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Sample records for 5-year randomized trial

  1. Sealing caries in primary molars: randomized control trial, 5-year results.

    Innes, N P T; Evans, D J P; Stirrups, D R

    2011-12-01

    The Hall Technique (HT) is a method for managing carious primary molars. Decay is sealed under pre-formed metal crowns without any caries removal, tooth preparation, or local anesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare HT clinical/radiographic failure rates with General Dental Practitioners' (GDPs) standard (control) restorations. We conducted a split-mouth, randomized control trial (132 children, aged 3-10 yrs, GDPs n = 17) in Scotland. There were 264 study teeth with initial lesions, 42% of which were radiographically > half-way into dentin, and 67% of which had Class II restorations. Teeth were randomized to HT (intervention) or GDPs' usual treatment (control). Annual clinical/radiographic follow-up data were recorded. Ninety-one patients (69%) had 48 months' minimum follow-up. At 60 months, 'Major' failures (irreversible pulpitis, loss of vitality, abscess, or unrestorable tooth) were recorded: HT, 3 (3%); control restorations, 15 (16.5%) (p = 0.000488; NNT 8); and 'Minor' failures (reversible pulpitis, restoration loss/wear/fracture; or secondary caries): HT, 4 (5%); control restorations, 38 (42%) (p < 0.000001; NNT 3). Overall, there were follow-up data for 130 patients (2-60 mos): 'Major' failures: HT, 3 (2%); control restorations, 22 (17%) (p = 0.000004; NNT 7); and 'Minor' failures, HT, 7 (5%); control restorations, 60 (46%) (p < 0.000001; NNT 3). Sealing in caries by the Hall Technique statistically, and clinically, significantly outperformed GDPs' standard restorations in the long term (Trial registration no. ISRCTN 47267892). PMID:21921249

  2. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  3. BST-CarGel® Treatment Maintains Cartilage Repair Superiority over Microfracture at 5 Years in a Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    Shive, Matthew S.; Stanish, William D; McCormack,Robert; Forriol, Francisco; Mohtadi, Nicholas; Pelet, Stéphane; Desnoyers, Jacques; Méthot, Stéphane; Vehik, Kendra; Restrepo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objective The efficacy and safety of BST-CarGel®, a chitosan scaffold for cartilage repair was compared with microfracture alone at 1 year during a multicenter randomized controlled trial in the knee. This report was undertaken to investigate 5-year structural and clinical outcomes. Design The international randomized controlled trial enrolled 80 patients, aged 18 to 55 years, with grade III or IV focal lesions on the femoral condyles. Patients were randomized to receive BST-CarGel® treatment...

  4. Deferiprone versus deferoxamine in sickle cell disease: results from a 5-year long-term Italian multi-center randomized clinical trial.

    Calvaruso, Giusi; Vitrano, Angela; Di Maggio, Rosario; Ballas, Samir; Steinberg, Martin H; Rigano, Paolo; Sacco, Massimiliano; Telfer, Paul; Renda, Disma; Barone, Rita; Maggio, Aurelio

    2014-12-01

    Blood transfusion and iron chelation currently represent a supportive therapy to manage anemia, vasculopathy and vaso-occlusion crises in Sickle-Cell-Disease. Here we describe the first 5-year long-term randomized clinical trial comparing Deferiprone versus Deferoxamine in patients with Sickle-Cell-Disease. The results of this study show that Deferiprone has the same effectiveness as Deferoxamine in decreasing body iron burden, measured as repeated measurements of serum ferritin concentrations on the same patient over 5-years and analyzed according to the linear mixed-effects model (LMM) (p=0.822). Both chelators are able to decrease, significantly, serum ferritin concentrations, during 5-years, without any effect on safety (p=0.005). Moreover, although the basal serum ferritin levels were higher in transfused compared with non-transfused group (p=0.031), the changes over time in serum ferritin levels were not statistically significantly different between transfused and non-transfused cohort of patients (p=0.389). Kaplan-Meier curve, during 5-years of study, suggests that Deferiprone does not alter survival in comparison with Deferoxamine (p=0.38). In conclusion, long-term iron chelation therapy with Deferiprone was associated with efficacy and safety similar to that of Deferoxamine. Therefore, in patients with Sickle-Cell-Disease, Deferiprone may represent an effective long-term treatment option. PMID:24814618

  5. Randomized Comparison of Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) with Surgical Treatment in Patients with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids (REST Trial): Subanalysis of 5-Year MRI Findings

    Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy, E-mail: ganapathy.ananthakrishnan@nhs.net [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Murray, Lilian, E-mail: Lilian.murray@glasgow.ac.uk [Vital Statistics (United Kingdom); Ritchie, Moira, E-mail: moira.ritchie@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Murray, Gordon, E-mail: Gordon.murray@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Department of Medical Statistics (United Kingdom); Bryden, Fiona, E-mail: Fiona.bryden@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Stobhill Hospital (United Kingdom); Lassman, Sue, E-mail: sue.lassman@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom); Lumsden, Mary Ann, E-mail: Maryann.lumsden@glasgow.ac.uk [Room 12, Level 4, Walton Building, Department of Medical Education and Gynaecology, Reproductive and Maternal Medicine (United Kingdom); Moss, Jon G., E-mail: jon.moss@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Gartnavel General Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To report 5-year contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings of the REST trial recruits who underwent either uterine artery embolization (UAE) or myomectomy. Methods. A total of 157 patients were randomized to UAE or surgery (hysterectomy or myomectomy). Ninety-nine patients who had UAE and eight patients who had myomectomy were analyzed. MRI scans at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years were independently interpreted by two radiologists. Dominant fibroid diameter, uterine volume, total fibroid infarction (complete 100 %, almost complete 90-99 %, partial <90 %), and new fibroid formation were the main parameters assessed and related to the need for reintervention. Results. In the UAE group, mean {+-} standard deviation uterine volume was 670 {+-} 503, 422 {+-} 353, and 292 {+-} 287 mL at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years, respectively. Mean dominant fibroid diameter was 7.6 {+-} 3.0, 5.8 {+-} 2.9, and 5 {+-} 2.9 cm at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years. Fibroid infarction at 6 months was complete in 35 % of women, almost complete in 29 %, and partial in 36 %. Need for reintervention was 19, 10, and 33 % in these groups, respectively (p = 0.123). No myomectomy cases had further intervention. At 5 years, the prevalence of new fibroid was 60 % in the myomectomy group and 7 % in the UAE group (p = 0.008). Conclusion. There is a further significant reduction in both uterine volume and dominant fibroid diameter between 6 months and 5 years after UAE. Complete fibroid infarction does not translate into total freedom from a subsequent reintervention. New fibroid formation is significantly higher after myomectomy.

  6. Randomized Comparison of Uterine Artery Embolization (UAE) with Surgical Treatment in Patients with Symptomatic Uterine Fibroids (REST Trial): Subanalysis of 5-Year MRI Findings

    Purpose. To report 5-year contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging findings of the REST trial recruits who underwent either uterine artery embolization (UAE) or myomectomy. Methods. A total of 157 patients were randomized to UAE or surgery (hysterectomy or myomectomy). Ninety-nine patients who had UAE and eight patients who had myomectomy were analyzed. MRI scans at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years were independently interpreted by two radiologists. Dominant fibroid diameter, uterine volume, total fibroid infarction (complete 100 %, almost complete 90–99 %, partial <90 %), and new fibroid formation were the main parameters assessed and related to the need for reintervention. Results. In the UAE group, mean ± standard deviation uterine volume was 670 ± 503, 422 ± 353, and 292 ± 287 mL at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years, respectively. Mean dominant fibroid diameter was 7.6 ± 3.0, 5.8 ± 2.9, and 5 ± 2.9 cm at baseline, 6 months, and 5 years. Fibroid infarction at 6 months was complete in 35 % of women, almost complete in 29 %, and partial in 36 %. Need for reintervention was 19, 10, and 33 % in these groups, respectively (p = 0.123). No myomectomy cases had further intervention. At 5 years, the prevalence of new fibroid was 60 % in the myomectomy group and 7 % in the UAE group (p = 0.008). Conclusion. There is a further significant reduction in both uterine volume and dominant fibroid diameter between 6 months and 5 years after UAE. Complete fibroid infarction does not translate into total freedom from a subsequent reintervention. New fibroid formation is significantly higher after myomectomy.

  7. Effect of Breastfeeding Promotion on Early Childhood Caries and Breastfeeding Duration among 5 Year Old Children in Eastern Uganda: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Nancy Birungi

    Full Text Available Although several studies have shown short term health benefits of exclusive breastfeeding (EBF, its long term consequences have not been studied extensively in low-income contexts. This study assessed the impact of an EBF promotion initiative for 6 months on early childhood caries (ECC and breastfeeding duration in children aged 5 years in Mbale, Eastern Uganda.Participants were recruited from the Ugandan site of the PROMISE- EBF cluster randomised trial (ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT00397150. A total of 765 pregnant women from 24 clusters were included in the ratio 1:1 to receive peer counselled promotion of EBF as the intervention or standard of care. At the 5 year follow-up, ECC was recorded under field conditions using the World Health Organization's decayed missing filled tooth (dmft index. Adjusted negative binomial and linear regression were used in the analysis.Mean breastfeeding duration in the intervention and control groups (n=417 were 21.8 (CI 20.7-22.9 and 21.3(CI 20.7-21.9 months, respectively. The mean dmft was 1.5 (standard deviation [SD] 2.9 and 1.7 (SD 2.9 in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Corresponding prevalence estimates of ECC were 38% and 41%. Negative binomial regression analysis adjusted for cluster effects and loss-to-follow-up by inverse probability weights (IPW showed an incidence-rate ratio (IRR of 0.91 (95% CI 0.65-1.2. Comparing the effect of the trial arm on breastfeeding duration showed a difference in months of 0.48 (-0.72 to 1.7.PROMISE EBF trial did not impact on early childhood caries or breastfeeding duration at 5 years of age. This study contributes to the body of evidence that promotion of exclusive breastfeeding does not raise oral health concerns. However, the high burden of caries calls for efforts to improve the oral health condition in this setting.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00397150.

  8. Breast-Conserving Treatment With Partial or Whole Breast Irradiation for Low-Risk Invasive Breast Carcinoma-5-Year Results of a Randomized Trial

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a randomized study comparing the survival and cosmetic results of breast-conserving treatment with partial breast irradiation (PBI) or conventional whole breast irradiation (WBI). Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 258 selected patients with T1 N0-1mi, Grade 1-2, nonlobular breast cancer without presence of extensive intraductal component and resected with negative margins were randomized after breast-conserving surgery to receive 50 Gy/25 fractions WBI (n = 130) or PBI (n = 128). The latter consisted of either 7 x 5.2 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) multicatheter brachytherapy (BT; n = 88) or 50 Gy/25 fractions electron beam (EB) irradiation (n = 40). Results: At a median follow-up of 66 months, the 5-year actuarial rate of local recurrence was 4.7% and 3.4% in the PBI and WBI arms, respectively (p = 0.50). There was no significant difference in the 5-year probability of overall survival (94.6% vs. 91.8%), cancer-specific survival (98.3% vs. 96.0%), and disease-free survival (88.3% vs. 90.3%). The rate of excellent to good cosmetic result was 77.6% in the PBI group (81.2% after HDR BT; 70.0% after EB) and 62.9% in the control group (52.2% after telecobalt; 65.6% after 6-9-MV photons; pWBI/PBI = 0.009). Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using interstitial HDR implants or EB to deliver radiation to the tumor bed alone for a selected group of early-stage breast cancer patients produces 5-year results similar to those achieved with conventional WBI. Significantly better cosmetic outcome can be achieved with carefully designed HDR multicatheter implants compared with the outcome after WBI

  9. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia; Bertelsen, Mette

    BACKGROUND: The effects of hospital-based rehabilitation including weekly supportive psychodynamic therapy compared with specialized assertive intervention and standard treatment has not previously been investigated in first-episode psychosis. The aim of the study was to examine long-term effect on...... special part of the Copenhagen OPUS trial and randomized to either the specialized assertive intervention program (OPUS), standard treatment or hospital-based rehabilitation. RESULTS: It was a stable pattern that patients randomized to hospital-based rehabilitation spent more days in psychiatric wards and...... in supported housing throughout the 5-year follow-up period compared with the two other groups. Patients in OPUS treatment spent significantly fewer days in psychiatric wards and supported housing in the first 3 years compared with patients in hospital-based rehabilitation. Due to attrition and small...

  10. Evaluation of two formulations of adjuvanted RTS, S malaria vaccine in children aged 3 to 5 years living in a malaria-endemic region of Mozambique: a Phase I/IIb randomized double-blind bridging trial

    Mandomando Inacio

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous trials of the RTS, S malaria candidate vaccine have shown that this vaccine is safe, tolerated and immunogenic. The development plan for this vaccine aims at administering it in the first year of life through the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI. The objective was to evaluate the safety and reactogenicity of RTS, S/AS02D (0.5 ml dose, a pediatric formulation of GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals' current malaria candidate vaccine RTS, S/AS02A (0.25 ml dose. A 0.5 ml dose of AS02D is composed of the same active ingredients in the same quantities as in a 0.25 ml dose of AS02A and has been developed to be easily introduced into routine EPI practices. Methods We performed a phase I/IIb randomized double-blind bridging study in a malaria-endemic region of Mozambique, to compare the safety and immunogenicity of both candidate vaccines with the aim of replacing RTS, S/AS02A with RTS, S/AS02D as the candidate pediatric vaccine. 200 Mozambican children aged 3 to 5 years were randomized 1:1 to receive one of the 2 vaccines according to a 0, 1, 2 month schedule. Results Both vaccines were safe and had similar reactogenicity profiles. All subjects with paired pre and post-vaccination samples showed a vaccine response with respect to anti-circumsporozoite (CS antibodies irrespective of initial anti-CS serostatus. Geometric mean titers (GMTs were 191 EU/ml (95% CI 150–242 in recipients of RTS, S/AS02D compared to 180 EU/ml (95% CI 146–221 in recipients of RTS, S/AS02A. For the anti-hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, all subjects were seroprotected at day 90, and the GMTs were 23978 mIU/ml (95% CI 17896–32127 in RTS, S/AS02D recipients and 17410 mIU/ml (95% CI 13322–22752 in RTS, S/AS02A recipients. There was a decrease in anti-CS GMTs between months 3 and 14 in both groups (191 vs 22 EU/mL in RTS, S/AS02D group and 180 vs 29 EU/mL in RTS, S/AS02A group. Conclusion Our data show that the RTS, S/AS02D is safe, well tolerated

  11. Deinstitutionalization revisited: a 5-year follow-up of a randomized clinical trial of hospital-based rehabilitation versus specialized assertive intervention (OPUS) versus standard treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    Nordentoft, Merete; Øhlenschlæger, Johan; Thorup, Anne Amalie Elgaard; Petersen, Lone; Jeppesen, Pia; Bertelsen, Mette

    BACKGROUND: The effects of hospital-based rehabilitation including weekly supportive psychodynamic therapy compared with specialized assertive intervention and standard treatment has not previously been investigated in first-episode psychosis. The aim of the study was to examine long-term effect on...... special part of the Copenhagen OPUS trial and randomized to either the specialized assertive intervention program (OPUS), standard treatment or hospital-based rehabilitation. RESULTS: It was a stable pattern that patients randomized to hospital-based rehabilitation spent more days in psychiatric wards and...

  12. Final 5-Year Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Everolimus- and Paclitaxel-Eluting Stents for Coronary Revascularization in Daily Practice the COMPARE Trial (A Trial of Everolimus-Eluting Stents and Paclitaxel Stents for Coronary Revascularization in Daily Practice)

    P.C. Smits (Pieter); G.J. Vlachojannis (Georgios J.); E.P. McFadden (Eugene); K.-J. Royaards; J. Wassing (Jochem); K.S. Joesoef; C.A.G. van Mieghem (Carlos); M. van der Ent (Martin)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives This study sought to report the 5-year outcomes of everolimus-eluting stents (EES) and paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) in an all-comers population undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Background The medium-term 1 and 2-year results of the prospective randomized

  13. Hormone replacement therapy dissociates fat mass and bone mass, and tends to reduce weight gain in early postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled 5-year clinical trial of the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study

    Jensen, L B; Vestergaard, P; Hermann, A P; Gram, J; Eiken, Pia Agnete; Abrahamsen, Bo; Brot, C; Kolthoff, Niels-Ulrik; Sørensen, O H; Beck-Nielsen, H; Nielsen, S Pors; Charles, P; Mosekilde, Leif

    2003-01-01

    menopause. Fat gain protects against bone loss in untreated women but not in HRT-treated women. The data suggest that women's attitudes to HRT are more positive if they have low body weight, but there is no evidence that the conclusions in this study are skewed by selection bias....... in women randomized to HRT (1.94 +/- 4.86 kg) than in women randomized to no HRT (2.57 +/- 4.63, p = 0.046). A similar pattern was seen in the group receiving HRT or not by their own choice. The smaller weight gain in women on HRT was almost entirely caused by a lesser gain in fat. The main...... determinant of the weight gain was a decline in physical fitness. Women opting for HRT had a significantly lower body weight at inclusion than the other participants, but the results in the self-selected part of the study followed the pattern found in the randomized part. The change in fat mass was the...

  14. Randomized clinical trial

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam;

    2015-01-01

    : The study was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial in healthy males. Esophageal electrical, thermal, mechanical, and chemical stimulations were performed, pain perception was rated, and referred pain areas were drawn. Sensitization was induced by intraluminal esophageal acid...

  15. Long-term (5 year) safety of bronchial thermoplasty: Asthma Intervention Research (AIR) trial.

    Thomson, NC; Rubin, AS; Niven, RM; Corris, PA; Siersted, HC; Olivenstein, R.; Pavord, ID; McCormack, D.; Laviolette, M.; Shargill, NS; Cox, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a bronchoscopic procedure that improves asthma control by reducing excess airway smooth muscle. Treated patients have been followed out to 5 years to evaluate long-term safety of this procedure. METHODS: Patients enrolled in the Asthma Intervention Research Trial were on inhaled corticosteroids ≥200 μg beclomethasone or equivalent + long-acting-beta2-agonists and demonstrated worsening of asthma on long-acting-β2-agonist withdrawal. Following initial...

  16. Long term (5 Year) safety of bronchial thermoplasty: Asthma Intervention Research (AIR) trial

    Thomson, N C; Rubin, A.S.; Niven, R. M.; Corris, P A; Siersted, H. C.; Olivenstein, R.; Pavord, I.D.; McCormick, D.; Laviolette, M.; Shargill, N.S.; Cox, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a bronchoscopic procedure that improves asthma control by reducing excess airway smooth muscle. Treated patients have been followed out to 5 years to evaluate long-term safety of this procedure. Methods: Patients enrolled in the Asthma Intervention Research Trial were on inhaled corticosteroids ≥200 μg beclomethasone or equivalent + long-acting-beta2-agonists and demonstrated worsening of asthma on long-acting-β2-agonist withdrawal. ...

  17. a randomized, controlled trial

    Reinecke, Franziska

    2010-01-01

    The polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by hyperandrogenism and associated with obesity and impaired glucose metabolism. Despite the high prevalence of PCOS and the considerable clinical impact, the precise interplay between metabolism and hyperandrogenemia is not entirely clear. To analyse the effects of intravenous lipid and heparin infusion on circulating androgen levels in healthy women, we performed a randomized controlled cross-over trial. 12 healthy young women durin...

