorders (Niemann-Pick disease A/B, Gaucher), and mucopolysaccharide disorders followed by confirmatory lysosomal enzymes study from leucocytes and/or fibroblasts. Niemann-Pick disease-C (NPC) was confirmed by fibroblasts study using filipin stain. Various storage disorders were detected in 387 children (34.8 %) with highest prevalence of glycolipid storage disorders in 48 %, followed by mucopolysaccharide disorders in 22 % and defective sulfatide degradation in 14 % of the children. Less common defects were glycogen degradation defect and protein degradation defect in 5 % each, lysosomal trafficking protein defect in 4 %, and transport defect in 3 % of the patients. This study demonstrates higher incidence of Gaucher disease (16 %) followed by GM2 gangliosidosis that includes Tay-Sachs disease (10 %) and Sandhoff disease (7.8 %) and mucopolysaccharide disorders among all LSDs. Nearly 30 % of the affected children were born to consanguineous parents and this was higher (72 %) in children with Batten disease. Our study also demonstrates two common mutations c.1277_1278insTATC in 14.28 % (4/28) and c.964G>T (p.D322Y) in 10.7 % (3/28) for Tay-Sachs disease in addition to the earlier reported c.1385A>T (p.E462V) mutation in 21.42 % (6/28). PMID:23852624

  8. Invariant Natural Killer T cells are not affected by lysosomal storage in patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C

    Speak, Anneliese O; Platt, Nicholas; Salio, Mariolina; te Vruchte, Danielle Taylor; Smith, David A.; Shepherd, Dawn; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Simmons, Louise; Imrie, Jackie; Wraith, James E.; Lachmann, Robin; Hartung, Ralf; Runz, Heiko

    2012-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialised subset of T cells that are restricted to the MHC class I like molecule, CD1d. The ligands for iNKT cells are lipids, with the canonical superagonist being α-galactosylceramide, a non-mammalian glycosphingolipid. Trafficking of CD1d through the lysosome is required for the development of murine iNKT cells. Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by dysfunction in either of two lysosomal proteins, NPC1 or...

  9. The enlarged lysosomes in beigej cells result from decreased lysosome fission and not increased lysosome fusion

    Durchfort, Nina; Verhoef, Shane; Vaughn, Michael B.; Shrestha, Rishna; Adam, Dieter; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane McVey

    2011-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi Syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects vesicle morphology. The Chs1/Lyst protein is a member of the BEACH family of proteins. The absence of Chs1/Lyst gives rise to enlarged lysosomes. Lysosome size is regulated by a balance between vesicle fusion and fission and can be reversibly altered by acidifying the cytoplasm using Acetate Ringer’s or by incubating with the drug vacuolin-1. We took advantage of these procedures to determine rates of lysosome fusion and...

  10. The awesome lysosome

    Ballabio, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In the early 50s, Christian De Duve identified a new cellular structure, the lysosome, defined as the cell's “suicide bag” (de Duve, 2005). Sixty years later, it is clear that the lysosome greatly exceeded the expectations of its discoverer. Over 50 different types of lysosomal storage diseases have been identified, each due to the deficiency or malfunction of a specific lysosomal protein. In addition, an important role of the lysosome has been unveiled in several common human diseases, such ...

  11. Pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in the CNS of normal and Krabbe-affected non-human primates by intracerebral lentiviral gene therapy.

    Meneghini, Vasco; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Tiradani, Luigi; Bravo, Gabriele; Morena, Francesco; Sanvito, Francesca; Calabria, Andrea; Bringas, John; Fisher-Perkins, Jeanne M; Dufour, Jason P; Baker, Kate C; Doglioni, Claudio; Montini, Eugenio; Bunnell, Bruce A; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD or Krabbe disease) are severe neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and galactosylceramidase (GALC) deficiency, respectively. Our previous studies established lentiviral gene therapy (GT) as a rapid and effective intervention to provide pervasive supply of therapeutic lysosomal enzymes in CNS tissues of MLD and GLD mice. Here, we investigated whether this strategy is similarly effective in juvenile non-human primates (NHP). To provide proof of principle for tolerability and biological efficacy of the strategy, we established a comprehensive study in normal NHP delivering a clinically relevant lentiviral vector encoding for the human ARSA transgene. Then, we injected a lentiviral vector coding for the human GALC transgene in Krabbe-affected rhesus macaques, evaluating for the first time the therapeutic potential of lentiviral GT in this unique LSD model. We showed favorable safety profile and consistent pattern of LV transduction and enzyme biodistribution in the two models, supporting the robustness of the proposed GT platform. We documented moderate inflammation at the injection sites, mild immune response to vector particles in few treated animals, no indication of immune response against transgenic products, and no molecular evidence of insertional genotoxicity. Efficient gene transfer in neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes close to the injection sites resulted in robust production and extensive spreading of transgenic enzymes in the whole CNS and in CSF, leading to supraphysiological ARSA activity in normal NHP and close to physiological GALC activity in the Krabbe NHP, in which biological efficacy was associated with preliminary indication of therapeutic benefit. These results support the rationale for the clinical translation of intracerebral lentiviral GT to address CNS pathology in MLD, GLD, and other neurodegenerative LSD. PMID

  12. Impaired lysosomal cobalamin transport in Alzheimer's disease.

    Zhao, Hua; Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Garner, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) is required for erythrocyte formation and DNA synthesis and it plays a crucial role in maintaining neurological function. As a coenzyme for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, cobalamin utilization depends on its efficient transit through the intracellular lysosomal compartment and subsequent delivery to the cytosol and mitochondria. Lysosomal function deteriorates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Lysosomal acidification is defective in AD and lysosomal proteolysis is disrupted by AD-related presenilin 1 mutation. In this study, we propose that AD related lysosomal dysfunction may impair lysosomal cobalamin transport. The experiments use in vitro and in vivo models of AD to define how lysosomal dysfunction directly affects cobalamin utilization. SH-SY5Y-AβPP mutant cells were treated with a proteasome inhibitor to induce lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation. We metabolically labeled these cells with [57Co] cobalamin and isolated purified lysosomes, mitochondria, and cytosol fractions. The results indicated that proteasome inhibition was associated with lysosomal amyloid-β accumulation and a doubling of lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin levels. We also used AβPPxPS1 transgenic AD mice that were intraperitoneally injected with [57Co] cobalamin. The amount of [57Co] cobalamin in the major organs of these mice was measured and the subcellular [57Co] cobalamin distribution in the brain was assessed. The results demonstrated that lysosomal [57Co] cobalamin level was significantly increased by 56% in the AβPPxPS1 AD mouse brains as compared to wild type control mice. Together these data provide evidence that lysosomal cobalamin may be impaired in AD in association with amyloid-β accumulation. PMID:25125476

  13. Proteomics of the Lysosome

    Lübke, Torben; Lobel, Peter; Sleat, David

    2008-01-01

    Defects in lysosomal function have been associated with numerous monogenic human diseases typically classified as lysosomal storage diseases. However, there is increasing evidence that lysosomal proteins are also involved in more widespread human diseases including cancer and Alzheimer disease. Thus, there is a continuing interest in understanding the cellular functions of the lysosome and an emerging approach to this is the identification of its constituent proteins by proteomic analyses. To...

  14. Lysosomal Signaling Molecules Regulate Longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Folick, Andrew; Oakley, Holly Doebbler; Yu, Yong; Armstrong, Eric H.; Kumari, Manju; Sanor, Lucas; Moore, David D.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Zechner, Rudolf; Wang, Meng C.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm, Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, consequently promoting longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysi...

  15. Lysosome Transport as a Function of Lysosome Diameter

    Debjyoti Bandyopadhyay; Austin Cyphersmith; Zapata, Jairo A.; Y Joseph Kim; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles responsible for the transport and degradation of intracellular and extracellular cargo. The intracellular motion of lysosomes is both diffusive and active, mediated by motor proteins moving lysosomes along microtubules. We sought to determine how lysosome diameter influences lysosome transport. We used osmotic swelling to double the diameter of lysosomes, creating a population of enlarged lysosomes. This allowed us to directly examine the intracellular ...

  16. Lysosomes, cholesterol and atherosclerosis

    Jerome, W. Gray

    2010-01-01

    Cholesterol-engorged macrophage foam cells are a critical component of the atherosclerotic lesion. Reducing the sterol deposits in lesions reduces clinical events. Sterol accumulations within lysosomes have proven to be particularly hard to mobilize out of foam cells. Moreover, excess sterol accumulation in lysosomes has untoward effects, including a complete disruption of lysosome function. Recently, we demonstrated that treatment of sterol-engorged macrophages in culture with triglyceride-c...

  17. Targeting the lysosome in cancer

    Piao, Shengfu; Amaravadi, Ravi K.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound intracellular organelles that receive macromolecules delivered by endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy for degradation and recycling. Over the last decade, advances in lysosome research have established a broad role for the lysosome in the pathophysiology of disease. In this review, we highlight the recent discoveries in lysosome biology, with an emphasis on their implications for cancer therapy. We focus on targeting the lysosome in cancer by exploring lysoso...

  18. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs. PMID:23393155

  19. Aging. Lysosomal signaling molecules regulate longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Folick, Andrew; Oakley, Holly D; Yu, Yong; Armstrong, Eric H; Kumari, Manju; Sanor, Lucas; Moore, David D; Ortlund, Eric A; Zechner, Rudolf; Wang, Meng C

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes are crucial cellular organelles for human health that function in digestion and recycling of extracellular and intracellular macromolecules. We describe a signaling role for lysosomes that affects aging. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the lysosomal acid lipase LIPL-4 triggered nuclear translocalization of a lysosomal lipid chaperone LBP-8, which promoted longevity by activating the nuclear hormone receptors NHR-49 and NHR-80. We used high-throughput metabolomic analysis to identify several lipids in which abundance was increased in worms constitutively overexpressing LIPL-4. Among them, oleoylethanolamide directly bound to LBP-8 and NHR-80 proteins, activated transcription of target genes of NHR-49 and NHR-80, and promoted longevity in C. elegans. These findings reveal a lysosome-to-nucleus signaling pathway that promotes longevity and suggest a function of lysosomes as signaling organelles in metazoans. PMID:25554789

  20. 溶酶体贮积病%Lysosomal storage disorders

    Yong QU

    2006-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are genetic defects caused by lysosomal hydrolase deficiencies. These deficiencies lead to substrate accumulation affecting cells, tissues and organs. Detecting abnormal compound excretion and deficient enzymes assist diagnosis of these disorders for treatment and prevention. This mini review summarizes clinical presentations and diagnostic workup of LSDs and updates the new development in the area.

  1. 45 CFR 5b.13 - Fees.

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fees. 5b.13 Section 5b.13 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.13 Fees. (a) Policy. Where applicable, fees for copying records will be charged in accordance with the schedule...

  2. 34 CFR 5b.13 - Fees.

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fees. 5b.13 Section 5b.13 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.13 Fees. (a) Policy. Where applicable, fees for copying records will be charged in accordance with the schedule set forth in this section....

  3. 45 CFR 5b.11 - Exempt systems.

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exempt systems. 5b.11 Section 5b.11 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.11 Exempt systems. (a) General policy. The Act permits certain types of specific systems of records to be exempt...

  4. 34 CFR 5b.11 - Exempt systems.

    2010-07-01

    ... Chief Information Officer, Regulatory Information Management Group, Washington, DC 20202-4651. (f... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exempt systems. 5b.11 Section 5b.11 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.11 Exempt systems. (a)...

  5. Lysosomal Trafficking Regulator (LYST).

    Ji, Xiaojie; Chang, Bo; Naggert, Jürgen K; Nishina, Patsy M

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of vesicle trafficking to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) as well as regulation of the size of these organelles are critical to maintain their functions. Disruption of the lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) results in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, prolonged bleeding, severe immunodeficiency, recurrent bacterial infection, neurologic dysfunction and hemophagocytic lympohistiocytosis (HLH). The classic diagnostic feature of the syndrome is enlarged LROs in all cell types, including lysosomes, melanosomes, cytolytic granules and platelet dense bodies. The most striking CHS ocular pathology observed is an enlargement of melanosomes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which leads to aberrant distribution of eye pigmentation, and results in photophobia and decreased visual acuity. Understanding the molecular function of LYST and identification of its interacting partners may provide therapeutic targets for CHS and other diseases associated with the regulation of LRO size and/or vesicle trafficking, such as asthma, urticaria and Leishmania amazonensis infections. PMID:26427484

  6. Deletion of the highly conserved N-glycan at Asn260 of HIV-1 gp120 affects folding and lysosomal degradation of gp120, and results in loss of viral infectivity.

    Leen Mathys

    Full Text Available N-linked glycans covering the surface of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120 are of major importance for the correct folding of this glycoprotein. Of the, on average, 24 N-linked glycans present on gp120, the glycan at Asn260 was reported to be essential for the correct expression of gp120 and gp41 in the virus particle and deletion of the N260 glycan in gp120 heavily compromised virus infectivity. We show here that gp160 containing the N260Q mutation reaches the Golgi apparatus during biosynthesis. Using pulse-chase experiments with [35S] methionine/cysteine, we show that oxidative folding was slightly delayed in case of mutant N260Q gp160 and that CD4 binding was markedly compromised compared to wild-type gp160. In the search of compensatory mutations, we found a mutation in the V1/V2 loop of gp120 (S128N that could partially restore the infectivity of mutant N260Q gp120 virus. However, the mutation S128N did not enhance any of the above-mentioned processes so its underlying compensatory mechanism must be a conformational effect that does not affect CD4 binding per se. Finally, we show that mutant N260Q gp160 was cleaved to gp120 and gp41 to a much lower extent than wild-type gp160, and that it was subject of lysosomal degradation to a higher extent than wild-type gp160 showing a prominent role of this process in the breakdown of N260-glycan-deleted gp160, which could not be counteracted by the S128N mutation. Moreover, at least part of the wild-type or mutant gp160 that is normally targeted for lysosomal degradation reached a conformation that enabled CD4 binding.

  7. The Biogenesis of Lysosomes and Lysosome-Related Organelles

    Luzio, J. Paul; Hackmann, Yvonne; Dieckmann, Nele M.G.; Griffiths, Gillian M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomes were once considered the end point of endocytosis, simply used for macromolecule degradation. They are now recognized to be dynamic organelles, able to fuse with a variety of targets and to be re-formed after fusion events. They are also now known to be the site of nutrient sensing and signaling to the cell nucleus. In addition, lysosomes are secretory organelles, with specialized machinery for regulated secretion of proteins in some cell types. The biogenesis of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles is discussed, taking into account their dynamic nature and multiple roles. PMID:25183830

  8. The lysosome and neurodegenerative diseases

    Lisha Zhang; Rui Sheng; Zhenghong Qin

    2009-01-01

    It has long been believed that the lysosome is an important digestive organelle. There is increasing evidence that the lysosome is also involved in pathogenesis of a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Abnormal protein degradation and deposition induced by lysosoreal dysfunction may be the primary contributor to age-related neurodegeneration. In this review, the possible relationship between lysosome and various neurodegenerative diseases is described.

  9. Neuroinflammatory paradigms in lysosomal storage diseases

    Megan Elizabeth Bosch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs include approximately 70 distinct disorders that collectively account for 14% of all inherited metabolic diseases. LSDs are caused by mutations in various enzymes/proteins that disrupt lysosomal function, which impairs macromolecule degradation following endosome-lysosome and phagosome-lysosome fusion and autophagy, ultimately disrupting cellular homeostasis. LSDs are pathologically typified by lysosomal inclusions composed of a heterogeneous mixture of various proteins and lipids that can be found throughout the body. However, in many cases the CNS is dramatically affected, which may result from heightened neuronal vulnerability based on their post-mitotic state. Besides intrinsic neuronal defects, another emerging factor common to many LSDs is neuroinflammation, which may negatively impact neuronal survival and contribute to neurodegeneration. Microglial and astrocyte activation is a hallmark of many LSDs that affect the CNS, which often precedes and predicts regions where eventual neuron loss will occur. However, the timing, intensity, and duration of neuroinflammation may ultimately dictate the impact on CNS homeostasis. For example, a transient inflammatory response following CNS insult/injury can be neuroprotective, as glial cells attempt to remove the insult and provide trophic support to neurons. However, chronic inflammation, as seen in several LSDs, can promote neurodegeneration by creating a neurotoxic environment due to elevated levels of cytokines, chemokines, and pro-apoptotic molecules. Although neuroinflammation has been reported in several LSDs, the cellular basis and mechanisms responsible for eliciting neuroinflammatory pathways are just beginning to be defined. This review highlights the role of neuroinflammation in select LSDs and its potential contribution to neuron loss.

  10. Astrocytes and lysosomal storage diseases.

    Rama Rao, K V; Kielian, T

    2016-05-26

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) encompass a wide range of disorders characterized by inborn errors of lysosomal function. The majority of LSDs result from genetic defects in lysosomal enzymes, although some arise from mutations in lysosomal proteins that lack known enzymatic activity. Neuropathological abnormalities are a feature of several LSDs and when severe, represent an important determinant in disease outcome. Glial dysfunction, particularly in astrocytes, is also observed in numerous LSDs and has been suggested to impact neurodegeneration. This review will discuss the potential role of astrocytes in LSDs and highlight the possibility of targeting glia as a beneficial strategy to counteract the neuropathology associated with LSDs. PMID:26037807

  11. Transmembrane protein 106B, a risk factor in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, is a lysosomal type II transmembrane protein and affects autophagy

    Lang, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with presenile onset. Clinically, it mainly presents with language disorders or personality and behavioural changes whereas pathologically patients show atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. Like in other neurodegenerative disorders, abnormal protein deposition can be detected in the affected areas of the brain nervous system. However, several different proteins have been identified ...

  12. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders: a good start.

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2016-04-15

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases with a collective frequency of ∼1 in 7000 births, resulting from the deficiency in one or more enzymes or transporters that normally reside within the lysosomes. Pathology results from the progressive accumulation of uncleaved lipids, glycoproteins and/or glycosaminoglycans in the lysosomes and secondary damages that affect the brain, viscera, bones and connective tissues. Most treatment modalities developed for LSD, including gene therapy (GT), are based on the lysosome-specific cross-correction mechanism, by which close proximity of normal cells leads to the correction of the biochemical consequences of enzymatic deficiency within the neighboring cells. Here, GT efforts addressing these disorders are reviewed with an up-to-date discussion of their impact on the LSD disease phenotype in animal models and patients. PMID:26604151

  13. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer......-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 July 2012; doi...

  14. Lysosomal Adaptation: How the Lysosome Responds to External Cues

    Settembre, C.; Ballabio, A

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the importance of the lysosome in cell metabolism and organism physiology goes far beyond the simple disposal of cellular garbage. This dynamic organelle is situated at the crossroad of the most important cellular pathways and is involved in sensing, signaling, and transcriptional mechanisms that respond to environmental cues, such as nutrients. Two main mediators of these lysosomal adaptation mechanisms are the mTORC1 kinase complex and the transcription factor...

  15. Lysosomal Dysfunction and α-Synuclein Aggregation in Parkinson's Disease: Diagnostic Links.

    Moors, Tim; Paciotti, Silvia; Chiasserini, Davide; Calabresi, Paolo; Parnetti, Lucilla; Beccari, Tommaso; van de Berg, Wilma D J

    2016-06-01

    Lysosomal impairment is increasingly recognized as a central event in the pathophysiology of PD. Genetic associations between lysosomal storage disorders, including Gaucher disease and PD, highlight common risk factors and pathological mechanisms. Because the autophagy-lysosomal system is involved in the intralysosomal hydrolysis of dysfunctional proteins, lysosomal impairment may contribute to α-synuclein aggregation in PD. The degradation of α-synuclein is a complex process involving different proteolytic mechanisms depending on protein burden, folding, posttranslational modifications, and yet unknown factors. In this review, evidence for lysosomal dysfunction in PD and its intimate relationship with α-synuclein aggregation are discussed, after which the question of whether lysosomal proteins may serve as diagnostic biomarkers for PD is addressed. Changes in lysosomal enzymes, such as reduced glucocerebrosidase and cathepsin levels, have been observed in affected brain regions in PD patients. The detection of lysosomal proteins in CSF may provide a read-out of lysosomal dysfunction in PD and holds promise for the development of diagnostic PD biomarkers. Initial PD biomarker studies demonstrated altered lysosomal enzyme activities in CSF of PD patients when compared with controls. However, CSF lysosomal enzyme activities alone could not discriminate between PD patients and controls. The combination of CSF lysosomal markers with α-synuclein species and indicators of mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation, and other pathological proteins in PD may be able to facilitate a more accurate diagnosis of PD. Further CSF biomarker studies are needed to investigate the utility of CSF lysosomal proteins as measures of disease state and disease progression in PD. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:26923732

  16. Conventional kinesin KIF5B mediates adiponectin secretion in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Cui, Ju; Pang, Jing; Lin, Ya-Jun; Jiang, Ping; Gong, Huan; Wang, Zai; Li, Jian; Cai, Jian-Ping; Huang, Jian-Dong; Zhang, Tie-Mei

    2016-08-01

    Insulin stimulates adiponectin secretion and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) translocation in adipocyte to regulate metabolism homeostasis. Similar to GLUT4 translocation, intracellular trafficking and release of adiponectin in adipocytes relies on the trans-Golgi network and endosomal system. Recent studies show that the heavy chain of conventional kinesin (KIF5B) mediates GLUT4 translocation in murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes, however, the motor machinery involved in mediating intracellular trafficking and release of adiponectin is unknown. Here, we examined the role of KIF5B in the regulation of adiponectin secretion. The KIF5B level was up-regulated during 3T3-L1 adipogenesis. This increase in cytosolic KIF5B was synchronized with the induction of adiponectin. Endogenous KIF5B and adiponectin were partially colocalized at the peri-nuclear and cytosolic regions. In addition, adiponectin-containing vesicles were co-immunoprecipitated with KIF5B. Knockdown of KIF5B resulted in a marked inhibition of adiponectin secretion and overexpression of KIF5B enhanced adiponectin release, whereas leptin secretion was not affected by changes in KIF5B expression. These data suggest that the secretion of adiponectin, but not leptin, is dependent on functional KIF5B. PMID:27264953

  17. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form of...... cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...

  18. The FTLD risk factor TMEM106B and MAP6 control dendritic trafficking of lysosomes

    Schwenk, B.M.; Lang, C.M.; Hogl, S.; Tahirovic, S.; Orozco, D.; Rentzsch, K.; Lichtenthaler, S.F.; Hoogenraad, Casper; Capell, A.; Haass, C.; Edbauer, D.

    2014-01-01

    TMEM106B is a major risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP‐43 pathology. TMEM106B localizes to lysosomes, but its function remains unclear. We show that TMEM106B knockdown in primary neurons affects lysosomal trafficking and blunts dendritic arborization. We identify microtubule‐

  19. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  20. Human recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms.

    Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Alméciga-Díaz, Carlos J; Rodríguez, Alexander; Mosquera, Ángela; Díaz, Dennis; Beltrán, Laura; Díaz, Sergio; Pimentel, Natalia; Moreno, Jefferson; Sánchez, Jhonnathan; Sánchez, Oscar F; Córdoba, Henry; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Barrera, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are caused by accumulation of partially degraded substrates within the lysosome, as a result of a function loss of a lysosomal protein. Recombinant lysosomal proteins are usually produced in mammalian cells, based on their capacity to carry out post-translational modifications similar to those observed in human native proteins. However, during the last years, a growing number of studies have shown the possibility to produce active forms of lysosomal proteins in other expression systems, such as plants and microorganisms. In this paper, we review the production and characterization of human lysosomal proteins, deficient in several LSDs, which have been produced in microorganisms. For this purpose, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Ogataea minuta have been used as expression systems. The recombinant lysosomal proteins expressed in these hosts have shown similar substrate specificities, and temperature and pH stability profiles to those produced in mammalian cells. In addition, pre-clinical results have shown that recombinant lysosomal enzymes produced in microorganisms can be taken-up by cells and reduce the substrate accumulated within the lysosome. Recently, metabolic engineering in yeasts has allowed the production of lysosomal enzymes with tailored N-glycosylations, while progresses in E. coli N-glycosylations offer a potential platform to improve the production of these recombinant lysosomal enzymes. In summary, microorganisms represent convenient platform for the production of recombinant lysosomal proteins for biochemical and physicochemical characterization, as well as for the development of ERT for LSD. PMID:26071627

  1. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Lyanna O. L.; Chorna V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic anal...

  2. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  3. Intracellular targeting of peroxiredoxin 6 to lysosomal organelles requires MAPK activity and binding to 14-3-3ε

    Sorokina, Elena M.; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Zhou, Suiping; Fisher, Aron B.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), a bifunctional protein with GSH peroxidase and lysosomal-type phospholipase A2 activities, has been localized to both cytosolic and acidic compartments (lamellar bodies and lysosomes) in lung alveolar epithelium. We postulate that Prdx6 subcellular localization affects the balance between the two activities. Immunostaining localized Prdx6 to lysosome-related organelles in the MLE12 and A549 alveolar epithelial cell lines. Inhibition of trafficking by brefeldin A indic...

  4. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  5. Potential pitfalls and solutions for use of fluorescent fusion proteins to study the lysosome.

    Ling Huang

    Full Text Available Use of fusion protein tags to investigate lysosomal proteins can be complicated by the acidic, protease-rich environment of the lysosome. Potential artifacts include degradation or release of the tag and acid quenching of fluorescence. Tagging can also affect protein folding, glycosylation and/or trafficking. To specifically investigate the use of fluorescent tags to reveal lysosomal localization, we tested mCherry derivatives as C-terminal tags for Niemann-Pick disease type C protein 2 (NPC2, a luminal lysosomal protein. Full-length mCherry was released from the NPC2 chimera while deletion of the 11 N-terminal residues of mCherry generated a cleavage-resistant (cr fluorescent variant. Insertion of proline linkers between NPC2 and crmCherry had little effect while Gly-Ser linkers promoted cleavage. The NPC2-crmCherry fusion was targeted to the lysosome and restored function in NPC2-deficient cells. Fusion of crmCherry to known and candidate lysosomal proteins revealed that the linkers had different effects on lysosomal localization. Direct fusion of crmCherry impaired mannose 6-phosphorylation and lysosomal targeting of the lysosomal protease tripeptidyl peptidase I (TPP1, while insertion of linkers corrected the defects. Molecular modeling suggested structural bases for the effects of different linkers on NPC2 and TPP1 fusion proteins. While mCherry fusion proteins can be useful tools for studying the lysosome and related organelles, our findings underscore the potential artifacts associated with such applications.

  6. Analysis list: Stat5b [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Stat5b Blood,Breast + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Sta...t5b.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Stat5b.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc....jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Stat5b.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Stat5b.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Stat5b.Breast.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Blood.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Breast.gml ...

  7. Role of lysosomes in cancer therapy

    Halaby R

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Reginald Halaby Department of Biology, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ, USA Abstract: Lysosomes are acidic organelles that are involved in cellular digestion by endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy. They contain more than 50 hydrolases that are capable of degrading all macromolecules. There is accumulating evidence that lysosomal enzymes can provoke apoptotic cell death. This has important implications for cancer, where proapoptotic genes are mutated and antiapoptotic genes are often overexpressed leading to chemoresistance. Lysosomes play a dual role in cancer development depending on their subcellular localization. When they are located extracellularly they can promote invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. However, when they are located intracellularly they can trigger apoptosis by leaking into the cytosol. In this review, we examine the pathways by which lysosomes can evoke both apoptosis and tumorigenesis. Although cancer cells have defects in their apoptotic machinery, they can still undergo lysosomal cell death. We offer several strategies to explain how targeting lysosomes can serve as a putative model for the development of novel anticancer agents. Furthermore, we propose that lysosomal cell death is an effective treatment against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells and thus holds great potential as a therapeutic strategy for circumventing apoptosis deficiency in tumors. Keywords: cathepsins, lysosomal membrane permeability, apoptosis, chemoresistance 

  8. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P2, a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P2-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation. PMID:26950892

  9. Limited and selective transfer of plasma membrane glycoproteins to membrane of secondary lysosomes

    Radioactive galactose, covalently bound to cell surface glycoconjugates on mouse macrophage cells, P388D1, was used as a membrane marker to study the composition, and the kinetics of exchange, of plasma membrane-derived constituents in the membrane of secondary lysosomes. Secondary lysosomes were separated from endosomes and plasma membrane by self-forming Percoll density gradients. Horseradish peroxidase, taken up by fluid-phase pinocytosis, served as a vesicle contents marker to monitor transfer of endosomal contents into secondary lysosomes. Concurrently, the fraction of plasma membrane-derived label of secondary lysosomes increased by first order kinetics from 4 PAGE, labeled molecules of M/sub r/ 160-190 kD were depleted and of the M/sub r/ 100-120 kD were enriched in lysosome membrane compared with the relative composition of label on the cell surface. No corresponding selectivity was observed for the degradation of label, with all M/sub r/ classes being affected to the same relative extent. The results indicate that endocytosis-derived transfer of plasma membrane constitutents to secondary lysosomes is a limited and selective process, and that only ∼1% of internalized membrane is recycled via a membrane pool of secondary lysosomes

  10. Podocytes degrade endocytosed albumin primarily in lysosomes.

    Carson, John M; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and

  11. Coronavirus cell entry occurs through the endo-/lysosomal pathway in a proteolysis-dependent manner.

    Christine Burkard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Enveloped viruses need to fuse with a host cell membrane in order to deliver their genome into the host cell. While some viruses fuse with the plasma membrane, many viruses are endocytosed prior to fusion. Specific cues in the endosomal microenvironment induce conformational changes in the viral fusion proteins leading to viral and host membrane fusion. In the present study we investigated the entry of coronaviruses (CoVs. Using siRNA gene silencing, we found that proteins known to be important for late endosomal maturation and endosome-lysosome fusion profoundly promote infection of cells with mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV. Using recombinant MHVs expressing reporter genes as well as a novel, replication-independent fusion assay we confirmed the importance of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and demonstrated that trafficking of MHV to lysosomes is required for fusion and productive entry to occur. Nevertheless, MHV was shown to be less sensitive to perturbation of endosomal pH than vesicular stomatitis virus and influenza A virus, which fuse in early and late endosomes, respectively. Our results indicate that entry of MHV depends on proteolytic processing of its fusion protein S by lysosomal proteases. Fusion of MHV was severely inhibited by a pan-lysosomal protease inhibitor, while trafficking of MHV to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases was no longer required when a furin cleavage site was introduced in the S protein immediately upstream of the fusion peptide. Also entry of feline CoV was shown to depend on trafficking to lysosomes and processing by lysosomal proteases. In contrast, MERS-CoV, which contains a minimal furin cleavage site just upstream of the fusion peptide, was negatively affected by inhibition of furin, but not of lysosomal proteases. We conclude that a proteolytic cleavage site in the CoV S protein directly upstream of the fusion peptide is an essential determinant of the intracellular site of fusion.

  12. STAT5B deficiency: Impacts on human growth and immunity.

    Hwa, Vivian

    2016-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) promotes postnatal human growth primarily by regulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I production through activation of the GH receptor (GHR)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-5B signaling cascade. The critical importance of STAT5B in human IGF-I production was confirmed with the identification of the first homozygous, autosomal recessive, STAT5B mutation in a young female patient who phenotypically resembled patients with classical growth hormone insensitivity (GHI) syndrome (Laron syndrome) due to mutations in the GHR gene, presenting with severe postnatal growth failure and marked IGF-I deficiency. Of note, the closely related STAT5A, which shares >95% amino acid identity with STAT5B, could not compensate for loss of functional STAT5B. To date, 7 homozygous, inactivating, STAT5B mutations in 10 patients have been reported. STAT5B deficient patients, unlike patients deficient in GHR, can also present with a novel, potentially fatal, primary immunodeficiency, which can manifest as chronic pulmonary disease. STAT5B deficiency may be underestimated in endocrine, immunology and pulmonary clinics. PMID:26703237

  13. Variants of MUC5B minisatellites and the susceptibility of bladder cancer.

    Ahn, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Wun-Jae; Kwon, Jeong-Ah; Choi, Phil-Jo; Kim, Woo Jin; Sunwoo, Yangil; Heo, Jeonghoon; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2009-04-01

    The human MUC5B gene, which is primarily expressed in the tracheobronchial tract, is clustered to chromosome 11p15.5 with three other secreted gel-forming mucins, MUC6, MUC2, and MUC5AC. In this study, we identified seven variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs; minisatellites) from the entire MUC5B region. Six (MUC5B-MS1, -MS2, -MS3, -MS4, -MS5, and -MS7) of the seven minisatellites evaluated in this study were novel minisatellites, but the MUC5B-MS6 minisatellite was described in a previous study. These minisatellites of MUC5B were analyzed in genomic DNA extracted from controls, cancer patients, and multigenerational families. Three (MUC5B-MS3, -MS6, and -MS7) of the seven minisatellites were found to be polymorphic and transmitted through meiosis following Mendelian inheritance in seven families; therefore, these minisatellite polymorphisms could be useful as markers for paternity mapping and DNA fingerprinting. In addition, we evaluated allelic variation in these minisatellites to determine if such variation affected the susceptibility to various carcinomas. To accomplish this, we conducted a case-control study in which the genomic DNA of 789 cancer-free controls and cancer patients with five types of cancer were compared. A statistically significant association between the long rare MUC5B-MS6 alleles and the occurrence of bladder cancer was identified in the younger group (<60; odds ratio, 4.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-20.7; p=0.03). This observation suggests that the long rare MUC5B-MS6 alleles evaluated in this study could be used to identify the risk of bladder cancer. PMID:19191526

  14. Nanoparticles restore lysosomal acidification defects: Implications for Parkinson and other lysosomal-related diseases.

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Daniel, Jonathan; Genin, Emilie; Soria, Federico N; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Lysosomal impairment causes lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) and is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, notably Parkinson disease (PD). Strategies enhancing or restoring lysosomal-mediated degradation thus appear as tantalizing disease-modifying therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) acidic nanoparticles (aNP) restore impaired lysosomal function in a series of toxin and genetic cellular models of PD, i.e. ATP13A2-mutant or depleted cells or glucocerebrosidase (GBA)-mutant cells, as well as in a genetic model of lysosomal-related myopathy. We show that PLGA-aNP are transported to the lysosome within 24 h, lower lysosomal pH and rescue chloroquine (CQ)-induced toxicity. Re-acidification of defective lysosomes following PLGA-aNP treatment restores lysosomal function in different pathological contexts. Finally, our results show that PLGA-aNP may be detected after intracerebral injection in neurons and attenuate PD-related neurodegeneration in vivo by mechanisms involving a rescue of compromised lysosomes. PMID:26761717

  15. Lysosomes and autophagy in aquatic animals.

    Moore, Michael N; Kohler, Angela; Lowe, David; Viarengo, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic system appears to be a common target for many environmental pollutants, as lysosomes accumulate many toxic metals and organic xenobiotics, which perturb normal function and damage the lysosomal membrane. In fact, autophagic reactions frequently involving reduced lysosomal membrane integrity or stability appear to be effective generic indicators of cellular well-being in eukaryotes: in social amoebae (slime mold), mollusks and fish, autophagy/membrane destabilization is correlated with many stress and toxicological responses and pathological reactions. Prognostic use of adverse lysosomal and autophagic reactions to environmental pollutants can be used for predicting cellular dysfunction and health in aquatic animals, such as shellfish and fish, which are extensively used as sensitive bioindicators in monitoring ecosystem health; and also represent a significant food resource for at least 20% of the global human population. Explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on health have been derived encompassing a conceptual mechanistic model linking lysosomal damage and autophagic dysfunction with injury to cells and tissues. Methods are described for tracking in vivo autophagy of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins, measuring degradation of radiolabeled intracellular proteins and morphometric measurement of lysosomal/cytoplasmic volume ratio. Additional methods for the determination of lysosomal membrane stability in lower animals are also described, which can be applied to frozen tissue sections, protozoans and isolated cells in vivo. Experimental and simulated results have also indicated that nutritional deprivation (analogous in marine mussels to caloric restriction)-induced autophagy has a protective function against toxic effects mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, coupled measurement of lysosomal-autophagic reactions and simulation modelling is proposed as a practical toolbox for predicting toxic

  16. Lysosomal enlargement and lysosomal membrane destabilisation in mussel digestive cells measured by an integrative index

    Lysosomal responses (enlargement and membrane destabilisation) in mussel digestive cells are well-known environmental stress biomarkers in pollution effects monitoring in marine ecosystems. Presently, in laboratory and field studies, both responses were measured separately (in terms of lysosomal volume density - Vv - and labilisation period -LP) and combined (lysosomal response index - LRI) in order to contribute to their understanding and to develop an index useful for decisions makers. LRI integrates Vv and LP, which are not necessarily dependent lysosomal responses. It is unbiased and more sensitive than Vv and LP alone and diminishes background due to confounding factors. LRI provides a simple numerical index (consensus reference = 0; critical threshold = 1) directly related to the pollution impact degree. Moreover, LRI can be represented in a way that allows the interpretation of lysosomal responses, which is useful for environmental scientists. - Lysosomal responses to pollutants measured by an integrative index.

  17. Muc5b is required for airway defence

    Roy, Michelle G.; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Fletcher, Ashley A.; McElwee, Melissa M.; Evans, Scott E.; Boerner, Ryan M.; Alexander, Samantha N.; Bellinghausen, Lindsey K.; Song, Alfred S.; Petrova, Youlia M.; Tuvim, Michael J.; Adachi, Roberto; Romo, Irlanda; Bordt, Andrea S.; Bowden, M. Gabriela; Sisson, Joseph H.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Thornton, David J.; Rousseau, Karine; de La Garza, Maria M.; Moghaddam, Seyed J.; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Blackburn, Michael R.; Drouin, Scott M.; Davis, C. William; Terrell, Kristy A.; Grubb, Barbara R.; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Flores, Sonia C.; Cota-Gomez, Adela; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Donnelly, Jody M.; Watson, Alan M.; Hennessy, Corinne E.; Keith, Rebecca C.; Yang, Ivana V.; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.; Schwartz, David A.; Boucher, Richard C.; Dickey, Burton F.; Evans, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory surfaces are exposed to billions of particulates and pathogens daily. A protective mucus barrier traps and eliminates them through mucociliary clearance (MCC). However, excessive mucus contributes to transient respiratory infections and to the pathogenesis of numerous respiratory diseases. MUC5AC and MUC5B are evolutionarily conserved genes that encode structurally related mucin glycoproteins, the principal macromolecules in airway mucus. Genetic variants are linked to diverse lung diseases, but specific roles for MUC5AC and MUC5B in MCC, and the lasting effects of their inhibition, are unknown. Here we show that mouse Muc5b (but not Muc5ac) is required for MCC, for controlling infections in the airways and middle ear, and for maintaining immune homeostasis in mouse lungs, whereas Muc5ac is dispensable. Muc5b deficiency caused materials to accumulate in upper and lower airways. This defect led to chronic infection by multiple bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, and to inflammation that failed to resolve normally. Apoptotic macrophages accumulated, phagocytosis was impaired, and interleukin-23 (IL-23) production was reduced in Muc5b-/- mice. By contrast, in mice that transgenically overexpress Muc5b, macrophage functions improved. Existing dogma defines mucous phenotypes in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as driven by increased MUC5AC, with MUC5B levels either unaffected or increased in expectorated sputum. However, in many patients, MUC5B production at airway surfaces decreases by as much as 90%. By distinguishing a specific role for Muc5b in MCC, and by determining its impact on bacterial infections and inflammation in mice, our results provide a refined framework for designing targeted therapies to control mucin secretion and restore MCC.

  18. Disruption of STAT5b-Regulated Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome by Diverse Factors Is a Common Event.

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Waxman, David J; Corton, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a growth hormone (GH)-activated transcription factor and a master regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Disruption of the GH hypothalamo-pituitary-liver axis controlling STAT5b activation can lead to metabolic dysregulation, steatosis, and liver cancer. Computational approaches were developed to identify factors that disrupt STAT5b function in a mouse liver gene expression compendium. A biomarker comprised of 144 STAT5b-dependent genes was derived using comparisons between wild-type male and wild-type female mice and between STAT5b-null and wild-type mice. Correlations between the STAT5b biomarker gene set and a test set comprised of expression datasets (biosets) with known effects on STAT5b function were evaluated using a rank-based test (the Running Fisher algorithm). Using a similarity p-value ≤ 10(-4), the test achieved a balanced accuracy of 99% and 97% for detection of STAT5b activation or STAT5b suppression, respectively. The STAT5b biomarker gene set was then used to identify factors that activate (masculinize) or suppress (feminize) STAT5b function in an annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1,850 datasets. Disruption of GH-regulated STAT5b is a common phenomenon in liver in vivo, with 5% and 29% of the male datasets, and 11% and 13% of the female datasets, associated with masculinization or feminization, respectively. As expected, liver STAT5b activation/masculinization occurred at puberty and suppression/feminization occurred during aging and in mutant mice with defects in GH signaling. A total of 70 genes were identified that have effects on STAT5b activation in genetic models in which the gene was inactivated or overexpressed. Other factors that affected liver STAT5b function were shown to include fasting, caloric restriction and infections. Together, these findings identify diverse factors that perturb the hypothalamo

  19. Assembly of the Respiratory Mucin MUC5B

    Ridley, C.; Kouvatsos, Nikos; Thornton, David J.; Raynal, Bertrand D; Howard, Marj; Collins, Richard F.; Desseyn, Jean-Luc; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Baldock, Clair; Davis, C. William; Timothy E. Hardingham

    2014-01-01

    Mucins are essential components in mucus gels that form protective barriers at all epithelial surfaces, but much remains unknown about their assembly, intragranular organization, and post-secretion unfurling to form mucus. MUC5B is a major polymeric mucin expressed by respiratory epithelia, and we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved during its assembly. Studies of intact polymeric MUC5B revealed a single high affinity calcium-binding site, distinct from multiple low affinity sites ...

  20. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro.

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes' internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality. PMID:26999125

  1. ErbB2-associated changes in the lysosomal proteome

    Nylandsted, Jesper; Becker, Andrea C; Bunkenborg, Jakob;

    2011-01-01

    Late endosomes and lysosomes (hereafter referred to as lysosomes) play an essential role in the turnover of cellular macromolecules and organelles. Their biochemical characterization has so far depended on purification methods based on either density gradient centrifugations or magnetic...... purification of iron-loaded organelles. Owing to dramatic changes in lysosomal density and stability associated with lysosomal diseases and cancer, these methods are not optimal for the comparison of normal and pathological lysosomes. Here, we introduce an efficient method for the purification of intact...... lysosomes by magnetic immunoprecipitation with antibodies against the vacuolar-type H(+) -ATPase. Quantitative MS-based proteomics analysis of the obtained lysosomal membranes identified 60 proteins, most of which have previously been associated with the lysosomal compartment. Interestingly, the lysosomal...

  2. Analysis of mutant NS5B proteins encoded by isolates from chimpanzees chronically infected following clonal HCV RNA inoculation

    We hypothesized that mutations in the HCV NS5B polymerase, which occur during infection, may affect RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity. NS5B proteins corresponding to a genotype 1a infectious clone and mutants identified in chimpanzees following inoculation with the clone were expressed and purified and their in vitro RdRp activity was compared to a NS5B genotype 1b control. A Gln-65-to-His mutation increased RdRp activity by 1.8-fold as compared to the infectious clone. Moreover, this NS5B1a protein had RdRp activity similar to the NS5B1b control. Three NS5B proteins representing mutations found in another animal had no in vitro RdRp activity. All mutations were maintained in the majority circulating virus for at least 216 weeks. The results demonstrate that some in vivo mutations of NS5B directly enhance in vitro RdRp activity. In addition, they suggest that the in vitro RdRp activity of NS5B may not always reflect in vivo activity within replication complexes

  3. On the structure of Lattice code WIMSD-5B

    The WIMS-D code is a freely available thermal reactor physics lattice code used widely for thermal research and power reactor calculation. Now the code WIMS-AECL, developed on the basis of WIMS-D, has been used as one of lattice codes for the cell calculation in Canada and also, in 1998, the latest version WIMSD-5B is released for OECD/NEA Data Bank. While WIMS-KAERI was developed and has been used, originated from WIMS-D, in Korea, it was adjusted for the cell calculation of research reactor HANARO and so it has no confirmaty to CANDU reactor. Therefore, the code development applicable to cell calculation of CANDU reactor is necessary not only for technological independence and but also for the establishment of CANDU safety analysis system. A lattice code WIMSD-5B was analyzed in order to set the system of reactor physics computer codes, to be used in the assessment of void reactivity effect. In order to improve and validate WIMSD-5B code, the analysis of the structure of WIMSD-5B lattice code was made and so its structure, algorithm and the subroutines of WIMSD-5B were presented for the cluster type and the pij method modelling the CANDU-6 fuel

  4. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C.; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes’ internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality. PMID:26999125

  5. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro

    Alberto Canfrán-Duque

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively, have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2 and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid, which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1 and coatomer subunit β (β-COP were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes’ internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality.

  6. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) regulate intracellular positioning of mitochondria in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    Rajapakshe, Anupama R; Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A; Terasawa, Kazue; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Namba, Toshimitsu; Kumei, Yasuhiro; Yanagishita, Masaki; Hara-Yokoyama, Miki

    2015-02-01

    The intracellular positioning of both lysosomes and mitochondria meets the requirements of degradation and energy supply, which are respectively the two major functions for cellular maintenance. The positioning of both lysosomes and mitochondria is apparently affected by the nutrient status of the cells. However, the mechanism coordinating the positioning of the organelles has not been sufficiently elucidated. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins-1 and -2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are highly glycosylated proteins that are abundant in lysosomal membranes. In the present study, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated downregulation of LAMP-1, LAMP-2 or their combination enhanced the perinuclear localization of mitochondria, in the pre-osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. On the other hand, in the osteocytic cell line MLO-Y4, in which both the lysosomes and mitochondria originally accumulate in the perinuclear region and mitochondria also fill dendrites, the effect of siRNA of LAMP-1 or LAMP-2 was barely observed. LAMPs are not directly associated with mitochondria, and there do not seem to be any accessory molecules commonly required to recruit the motor proteins to lysosomes and mitochondria. Our results suggest that LAMPs may regulate the positioning of lysosomes and mitochondria. A possible mechanism involving the indirect and context-dependent action of LAMPs is discussed. PMID:25246127

  7. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion

    Jing Zhou; Shi-Hao Tan; Valérie Nicolas; Chantal Bauvy; Nai-Di Yang; Jianbin Zhang; Yuan Xue

    2013-01-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy.In this study,we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torinl),but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin),leads to activation of lysosomal function.Second,we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1),but not mTORC2,and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function.Third,we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation.Finally,Atg5 or Atg7deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation,suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on antophagosome-lysosome fusion.Taken together,this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy,lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  8. Screening and Optimization of Ligand Conjugates for Lysosomal Targeting

    Meerovich, Igor; Koshkaryev, Alexander; Thekkedath, Ritesh; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lysosome-targeted liposomes may significantly improve the delivery of therapeutic enzymes and chaperones into lysosomes for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. The aim of this research was to synthesize new potentially lysosomotropic ligands on a base of Neutral Red and rhodamine B and to study their ability to enhance specific lysosomal delivery of surface-modified liposomes loaded with a model compound, fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FD). The delivery of these lipo...

  9. Purification of Lysosomes Using Supraparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs).

    Rofe, Adam P; Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomes can be rapidly isolated from tissue culture cells using supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIONs). In this protocol, colloidal iron dextran (FeDex) particles, a type of SPION, are taken up by cultured mouse macrophage cells via the endocytic pathway. The SPIONs accumulate in lysosomes, the end point of the endocytic pathway, permitting the lysosomes to be isolated magnetically. The purified lysosomes are suitable for in vitro fusion assays or for proteomic analysis. PMID:27037068

  10. Promotion of Proapoptotic Signals by Lysosomal Photodamage.

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John J

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that low-level lysosomal photodamage enhanced the efficacy of subsequent mitochondrial photodamage, resulting in a substantial promotion of apoptotic cell death. We now extend our analysis of the sequential PDT protocol to include two additional lysosomal-targeting photosensitizers. These agents, because of enhanced permeability, are more potent than the agent (N-aspartyl chlorin E6, NPe6) used in the initial study. Addition of the cell-permeable cysteine protease inhibitor E-64d and calcium chelator BAPTA-AM almost completely suppressed sequential PDT-induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of procaspases-3 and -7. These inhibitors did not, however, suppress the proapoptotic effect of a BH3 mimetic or mitochondrial photodamage. Knockdowns of ATG7 or ATG5, proteins normally associated with autophagy, suppressed photodamage induced by the sequential PDT protocol. These effects appear to be independent of the autophagic process as pharmacological inhibition of autophagy offered no such protection. Effects of ATG7 and ATG5 knockdowns may reflect the role that ATG7 plays in regulating lysosome permeability, and the likelihood that a proteolytic fragment of ATG5 amplifies mitochondrial proapoptotic processes. Our results suggest that low-dose photodamage that sequentially targets lysosomes and mitochondria may offer significant advantages over the use of single photosensitizers. PMID:25873082

  11. Transport of Lysosome-Related Organelles

    Jordens, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    Many intracellular compartments, including (MHC class II-containing) lysosomes, melanosomes and phagosomes, move along microtubules in a bi-directional manner due to the alternating activities of the plus-end directed kinesin motor and the minus-end directed dynein-dynactin motor. However, it is lar

  12. Close encounters of the lysosome/peroxisome kind

    Jin, Yui; Strunk, Bethany S.; Weisman, Lois S.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes provide a major source for cellular cholesterol; however, most of this cholesterol is trafficked to the plasma membrane via unknown mechanisms. In this issue of Cell, Chu et al. identify an unexpected role for peroxisomes in the transport of cholesterol from the lysosome to the plasma membrane via a lysosome-peroxisome membrane contact site.

  13. Lysosome-targeted stress reveals increased stability of lipofuscin-containing lysosomes

    Stroikin, Yuri; Mild, Hanna; Johansson, Uno; Roberg, Karin; Öllinger, Karin

    2008-01-01

    Cellular ageing is associated with accumulation of undegradable intralysosomal material, called lipofuscin. In order to accelerate the lipofuscin-accumulation, confluent, growth arrested human fibroblasts were cultured under hyperoxic conditions. To provide a better insight into the effects of lipofuscin on cellular functions, we compared lysosomal stability in control and lipofuscin-loaded human fibroblasts under conditions of lysosome-targeted stress induced by exposure to either the lysoso...

  14. A Proteolytic Cascade Controls Lysosome Rupture and Necrotic Cell Death Mediated by Lysosome-Destabilizing Adjuvants

    Jürgen Brojatsch; Heriberto Lima; Alak K Kar; Jacobson, Lee S.; Stefan M Muehlbauer; Kartik Chandran; Felipe Diaz-Griffero

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have linked necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins to the adaptive immune response mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing adjuvants, alum and Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). However, the mechanism by which lysosome-destabilizing agents trigger necrosis and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins is poorly understood. The proteasome is a cellular complex that has been shown to regulate both necrotic cell death and proteolysis of inflammatory proteins. We found that the p...

  15. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion

    ZHOU, JING; Tan, Shi-Hao; Nicolas, Valérie; Bauvy, Chantal; Yang, Nai-Di; Zhang, Jianbin; Xue,Yuan; Codogno, Patrice; Shen, Han-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy. In this study, we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torin1), but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin), leads to activation of lysosomal function. Second, we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal f...

  16. A lysosome-to-nucleus signalling mechanism senses and regulates the lysosome via mTOR and TFEB

    Settembre C; Zoncu R; Medina DL; Vetrini F; Erdin S; Huynh T; Ferron M; Karsenty G; Vellard MC; Facchinetti V; Sabatini DM; Ballabio A.

    2012-01-01

    The lysosome plays a key role in cellular homeostasis by controlling both cellular clearance and energy production to respond to environmental cues. However, the mechanisms mediating lysosomal adaptation are largely unknown. Here, we show that the Transcription Factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, colocalizes with master growth regulator mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) on the lysosomal membrane. When nutrients are present, phosphorylation of TFEB by mTORC1 inhibits TFEB activ...

  17. Pigeon monocyte/macrophage lysosomes during beta VLDL uptake. Induction of acid phosphatase activity. A model for complex arterial lysosomes.

    Jones, N L; Jerome, W. G.; Lewis, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    Lysosomes have long been implicated as a factor contributing to the progression and complication of atherosclerosis. The authors' laboratory previously has shown that lysosomal ultrastructure in arterial macrophage foam cells is altered as primary lysosomes give rise to large pleiomorphic organelles on lipid accumulation during lesion progression. To further explore the subcellular alterations in lysosomes and associated organelles during foam cell formation, three-dimensional (3D) intermedia...