  18. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the Occluded Artery Trial: Procedural success, hazard, and outcomes over 5 years

    Buller, C; Rankin, J.; Carere, R; P. Buszman; Pfisterer, M.; Dzavik, V; Thomas, B.; Forman, S.; Ruzyllo, W; Mancini, G.; Michalis, L; de Abreu, G.; Lamas, G.; Hochman, J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Occluded Artery Trial (OAT) was a 2,201-patient randomized clinical trial comparing routine stent-based percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) versus optimal medical therapy alone in stable myocardial infarction (MI) survivors with persistent infarct-related artery occlusion identified day 3 to 28 post MI. Intent-to-treat analysis showed no difference between strategies with respect to the incidence of new class IV congestive heart failure, MI, or death. The influence of PCI...

  19. Docetaxel- and 5-FU-concurrent radiotherapy in patients presenting unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a FNCLCC-ACCORD/0201 randomized phase II trial's pre-planned analysis and case report of a 5.5-year disease-free survival

    To explore possible improvement in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) we performed a randomized, non-comparative phase II study evaluating docetaxel - plus either daily continuous 5 FU or weekly cisplatin concurrent to radiotherapy. We report here the results of the docetaxel plus 5 FU regimen stopped according to the interim analysis. The docetaxel plus cisplatin arm was continued. Forty (40) chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable LAPC were randomly assigned (1:1) to either continuous fluorouracil (5-FU) 200 mg/m2/day (protracted IV) and docetaxel (DCT) 20 mg/m2/week or DCT 20 mg/m2 and cisplatin (CDDP) 20 mg/m2, plus concurrent radiotherapy for a period of 6 weeks. The radiation dose to the primary tumor was 54 Gy in 30 fractions. The trial's primary endpoint was the 6-month crude non-progression rate (NPR). Secondary endpoints were tolerance, objective response rate, and overall survival. Accrual was to be stopped if at 6 months more than 13 disease progressions were observed in 20 patients. Eighteen (18) progressions occurred at 6 months in the 5-FU-DCT arm. Six-month NPR was 10% (95%CI: 0-23). Six and 12-month survivals were 85% (95%CI: 64-95) and 40% (95%CI: 22-61); median overall survival was 10.1 months. Median progression-free survival was 4.3 months. We report the case of one patient who was amenable to surgery and has been in complete response (CR) for 5.5 years. Toxicities grade ≥ 3 were reported in 75% of patients; no treatment-related death occurred. Severe toxicities were mainly vomiting (35%), abdominal pain (10%) and fatigue (10%). Combination of 5-FU, docetaxel and radiotherapy has inadequate efficacy in the treatment of LAPC despite good tolerance for the 5-FU-DCT regimen.

  20. Registration of randomized clinical trials

    Østervig, R M; Sonne, A; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    the proportion of correctly registered randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in Acta from 2009 to 2014. METHODS: We manually searched all Acta issues from 2009 to 2014 for RCTs. Information about timing of data collection and registration in trial registries was extracted. We classified RCTs as correctly...... starting enrolment before 2010 to 63.2% after 2010 (24/38, P randomized controlled trials from Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica were not adequately registered but the requirement of trial registration has...

  1. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations. A 5-year randomized controlled clinical study

    Dijken, Jan WVvan; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using slightly modified......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate in a randomized controlled study the 5-year clinical durability of a flowable resin composite bulk-fill technique in Class I and Class II restorations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 38 pairs Class I and 62 pairs Class II restorations were placed in 44 male and 42 female (mean age 52.......4 years). Each patient received at least two, as similar as possible, extended Class I or Class II restorations. In all cavities, a 1-step self-etch adhesive (Xeno V+) was applied. Randomized, one of the cavities of each pair received the flowable bulk-filled resin composite (SDR), in increments up to 4mm...

  2. Randomized clinical trials in HEPATOLOGY

    Kjaergard, L L; Nikolova, D; Gluud, C

    1999-01-01

    Evidence shows that the quality of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) affects estimates of intervention efficacy, which is significantly exaggerated in low-quality trials. The present study examines the quality of all 235 RCTs published in HEPATOLOGY from the initiation in 1981 through August 1998...

  3. Intranasal LH-RH treatment of cryptorchidism. A clinical trial and 5 years follow-up

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Mauritzen, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of intranasal LH-RH on cryptorchidism was investigated in 45 prepubertal boys with 68 undescended testes. A daily dose of 1.2 mg LH-RH was given for 4 weeks. A total of 16 testes (24%) descended. Follow-up examination 5 years later showed that relapse had occurred in two cases. Fifty-t...

  4. Implant-supported mandibular overdentures retained with ball or bar attachments: a randomized prospective 5-year study

    Gotfredsen, K; Holm, B

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the periimplant conditions and the maintenance requirements for implant-supported overdentures in the mandible retained with ball or bar attachments during a 5-year period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-six completely edentulous patients had two...... Astra Tech dental implants placed in the anterior part of the mandible. The denture attachment system for the patients was chosen randomly by drawing lots. Eleven patients drew the bar attachment system and fifteen patients drew the ball attachment system. Plaque Index, Gingival Index, and probing...... differences were registered. The mean frequency of complications/repairs per patient per year was 1.0 in the bar group and 0.6 in the ball group during the 5-year observation period. CONCLUSION: Two implants with ball or bar attachment supported an overdenture in the mandible for 5 years with a 100% survival...

  5. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were...

  6. TP53 mutational status and cetuximab benefit in rectal cancer: 5-year results of the EXPERT-C trial.

    Sclafani, Francesco; Gonzalez, David; Cunningham, David; Hulkki Wilson, Sanna; Peckitt, Clare; Tabernero, Josep; Glimelius, Bengt; Cervantes, Andrés; Dewdney, Alice; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Brown, Gina; Tait, Diana; Oates, Jacqueline; Chau, Ian

    2014-07-01

    In this updated analysis of the EXPERT-C trial we show that, in magnetic resonance imaging-defined, high-risk, locally advanced rectal cancer, adding cetuximab to a treatment strategy with neoadjuvant CAPOX followed by chemoradiotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant CAPOX is not associated with a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in both KRAS/BRAF wild-type and unselected patients. In a retrospective biomarker analysis, TP53 was not prognostic but emerged as an independent predictive biomarker for cetuximab benefit. After a median follow-up of 65.0 months, TP53 wild-type patients (n = 69) who received cetuximab had a statistically significant better PFS (89.3% vs 65.0% at 5 years; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.23; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07 to 0.78; two-sided P = .02 by Cox regression) and OS (92.7% vs 67.5% at 5 years; HR = 0.16; 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.70; two-sided P = .02 by Cox regression) than TP53 wild-type patients who were treated in the control arm. An interaction between TP53 status and cetuximab effect was found (P < .05) and remained statistically significant after adjusting for statistically significant prognostic factors and KRAS. PMID:24957073

  7. Effects of a Randomized Reading Intervention Study Aimed at 9-Year-Olds: A 5-Year Follow-up.

    Wolff, Ulrika

    2016-05-01

    The present paper reports on a 5-year follow-up of a randomized reading intervention in grade 3 in Sweden. An intervention group (n = 57) received daily training for 12 weeks in phoneme/grapheme mapping, reading comprehension and reading speed, whereas a control group (n = 55) participated in ordinary classroom activities. The main aim was to investigate if there were remaining effects of the intervention on reading-related skills. Previous analyses showed that the intervention group performed significantly better than the control group on spelling, reading speed, reading comprehension and phoneme awareness at the immediate post-test with sustained effects 1 year later. Results from the 5-year follow-up show that the only significant difference between the intervention (n = 47) and the control group (n = 37) was on word decoding. There was also a significant interaction effect of group assignment and initial word decoding, in the way that the lowest-performing students benefitted the most from the intervention. Another aim was to examine if the children identified in a screening (n = 2212) as poor readers in grade 2 still performed worse than typical readers. The analyses showed that the typically developing students (n = 66) outperformed the students identified as poor readers in grade 2 on working memory, spelling, reading comprehension and word decoding. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27146373

  8. Randomization in clinical trials: conclusions and recommendations.

    Lachin, J M; Matts, J P; Wei, L J

    1988-12-01

    The statistical properties of simple (complete) randomization, permuted-block (or simply blocked) randomization, and the urn adaptive biased-coin randomization are summarized. These procedures are contrasted to covariate adaptive procedures such as minimization and to response adaptive procedures such as the play-the-winner rule. General recommendations are offered regarding the use of complete, permuted-block, or urn randomization. In a large double-masked trial, any of these procedures may be acceptable. For a given trial, the relative merits of each procedure should be carefully weighed in relation to the characteristics of the trial. Important considerations are the size of the trial, overall as well as within the smallest subgroup to be employed in a subgroup-specific analysis, whether or not the trial is to be masked, and the resources needed to perform the proper randomization-based permutational analysis. PMID:3203526

  9. Causal Mediation Analyses for Randomized Trials

    Lynch, Kevin G.; Cary, Mark; Gallop, Robert; Ten Have, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of randomized intervention trials, we describe causal methods for analyzing how post-randomization factors constitute the process through which randomized baseline interventions act on outcomes. Traditionally, such mediation analyses have been undertaken with great caution, because they assume that the mediating factor is also randomly assigned to individuals in addition to the randomized baseline intervention (i.e., sequential ignorability). Because the mediating factors are t...

  10. Maximizing scientific knowledge from randomized clinical trials

    Gustafsson, Finn; Atar, Dan; Pitt, Bertram;

    2010-01-01

    Trialists have an ethical and financial responsibility to plan and conduct clinical trials in a manner that will maximize the scientific knowledge gained from the trial. However, the amount of scientific information generated by randomized clinical trials in cardiovascular medicine is highly...... variable. Generation of trial databases and/or biobanks originating in large randomized clinical trials has successfully increased the knowledge obtained from those trials. At the 10th Cardiovascular Trialist Workshop, possibilities and pitfalls in designing and accessing clinical trial databases were...... discussed by a group of trialists. This review focuses on the arguments for conducting posttrial database studies and presents examples of studies in which posttrial knowledge generation has been substantial. Possible strategies to ensure successful trial database or biobank generation are discussed, in...

  11. Randomization in substance abuse clinical trials

    Woolson Robert F; Hedden Sarra L; Malcolm Robert J

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background A well designed randomized clinical trial rates as the highest level of evidence for a particular intervention's efficacy. Randomization, a fundamental feature of clinical trials design, is a process invoking the use of probability to assign treatment interventions to patients. In general, randomization techniques pursue the goal of providing objectivity to the assignment of treatments, while at the same time balancing for treatment assignment totals and covariate distribu...

  12. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations...

  13. Blinding in randomized clinical trials: imposed impartiality

    Hróbjartsson, A; Boutron, I

    2011-01-01

    Blinding, or "masking," is a crucial method for reducing bias in randomized clinical trials. In this paper, we review important methodological aspects of blinding, emphasizing terminology, reporting, bias mechanisms, empirical evidence, and the risk of unblinding. Theoretical considerations and...

  14. 'Be active, eat right', evaluation of an overweight prevention protocol among 5-year-old children: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Veldhuis Lydian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has at least doubled in the past 25 years with a major impact on health. In 2005 a prevention protocol was developed applicable within Youth Health Care. This study aims to assess the effects of this protocol on prevalence of overweight and health behaviour among children. Methods and design A cluster randomised controlled trial is conducted among 5-year-old children included by 44 Youth Health Care teams randomised within 9 Municipal Health Services. The teams are randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The teams measure the weight and height of all children. When a child in the intervention group is detected with overweight according to the international age and gender specific cut-off points of BMI, the prevention protocol is applied. According to this protocol parents of overweight children are invited for up to three counselling sessions during which they receive personal advice about a healthy lifestyle, and are motivated for and assisted in behavioural change. The primary outcome measures are Body Mass Index and waist circumference of the children. Parents will complete questionnaires to assess secondary outcome measures: levels of overweight inducing/reducing behaviours (i.e. being physically active, having breakfast, drinking sweet beverages and watching television/playing computer games, parenting styles, parenting practices, and attitudes of parents regarding these behaviours, health-related quality of life of the children, and possible negative side effects of the prevention protocol. Data will be collected at baseline (when the children are aged 5 years, and after 12 and 24 months of follow-up. Additionally, a process and a cost-effectiveness evaluation will be conducted. Discussion In this study called 'Be active, eat right' we evaluate an overweight prevention protocol for use in the setting of Youth Health Care. It is hypothesized that the

  15. Cluster Randomized Trials with Treatment Noncompliance

    Jo, Booil; Asparouhov, Tihomir; Muthen, Bengt O.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.; Brown, C. Hendricks

    2008-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) have been widely used in field experiments treating a cluster of individuals as the unit of randomization. This study focused particularly on situations where CRTs are accompanied by a common complication, namely, treatment noncompliance or, more generally, intervention nonadherence. In CRTs, compliance may be…

  16. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    Saghaei Mahmood

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over different aspects of randomization in parallel group trials, including output type and format, structure and ordering of generated unique identifiers and enabling users to specify group names for more than two groups. Results The program has different settings for: simple and blocked randomizations; length, format and ordering of generated unique identifiers; type and format of program output; and saving sessions for future use. A formatted random list generated by this program can be used directly (without further formatting by the coordinator of the research team to prepare and encode different drugs or instruments necessary for the parallel group trial. Conclusions Random Allocation Software enables users to control different attributes of the random allocation sequence and produce qualified lists for parallel group trials.

  17. Randomization in substance abuse clinical trials

    Woolson Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A well designed randomized clinical trial rates as the highest level of evidence for a particular intervention's efficacy. Randomization, a fundamental feature of clinical trials design, is a process invoking the use of probability to assign treatment interventions to patients. In general, randomization techniques pursue the goal of providing objectivity to the assignment of treatments, while at the same time balancing for treatment assignment totals and covariate distributions. Numerous randomization techniques, each with varying properties of randomness and balance, are suggested in the statistical literature. This paper reviews common randomization techniques often used in substance abuse research and an application from a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA-funded clinical trial in substance abuse is used to illustrate several choices an investigator faces when designing a clinical trial. Results Comparisons and contrasts of randomization schemes are provided with respect to deterministic and balancing properties. Specifically, Monte Carlo simulation is used to explore the balancing nature of randomization techniques for moderately sized clinical trials. Results demonstrate large treatment imbalance for complete randomization with less imbalance for the urn or adaptive scheme. The urn and adaptive randomization methods display smaller treatment imbalance as demonstrated by the low variability of treatment allocation imbalance. For all randomization schemes, covariate imbalance between treatment arms was small with little variation between adaptive schemes, stratified schemes and unstratified schemes given that sample sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion We develop this paper with the goal of reminding substance abuse researchers of the broad array of randomization options available for clinical trial designs. There may be too quick a tendency for substance abuse researchers to implement the fashionable urn

  18. The DAHANCA 6 randomized trial

    Lyhne, Nina M; Primdahl, Hanne; Kristensen, Claus A; Andersen, Elo; Johansen, Jørgen; Andersen, Lisbeth J; Evensen, Jan; Mortensen, Hanna R; Overgaard, Jens

    2015-01-01

    explored. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Six hundred and ninety-four patients with non-metastatic glottic SCC were randomized between six or five weekly fractions (fx/w) of radiotherapy to the same total dose. The median treatment time was 38 and 46days, respectively. The primary endpoint was loco-regional failure...

  19. Bone fractures among postmenopausal patients with endocrine-responsive early breast cancer treated with 5 years of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial

    Rabaglio, M; Sun, Z; Price, K N;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To compare the incidence and timing of bone fractures in postmenopausal women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen or letrozole for endocrine-responsive early breast cancer in the Breast International Group (BIG) 1-98 trial. METHODS: We evaluated 4895 patients allocated to 5 years...... of letrozole or tamoxifen in the BIG 1-98 trial who received at least some study medication (median follow-up 60.3 months). Bone fracture information (grade, cause, site) was collected every 6 months during trial treatment. RESULTS: The incidence of bone fractures was higher among patients treated...... with letrozole [228 of 2448 women (9.3%)] versus tamoxifen [160 of 2447 women (6.5%)]. The wrist was the most common site of fracture in both treatment groups. Statistically significant risk factors for bone fractures during treatment included age, smoking history, osteoporosis at baseline, previous...

  20. Causal Mediation Analyses for Randomized Trials.

    Lynch, Kevin G; Cary, Mark; Gallop, Robert; Ten Have, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    In the context of randomized intervention trials, we describe causal methods for analyzing how post-randomization factors constitute the process through which randomized baseline interventions act on outcomes. Traditionally, such mediation analyses have been undertaken with great caution, because they assume that the mediating factor is also randomly assigned to individuals in addition to the randomized baseline intervention (i.e., sequential ignorability). Because the mediating factors are typically not randomized, such analyses are unprotected from unmeasured confounders that may lead to biased inference. We review several causal approaches that attempt to reduce such bias without assuming that the mediating factor is randomized. However, these causal approaches require certain interaction assumptions that may be assessed if there is enough treatment heterogeneity with respect to the mediator. We describe available estimation procedures in the context of several examples from the literature and provide resources for software code. PMID:19484136

  1. Randomized controlled trials of COX-2 inhibitors

    Stefansdottir, Gudrun; De Bruin, Marie L; Knol, Mirjam J;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Naproxen, ibuprofen and diclofenac are frequently used as comparators in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the safety and efficacy of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors. Different comparator doses may influence the results of RCTs. It has been hypothesized that RCTs of COX-2...

  2. 'Be active, eat right', evaluation of an overweight prevention protocol among 5-year-old children: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Veldhuis Lydian; Struijk Mirjam K; Kroeze Willemieke; Oenema Anke; Renders Carry M; Bulk-Bunschoten Anneke MW; HiraSing Remy A; Raat Hein

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has at least doubled in the past 25 years with a major impact on health. In 2005 a prevention protocol was developed applicable within Youth Health Care. This study aims to assess the effects of this protocol on prevalence of overweight and health behaviour among children. Methods and design A cluster randomised controlled trial is conducted among 5-year-old children included by 44 Youth Health Care teams randomised with...

  3. 'Be active, eat right', evaluation of an overweight prevention protocol among 5-year-old children: design of a cluster randomised controlled trial

    Veldhuis, Lydian; Struijk, Mirjam; Kroeze, Willemieke; Oenema, Anke; Renders, Carry; Bulk-Bunschoten, Anneke; Hirasing, Remy; Raat, Hein

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The prevalence of overweight and obesity in children has at least doubled in the past 25 years with a major impact on health. In 2005 a prevention protocol was developed applicable within Youth Health Care. This study aims to assess the effects of this protocol on prevalence of overweight and health behaviour among children. METHODS AND DESIGN: A cluster randomised controlled trial is conducted among 5-year-old children included by 44 Youth Health Care teams randomised...

  4. Statistical properties of randomization in clinical trials.

    Lachin, J M

    1988-12-01

    This is the first of five articles on the properties of different randomization procedures used in clinical trials. This paper presents definitions and discussions of the statistical properties of randomization procedures as they relate to both the design of a clinical trial and the statistical analysis of trial results. The subsequent papers consider, respectively, the properties of simple (complete), permuted-block (i.e., blocked), and urn (adaptive biased-coin) randomization. The properties described herein are the probabilities of treatment imbalances and the potential effects on the power of statistical tests; the permutational basis for statistical tests; and the potential for experimental biases in the assessment of treatment effects due either to the predictability of the random allocations (selection bias) or the susceptibility of the randomization procedure to covariate imbalances (accidental bias). For most randomization procedures, the probabilities of overall treatment imbalances are readily computed, even when a stratified randomization is used. This is important because treatment imbalance may affect statistical power. It is shown, however, that treatment imbalance must be substantial before power is more than trivially affected. The differences between a population versus a permutation model as a basis for a statistical test are reviewed. It is argued that a population model can only be invoked in clinical trials as an untestable assumption, rather than being formally based on sampling at random from a population. On the other hand, a permutational analysis based on the randomization actually employed requires no assumptions regarding the origin of the samples of patients studied. The large sample permutational distribution of the family of linear rank tests is described as a basis for easily conducting a variety of permutation tests. Subgroup (stratified) analyses, analyses when some data are missing, and regression model analyses are also

  5. Sentinel node biopsy in head and neck squamous cell cancer: 5-year follow-up of a European multicenter trial

    Alkureishi, Lee W T; Ross, Gary L; Shoaib, Taimur; Soutar, David S; Robertson, A Gerry; Thompson, Richard; Hunter, Keith D; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Krogdahl, Annelise; Alvarez, Julio; Barbier, Luis; Santamaria, Joseba; Poli, Tito; Sesenna, Enrico; Kovács, Adorjan F; Grünwald, Frank; Barzan, Luigi; Sulfaro, Sandro; Alberti, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Sentinel node biopsy (SNB) may represent an alternative to elective neck dissection for the staging of patients with early head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). To date, the technique has been successfully described in a number of small single-institution studies. This report describes t...... long-term follow-up of a large European multicenter trial evaluating the accuracy of the technique....

  6. Covariate-based constrained randomization of group-randomized trials.

    Moulton, Lawrence H

    2004-01-01

    Group-randomized study designs are useful when individually randomized designs are either not possible, or will not be able to estimate the parameters of interest. Blocked and/or stratified (for example, pair-matched) designs have been used, and their properties statistically evaluated by many researchers. Group-randomized trials often have small numbers of experimental units, and strong, geographically induced between-unit correlation, which increase the chance of obtaining a "bad" randomization outcome. This article describes a procedure--random selection from a list of acceptable allocations--to allocate treatment conditions in a way that ensures balance on relevant covariates. Numerous individual- and group-level covariates can be balanced using exact or caliper criteria. Simulation results indicate that this method has good frequency properties, but some care may be needed not to overly constrain the randomization. There is a trade-off between achieving good balance through a highly constrained design, and jeopardizing the appearance of impartiality of the investigator and potentially departing from the nominal Type I error. PMID:16279255

  7. Marital Status and Satisfaction Five Years Following a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Traditional versus Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

    Christensen, Andrew; Atkins, David C.; Baucom, Brian; Yi, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To follow distressed married couples for 5 years after their participation in a randomized clinical trial. Method: A total of 134 chronically and seriously distressed married couples were randomly assigned to approximately 8 months of either traditional behavioral couple therapy (TBCT; Jacobson & Margolin, 1979) or integrative…

  8. Perspectives on randomized clinical trials : the case for albuminuria

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan

    2008-01-01

    Large scale randomized clinical trials are needed to detect small but meaningful effects of new drugs. However, large scale randomized clinical trials are expensive undertakings and they are in imbalance with the scientific output. As a consequence there is a strong voice for more efficacious random

  9. A phase I/II trial of intraoperative breast radiotherapy in an Asian population: 5-year results of local control and cosmetic outcome

    To date, there are no reports of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) use with long-term follow up as a method of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in Asian countries. We initiated a prospective phase I/II clinical trial of IORT in Japan in 2007, and herein, we report the 5-year follow-up results. The following inclusion criteria were used for enrollment in the trial: (1) tumor size < 2.5 cm, (2) desire for breast-conserving surgery, (3) age >50 years, and (4) negative margins after resection. In February 2009, the eligibility criteria were changed to include only patients with sentinel lymph node-negative disease. In phase I, the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 19 Gy/fr to 21 Gy/fr, incremented by 1 Gy per step, with 3 patients in each step. Doses were escalated after all patients in the preceding cohort had completed treatment and exhibited only grade 1 or 2 toxicities at a given dose level. The recommended phase II dose was set at 21 Gy at 90 % isodose. The primary endpoint was early toxicity. Secondary endpoints were long-term efficacy and late toxicity. In addition, Hypertrophic scarring was evaluated retrospectively as a cosmetic outcome by a radiation oncologist. Between December 2007 and March 2010, 32 women with breast cancer were enrolled in the trial. The median age was 65 years (51–80 years), and the median follow-up time was 6 years. No recurrence or metastasis was observed in any patient. Grade 2 fibrosis was detected in 3 patients as an acute adverse event and in 2 patients as a late adverse event. Ten patients developed a hypertrophic scar 1 year after the IORT; the number of patients decreased to 7 in the 3 years of follow-up. The first group of female Asian patients tolerated the treatment with IORT in this Phase I/II study and remained recurrence-free for more than 5 years after treatment. However, 24 % of the patients developed hypertrophic scarring, an event that is being further examined in our ongoing multi-center Phase II

  10. Long-term safety and performance of the orbital atherectomy system for treating calcified coronary artery lesions: 5-Year follow-up in the ORBIT I trial

    Bhatt, Parloop; Parikh, Parth [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India); Patel, Apurva [Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chag, Milan; Chandarana, Anish [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India); Parikh, Roosha [Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH (United States); Parikh, Keyur, E-mail: keyur.parikh@cims.me [Care Institute of Medical Sciences (CIMS), Ahmedabad 380060, Gujarat (India)

    2015-06-15

    Background/Purpose: The ORBIT I trial, a first-in-man study, was conducted to evaluate the safety and performance of the orbital atherectomy system (OAS) in treating de novo calcified coronary lesions. Methods/Materials: Fifty patients were enrolled between May and July 2008 based on several criteria, and were treated with the OAS followed by stent placement. The safety and performance of the OAS were evaluated by procedural success, device success, and overall major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) rates, including cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI) and need for target lesion revascularization (TLR). Our institution enrolled and treated 33 of the 50 patients and continued follow-up for 5 years. Results: Average age was 54 years and 91% were males. Mean lesion length was 15.9 mm. Device success was 100%, and average number of orbital atherectomy devices (OAD) used per patient was 1.3. Stents were placed directly after OAS in 31/32 patients (96.9%). All stents (average stent per lesion 1.1) were successfully deployed with 0.3% residual stenosis. The overall cumulative MACE rate was 6.1% in-hospital, 9.1% at 30 days, 12.1% at 6 months, 15.2% at 2 years, 18.2% at 3 years and 21.2% at 5 years (4 total cardiac deaths). None of the patients had Q-wave MIs. Angiographic complications were observed in 5 patients. No flow/slow flow due to distal embolization was observed. Conclusions: The ORBIT I trial suggests that OAS treatment continues to offer a safe and effective method to change compliance of calcified coronary lesions to facilitate optimal stent placement in these difficult-to-treat patients.

  11. A Quality Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials about Erectile Dysfunction

    Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jeong Woo; Jo, Jung Ki; Kim, Kyu Shik; Lee, Seung Wook

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A low quality clinical trial could produce errors, and these errors could, in turn, distort the results of the clinical trial. To avoid applying distorted results of trials clinically, a quality analysis of clinical trials is needed. Materials and Methods We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about erectile dysfunction (ED) conducted in Korea using Medline and KoreaMed. Quality assessment of selected RCTs was performed using three assessment tools (Jadad scales, van Tulder s...

  12. The clinically-integrated randomized trial: proposed novel method for conducting large trials at low cost

    Scardino Peter T

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Randomized controlled trials provide the best method of determining which of two comparable treatments is preferable. Unfortunately, contemporary randomized trials have become increasingly expensive, complex and burdened by regulation, so much so that many trials are of doubtful feasibility. Discussion Here we present a proposal for a novel, streamlined approach to randomized trials: the "clinically-integrated randomized trial". The key aspect of our methodology is that the clinical experience of the patient and doctor is virtually indistinguishable whether or not the patient is randomized, primarily because outcome data are obtained from routine clinical data, or from short, web-based questionnaires. Integration of a randomized trial into routine clinical practice also implies that there should be an attempt to randomize every patient, a corollary of which is that eligibility criteria are minimized. The similar clinical experience of patients on- and off-study also entails that the marginal cost of putting an additional patient on trial is negligible. We propose examples of how the clinically-integrated randomized trial might be applied in four distinct areas of medicine: comparisons of surgical techniques, "me too" drugs, rare diseases and lifestyle interventions. Barriers to implementing clinically-integrated randomized trials are discussed. Conclusion The proposed clinically-integrated randomized trial may allow us to enlarge dramatically the number of clinical questions that can be addressed by randomization.

  13. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation: 5-Year Results of the German-Austrian Multicenter Phase II Trial Using Interstitial Multicatheter Brachytherapy Alone After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of accelerated partial breast irradiation on local control, side effects, and cosmesis using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy as the sole method for the adjuvant local treatment of patients with low-risk breast cancer. Methods and Materials: 274 patients with low-risk breast cancer were treated on protocol. Patients were eligible for the study if the tumor size was 35 years, hormone receptors were positive, and histologic grades were 1 or 2. Of the 274 patients, 175 (64%) received pulse-dose-rate brachytherapy (Dref = 50 Gy). and 99 (36%) received high-dose-rate brachytherapy (Dref = 32.0 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 63 months (range, 9-103). Only 8 of 274 (2.9%) patients developed an ipsilateral in-breast tumor recurrence at the time of analysis. The 5-year actuarial local recurrence-free survival probability was 98%. The 5- year overall and disease-free survival probabilities of all patients were 97% and 96%, respectively. Contralateral in-breast malignancies were detected in 2 of 274 (0.7%) patients, and distant metastases occurred in 6 of 274 (2.2%). Late side effects ≥Grade 3 (i.e., breast tissue fibrosis and telangiectasia) occurred in 1 patient (0.4%, 95%CI:0.0-2.0%) and 6 patients (2.2%, 95%CI:0.8-4.7%), respectively. Cosmetic results were good to excellent in 245 of 274 patients (90%). Conclusions: The long-term results of this prospective Phase II trial confirm that the efficacy of accelerated partial breast irradiation using multicatheter brachytherapy is comparable with that of whole breast irradiation and that late side effects are negligible.

  14. Barriers to Clinical Research Participation in a Diabetes Randomized Clinical Trial

    Yozwiak, John A; Bearman, Diane L; Strand, Trudy D.; Strasburg, Katherine R; Robiner, William N

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how barriers to research participation are perceived, affected by or interact with patient characteristics, or how they vary over the course of a clinical trial. Participants (285) in the Renin-Angiotensin System Study (RASS), a randomized clinical primary prevention study of diabetic nephropathy and retinopathy at 2 Canadiana dn 1 US university, rated potential barriers to research participation yearly for 5 years. Baseline barriers rated as most adversely affecting par...

  15. The Danish randomized lung cancer CT screening trial

    Pedersen, Jesper H; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger;

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (CT) has not yet been evaluated in randomized clinical trials, although several are underway. METHODS: In The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 4104 smokers and previous smokers from 2004 to 2006 were randomized to either...

  16. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS: We...... conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two...... optimistic estimates of effect. We pooled the differences in effect size using inverse variance random-effects meta-analysis and used metaregression to identify potential reasons for variation. RESULTS: We included 24 trials in our review. The main meta-analysis included 16 trials (involving 2854 patients...

  17. Pelvic Organ Prolapse Repair with and without Concomitant Burch Colposuspension in Incontinent Women: A Randomised Controlled Trial with at Least 5-Year Followup

    Elisabetta Costantini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to reevaluate and update the followup of a previously published randomized controlled trial (RCT on the impact of Burch Colposuspension (BC, as an anti-incontinence procedure, in patients with UI and POP, who underwent POP repair. Forty-seven women were randomly assigned to abdominal POP repair and concomitant BC (24 patients; group A or POP repair alone without any anti-incontinence procedure (23 patients; group B. Median followup was 82 months (range 60–107; from over 47 patients, 30 reached 6-year followup. Two patients were lost at followup. In group A, 2 patients showed a stage I rectocele. In group B, 2 patients had a stage I rectocele and 1 a stage II rectocele. In group A, 13/23 (56.5% were still incontinent after surgery compared with 9/22 patients (40.9% in group B (P=0.298. No significant changes were observed between the first and the current followup. The update of long-term followup confirmed that BC did not improve outcome significantly in incontinent women when they undergo POP repair.

  18. Citation bias of hepato-biliary randomized clinical trials

    Kjaergard, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether trials with a positive (i.e., statistically significant) outcome are cited more often than negative trials. We reviewed 530 randomized clinical trials on hepato-biliary diseases published in 11 English-language journals indexed in MEDLINE from 1985......-1996. From each trial, we extracted the statistical significance of the primary study outcome (positive or negative), the disease area, and methodological quality (randomization and double blinding). The number of citations during two calendar years after publication was obtained from Science Citation Index...

  19. Subjective and objective outcomes in randomized clinical trials

    Moustgaard, Helene; Bello, Segun; Miller, Franklin G;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The degree of bias in randomized clinical trials varies depending on whether the outcome is subjective or objective. Assessment of the risk of bias in a clinical trial will therefore often involve categorization of the type of outcome. Our primary aim was to examine how the concepts...... explicitly defined the terms. CONCLUSION: The terms "subjective" and "objective" are ambiguous when used to describe outcomes in randomized clinical trials. We suggest that the terms should be defined explicitly when used in connection with the assessment of risk of bias in a clinical trial...

  20. Random allocation software for parallel group randomized trials

    Saghaei Mahmood

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Typically, randomization software should allow users to exert control over the different aspects of randomization including block design, provision of unique identifiers and control over the format and type of program output. While some of these characteristics have been addressed by available software, none of them have all of these capabilities integrated into one package. The main objective of the Random Allocation Software project was to enhance the user's control over...

  1. Reported methodologic quality and discrepancies between large and small randomized trials in meta-analyses

    Kjaergard, L L; Villumsen, J; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    To explore whether reported methodologic quality affects estimated intervention effects in randomized trials and contributes to discrepancies between the results of large randomized trials and small randomized trials in meta-analyses....

  2. Randomized Clinical Trial of Interceptive and Comprehensive Orthodontics

    King, G. J.; Spiekerman, C.F.; Greenlee, G.M.; Huang, G J

    2012-01-01

    Focusing public insurance programs on interceptive orthodontics (IO) may increase access for low-income children. This report presents outcomes from a randomized clinical trial (RCT) comparing IO with comprehensive orthodontics (CO) in Medicaid patients.

  3. Randomized clinical trial of laparoscopic versus open appendicectomy

    Pedersen, Allan Gorm; Petersen, O B; Wara, P;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopy in patients with a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis has not gained wide acceptance, and its use remains controversial. METHODS: In a randomized controlled trial of laparoscopic versus open appendicectomy, 583 of 828 consecutive patients consented to participate...

  4. Pragmatic design in randomized controlled trials.

    Purgato, M; Barbui, C; Stroup, S; Adams, C

    2015-01-01

    At more than 10 years after the paper by Hotopf and colleagues regarding pragmatic trials in psychiatry, the field has evolved and is evolving further. There have been many developments in our understanding of what pragmatism really means, and excellent examples of truly pragmatic trials in psychiatry are currently available. Funders have helped encourage more emphasis on the need for such studies, but 'local' and trans-national regulations could help more. Consumers of the evidence should have a greater voice in generating the research agenda and, as this happens, the questions generated are more likely to be answered by a pragmatic approach to trials. PMID:25065958

  5. European randomized lung cancer screening trials: Post NLST

    Field, JK; Klaveren, R; Pedersen, JH;

    2013-01-01

    Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects of their ......Overview of the European randomized lung cancer CT screening trials (EUCT) is presented with regard to the implementation of CT screening in Europe; post NLST. All seven principal investigators completed a questionnaire on the epidemiological, radiological, and nodule management aspects...

  6. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-a receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) a and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-a receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  7. Effect of etanercept in polymyalgia rheumatica: a randomized controlled trial

    Kreiner, Frederik; Galbo, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR.......To elucidate in polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and the therapeutic potential of blockade with soluble TNF-α receptor, we carried out the first randomized controlled trial with etanercept in PMR....

  8. Observer bias in randomized clinical trials with measurement scale outcomes

    Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Emanuelsson, Frida;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical trials are commonly done without blinded outcome assessors despite the risk of bias. We wanted to evaluate the effect of nonblinded outcome assessment on estimated effects in randomized clinical trials with outcomes that involved subjective measurement scales. METHODS: We...... conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with both blinded and nonblinded assessment of the same measurement scale outcome. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, HighWire Press and Google Scholar for relevant studies. Two...... investigators agreed on the inclusion of trials and the outcome scale. For each trial, we calculated the difference in effect size (i.e., standardized mean difference between nonblinded and blinded assessments). A difference in effect size of less than 0 suggested that nonblinded assessors generated more...

  9. INvestigational Vertebroplasty Efficacy and Safety Trial (INVEST: a randomized controlled trial of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    Stout Lydia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment of painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures has historically been limited to several weeks of bed rest, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications, calcitonin injections, or external bracing. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (the injection of bone cement into the fractured vertebral body is a relatively new procedure used to treat these fractures. There is increasing interest to examine the efficacy and safety of percutaneous vertebroplasty and to study the possibility of a placebo effect or whether the pain relief is from local anesthetics placed directly on the bone during the vertebroplasty procedure. Methods/Designs Our goal is to test the hypothesis that patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures who undergo vertebroplasty have less disability and pain at 1 month than patients who undergo a control intervention. The control intervention is placement of local anesthesia near the fracture, without placement of cement. One hundred sixty-six patients with painful osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures will be recruited over 5 years from US and foreign sites performing the vertebroplasty procedure. We will exclude patients with malignant tumor deposit (multiple myeloma, tumor mass or tumor extension into the epidural space at the level of the fracture. We will randomly assign participants to receive either vertebroplasty or the control intervention. Subjects will complete a battery of validated, standardized measures of pain, functional disability, and health related quality of life at baseline and at post-randomization time points (days 1, 2, 3, and 14, and months 1, 3, 6, and 12. Both subjects and research interviewers performing the follow-up assessments will be blinded to the randomization assignment. Subjects will have a clinic visit at months 1 and 12. Spine X-rays will be obtained at the end of the study (month 12 to determine subsequent fracture rates. Our co

  10. The design of the run Clever randomized trial

    Ramskov, Daniel; Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Sørensen, Henrik;

    2016-01-01

    and the statistical analysis of the collected data. The aim of the Run Clever trial is to investigate if a focus on running intensity compared with a focus on running volume in a running schedule influences the overall injury risk differently. METHODS/DESIGN: The Run Clever trial is a randomized trial with a 24-week...... follow-up. Healthy recreational runners between 18 and 65 years and with an average of 1-3 running sessions per week the past 6 months are included. Participants are randomized into two intervention groups: Running schedule-I and Schedule-V. Schedule-I emphasizes a progression in running intensity...