  18. Pharmacoinformatics approach for investigation of alternative potential hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5B inhibitors

    Mirza MU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Usman Mirza,1 Noor-Ul-Huda Ghori,2 Nazia Ikram,3 Abdur Rehman Adil,4 Sadia Manzoor3 1Centre for Research in Molecular Medicine (CRiMM, The University of Lahore, Lahore, 2Atta-ur-Rehman School of Applied Biosciences (ASAB, National University of Science and Technology, Islamabad, 3Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan; 4Centre for Excellence in Molecular Biology (CEMB, The University of Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan Abstract: Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the major viruses affecting the world today. It is a highly variable virus, having a rapid reproduction and evolution rate. The variability of genomes is due to hasty replication catalyzed by nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B which is also a potential target site for the development of anti-HCV agents. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved sofosbuvir as a novel oral NS5B inhibitor for the treatment of HCV. Unfortunately, it is much highlighted for its pricing issues. Hence, there is an urgent need to scrutinize alternate therapies against HCV that are available at affordable price and do not have associated side effects. Such a need is crucial especially in underdeveloped countries. The search for various new bioactive compounds from plants is a key part of pharmaceutical research. In the current study, we applied a pharmacoinformatics-based approach for the identification of active plant-derived compounds against NS5B. The results were compared to docking results of sofosbuvir. The lead compounds with high-binding ligands were further analyzed for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters based on in silico absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET profile. The results showed the potential alternative lead compounds that can be developed into commercial drugs having high binding energy and promising ADMET properties. Keywords: hepatitis C, NS5B inhibitors, molecular docking, Auto

  19. Diagnosing lysosomal storage diseases in a Brazilian non-newborn population by tandem mass spectrometry

    Guilherme Dotto Brand

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: High-throughput mass spectrometry methods have been developed to screen newborns for lysosomal storage disorders, allowing the implementation of newborn screening pilot studies in North America and Europe. It is currently feasible to diagnose Pompe, Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, and Niemann-Pick A/B diseases, as well as mucopolysaccharidosis I, by tandem mass spectrometry in dried blood spots, which offers considerable technical advantages compared with standard methodologies. We aimed to investigate whether the mass spectrometry methodology for lysosomal storage disease screening, originally developed for newborns, can also discriminate between affected patients and controls of various ages. METHODS: A total of 205 control individuals were grouped according to age and subjected to mass spectrometry quantification of lysosomal α-glucosidase, β-glucocerebrosidase, α-galactosidase, acid sphingomyelinase, galactocerebrosidase, and α−L-iduronidase activities. Additionally, 13 affected patients were analyzed. RESULTS: The median activities for each enzyme and each age group were determined. Enzyme activities were significantly lower in individuals aged older than 18 years compared with those in newborns. Affected patients presented enzymatic activities corresponding to less than 20% of the age-matched controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the mass spectrometry methodology can be used for the screening of lysosomal storage diseases in non-newborn patients. However, for some diseases, such as Fabry and mucopolysaccharidosis I, a combination of biochemical and clinical data may be necessary to achieve accurate diagnoses.

  20. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  1. Lysosome: regulator of lipid degradation pathways

    Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic pathway that has a fundamental role in the adaptation to fasting and primarily relies on the activity of the endolysosomal system, to which the autophagosome targets substrates for degradation. Recent studies have revealed that the lysosomal–autophagic pathway plays an important part in the early steps of lipid degradation. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional mechanisms underlying co-regulation between lysosome, autophagy, and other steps of lipid catabolis...

  2. Ultraviolet induced lysosome activity in corneal epithelium

    A 5.000 W Xe-Hg high pressure lamp and a double monochromator were used to produce a 3.3 nm half-bandpass ultraviolet radiation at 295 nm. Pigmented rabbit eyes were irradiated with radiant exposures from 140 Jm-2 to 10.000 Jm-2 and evaluated by slit-lamp biomicroscopy, light and electron microscopy. Corneal threshold (Hsub(c) was 200 Jm-2 and lens threshold (Hsub(L)) was 7.500 Jm-2. The most repeatable and reliable corneal response to these levels of UV was the development of corneal epithelial granules. Histological changes included a loss of superficial epithelial cells and selective UV induced autolysis of the wing cells. It is suggested that the biomicroscopically observed granules are the clinical manifestation of the secondary lysosomes revealed by light and electron microscopy. It is proposed that UV breaks down the primary lysosome membranes to release hydrolytic enzymes which in turn form the secondary lysosomes during autolysis. Extreme levels of radiant exposure at 295 nm result in indiscriminate destruction of all layers of the corneal epithelium, but the posterior cornea was spared. (orig.)

  3. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  4. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1 Plays a Dominant Role in Glycogen Transport to Lysosomes in Liver.

    Sun, Tao; Yi, Haiqing; Yang, Chunyu; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-08-01

    A small portion of cellular glycogen is transported to and degraded in lysosomes by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) in mammals, but it is unclear why and how glycogen is transported to the lysosomes. Stbd1 has recently been proposed to participate in glycogen trafficking to lysosomes. However, our previous study demonstrated that knockdown of Stbd1 in GAA knock-out mice did not alter lysosomal glycogen storage in skeletal muscles. To further determine whether Stbd1 participates in glycogen transport to lysosomes, we generated GAA/Stbd1 double knock-out mice. In fasted double knock-out mice, glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles was not affected, but glycogen content in liver was reduced by nearly 73% at 3 months of age and by 60% at 13 months as compared with GAA knock-out mice, indicating that the transport of glycogen to lysosomes was suppressed in liver by the loss of Stbd1. Exogenous expression of human Stbd1 in double knock-out mice restored the liver lysosomal glycogen content to the level of GAA knock-out mice, as did a mutant lacking the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) and another mutant that contains only the N-terminal 24 hydrophobic segment and the C-terminal starch binding domain (CBM20) interlinked by an HA tag. Our results demonstrate that Stbd1 plays a dominant role in glycogen transport to lysosomes in liver and that the N-terminal transmembrane region and the C-terminal CBM20 domain are critical for this function. PMID:27358407

  5. Diagnosing Lysosomal Storage Disorders: The GM2 Gangliosidoses.

    Hall, Patricia; Minnich, Sara; Teigen, Claire; Raymond, Kimiyo

    2014-01-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by defective β-hexosaminidase. There are three clinical conditions in this group: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Sandhoff disease (SD), and hexosaminidase activator deficiency. The three conditions are clinically indistinguishable. TSD and SD have been identified with infantile, juvenile, and adult onset forms. The activator deficiency is only known to present with infantile onset. Diagnosis of TSD and SD is based on decreased hexosaminidase activity and a change in the percentage of activity between isoforms. There are no biochemical tests currently available for activator deficiency. This unit provides a detailed procedure for identifying TSD and SD in affected individuals and carriers from leukocyte samples, the most robust sample type available. PMID:25271840

  6. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Highlights: ► p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. ► We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. ► The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. ► Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. ► The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome–lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  7. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okada, Masato, E-mail: okadam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  8. Chinese hamster ovary cell lysosomes rapidly exchange contents

    1987-01-01

    We have used cell fusion to address the question of whether macromolecules are rapidly exchanged between lysosomes. Donor cell lysosomes were labeled by the long-term internalization of the fluid- phase pinocytic markers, invertase (sucrase), Lucifer Yellow, FITC- conjugated dextran, or Texas red-conjugated dextran. Recipient cells contained lysosomes swollen by long-term internalization of dilute sucrose or marked by an overnight FITC-dextran uptake. Cells were incubated for 1 or 2 h in mark...

  9. Inhibition of macrophage phagosome-lysosome fusion by Salmonella typhimurium.

    Buchmeier, N A; Heffron, F

    1991-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium-infected macrophages were examined by electron microscopy to determine whether intracellular survival of S. typhimurium is associated with failure of bacteria containing phagosomes to fuse with secondary lysosomes. S. typhimurium 14028 actively inhibited phagosome-lysosome fusion and appeared to preferentially divide within unfused phagocytic vesicles. In comparison with Escherichia coli, S. typhimurium inhibited phagosome-lysosome fusion in peritoneal macrophages, J774...

  10. A lysosome-centered view of nutrient homeostasis.

    Mony, Vinod K; Benjamin, Shawna; O'Rourke, Eyleen J

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomes are highly acidic cellular organelles traditionally viewed as sacs of enzymes involved in digesting extracellular or intracellular macromolecules for the regeneration of basic building blocks, cellular housekeeping, or pathogen degradation. Bound by a single lipid bilayer, lysosomes receive their substrates by fusing with endosomes or autophagosomes, or through specialized translocation mechanisms such as chaperone-mediated autophagy or microautophagy. Lysosomes degrade their substrates using up to 60 different soluble hydrolases and release their products either to the cytosol through poorly defined exporting and efflux mechanisms or to the extracellular space by fusing with the plasma membrane. However, it is becoming evident that the role of the lysosome in nutrient homeostasis goes beyond the disposal of waste or the recycling of building blocks. The lysosome is emerging as a signaling hub that can integrate and relay external and internal nutritional information to promote cellular and organismal homeostasis, as well as a major contributor to the processing of energy-dense molecules like glycogen and triglycerides. Here we describe the current knowledge of the nutrient signaling pathways governing lysosomal function, the role of the lysosome in nutrient mobilization, and how lysosomes signal other organelles, distant tissues, and even themselves to ensure energy homeostasis in spite of fluctuations in energy intake. At the same time, we highlight the value of genomics approaches to the past and future discoveries of how the lysosome simultaneously executes and controls cellular homeostasis. PMID:27050453

  11. Current molecular genetics strategies for the diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders.

    Giugliani, Roberto; Brusius-Facchin, Ana-Carolina; Pasqualim, Gabriela; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Riegel, Mariluce; Matte, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of almost 50 monogenic diseases characterized by mutations causing deficiency of lysosomal enzymes or non-enzyme proteins involved in transport across the lysosomal membrane, protein maturation or lysosomal biogenesis. Usually, affected patients are normal at birth and have a progressive and severe disease with high morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The overall incidence of LSDs is usually estimated as 1:5000, but newborn screening studies are indicating that it could be much higher. Specific therapies were already developed for selected LSDs, making the timely and correct diagnosis very important for successful treatment and also for genetic counseling. In most LSD cases the biochemical techniques provide a reliable diagnosis. However, the identification of pathogenic mutations by genetic analysis is being increasingly recommended to provide additional information. In this paper we discuss the conventional methods for genetic analysis used in the LSDs [restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS), single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC), real-time polymerase chain reaction, high resolution melting (HRM), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), Sanger sequencing] and also the newer approaches [massive parallel sequencing, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)]. PMID:26567866

  12. Septins promote macropinosome maturation and traffic to the lysosome by facilitating membrane fusion.

    Dolat, Lee; Spiliotis, Elias T

    2016-08-29

    Macropinocytosis, the internalization of extracellular fluid and material by plasma membrane ruffles, is critical for antigen presentation, cell metabolism, and signaling. Macropinosomes mature through homotypic and heterotypic fusion with endosomes and ultimately merge with lysosomes. The molecular underpinnings of this clathrin-independent endocytic pathway are largely unknown. Here, we show that the filamentous septin GTPases associate preferentially with maturing macropinosomes in a phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-dependent manner and localize to their contact/fusion sites with macropinosomes/endosomes. Septin knockdown results in large clusters of docked macropinosomes, which persist longer and exhibit fewer fusion events. Septin depletion and overexpression down-regulates and enhances, respectively, the delivery of fluid-phase cargo to lysosomes, without affecting Rab5 and Rab7 recruitment to macropinosomes/endosomes. In vitro reconstitution assays show that fusion of macropinosomes/endosomes is abrogated by septin immunodepletion and function-blocking antibodies and is induced by recombinant septins in the absence of cytosol and polymerized actin. Thus, septins regulate fluid-phase cargo traffic to lysosomes by promoting macropinosome maturation and fusion with endosomes/lysosomes. PMID:27551056

  13. Decreased T2 signal in the thalami may be a sign of lysosomal storage disease

    Lysosomal disorders are rare and are caused by genetically transmitted lysosomal enzyme deficiencies. A decreased T2 signal in the thalamus has occasionally been reported. Because the finding of bilateral abnormal signal intensity of the thalamus on T2-weighted images has not been systematically reviewed, and its value as a diagnostic tool critically evaluated, we carried out a systematic review of the literature. Articles in English with 30 trios of keywords were collected from PubMed. Exclusion criteria were lack of conventional T2-weighted images in the protocol and not being a human study. Finally, 111 articles were included. The thalamus was considered affected only if mentioned in the text or in the figure legends. Some 117 patients with various lysosomal diseases and five patients with ceruloplasmin deficiency were reported to have a bilateral decrease in T2 signal intensity. At least one article reported a bilateral decrease in signal intensity of the thalami on T2-weighted images in association with GM1 and GM2 gangliosidosis and with Krabbe's disease, aspartylglucosaminuria, mannosidosis, fucosidosis, and mucolipidosis IV. Furthermore, thalamic alteration was a consistent finding in several types of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) including CLN1 (infantile NCL), CLN2 (classic late infantile NCL), CLN3 (juvenile NCL), CLN5 (Finnish variant late infantile NCL), and CLN7 (Turkish variant late infantile NCL). A decrease in T2 signal intensity in the thalami seems to be a sign of lysosomal disease. (orig.)

  14. Arl5b is a Golgi-localised small G protein involved in the regulation of retrograde transport.

    Houghton, Fiona J; Bellingham, Shayne A; Hill, Andrew F; Bourges, Dorothée; Ang, Desmond K Y; Gemetzis, Timothy; Gasnereau, Isabelle; Gleeson, Paul A

    2012-03-10

    Regulation of membrane transport is controlled by small G proteins, which include members of the Rab and Arf families. Whereas the role of the classic Arf family members are well characterized, many of the Arf-like proteins (Arls) remain poorly defined. Here we show that Arl5a and Arl5b are localised to the trans-Golgi in mammalian cells, and furthermore have identified a role for Arl5b in the regulation of retrograde membrane transport from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The constitutively active Arl5b (Q70L)-GFP mutant was localised efficiently to the Golgi in HeLa cells whereas the dominant-negative Arl5b (T30N)-GFP mutant was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and resulted in perturbation of the Golgi apparatus. Stable HeLa cells expressing GFP-tagged Arl5b (Q70L) showed an increased rate of endosome-to-Golgi transport of the membrane cargo TGN38 compared with control HeLa cells. Depletion of Arl5b by RNAi resulted in an alteration in the intracellular distribution of mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and significantly reduced the endosome-to-TGN transport of the membrane cargo TGN38 and of Shiga toxin, but had no affect on the anterograde transport of the cargo E-cadherin. Collectively these results suggest that Arl5b is a TGN-localised small G protein that plays a key role in regulating transport along the endosome-TGN pathway. PMID:22245584

  15. Lysosomal Targeting with Stable and Sensitive Fluorescent Probes (Superior LysoProbes): Applications for Lysosome Labeling and Tracking during Apoptosis

    Xin Chen; Yue Bi; Tianyang Wang; Pengfei Li; Xin Yan; Shanshan Hou; Catherine E. Bammert; Jingfang Ju; K. Michael Gibson; Pavan, William J.; Lanrong Bi

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pH plays an important role in the response to cancer invasion. We have designed and synthesized a series of new fluorescent probes (Superior LysoProbes) with the capacity to label acidic organelles and monitor lysosomal pH. Unlike commercially available fluorescent dyes, Superior LysoProbes are lysosome-specific and are highly stable. The use of Superior LysoProbes facilitates the direct visualization of the lysosomal response to lobaplatin elicited in human chloangiocarcinoma (...

  16. Presenilin 1 Maintains Lysosomal Ca2+ Homeostasis via TRPML1 by Regulating vATPase-Mediated Lysosome Acidification

    Ju-Hyun Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Presenilin 1 (PS1 deletion or Alzheimer’s disease (AD-linked mutations disrupt lysosomal acidification and proteolysis, which inhibits autophagy. Here, we establish that this phenotype stems from impaired glycosylation and instability of vATPase V0a1 subunit, causing deficient lysosomal vATPase assembly and function. We further demonstrate that elevated lysosomal pH in Presenilin 1 knockout (PS1KO cells induces abnormal Ca2+ efflux from lysosomes mediated by TRPML1 and elevates cytosolic Ca2+. In WT cells, blocking vATPase activity or knockdown of either PS1 or the V0a1 subunit of vATPase reproduces all of these abnormalities. Normalizing lysosomal pH in PS1KO cells using acidic nanoparticles restores normal lysosomal proteolysis, autophagy, and Ca2+ homeostasis, but correcting lysosomal Ca2+ deficits alone neither re-acidifies lysosomes nor reverses proteolytic and autophagic deficits. Our results indicate that vATPase deficiency in PS1 loss-of-function states causes lysosomal/autophagy deficits and contributes to abnormal cellular Ca2+ homeostasis, thus linking two AD-related pathogenic processes through a common molecular mechanism.

  17. A Review of Gene Therapy in Canine and Feline Models of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Bradbury, Allison M.; Gurda, Brittney L.; Casal, Margret L.; Ponder, Katherine P; Vite, Charles H.; Haskins, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are inherited diseases that result from the intracellular accumulation of incompletely degraded macromolecules. The majority of LSDs affect both the peripheral and central nervous systems and are not effectively treated by enzyme replacement therapy, substrate reduction therapy, or bone marrow transplantation. Advances in adeno-associated virus and retroviral vector development over the past decade have resurged gene therapy as a promising therapeutic interv...

  18. Engaging the lysosomal compartment to combat B cell malignancies

    Gronbaek, K.; Jaattela, M.

    2009-01-01

    generation of therapeutic anti-CD20 mAbs. In this issue of the JCI, Ivanov and colleagues identify the lysosomal compartment as a target for type II mAbs (see the related article beginning on page 2143). These data encourage the further clinical development of type II mAbs as well as other lysosome...

  19. Lysosomal phospholipids from rat liver after treatment with different drugs.

    Tjiong, H B; Lepthin, J; Debuch, H

    1978-01-01

    Rats were treated with 5 different drugs p-ethoxyacetanilide (I), indometacin (II) and nor-amidopyrine-methanesulfonate (III), O,O'-bis(diethylaminoethyl)hexestrol(IV) and choloroquine (V) for 3 - 4 weeks. Liver cell fractions were isolated by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and the specific activity of acid phosphatase was determined in each. Lysosomal fractions contained widely varying amounts of this marker enzyme, indicating that the concentration of lysosomes within these fractions differed. The amounts and patterns of phospholipids reflected this fact. Since we assumed bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate [(MAG)2-P; synonym:lysobisphosphatidic acid] is a marker lipid for secondary lysosomes, we expected and found significant quantities of this acidic phospholipid only in those lysosomal fractions which were also rich in acid phosphatase activity. 12% of the lysosomal phospholipids from animals receiving the hexestrol derivative (IV), and 19% of those from the chloroquine (V) experiment were present as (MAG)2P. The fatty acid compositions of this lysosomal phospholipid were not the same in all lysosome fractions. The more (MAG)2P present in the lysosomes, the more unsaturated are the fatty acids. Thus, after treatment with chloroquine, more than 90% of the fatty acids from (MAG)2P are unsaturated; C22:6 represents about 70% of the total. PMID:627402

  20. Homotypic Lysosome Fusion in Macrophages: Analysis Using an In Vitro Assay

    Diane M Ward; Jonathan D Leslie; Kaplan, Jerry

    1997-01-01

    Lysosomes are dynamic structures capable of fusing with endosomes as well as other lysosomes. We examined the biochemical requirements for homotypic lysosome fusion in vitro using lysosomes obtained from rabbit alveolar macrophages or the cultured macrophage-like cell line, J774E. The in vitro assay measures the formation of a biotinylated HRP–avidin conjugate, in which biotinylated HRP and avidin were accumulated in lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. We determined that lysosome fusi...

  1. Diabetes alters KIF1A and KIF5B motor proteins in the hippocampus.

    Filipa I Baptista

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder in humans. Diabetic encephalopathy is characterized by cognitive and memory impairments, which have been associated with changes in the hippocampus, but the mechanisms underlying those impairments triggered by diabetes, are far from being elucidated. The disruption of axonal transport is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases and might also play a role in diabetes-associated disorders affecting nervous system. We investigated the effect of diabetes (2 and 8 weeks duration on KIF1A, KIF5B and dynein motor proteins, which are important for axonal transport, in the hippocampus. The mRNA expression of motor proteins was assessed by qRT-PCR, and also their protein levels by immunohistochemistry in hippocampal slices and immunoblotting in total extracts of hippocampus from streptozotocin-induced diabetic and age-matched control animals. Diabetes increased the expression and immunoreactivity of KIF1A and KIF5B in the hippocampus, but no alterations in dynein were detected. Since hyperglycemia is considered a major player in diabetic complications, the effect of a prolonged exposure to high glucose on motor proteins, mitochondria and synaptic proteins in hippocampal neurons was also studied, giving particular attention to changes in axons. Hippocampal cell cultures were exposed to high glucose (50 mM or mannitol (osmotic control; 25 mM plus 25 mM glucose for 7 days. In hippocampal cultures incubated with high glucose no changes were detected in the fluorescence intensity or number of accumulations related with mitochondria in the axons of hippocampal neurons. Nevertheless, high glucose increased the number of fluorescent accumulations of KIF1A and synaptotagmin-1 and decreased KIF5B, SNAP-25 and synaptophysin immunoreactivity specifically in axons of hippocampal neurons. These changes suggest that anterograde axonal transport mediated by these kinesins may be impaired in hippocampal

  2. Lysosomal Dysfunction Caused by Cellular Accumulation of Silica Nanoparticles.

    Schütz, Irene; Lopez-Hernandez, Tania; Gao, Qi; Puchkov, Dmytro; Jabs, Sabrina; Nordmeyer, Daniel; Schmudde, Madlen; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina M; Haucke, Volker

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as components of drugs or cosmetics and hold great promise for biomedicine, yet their effects on cell physiology remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that clathrin-independent dynamin 2-mediated caveolar uptake of surface-functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) impairs cell viability due to lysosomal dysfunction. We show that internalized SiNPs accumulate in lysosomes resulting in inhibition of autophagy-mediated protein turnover and impaired degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor, whereas endosomal recycling proceeds unperturbed. This phenotype is caused by perturbed delivery of cargo via autophagosomes and late endosomes to SiNP-filled cathepsin B/L-containing lysosomes rather than elevated lysosomal pH or altered mTOR activity. Given the importance of autophagy and lysosomal protein degradation for cellular proteostasis and clearance of aggregated proteins, these results raise the question of beneficial use of NPs in biomedicine and beyond. PMID:27226546

  3. Transformation-associated changes in sphingolipid metabolism sensitize cells to lysosomal cell death induced by inhibitors of acid sphingomyelinase

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Olsen, Ole D; Groth-Pedersen, Line;

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent cell death may prove useful in cancer treatment, provided that cancer cell lysosomes can be specifically targeted. Here, we identify acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) inhibition as a selective means to destabilize cancer cell lysosomes. Lysosome...

  4. Lysosomal Storage Causes Cellular Dysfunction in Mucolipidosis II Skin Fibroblasts*

    Otomo, Takanobu; Higaki, Katsumi; Nanba, Eiji; Ozono, Keiichi; Sakai, Norio

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a fatal inherited metabolic disease caused by deficiency of GlcNAc-phosphotransferase, which plays a role in generating the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker on lysosomal enzymes. In ML-II, many lysosomal acid hydrolases are mistargeted out of cells, and lysosomes become filled with undigested substrates, which explains inclusion cell disease as an alternative name for this disease. In this study, we revealed various cellular phenotypes in ML-II skin fibroblasts. We quantitated phospholipid and cholesterol within cells and showed ∼2-fold accumulation in ML-II as compared with normal cells. Lysosomal pH of ML-II cells was higher than that of normal cells (5.29 ± 0.08 versus 4.79 ± 0.10, p < 0.001). The proliferated lysosomes in ML-II cells were accumulated ∼3-fold in amount as compared with normal cells. Intracellular logistics including endocytosis and mannose 6-phosphate receptor recycling were impaired in ML-II cells. To confirm whether these ML-II cellular phenotypes derive from deficient lysosomal acid hydrolases within lysosomes, we performed supplementation of lysosomal enzymes using a partially purified total enzyme mixture, which was derived from the conditioned culture medium of normal skin fibroblasts after NH4Cl treatment. This supplementation corrected all of the previously described ML-II phenotypes. In addition, the autophagic and mitochondrial impairment that we have previously reported improved, and inclusion bodies disappeared on electron micrography following total lysosomal enzyme supplementation. Our results indicate that various cellular phenotypes in ML-II are caused by the deficiency of many lysosomal enzymes and massive accumulation of undigested substrates. PMID:21846724

  5. Cyclodextrin induces calcium-dependent lysosomal exocytosis.

    Fannie W Chen

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrins (CDs have long been used to manipulate cellular cholesterol levels both in vitro and in vivo, but their direct effects at a cellular level are not well characterized. Recently, CDs have garnered much interest because of their ability to clear stored cholesterol from Niemann Pick Type C (NPC cells and markedly prolong the life of NPC1 disease mice. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that treatment with 2-hydroxypropyl- β-cyclodextrin (HPB-CD stimulates lysosomal exocytosis in a calcium-enhanced manner. We propose that this exocytosis is the mechanism by which HPB-CD ameliorates the endolysosomal cholesterol storage phenotype in NPC cells. These findings have significant implications for the use of HPB-CD in biochemical assays and data interpretation as well as for their use for the treatment for NPC and other disorders.