  11. Estimating the Causal Effect of Randomization versus Treatment Preference in a Doubly Randomized Preference Trial

    Marcus, Sue M.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Pei; Shadish, William R.; Steiner, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Although randomized studies have high internal validity, generalizability of the estimated causal effect from randomized clinical trials to real-world clinical or educational practice may be limited. We consider the implication of randomized assignment to treatment, as compared with choice of preferred treatment as it occurs in real-world…

  12. Power Calculations for Binary Moderator in Cluster Randomized Trials

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Kelcey, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs), or studies in which intact groups of individuals are randomly assigned to a condition, are becoming more common in the evaluation of educational programs, policies, and practices. The website for the National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance (NCEE) reveals they have launched over 30…

  13. Summer School Effects in a Randomized Field Trial

    Zvoch, Keith; Stevens, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    This field-based randomized trial examined the effect of assignment to and participation in summer school for two moderately at-risk samples of struggling readers. Application of multiple regression models to difference scores capturing the change in summer reading fluency revealed that kindergarten students randomly assigned to summer school…

  14. The Move from Accuracy Studies to Randomized Trials in PET

    Siepe, Bettina; Hoilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Gerke, Oke;

    2014-01-01

    Since the influential study by van Tinteren et al. published in The Lancet in 2002, there have been an increasing number of diagnostic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefit of PET. If they provide valid and useful information on the benefit, these studies can play an impor......Since the influential study by van Tinteren et al. published in The Lancet in 2002, there have been an increasing number of diagnostic randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefit of PET. If they provide valid and useful information on the benefit, these studies can play...... of diagnostic randomized trials, in which PET was applied in only one arm. We covered published studies as well as registered unpublished and planned studies. We considered 3 quality indicators related to the usefulness of a trial to generate evidence for a clinical benefit: use of patient-important outcome...

  15. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    Eskes, Anne M; Brölmann, Fleur E; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2012-01-01

    The care for chronic and acute wounds is a substantial problem around the world. This has led to a plethora of products to accelerate healing. Unfortunately, the quality of studies evaluating the efficacy of such wound care products is frequently low. Randomized clinical trials are universally...... acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects, as they eliminate several sources of bias. We propose a framework for the design and conduct of future randomized clinical trials that will offer strong scientific evidence for the effectiveness of wound care interventions. While...... randomization is a necessary feature of a robust comparative study, it is not sufficient to ensure a study at low risk of bias. Randomized clinical trials should also ensure adequate allocation concealment and blinding of outcome assessors, apply intention-to-treat analysis, and use patient-oriented outcomes...

  16. Mood reactivity rather than cognitive reactivity is predictive of depressive relapse : a randomized study with 5.5-year follow-up

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D; Bockting, Claudi L H; Burger, Huibert; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W J; Ruhe, Eric; Hollon, Steven D; Schene, Aart H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The current study examined whether cognitive reactivity, cognitive extremity reactivity, and mood reactivity following mood provocation predicted relapse in depression over 5.5 years. Additionally, this study was the 1st to examine whether changes in cognitive reactivity and mood reactivi

  17. Mood Reactivity Rather than Cognitive Reactivity Is Predictive of Depressive Relapse: A Randomized Study with 5.5-Year Follow-Up

    van Rijsbergen, Gerard D.; Bockting, Claudi L. H.; Burger, Huibert; Spinhoven, Philip; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Ruhe, Henricus G.; Hollon, Steven D.; Schene, Aart H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined whether cognitive reactivity, cognitive extremity reactivity, and mood reactivity following mood provocation predicted relapse in depression over 5.5 years. Additionally, this study was the 1st to examine whether changes in cognitive reactivity and mood reactivity following preventive cognitive therapy (PCT)…

  18. A randomized lifestyle intervention with 5-year follow-up in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: pronounced short-term impact but long-term adherence problems

    Lindahl, Bernt; Nilssön, Torbjörn K; Borch-Johnsen, Knut;

    2009-01-01

    between 1995 and 2000, in 168 individuals with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and body mass index above 27 at start. The intensive intervention group (n = 83) was subjected to a 1-month residential lifestyle programme. The usual care group (n = 85) participated in a health examination ending with a...... single counselling session. Follow-up was conducted at 1, 3 and 5 years. RESULTS: At 1-year follow-up, an extensive cardio-metabolic risk factor reduction was demonstrated in the intensive intervention group, along with a 70% decrease of progress to type 2 diabetes. At 5-year follow-up, most of these...... beneficial effects had disappeared. Reported physical activity and fibre intake as well as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were still increased, and fasting insulin and proinsulin were lower. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention affected several important cardio-metabolic risk variables beneficially, and...

  19. Adjuvant radiotherapy of regional lymph nodes in breast cancer - a meta-analysis of randomized trials

    Radiotherapy (RT) improves overall survival (OS) of breast cancer patients after breast conserving surgery and after mastectomy in patients with involved lymph nodes (LN). The contribution of RT to the regional LN to this survival benefit was poorly understood. Recently, the results of three large randomized trials addressing this question have become available. The published abstracts (full publication pending) of the MA.20 (n=1832) and the EORTC 22922–10925 (EORTC) (n=4004) trial and the full publication of the French trial (n=1334) were basis of the meta-analysis. Main eligibility criteria were positive axillary LN (all trials), LN negative disease with high risk for recurrence (MA.20), and medial/central tumor location (French, EORTC). The MA.20 and the EORTC trial tested the effect of additional regional RT to the internal mammary (IM) LN and medial supraclavicular (MS) LN, whereas in the French trial all patients received RT to the MS-LN and solely RT to the IM-LN was randomized. Primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS). Regional RT of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) resulted in a significant improvement of OS (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.85 (95% CL 0.75 - 0.96)). Adding the results of the French trial and using the random effects model to respect the different design of the French trial, the effect on OS of regional radiotherapy was still significant (HR 0.88 (95% CL 0.80 - 0.97)). The absolute benefits in OS were 1.6% in the MA.20 trial at 5 years, 1.6% in the EORTC trial at 10 years, and 3.3% in the French trial at 10 years (not significant in single trials). Regional radiotherapy of the MS-LN and the IM-LN (MA.20 and EORTC) was associated with a significant improvement of DFS (HR 0.85 (95% CL 0.77 - 0.94)) and DMFS (HR 0.82 (95% CL 0.73 - 0.92)). The effect sizes were not significantly different between trials for any end point. Additional regional radiotherapy to the

  20. Qigong and Fibromyalgia: Randomized Controlled Trials and Beyond

    Jana Sawynok; Mary Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6–8 weeks) produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pai...

  1. How to Calculate Sample Size in Randomized Controlled Trial?

    ZHONG, Baoliang

    2009-01-01

    To design clinical trials, efficiency, ethics, cost effectively, research duration and sample size calculations are the key things to remember. This review highlights the statistical issues to estimate the sample size requirement. It elaborates the theory, methods and steps for the sample size calculation in randomized controlled trials. It also emphasizes that researchers should consider the study design first and then choose appropriate sample size calculation method.

  2. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Poh Catherine F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. Method/Design This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160 and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240. Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm or white light-guided surgery (control arm. The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1 the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization; or 2 further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. Discussion In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS

  3. A Randomized Trial Comparing Digital and Live Lecture Formats

    Solomon PhD, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Problem Statement and Background – Medical education is increasingly being conducted in community-based teaching sites making it difficult to provide a consistent curriculum. We conducted a randomized trial to assess whether digital lectures could replace live lectures. Methods – Students were randomized to either attending a lecture series at our main campus or viewing digital versions of the same lectures at community sites. Both groups completed an examination based on the lectures and ...

  4. Inadequate description of educational interventions in ongoing randomized controlled trials

    Pino Cécile

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The registration of clinical trials has been promoted to prevent publication bias and increase research transparency. Despite general agreement about the minimum amount of information needed for trial registration, we lack clear guidance on descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions in trial registries. We aimed to evaluate the quality of registry descriptions of non-pharmacologic interventions assessed in ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs of patient education. Methods On 6 May 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the 10 trial registries accessible through the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We included trials evaluating an educational intervention (that is, designed to teach or train patients about their own health and dedicated to participants, their family members or home caregivers. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data related to the description of the experimental intervention, the centers, and the caregivers. Results We selected 268 of 642 potentially eligible studies and appraised a random sample of 150 records. All selected trials were registered in 4 registers, mainly ClinicalTrials.gov (61%. The median [interquartile range] target sample size was 205 [100 to 400] patients. The comparator was mainly usual care (47% or active treatment (47%. A minority of records (17%, 95% CI 11 to 23% reported an overall adequate description of the intervention (that is, description that reported the content, mode of delivery, number, frequency, duration of sessions and overall duration of the intervention. Further, for most reports (59%, important information about the content of the intervention was missing. The description of the mode of delivery of the intervention was reported for 52% of studies, the number of sessions for 74%, the frequency of sessions for 58%, the duration of each session for 45% and the overall duration for 63

  5. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: A randomized trial

    Purpose: To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and materials: After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. Results: No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p < 0.05) and overall (p < 0.05) well-being. Conclusion: Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect

  6. The HAART cell phone adherence trial (WelTel Kenya1): a randomized controlled trial protocol

    Ball T Blake; Ngugi Elizabeth; Estambale Benson; Nguti Rosemary; Barasa Samson; Karanja Sarah; Habyarimana James; Jack William; Chung Michael; Ritvo Paul; Kariri Antony; Mills Edward J; Lester Richard T; Thabane Lehana; Kimani Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The objectives are to compare the effectiveness of cell phone-supported SMS messaging to standard care on adherence, quality of life, retention, and mortality in a population receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods and Design A multi-site randomized controlled open-label trial. A central randomization centre provided opaque envelopes to allocate treatments. Patients initiating ART at three comprehensive care clinics in Kenya will be randomized to ...

  7. Canadian Optically-guided approach for Oral Lesions Surgical (COOLS) trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Oral cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The 5-year survival rate ranges from 30-60%, and has remained unchanged in the past few decades. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and high recurrence of the disease. Of the patients who receive treatment, up to one third suffer from a recurrence or a second primary tumor. It is apparent that one major cause of disease recurrence is clinically unrecognized field changes which extend beyond the visible tumor boundary. We have previously developed an approach using fluorescence visualization (FV) technology to improve the recognition of the field at risk surrounding a visible oral cancer that needs to be removed and preliminary results have shown a significant reduction in recurrence rates. This paper describes the study design of a randomized, multi-centre, double blind, controlled surgical trial, the COOLS trial. Nine institutions across Canada will recruit a total of 400 patients with oral severe dysplasia or carcinoma in situ (N = 160) and invasive squamous cell carcinoma (N = 240). Patients will be stratified by participating institution and histology grade and randomized equally into FV-guided surgery (experimental arm) or white light-guided surgery (control arm). The primary endpoint is a composite of recurrence at or 1 cm within the previous surgery site with 1) the same or higher grade histology compared to the initial diagnosis (i.e., the diagnosis used for randomization); or 2) further treatment due to the presence of severe dysplasia or higher degree of change at follow-up. This is the first randomized, multi-centre trial to validate the effectiveness of the FV-guided surgery. In this paper we described the strategies, novelty, and challenges of this unique trial involving a surgical approach guided by the FV technology. The success of the trial requires training, coordination, and quality assurance across multiple sites within Canada. The COOLS trial, an example of translational research, may result in

  8. Levetiracetam in spinal cord injury pain: a randomized controlled trial

    Finnerup, N B; Grydehøj, J; Bing, J;

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover, multicenter trial. A 1-week baseline period was followed by two treatment periods of 5 weeks duration with levetiracetam increased from 500 mg b.i.d. to a maximum of 1500 mg b.i.d. separated by a 1-week washout period...

  9. Acupuncture as pain relief during delivery: a randomized controlled trial

    Borup, Lissa; Wurlitzer, Winnie; Hedegaard, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    with respect to pain intensity, birth experience, and obstetric outcome. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 607 healthy women in labor at term who received acupuncture, TENS, or traditional analgesics. Primary outcomes were the need for pharmacological and invasive methods, level of pain...

  10. Fundamentals of randomized clinical trials in wound care

    Brölmann, Fleur E; Eskes, Anne M; Sumpio, Bauer E;

    2013-01-01

    . Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are universally acknowledged as the study design of choice for comparing treatment effects. To give high-level evidence the appreciation it deserves in wound care, we propose a step-by-step reporting standard for comprehensive and transparent reporting of RCTs in wound care...

  11. Using Randomized Controlled Trials to Evaluate Interventions for Releasing Prisoners

    Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Howard, Matthew Owen; Dunnigan, Allison; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are rarely used to evaluate social and behavioral interventions designed for releasing prisoners. Objective: We use a pilot RCT of a social support intervention (Support Matters) as a case example to discuss obstacles and strategies for conducting RCT intervention evaluations that span prison and community…

  12. Teacher Awareness Program on Child Abuse: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    McGrath, Patrick; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Because teachers lack knowledge of the law, of school board policies, and of issues regarding child abuse and neglect, a professional development workshop was developed and presented to all teachers in the Ottawa Public Schools. Evaluation by a randomized controlled trial showed the workshop effective in increasing and maintaining knowledge.…

  13. Use of 'sham' radiotherapy in randomized clinical trials

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify quality trials that use sham radiotherapy in their design and review them to determine its potential value. The Cochrane Library, Pubmed and a Reference Search served as data sources. Trials were included if they met a minimum quality score of 3 on a validated assessment instrument (which assesses randomization, control and blinding) and if they compared sham radiotherapy to active treatment. External beam therapy and brachytherapy trials were considered. Twenty-six trials were identified, collectively including 2663 participants in the period of 1970-2004. All the trials studied the value of radiotherapy for treatment or prevention of benign diseases, including multiple sclerosis, coronary artery restenosis, age-related macular degeneration and Graves' ophthalmopathy. There were no trials relating to the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignancy. This review showed that it is possible to carry out sham radiotherapy with due regard for ethical concerns, with effective blinding and high levels of patient acceptance. Large sample sizes with multicentre trial designs were achievable. Although the statistical philosophy for using sham radiotherapy in trials is legitimate, it is no longer routinely used.

  14. Sequential monitoring of response-adaptive randomized clinical trials

    Zhu, Hongjian; 10.1214/10-AOS796

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials are complex and usually involve multiple objectives such as controlling type I error rate, increasing power to detect treatment difference, assigning more patients to better treatment, and more. In literature, both response-adaptive randomization (RAR) procedures (by changing randomization procedure sequentially) and sequential monitoring (by changing analysis procedure sequentially) have been proposed to achieve these objectives to some degree. In this paper, we propose to sequentially monitor response-adaptive randomized clinical trial and study it's properties. We prove that the sequential test statistics of the new procedure converge to a Brownian motion in distribution. Further, we show that the sequential test statistics asymptotically satisfy the canonical joint distribution defined in Jennison and Turnbull (\\citeyearJT00). Therefore, type I error and other objectives can be achieved theoretically by selecting appropriate boundaries. These results open a door to sequentially monitor res...

  15. The FDA-NIMH-MATRICS Guidelines for Clinical Trial Design of Cognitive-Enhancing Drugs: What Do We Know 5 Years Later?

    Buchanan, Robert W.; Keefe, Richard S. E.; Umbricht, Daniel; Green, Michael F; Laughren, Thomas; Marder, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)-Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) clinical trial guidelines for cognitive-enhancing drugs in schizophrenia and the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) were designed to facilitate novel compound development in the treatment of cognitive impairments. Several studies have recently utilized the FDA-NIMH-MATRICS guidelines and MCCB and allow an evaluation of the...

  16. A pilot trial of hyperfractionated thoracic radiation therapy with concurrent cisplatin and oral etoposide for locally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: a 5-year follow-up report

    Purpose: To improve the outcome of patients with locally advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we conducted a pilot trial of concurrent chemoradiation therapy using a cisplatin and oral etoposide regimen given concurrently with hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: In this single-institution pilot trial, we enrolled 23 patients with inoperable Stage IIIa (4) and IIIb (19) NSCLC. Treatment consisted of two cycles of chemotherapy with oral etoposide 50 mg one day alternating with 50 mg b.i.d. (50 mg/day if BSA is 2) on days 1-21 and intravenous cisplatin (40 mg/m2) on days 1 and 8 of a 28-day cycle. Radiation therapy was given twice a day (1.2 Gy per fraction), 5 days a week, to a total dose of 69.6 Gy in 58 fractions over 6 weeks. Results: Overall, 18 (78%) of the 23 patients completed the chemotherapy as planned and 21 (91%) received thoracic irradiation per protocol. One patient died of radiation pneumonitis. Fourteen (78%) of 18 evaluable patients achieved objective responses. The median survival duration was 9.3 months for all patients and 20.2 months for 15 patients who had no more than 5% weight loss. After a minimum follow-up of 5 years, five patients (1 IIIa, 4 IIIb) are still alive and disease-free, which gives an actual 5-year survival rate of 22%. Four of the five 5-year survivors were among those who completed the treatment as planned. Conclusion: This long-term survival outcome compares favorably with that of other chemoradiation therapy trials and even with those reported in multimodality trials including surgery. These results suggest that intensive concurrent chemoradiation therapy is feasible, and some patients with locally advanced inoperable NSCLC may enjoy long-term survivorship following nonsurgical therapy

  17. Impact assessment of nutritional education and motivation of mothers in food supplementation of malnourished 2-5 years old in an urban slum of Ludhiana: A field trial

    Ragini .

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Malnutrition in all its forms remains a major public health problem throughout the developing world and is an underlying factor in child mortality. India is home to 40 percent of the world’s malnourished children. 2 million children die in India, accounting for one in five child deaths in the world. More than half of these deaths could be prevented if children were well nourished.  Objectives: To assess the impact of maternal education and motivation in the nutritional supplementation of malnourished 2-5 years olds in an urban slum area of Ludhiana. Methodology: A community-based interventional study was carried out in 101 eligible children in an urban slum of Ludhiana. The mothers were given nutritional and health education and were also taught how to prepare different types of low cost energy-dense supplementary foodstuffs for the children. The results were seen in terms of continuation of the practice after educating and motivating the mothers of malnourished under-fives to provide the supplementary nutrition. The data was analyzed using Epi-Info version-6 software and SPSS version 16. Result: Post intervention showed that number of days in a month the mother gave nutritional supplement declined from mean 17.5 days to 10.5 days from first to sixth month follow up. Conclusion: Nutritional status of the children improves with continued nutrition and health education of the mothers.

  18. Using Big Data to Emulate a Target Trial When a Randomized Trial Is Not Available.

    Hernán, Miguel A; Robins, James M

    2016-04-15

    Ideally, questions about comparative effectiveness or safety would be answered using an appropriately designed and conducted randomized experiment. When we cannot conduct a randomized experiment, we analyze observational data. Causal inference from large observational databases (big data) can be viewed as an attempt to emulate a randomized experiment-the target experiment or target trial-that would answer the question of interest. When the goal is to guide decisions among several strategies, causal analyses of observational data need to be evaluated with respect to how well they emulate a particular target trial. We outline a framework for comparative effectiveness research using big data that makes the target trial explicit. This framework channels counterfactual theory for comparing the effects of sustained treatment strategies, organizes analytic approaches, provides a structured process for the criticism of observational studies, and helps avoid common methodologic pitfalls. PMID:26994063

  19. Tooth-surface-specific Effects of Xylitol: Randomized Trial Results

    Ritter, A.V.; Bader, J.D.; Leo, M. C.; Preisser, J.S.; Shugars, D.A.; Vollmer, W.M.; Amaechi, B.T.; Holland, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The Xylitol for Adult Caries Trial was a three-year, double-blind, multi-center, randomized clinical trial that evaluated the effectiveness of xylitol vs. placebo lozenges in the prevention of dental caries in caries-active adults. The purpose of this secondary analysis was to investigate whether xylitol lozenges had a differential effect on cumulative caries increments on different tooth surfaces. Participants (ages 21-80 yrs) with at least one follow-up visit (n = 620) were examined at base...

  20. Complementary feeding: a Global Network cluster randomized controlled trial

    Pasha Omrana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inadequate and inappropriate complementary feeding are major factors contributing to excess morbidity and mortality in young children in low resource settings. Animal source foods in particular are cited as essential to achieve micronutrient requirements. The efficacy of the recommendation for regular meat consumption, however, has not been systematically evaluated. Methods/Design A cluster randomized efficacy trial was designed to test the hypothesis that 12 months of daily intake of beef added as a complementary food would result in greater linear growth velocity than a micronutrient fortified equi-caloric rice-soy cereal supplement. The study is being conducted in 4 sites of the Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research located in Guatemala, Pakistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC and Zambia in communities with toddler stunting rates of at least 20%. Five clusters per country were randomized to each of the food arms, with 30 infants in each cluster. The daily meat or cereal supplement was delivered to the home by community coordinators, starting when the infants were 6 months of age and continuing through 18 months. All participating mothers received nutrition education messages to enhance complementary feeding practices delivered by study coordinators and through posters at the local health center. Outcome measures, obtained at 6, 9, 12, and 18 months by a separate assessment team, included anthropometry; dietary variety and diversity scores; biomarkers of iron, zinc and Vitamin B12 status (18 months; neurocognitive development (12 and 18 months; and incidence of infectious morbidity throughout the trial. The trial was supervised by a trial steering committee, and an independent data monitoring committee provided oversight for the safety and conduct of the trial. Discussion Findings from this trial will test the efficacy of daily intake of meat commencing at age 6 months and, if beneficial, will

  1. An evaluation of constrained randomization for the design and analysis of group-randomized trials.

    Li, Fan; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Murray, David M; Heagerty, Patrick J; DeLong, Elizabeth R

    2016-05-10

    In group-randomized trials, a frequent practical limitation to adopting rigorous research designs is that only a small number of groups may be available, and therefore, simple randomization cannot be relied upon to balance key group-level prognostic factors across the comparison arms. Constrained randomization is an allocation technique proposed for ensuring balance and can be used together with a permutation test for randomization-based inference. However, several statistical issues have not been thoroughly studied when constrained randomization is considered. Therefore, we used simulations to evaluate key issues including the following: the impact of the choice of the candidate set size and the balance metric used to guide randomization; the choice of adjusted versus unadjusted analysis; and the use of model-based versus randomization-based tests. We conducted a simulation study to compare the type I error and power of the F-test and the permutation test in the presence of group-level potential confounders. Our results indicate that the adjusted F-test and the permutation test perform similarly and slightly better for constrained randomization relative to simple randomization in terms of power, and the candidate set size does not substantially affect their power. Under constrained randomization, however, the unadjusted F-test is conservative, while the unadjusted permutation test carries the desired type I error rate as long as the candidate set size is not too small; the unadjusted permutation test is consistently more powerful than the unadjusted F-test and gains power as candidate set size changes. Finally, we caution against the inappropriate specification of permutation distribution under constrained randomization. An ongoing group-randomized trial is used as an illustrative example for the constrained randomization design. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26598212

  2. Fukushima, 5 years after

    This publication proposes an overview of the situation in Fukushima (in the plant and in its region), 5 years after the accident. As far as the plant is concerned, several issues are addressed: the withdrawal of fuel from decay pools, the management of contaminated waters, and the situation of reactors 1, 2 and 3. The radiological impact for operators is discussed in terms of radioactivity level, of occurrence of leukaemia, and of storage of radioactive wastes. The next part comments the slow return of populations and the recovery of agriculture, notably with respect to decontamination advances, and to waste management. Current perspectives for the Japanese nuclear industry are then addressed: creation of a new and stronger safety authority, and situation of the various other reactors (some are planned to be restarted, some will be dismantled, and new reactors are still being built). The last part addresses the rehabilitation of areas devastated by the tsunami, with temporary housing, urban planning comprising possibilities for the population to quickly find a shelter, and works on the coast for a better protection against tsunamis

  3. The SafeBoosC II randomized trial

    Plomgaard, Anne M; van Oeveren, Wim; Petersen, Tue Hvass;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SafeBoosC phase II multicentre randomized clinical trial investigated the benefits and harms of monitoring cerebral oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an evidence-based treatment guideline vs. no NIRS data and treatment as usual in the control group......)) and blood biomarkers of brain injury (S100β, brain fatty acid-binding protein, and neuroketal). METHODS: One hundred and sixty-six extremely preterm infants were randomized to either experimental or control group. EEG was recorded at 64 h of age and blood samples were collected at 6 and 64 h of age. RESULTS...

  4. Effectiveness of an intervention to reduce sickness absence in patients with emotional distress or minor mental disorders: a randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    Brouwers, E.P.M.; Tiemens, B.G.; Terluin, B.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an activating intervention designed to reduce sick leave duration in patients with emotional distress or minor mental disorders. METHOD: In a 1.5-year randomized controlled trial, 194 patients with minor mental disorders recei

  5. Differential Susceptibility to Early Literacy Intervention in Children with Mild Perinatal Adversities: Short- and Long-Term Effects of a Randomized Control Trial

    Van der Kooy-Hofland, Verna A. C.; Van der Kooy, Jacoba; Bus, Adriana G.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bonsel, Gouke J.

    2012-01-01

    In a randomized control trial, the authors tested whether short- and long-term effects of an early literacy intervention are moderated by mild perinatal adversities in accordance with differential susceptibility theory. One-hundred 5-year-old children (58% male) who scored at or below the 30th percentile on early literacy measures were randomized…

  6. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus

    Hesser, Hugo; Gustafsson, Tore; Lunden, Charlotte; Henrikson, Oskar; Fattahi, Kidjan; Johnsson, Erik; Westin, Vendela Zetterqvist; Carlbring, Per; Maki-Torkko, Elina; Kaldo, Viktor; Andersson, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were…

  7. Shallow Semantic Parsing of Randomized Controlled Trial Reports

    Paek, Hyung; Kogan, Yacov; Thomas, Prem; Codish, Seymour; Krauthammer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we are measuring the performance of Propbank-based Machine Learning (ML) for automatically annotating abstracts of Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) with semantically meaningful tags. Propbank is a resource of annotated sentences from the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) corpus, and we were interested in assessing performance issues when porting this resource to the medical domain. We compare intra-domain (WSJ/WSJ) with cross-domain (WSJ/medical abstracts) performance. Although the i...

  8. STANDARDIZATION FOR SUBGROUP ANALYSIS IN RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIALS

    Varadhan, Ravi; Wang, Sue-Jane

    2014-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) emphasize the average or overall effect of a treatment (ATE) on the primary endpoint. Even though the ATE provides the best summary of treatment efficacy, it is of critical importance to know whether the treatment is similarly efficacious in important, predefined subgroups. This is why the RCTs, in addition to the ATE, also present the results of subgroup analysis for preestablished subgroups. Typically, these are marginal subgroup analysis in the sense tha...

  9. Participant informed consent in cluster randomized trials: review.

    Bruno Giraudeau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Nuremberg code defines the general ethical framework of medical research with participant consent as its cornerstone. In cluster randomized trials (CRT, obtaining participant informed consent raises logistic and methodologic concerns. First, with randomization of large clusters such as geographical areas, obtaining individual informed consent may be impossible. Second, participants in randomized clusters cannot avoid certain interventions, which implies that participant informed consent refers only to data collection, not administration of an intervention. Third, complete participant information may be a source of selection bias, which then raises methodological concerns. We assessed whether participant informed consent was required in such trials, which type of consent was required, and whether the trial was at risk of selection bias because of the very nature of participant information. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically reviewed all reports of CRT published in MEDLINE in 2008 and surveyed corresponding authors regarding the nature of the informed consent and the process of participant inclusion. We identified 173 reports and obtained an answer from 113 authors (65.3%. In total, 23.7% of the reports lacked information on ethics committee approval or participant consent, 53.1% of authors declared that participant consent was for data collection only and 58.5% that the group allocation was not specified for participants. The process of recruitment (chronology of participant recruitment with regard to cluster randomization was rarely reported, and we estimated that only 56.6% of the trials were free of potential selection bias. CONCLUSIONS: For CRTs, the reporting of ethics committee approval and participant informed consent is less than optimal. Reports should describe whether participants consented for administration of an intervention and/or data collection. Finally, the process of participant recruitment should be fully

  10. A Randomized Trial Comparing Treatments for Varicose Veins

    Brittenden, J.; Cotton, S. C.; Elders, A.; Ramsay, C. R.; Norrie, J.; Burr, J.M.; Campbell, B.; Bachoo, P.; Chetter, I.; Gough, M.; Earnshaw, J; Lees, T; Scott, J.; BAKER, S.; Francis, J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy and endovenous laser ablation are widely used alternatives to surgery for the treatment of varicose veins, but their comparative effectiveness and safety remain uncertain. METHODS: In a randomized trial involving 798 participants with primary varicose veins at 11 centers in the United Kingdom, we compared the outcomes of foam, laser, and surgical treatments. Primary outcomes at 6 months were disease-specific quality of life and generic qual...

  11. Optimal Design of Cluster Randomized Trials with Binary Outcomes

    Wu, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs) are increasingly used in many fields including public health and medicine. We consider two-arm CRTs with binary outcomes with possibly unequal intraclass correlations coefficients (ICCs) in the two arms. The efficacy of the intervention may be measured in terms of the risk difference (RD), relative risk (RR) or odds ratio (OR). We define cost efficiency (CE) as the ratio of the precision of the efficacy measure to the study cost and develop optimal allocations...

  12. Outcomes in Registered, Ongoing Randomized Controlled Trials of Patient Education

    Pino, Cécile; Boutron, Isabelle; Ravaud, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life). Methods On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the ...

  13. African HIV/AIDS trials are more likely to report adequate allocation concealment and random generation than North American trials.

    Nandi Siegfried; Michael Clarke; Jimmy Volmink; Lize Van der Merwe

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to good methodological quality is necessary to minimise bias in randomised conrolled trials (RCTs). Specific trial characteristics are associated with better trial quality, but no studies to date are specific to HIV/AIDS or African trials. We postulated that location may negatively impact on trial quality in regions where resources are scarce. METHODS: 1) To compare the methodological quality of all HIV/AIDS RCTs conducted in Africa with a random sample of similar trials...

  14. The RAZOR (randomized open vs robotic cystectomy) trial: study design and trial update

    Smith, Norm D.; Castle, Erik P.; Gonzalgo, Mark L.; Svatek, Robert S.; Weizer, Alon Z.; Montgomery, Jeffrey S.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Woods, Michael E.; Tollefson, Matthew K.; Konety, Badrinath R.; Shabsigh, Ahmad; Krupski, Tracey; Barocas, Daniel A.; Dash, Atreya; Quek, Marcus L.; Kibel, Adam S.; Parekh, Dipen J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the RAZOR (randomized open vs robotic cystectomy) study is to compare open radical cystectomy (ORC) vs robot-assisted RC (RARC), pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) and urinary diversion for oncological outcomes, complications and health-related quality of life (HRQL) measures with a primary endpoint of 2-year progression-free survival (PFS). RAZOR is a multi-institutional, randomized, non-inferior, phase III trial that will enrol at least 320 patients with T1–T4, N0–N1, M0 bladder cancer with ≈160 patients in both the RARC and ORC arms at 15 participating institutions. Data will be collected prospectively at each institution for cancer outcomes, complications of surgery and HRQL measures, and then submitted to trial data management services Cancer Research and Biostatistics (CRAB) for final analyses. To date, 306 patients have been randomized and accrual to the RAZOR trial is expected to conclude in 2014. In this study, we report the RAZOR trial experimental design, objectives, data safety, and monitoring, and accrual update. The RAZOR trial is a landmark study in urological oncology, randomizing T1–T4, N0–N1, M0 patients with bladder cancer to ORC vs RARC, PLND and urinary diversion. RAZOR is a multi-institutional, non-inferiority trial evaluating cancer outcomes, surgical complications and HRQL measures of ORC vs RARC with a primary endpoint of 2-year PFS. Full data from the RAZOR trial are not expected until 2016–2017. PMID:25626182

  15. Reporting methods of blinding in randomized trials assessing nonpharmacological treatments.

    Isabelle Boutron

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blinding is a cornerstone of treatment evaluation. Blinding is more difficult to obtain in trials assessing nonpharmacological treatment and frequently relies on "creative" (nonstandard methods. The purpose of this study was to systematically describe the strategies used to obtain blinding in a sample of randomized controlled trials of nonpharmacological treatment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We systematically searched in Medline and the Cochrane Methodology Register for randomized controlled trials (RCTs assessing nonpharmacological treatment with blinding, published during 2004 in high-impact-factor journals. Data were extracted using a standardized extraction form. We identified 145 articles, with the method of blinding described in 123 of the reports. Methods of blinding of participants and/or health care providers and/or other caregivers concerned mainly use of sham procedures such as simulation of surgical procedures, similar attention-control interventions, or a placebo with a different mode of administration for rehabilitation or psychotherapy. Trials assessing devices reported various placebo interventions such as use of sham prosthesis, identical apparatus (e.g., identical but inactivated machine or use of activated machine with a barrier to block the treatment, or simulation of using a device. Blinding participants to the study hypothesis was also an important method of blinding. The methods reported for blinding outcome assessors relied mainly on centralized assessment of paraclinical examinations, clinical examinations (i.e., use of video, audiotape, photography, or adjudications of clinical events. CONCLUSIONS: This study classifies blinding methods and provides a detailed description of methods that could overcome some barriers of blinding in clinical trials assessing nonpharmacological treatment, and provides information for readers assessing the quality of results of such trials.

  16. Project Energize: whole-region primary school nutrition and physical activity programme; evaluation of body size and fitness 5 years after the randomised controlled trial.

    Rush, Elaine; McLennan, Stephanie; Obolonkin, Victor; Vandal, Alain C; Hamlin, Michael; Simmons, David; Graham, David

    2014-01-28

    Project Energize, a region-wide whole-school nutrition and physical activity programme, commenced as a randomised controlled trial (RCT) in the period 2004-6 in 124 schools in Waikato, New Zealand. In 2007, sixty-two control schools were engaged in the programme, and by 2011, all but two of the 235 schools in the region were engaged. Energizers (trained nutrition and physical activity specialists) work with eight to twelve schools each to achieve the goals of the programme, which are based on healthier eating and enhanced physical activity. In 2011, indices of obesity and physical fitness of 2474 younger (7·58 (sd 0·57) years) and 2330 older (10·30 (sd 0·51) years) children attending 193 of the 235 primary schools were compared with historical measurements. After adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity, socio-economic status (SES) and school cluster effects, the combined prevalence of obesity and overweight among younger and older children in 2011 was lower by 31 and 15 %, respectively, than that among 'unEnergized' children in the 2004 to 2006 RCT. Similarly, BMI was lower by 3·0 % (95 % CI - 5·8, - 1·3) and 2·4 % (95 % CI - 4·3, - 0·5). Physical fitness (time taken to complete a 550 m run) was significantly higher in the Energized children (13·7 and 11·3 %, respectively) than in a group of similarly aged children from another region. These effects were observed for boys and girls, both indigenous Māori and non-Māori children, and across SES. The long-term regional commitment to the Energize programme in schools may potentially lead to a secular reduction in the prevalence of overweight and obesity and gains in physical fitness, which may reduce the risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23867069

  17. Desmopressin versus Oxybutynin for Nocturnal Enuresis in Children in Bandar Abbas: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Ghasemi, Kambiz; Esteghamati, Maryam; Mohammadzadeh, Malihe; Zare, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Background Nocturnal enuresis is among the most common disorders in children. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments are available for nocturnal enuresis. Studies for reaching the best pharmacological treatment for this disorder are continuing. Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety of Desmopressin and oxybutynin for treatment of nocturnal enuresis in children from Bandar Abbas in 2014. Methods This randomized controlled trial was conducted in 2014 and participants included 66 children with nocturnal enuresis who were more than 5 years old. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups. The first group received 120 microgram Desmopressin daily for 2 months, then 60 microgram daily for 2 months, then 60 microgram every 2 days. The second group received 5 mg oxybutynin twice a day for 6 months. The patients were followed after 1, 3, and 6 months to track treatment response. The study outcomes were frequency of nocturnal enuresis, urinary incontinency, urgency, and frequency. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups with respects to sex, age, place of residence, and parents’ education (pxerostomia were more frequent among the oxybutynin group after 1, 3, and 6 months (p<0.01). Blurred vision was also more frequent among oxybutynin group after 3 months (p<0.01). After 6 months the frequency of nocturnal enuresis and its frequency was higher in oxybutynin group in comparison to the Desmopressin group (p<0.05). Conclusion Desmopressin is more effective and has lower rate of side effects in comparison to oxybutynin for treatment of nocturnal enuresis. We recommend using Desmopressin for treatment of nocturnal enuresis in children. More studies are needed to achieve the best pharmacological treatment option for treatment of nocturnal enuresis. Trial registration The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov with a ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02538302 Funding The

  18. Efficacy and effectiveness as aspects of cluster randomized trials with nursing home residents: Methodological insights from a pneumonia prevention trial

    Van Ness, Peter H.; Peduzzi, Peter N.; Quagliarello, Vincent J.

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses how methodological aspects of study efficacy and effectiveness combine in cluster randomized trials in nursing homes. Discussion focuses on the relationships between these study aspects in the Pneumonia Reduction in Institutionalized Disabled Elders (PRIDE) trial, an ongoing cluster randomized clinical trial of pneumonia prevention among nursing home residents launched in October 2009 in Greater New Haven, Connecticut. This clinical trial has enrolled long-term care nurs...