  6. Diagnosing lysosomal storage disorders: mucopolysaccharidosis type I.

    Johnson, Britt A; Dajnoki, Angela; Bodamer, Olaf A

    2015-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder due to deficiency of alpha iduronidase (IDUA). Progressive storage of dermatan and heparan sulfate throughout the body lead to a multiorgan presentation including short stature, dysostosis multiplex, corneal clouding, hearing loss, coarse facies, hepatosplenomegaly, and intellectual disability. Diagnosis of MPS I is based on IDUA enzyme analysis in leukocytes or dried blood spots (DBS) followed by molecular confirmation of the IDUA gene mutations in individuals with low enzyme activity. The advent of mass spectrometry methods for enzyme analysis in DBS has enabled high-throughput screening for MPS I in symptomatic individuals and newborn infants. The following unit provides the detailed analytical protocol for measurement of IDUA activity in DBS using tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25599668

  7. Crystal structure of translation initiation factor 5B from the crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Murakami, Ryo; Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Uchiumi, Toshio; Ito, Kosuke

    2016-05-01

    Initiation factor 5B (IF5B) is a universally conserved translational GTPase that catalyzes ribosomal subunit joining. In eukaryotes, IF5B directly interacts via a groove in its domain IV with initiation factor 1A (IF1A), another universally conserved initiation factor, to accomplish efficient subunit joining. Here, we have determined the first structure of a crenarchaeal IF5B, which revealed that the archaea-specific region of IF5B (helix α15) binds and occludes the groove of domain IV. Therefore, archaeal IF5B cannot access IF1A in the same manner as eukaryotic IF5B. This fact suggests that different relationships between IF5B and IF1A exist in archaea and eukaryotes. Proteins 2016; 84:712-717. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868175

  8. Obesity-resistant S5B rats showed great cocaine conditioned place preference than the obesity-prone OM rats

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K..; Kim, R.; Cho, J.; Michaelides, M.; Anderson, B.J.; Primeaux, S.D.; Bray, G.A.; Wang, G.-J.; Robinson, J.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-12-01

    Dopamine (DA) and the DA D2 receptor (D2R) are involved in the rewarding and conditioned responses to food and drug rewards. Osborne-Mendel (OM) rats are genetically prone and S5B/P rats are genetically resistant to obesity when fed a high-fat diet. We hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of these two rat strains to natural rewards may also be reflected in sensitivity to drugs of abuse. Therefore, we tested whether OM and S5B/P rats showed a differential preference to cocaine using conditioned place preference (CPP). To also evaluate whether there is specific involvement of the D2R in this differential conditioning sensitivity, we then tested whether the D2R agonist bromocriptine (BC) would differentially affect the effects of cocaine in the two strains. OM and S5B/P rats were conditioned with cocaine (5 or 10 mg/kg) in one chamber and saline in another for 8 days. Rats were then tested for cocaine preference. The effects of BC (0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg) on cocaine preference were then assessed in subsequent test sessions. OM rats did not show a significant preference for the cocaine-paired chamber on test day. Only the S5B/P rats showed cocaine CPP. Later treatment with only the highest dose of BC resulted in reduced cocaine CPP in S5B/P rats when treated with 5 mg/kg cocaine and in OM rats treated with 10 mg/kg cocaine. Our results indicated that obesity-resistant S5B rats showed greater cocaine CPP than the obesity-prone OM rats. These findings do not support a theory of common vulnerability for reinforcer preferences (food and cocaine). However, they show that BC reduced cocaine conditioning effects supporting at least a partial regulatory role of D2R in conditioned responses to drugs.

  9. Chemical and Hormonal Effects on STAT5b-Dependent Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome.

    The growth hormone (GH)-activated transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b) is a key regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Suppression of hepatic STAT5b signaling is associated with lipid metabolic dysfunction leadi...

  10. Rotenone Upregulates Alpha-Synuclein and Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2D Independently from Lysosomal Degradation Inhibition

    Gessica Sala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunctions of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA, the main catabolic pathway for alpha-synuclein, have been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Since till now there is limited information on how PD-related toxins may affect CMA, in this study we explored the effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone on CMA substrates, alpha-synuclein and MEF2D, and effectors, lamp2A and hsc70, in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Rotenone induced an upregulation of alpha-synuclein and MEF2D protein levels through the stimulation of their de novo synthesis rather than through a reduction of their CMA-mediated degradation. Moreover, increased MEF2D transcription resulted in higher nuclear protein levels that exert a protective role against mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. These results were compared with those obtained after lysosome inhibition with ammonium chloride. As expected, this toxin induced the cytosolic accumulation of both alpha-synuclein and MEF2D proteins, as the result of the inhibition of their lysosome-mediated degradation, while, differently from rotenone, ammonium chloride decreased MEF2D nuclear levels through the downregulation of its transcription, thus reducing its protective function. These results highlight that rotenone affects alpha-synuclein and MEF2D protein levels through a mechanism independent from lysosomal degradation inhibition.

  11. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  12. Presence of detergent-resistant microdomains in lysosomal membranes.

    Taute, Antje; Wätzig, Kristin; Simons, Brigitte; Lohaus, Christiane; Meyer, Helmut; Hasilik, Andrej

    2002-10-18

    We examined the association of acetyl-CoA:alpha-glucosaminide N-acetyltransferase, a lysosomal enzyme participating in the degradation of heparan sulfate with other components of the lysosomal membrane. We prepared lysosomal membranes from human placenta and treated them with zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents. Membrane proteins were solubilized either in the presence of CHAPS at room temperature or of Triton X-100 at 4 degrees C. The CHAPS-containing extract was subjected to gel filtration in a column with the nominal size exclusion of 0.6 MDa. Under these conditions the enzyme fractionated near the void volume. To examine the association of the enzyme with detergent-resistant lipid microdomains, the extract that had been prepared with Triton X-100 was subjected to flotation in a density gradient medium. After centrifugation, a major portion of the activity of the acetyltransferase was found at the top of the gradient along with the bulk of alkaline phosphatase. Alkaline phosphatase is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein; possibly a contaminant in the lysosomal fraction originating from the plasma membrane and adventitiously an internal control for the flotation in the gradient. In contrast, acetyltransferase is a genuine lysosomal protein that obligatorily spans the membrane since it transfers acetyl residues from acetyl-CoA in cytosol to glucosaminyl residues in heparan sulfate fragments in the lysosomal matrix. To our knowledge this is the first report on association of a lysosomal membrane protein with detergent-resistant membrane microdomains or rafts. PMID:12379211

  13. Lamellar granule biogenesis: a role for ceramide glucosyltransferase, lysosomal enzyme transport, and the Golgi.

    Madison, K C; Sando, G N; Howard, E J; True, C A; Gilbert, D; Swartzendruber, D C; Wertz, P W

    1998-08-01

    Although lamellar granules are critical to the formation of the epidermal permeability barrier and are a known marker of late keratinocyte differentiation, very little is known about the physiologic regulators of lamellar granule assembly and extrusion. Ceramide glucosyltransferase (CGT), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of lamellar granule glucosylceramides (GlcCer; the precursors of the stratum corneum ceramides), is localized to the Golgi apparatus in other cell types. We have found that CGT is induced during keratinocyte culture differentiation coincident with increased GlcCer content and the appearance of lamellar granules. In this study we show that the differentiation-related CGT induction is likely mediated at the transcriptional level. In addition, all-trans retinoic acid, a well-known inhibitor of keratinocyte differentiation, prevents the appearance of lamellar granules and decreases culture CGT activity and GlcCer content without affecting sphingomyelin or total lipid content, indicating a specific inhibition of this enzymatic pathway. These data show a direct relationship between CGT activity and epidermal differentiation, suggesting that regulation of CGT expression is a critical part of epidermal barrier generation. The differentiation dependence of CGT activity, the key role of this Golgi-localized enzyme in epidermal GlcCer synthesis, and our previous finding that ceramides are converted to GlcCer in the Golgi apparatus in keratinocyte cultures, strongly suggest a Golgi origin for lamellar granules. In contrast to CGT, the activity of the lysosomal enzymes acid lipase and glucocerebrosidase is less clearly related to epidermal differentiation and the appearance of lamellar granules, although both enzymes show striking colocalization and enrichment in a subcellular lamellar granule fraction derived from pig epidermis. Acid lipase activity in the lamellar granule fraction was found to contain primarily a small lysosomal form of the enzyme

  14. Secondary Lysosomal Changes in Liver in Preclinical Drug Development

    Vincent P. Meador; D. V. M.; Ph. D.; Diplomate ACVP

    2005-01-01

    @@ Lysosomes are intracytoplasmic membrane-bound organelles that function to degrade intracellular substances by enzymatic digestion. They occur normally in all cells, being especially prominent in phagocytic cells of the reticuloendothelial system.

  15. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers...... the diffusion of neutral and ionic molecules across biomembranes, protonation to mono- or bivalent ions, adsorption to lipids, and electrical attraction or repulsion. Based on simulation results, high and selective accumulation in lysosomes was found for weak mono- and bivalent bases with intermediate...... to high log K ow. These findings were validated with experimental results and by a comparison to the properties of antimalarial drugs in clinical use. For ten active compounds, nine were predicted to accumulate to a greater extent in lysosomes than in other organelles, six of these were in the...

  16. Acidic nanoparticles are trafficked to lysosomes and restore an acidic lysosomal pH and degradative function to compromised ARPE-19 cells.

    Gabriel C Baltazar

    Full Text Available Lysosomal enzymes function optimally in acidic environments, and elevation of lysosomal pH can impede their ability to degrade material delivered to lysosomes through autophagy or phagocytosis. We hypothesize that abnormal lysosomal pH is a key aspect in diseases of accumulation and that restoring lysosomal pH will improve cell function. The propensity of nanoparticles to end up in the lysosome makes them an ideal method of delivering drugs to lysosomes. This study asked whether acidic nanoparticles could traffic to lysosomes, lower lysosomal pH and enhance lysosomal degradation by the cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line ARPE-19. Acidic nanoparticles composed of poly (DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA 502 H, PLGA 503 H and poly (DL-lactide (PLA colocalized to lysosomes of ARPE-19 cells within 60 min. PLGA 503 H and PLA lowered lysosomal pH in cells compromised by the alkalinizing agent chloroquine when measured 1 hr. after treatment, with acidification still observed 12 days later. PLA enhanced binding of Bodipy-pepstatin-A to the active site of cathepsin D in compromised cells. PLA also reduced the cellular levels of opsin and the lipofuscin-like autofluorescence associated with photoreceptor outer segments. These observations suggest the acidification produced by the nanoparticles was functionally effective. In summary, acid nanoparticles lead to a rapid and sustained lowering of lysosomal pH and improved degradative activity.

  17. Extracellular Acidification Alters Lysosomal Trafficking in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Kristine Glunde; Sandra E. Guggino; Meiyappan Solaiyappan; Pathak, Arvind P.; Yoshitaka Ichikawa; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2003-01-01

    Cancer cells invade by secreting degradative enzymes, which are sequestered in lysosomal vesicles. In this study, the impact of an acidic extracellular environment on lysosome size, number, and distance from the nucleus in human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) and breast cancer cells of different degrees of malignancy was characterized because the physiological microenvironment of tumors is frequently characterized by extracellular acidity. An acidic extracellular pH (pHe) resulted in a dist...

  18. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    Chapman Harold A; Wolters Paul J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically ...

  19. A Lysosome-Targeting AIEgen for Autophagy Visualization.

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Wang, Zhiming; Zhao, Engui; Hong, Yuning; Chen, Sijie; Kwok, Ryan Tsz Kin; Leung, Anakin Chun Sing; Wen, Rongsen; Li, Bingshi; Lam, Jacky Wing Yip; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-02-18

    In this work, a morpholine-functionalized aggregation-induced emission luminogen (AIEgen), AIE-LysoY, is reported for lysosomal imaging and autophagy visualization. To attain outstanding imaging contrast, AIE-LysoY is equipped with excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) characteristic. AIE-LysoY provides a new platform for lysosome visualization with good biocompatibility, large Stokes shift, superior signal-to-noise ratio, and high photostability. PMID:26688031

  20. SUMOylation negatively modulates target gene occupancy of the KDM5B, a histone lysine demethylase.

    Bueno, Murilo T D; Richard, Stéphane

    2013-11-01

    The histone lysine demethylase KDM5B plays key roles in gene repression by demethylating trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3), a modification commonly found at the promoter region of actively transcribed genes. KDM5B is known to regulate the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression; however, little is known about the post-translational modifications that regulate KDM5B. Herein, we report that KDM5B is SUMOylated at lysine residues 242 and 278 and that the ectopic expression of the hPC2 SUMO E3 ligase enhances this SUMOylation. Interestingly, the levels of KDM5B and its SUMOylated forms are regulated during the cell cycle. KDM5B is modulated by RNF4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets SUMO-modified proteins to proteasomal degradation. Digital gene expression analyses showed that cells expressing the SUMOylation-deficient KDM5B harbor repressed mRNA expression profiles of cell cycle and DNA repair genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitations confirmed some of these genes as KDM5B targets, as they displayed reduced H3K4me3 levels in cells ectopically expressing KDM5B. We propose that SUMOylation by hPC2 regulates the activity of KDM5B. PMID:23970103

  1. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells leads to epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    Cui, Ju, E-mail: juzi.cui@gmail.com [The Key Laboratory of Geriatrics, Beijing Hospital & Beijing Institute of Geriatrics, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Jin, Guoxiang; Yu, Bin [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wang, Zai [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, China-Japan Friendship Hospital, Beijing (China); Lin, Raozhou [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Huang, Jian-Dong, E-mail: jdhuang@hku.hk [Department of Biochemistry, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); The Centre for Synthetic Biology Engineering Research, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-07-17

    Polarization of epithelial cells requires vectorial sorting and transport of polarity proteins to apical or basolateral domains. Kif5b is the mouse homologue of the human ubiquitous Kinesin Heavy Chain (uKHC). To investigate the function of Kif5b in epithelial cells, we examined the phenotypes of Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate, profound changes in cell morphology, loss of epithelial cell marker, and gain of mesenchymal marker, as well as increased cell migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis abilities. E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells, and their expression levels were decreased in Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA in Kif5b depleted MDCK cells could decrease mesenchymal marker expression and cell migration ability. These results indicate that stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells can lead to epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which is mediated by defective E-cadherin and NMMIIA expression. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate. • Kif5b deficient MDCK cells underwent epithelial–mesenchymal transition. • E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells. • Decreased E-cadherin and NMMIIA levels mediate EMT in Kif5b deficient MDCK cells. • Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA reverse the effects of Kif5b knockdown.

  2. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells leads to epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    Polarization of epithelial cells requires vectorial sorting and transport of polarity proteins to apical or basolateral domains. Kif5b is the mouse homologue of the human ubiquitous Kinesin Heavy Chain (uKHC). To investigate the function of Kif5b in epithelial cells, we examined the phenotypes of Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate, profound changes in cell morphology, loss of epithelial cell marker, and gain of mesenchymal marker, as well as increased cell migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis abilities. E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells, and their expression levels were decreased in Kif5b-deficient MDCK cells. Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA in Kif5b depleted MDCK cells could decrease mesenchymal marker expression and cell migration ability. These results indicate that stable knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells can lead to epithelial–mesenchymal transition, which is mediated by defective E-cadherin and NMMIIA expression. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Kif5b in MDCK cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation rate. • Kif5b deficient MDCK cells underwent epithelial–mesenchymal transition. • E-cadherin and NMMIIA could interact with Kif5b in polarized MDCK cells. • Decreased E-cadherin and NMMIIA levels mediate EMT in Kif5b deficient MDCK cells. • Overexpression of E-cadherin and NMMIIA reverse the effects of Kif5b knockdown

  3. Prevention of lysosomal storage diseases and derivation of mutant stem cell lines by preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research. PMID:23320174

  4. Prevention of Lysosomal Storage Diseases and Derivation of Mutant Stem Cell Lines by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    Gheona Altarescu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD: Tay-Sachs disease (TSD, Gaucher disease (GD, Fabry disease (FD, and Hunter syndrome (HS, and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14, and HS/oculocutaneus albinism. These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research.

  5. Role of Nanotechnology for Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Lysosomal Diseases. A Focus on Gaucher's Disease.

    Martín-Banderas, L; Holgado, M A; Durán-Lobato, M; Infante, J J; Álvarez-Fuentes, J; Fernández-Arévalo, M

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) comprise a group of rare inherited chronic syndromes that cause deficiency of specific native enzymes within the lysosomes. The macromolecular compounds that are usually catabolized by lysosomal enzymes are accumulated within these organelles, causing progressive damage to tissues, skeleton and organs and, in several cases, the central nervous system (CNS). The damage caused by substrate accumulation finally results in physical deterioration, functional impairment and potential death. Up to date, the most promising therapy for most LSDs is enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT), which provides patients with the corresponding active enzyme. However, these enzymes do not have enough stability in blood, the treatment must be therefore periodically administrated by i.v. infusion under medical supervision, and immunogenicity issues are frequent. In addition, affected areas within the CNS, where the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle, cannot be reached by the enzymes. Nanotechnology can provide useful carriers to successfully protect and preserve enzymes, and transport them through the BBB towards brain locations. Several strategies based on targeting specific receptors on the BBB have led to nanoparticles that successfully carry sensitive molecules to the brain. Then, the main LSDs are described and a thorough review of nanotechnology strategies for brain delivery studied up to date is presented. PMID:26860997

  6. Lysosomes from rabbit type II cells catabolize surfactant lipids.

    Rider, E D; Ikegami, M; Pinkerton, K E; Peake, J L; Jobe, A H

    2000-01-01

    The role of a lysosome fraction from rabbit type II cells in surfactant dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) catabolism was investigated in vivo using radiolabeled DPPC and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (1, 2-dihexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; DEPC), a phospholipase A(1)- and A(2)-resistant analog of DPPC. Freshly isolated type II cells were gently disrupted by shearing, and lysosomes were isolated with Percoll density gradients (density range 1.0591-1.1457 g/ml). The lysosome fractions were relatively free of contaminating organelles as determined by electron microscopy and organelle marker enzymes. After intratracheal injection of rabbits with [(3)H]DPPC and [(14)C]DEPC associated with a trace amount of natural rabbit surfactant, the degradation-resistant DEPC accumulated 16-fold compared with DPPC in lysosome fractions at 15 h. Lysosomes can be isolated from freshly isolated type II cells, and lysosomes from type II cells are the primary catabolic organelle for alveolar surfactant DPPC following reuptake by type II cells in vivo. PMID:10645892

  7. Lysosomal function in macromolecular homeostasis and bioenergetics in Parkinson's disease

    Zhang Jianhua

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pathological changes occurring in Parkinson's and several other neurodegenerative diseases are complex and poorly understood, but all clearly involve protein aggregation. Also frequently appearing in neurodegeneration is mitochondrial dysfunction which may precede, coincide or follow protein aggregation. These observations led to the concept that protein aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction either arise from the same etiological factors or are interactive. Understanding the mechanisms and regulation of processes that lead to protein aggregation or mitochondrial dysfunction may therefore contribute to the design of better therapeutics. Clearance of protein aggregates and dysfunctional organelles is dependent on macroautophagy which is the process through which aged or damaged proteins and organelles are first degraded by the lysosome and then recycled. The macroautophagy-lysosomal pathway is essential for maintaining protein and energy homeostasis. Not surprisingly, failure of the lysosomal system has been implicated in diseases that have features of protein aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction. This review summarizes 3 major topics: 1 the current understanding of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis in terms of accumulation of damaged proteins and reduction of cellular bioenergetics; 2 evolving insights into lysosomal function and biogenesis and the accumulating evidence that lysosomal dysfunction may cause or exacerbate Parkinsonian pathology and finally 3 the possibility that enhancing lysosomal function may provide a disease modifying therapy.

  8. Lysosomal trafficking functions of mucolipin-1 in murine macrophages

    Dang Hope

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis Type IV is currently characterized as a lysosomal storage disorder with defects that include corneal clouding, achlorhydria and psychomotor retardation. MCOLN1, the gene responsible for this disease, encodes the protein mucolipin-1 that belongs to the "Transient Receptor Potential" family of proteins and has been shown to function as a non-selective cation channel whose activity is modulated by pH. Two cell biological defects that have been described in MLIV fibroblasts are a hyperacidification of lysosomes and a delay in the exit of lipids from lysosomes. Results We show that mucolipin-1 localizes to lysosomal compartments in RAW264.7 mouse macrophages that show subcompartmental accumulations of endocytosed molecules. Using stable RNAi clones, we show that mucolipin-1 is required for the exit of lipids from these compartments, for the transport of endocytosed molecules to terminal lysosomes, and for the transport of the Major Histocompatibility Complex II to the plasma membrane. Conclusion Mucolipin-1 functions in the efficient exit of molecules, destined for various cellular organelles, from lysosomal compartments.

  9. Glucosamine-Bound Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes with Lysosomal Specificity for Breast Tumor Imaging1

    Li, Cong; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Glunde, Kristine

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of lysosomes will be useful 1) to elucidate the role of lysosomal parameters in cancer, 2) to diagnose malignant lesions, and 3) to evaluate future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies. Lysosome-specific labeling of glucosamine-bound near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes, IR-1 and IR-2, but not control probe IR-15 without the glucosamine moiety, was observed by fluorescence microscopy in human breast epithelial cell lines. Lysosome labeling and tumor specificity of thes...

  10. Spinster is required for autophagic lysosome reformation and mTOR reactivation following starvation

    Rong, Yueguang; McPhee, Christina K; Deng, Shuangshen; Huang, Lei; Chen, Lilian; Liu, Mei; Tracy, Kirsten; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Yu, Li; Lenardo, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process to degrade and recycle cytoplasmic components. During autophagy, lysosomes fuse with an autophagosome to form an autolysosome. Sequestered components are degraded by lysosomal hydrolases and presumably released into the cytosol by lysosomal efflux permeases. Following starvation-induced autophagy, lysosome homeostasis is restored by autophagic lysosome reformation (ALR) requiring activation of the “target of rapamycin” (TOR) kinase. Spinster (Spin) en...

  11. Glucosamine-Bound Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes with Lysosomal Specificity for Breast Tumor Imaging

    Cong Li; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Kristine Glunde

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of lysosomes will be useful 1) to elucidate the role of lysosomal parameters in cancer, 2) to diagnose malignant lesions, and 3) to evaluate future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies. Lysosome-specific labeling of glucosamine-bound near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes, IR-1 and IR-2, but not control probe IR-15 without the glucosamine moiety, was observed by fluorescence microscopy in human breast epithelial cell lines. Lysosome labeling and tumor specificity of thes...

  12. Gene Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Diseases (LSDs) in Large Animal Models

    Haskins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficient activity of a single lysosomal enzyme or other defects resulting in deficient catabolism of large substrates in lysosomes. There are more than 40 forms of inherited LSDs known to occur in humans, with an aggregate incidence estimated at 1 in 7,000 live births. Clinical signs result from the inability of lysosomes to degrade large substrates; because most lysosomal enzymes are ubiquitously expressed, a defi...

  13. Constitutively overexpressed 21 kDa protein in Hodgkin lymphoma and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas identified as cytochrome B5b (CYB5B

    Gascoyne Randy D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported a novel constitutively overexpressed 21 kDa protein in Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL and aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL. The objective of the current study was to 1 identify this protein using two independent methods, 2 study the expression of the protein and its encoding mRNA in reactive lymph nodes, normal lymphocytes and CD34+ bone marrow precursor cells, 3 analyse patterns of expression of the protein in tissue microarrays assembled from a large number of diagnostic clinical biopsies from patients with HL, and 4 determine the copy number variation and mutation status of the encoding gene in HL cell lines. Results Peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS and protein identification by protein array screening identified a single protein, CYB5B. No mutations were detected in the CYB5B gene in HL cell lines. Quantitative PCR showed CYB5B gene expression was increased in HL and NHL cell lines. Array CGH using a submegabase resolution tiling array revealed gains in the CYB5B locus in HL cell lines KMH2 and L428. Membrane expression was seen in Reed-Sternberg cells in clinical biopsies from patients with HL but not in reactive lymph nodes. Bone marrow CD34+ precursor cells were CYB5B negative on the cell surface. RT-PCR assays of RNA extracted from T and B cell enriched fractions obtained from normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, reactive lymph nodes, tonsils and normal bone marrow samples showed no evidence of increased mRNA levels of CYB5B in comparison to housekeeping gene GAPDH. Conclusions The 21 kDa protein overexpressed in HL and aggressive NHL is identical to CYB5B. CYB5B gene expression is increased in a subset of HL and NHL cell lines tested. This is associated with CYB5B gene amplification in HL cell lines KMH2 and L428. CYB5B may be a potential target for antibody-based therapy of HL and aggressive NHL as although cytoplasmic expression is present in reactive lymphocytes, it is not expressed on

  14. Histone demethylase KDM5B is a key regulator of genome stability

    LI, XIN; Liu, Ling; Yang, Shangda; Song, Nan; Zhou, Xing; Gao, Jie; Yu, Na; Shan, Lin; Wang, Qian; Liang, Jing; Xuan, Chenghao; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks are generally repaired in the context of highly organized chromatin. However, how epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the maintenance of the genetic fidelity remains poorly understood. Here we report that lysine-specific histone demethylase 5B (KDM5B), a well-defined transcriptional repressor, promotes double-strand break signaling and is required for efficient DNA repairs. We demonstrated that KDM5B, in doing so, functions to orchestrate checkpoint activation and c...

  15. Unprecedentedly mild direct Pd-catalyzed arylation of oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridine

    Zhuravlev, Fedor

    2006-01-01

    Pd-catalyzed C-2 arylation of oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridine proceeds efficiently at 30 degrees C and tolerates a variety of aryl halides, including derivatized amino acids for which no racemization was observed during the reaction. Experimental evidence for facile deprotonation of oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridine......Pd-catalyzed C-2 arylation of oxazolo[4,5-b]pyridine proceeds efficiently at 30 degrees C and tolerates a variety of aryl halides, including derivatized amino acids for which no racemization was observed during the reaction. Experimental evidence for facile deprotonation of oxazolo[4,5-b...

  16. Structure and dimerization of translation initiation factor aIF5B in solution

    Highlights: ► aIF5B forms maximum 5.0–6.8% irreversible dimers in solution. ► Sedimentation coefficients for monomer and dimer are 3.64 and 5.51 ± 0.29 S. ► Adding only 2% glycerol prevents dimerization. ► SAXS on aIF5B monomer gave an Rg of 37.5 ± 0.2 Å and a Dmax of ∼130 Å. ► There are universal structural differences between aIF5B and Escherichia coli IF2. -- Abstract: Translation initiation factor 5B (IF5B) is required for initiation of protein synthesis. The solution structure of archaeal IF5B (aIF5B) was analysed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and was indicated to be in both monomeric and dimeric form. Sedimentation equilibrium (SE) analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) of aIF5B indicated that aIF5B forms irreversible dimers in solution but only to a maximum of 5.0–6.8% dimer. Sedimentation velocity (SV) AUC at higher speed also indicated the presence of two species, and the sedimentation coefficients s20,w0 were determined to be 3.64 and 5.51 ± 0.29 S for monomer and dimer, respectively. The atomic resolution (crystallographic) structure of aIF5B (Roll-Mecak et al. ) was used to model monomer and dimer, and theoretical sedimentation coefficients for these models were computed (3.89 and 5.63 S, respectively) in good agreement with the sedimentation coefficients obtained from SV analysis. Thus, the structure of aIF5B in solution must be very similar to the atomic resolution structure of aIF5B. SAXS data were acquired in the same buffer with the addition of 2% glycerol to inhibit dimerization, and the resultant monomeric aIF5B in solution did indeed adopt a structure very similar to the one reported earlier for the protein in crystalline form. The p(r) function indicated an elongated conformation supported by a radius of gyration of 37.5 ± 0.2 Å and a maximum dimension of ∼130 Å. The effects of glycerol on the formation of dimers are discussed. This new model of aIF5B in solution shows that

  17. Assembly and Regulation of the Membrane Attack Complex Based on Structures of C5b6 and sC5b9

    Michael A. Hadders

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the complement system results in formation of membrane attack complexes (MACs, pores that disrupt lipid bilayers and lyse bacteria and other pathogens. Here, we present the crystal structure of the first assembly intermediate, C5b6, together with a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a soluble, regulated form of the pore, sC5b9. Cleavage of C5 to C5b results in marked conformational changes, distinct from those observed in the homologous C3-to-C3b transition. C6 captures this conformation, which is preserved in the larger sC5b9 assembly. Together with antibody labeling, these structures reveal that complement components associate through sideways alignment of the central MAC-perforin (MACPF domains, resulting in a C5b6-C7-C8β-C8α-C9 arc. Soluble regulatory proteins below the arc indicate a potential dual mechanism in protection from pore formation. These results provide a structural framework for understanding MAC pore formation and regulation, processes important for fighting infections and preventing complement-mediated tissue damage.