  19. Standards of Reporting of Randomized Controlled Trials in General Surgery

    Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Wiener, Martin; Alshameeri, Zeiad; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Elbourne, Diana; Reed, Malcolm W.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the quality of reporting of surgical randomized controlled trials published in surgical and general medical journals using Jadad score, allocation concealment, and adherence to CONSORT guidelines and to identify factors associated with good quality. Summary Background Data: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide the best evidence about the relative effectiveness of different interventions. Improper methodology and reporting of RCTs can lead to erroneous conclusions about treatment effects, which may mislead decision-making in health care at all levels. Methods: Information was obtained on RCTs published in 6 general surgical and 4 general medical journals in the year 2003. The quality of reporting of RCTs was assessed under masked conditions using allocation concealment, Jadad score, and a CONSORT checklist devised for the purpose. Results: Of the 69 RCTs analyzed, only 37.7% had a Jadad score of ≥3, and only 13% of the trials clearly explained allocation concealment. The modified CONSORT score of surgical trials reported in medical journals was significantly higher than those reported in surgical journals (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.001). Overall, the modified CONSORT score was higher in studies with higher author numbers (P = 0.03), multicenter studies (P = 0.002), and studies with a declared funding source (P = 0.022). Conclusion: The overall quality of reporting of surgical RCTs was suboptimal. There is a need for improving awareness of the CONSORT statement among authors, reviewers, and editors of surgical journals and better quality control measures for trial reporting and methodology. PMID:17060756

  20. Outcomes in registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials of patient education.

    Cécile Pino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the increasing prevalence of chronic noncommunicable diseases, patient education is becoming important to strengthen disease prevention and control. We aimed to systematically determine the extent to which registered, ongoing randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluated an educational intervention focus on patient-important outcomes (i.e., outcomes measuring patient health status and quality of life. METHODS: On May 6, 2009, we searched for all ongoing RCTs registered in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry platform. We used a standardized data extraction form to collect data and determined whether the outcomes assessed were 1 patient-important outcomes such as clinical events, functional status, pain, or quality of life or 2 surrogate outcomes, such as biological outcome, treatment adherence, or patient knowledge. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected 268 of the 642 potentially eligible studies and assessed a random sample of 150. Patient-important outcomes represented 54% (178 of 333 of all primary outcomes and 46% (286 of 623 of all secondary outcomes. Overall, 69% of trials (104 of 150 used at least one patient-important outcome as a primary outcome and 66% (99 of 150 as a secondary outcome. Finally, for 31% of trials (46 of 150, primary outcomes were only surrogate outcomes. The results varied by medical area. In neuropsychiatric disorders, patient important outcomes represented 84% (51 of 61 of primary outcomes, as compared with 54% (32 of 59 in malignant neoplasm and 18% (4 of 22 in diabetes mellitus trials. In addition, only 35% assessed the long-term impact of interventions (i.e., >6 months. CONCLUSIONS: There is a need to improve the relevance of outcomes and to assess the long term impact of educational interventions in RCTs.

  1. Power Calculations for Moderators in Multi-Site Cluster Randomized Trials

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Kelcey, Ben; Dong, Nianbo

    2016-01-01

    Cluster randomized trials (CRTs), or studies in which intact groups of individuals are randomly assigned to a condition, are becoming more common in evaluation studies of educational programs. A specific type of CRT in which clusters are randomly assigned to treatment within blocks or sites, known as multisite cluster randomized trials (MSCRTs),…

  2. Randomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenance

    Elder Charles R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is an urgent public health problem, yet only a few clinical trials have systematically tested the efficacy of long-term weight-loss maintenance interventions. This randomized clinical trial tested the efficacy of a novel mind and body technique for weight-loss maintenance. Methods Participants were obese adults who had completed a six-month behavioral weight-loss program prior to randomization. Those who successfully lost weight were randomized into either an experimental weight-loss maintenance intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT®, or a control intervention comprised of social-support group meetings (SS led by professional facilitators. TAT combines self-applied light pressure to specific acupressure points accompanied by a prescribed sequence of mental steps. Participants in both maintenance conditions attended eight group sessions over six months of active weight loss maintenance intervention, followed by an additional 6 months of no intervention. The main outcome measure was change in weight from the beginning of the weight loss maintenance intervention to 12 months later. Secondary outcomes were change in depression, stress, insomnia, and quality of life. We used analysis of covariance as the primary analysis method. Missing values were replaced using multiple imputation. Results Among 285 randomized participants, 79% were female, mean age was 56 (standard deviation (sd = 11, mean BMI at randomization was 34 (sd = 5, and mean initial weight loss was 9.8 kg (sd = 5. In the primary outcome model, there was no significant difference in weight regain between the two arms (1.72 kg (se 0.85 weight regain for TAT and 2.96 kg (se 0.96 weight regain for SS, p post hoc tests showing that greater initial weight loss was associated with more weight regain for SS but less weight regain for TAT. Conclusions The primary analysis showed no significant difference in weight regain between TAT and SS, while secondary

  3. COLOR II. A randomized clinical trial comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopic resection of rectal cancer has been proven efficacious but morbidity and oncological outcome need to be investigated in a randomized clinical trial. Trial design: Non-inferiority randomized clinical trial. METHODS: The COLOR II trial is an ongoing international randomized...... clinical trial. Currently 27 hospitals from Europe, South Korea and Canada are including patients. The primary endpoint is loco-regional recurrence rate three years post-operatively. Secondary endpoints cover quality of life, overall and disease free survival, post-operative morbidity and health economy...... II trial. Completion of inclusion is expected by the end of 2009. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, identifier: NCT00297791 (www.clinicaltrials.gov)....

  4. Randomized, Controlled Trial of a Comprehensive Program for Young Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Young, Helen E; Falco, Ruth A; Hanita, Makoto

    2016-02-01

    This randomized, controlled trial, comparing the Comprehensive Autism Program (CAP) and business as usual programs, studied outcomes for 3-5 year old students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants included 84 teachers and 302 students with ASD and their parents. CAP utilized specialized curricula and training components to implement specific evidence-based practices both at school and home. A comprehensive set of outcome areas was studied. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to estimate the treatment impact. CAP had small positive impacts on the students' receptive language (effect size of .13) and on their social skills as rated by teachers (effect size of .19). Treatment effects were moderated by severity of ASD. PMID:26438637

  5. Qigong and fibromyalgia: randomized controlled trials and beyond.

    Sawynok, Jana; Lynch, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Qigong is currently considered as meditative movement, mindful exercise, or complementary exercise and is being explored for relief of symptoms in fibromyalgia. Aim. This narrative review summarizes randomized controlled trials, as well as additional studies, of qigong published to the end of 2013 and discusses relevant methodological issues. Results. Controlled trials indicate regular qigong practice (daily, 6-8 weeks) produces improvements in core domains for fibromyalgia (pain, sleep, impact, and physical and mental function) that are maintained at 4-6 months compared to wait-list subjects or baselines. Comparisons with active controls show little difference, but compared to baseline there are significant and comparable effects in both groups. Open-label studies provide information that supports benefit but remain exploratory. An extension trial and case studies involving extended practice (daily, 6-12 months) indicate marked benefits but are limited by the number of participants. Benefit appears to be related to amount of practice. Conclusions. There is considerable potential for qigong to be a useful complementary practice for the management of fibromyalgia. However, there are unique methodological challenges, and exploration of its clinical potential will need to focus on pragmatic issues and consider a spectrum of trial designs. Mechanistic considerations need to consider both system-wide and more specific effects. PMID:25477991

  6. Randomized controlled trials for Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Ticinesi, Andrea; Meschi, Tiziana; Teresi, Giulio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The continuous increase in elderly and oldest-old population, and subsequent rise in prevalence of chronic neurological diseases like Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), are a major challenge for healthcare systems. These two conditions are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in older persons and physicians should engage treatment for these patients. In this field, Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs) specifically focused on elderly populations are still lacking. The aim of this study was to identify RCTs conducted among AD and PD and to examine the difference between mean age of enrollment and incidence of these two neurodegenerative diseases. We found that the scenario is different between PD and AD. In particular, the enrollment for PD trials seems to include younger persons than AD, although the incidence of both diseases is similar and highest after 80 years old. The consequence of these results could influence conclusive guidelines of treatment in older parkinsonian patients. PMID:27100346

  7. Effect of Playful Balancing Training - A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jessen, Jari Due

    2013-01-01

    increase in balancing performance (DGI score: 21.3) after short-term playful training with the modular interactive tiles, whereas the control group remained with a score indicating balancing problems and risk of falling (DGI score: 16.6). The small pilot randomized controlled trial suggests that the......We used the modular playware in the form of modular interactive tiles for playful training of community-dwelling elderly with balancing problem. During short-term play on the modular interactive tiles, the elderly were playing physical, interactive games that were challenging their dynamic balance...

  8. Making birthing safe for Pakistan women: a cluster randomized trial

    Khan Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two out of three neonatal deaths occur in just 10 countries and Pakistan stands third among them. Maternal mortality is also high with most deaths occurring during labor, birth, and first few hours after birth. Enhanced access and utilization of skilled delivery and emergency obstetric care is the demonstrated strategy in reducing maternal and neonatal mortality. This trial aims to compare reduction in neonate mortality and utilization of available safe birthing and Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care services among pregnant mothers receiving ‘structured birth planning’, and/or ‘transport facilitation’ compared to routine care. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomized trial, with qualitative and economic studies, will be conducted in Jhang, Chiniot and Khanewal districts of Punjab, Pakistan, from February 2011 to May 2013. At least 29,295 pregnancies will be registered in the three arms, seven clusters per arm; 1 structured birth planning and travel facilitation, 2 structured birth planning, and 3 control arm. Trial will be conducted through the Lady Health Worker program. Main outcomes are difference in neonatal mortality and service utilization; maternal mortality being the secondary outcome. Cluster level analysis will be done according to intention-to-treat. Discussion A nationwide network of about 100,000 lady health workers is already involved in antenatal and postnatal care of pregnant women. They also act as “gatekeepers” for the child birthing services. This gate keeping role mainly includes counseling and referral for skill birth attendance and travel arrangements for emergency obstetric care (if required. The review of current arrangements and practices show that the care delivery process needs enhancement to include adequate information provision as well as informed “decision” making and planned “action” by the pregnant women. The proposed three-year research is to develop, through national

  9. Sexual assault resistance education for university women: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (SARE trial)

    Senn, Charlene Y; Eliasziw, Misha; Barata, Paula C.; Thurston, Wilfreda E.; Newby-Clark, Ian R.; Radtke, H Lorraine; Hobden, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    Background More than one in six women will be sexually assaulted in their lifetimes, most by men they know. The situation on university campuses is even more startling, with as many as 1 in 4 female students being victims of rape or attempted rape. The associated physical and mental health effects are extensive and the social and economic costs are staggering. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to determine whether a novel, small-group sexual assault resistance education program c...

  10. Mini vs. Standard Implants for Mandibular Overdentures: A Randomized Trial.

    de Souza, R F; Ribeiro, A B; Della Vecchia, M P; Costa, L; Cunha, T R; Reis, A C; Albuquerque, R F

    2015-10-01

    A mandibular implant-retained overdenture is considered a first-choice treatment for edentulism. However, some aspects limit the use of standard implants-for example, the width of edentulous ridges, chronic diseases, fear, or costs. This randomized trial compared mandibular overdentures retained by 2 or 4 mini-implants with standard implants, considering oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), patient satisfaction, and complications such as lost implant. In sum, 120 edentulous men and women (mean age, 59.5 ± 8.5 y) randomly received 4 mini-implants, 2 mini-implants, or 2 standard implants. Participants provided data regarding OHRQoL and satisfaction until 12 mo. Clinical parameters, including implant survival rate, were also recorded. Both 2 and 4 mini-implants led to better OHRQoL, compared with 2 standard implants. Treatment with 4 mini-implants was more satisfying than 2 standard implants, with 2 mini-implants presenting intermediate results. Implant survival rate was 89%, 82%, and 99% for 4 mini-implants, 2 mini-implants, or 2 standard implants, respectively. Overdentures retained by 4 or 2 mini-implants can achieve OHRQoL and satisfaction at least comparable with that of 2 standard implants. However, the survival rate of mini implants is not as high as that of standard implants (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01411683). PMID:26294416

  11. Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Prospective Clinical Trials

    Young-Dae Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the current evidence for effectiveness of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in the form of a systematic review, a systematic literature search was conducted in 23 electronic databases. Grey literature was also searched. The key search terms were “acupuncture” and “PTSD.” No language restrictions were imposed. We included all randomized or prospective clinical trials that evaluated acupuncture and its variants against a waitlist, sham acupuncture, conventional therapy control for PTSD, or without control. Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs and 2 uncontrolled clinical trials (UCTs out of 136 articles in total were systematically reviewed. One high-quality RCT reported that acupuncture was superior to waitlist control and therapeutic effects of acupuncture and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT were similar based on the effect sizes. One RCT showed no statistical difference between acupuncture and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs. One RCT reported a favorable effect of acupoint stimulation plus CBT against CBT alone. A meta-analysis of acupuncture plus moxibustion versus SSRI favored acupuncture plus moxibustion in three outcomes. This systematic review and meta-analysis suggest that the evidence of effectiveness of acupuncture for PTSD is encouraging but not cogent. Further qualified trials are needed to confirm whether acupuncture is effective for PTSD.

  12. Magnesium treatment in alcoholics: A randomized clinical trial

    Poikolainen Kari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnesium (Mg deficiency is common among alcoholics. Earlier research suggests that Mg treatment may help to normalize elevated enzyme activities and some other clinically relevant parameters among alcoholics but the evidence is weak. Methods The effect of Mg was studied in a randomized, parallel group, double-blind trial. The patients were first treated for alcohol withdrawal symptoms and then received for 8 weeks either 500 mg of Mg divided into two tablets or matching placebo. Measurements were made at the beginning and in the end of the Mg treatment period. The primary outcome was serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (S-GGT activity; secondary outcomes included aspartate-aminotransferase (S-AST and alanine-aminotransferase (S-ALT activity. Results The number of randomized patients (completers was 64 (27 in the treatment and 54 (31 in the control group. In intention-to-treat-analyses and in most analyses of study completers, there were no significant differences between the Mg-treated and placebo groups in the outcome variables. When baseline serum Mg level, coffee intake, and the number of unused Mg tablets were controlled for in a multivariate regression model, after-treatment serum Mg levels were found to be higher among the Mg-treated group than in the placebo group (t-test 3.334, df = 53, p = 0.002. After controlling for age, body weight, baseline alcohol intake, subsequent change in alcohol intake and baseline S-AST, the after-treatment S-AST levels were found to be lower among the Mg-treated group than in the placebo group (t-test 2.061, df = 49, p = 0.045. Conclusion Mg treatment may speed up the S-AST decrease in compliant patients. This might decrease the risk of death from alcoholic liver disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00325299

  13. Long-term effect of early treatment with interferon beta-1b after a first clinical event suggestive of multiple sclerosis: 5-year active treatment extension of the phase 3 BENEFIT trial

    Kappos, Ludwig; Freedman, Mark S; Polman, Chris H; Edan, Gilles; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Miller, David H; Montalbán, Xavier; Barkhof, Frederik; Radü, Ernst-Wilhelm; Metzig, Carola; Bauer, Lars; Lanius, Vivian; Sandbrink, Rupert; Pohl, Christoph; Battistini, Jette Lautrup

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Betaferon/Betaseron in newly emerging multiple sclerosis for initial treatment (BENEFIT) trial investigated the effect of treatment with interferon beta-1b after a clinically isolated syndrome. The 5-year active treatment extension compares the effects of early and delayed treatme...... favourable long-term safety and tolerability profile support early initiation of treatment with interferon beta-1b, although a delay in treatment by up to 2 years did not affect long-term disability outcomes. FUNDING: Bayer Schering Pharma....... after randomisation. Patients and study personnel remained unaware of initial treatment allocation throughout the study. Primary endpoints were time to CDMS, time to confirmed disability progression measured with the expanded disability status scale, and the functional assessment of multiple sclerosis...

  14. Stopping randomized trials early for benefit: a protocol of the Study Of Trial Policy Of Interim Truncation-2 (STOPIT-2)

    Mullan Rebecca J; Bankhead Clare R; Kaur Jagdeep; Sood Amit; Raatz Heike; Mulla Sohail M; Burns Karen EA; Nordmann Alain J; Lampropulos Julianna F; Bucher Heiner C; Karanicolas Paul J; You John J; Elnour Nisrin; Soares Heloisa P; Kirpalani Haresh

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) stopped early for benefit often receive great attention and affect clinical practice, but pose interpretational challenges for clinicians, researchers, and policy makers. Because the decision to stop the trial may arise from catching the treatment effect at a random high, truncated RCTs (tRCTs) may overestimate the true treatment effect. The Study Of Trial Policy Of Interim Truncation (STOPIT-1), which systematically reviewed the epidemiol...

  15. Randomized trial of achieving healthy lifestyles in psychiatric rehabilitation: the ACHIEVE trial

    Guallar Eliseo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overweight and obesity are highly prevalent among persons with serious mental illness. These conditions likely contribute to premature cardiovascular disease and a 20 to 30 percent shortened life expectancy in this vulnerable population. Persons with serious mental illness need effective, appropriately tailored behavioral interventions to achieve and maintain weight loss. Psychiatric rehabilitation day programs provide logical intervention settings because mental health consumers often attend regularly and exercise can take place on-site. This paper describes the Randomized Trial of Achieving Healthy Lifestyles in Psychiatric Rehabilitation (ACHIEVE. The goal of the study is to determine the effectiveness of a behavioral weight loss intervention among persons with serious mental illness that attend psychiatric rehabilitation programs. Participants randomized to the intervention arm of the study are hypothesized to have greater weight loss than the control group. Methods/Design A targeted 320 men and women with serious mental illness and overweight or obesity (body mass index ≥ 25.0 kg/m2 will be recruited from 10 psychiatric rehabilitation programs across Maryland. The core design is a randomized, two-arm, parallel, multi-site clinical trial to compare the effectiveness of an 18-month behavioral weight loss intervention to usual care. Active intervention participants receive weight management sessions and physical activity classes on-site led by study interventionists. The intervention incorporates cognitive adaptations for persons with serious mental illness attending psychiatric rehabilitation programs. The initial intensive intervention period is six months, followed by a twelve-month maintenance period in which trained rehabilitation program staff assume responsibility for delivering parts of the intervention. Primary outcomes are weight loss at six and 18 months. Discussion Evidence-based approaches to the high burden

  16. Alzheimer’s disease multiple intervention trial (ADMIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Callahan Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the current lack of disease-modifying therapies, it is important to explore new models of longitudinal care for older adults with dementia that focus on improving quality of life and delaying functional decline. In a previous clinical trial, we demonstrated that collaborative care for Alzheimer’s disease reduces patients’ neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as caregiver stress. However, these improvements in quality of life were not associated with delays in subjects’ functional decline. Trial design Parallel randomized controlled clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Participants A total of 180 community-dwelling patients aged ≥45 years who are diagnosed with possible or probable Alzheimer’s disease; subjects must also have a caregiver willing to participate in the study and be willing to accept home visits. Subjects and their caregivers are enrolled from the primary care and geriatric medicine practices of an urban public health system serving Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Interventions All patients receive best practices primary care including collaborative care by a dementia care manager over two years; this best practices primary care program represents the local adaptation and implementation of our prior collaborative care intervention in the urban public health system. Intervention patients also receive in-home occupational therapy delivered in twenty-four sessions over two years in addition to best practices primary care. The focus of the occupational therapy intervention is delaying functional decline and helping both subjects and caregivers adapt to functional impairments. The in-home sessions are tailored to the specific needs and goals of each patient-caregiver dyad; these needs are expected to change over the course of the study. Objective To determine whether best practices primary care plus home-based occupational therapy delays functional decline among patients with Alzheimer’s disease compared

  17. The Cessation in Pregnancy Incentives Trial (CPIT: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Tappin David M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seventy percent of women in Scotland have at least one baby, making pregnancy an opportunity to help most young women quit smoking before their own health is irreparably compromised. By quitting during pregnancy their infants will be protected from miscarriage and still birth as well as low birth weight, asthma, attention deficit disorder and adult cardiovascular disease. In the UK, the NICE guidelines: ‘How to stop smoking in pregnancy and following childbirth’ (June 2010 highlighted that little evidence exists in the literature to confirm the efficacy of financial incentives to help pregnant smokers to quit. Its first research recommendation was to determine: Within a UK context, are incentives an acceptable, effective and cost-effective way to help pregnant women who smoke to quit? Design and methods This study is a phase II exploratory individually randomized controlled trial comparing standard care for pregnant smokers with standard care plus the additional offer of financial voucher incentives to engage with specialist cessation services and/or to quit smoking during pregnancy. Participants (n = 600 will be pregnant smokers identified at maternity booking who, when contacted by specialist cessation services, agree to having their details passed to the NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline to discuss the trial. The NHS Smokefree Pregnancy Study Helpline will be responsible for telephone consent and follow-up in late pregnancy. The primary outcome will be self reported smoking in late pregnancy verified by cotinine measurement. An economic evaluation will refine cost data collection and assess potential cost-effectiveness while qualitative research interviews with clients and health professionals will assess the level of acceptance of this form of incentive payment. The research questions are: What is the likely therapeutic efficacy? Are incentives potentially cost-effective? Is individual randomization an

  18. Competing events and costs of clinical trials: Analysis of a randomized trial in prostate cancer

    Background: Clinical trial costs may be reduced by identifying enriched subpopulations of patients with favorable risk profiles for the events of interest. However, increased selectivity affects accrual rates, with uncertain impact on clinical trial cost. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) 8794 randomized trial of adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer. The primary endpoint was metastasis-free survival (MFS), defined as time to metastasis or death from any cause (competing mortality). We used competing risks regression models to identify an enriched subgroup at high risk for metastasis and low risk for competing mortality. We applied a cost model to estimate the impact of enrichment on trial cost and duration. Results: The treatment effect on metastasis was similar in the enriched subgroup (HR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.23–0.76) compared to the whole cohort (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.30–0.81) while the effect on competing mortality was not significant in the subgroup or the whole cohort (HR 0.70; 95% CI 0.39–1.23, vs. HR 0.94; 95% CI, 0.68–1.31). Due to the higher incidence of metastasis relative to competing mortality in the enriched subgroup, the treatment effect on MFS was greater in the subgroup compared to the whole cohort (HR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36–0.82, vs. HR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.58–1.01). Trial cost was 75% less in the subgroup compared to the whole cohort ($1.7 million vs. $6.8 million), and the trial duration was 30% shorter (8.4 vs. 12.0 years). Conclusion: Competing event enrichment can reduce clinical trial cost and duration, without sacrificing generalizability

  19. PREVENTion of a parastomal hernia with a prosthetic mesh in patients undergoing permanent end-colostomy; the PREVENT-trial: study protocol for a multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Brandsma Henk-Thijs

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parastomal hernia is a common complication of a colostomy. Ultimately, one-third of patients with a parastomal hernia will need surgical correction due to frequent leakage or life-threatening bowel obstruction or strangulation. However, treatment remains a challenge resulting in high recurrence rates. Two single center trials demonstrated that the frequency of parastomal hernias decreases by prophylactic placement of a mesh around the stoma at the time of formation. Unfortunately, both studies were small-sized, single-center studies and with these small numbers less common complications could be missed which were the reasons to initiate a prospective randomized multicenter trial to determine if a retromuscular, preperitoneal mesh at the stoma site prevents parastomal hernia and does not cause unacceptable complications. Methods One hundred and fifty patients undergoing open procedure, elective formation of a permanent end-colostomy will be randomized into two groups. In the intervention group an end-colostomy is created with placement of a preperitioneal, retromuscular lightweight monofilament polypropylene mesh, and compared to a group with a traditional stoma without mesh. Patients will be recruited from 14 teaching hospitals in the Netherlands during a 2-year period. Primary endpoint is the incidence of parastomal hernia. Secondary endpoints are stoma complications, cost-effectiveness, and quality of life. Follow-up will be performed at 3 weeks, 3 months and at 1, 2, and 5 years. To find a difference of 20% with a power of 90%, a total number of 134 patients must be included. All results will be reported according to the CONSORT 2010 statement. Discussion The PREVENT-trial is a multicenter randomized controlled trial powered to determine whether prophylactic placement of a polypropylene mesh decreases the incidence of a parastomal hernia versus the traditional stoma formation without a mesh. Trial registration The PREVENT-trial

  20. Robustness of ordinary least squares in randomized clinical trials.

    Judkins, David R; Porter, Kristin E

    2016-05-20

    There has been a series of occasional papers in this journal about semiparametric methods for robust covariate control in the analysis of clinical trials. These methods are fairly easy to apply on currently available computers, but standard software packages do not yet support these methods with easy option selections. Moreover, these methods can be difficult to explain to practitioners who have only a basic statistical education. There is also a somewhat neglected history demonstrating that ordinary least squares (OLS) is very robust to the types of outcome distribution features that have motivated the newer methods for robust covariate control. We review these two strands of literature and report on some new simulations that demonstrate the robustness of OLS to more extreme normality violations than previously explored. The new simulations involve two strongly leptokurtic outcomes: near-zero binary outcomes and zero-inflated gamma outcomes. Potential examples of such outcomes include, respectively, 5-year survival rates for stage IV cancer and healthcare claim amounts for rare conditions. We find that traditional OLS methods work very well down to very small sample sizes for such outcomes. Under some circumstances, OLS with robust standard errors work well with even smaller sample sizes. Given this literature review and our new simulations, we think that most researchers may comfortably continue using standard OLS software, preferably with the robust standard errors. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26694758

  1. ORCHIDS: an Observational Randomized Controlled Trial on Childhood Differential Susceptibility

    Chhangur Rabia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central tenet in developmental psychopathology is that childhood rearing experiences have a major impact on children’s development. Recently, candidate genes have been identified that may cause children to be differentially susceptible to these experiences (i.e., susceptibility genes. However, our understanding of the differential impact of parenting is limited at best. Specifically, more experimental research is needed. The ORCHIDS study will investigate gene-(gene-environment interactions to obtain more insight into a moderating effects of polymorphisms on the link between parenting and child behavior, and b behavioral mechanisms that underlie these gene-(gene-environment interactions in an experimental design. Methods/Design The ORCHIDS study is a randomized controlled trial, in which the environment will be manipulated with an intervention (i.e., Incredible Years parent training. In a screening, families with children aged 4–8 who show mild to (subclinical behavior problems will be targeted through community records via two Dutch regional healthcare organizations. Assessments in both the intervention and control condition will be conducted at baseline (i.e., pretest, after 6 months (i.e., posttest, and after 10 months (i.e., follow-up. Discussion This study protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial that investigates gene-(gene-environment interactions in the development of child behavior. Two hypotheses will be tested. First, we expect that children in the intervention condition who carry one or more susceptibility genes will show significantly lower levels of problem behavior and higher levels of prosocial behavior after their parent(s received the Incredible Years training, compared to children without these genes, or children in the control group. Second, we expect that children carrying one or more susceptibility genes will show a heightened sensitivity to changes in parenting behaviors, and

  2. Partner randomized controlled trial: study protocol and coaching intervention

    Garbutt Jane M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many children with asthma live with frequent symptoms and activity limitations, and visits for urgent care are common. Many pediatricians do not regularly meet with families to monitor asthma control, identify concerns or problems with management, or provide self-management education. Effective interventions to improve asthma care such as small group training and care redesign have been difficult to disseminate into office practice. Methods and design This paper describes the protocol for a randomized controlled trial (RCT to evaluate a 12-month telephone-coaching program designed to support primary care management of children with persistent asthma and subsequently to improve asthma control and disease-related quality of life and reduce urgent care events for asthma care. Randomization occurred at the practice level with eligible families within a practice having access to the coaching program or to usual care. The coaching intervention was based on the transtheoretical model of behavior change. Targeted behaviors included 1 effective use of controller medications, 2 effective use of rescue medications and 3 monitoring to ensure optimal control. Trained lay coaches provided parents with education and support for asthma care, tailoring the information provided and frequency of contact to the parent's readiness to change their child's day-to-day asthma management. Coaching calls varied in frequency from weekly to monthly. For each participating family, follow-up measurements were obtained at 12- and 24-months after enrollment in the study during a telephone interview. The primary outcomes were the mean change in 1 the child's asthma control score, 2 the parent's quality of life score, and 3 the number of urgent care events assessed at 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes reflected adherence to guideline recommendations by the primary care pediatricians and included the proportion of children prescribed controller medications

  3. Long-term effect of early treatment with interferon beta-1b after a first clinical event suggestive of multiple sclerosis: 5-year active treatment extension of the phase 3 BENEFIT trial

    Kappos, Ludwig; Freedman, Mark S; Polman, Chris H;

    2009-01-01

    with interferon beta-1b on time to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) and other disease outcomes, including disability progression. METHODS: Patients with a first event suggestive of multiple sclerosis and a minimum of two clinically silent lesions in MRI were randomly assigned to receive...... interferon beta-1b 250 microg (n=292; early treatment) or placebo (n=176; delayed treatment) subcutaneously every other day for 2 years, or until diagnosis of CDMS. All patients were then eligible to enter a prospectively planned follow-up phase with open-label interferon beta-1b up to a maximum of 5 years...... 125 in both groups. No significant differences in other disability related outcomes were recorded. Frequency and severity of adverse events remained within the established safety and tolerability profile of interferon beta-1b. INTERPRETATION: Effects on the rate of conversion to CDMS and the...

  4. Validity of randomized clinical trials in gastroenterology from 1964-2000

    Kjaergard, Lise L; Frederiksen, Sarah L; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The internal validity of clinical trials depends on the adequacy of the reported methodological quality. We assessed the methodological quality of all 383 randomized clinical trials published in GASTROENTEROLOGY as original articles from 1964 to 2000.......The internal validity of clinical trials depends on the adequacy of the reported methodological quality. We assessed the methodological quality of all 383 randomized clinical trials published in GASTROENTEROLOGY as original articles from 1964 to 2000....

  5. Incorporating Contact Network Structure in Cluster Randomized Trials

    Staples, Patrick C; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Whenever possible, the efficacy of a new treatment, such as a drug or behavioral intervention, is investigated by randomly assigning some individuals to a treatment condition and others to a control condition, and comparing the outcomes between the two groups. Often, when the treatment aims to slow an infectious disease, groups or clusters of individuals are assigned en masse to each treatment arm. The structure of interactions within and between clusters can reduce the power of the trial, i.e. the probability of correctly detecting a real treatment effect. We investigate the relationships among power, within-cluster structure, between-cluster mixing, and infectivity by simulating an infectious process on a collection of clusters. We demonstrate that current power calculations may be conservative for low levels of between-cluster mixing, but failing to account for moderate or high amounts can result in severely underpowered studies. Power also depends on within-cluster network structure for certain kinds of i...

  6. The conflict between randomized clinical trials and the therapeutic obligation.

    Gifford, F

    1986-11-01

    The central dilemma concerning randomized clinical trials (RCTs) arises out of some simple facts about causal methodology (RCTs are the best way to generate the reliable causal knowledge necessary for optimally-informed action) and a prima facie plausible principle concerning how physicians should treat their patients (always do what it is most reasonable to believe will be best for the patient). A number of arguments related to this in the literature are considered. Attempts to avoid the dilemma fail. Appeals to informed consent and mechanisms for minimizing the resulting harm are important for policy, but informed consent is problematic and mechanisms for minimization of harm do not address the dilemma. Appeals to some sort of contract model of justification are promising and illuminating. PMID:3819604

  7. Properties of permuted-block randomization in clinical trials.

    Matts, J P; Lachin, J M

    1988-12-01

    This article describes some of the important statistical properties of the commonly used permuted-block design, also known simply as blocked-randomization. Under a permutation model for statistical tests, proper analyses should employ tests that incorporate the blocking used in the randomization. These include the block-stratified Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test for binary data, the blocked analysis of variance F test, and the blocked nonparametric linear rank test. It is common, however, to ignore the blocking in the analysis. For these tests, it is shown that the size of a test obtained from an analysis incorporating the blocking (say T), versus an analysis ignoring the blocking (say TI), is related to the intrablock correlation coefficient (R) as TI = T(1-R). For blocks of common length 2m, the range of R is from -1/(2m-1) to 1. Thus, if there is a positive intrablock correlation, which is more likely than not for m greater than 1, an analysis ignoring blocking will be unduly conservative. Permutation tests are also presented for the case of stratified analyses within one or more subgroups of patients defined post hoc on the basis of a covariate. This provides a basis for the analysis when responses from some patients are assumed to be missing-at-random. An alternative strategy that requires no assumptions is to perform the analysis using only the subset of complete blocks in which no observations are missing. The Blackwell-Hodges model is used to assess the potential for selection bias induced by investigator attempts to guess which treatment is more likely to be assigned to each incoming patient. In an unmasked trial, the permuted-block design provides substantial potential for selection bias in the comparison of treatments due to the predictability of the assignments that is induced by the requirement of balance within blocks. Further, this bias is not eliminated by the use of random block sizes. We also modify the Blackwell-Hodges model to allow for

  8. Improving Osteoporosis Screening: Results from a Randomized Cluster Trial

    Kolk, Deneil; Peterson, Edward L.; McCarthy, Bruce D.; Weiss, Thomas W.; Chen, Ya-Ting; Muma, Bruce K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite recommendations, osteoporosis screening rates among women aged 65 years and older remain low. We present results from a clustered, randomized trial evaluating patient mailed reminders, alone and in combination with physician prompts, to improve osteoporosis screening and treatment. Methods Primary care clinics (n = 15) were randomized to usual care, mailed reminders alone, or mailed reminders with physician prompts. Study patients were females aged 65–89 years (N = 10,354). Using automated clinical and pharmacy data, information was collected on bone mineral density testing, pharmacy dispensings, and other patient characteristics. Unadjusted/adjusted differences in testing and treatment were assessed using generalized estimating equation approaches. Results Osteoporosis screening rates were 10.8% in usual care, 24.1% in mailed reminder, and 28.9% in mailed reminder with physician prompt. Results adjusted for differences at baseline indicated that mailed reminders significantly improved testing rates compared to usual care, and that the addition of prompts further improved testing. This effect increased with patient age. Treatment rates were 5.2% in usual care, 8.4% in mailed reminders, and 9.1% in mailed reminders with prompt. No significant differences were found in treatment rates between those receiving mailed reminders alone or in combination with physician prompts. However, women receiving usual care were significantly less likely to be treated. Conclusions The use of mailed reminders, either alone or with physician prompts, can significantly improve osteoporosis screening and treatment rates among insured primary care patients (Clinical Trials.gov number NCT00139425). PMID:17356966

  9. Computerized Tool to Manage Dental Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Tellez, M; Potter, C M; Kinner, D G; Jensen, D; Waldron, E; Heimberg, R G; Myers Virtue, S; Zhao, H; Ismail, A I

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety regarding dental and physical health is a common and potentially distressing problem, for both patients and health care providers. Anxiety has been identified as a barrier to regular dental visits and as an important target for enhancement of oral health-related quality of life. The study aimed to develop and evaluate a computerized cognitive-behavioral therapy dental anxiety intervention that could be easily implemented in dental health care settings. A cognitive-behavioral protocol based on psychoeducation, exposure to feared dental procedures, and cognitive restructuring was developed. A randomized controlled trial was conducted (N = 151) to test its efficacy. Consenting adult dental patients who met inclusion criteria (e.g., high dental anxiety) were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: immediate treatment (n = 74) or a wait-list control (n = 77). Analyses of covariance based on intention-to-treat analyses were used to compare the 2 groups on dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia. Baseline scores on these outcomes were entered into the analyses as covariates. Groups were equivalent at baseline but differed at 1-mo follow-up. Both groups showed improvement in outcomes, but analyses of covariance demonstrated significant differences in dental anxiety, fear, avoidance, and overall severity of dental phobia in favor of immediate treatment at the follow-up assessment. Of the patients who met diagnostic criteria for phobia at baseline, fewer patients in the immediate treatment group continued to meet criteria for dental phobia at follow-up as compared with the wait-list group. A new computer-based tool seems to be efficacious in reducing dental anxiety and fear/avoidance of dental procedures. Examination of its effectiveness when administered in dental offices under less controlled conditions is warranted (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02081365). PMID:26202996

  10. Dialysis fistula or graft: the role for randomized clinical trials.

    Allon, Michael; Lok, Charmaine E

    2010-12-01

    The Fistula First Initiative has strongly encouraged nephrologists, vascular access surgeons, and dialysis units in the United States to make valiant efforts to increase fistula use in the hemodialysis population. Unfortunately, the rigid "fistula first" recommendations are not based on solid, current, evidence-based data and may be harmful to some hemodialysis patients by subjecting them to prolonged catheter dependence with its attendant risks of bacteremia and central vein stenosis. Once they are successfully cannulated for dialysis, fistulas last longer than grafts and require fewer interventions to maintain long-term patency for dialysis. However, fistulas have a much higher primary failure rate than grafts, require more interventions to achieve maturation, and entail longer catheter dependence, thereby leading to more catheter-related complications. Given the tradeoffs between fistulas and grafts, there is equipoise about their relative merits in patients with moderate to high risk of fistula nonmaturation. The time is right for definitive, large, multicenter randomized clinical trials to compare fistulas and grafts in various subsets of chronic kidney disease patients. Until the results of such clinical trials are known, the optimal vascular access for a given patients should be determined by the nephrologist and access surgeon by taking into account (1) whether dialysis has been initiated, (2) the patient's life expectancy, (3) whether the patient has had a previous failed vascular access, and (4) the likelihood of fistula nonmaturation. Careful clinical judgment should optimize vascular access outcomes and minimize prolonged catheter dependence among hemodialysis patients. PMID:21030576

  11. A 3-year randomized therapeutic trial of nitisinone in alkaptonuria.

    Introne, Wendy J; Perry, Monique B; Troendle, James; Tsilou, Ekaterini; Kayser, Michael A; Suwannarat, Pim; O'Brien, Kevin E; Bryant, Joy; Sachdev, Vandana; Reynolds, James C; Moylan, Elizabeth; Bernardini, Isa; Gahl, William A

    2011-08-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine degradation due to deficiency of the third enzyme in the catabolic pathway. As a result, homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is excreted in gram quantities in the urine, which turns dark upon alkalization. The first symptoms, occurring in early adulthood, involve a painful, progressively debilitating arthritis of the spine and large joints. Cardiac valvular disease and renal and prostate stones occur later. Previously suggested therapies have failed to show benefit, and management remains symptomatic. Nitisinone, a potent inhibitor of the second enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway, is considered a potential therapy; proof-of-principle studies showed 95% reduction in urinary HGA. Based on those findings, a prospective, randomized clinical trial was initiated in 2005 to evaluate 40 patients over a 36-month period. The primary outcome parameter was hip total range of motion with measures of musculoskeletal function serving as secondary parameters. Biochemically, this study consistently demonstrated 95% reduction of HGA in urine and plasma over the course of 3 years. Clinically, primary and secondary parameters did not prove benefit from the medication. Side effects were infrequent. This trial illustrates the remarkable tolerability of nitisinone, its biochemical efficacy, and the need to investigate its use in younger individuals prior to development of debilitating arthritis. PMID:21620748

  12. Anethum graveolens and hyperlipidemia: A randomized clinical trial

    Mahmoud Mirhosseini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been established that hyperlipidemia increases the incidence and mortality associated with coronary heart disease. In this study, the effects of Dill (Anethum graveolens were evaluated on lipid profile of hypercholesterolemic patients. Materials and Methods: In this clinical study, 91 hyperlipidemic patients were randomly designated into two groups. One group received gemfibrozil (900 mg daily and the other group received Dill tablet (six tablets daily for 2 months. The blood lipids including total cholesterol, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol from each group were assessed at the beginning and end of the trial. Results: Use of gemfibrozil brought about increased HDL-cholesterol by 3.91% (P < 0.05 and reduced triglyceride and total cholesterol by 32.7% (P < 0.05 and 9.41% (P < 0.05, respectively. Applying Dill tablet for 2 months resulted in reduction of total cholesterol up to 18% (P < 0.05 and triglyceride by 7.38% (P < 0.05. However, circulating HDL-cholesterol was not affected by this treatment. In this study, gemfibrozil decreased triglyceride and increased HDL-cholesterol more than anethum (P < 0.05. Anethum decreased total cholesterol more than gemfibrozil (P < 0.05. Patients treated with anethum did not report any side effects. Conclusion: The results of this trial indicate that Dill might be beneficial for hypercholesterolemic and hypertriglycemic patients.