  18. N-acetylglucosamine-1-Phosphate Transferase Suppresses Lysosomal Hydrolases in Dysfunctional Osteoclasts: A Potential Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

    Yang Lei

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to increased differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells into osteoblast-like phenotypes, the limited accumulation of osteoclasts in atherosclerotic plaques or their dysfunction may participate in potential mechanisms for vascular calcification. N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate transferase containing alpha and beta subunits (GNPTAB is a transmembrane enzyme complex that mediates the vesicular transport of lysosomal hydrolases. GNPTAB may also regulate the biogenesis of lysosomal hydrolases from bone-marrow derived osteoclasts. In this study, the areas surrounding calcification in human atherosclerotic plaques contained high levels of GNPTAB and low levels of lysosomal hydrolases such as cathepsin K (CTSK and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and laser-capture microdissection-assisted mRNA expression analysis. We therefore hypothesized that GNPTAB secretion may suppress the release of CTSK and TRAP by vascular osteoclast-like cells, thus causing their dysfunction and reducing the resorption of calcification. We used human primary macrophages derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, an established osteoclast differentiation model. GNPTAB siRNA silencing accelerated the formation of functional osteoclasts as detected by increased secretion of CTSK and TRAP and increased their bone resorption activity as gauged by resorption pits assay. We concluded that high levels of GNPTAB inhibit secretion of lysosomal hydrolases in dysfunctional osteoclasts, thereby affecting their resorption potential in cardiovascular calcification.

  19. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extract, aucubin, and geniposide enhance lysosomal activity to regulate ER stress and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    Hwa-Young Lee

    Full Text Available Eucommia ulmoides Oliver is a natural product widely used as a dietary supplement and medicinal plant. Here, we examined the potential regulatory effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extracts (EUE on hepatic dyslipidemia and its related mechanisms by in vitro and in vivo studies. EUE and its two active constituents, aucubin and geniposide, inhibited palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, reducing hepatic lipid accumulation through secretion of apolipoprotein B and associated triglycerides and cholesterol in human HepG2 hepatocytes. To determine how EUE diminishes the ER stress response, lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation activities were analyzed. Although proteasomal activity was not affected, lysosomal enzyme activities including V-ATPase were significantly increased by EUE as well as aucubin and geniposide in HepG2 cells. Treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, reversed the inhibition of ER stress, secretion of apolipoprotein B, and hepatic lipid accumulation induced by EUE or its component, aucubin or geniposide. In addition, EUE was determined to regulate hepatic dyslipidemia by enhancing lysosomal activity and to regulate ER stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. Together, these results suggest that EUE and its active components enhance lysosomal activity, resulting in decreased ER stress and hepatic dyslipidemia.

  20. Membrane proteins of dense lysosomes from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    In this work membrane proteins from lysosomes were studied in order to gain more information on the biogenesis and intracellular sorting of this class of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins were isolated from a purified population of lysosomes. These proteins were then examined for various co- and post-translational modifications which could serve as potential intracellular sorting signals. Biochemical analysis using marker enzymatic activities detected no plasma membrane, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, mitochondria, or cytosol. Analysis after incorporation of [3H]thymidine or [3H]uridine detected no nuclei or ribosomes. A fraction containing integral membrane proteins was obtained from the dense lysosomes by extraction with Triton X-114. Twenty-three polypeptides which incorporated both [35S]methionine and [3H]leucine were detected by SDS PAGE in this membrane fraction, and ranged in molecular weight from 30-130 kDa. After incorporation by cells of various radioactive metabolic precursors, the membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was examined and was found to be enriched in mannose, galactose, fucose, palmitate, myristate, and sulfate, but was depleted in phosphate. The membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was then analyzed by SDS PAGE to determine the apparent molecular weights of modified polypepties

  1. LAMP proteins are required for fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes.

    Huynh, Kassidy K; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scott, Cameron C; Malevanets, Anatoly; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio

    2007-01-24

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are delivered to phagosomes during the maturation process. We used cells from LAMP-deficient mice to analyze the role of these proteins in phagosome maturation. Macrophages from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2-deficient mice displayed normal fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes. Because ablation of both the lamp-1 and lamp-2 genes yields an embryonic-lethal phenotype, we were unable to study macrophages from double knockouts. Instead, we reconstituted phagocytosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by transfection of FcgammaIIA receptors. Phagosomes formed by FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs obtained from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2- deficient mice acquired lysosomal markers. Remarkably, although FcgammaIIA-transfected MEFs from double-deficient mice ingested particles normally, phagosomal maturation was arrested. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 double-deficient phagosomes acquired Rab5 and accumulated phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but failed to recruit Rab7 and did not fuse with lysosomes. We attribute the deficiency to impaired organellar motility along microtubules. Time-lapse cinematography revealed that late endosomes/lysosomes as well as phagosomes lacking LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 had reduced ability to move toward the microtubule-organizing center, likely precluding their interaction with each other. PMID:17245426

  2. 49 CFR 173.5b - Portable and mobile refrigeration systems.

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Portable and mobile refrigeration systems. 173.5b...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS General § 173.5b Portable and mobile refrigeration... refrigeration systems, which may or may not be permanently mounted to a transport vehicle, used for...

  3. Corticothalamic Spike Transfer via the L5B-POm Pathway in vivo.

    Mease, Rebecca A; Sumser, Anton; Sakmann, Bert; Groh, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The cortex connects to the thalamus via extensive corticothalamic (CT) pathways, but their function in vivo is not well understood. We investigated "top-down" signaling from cortex to thalamus via the cortical layer 5B (L5B) to posterior medial nucleus (POm) pathway in the whisker system of the anesthetized mouse. While L5B CT inputs to POm are extremely strong in vitro, ongoing activity of L5 neurons in vivo might tonically depress these inputs and thereby block CT spike transfer. We find robust transfer of spikes from the cortex to the thalamus, mediated by few L5B-POm synapses. However, the gain of this pathway is not constant but instead is controlled by global cortical Up and Down states. We characterized in vivo CT spike transfer by analyzing unitary PSPs and found that a minority of PSPs drove POm spikes when CT gain peaked at the beginning of Up states. CT gain declined sharply during Up states due to frequency-dependent adaptation, resulting in periodic high gain-low gain oscillations. We estimate that POm neurons receive few (2-3) active L5B inputs. Thus, the L5B-POm pathway strongly amplifies the output of a few L5B neurons and locks thalamic POm sub-and suprathreshold activity to cortical L5B spiking. PMID:27178196

  4. Release of arachidonic acid from oligodendrocytes by terminal complement proteins, C5b-C9

    Activation of C5b-C9 on monocytes, macrophages, platelets and neutrophils induces membrane lipid hydrolysis and generates arachidonic acid (AA) and its oxygenated derivatives. Additionally, activation of C5b-C9 and myelin lipid hydrolysis has been observed in demyelination. The authors have investigated the modulatory effect of C5b-9 on membrane lipid hydrolysis of oligodendrocytes (OLG), the myelin producing cells in the central nervous system. Antibody-sensitized rat OLG, prelabeled with 14C AA were treated with excess C6-deficient rabbit serum reconstituted with limiting doses of C6. Qualitative analysis of the supernatants by HPLC revealed the presence of both cyclooxygenase and lipooxygenase products. Prostaglandin E2, leukotriene (LT) E4, LTB4 and free AA were the major radiolabeled products. The kinetics and dose response of LTB4 release with respect to the cytolytic dose of C5b-9 were quantitated by radioimmunoassay. LTB4 release approached maximum in 1 hr and higher amounts were detected with fewer C5b-9 channels. Addition of C8 to OLG bearing C5b-7 intermediates induced maximum LTB4 release without further enhancement by C9 in contrast to the absolute requirement of C9 in mediator release from rat neutrophils. Thus, the requirement of C5b-8 or C5b-9 in mediator release appears to be cell-type dependent

  5. Experimental vaccination of pigs with an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b capsular polysaccharide tetanus toxoid conjugate

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Jacobsen, M.J.; Nielsen, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The protective efficacy of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b capsular polysaccharide-tetanus toroid conjugate (Ap5bCP-TT) against homologous challenge of pigs was investigated. Four pigs were non-vaccinated controls (group A), 4 pigs were injected with adjuvant without antigen (group B...

  6. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P  0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P  0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes. PMID:26968550

  7. Experimental vaccination of pigs with an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b capsular polysaccharide tetanus toxoid conjugate

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Jacobsen, M.J.; Nielsen, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The protective efficacy of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5b capsular polysaccharide-tetanus toroid conjugate (Ap5bCP-TT) against homologous challenge of pigs was investigated. Four pigs were non-vaccinated controls (group A), 4 pigs were injected with adjuvant without antigen (group...

  8. 45 CFR Appendix A to Part 5b - Employee Standards of Conduct

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee Standards of Conduct A Appendix A to Part 5b Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT... implementing the Act are set forth in 45 CFR 5b. Instruction on the requirements of the Act and...

  9. 12 CFR 226.5b - Requirements for home equity plans.

    2010-01-01

    ... published by the Board or a suitable substitute shall be provided. (f) Limitations on home equity plans. No... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for home equity plans. 226.5b... RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Open-End Credit § 226.5b Requirements for home equity...

  10. Genetic Coding Variant in GPR65 Alters Lysosomal pH and Links Lysosomal Dysfunction with Colitis Risk.

    Lassen, Kara G; McKenzie, Craig I; Mari, Muriel; Murano, Tatsuro; Begun, Jakob; Baxt, Leigh A; Goel, Gautam; Villablanca, Eduardo J; Kuo, Szu-Yu; Huang, Hailiang; Macia, Laurence; Bhan, Atul K; Batten, Marcel; Daly, Mark J; Reggiori, Fulvio; Mackay, Charles R; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-21

    Although numerous polymorphisms have been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), identifying the function of these genetic factors has proved challenging. Here we identified a role for nine genes in IBD susceptibility loci in antibacterial autophagy and characterized a role for one of these genes, GPR65, in maintaining lysosome function. Mice lacking Gpr65, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, showed increased susceptibly to bacteria-induced colitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages lacking GPR65 exhibited impaired clearance of intracellular bacteria and accumulation of aberrant lysosomes. Similarly, IBD patient cells and epithelial cells expressing an IBD-associated missense variant, GPR65 I231L, displayed aberrant lysosomal pH resulting in lysosomal dysfunction, impaired bacterial restriction, and altered lipid droplet formation. The GPR65 I231L polymorphism was sufficient to confer decreased GPR65 signaling. Collectively, these data establish a role for GPR65 in IBD susceptibility and identify lysosomal dysfunction as a potentially causative element in IBD pathogenesis with effects on cellular homeostasis and defense. PMID:27287411

  11. The endoplasmic reticulum, not the pH gradient, drives calcium refilling of lysosomes.

    Garrity, Abigail G; Wang, Wuyang; Collier, Crystal Md; Levey, Sara A; Gao, Qiong; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    Impaired homeostasis of lysosomal Ca(2+) causes lysosome dysfunction and lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), but the mechanisms by which lysosomes acquire and refill Ca(2+) are not known. We developed a physiological assay to monitor lysosomal Ca(2+) store refilling using specific activators of lysosomal Ca(2+) channels to repeatedly induce lysosomal Ca(2+) release. In contrast to the prevailing view that lysosomal acidification drives Ca(2+) into the lysosome, inhibiting the V-ATPase H(+) pump did not prevent Ca(2+) refilling. Instead, pharmacological depletion or chelation of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) prevented lysosomal Ca(2+) stores from refilling. More specifically, antagonists of ER IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) rapidly and completely blocked Ca(2+) refilling of lysosomes, but not in cells lacking IP3Rs. Furthermore, reducing ER Ca(2+) or blocking IP3Rs caused a dramatic LSD-like lysosome storage phenotype. By closely apposing each other, the ER may serve as a direct and primary source of Ca(2+)for the lysosome. PMID:27213518

  12. Main design elements of the superconducting magnet for the LIN-5B baseball trap

    A design of superconducting magnet system (SMS) is described for the LIN-5B baseball trap elaborated for the OGRA-3B experimental installation. The general layout of the trap, cross sections of the superconducting coil and load-bearing frame, the current leads arrangement and main LIN-5B SMS parameters are presented. A three-year experience in operation of the baseball LIN-5B SMS and successful tests followed by achieving critical conditions four times permit to make the conclusion that the design and SMS assembly meet the requirements

  13. A Rab3a-dependent complex essential for lysosome positioning and plasma membrane repair.

    Encarnação, Marisa; Espada, Lília; Escrevente, Cristina; Mateus, Denisa; Ramalho, José; Michelet, Xavier; Santarino, Inês; Hsu, Victor W; Brenner, Michael B; Barral, Duarte; Vieira, Otília V

    2016-06-20

    Lysosome exocytosis plays a major role in resealing plasma membrane (PM) disruptions. This process involves two sequential steps. First, lysosomes are recruited to the periphery of the cell and then fuse with the damaged PM. However, the trafficking molecular machinery involved in lysosome exocytosis and PM repair (PMR) is poorly understood. We performed a systematic screen of the human Rab family to identify Rabs required for lysosome exocytosis and PMR. Rab3a, which partially localizes to peripheral lysosomes, was one of the most robust hits. Silencing of Rab3a or its effector, synaptotagmin-like protein 4a (Slp4-a), leads to the collapse of lysosomes to the perinuclear region and inhibition of PMR. Importantly, we have also identified a new Rab3 effector, nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA, as part of the complex formed by Rab3a and Slp4-a that is responsible for lysosome positioning at the cell periphery and lysosome exocytosis. PMID:27325790

  14. A non-conserved miRNA regulates lysosomal function and impacts on a human lysosomal storage disorder

    Frankel, Lisa B; Di Malta, Chiara; Wen, Jiayu;

    2014-01-01

    Sulfatases are key enzymatic regulators of sulfate homeostasis with several biological functions including degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and other macromolecules in lysosomes. In a severe lysosomal storage disorder, multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), global sulfatase activity...... is deficient due to mutations in the sulfatase-modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) gene, encoding the essential activator of all sulfatases. We identify a novel regulatory layer of sulfate metabolism mediated by a microRNA. miR-95 depletes SUMF1 protein levels and suppresses sulfatase activity, causing the disruption...

  15. Plasma Membrane Repair Is Regulated Extracellularly by Proteases Released from Lysosomes

    Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Andrews, Norma W.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells rapidly repair wounds on their plasma membrane. Resealing is Ca2+-dependent, and involves exocytosis of lysosomes followed by massive endocytosis. Extracellular activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase was previously shown to promote endocytosis and wound removal. However, whether lysosomal proteases released during cell injury participate in resealing is unknown. Here we show that lysosomal proteases regulate plasma membrane repair. Extracellular proteolysis is...

  16. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Eva L Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved ...

  17. Host cell invasion by trypanosomes requires lysosomes and microtubule/kinesin-mediated transport

    1996-01-01

    Invasion of mammalian cells by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi occurs by an actin-independent mechanism distinct from phagocytosis. Clusters of host lysosomes are observed at the site of parasite attachment, and lysosomal markers are detected in the vacuolar membrane at early stages of the entry process. These observations led to the hypothesis that the trypanosomes recruit host lysosomes to their attachment site, and that lysosomal fusion serves as a source of membrane to form the p...

  18. Myo5b knockout mice as a model of microvillus inclusion disease

    Carton-Garcia, Fernando; Overeem, Arend W.; Nieto, Rocio; Bazzocco, Sarah; Dopeso, Higinio; Macaya, Irati; Bilic, Josipa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Schwartz, Simo; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Arango, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Inherited MYO5B mutations have recently been associated with microvillus inclusion disease (MVID), an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by intractable, life-threatening, watery diarrhea appearing shortly after birth. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease and d

  19. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E., E-mail: jed55@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-27

    A 1.8 Å resolution structure of the sphingolipid activator protein saposin A has been determined at pH 4.8, the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH for hydrolase enzyme activation and lipid-transfer activity. The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from a ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.

  20. The frequency of lysosomal storage diseases in The Netherlands

    Poorthuis, BJHM; Wevers, RA; Kleijer, WJ; Groener, JEM; de Jong, JGN; van Weely, S; Niezen-Koning, KE; van Diggelen, OP

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the relative frequency and the birth prevalence of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) in The Netherlands based on all 963 enzymatically confirmed cases diagnosed during the period 1970-1996. The combined birth prevalence for all LSDs is 14 per 100,000 live births. Glycogenosis type

  1. Clinical, biochemical and genetic heterogeneity in lysosomal storage diseases

    A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold)

    1977-01-01

    textabstractThe history of lysosomal storage diseases dates back to the end of the last century when the first clinical reports appeared of patients suffering from these genetic, metabolic disorders (Tay, 1881; Gaucher, 1882; Sachs, 1887; Fabry, 1898). About seventy years wouid pass before the term

  2. LOFT CIS analysis S-5B penetration 3'' IA-296-AB

    The 3'' IA-296-AB line from the containment penetration S-5B was analyzed to ASME Code, Subsection NC (Class 2) criteria. This section of piping is part of the Containment Isolation System; the model considered the line from penetration S-5B outward through a series of elbows and through the third isolation valve. Results of this analysis show that the section of line described will meet Class 2 requirements if additional supports are installed at three locations

  3. Chemical and Hormonal Effects on STAT5b-Dependent Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome.

    Keiyu Oshida

    Full Text Available The growth hormone (GH-activated transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b is a key regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Suppression of hepatic STAT5b signaling is associated with lipid metabolic dysfunction leading to steatosis and liver cancer. In the companion publication, a STAT5b biomarker gene set was identified and used in a rank-based test to predict both increases and decreases in liver STAT5b activation status/function with high (≥ 97% accuracy. Here, this computational approach was used to identify chemicals and hormones that activate (masculinize or suppress (feminize STAT5b function in a large, annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone and thyroid hormone caused liver masculinization, whereas glucocorticoids, fibroblast growth factor 15, and angiotensin II caused liver feminization. In mouse models of diabetes and obesity, liver feminization was consistently observed and was at least partially reversed by leptin or resveratrol exposure. Chemical-induced feminization of male mouse liver gene expression profiles was a relatively frequent phenomenon: of 156 gene expression biosets from chemically-treated male mice, 29% showed feminization of liver STAT5b function, while <1% showed masculinization. Most (93% of the biosets that exhibited feminization of male liver were also associated with activation of one or more xenobiotic-responsive receptors, most commonly constitutive activated receptor (CAR or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα. Feminization was consistently associated with increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg but not other lipogenic transcription factors linked to steatosis. GH-activated STAT5b signaling in mouse liver is thus commonly altered by diverse chemicals, and provides a linkage between chemical exposure and dysregulated gene

  4. Severity of cough in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is associated with MUC5 B genotype

    Scholand, Mary Beth; Wolff, Roger; Crossno, Peter Fredrick; Sundar, Krishna; Winegar, Molly; Whipple, Spencer; Carey, Patrick; Sunchild, Nicholas; Coon, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    Background A polymorphism (rs35705950) in the promoter region of the mucin MUC5B is associated with both familial and sporadic forms of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (IPF) We hypothesize that this common MUC5B variant will impact the expression of cough, a frequent disabling symptom seen in subjects with IPF. Methods We genotyped 136 subjects with IPF. All living subjects were provided with a Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ) to measure cough severity. We assessed allele effects of the MUC...

  5. Lysosomal Exocytosis in Schwann Cells Contributes to Axon Remyelination

    GANG CHEN; ZHIJUN ZHANG; ZHONGYA WEI; QIONG CHENG; XIA LI; WEI LI; SHUMIN DUAN; XIAOSONG GU

    2012-01-01

    Myelin biogenesis is a complex process involving coordinated exocytosis, endocytosis, mRNA transport, and cytoskeletal dynamics. Although abnormalities of myelin are common in lysosomal storage diseases, our understanding of the role of lysosomes in the formation and maintenance of myelin is still limited. Here, we show that late endosomes/lysosomes in Schwann cells contain abundant myelin protein P0, which accounts for over half the total protein of compact myelin in the peripheral nervous system and exhibit Ca2+-dependent exocytosis in response to various stimuli. Downregulation of Rab27a, a small GTPase required for the trafficking of the secretory lysosomes to the plasma membrane, largely blocked lysosomal exocytosis in Schwann cells and reduced the remyelination of regenerated sciatic nerve. These findings highlight a novel role for lysosomes in Schwann cells and suggest that the regulated lysosome exocytosis in Schwann cells may have important physiological and pathological significance in the peripheral nervous%髓鞘形成是一个包括协同性的胞吐、内吞、mRNA转运和细胞骨架的动态变化的复杂过程.尽管髓鞘的异常在溶酶体贮积症中很常见,但对溶酶体在髓鞘形成和维持中所扮演的角色仍不清楚.本文发现Schwann细胞中的晚期内涵体/溶酶体包含大量的髓鞘蛋白P0,含量占超过一半的外周神经系统中的致密髓鞘的总蛋白并且在不同的刺激下表现出Ca2+依赖性的胞吐作用.Rab27a(一种将分泌溶酶体运输至细胞膜的小GTP酶)下调,极大地阻碍了Schwann细胞中的溶酶体胞吐作用,减少了再生坐骨神经的髓鞘形成.这些发现强调了Schwann细胞中溶酶体的新角色,提示调节Schwann细胞中的溶酶体胞吐作用在外周神经系统中有很重要的生理和病理意义.

  6. Protective effect of enterosgel on rat liver lysosomes during cytostatic treatment.

    Grek, O R; Mishenina, S V; Pupyshev, A B

    2002-10-01

    Polychemotherapy with a complex of cytostatics (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone) induces progressive damage to hepatocyte membranes, which manifested in labilization of lysosomes and activation of lysosomal enzymes and serum transaminases. Enterosgel stabilized liver lysosomes and reduced manifestation of hepatocyte cytolysis. PMID:12533758

  7. Lysosome size, motility and stress response regulated by fronto-temporal dementia modifier TMEM106B.

    Stagi, Massimiliano; Klein, Zoe A; Gould, Travis J; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2014-07-01

    Fronto-temporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) is a fatal neurodegeneration. TMEM106B variants are linked to FTLD-TDP risk, and TMEM106B is lysosomal. Here, we focus on neuronal TMEM106B, and demonstrate co-localization and traffic with lysosomal LAMP-1. pH-sensitive reporters demonstrate that the TMEM106B C-terminus is lumenal. The TMEM106B N-terminus interacts with endosomal adaptors and other TMEM106 proteins. TMEM106B knockdown reduces neuronal lysosomal number and diameter by STED microscopy, and overexpression enlarges LAMP-positive structures. Reduction of TMEM106B increases axonally transported lysosomes, while TMEM106B elevation inhibits transport and yields large lysosomes in the soma. TMEM106B overexpression alters lysosomal stress signaling, causing a translocation of the mTOR-sensitive transcription factor, TFEB, to neuronal nuclei. TMEM106B loss-of-function delays TFEB translocation after Torin-1-induced stress. Enlarged TMEM106B-overexpressing lysosomes maintain organelle integrity longer after lysosomal photodamage than do control lysosomes, while small TMEM106B-knockdown lysosomes are more sensitive to illumination. Thus, neuronal TMEM106B plays a central role in regulating lysosomal size, motility and responsiveness to stress, highlighting the possible role of lysosomal biology in FTLD-TDP. PMID:25066864

  8. Glycolipid-dependent sorting of melanosomal from lysosomal membrane proteins by lumenal determinants

    Groux-Degroote, S.; Dijk, S.M. van; Wolthoorn, J.; Neumann, S.; Theos, A.C.; Mazière, A.M. de; Klumperman, J.; Meer, G. van; Sprong, H.

    2008-01-01

    Melanosomes are lysosome-related organelles that coexist with lysosomes in mammalian pigment cells. Melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins share similar sorting signals in their cytoplasmic tail, raising the question how they are segregated. We show that in control melanocytes, the melanosomal

  9. Enrichment and analysis of secretory lysosomes from lymphocyte populations

    Leippe Matthias

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In specialized cells, such as mast cells, macrophages, T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells in the immune system and for instance melanocytes in the skin, secretory lysosomes (SL have evolved as bifunctional organelles that combine degradative and secretory properties. Mutations in lysosomal storage, transport or sorting molecules are associated with severe immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and (partial albinism. In order to analyze the function and content of secretory lysosomes in different cell populations, an efficient enrichment of these organelles is mandatory. Results Based on a combination of differential and density gradient centrifugation steps, we provide a protocol to enrich intact SL from expanded hematopoietic cells, here T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Individual fractions were initially characterized by Western blotting using antibodies against an array of marker proteins for intracellular compartments. As indicated by the presence of LAMP-3 (CD63 and FasL (CD178, we obtained a selective enrichment of SL in one of the resulting organelle fractions. The robustness and reproducibility of the applied separation protocol was examined by a high-resolution proteome analysis of individual SL preparations of different donors by 2D difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. Conclusion The provided protocol is readily applicable to enrich and isolate intact secretory vesicles from individual cell populations. It can be used to compare SL of normal and transformed cell lines or primary cell populations from healthy donors and patients with lysosomal storage or transport diseases, or from corresponding mutant mice. A subsequent proteome analysis allows the characterization of molecules involved in lysosomal maturation and cytotoxic effector function at high-resolution.

  10. Leaky lysosomes in lung transplant macrophages: azithromycin prevents oxidative damage

    Persson H L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung allografts contain large amounts of iron (Fe, which inside lung macrophages may promote oxidative lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP, cell death and inflammation. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM accumulates 1000-fold inside the acidic lysosomes and may interfere with the lysosomal pool of Fe. Objective Oxidative lysosomal leakage was assessed in lung macrophages from lung transplant recipients without or with AZM treatment and from healthy subjects. The efficiency of AZM to protect lysosomes and cells against oxidants was further assessed employing murine J774 macrophages. Methods Macrophages harvested from 8 transplant recipients (5 without and 3 with ongoing AZM treatment and 7 healthy subjects, and J774 cells pre-treated with AZM, a high-molecular-weight derivative of the Fe chelator desferrioxamine or ammonium chloride were oxidatively stressed. LMP, cell death, Fe, reduced glutathione (GSH and H-ferritin were assessed. Results Oxidant challenged macrophages from transplants recipients without AZM exhibited significantly more LMP and cell death than macrophages from healthy subjects. Those macrophages contained significantly more Fe, while GSH and H-ferritin did not differ significantly. Although macrophages from transplant recipients treated with AZM contained both significantly more Fe and less GSH, which would sensitize cells to oxidants, these macrophages resisted oxidant challenge well. The preventive effect of AZM on oxidative LMP and J774 cell death was 60 to 300 times greater than the other drugs tested. Conclusions AZM makes lung transplant macrophages and their lysososomes more resistant to oxidant challenge. Possibly, prevention of obliterative bronchiolitis in lung transplants by AZM is partly due to this action.

  11. Fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles leads to uncontrolled exocytosis in the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV.

    Park, Soonhong; Ahuja, Malini; Kim, Min Seuk; Brailoiu, G Cristina; Jha, Archana; Zeng, Mei; Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Ling-Gang; Wassif, Christopher A; Porter, Forbes D; Zerfas, Patricia M; Eckhaus, Michael A; Brailoiu, Eugen; Shin, Dong Min; Muallem, Shmuel

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in TRPML1 cause the lysosomal storage disease mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV). The role of TRPML1 in cell function and how the mutations cause the disease are not well understood. Most studies focus on the role of TRPML1 in constitutive membrane trafficking to and from the lysosomes. However, this cannot explain impaired neuromuscular and secretory cells' functions that mediate regulated exocytosis. Here, we analyzed several forms of regulated exocytosis in a mouse model of MLIV and, opposite to expectations, we found enhanced exocytosis in secretory glands due to enlargement of secretory granules in part due to fusion with lysosomes. Preliminary exploration of synaptic vesicle size, spontaneous mEPSCs, and glutamate secretion in neurons provided further evidence for enhanced exocytosis that was rescued by re-expression of TRPML1 in neurons. These features were not observed in Niemann-Pick type C1. These findings suggest that TRPML1 may guard against pathological fusion of lysosomes with secretory organelles and suggest a new approach toward developing treatment for MLIV. PMID:26682800

  12. KIF5B/RET fusion gene in surgically-treated adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    Yokota, Keisuke; Sasaki, Hidefumi; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Shigeki; Shitara, Masayuki; Hikosaka, Yu; Moriyama, Satoru; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2012-10-01

    Recently, a novel fusion gene resulting from a linkage between the kinesin family member 5B gene (KIF5B; 10p11.22) and the rearranged during transfection gene (RET; 10q11.21) was identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the correlation between the KIF5B/RET fusion gene status and the clinicopathological features of surgically-treated lung cancer has not been well characterized. In this study, we have independently investigated the KIF5B/RET fusion gene status in 371 surgically-treated NSCLCs (270 were adenocarcinomas and 101 were squamous cell carcinomas), 60 breast cancers, 11 metastatic lung cancers from colon cancers and thyroid papillary adenocarcinoma cases at the Nagoya City University Hospital. The fusion gene status was analyzed by an RT-PCR-based assay and by using direct sequencing. We detected 3 of 270 cases of KIF5B/RET fusion genes in adenocarcinomas (1.1%) consisting of female and never smokers with mixed subtype adenocarcinomas. The fusion genes were detected exclusively with other mutations, such as EGFR, Kras, Braf, erbB2 mutations, and EML4/ALK fusion. KIF5B/RET fusion was not detected in the cases with squamous cell carcinoma or other types of cancers. From the 3 cases, 2 were KIF5B (exon 15); RET (exon 12) fusions with papillary dominant and 1 case was KIF5B (exon 22); RET (exon 12) fusion with solid dominant adenocarcinoma. The matched normal lung tissues did not display translocation. We reported KIF5B/RET fusion genes as a driver somatic mutation of lung adenocarcinomas. The cinicopathological backgrounds of the KIF5B/RET fusion-positive patients were similar with those of the EML4/ALK fusion-positive patients. The chimeric oncogene may be a promising molecular target for the personalized diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC. PMID:22797671

  13. Reduced mucociliary clearance in old mice is associated with a decrease in Muc5b mucin.

    Grubb, Barbara R; Livraghi-Butrico, Alessandra; Rogers, Troy D; Yin, Weining; Button, Brian; Ostrowski, Lawrence E

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Previous reports have suggested that mucociliary clearance (MCC) is impaired in older individuals, but the cause is unclear. To unravel the mechanisms responsible for the age-associated decline in MCC, we investigated the MCC system in young (3 mo) and old (2 yr) C57BL/6 mice. We found that old mice had significantly reduced MCC function in both the upper and lower airways compared with young mice. Measurement of bioelectric properties of isolated tracheal and bronchial tissue revealed a significant decrease in Cl(-) secretion, suggesting that the older mice may have a reduced ability to maintain a sufficiently hydrated airway surface for efficient MCC. Ciliary beat frequency was also observed to be reduced in the older animals; however, this reduction was small relative to the reduction in MCC. Interestingly, the level of the major secreted mucin, Muc5b, was found to be reduced in both bronchioalveolar lavage and isolated tracheal tissue. Our previous studies of Muc5b(-/-) mice have demonstrated that Muc5b is essential for normal MCC in the mouse. Furthermore, examination of Muc5b(+/-) and wild-type animals revealed that heterozygous animals, which secrete ∼50% of the wild-type level of Muc5b, also demonstrate a markedly reduced level of MCC, confirming the importance of Muc5b levels to MCC. These results demonstrate that aged mice exhibit a decrease in MCC and suggest that a reduced level of secretion of both Cl(-) and Muc5b may be responsible. PMID:26968767

  14. Rab7 and Arl8 GTPases are necessary for lysosome tubulation in macrophages.

    Mrakovic, Amra; Kay, Jason G; Furuya, Wendy; Brumell, John H; Botelho, Roberto J

    2012-12-01

    Lysosomes provide a niche for molecular digestion and are a convergence point for endocytic trafficking, phagosome maturation and autophagy. Typically, lysosomes are small, globular organelles that appear punctate under the fluorescence microscope. However, activating agents like phorbol esters transform macrophage lysosomes into tubular lysosomes (TLs), which have been implicated in retention of pinocytic uptake and phagosome maturation. Moreover, dendritic cells exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) convert their punctate class II major histocompatibility complex compartment, a lysosome-related organelle, into a tubular network that is thought to be involved in antigen presentation. Other than a requirement for microtubules and kinesin, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that drive lysosome tubulation. Here, we show that macrophage cell lines readily form TLs after LPS exposure, with a requirement for the Rab7 GTPase and its effectors RILP (Rab7-interacting lysosomal protein) and FYCO1 (coiled-coil domain-containing protein 1), which respectively modulate the dynein and kinesin microtubule motor proteins. We also show that Arl8B, a recently identified lysosomal GTPase, and its effector SKIP, are also important for TL biogenesis. Finally, we reveal that TLs are significantly more motile than punctate lysosomes within the same LPS-treated cells. Therefore, we identify the first molecular regulators of lysosome tubulation and we show that TLs represent a more dynamic lysosome population. PMID:22909026

  15. The Role of Oxidized Cholesterol in Diabetes-Induced Lysosomal Dysfunction in the Brain.

    Sims-Robinson, Catrina; Bakeman, Anna; Rosko, Andrew; Glasser, Rebecca; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-05-01

    Abnormalities in lysosomal function have been reported in diabetes, aging, and age-related degenerative diseases. These lysosomal abnormalities are an early manifestation of neurodegenerative diseases and often precede the onset of clinical symptoms such as learning and memory deficits; however, the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction is not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism underlying lysosomal dysfunction in the cortex and hippocampi, key structures involved in learning and memory, of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model, the leptin receptor deficient db/db mouse. We demonstrate for the first time that diabetes leads to destabilization of lysosomes as well as alterations in the protein expression, activity, and/or trafficking of two lysosomal enzymes, hexosaminidase A and cathepsin D, in the hippocampus of db/db mice. Pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione (TZD) commonly used in the treatment of diabetes due to its ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reverse hyperglycemia, was ineffective in reversing the diabetes-induced changes on lysosomal enzymes. Our previous work revealed that pioglitazone does not reverse hypercholesterolemia; thus, we investigated whether cholesterol plays a role in diabetes-induced lysosomal changes. In vitro, cholesterol promoted the destabilization of lysosomes, suggesting that lysosomal-related changes associated with diabetes are due to elevated levels of cholesterol. Since lysosome dysfunction precedes neurodegeneration, cognitive deficits, and Alzheimer's disease neuropathology, our results may provide a potential mechanism that links diabetes with complications of the central nervous system. PMID:25976368

  16. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    Dai, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Hu, Zhiqiang, E-mail: zhiqhutg@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Huang, Hui; Zhu, Guangtong; Xiao, Zhiyong [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100038 (China); Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Liwei [Department of Neurosurgery, Beijing Tian Tan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management.

  17. Overexpressed KDM5B is associated with the progression of glioma and promotes glioma cell growth via downregulating p21

    Highlights: • KDM5B is overexpressed in glioma samples. • KDM5B stimulated proliferation of glioma cells. • Inhibition of p21contributes to KDM5B-induced proliferation. - Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Upregulation of lysine (K)-specific demethylase 5B (KDM5B) has been reported in a variety of malignant tumors. However, the impact of KDM5B in glioma remains unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic value of KDM5B in glioma. In clinical glioma samples, we found that KDM5B expression was significantly upregulated in cancer lesions compared with normal brain tissues. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with glioma and higher KDM5B expression tend to have shorter overall survival time. By silencing or overexpressing KDM5B in glioma cells, we found that KDM5B could promote cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that KDM5B promoted glioma proliferation partly via regulation of the expression of p21. Our study provided evidence that KDM5B functions as a novel tumor oncogene in glioma and may be a potential therapeutic target for glioma management

  18. Disease models for the development of therapies for lysosomal storage diseases.

    Xu, Miao; Motabar, Omid; Ferrer, Marc; Marugan, Juan J; Zheng, Wei; Ottinger, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare diseases in which the function of the lysosome is disrupted by the accumulation of macromolecules. The complexity underlying the pathogenesis of LSDs and the small, often pediatric, population of patients make the development of therapies for these diseases challenging. Current treatments are only available for a small subset of LSDs and have not been effective at treating neurological symptoms. Disease-relevant cellular and animal models with high clinical predictability are critical for the discovery and development of new treatments for LSDs. In this paper, we review how LSD patient primary cells and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular models are providing novel assay systems in which phenotypes are more similar to those of the human LSD physiology. Furthermore, larger animal disease models are providing additional tools for evaluation of the efficacy of drug candidates. Early predictors of efficacy and better understanding of disease biology can significantly affect the translational process by focusing efforts on those therapies with the higher probability of success, thus decreasing overall time and cost spent in clinical development and increasing the overall positive outcomes in clinical trials. PMID:27144735

  19. A NEW CELL CLONE DERIVED FROM TRICHOPLUSIA NI TN5B1-4 CELLS

    Jian-xiaoTian; Chang-youLi; Gui-lingZheng; Guo-xunLi; PingWang; Granados

    2004-01-01

    The characteristics of a cultured cell line do not always remain stable and may change upon continuous passage. Most continuous cell lines, even after cloning, possess several genotypes that are constantly changing. There are numerous selective and adaptive culture processes, in addition to genetic instability, that may improve phenotypic change in cell growth, virus susceptibility, gene expression, and production of virus. Similar detrimental effects of long term passaging of insect cells have also been reported for continuous cell lines, for example, Tn5B 1-4 cells, which are the most widely used for the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS), provide superior production of recombinant proteins,however, this high productivity may be more evident in low passage cells. In this paper, we describe the isolation of a cell clone, Tn5B-40, from low passage Tn5B 1-4 cells. The growth characteristics,productions of virus, and high level of recombinant protein productions were determined. The results showed the susceptibility of both clone and Tn5B 1-4 cells to wild-type AcNPV was approximately the same rate with over 95% of infection; when the cloned cells were infected with recombinant baculoviruses expressing β-galactosidase and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP), expression of the recombinant proteins from the cloned cells exceeded that from the parental Tn5B 1-4 cells.

  20. Abnormal autophagy, ubiquitination, inflammation and apoptosis are dependent upon lysosomal storage and are useful biomarkers of mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Tessitore, Alessandra; Pirozzi, Marinella; Auricchio, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Lysosomal storage diseases are characterized by intracellular accumulation of metabolites within lysosomes. Recent evidence suggests that lysosomal storage impairs autophagy resulting in accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and dysfunctional mitochondria, ultimately leading to apoptosis. We studied the relationship between lysosome storage and impairment of different intracellular pathways and organelle function in mucopolysaccharidosis VI, which is characterized by accumulat...

  1. Zinc Chelation Mediates the Lysosomal Disruption without Intracellular ROS Generation

    Matias, Andreza Cândido; Manieri, Tânia Maria; Cerchiaro, Giselle

    2016-01-01

    We report the molecular mechanism for zinc depletion caused by TPEN (N,N,N′,N′-Tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine) in neuroblastoma cells. The activation of p38 MAP kinase and subsequently caspase 3 is not due to or followed by redox imbalance or ROS generation, though these are commonly observed in literature. We found that TPEN is not responsible for ROS generation and the mechanism involves essentially lysosomal disruption caused by intracellular zinc depletion. We also observed a modest activation of Bax and no changes in the Bcl-2 proteins. As a result, we suggest that TPEN causes intracellular zinc depletion which can influence the breakdown of lysosomes and cell death without ROS generation. PMID:27123155

  2. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2 Regulates Sensory Function through Sema5b and Robo2

    Wan Ying eLeong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding the MECP2 underlies Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder in young females. Although reduced pain sensitivity in Rett syndrome patients and in partial MeCP2 deficient mice had been reported, these previous studies focused predominantly on motor impairments. Therefore, it is still unknown how MeCP2 is involved in these sensory defects. In addition, the human disease manifestations where males with mutations in MECP2 gene normally do not survive and females show typical neurological symptoms only after 18 months of age, is profoundly different in MeCP2-deficient mouse where all animals survived, and males but not females displayed Rett syndrome phenotypes at an early age. Thus, the mecp2-deficient zebrafish serves as an additional animal model to aid in deciphering the role and mechanisms of Mecp2 in neurodevelopment. Here, we used 2 independent methods of silencing expression of Mecp2 in zebrafish to uncover a novel role of Mecp2 in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons during the embryonic development. mecp2-null mutation and morpholino-mediated silencing of Mecp2 in the zebrafish embryos resulted in defects in peripheral innervation of trigeminal sensory neurons and consequently affecting the sensory function. These defects were demonstrated to be dependent on the expression of Sema5b and Robo2. The expression of both proteins together could better overcome the defects caused by Mecp2 deficiency as compared to the expression of either Sema5b or Robo2 alone. Sema5b and Robo2 were downregulated upon Mecp2 silencing or in mecp2-null embryos, and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay using antibody against Mecp2 was able to pull down specific regions of both Sema5b and Robo2 promoters, showing interaction between Mecp2 and the promoters of both genes. In addition, cell-specific expression of Mecp2 can overcome the innervation and sensory response defects in Mecp2 morphants indicating that these MeCP2-mediated

  3. The chromosomal passenger protein birc5b organizes microfilaments and germ plasm in the zebrafish embryo.

    Sreelaja Nair

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microtubule-microfilament interactions are important for cytokinesis and subcellular localization of proteins and mRNAs. In the early zebrafish embryo, astral microtubule-microfilament interactions also facilitate a stereotypic segregation pattern of germ plasm ribonucleoparticles (GP RNPs, which is critical for their eventual selective inheritance by germ cells. The precise mechanisms and molecular mediators for both cytoskeletal interactions and GP RNPs segregation are the focus of intense research. Here, we report the molecular identification of a zebrafish maternal-effect mutation motley as Birc5b, a homolog of the mammalian Chromosomal Passenger Complex (CPC component Survivin. The meiosis and mitosis defects in motley/birc5b mutant embryos are consistent with failed CPC function, and additional defects in astral microtubule remodeling contribute to failures in the initiation of cytokinesis furrow ingression. Unexpectedly, the motley/birc5b mutation also disrupts cortical microfilaments and GP RNP aggregation during early cell divisions. Birc5b localizes to the tips of astral microtubules along with polymerizing cortical F-actin and the GP RNPs. Mutant Birc5b co-localizes with cortical F-actin and GP RNPs, but fails to associate with astral microtubule tips, leading to disorganized microfilaments and GP RNP aggregation defects. Thus, maternal Birc5b localizes to astral microtubule tips and associates with cortical F-actin and GP RNPs, potentially linking the two cytoskeletons to mediate microtubule-microfilament reorganization and GP RNP aggregation during early embryonic cell cycles in zebrafish. In addition to the known mitotic function of CPC components, our analyses reveal a non-canonical role for an evolutionarily conserved CPC protein in microfilament reorganization and germ plasm aggregation.

  4. A genetic model with specifically impaired autophagosome–lysosome fusion

    Takáts, Szabolcs; Juhász, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Yeast studies identified the evolutionarily conserved core ATG genes responsible for autophagosome formation. However, the SNARE-dependent machinery involved in autophagosome fusion with the vacuole in yeast is not conserved. We recently reported that the SNARE complex consisting of Syx17 (Syntaxin 17), ubisnap (SNAP-29) and Vamp7 is required for the fusion of autophagosomes with late endosomes and lysosomes in Drosophila. Syx17 mutant flies are viable but exhibit neuronal dysfunction, locomo...

  5. The Use of Lysosomotropic Dyes to Exclude Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization.

    Repnik, Urška; Česen, Maruša Hafner; Turk, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Progressive lowering of pH is characteristic for the endocytic pathway and enables efficient degradation of molecules by hydrolytic enzymes at its distal end. The existence of the proton gradient over the endosomal/lysosomal membranes depends on the action of the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). During lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), protons leak through the destabilized membrane, resulting in loss of the pH gradient. Here, we present a protocol showing how this effect can be detected by staining cells with lysosomotropic dyes, which accumulate in acidic organelles after protonation. During LMP, cells lose the ability to retain these dyes and therefore appear pale. Among the most commonly used lysosomotropic dyes are LysoTracker reagents and acridine orange. Cells can be analyzed with a fluorescence microscope; however, flow-cytometric analysis enables fast, objective, and reliable evaluation of differences between samples. Advantages of the technique include the fact that sample preparation is relatively simple and can be scaled-up to test several different compounds or conditions. However, as we will discuss, cells treated with v-ATPase inhibitors also lose the pH gradient across lysosomal membranes and cannot be stained with lysosomotropic dyes, although this is not accompanied by LMP. Therefore, merely observing loss of staining is not in itself a proof of LMP. PMID:27140914

  6. MCOLN1 is a ROS sensor in lysosomes that regulates autophagy

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Cheng, Xiping; Yu, Lu; Yang, Junsheng; Calvo, Raul; Patnaik, Samarjit; Hu, Xin; Gao, Qiong; Yang, Meimei; Lawas, Maria; Delling, Markus; Marugan, Juan; Ferrer, Marc; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    Cellular stresses trigger autophagy to remove damaged macromolecules and organelles. Lysosomes ‘host' multiple stress-sensing mechanisms that trigger the coordinated biogenesis of autophagosomes and lysosomes. For example, transcription factor (TF)EB, which regulates autophagy and lysosome biogenesis, is activated following the inhibition of mTOR, a lysosome-localized nutrient sensor. Here we show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) activate TFEB via a lysosomal Ca2+-dependent mechanism independent of mTOR. Exogenous oxidants or increasing mitochondrial ROS levels directly and specifically activate lysosomal TRPML1 channels, inducing lysosomal Ca2+ release. This activation triggers calcineurin-dependent TFEB-nuclear translocation, autophagy induction and lysosome biogenesis. When TRPML1 is genetically inactivated or pharmacologically inhibited, clearance of damaged mitochondria and removal of excess ROS are blocked. Furthermore, TRPML1's ROS sensitivity is specifically required for lysosome adaptation to mitochondrial damage. Hence, TRPML1 is a ROS sensor localized on the lysosomal membrane that orchestrates an autophagy-dependent negative-feedback programme to mitigate oxidative stress in the cell. PMID:27357649

  7. Chinese hamster ovary cell lysosomes retain pinocytized horseradish peroxidase and in situ-radioiodinated proteins

    We used Chinese hamster ovary cells, a cell line of fibroblastic origin, to investigate whether lysosomes are an exocytic compartment. To label lysosomal contents, Chinese hamster ovary cells were incubated with the solute marker horseradish peroxidase. After an 18-h uptake period, horseradish peroxidase was found in lysosomes by cell fractionation in Percoll gradients and by electron microscope cytochemistry. Over a 24-h period, lysosomal horseradish peroxidase was quantitatively retained by Chinese hamster ovary cells and inactivated with a t 1/2 of 6 to 8 h. Lysosomes were radioiodinated in situ by soluble lactoperoxidase internalized over an 18-h uptake period. About 70% of the radioiodine incorporation was pelleted at 100,000 X g under conditions in which greater than 80% of the lysosomal marker enzyme beta-hexosaminidase was released into the supernatant. By one-dimensional electrophoresis, about 18 protein species were present in the lysosomal membrane fraction, with radioiodine incorporation being most pronounced into species of 70,000 to 75,000 daltons. After a 30-min or 2-h chase at 37 degrees C, radioiodine that was incorporated into lysosomal membranes and contents was retained in lysosomes. These observations indicate that lysosomes labeled by fluid-phase pinocytosis are a terminal component of endocytic pathways in fibroblasts

  8. Age-related changes of serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and the relationship with bone mineral density in Chinese women

    Yue-juan QIN; Zhen-lin ZHANG; Hao ZHANG; Wei-wei HU; Yu-juan LIU; Yun-qiu HU; Miao LI; Jie-mei GU; Jin-wei HE

    2008-01-01

    Aim: Ostcoclastic activity is mainly assessed by measurement of urinary markers (eg C-terminal cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen, N-terminal cross-linked telopeptides of type I collagen etc), the levels of which could often be affected by renal clearance. Recently, serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRACP5b) has been used as an alternative serum marker to evaluate osteoclastic activity. We investigated the age-related changes of TRACP5b level and its association with bone mineral density (BMD) in Chinese women. Methods: Seven-hundred and twenty-two Chinese mainland women aged 20-79 years were recruited in the study. Serum TRACP5b level was measured using immunoassay to evaluate the state of bone resorption. Bone mineral density (BMD) (g/cm2) at lumbar spine 1-4 and proximal femur were measured by duel-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results: The serum TRACP5b level reached a bottom value in premenopausal women aged 30-39, gradually increased in women aged 40-49, rapidly rose in women aged 50-59, and culminated with a maximum value in women aged 60-69 before a slow drop in women aged 70-79. The average level of TRACPSb was significantly higher in postmenopausal women [(3.29±1.07) U/L] than in premenopausal women ([1.70±0.59] U/L). The levels of TRACP5b were inversely correlated with BMD at all measured sites (P<0.001). Furthermore, the level of TRACP5b was obviously higher in women with osteoporosis and osteopenia than those with normal bone mass (P<0.001). Conclusion: We have established the reference values of serum TRACPSb in Chinese mainland women, and found that postmenopausal women had higher TRACP5b concentration than younger women. The results showed that serum TRACPSb was a sensitive and useful parameter for the evaluation of age-related changes of bone absorption.

  9. Principles of lysosomal membrane digestion: stimulation of sphingolipid degradation by sphingolipid activator proteins and anionic lysosomal lipids.

    Kolter, Thomas; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Sphingolipids and glycosphingolipids are membrane components of eukaryotic cell surfaces. Their constitutive degradation takes place on the surface of intra-endosomal and intra-lysosomal membrane structures. During endocytosis, these intra-lysosomal membranes are formed and prepared for digestion by a lipid-sorting process during which their cholesterol content decreases and the concentration of the negatively charged bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)--erroneously also called lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA)--increases. Glycosphingolipid degradation requires the presence of water-soluble acid exohydrolases, sphingolipid activator proteins, and anionic phospholipids like BMP. The lysosomal degradation of sphingolipids with short hydrophilic head groups requires the presence of sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs). These are the saposins (Saps) and the GM2 activator protein. Sphingolipid activator proteins are membrane-perturbing and lipid-binding proteins with different specificities for the bound lipid and the activated enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Their inherited deficiency leads to sphingolipid- and membrane-storage diseases. Sphingolipid activator proteins not only facilitate glycolipid digestion but also act as glycolipid transfer proteins facilitating the association of lipid antigens with immunoreceptors of the CD1 family. PMID:16212488

  10. Characterization of thiobarbituric acid derivatives as inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase

    Park Mi Young

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In an effort to find chemicals inhibiting the enzymatic activity of the hepatitis C virus (HCV NS5B polymerase, a series of thiobarbituric acid derivatives were selected from a library provided by Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology and characterized. The selected compounds exhibited IC50 values ranging from 1.7 to 3.8 μM, and EC50 values ranging from 12.3 to 20.7 μM against NS5B polymerase of type 1b strain. They showed little effect against type 2a polymerase. One of the compounds, G05, was selected and further characterized. It inhibited the synthesis of RNA by recombinant HCV NS5B polymerase in a dose dependent manner. The CC50 value was 77 μM. The inhibition was in a noncompetitive manner with the substrate UTP. The compound did not inhibit the elongation step of RNA synthesis in a single-cycle processive polymerization assay. It inhibited the binding of NS5B polymerase to the template RNA in a dose-dependent manner.

  11. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.6 Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records... medical records, including a special procedure for notification of or access to medical records of minors... of or access to medical records, or may issue regulations establishing special procedures for...

  12. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Biogenic Amine-Degrading Strain Lactobacillus casei 5b

    Ladero Losada, Víctor Manuel; Herrero, Ana; Martínez Álvarez, Noelia; Río Lagar, Beatriz del; Linares, Daniel M.; Fernández García, María; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez González, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We here report a 3.02-Mbp annotated draft assembly of the Lactobacillus casei 5b genome. The sequence of this biogenic amine-degrading dairy isolate may help identify the mechanisms involved in the catabolism of biogenic amines and perhaps shed light on ways to reduce the presence of these toxic compounds in food.

  13. 12th international corrosion congress: Preceedings. Volume 5B: Corrosion -- General issues

    Volume 5B of these proceedings contain 52 papers divided into the following sections: Life prediction (5); Marine engineering (8); Microbiologically induced corrosion (15); Surface analysis techniques (17); Nuclear energy and waste storage (4); and Water systems (3). Most papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  14. WNT-5A and WNT-5B modulate calcium homeostasis in airway smooth muscle

    Koopmans, Tim; Kumawat, Kudleer; Van Den Berge, Maarten; Hoffmann, Roland; Halayko, Andrew J.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Airway hyperresponsiveness is a common feature of asthma explained in part by an excessive contractile response of the airway smooth muscle (ASM). The underlying mechanisms are complex and in need of study. WNT-5A and WNT-5B, two members of the WNT signaling pathway, may be of significance

  15. HATS-5b: A Transiting hot-Saturn from the HATSouth Survey

    Zhou, G; Penev, K; Bakos, G Á; Hartman, J D; Jordán, A; Mancini, L; Mohler, M; Csubry, Z; Ciceri, S; Brahm, R; Rabus, M; Buchhave, L; Henning, T; Suc, V; Espinoza, N; Béky, B; Noyes, R W; Schmidt, B; Butler, R P; Shectman, S; Thompson, I; Crane, J; Sato, B; Csák, B; Lázár, J; Papp, I; Sári, P; Nikolov, N

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot-Saturn orbiting a G type star, by the HAT-South survey. HATS-5b has a mass of Mp=0.24 Mj, radius of Rp=0.91 Rj, and transits its host star with a period of P=4.7634d. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 Msun, and radius of 0.87 Rsun. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b, and the bright, photometrically quiet host star, make this planet a favourable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas-giants, and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas-giant population.

  16. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP controls KIF5B-mediated insulin secretion

    Satoshi Asano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP-knockout mice exhibited hyperinsulinemia. Here, we investigated the role of PRIP in insulin granule exocytosis using Prip-knockdown mouse insulinoma (MIN6 cells. Insulin release from Prip-knockdown MIN6 cells was higher than that from control cells, and Prip knockdown facilitated movement of GFP-phogrin-labeled insulin secretory vesicles. Double-immunofluorescent staining and density step-gradient analyses showed that the KIF5B motor protein co-localized with insulin vesicles in Prip-knockdown MIN6 cells. Knockdown of GABAA-receptor-associated protein (GABARAP, a microtubule-associated PRIP-binding partner, by Gabarap silencing in MIN6 cells reduced the co-localization of insulin vesicles with KIF5B and the movement of vesicles, resulting in decreased insulin secretion. However, the co-localization of KIF5B with microtubules was not altered in Prip- and Gabarap-knockdown cells. The presence of unbound GABARAP, freed either by an interference peptide or by Prip silencing, in MIN6 cells enhanced the co-localization of insulin vesicles with microtubules and promoted vesicle mobility. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PRIP and GABARAP function in a complex to regulate KIF5B-mediated insulin secretion, providing new insights into insulin exocytic mechanisms.

  17. HATS-5b: A TRANSITING HOT SATURN FROM THE HATSouth SURVEY

    Zhou, G.; Bayliss, D.; Schmidt, B. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Penev, K.; Bakos, G. Á.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, NJ 08544 (United States); Jordán, A.; Brahm, R.; Rabus, M.; Suc, V.; Espinoza, N. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Mancini, L.; Mohler, M.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg (Germany); Buchhave, L. [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University (Denmark); Béky, B.; Noyes, R. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Butler, R. P., E-mail: george.zhou@anu.edu.au [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States); and others

    2014-06-01

    We report the discovery of HATS-5b, a transiting hot Saturn orbiting a G-type star, by the HATSouth survey. HATS-5b has a mass of M{sub p} ≈ 0.24 M {sub J}, radius of R{sub p} ≈ 0.91 R {sub J}, and transits its host star with a period of P ≈ 4.7634 days. The radius of HATS-5b is consistent with both theoretical and empirical models. The host star has a V-band magnitude of 12.6, mass of 0.94 M {sub ☉}, and radius of 0.87 R {sub ☉}. The relatively high scale height of HATS-5b and the bright, photometrically quiet host star make this planet a favorable target for future transmission spectroscopy follow-up observations. We reexamine the correlations in radius, equilibrium temperature, and metallicity of the close-in gas giants and find hot Jupiter-mass planets to exhibit the strongest dependence between radius and equilibrium temperature. We find no significant dependence in radius and metallicity for the close-in gas giant population.

  18. MicroRNA-205‑5b inhibits HMGB1 expression in LPS-induced sepsis.

    Zhou, Wenhai; Wang, Jing; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Jianguo; Sang, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Inflammatory cytokines belonging to high mobility group box (HMGB)1 play a key role in sepsis through yet unknown mechanisms. The inflammatory response is modulated by microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) at multiple levels and is poorly understood. In this study, the regulation of HMGB1 by miRNAs was evaluated using 3-(2,4-dimethoxybenzylidene)anabaseine (GTS-21) to activate the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP) and decrease HMGB1 expression in RAW264.7 cells. Microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of RAW264.7 cells was used to screen target miRNAs through genetic screening, GO analysis and hierarchical clustering. The expression of miRNA targets in the serum, colon, spleen, livers and lungs of BALB/c mice was quantified by RT-qPCR. Serum protein levels were quantified by ELISA. Western blot analysis and RT-qPCR were used for verification in vitro. Using miRNA array analysis, we screened 3 miRNAs (miR‑205‑5b, miR‑196a and miR‑193b). Animal experiments with miR‑205‑5b indicated its high degree of expression in the serum, colon, spleen, liver and lungs following the downregulation of HMGB1 in the tissues. RAW264.7 cells transfected with miR‑205‑5b mimics downregulated HMGB1 protein expression, suggesting translational regulation. HMGB1 expression negatively correlated with miR‑205‑5b expression in LPS-induced sepsis. By contrast, HMGB1 expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells was increased following transfection with miR‑205‑5b inhibitor. miR‑205‑5b is a critical mediator of cholinergic anti-inflammatory activity in late sepsis. The upregulation of miR‑205‑5b as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases is a possible novel therapeutic strategy against late sepsis. The mechanisms involved include the by post-transcriptional suppression of HMGB1 in cells and tissues. PMID:27246725

  19. Effect of chromium concentration on microstructure and properties of Fe-3.5B alloy

    Research highlights: → With the increasing chromium additions, the boride changes from Fe2B to (Fe,Cr)2B-type boride. → The matrix of Fe-3.5B alloy transforms to supersaturated α-(Fe,Cr) solid solution when high chromium concentration is added. → The fracture toughness of boride increases with the increase of chromium addition. → Secondary phase precipitates during the heat treatment of Fe-3.5B alloy with various chromium concentrations. - Abstract: The cast low carbon Fe-3.5B alloys containing various chromium concentrations were prepared in a 10 kg medium frequency induction furnace and the effects of chromium concentration on microstructure and properties of Fe-3.5B alloys have been examined by means of optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), back-scattered electron microscope (BSE), electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vickers hardness. As a result, the as-cast structures of Fe-3.5B-XCr (X = 0, 2, 5, 8, 12, 18, mass fraction) alloys are mainly composed of dendrite ferrite, martensite, pearlite and boride. The boride in the alloy without chromium addition comprises the eutectic Fe2B, which is continuous netlike or fish-bone structure distributed over the metallic matrix. With the increase of chromium concentration in Fe-3.5B alloy, matrix structure turns into the supersaturated α-Fe solid solution while the morphology of boride becomes dispersed due to the transformation of boride from simple Fe2B to (Fe,Cr)2B when the chromium concentration in Fe-3.5B alloy exceeds 8 wt.%. Meanwhile, some primary M2B-type borides may precipitate under this condition. The bulk hardness of the as-cast alloy ranges from 41.8 to 46.8 HRC. However, the bulk hardness of the heat treated alloy rises first and falls later mainly because of the morphology variation of structure. Fracture toughness of boride is improved gradually owing to the entrance of

  20. Protection and Delivery of Anthelmintic Protein Cry5B to Nematodes Using Mesoporous Silicon Particles.

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Hu, Yan; Miller, Melanie; Aroian, Raffi V; Sailor, Michael J

    2015-06-23

    The ability of nano- and microparticles of partially oxidized mesoporous silicon (pSi) to sequester, protect, and deliver the anthelmintic pore-forming protein Cry5B to nematodes is assessed in vitro and in vivo. Thermally oxidized pSi particles are stable under gastric conditions and show relatively low toxicity to nematodes. Fluorescence images of rhodamine-labeled pSi particles within the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Ancylostoma ceylanicum show that ingestion is dependent on particle size: particles of a 0.4 ± 0.2 μm size are noticeably ingested by both species within 2 h of introduction in vitro, whereas 5 ± 2 μm particles are excluded from C. elegans but enter the pharynx region of A. ceylanicum after 24 h. The anthelmintic protein Cry5B, a pore-forming crystal (Cry) protein derived from Bacillus thuringiensis, is incorporated into the pSi particles by aqueous infiltration. Feeding of Cry5B-loaded pSi particles to C. elegans leads to significant intoxication of the nematode. Protein-loaded particles of size 0.4 μm display the highest level of in vitro toxicity toward C. elegans on a drug-mass basis. The porous nanostructure protects Cry5B from hydrolytic and enzymatic (pepsin) degradation in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) for time periods up to 2 h. In vivo experiments with hookworm-infected hamsters show no significant reduction in worm burden with the Cry5B-loaded particles, which is attributed to slow release of the protein from the particles and/or short residence time of the particles in the duodenum of the animal. PMID:25950754

  1. Nuclear morphology and lysosomal stability of molluskan hemocytes as possible biomarkers of arsenic toxicity

    Chakraborty, Sudipta [Post Graduate Department of Zoology, Parasitology and Medical Entomology Laboratory, Darjeeling Government College, Darjeeling (India); Ray, Sajal [Department of Zoology, Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory, University of Calcutta, Kolkata (India)

    2009-10-15

    The frequency of nuclear aberrations and neutral red retention time of hemocytes in the mollusk Lamellidens marginalis were recorded under exposure to sublethal concentrations of sodium arsenite in order to examine the sensitivity and effectiveness of these inexpensive assays for screening the toxicity of As{sup 3+}in a freshwater ecosystem. A dose and time dependent increase in the density of micronucleated and binucleated hemocytes and gill cells was indicative of the pronounced genotoxic effect of arsenic on this animal. The disruption of intrahemocyte homeostasis imposed by this natural toxicant was evident from a dose and time dependent reduction in the lysosomal stability of the hemocytes of the animal. The tested parameters are indicative of arsenic toxicity in L. marginalis in the freshwater systems of the arsenic affected geographical areas of West Bengal, India. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G;

    2013-01-01

    Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present...... study was to investigate the presence of lysosomes in astrocytic brain tumors focussing also on the therapy resistant tumor stem cells. Expression of the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 112 formalin fixed paraffin embedded...... individual tumor grades. LAMP-1/GFAP showed pronounced co-expression and LAMP-1/CD133 was co-expressed as well suggesting that tumor cells including the proposed tumor stem cells contain lysosomes. The results suggest that high amounts of lysosomes are present in glioblastomas and in the proposed tumor stem...

  3. Effect of glutamate on lysosomal membrane permeabilization in primary cultured cortical neurons

    Yan, Min; Zhu, Wenbo; Zheng, Xiaoke; Li, Yuan; TANG, LIPENG; LU, BINGZHENG; Chen, WenLi; Qiu, Pengxin; Leng, Tiandong; Lin, Suizhen; Yan, Guangmei; Yin, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is the predominant cause of cerebral damage. Recent studies have shown that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is involved in ischemia-associated neuronal death in non-human primates. This study was designed to investigate the effect of glutamate on lysosomal stability in primary cultured cortical neurons. Glutamate treatment for 30 min induced the permeabilization of lysosomal ...

  4. Lysosomal-specific Cholesterol Reduction by Biocleavable Polyrotaxanes for Ameliorating Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

    Atsushi Tamura; Nobuhiko Yui

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal trafficking disorder, in which the cholesterols are abnormally accumulated in lysosomes. Recently, the β-cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives are revealed to show therapeutic effect for NPC disease through the removal of accumulated cholesterols in lysosomes. Herein, to enhance the therapeutic effect and reduce the toxicity of β-CD derivatives, biocleavable Pluronic/β-CD-based polyrotaxanes (PRXs) bearing terminal disulfide linkag...

  5. Virulent Brucella abortus Prevents Lysosome Fusion and Is Distributed within Autophagosome-Like Compartments

    Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Moreno, Edgardo; Sanguedolce, Veronique; Mege, Jean-Louis; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    1998-01-01

    Virulent and attenuated Brucella abortus strains attach to and penetrate nonprofessional phagocytic HeLa cells. Compared to pathogenic Brucella, the attenuated strain 19 hardly replicates within cells. The majority of the strain 19 bacteria colocalized with the lysosome marker cathepsin D, suggesting that Brucella-containing phagosomes had fused with lysosomes, in which they may have degraded. The virulent bacteria prevented lysosome-phagosome fusion and were found distributed in the perinucl...

  6. Phagosome-lysosome fusion is a calcium-independent event in macrophages

    1996-01-01

    Phagosome-lysosome membrane fusion is a highly regulated event that is essential for intracellular killing of microorganisms. Functionally, it represents a form of polarized regulated secretion, which is classically dependent on increases in intracellular ionized calcium ([Ca2+]i). Indeed, increases in [Ca2+]i are essential for phagosome- granule (lysosome) fusion in neutrophils and for lysosomal fusion events that mediate host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. Since several...

  7. FLCN Maintains the Leucine Level in Lysosome to Stimulate mTORC1

    Wu, Xiaochun; Zhao, Lingling; Chen, Zhi; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular amino acid pool within lysosome is a signal that stimulates the nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signalling pathway. The signal transduction cascade has garnered much attention, but little is known about the sequestration of the signalling molecules within the lysosome. Using human HEK293 cells as a model, we found that suppression of the BHD syndrome gene FLCN reduced the leucine level in lysosome, which correlated with decreased mTORC1 activity. Both consequences could be reversed ...

  8. Disruption of Lysosome Function Promotes Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Drosophila *

    Chi, Congwu; Zhu, Huanhu; Han, Min; Zhuang, Yuan; Wu, Xiaohui; Xu, Tian

    2010-01-01

    Lysosome function is essential to many physiological processes. It has been suggested that deregulation of lysosome function could contribute to cancer. Through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we have discovered that mutations disrupting lysosomal degradation pathway components contribute to tumor development and progression. Loss-of-function mutations in the Class C vacuolar protein sorting (VPS) gene, deep orange (dor), dramatically promote tumor overgrowth and invasion of the RasV12 cells....

  9. Deviant Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP)-mediated Ca2+ Signaling upon Lysosome Proliferation*

    Dickinson, G. D.; Churchill, G. C.; Brailoiu, E; Patel, S.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the endolysosomal system is a novel intracellular Ca2+ pool mobilized by the second messenger, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). Although lysosomes in neurons are known to proliferate in numerous neurodegenerative diseases and during the normal course of aging, little is known concerning the effect of lysosomal proliferation on Ca2+ homeostasis. Here, we induce proliferation of lysosomes in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons an...

  10. Role of lysosome rupture in controlling Nlrp3 signaling and necrotic cell death

    Lima, Jr., Heriberto; Jacobson, Lee S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Chandran, Kartik; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Lisanti, Michael P; Brojatsch, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    The Nod-like receptor, Nlrp3, has been linked to inflammatory diseases and adjuvant-mediated immune responses. A wide array of structurally diverse agents does not interact directly with Nlrp3, but is thought to activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome by inducing a common upstream signal, such as lysosome rupture. To test the connection between lysosome integrity and Nlrp3 signaling, we analyzed inflammasome activation following stimulation of murine macrophages with lysosome-destabilizing agents and...

  11. Coordinated host responses during pyroptosis: caspase-1-dependent lysosome exocytosis and inflammatory cytokine maturation

    Bergsbaken, Tessa; Fink, Susan L.; den Hartigh, Andreas B.; Loomis, Wendy P.; Cookson, Brad T.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of caspase-1 leads to pyroptosis, a program of cell death characterized by cell lysis and inflammatory cytokine release. Caspase-1 activation triggered by multiple NLRs (NLRC4, NLRP1b, or NLRP3) leads to loss of lysosomes via their fusion with the cell surface, or lysosome exocytosis. Active caspase-1 increased cellular membrane permeability and intracellular calcium levels, which facilitated lysosome exocytosis and release of host antimicrobial factors and microbial products. Lyso...

  12. Signals for the lysosome: a control center for cellular clearance and energy metabolism

    Settembre, Carmine; Fraldi, Alessandro; Medina, Diego L.; Ballabio, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    For a long time lysosomes were considered merely to be cellular “incinerators” involved in the degradation and recycling of cellular waste. However, there is now compelling evidence indicating that lysosomes have a much broader function and that they are involved in fundamental processes such as secretion, plasma membrane repair, signaling and energy metabolism. Furthermore, the essential role of lysosomes in the autophagic pathway puts these organelles at the crossroads of several cellular p...

  13. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers

    Adar, Y.; M. ; Stark; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P.; Bergh, van den, H.; Szewczyk, G.; Sarna, T.; Skladanowski, A.; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y.G.

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes beca...

  14. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    Roger Gilabert-Oriol

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP, Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa and ricin A-chain (RTA—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM.

  15. Cathepsin inhibition-induced lysosomal dysfunction enhances pancreatic beta-cell apoptosis in high glucose.

    Minjeong Jung

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway that plays an important role in maintaining cellular homeostasis. We previously showed that the inhibition of autophagy causes pancreatic β-cell apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy is a protective mechanism for the survival of pancreatic β-cells. The current study demonstrates that treatment with inhibitors and knockdown of the lysosomal cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B and L impair autophagy, enhancing the caspase-dependent apoptosis of INS-1 cells and islets upon exposure to high concentration of glucose. Interestingly, treatment with cathepsin B and L inhibitors prevented the proteolytic processing of cathepsins B, D and L, as evidenced by gradual accumulation of the respective pro-forms. Of note, inhibition of aspartic cathepsins had no effect on autophagy and cell viability, suggesting the selective role of cathepsins B and L in the regulation of β-cell autophagy and apoptosis. Lysosomal localization of accumulated pro-cathepsins in the presence of cathepsin B and L inhibitors was verified via immunocytochemistry and lysosomal fractionation. Lysotracker staining indicated that cathepsin B and L inhibitors led to the formation of severely enlarged lysosomes in a time-dependent manner. The abnormal accumulation of pro-cathepsins following treatment with inhibitors of cathepsins B and L suppressed normal lysosomal degradation and the processing of lysosomal enzymes, leading to lysosomal dysfunction. Collectively, our findings suggest that cathepsin defects following the inhibition of cathepsin B and L result in lysosomal dysfunction and consequent cell death in pancreatic β-cells.

  16. Glucosamine-Bound Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes with Lysosomal Specificity for Breast Tumor Imaging

    Cong Li

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive imaging of lysosomes will be useful 1 to elucidate the role of lysosomal parameters in cancer, 2 to diagnose malignant lesions, and 3 to evaluate future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies. Lysosome-specific labeling of glucosamine-bound near-infrared (NIR fluorescent probes, IR-1 and IR-2, but not control probe IR-15 without the glucosamine moiety, was observed by fluorescence microscopy in human breast epithelial cell lines. Lysosome labeling and tumor specificity of these NIR probes were investigated by dynamic optical imaging and immunofluorescence staining in human breast tumor xenografts. IR-1 and IR-2 demonstrated faster lysosome labeling rates in highly aggressive MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 cells compared with less aggressive MCF-7 and nontumorigenic MCF-12A cells. IR-1 and IR-2, but not IR-15, accumulated in human MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435, and MCF-7 breast tumor xenografts in vivo. IR-2 demonstrated the highest maximum fluorescence and tumor/normal tissue ratios in all tumor models. Specific lysosome labeling from IR-2 in vivo was validated by colocalization of the NIR fluorescence with CD63 immunofluorescence in tumor sections. IR-1 and IR-2 demonstrated high lysosome-labeling ability and breast tumor-targeting specificity in vitro and in vivo. They are promising for diagnosing malignant lesions and may provide a means for evaluating and monitoring future lysosome-targeted anticancer therapies.

  17. Receiving enzyme replacement therapy for a lysosomal storage disorder: a preliminary exploration of the experiences of young patients and their families.

    Freedman, R; Sahhar, M; Curnow, L; Lee, J; Peters, H

    2013-08-01

    Medical intervention for lysosomal storage disorders becomes part of life, shaping the reality of the condition for affected individuals and families. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is available to treat some lysosomal storage disorders. ERT is costly and time consuming, requiring frequent hospital visits to receive intravenous infusions. This qualitative study sought to explore the impact of receiving ERT for a lysosomal storage disorder on the health related quality of life (HRQoL) of young patients and their families. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with young people and parents and siblings of young people accessing ERT for Pompe disease, Gaucher disease or mucopolysaccharidosis types I or II living in Victoria, Australia. Interviews were transcribed then analyzed thematically. The biopsychosocial model assisted in interpreting themes. Findings revealed positive attitudes towards ERT, with noticed improvements in physical and psychosocial well-being. Participants prioritised intervention over other activities and provided suggestions for improving current service delivery. Communication with family members and professionals was deemed important, especially in respect to information provision. Participants described challenges associated with living with a lysosomal storage disorder and receiving ERT and coping strategies, such as positive thinking and ways to manage uncertainty. These findings provide valuable insights into the impact of living with a chronic genetic condition and receiving intensive treatment on HRQoL. PMID:23536258

  18. Ce2Ir5B2, a new structure type of ternary borides

    The crystal structure of a new ternary boride Ce2Ir5B2, space group R3-bar m, a=5.477(2) A, c=31.518(5) A, Z=6, V=818.79 A, was refined down to R=0.0484, wR2=0.1211 from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. This is the first representative of a new structure type of intermetallic compounds (an ordered variant of the binary Er2Co7 compound). The structure of Ce2Ir5B2 is the stacking variant of the MgCu2- and CeCo3B2-type slabs and belongs to the structural series with the general formula R2+nM4+3nX2n (n=2)

  19. Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase NS5B

    Megan H. Powdrill

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available More than 20 years after the identification of the hepatitis C virus (HCV as a novel human pathogen, the only approved treatment remains a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. This rather non-specific therapy is associated with severe side effects and by far not everyone benefits from treatment. Recently, progress has been made in the development of specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C. A major target for such direct acting antivirals (DAAs is the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or non-structural protein 5B (NS5B, which is essential for viral replication. This review will examine the current state of development of inhibitors targeting the polymerase and issues such as the emergence of antiviral resistance during treatment, as well as strategies to address this problem.

  20. The influence of alloying elements in aluminium on the grain refinement with ALTI5B1

    Naglič I.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the influence of alloying elements in aluminium on the grain refinement with various additions of AlTi5B1. Grain-refinement tests were made at a cooling rate of 15 °C/s. The results revealed that in both aluminium and an Al-Fe alloy the grain size decreases with increasing additions of the AlTi5B1 grain refiner. We found that for the same boron content the grain size was smaller in the case of the Al-Fe alloy. The difference in the grain sizes for the same content of boron was approximately 15 μm; this is considerably smaller than the difference between the grain sizes in samples with the same difference of growth-restricting factor made at slower cooling rates.

  1. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  2. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    Highlights: ► This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. ► Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. ► This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4+CD25+ Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4+ T cells and especially CD8+ T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

  3. 17 CFR 270.5b-1 - Definition of “total assets.”

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definition of âtotal assets.â... (CONTINUED) RULES AND REGULATIONS, INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 § 270.5b-1 Definition of “total assets.” The term total assets, when used in computing values for the purposes of sections 5 and 12 of the...

  4. Qatar Exoplanet Survey : Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b and Qatar-5b

    Alsubai, Khalid A; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I; Latham, David W; Bieryla, Allyson; Buchhave, Lars A; Esquerdo, Gilbert A; Bramich, D M; Pyrzas, Stylianos; Vilchez, Nicolas P E; Mancini, Luigi; Southworth, John; Evans, Daniel F; Henning, Thomas; Ciceri, Simona

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b, and Qatar-5b, three new transiting planets identified by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey (QES). The three planets belong to the hot Jupiter family, with orbital periods of $P_{Q3b}$=2.5079204 days, $P_{Q4b}$=1.8053949 days, and $P_{Q5b}$=2.8792319 days. Follow-up spectroscopic observations reveal the masses of the planets to be $M_{Q3b}$=4.31$M_{\\rm J}$, $M_{Q4b}$=5.85$M_{\\rm J}$, and $M_{Q5b}$=4.32$M_{\\rm J}$, while model fits to the transit light curves yield radii of $R_{Q3b}$=1.096$R_{\\rm J}$, $R_{Q4b}$=1.552$R_{\\rm J}$, and $R_{Q5b}$=1.107$R_{\\rm J}$. No evidence of eccentric orbit is seen in the radial velocity curve of any of the planets. The host stars are typical main sequence stars with masses and radii $M_{Q3}$=1.145$M_{\\odot}$, $M_{Q4}$=0.954$M_{\\odot}$, $M_{Q5}$=1.128$M_{\\odot}$ and $R_{Q3}$=1.272$R_{\\odot}$, $R_{Q4}$=1.115$R_{\\odot}$ and $R_{Q5}$=1.076$R_{\\odot}$ for the Qatar-3, 4 and 5 respectively. All three new planets can be classified as heavy hot ...

  5. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides

    Akpınar, Bala Anı; Akpinar, Bala Ani; Yüce, Meral; Yuce, Meral; Lucas, Stuart J.; Vrana, Jan; Buresova, Veronika; Dolezel, Jaroslav; Budak, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    Wild emmer wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is the wild relative of Triticum turgidum, the progenitor of durum and bread wheat, and maintains a rich allelic diversity among its wild populations. The lack of adequate genetic and genomic resources, however, restricts its exploitation in wheat improvement. Here, we report next-generation sequencing of the flow-sorted chromosome 5B of T. dicoccoides to shed light into its genome structure, function and organization by exploring the repet...

  6. Proteolytic degradation of human salivary MUC5B by dental biofilms

    Wickström, Claes; Herzberg, Mark C.; Beighton, David; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2009-01-01

    The degradation of complex substrates, like salivary mucins, requires an arsenal of glycosidases and proteases to sequentially degrade the oligosaccharides and polypeptide backbone. The mucin MUC5B is a complex oligomeric glycoprotein, heterogeneous in molecular mass (14–40×106 Da), with a diverse repertoire of oligosaccharides, differing in composition and charge. The aim of this study was to investigate whether proteolytic degradation of the mucin polypeptide backbone could be identified an...

  7. Structural analysis of human KDM5B guides histone demethylase inhibitor development.

    Johansson, Catrine; Velupillai, Srikannathasan; Tumber, Anthony; Szykowska, Aleksandra; Hookway, Edward S; Nowak, Radoslaw P; Strain-Damerell, Claire; Gileadi, Carina; Philpott, Martin; Burgess-Brown, Nicola; Wu, Na; Kopec, Jola; Nuzzi, Andrea; Steuber, Holger; Egner, Ursula; Badock, Volker; Munro, Shonagh; LaThangue, Nicholas B; Westaway, Sue; Brown, Jack; Athanasou, Nick; Prinjha, Rab; Brennan, Paul E; Oppermann, Udo

    2016-07-01

    Members of the KDM5 (also known as JARID1) family are 2-oxoglutarate- and Fe(2+)-dependent oxygenases that act as histone H3K4 demethylases, thereby regulating cell proliferation and stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Here we report crystal structures of the catalytic core of the human KDM5B enzyme in complex with three inhibitor chemotypes. These scaffolds exploit several aspects of the KDM5 active site, and their selectivity profiles reflect their hybrid features with respect to the KDM4 and KDM6 families. Whereas GSK-J1, a previously identified KDM6 inhibitor, showed about sevenfold less inhibitory activity toward KDM5B than toward KDM6 proteins, KDM5-C49 displayed 25-100-fold selectivity between KDM5B and KDM6B. The cell-permeable derivative KDM5-C70 had an antiproliferative effect in myeloma cells, leading to genome-wide elevation of H3K4me3 levels. The selective inhibitor GSK467 exploited unique binding modes, but it lacked cellular potency in the myeloma system. Taken together, these structural leads deliver multiple starting points for further rational and selective inhibitor design. PMID:27214403

  8. Molecular organization and comparative analysis of chromosome 5B of the wild wheat ancestor Triticum dicoccoides.

    Akpinar, Bala Ani; Yuce, Meral; Lucas, Stuart; Vrána, Jan; Burešová, Veronika; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, Hikmet

    2015-01-01

    Wild emmer wheat, Triticum turgidum ssp. dicoccoides is the wild relative of Triticum turgidum, the progenitor of durum and bread wheat, and maintains a rich allelic diversity among its wild populations. The lack of adequate genetic and genomic resources, however, restricts its exploitation in wheat improvement. Here, we report next-generation sequencing of the flow-sorted chromosome 5B of T. dicoccoides to shed light into its genome structure, function and organization by exploring the repetitive elements, protein-encoding genes and putative microRNA and tRNA coding sequences. Comparative analyses with its counterparts in modern and wild wheats suggest clues into the B-genome evolution. Syntenic relationships of chromosome 5B with the model grasses can facilitate further efforts for fine-mapping of traits of interest. Mapping of 5B sequences onto the root transcriptomes of two additional T. dicoccoides genotypes, with contrasting drought tolerances, revealed several thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms, of which 584 shared polymorphisms on 228 transcripts were specific to the drought-tolerant genotype. To our knowledge, this study presents the largest genomics resource currently available for T. dicoccoides, which, we believe, will encourage the exploitation of its genetic and genomic potential for wheat improvement to meet the increasing demand to feed the world. PMID:26084265

  9. Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis in Chickens after Experimental Infection with 9a5b Newcastle Disease Virus Mutant Isolate.

    El-Bahrawy, A; Zaid, A; Sunden, Y; Sakurai, M; Ito, H; Ito, T; Morita, T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) on the chicken pancreas. A virulent 9a5b mutant NDV isolate was inoculated intranasally into 32-day-old specific pathogen-free white Leghorn chickens. The pancreas was examined grossly and fixed for histopathological, immunohistochemical and electron microscopical investigations. Inflammatory changes were observed in the peripancreatic tissue at the early stage of infection (12 h post infection) and became more prevalent towards the end of the experiment. Multifocal areas of necrotizing inflammation were detected in the exocrine portion of the pancreas by 5 days post infection (dpi) and became more severe at 10 dpi. The endocrine islets were generally preserved, but slight degenerative changes were observed at 10 dpi. Immunohistochemically, NDV-nucleoprotein (NDV-NP) signals were detected in the peripancreatic tissues (associated with macrophages and other lymphoid cells) by 1 dpi. In the exocrine portion of the pancreas, NDV-NP signals were detected at 5 dpi and increased in intensity and distribution by 10 dpi. NDV particles were confirmed in the cytoplasm of exocrine acinar cells by transmission electron microscopy. CD3-positive cells were observed in the peripancreatic tissues earlier than in the pancreatic tissue. Moreover, in comparison with control chickens, insulin immunoexpression was unchanged, except on the last day of the experiment, when it was slightly reduced. The 9a5b NDV infection induced an inflammatory reaction and viral replication in the peripancreatic tissues earlier than in the pancreatic tissue. Furthermore, necrosis affected mainly the exocrine portion of the pancreas, while the endocrine portion was generally unaffected. PMID:26456574

  10. GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in anesthetized rats: are 5-HT5B receptors involved?

    Sánchez-Maldonado, Carolina; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Terrón, José A

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR-127935, inhibits hypotensive responses produced by the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, and 5-HT5A/5B receptor ligand, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), in rats. This work further characterized the above mechanism using more selective 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. Also, expression of 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in blood vessels was searched by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Decreases in diastolic blood pressure induced by 5-CT (0.001-10 μg/kg, intravenously) were analyzed in anesthetized rats that had received intravenous vehicle (1 mL/kg), SB-224289 (5-HT1B antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), BRL15572 (5-HT1D antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each), or SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each) + GR-127935 (1 mg/kg). Because only the latter treatment inhibited 5-CT-induced hypotension, suggestive of a mechanism unrelated to 5-HT1B/1D receptors, the effects of antagonists/ligands at 5-HT5A (SB-699551, 1 mg/kg), 5-HT6 (SB-399885, 1 mg/kg), and 5-HT1B/1D/5A/5B/7 receptors (ergotamine, 0.1 mg/kg) on 5-CT-induced hypotension were tested. Interestingly, only ergotamine blocked 5-CT-induced responses; this effect closely paralleled that of SB-224289 + BRL-15572 + GR-127935. Neither did ergotamine nor GR-127935 inhibit hypotensive responses induced by the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-44. Faint but clear bands corresponding to 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in aorta and mesenteric arteries were detected. Results suggest that the GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in rats is unrelated to 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. This mechanism, however, resembles putative 5-HT5B receptors. PMID:25502305

  11. Lysosomal sphingomyelinase is not solicited for apoptosis signaling.

    Bezombes, C; Ségui, B; Cuvillier, O; Bruno, A P; Uro-Coste, E; Gouazé, V; Andrieu-Abadie, N; Carpentier, S; Laurent, G; Salvayre, R; Jaffrézou, J P; Levade, T

    2001-02-01

    Stress-induced activation of an acidic sphingomyelinase leading to generation of ceramide, an important lipid mediator, has been associated with apoptosis; however, the implication of this hydrolase has been questioned. The present study aimed at re-evaluating the role of this lysosomal enzyme in apoptosis initiated by different apoptotic inducers. The sensitivity of a series of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient cell lines derived from Niemann-Pick disease patients to stress-induced apoptosis was investigated. We have now shown that stress stimuli, such as anthracyclines, ionizing radiation, and Fas ligation trigger similar apoptotic hallmarks in normal and acid sphingomyelinase-deficient cell lines. Retrovirus-mediated gene correction of enzyme deficiency in Niemann-Pick cells does not modify response to apoptosis. Ceramide production is comparable in normal and Niemann-Pick cells, and increased activity of neutral sphingomyelinase is observed. Thus, our findings cast serious doubts that lysosomal sphingomyelinase activation is responsible for stress-induced apoptosis of cultured cells. PMID:11156942

  12. Preubiquitinated chimeric ErbB2 is constitutively endocytosed and subsequently degraded in lysosomes

    Vuong, Tram Thu [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Bertelsen, Vibeke; Rødland, Marianne Skeie [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene, E-mail: i.h.madshus@medisin.uio.no [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, P.O. Box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2013-02-01

    The oncoprotein ErbB2 is endocytosis-deficient, probably due to its interaction with Heat shock protein 90. We previously demonstrated that clathrin-dependent endocytosis of ErbB2 is induced upon incubation of cells with Ansamycin derivatives, such as geldanamycin and its derivative 17-AAG. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that a preubiquitinated chimeric EGFR (EGFR-Ub{sub 4}) is constitutively endocytosed in a clathrin-dependent manner. We now demonstrate that also an ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} chimera is endocytosed constitutively and clathrin-dependently. Upon expression, the ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was further ubiquitinated, and by Western blotting, we demonstrated the formation of both Lys48-linked and Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was constitutively internalized and eventually sorted to late endosomes and lysosomes where the fusion protein was degraded. ErbB2-Ub{sub 4} was not cleaved prior to internalization. Interestingly, over-expression of Ubiquitin Interaction Motif-containing dominant negative fragments of the clathrin adaptor proteins epsin1 and Eps15 negatively affected endocytosis of ErbB2. Altogether, this argues that ubiquitination is sufficient to induce clathrin-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the otherwise plasma membrane localized ErbB2. Also, it appears that C-terminal cleavage is not required for endocytosis. -- Highlights: ► A chimera containing ErbB2 and a tetra-Ubiquitin chain internalizes constitutively. ► Receptor fragmentation is not required for endocytosis of ErbB2. ► Ubiquitination is sufficient to induce endocytosis and degradation of ErbB2. ► ErbB2-Ub4 is internalized clathrin-dependently.

  13. Physico-chemical Properties and Bioactivities of a Glycoconjugate LbGp5B from Lycium barbarum L.

    PENG,Xue-Mei(彭雪梅); PENG,Xue-Mei; QI,Chun-Hui(齐春会); QI,Chun-Hui; TIAN,Geng-Yuan (田庚元); TIAN,Geng-Yuan; ZHANG,Yong-Xiang(张永详); ZHANG,Yong-Xiang

    2001-01-01

    A glycoconjugatedesignated as LbGp5B was isolated from the fruit of Lyciun barbarum L. and purified to homogeneity by gel filtration .LbGp5B is composed of rhamnose (Rha), arabinose (Ara), galactose (Gal), glucose (Glc), galacturonic acid (GalA) and seveateen amino acids. The molecular weight of LbGp5B was determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and by matrix-asisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of fight (T OF) mass spectrometry (MS). The preliminary experiments showed that LbGp5B promoted splenocyte proliferation in mice and inhihited the peroxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL).

  14. MUC5B silencing reduces chemo-resistance of MCF-7 breast tumor cells and impairs maturation of dendritic cells.

    García, Enrique P; Tiscornia, Inés; Libisch, Gabriela; Trajtenberg, Felipe; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Chiale, Carolina; Brossard, Natalie; Robello, Carlos; Santiñaque, Federico; Folle, Gustavo; Osinaga, Eduardo; Freire, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Mucins participate in cancer progression by regulating cell growth, adhesion, signaling, apoptosis or chemo-resistance to drugs. The secreted mucin MUC5B, the major component of the respiratory tract mucus, is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer, where it could constitute a cancer biomarker. In this study we evaluated the role of MUC5B in breast cancer by gene silencing the MUC5B expression with short hairpin RNA on MCF-7 cells. We found that MUC5B-silenced MCF-7 cells have a reduced capacity to grow, adhere and form cell colonies. Interestingly, MUC5B knock-down increased the sensitivity to death induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. We also show that MUC5B silencing impaired LPS-maturation of DCs, and production of cytokines. Furthermore, MUC5B knock-down also influenced DC-differentiation and activation since it resulted in an upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10, cytokines that might be involved in cancer progression. Thus, MUC5B could enhance the production of LPS-induced cytokines, suggesting that the use of MUC5B-based cancer vaccines combined with DC-maturation stimuli, could favor the induction of an antitumor immune response. PMID:26984395

  15. Reduced sulfation of muc5b is linked to xerostomia in patients with Sjögren syndrome

    Alliende, C; Kwon, Y-J; Brito, M;

    2008-01-01

    amount of MUC5B (mRNA and protein) as well as sulfation levels in salivary glands of patients with normal or altered unstimulated salivary flow. Localisation of MUC5B and sulfated MUC5B, as well as total levels sulfated groups were determined and compared with acini basal lamina disorganisation. PATIENTS...... patients with highly disorganised basal lamina. CONCLUSION: Disorganisation of the basal lamina observed in patients with Sjögren syndrome may lead to dedifferentiation of acinar mucous cells and, as a consequence, alter sulfation of MUC5B. These changes are suggested to represent a novel mechanism that...

  16. Polarized secretion of lysosomal enzymes: co-distribution of cation- independent mannose-6-phosphate receptors and lysosomal enzymes along the osteoclast exocytic pathway

    1988-01-01

    The osteoclast is a polarized cell which secretes large amounts of newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes into an apical extracellular lacuna where bone resorption takes place. Using immunocytochemical techniques, we have localized the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (Man6P) receptor and lysosomal enzymes in this cell type in order to determine the expression and distribution of this receptor and its ligands. The results demonstrate that the osteoclast expresses large amounts of immunorea...

  17. Lysosome stabilization in slices of rat liver when incubated with vitamin A excess

    An organ culture of slices of livers from adult rats was used to study effect of vitamin A (all-trans retinol) on lysosome stability. Lysosomes were purified by centrifugation in Percoll gradients. Preparations were monitored by electron microscopy and evaluated by morphometry and assays of marker enzymes. Enrichments relative to homogenates and crude pellets were estimated from latent (triton X-100) acid p-nitrophenylphosphatase specific activities. Lysosomes prepared from unincubated slices were enriched 50-fold in latent acid phosphatase relative to homogenates. In contrast, lysosomes prepared from slices incubated for 30 min in PBS alone were enriched only 20-fold. When 25 μg/ml retinol was included in the incubation medium, enrichments of 40-fold were obtained. The integrity of the slices was monitored by electron microscopy and their viability was confirmed by a sustained uptake and incorporation of [3H]leucine into protein (up to 2 h in culture). The loss of lysosomes from homogenates of slices incubated in the absence of retinol was accompanied by a loss of acid phosphatase from the lysosomal pellet to the supernatant during purification. Addition of retinol to slices just prior to homogenization was without effect. The results demonstrate a stabilizing influence of vitamin A on lysosomes during incubation of licer slices. The findings contrast earlier reports of retinol-induced lysosome fragility in other in vitro systems

  18. Lysosomal and autophagic reactions as predictive indicators of environmental impact in aquatic animals.

    Moore, Michael N; Allen, J Icarus; McVeigh, Allan; Shaw, Jenny

    2006-01-01

    The lysosomal-autophagic system appears to be a common target for many environmental pollutants as lysosomes accumulate many toxic metals and organic xenobiotics, which perturb normal function and damage the lysosomal membrane. In fact, lysosomal membrane integrity or stability appears to be an effective generic indicator of cellular well-being in eukaryotes: in bivalve molluscs and fish, stability is correlated with many toxicological responses and pathological reactions. Prognostic use of adverse lysosomal and autophagic reactions to environmental pollutants has been explored in relation to predicting cellular dysfunction and health in marine mussels, which are extensively used as sensitive bioindicators in monitoring ecosystem health. Derivation of explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on health is a major goal; and we have developed a conceptual mechanistic model linking lysosomal damage and autophagic dysfunction with injury to cells and tissues. This model has also complemented the creation of a cell-based computational model for molluscan hepatopancreatic cells that simulates lysosomal, autophagic and other cellular reactions to pollutants. Experimental and simulated results have also indicated that nutritional deprivation-induced autophagy has a protective function against toxic effects mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, coupled measurement of lysosomal-autophagic reactions and modelling is proposed as a practical toolbox for predicting toxic environmental risk. PMID:16874099

  19. NEW EMBO MEMBER’S REVIEW: Lysosomal cysteine proteases: facts and opportunities

    Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Turk, Dušan

    2001-01-01

    From their discovery in the first half of the 20th century, lysosomal cysteine proteases have come a long way: from being the enzymes non-selectively degrading proteins in lysosomes to being those responsible for a number of important cellular processes. Some of the features and roles of their structures, specificity, regulation and physiology are discussed.

  20. Plasma Membrane Repair Is Regulated Extracellularly by Proteases Released from Lysosomes.

    Thiago Castro-Gomes

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells rapidly repair wounds on their plasma membrane. Resealing is Ca(2+-dependent, and involves exocytosis of lysosomes followed by massive endocytosis. Extracellular activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase was previously shown to promote endocytosis and wound removal. However, whether lysosomal proteases released during cell injury participate in resealing is unknown. Here we show that lysosomal proteases regulate plasma membrane repair. Extracellular proteolysis is detected shortly after cell wounding, and inhibition of this process blocks repair. Conversely, surface protein degradation facilitates plasma membrane resealing. The abundant lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, known to proteolytically remodel the extracellular matrix, are rapidly released upon cell injury and are required for efficient plasma membrane repair. In contrast, inhibition of aspartyl proteases or RNAi-mediated silencing of the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D enhances resealing, an effect associated with the accumulation of active acid sphingomyelinase on the cell surface. Thus, secreted lysosomal cysteine proteases may promote repair by facilitating membrane access of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase, which promotes wound removal and is subsequently downregulated extracellularly by a process involving cathepsin D.

  1. Plasma Membrane Repair Is Regulated Extracellularly by Proteases Released from Lysosomes.

    Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Andrews, Norma W

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells rapidly repair wounds on their plasma membrane. Resealing is Ca(2+)-dependent, and involves exocytosis of lysosomes followed by massive endocytosis. Extracellular activity of the lysosomal enzyme acid sphingomyelinase was previously shown to promote endocytosis and wound removal. However, whether lysosomal proteases released during cell injury participate in resealing is unknown. Here we show that lysosomal proteases regulate plasma membrane repair. Extracellular proteolysis is detected shortly after cell wounding, and inhibition of this process blocks repair. Conversely, surface protein degradation facilitates plasma membrane resealing. The abundant lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B and L, known to proteolytically remodel the extracellular matrix, are rapidly released upon cell injury and are required for efficient plasma membrane repair. In contrast, inhibition of aspartyl proteases or RNAi-mediated silencing of the lysosomal aspartyl protease cathepsin D enhances resealing, an effect associated with the accumulation of active acid sphingomyelinase on the cell surface. Thus, secreted lysosomal cysteine proteases may promote repair by facilitating membrane access of lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase, which promotes wound removal and is subsequently downregulated extracellularly by a process involving cathepsin D. PMID:27028538

  2. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation

    Fang Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O, has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu and Cat D inhibitor (pepA inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p < 0.05 in lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome.

  3. The Octyl Ester of Ginsenoside Rh2 Induces Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization via Bax Translocation.

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Bing; Sun, Yong; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Peng, Han; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rh2 is a potential pharmacologically active metabolite of ginseng. Previously, we have reported that an octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O), has been confirmed to possess higher bioavailability and anticancer effect than Rh2 in vitro. In order to better assess the possibility that Rh2-O could be used as an anticancer compound, the underlying mechanism was investigated in this study. The present results revealed that lysosomal destabilization was involved in the early stage of cell apoptosis in HepG2 cells induced by Rh2-O. Rh2-O could induce an early lysosomal membrane permeabilization with the release of lysosomal protease cathepsins to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. The Cat B inhibitor (leu) and Cat D inhibitor (pepA) inhibited Rh2-O-induced HepG2 apoptosis as well as tBid production and Δφm depolarization, indicating that lysosomal permeabilization occurred upstream of mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, Rh2-O induced a significant increase in the protein levels of DRAM1 and Bax (p < 0.05) in lysosomes of HepG2 cells. Knockdown of Bax partially inhibited Rh2-O-induced Cat D release from lysosomes. Thus it was concluded that Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through activation of the lysosomal-mitochondrial apoptotic pathway involving the translocation of Bax to the lysosome. PMID:27120618

  4. Taking Out TB–Lysosomal Trafficking and Mycobactericidal Ubiquitin-Derived Peptides

    Purdy, Georgiana E.

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a significant global health concern. The hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenicity is its ability to infect resting macrophages and establish an intracellular niche. Activated and autophagic macrophages control mycobacterial infections through bactericidal mechanisms ranging from reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates to the delivery of the bacterium to the acidified, hydrolytically active lysosome. The mycobactericidal activity of the lysosome is due in pa...

  5. Taking out TB – A role for lysosomal ubiquitin-derived peptides

    Georgiana ePurdy

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a significant global health concern. The hallmark of Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenicity is its ability to infect resting macrophages and establish an intracellular niche. Activated and autophagic macrophages control mycobacterial infections through bactericidal mechanisms ranging from reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates to the delivery of the bacterium to the acidified, hydrolytically active lysosome. The mycobactericidal activity of the lysosome is due in pa...

  6. The stereochemical configuration of lysosomal phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine: comparison with lysobisphosphatidic acid.

    Joutti, A; Renkonen, O

    1979-02-01

    Lysosomal phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were isolated from liver of rats treated with Triton WR 1339 and from cultured BHK-cells. Stereochemical analysis proved that these lipids, in contrast to the lysosomal lysobisphosphatidic acid, were derivatives of sn-glycero-3-phosphate. PMID:438662

  7. Imidazoacridinone-dependent lysosomal photodestruction: a pharmacological Trojan horse approach to eradicate multidrug-resistant cancers.

    Adar, Y; Stark, M; Bram, E E; Nowak-Sliwinska, P; van den Bergh, H; Szewczyk, G; Sarna, T; Skladanowski, A; Griffioen, A W; Assaraf, Y G

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a primary hindrance to curative cancer therapy. Thus, introduction of novel strategies to overcome MDR is of paramount therapeutic significance. Sequestration of chemotherapeutics in lysosomes is an established mechanism of drug resistance. Here, we show that MDR cells display a marked increase in lysosome number. We further demonstrate that imidazoacridinones (IAs), which are cytotoxic fluorochromes, undergo a dramatic compartmentalization in lysosomes because of their hydrophobic weak base nature. We hence developed a novel photoactivation-based pharmacological Trojan horse approach to target and eradicate MDR cancer cells based on photo-rupture of IA-loaded lysosomes and tumor cell lysis via formation of reactive oxygen species. Illumination of IA-loaded cells resulted in lysosomal photodestruction and restoration of parental cell drug sensitivity. Lysosomal photodestruction of MDR cells overexpressing the key MDR efflux transporters ABCG2, ABCB1 or ABCC1 resulted in 10- to 52-fold lower IC(50) values of various IAs, thereby restoring parental cell sensitivity. Finally, in vivo application of this photodynamic therapy strategy after i.v. injection of IAs in human ovarian tumor xenografts in the chorioallantoic membrane model revealed selective destruction of tumors and their associated vasculature. These findings identify lysosomal sequestration of IAs as an Achilles heel of MDR cells that can be harnessed to eradicate MDR tumor cells via lysosomal photodestruction. PMID:22476101

  8. Non-inhibitory antibodies impede lysosomal storage reduction during enzyme replacement therapy of a lysosomal storage disease.

    Matzner, Ulrich; Matthes, Frank; Weigelt, Cecilia; Andersson, Claes; Eistrup, Carl; Fogh, Jens; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2008-04-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy is a treatment option for several lysosomal storage disorders. We reported previously that treatment of a knockout mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disease metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) by intravenous injection of recombinant human arylsulfatase A (rhASA) reduces sulfatide storage and improves nervous system pathology and function. Here, we show that treated mice can develop anti-rhASA antibodies, which impede sulfatide clearance without inhibiting enzyme activity. The neutralizing effect of antibodies was reproduced in cell culture models of MLD by demonstrating that mouse immune serum reduces the ability of rhASA to clear sulfatide from cultured ASA-deficient Schwann and kidney cells. We show that reduced clearance is due to an antibody-mediated blockade of mannose 6-phosphate receptor-dependent enzyme uptake, retargeting of rhASA from sulfatide-storing cells to macrophages, intracellular misrouting of rhASA, and reduction of enzyme stability. Induction of immunotolerance to rhASA by transgenic expression of an active site mutant of human ASA restores sulfatide clearance in mice. The data indicate that the influence of non-inhibitory antibodies must be more intensively considered in evaluating the therapeutic efficacy of enzyme replacement in lysosomal storage disorders in general and in patients without cross-reacting material specifically. PMID:18360747

  9. Site investigation SFR. Reprocessing of reflection seismic profiles 5b and 8, Forsmark

    Reflection seismic profiles 5b and 8 in the northern Forsmark area have been reprocessed with the aim of improving the images in the uppermost 500 metres in the SFR area. The main conclusion is that a new reflection (B10) has been identified that may extend below the SFR site. This reflection was not clearly observed in the previous processing. The reflection strikes approximately N25E and dips at about 35 degrees to the southeast. This orientation is similar to the set B group identified earlier /Juhlin and Palm 2005/. Note that the dip of the reflection is uncertain. On shot gathers it appears to dip at a slightly shallower angle while on the stacked sections it appears to dip at a greater angle. This discrepancy is probably due to the crooked nature of the profiles. However, reflections are clearly observed in shot gathers and its presence below SFR is highly probable. Two new reflections were also identified further north along profile 5b (A11 and A12). These dip to the south-southeast, but would be found at a depth of 1-2 km below SFR if they extend to below the site. There are also signs of a 3rd reflection with similar orientation to the set A group identified earlier, A13, but its existence is very speculative. This reflector would intersect the surface within the SFR area. South of the Singoe deformation zone on profile 5b, another new reflection has been found, N1. The orientation of this reflection is speculative since it is not clearly seen on profile 8. It has been modelled as dipping to the north at about 35 degrees and projects to the surface south of the main SFR area. In addition, the orientation of reflection B7 has been revised as has the lateral extent of A1. Most importantly, A1 is now interpreted not to extend to the surface and not cross the Singoe deformation zone

  10. KIF5B and Nup358 Cooperatively Mediate the Nuclear Import of HIV-1 during Infection.

    Dharan, Adarsh; Talley, Sarah; Tripathi, Abhishek; Mamede, João I; Majetschak, Matthias; Hope, Thomas J; Campbell, Edward M

    2016-06-01

    Following envelope mediated fusion, the HIV-1 core is released into the cytoplasm of the target cell and undergoes a series of trafficking and replicative steps that result in the nuclear import of the viral genome, which ultimately leads to the integration of the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. Previous studies have found that disruption of microtubules, or depletion of dynein or kinesin motors, perturb the normal uncoating and trafficking of the viral genome. Here, we show that the Kinesin-1 motor, KIF5B, induces a relocalization of the nuclear pore component Nup358 into the cytoplasm during HIV-1 infection. This relocalization of NUP358 is dependent on HIV-1 capsid, and NUP358 directly associates with viral cores following cytoplasmic translocation. This interaction between NUP358 and the HIV-1 core is dependent on multiple capsid binding surfaces, as this association is not observed following infection with capsid mutants in which a conserved hydrophobic binding pocket (N74D) or the cyclophilin A binding loop (P90A) is disrupted. KIF5B knockdown also prevents the nuclear entry and infection by HIV-1, but does not exert a similar effect on the N74D or P90A capsid mutants which do not rely on Nup358 for nuclear import. Finally, we observe that the relocalization of Nup358 in response to CA is dependent on cleavage protein and polyadenylation factor 6 (CPSF6), but independent of cyclophilin A. Collectively, these observations identify a previously unappreciated role for KIF5B in mediating the Nup358 dependent nuclear import of the viral genome during infection. PMID:27327622