  13. Community based intervention to optimize osteoporosis management: randomized controlled trial

    Ciaschini Patricia M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoporosis-related fractures are a significant public health concern. Interventions that increase detection and treatment of osteoporosis are underutilized. This pragmatic randomised study was done to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted community-based care program aimed at optimizing evidence-based management in patients at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. Methods This was a 12-month randomized trial performed in Ontario, Canada. Eligible patients were community-dwelling, aged ≥55 years, and identified to be at risk for osteoporosis-related fractures. Two hundred and one patients were allocated to the intervention group or to usual care. Components of the intervention were directed towards primary care physicians and patients and included facilitated bone mineral density testing, patient education and patient-specific recommendations for osteoporosis treatment. The primary outcome was the implementation of appropriate osteoporosis management. Results 101 patients were allocated to intervention and 100 to control. Mean age of participants was 71.9 ± 7.2 years and 94% were women. Pharmacological treatment (alendronate, risedronate, or raloxifene for osteoporosis was increased by 29% compared to usual care (56% [29/52] vs. 27% [16/60]; relative risk [RR] 2.09, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29 to 3.40. More individuals in the intervention group were taking calcium (54% [54/101] vs. 20% [20/100]; RR 2.67, 95% CI 1.74 to 4.12 and vitamin D (33% [33/101] vs. 20% [20/100]; RR 1.63, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.65. Conclusions A multi-faceted community-based intervention improved management of osteoporosis in high risk patients compared with usual care. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT00465387

  14. Enhancing antiepileptic drug adherence: a randomized controlled trial.

    Brown, Ian; Sheeran, Paschal; Reuber, Markus

    2009-12-01

    Suboptimal adherence to antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is commonplace, and increases the risk of status epilepticus and sudden unexplained death in epilepsy. This randomized controlled trial was designed to demonstrate whether an implementation intention intervention involving the completion of a simple self-administered questionnaire linking the intention of taking medication with a particular time, place, and other activity can improve AED treatment schedule adherence. Of the 81 patients with epilepsy who were randomized, 69 completed a 1-month monitoring period with an objective measure of tablet taking (electronic registration of pill bottle openings, Medication Event Monitoring System [MEMS]). Intervention participants showed improved adherence relative to controls on all three outcomes: doses taken in total (93.4% vs. 79.1%), days on which correct dose was taken (88.7% vs. 65.3%), and doses taken on schedule (78.8% vs. 55.3%) (Pintention intervention may be an easy-to-administer and effective means of promoting AED adherence. PMID:19864187

  15. Surgical trial in traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (STITCH(Trauma: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Gregson Barbara A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracranial hemorrhage occurs in over 60% of severe head injuries in one of three types: extradural (EDH; subdural (SDH; and intraparenchymal (TICH. Prompt surgical removal of significant SDH and EDH is established and widely accepted. However, TICH is more common and is found in more than 40% of severe head injuries. It is associated with a worse outcome but the role for surgical removal remains undefined. Surgical practice in the treatment of TICHs differs widely around the world. The aim of early surgery in TICH removal is to prevent secondary brain injury. There have been trials of surgery for spontaneous ICH (including the STICH II trial, but none so far of surgery for TICH. Methods/Design The UK National Institutes of Health Research has funded STITCH(Trauma to determine whether a policy of early surgery in patients with TICH improves outcome compared to a policy of initial conservative treatment. It will include a health economics component and carry out a subgroup analysis of patients undergoing invasive monitoring. This is an international multicenter pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Patients are eligible if: they are within 48 h of injury; they have evidence of TICH on CT scan with a confluent volume of attenuation significantly raised above that of the background white and grey matter that has a total volume >10 mL; and their treating neurosurgeon is in equipoise. Patients will be ineligible if they have: a significant surface hematoma (EDH or SDH requiring surgery; a hemorrhage/contusion located in the cerebellum; three or more separate hematomas fulfilling inclusion criteria; or severe pre-existing physical or mental disability or severe co-morbidity which would lead to poor outcome even if the patient made a full recovery from the head injury. Patients will be randomized via an independent service. Patients randomized to surgery receive surgery within 12 h. Both groups will be monitored according to

  16. Cognitive function in postmenopausal women receiving adjuvant letrozole or tamoxifen for breast cancer in the BIG 1-98 randomized trial

    Phillips, Kelly Anne; Ribi, Karin; Sun, Zhuoxin; Stephens, Alisa; Thompson, Alastair; Harvey, Vernon; Thürlimann, Beat; Cardoso, Fatima; Pagani, Olivia; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D; Bernhard, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive function in postmenopausal women receiving letrozole or tamoxifen as adjuvant endocrine treatment was compared during the fifth year of treatment in a substudy of the BIG 1-98 trial. In BIG 1-98 patients were randomized to receive adjuvant A) 5-years tamoxifen, B) 5-years letrozole, C) 2-years tamoxifen followed by 3-years letrozole, or D) 2-years letrozole followed by 3-years tamoxifen. The primary comparison was the difference in composite score for patients taking letrozole (B+C;...

  17. Protocol and Recruitment Results from a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Group Phone-Based versus Newsletter Interventions for Weight Loss Maintenance among Rural Breast Cancer Survivors

    Befort, Christie A; Klemp, Jennifer R.; Fabian, Carol; Perri, Michael G; Sullivan, Debra K.; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Diaz, Francisco J.; Shireman, Theresa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for breast cancer recurrence and death. Women who reside in rural areas have higher obesity prevalence and suffer from breast cancer treatment-related disparities compared to urban women. The objective of this 5-year randomized controlled trial is to compare methods for delivering extended care for weight loss maintenance among rural breast cancer survivors. Group phone-based counseling via conference calls addresses access barriers, is more cost-effective than indivi...

  18. Effectiveness of an intervention to reduce sickness absence in patients with emotional distress or minor mental disorders: a randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    Brouwers, E.P.M.; Tiemens, B.G.; Terluin, B.; Verhaak, P.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an activating intervention designed to reduce sick leave duration in patients with emotional distress or minor mental disorders. METHOD: In a 1.5-year randomized controlled trial, 194 patients with minor mental disorders received either an experimental intervention by social workers or general practitioners' usual care. The intervention focused on understanding causes, developing and implementing problem-solving strateg...

  19. Accelerated partial irradiation for breast cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis of 8653 women in eight randomized trials

    Background and purpose: Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is the strategy that allows adjuvant treatment delivery in a shorter period of time in smaller volumes. This study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness and outcomes of APBI in breast cancer compared with whole-breast irradiation (WBI). Material and methods: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials of WBI versus APBI. Two authors independently selected and assessed the studies regarding eligibility criteria. Results: Eight studies were selected. A total of 8653 patients were randomly assigned for WBI versus APBI. Six studies reported local recurrence outcomes. Two studies were matched in 5 years and only one study for different time of follow-up. Meta-analysis of two trials assessing 1407 participants showed significant difference in the WBI versus APBI group regarding the 5-year local recurrence rate (HR = 4.54, 95% CI: 1.78–11.61, p = 0.002). Significant difference in favor of WBI for different follow-up times was also found. No differences in nodal recurrence, systemic recurrence, overall survival and mortality rates were observed. Conclusions: APBI is associated with higher local recurrence compared to WBI without compromising other clinical outcomes

  20. A comparison of imputation strategies in cluster randomized trials with missing binary outcomes.

    Caille, Agnès; Leyrat, Clémence; Giraudeau, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    In cluster randomized trials, clusters of subjects are randomized rather than subjects themselves, and missing outcomes are a concern as in individual randomized trials. We assessed strategies for handling missing data when analysing cluster randomized trials with a binary outcome; strategies included complete case, adjusted complete case, and simple and multiple imputation approaches. We performed a simulation study to assess bias and coverage rate of the population-averaged intervention-effect estimate. Both multiple imputation with a random-effects logistic regression model or classical logistic regression provided unbiased estimates of the intervention effect. Both strategies also showed good coverage properties, even slightly better for multiple imputation with a random-effects logistic regression approach. Finally, this latter approach led to a slightly negatively biased intracluster correlation coefficient estimate but less than that with a classical logistic regression model strategy. We applied these strategies to a real trial randomizing households and comparing ivermectin and malathion to treat head lice. PMID:24713160

  1. Developmental milestones record - 5 years

    ... view (but may not understand them) Has improved math skills Questions others, including parents Strongly identifies with ... milestones for children - 5 years References Feigelman S. The preschool years. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, ...

  2. Traditional invasive vs. minimally invasive esophagectomy: a multi-center, randomized trial (TIME-trial

    de Lange Elly SM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a rise in incidence of esophageal carcinoma due to increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma. Probably the only curative option to date is the use of neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgical resection. Traditional open esophageal resection is associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Furthermore, this approach involves long intensive care unit stay, in-hospital stay and long recovery period. Minimally invasive esophagectomy could reduce the morbidity and accelerate the post-operative recovery. Methods/Design Comparison between traditional open and minimally invasive esophagectomy in a multi-center, randomized trial. Patients with a resectable intrathoracic esophageal carcinoma, including the gastro-esophageal junction tumors (Siewert I are eligible for inclusion. Prior thoracic surgery and cervical esophageal carcinoma are indications for exclusion. The surgical technique involves a right thoracotomy with lung blockade and laparotomy either with a cervical or thoracic anastomosis for the traditional group. The minimally invasive procedure involves a right thoracoscopy in prone position with a single lumen tube and laparoscopy either with a cervical or thoracic anastomosis. All patients in both groups will undergo identical pre-operative and post-operative protocol. Primary endpoint of this study are post-operative respiratory complications within the first two post-operative weeks confirmed by clinical, radiological and sputum culture data. Secondary endpoints are the operative data, the post-operative data and oncological data such as quality of the specimen and survival. Operative data include duration of the operation, blood loss and conversion to open procedure. Post-operative data include morbidity (major and minor, quality of life tests and hospital stay. Based on current literature and the experience of all participating centers, an incidence of pulmonary complications for 57% in the traditional arm

  3. Targeting Preschool Children to Promote Cardiovascular Health: Cluster Randomized Trial

    Céspedes, Jaime; Briceño, German; Farkouh, Michael E.; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Baxter, Jorge; Leal, Martha; Boffetta, Paolo; Woodward, Mark; Hunn, Marilyn; Dennis, Rodolfo; Fuster, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND School programs can be effective in modifying knowledge, attitudes, and habits relevant to long-term risk of chronic diseases associated with sedentary lifestyles. As part of a long-term research strategy, we conducted an educational intervention in preschool facilities to assess changes in preschoolers’ knowledge, attitudes, and habits toward healthy eating and living an active lifestyle. METHODS Using a cluster design, we randomly assigned 14 preschool facilities in Bogotá, Colombia to a 5-month educational and playful intervention (7 preschool facilities) or to usual curriculum (7 preschool facilities). A total of 1216 children aged 3–5 years, 928 parents, and 120 teachers participated. A structured survey was used at baseline, at the end of the study, and 12 months later to evaluate changes in knowledge, attitudes, and habits. RESULTS Children in the intervention group showed a 10.9% increase in weighted score, compared with 5.3% in controls. The absolute adjusted difference was 3.90 units (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.64–6.16; P <.001). Among parents, the equivalent statistics were 8.9% and 3.1%, respectively (absolute difference 4.08 units; 95% CI, 2.03 to 6.12; P <.001), and among teachers, 9.4% and 2.5%, respectively (absolute difference 5.36 units; 95% CI, −0.29–11.01; P = .06). In the intervened cohort 1 year after the intervention, children still showed a significant increase in weighted score (absolute difference of 6.38 units; P <.001). CONCLUSIONS A preschool-based intervention aimed at improving knowledge, attitudes, and habits related to healthy diet and active lifestyle is feasible, efficacious, and sustainable in very young children. PMID:23062403

  4. Prosthetic heart valves: Objective Performance Criteria versus randomized clinical trial.

    Grunkemeier, Gary L; Jin, Ruyun; Starr, Albert

    2006-09-01

    The current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) heart valve guidance document uses an objective performance criteria (OPC) methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of prosthetic heart valves. OPC are essentially historical controls, but they have turned out to be an adequate, and perhaps optimal, study design in this situation. Heart valves have a simple open-and-close mechanism, device effectiveness is easy to document, and the common complications (thromboembolism, thrombosis, bleeding, leak, and infection) are well known and easily detected. Thus, randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have not been deemed necessary for the regulatory approval of prosthetic heart valves. The OPC are derived from the average complication rates of all approved heart valves. Studies based on OPC have been shown to work well; many different valve models have gained FDA market approval based on this methodology. Although heart valve RCTs are not required by the FDA, they have been done to compare valves or treatment regimens after approval. Recently, the Artificial Valve Endocarditis Reduction Trial (AVERT) was designed to compare a new Silzone sewing ring, designed to reduce infection, with the Standard sewing ring on a St. Jude Medical heart valve. This was the largest heart valve RCT ever proposed (4,400 valve patients, followed for as long as 4 years), but it was stopped prematurely because of a high leak rate associated with the Silzone valve. Examining the results showed that a much smaller, OPC-based study with 800 patient-years would have been sufficient to disclose this complication of the Silzone valve. PMID:16928482

  5. A Randomized Trial of Telephone Psychotherapy and Pharmacotherapy for Depression: Continuation and Durability of Effects

    Ludman, Evette J.; Simon, Gregory E.; Tutty, Steve; Von Korff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Randomized trial evidence and expert guidelines are mixed regarding the value of combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy as initial treatment for depression. This study describes long-term results of a randomized trial (N = 393) evaluating telephone-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) plus care management for primary care patients…

  6. Everolimus with reduced calcineurin inhibitor in thoracic transplant recipients with renal dysfunction: a multicenter, randomized trial

    Gullestad, Lars; Iversen, Martin; Mortensen, Svend-Aage; Eiskjaer, Hans; Riise, Gerdt C; Mared, Lena; Bjørtuft, Oystein; Ekmehag, Björn; Jansson, Kjell; Simonsen, Svein; Gude, Einar; Rundqvist, Bengt; Fagertun, Hans E; Solbu, Dag; Bergh, Claes-Håkan

    2010-01-01

    The proliferation signal inhibitor everolimus offers the potential to reduce calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure and alleviate CNI-related nephrotoxicity. Randomized trials in maintenance thoracic transplant patients are lacking.......The proliferation signal inhibitor everolimus offers the potential to reduce calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) exposure and alleviate CNI-related nephrotoxicity. Randomized trials in maintenance thoracic transplant patients are lacking....

  7. Event detection using population-based health care databases in randomized clinical trials

    Thuesen, Leif; Jensen, Lisette Okkels; Tilsted, Hans Henrik; Mæng, Michael; Terkelsen, Christian; Thayssen, Per; Ravkilde, Jan; Christiansen, Evald Høj; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Madsen, Morten; Lassen, Jens F

    2013-01-01

    To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials.......To describe a new research tool, designed to reflect routine clinical practice and relying on population-based health care databases to detect clinical events in randomized clinical trials....

  8. Ipsilateral transversus abdominis plane block provides effective analgesia after appendectomy in children: a randomized controlled trial.

    Carney, John

    2010-10-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block provides effective postoperative analgesia in adults undergoing major abdominal surgery. Its efficacy in children remains unclear, with no randomized clinical trials in this population. In this study, we evaluated its analgesic efficacy over the first 48 postoperative hours after appendectomy performed through an open abdominal incision, in a randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial.

  9. Fool’s gold, lost treasures, and the randomized clinical trial

    Stewart, David J; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials with a survival endpoint are the gold standard for clinical research, but have failed to achieve cures for most advanced malignancies. The high costs of randomized clinical trials slow progress (thereby causing avoidable loss of life) and increase health care costs. Discussion A malignancy may be caused by several differ...

  10. Impact of sending email reminders of the legal requirement for posting results on ClinicalTrials.gov: cohort embedded pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    Maruani, Annabel; Boutron, Isabelle; Baron, Gabriel; Ravaud, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of sending an email to responsible parties of completed trials that do not comply with the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act 801 legislation, to remind them of the legal requirement to post results. Design Cohort embedded pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Setting Trials registered on ClinicalTrials.gov. Participants 190 out of 379 trials randomly selected by computer generated randomization list to receive the intervention (personalized emails s...

  11. Pregnant womens' concerns when invited to a randomized trial : a qualitative case control study

    Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Logtenberg, Sabine; Hooft, Lotty; Bossuyt, Patrick M; Mol, Ben Willem; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women were excluded from clinical trials until the 1990s, but the Food and Drug Administration nowadays allows--and even encourages--responsible inclusion of pregnant women in trials with adequate safety monitoring. Still, randomized trials in pregnant women face specific enrolm

  12. Childhood Fruit and Vegetable Intake: A Randomized Trial

    Rafaela Rosário

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to assess the impact of a six-months nutrition program, taught by trained teachers, on fruit and vegetable consumption among children in grades 1 to 4. Four hundred and sixty-four children (239 female, 6 to 12 years old, from seven elementary schools were assigned to this randomized trial. Teachers were trained by researchers over six months, according to the following topics: nutrition, healthy eating, and strategies to increase physical activity. After each session, teachers were encouraged to develop activities in the classroom on the topics learned. Children's sociodemographic, anthropometric, dietary, and physical activity data were assessed at baseline and at the end of the intervention. The effect sizes ranged between small (Cohen's d=0.12 on “other vegetables” to medium (0.56 on “fruit and vegetable”, and intervened children reported a significantly higher consumption of vegetables and fruit. Interventions involving trained teachers offer promise to increase consumption of fruit and vegetable in children.

  13. Breast screening with mammography: Overview of Swedish randomized trials

    Despite encouraging results from screening trials the efficacy of mammography in reducing mortality remains somewhat controversial. Five studies have been done in Sweden. This overview, reveals a 24% significant reduction of breast cancer mortality among those invited to mammography screening compared with those not invited. To avoid the potential risk of differential misclassification causes of death were assessed by an independent end-point committee after a blinded review of all fatal breast cancer cases. The mortality reduction was similar, irrespective of the end-point used for evaluation (breast cancer as underlying cause of death or breast cancer present at death). There was a consistent risk reduction associated with screening in all studies, although the point estimate of the relative risk for all ages varied non-significantly between 0.68 and 0.84. The cumulative breast cancer mortality by time since randomization was estimated at 1.3 per 1,000 within 6 years in the invited group compared with 1.6 in the control group. The corresponding figures after 9 years are 2.6 and 3.3 and after 12 years 3.9 and 5.1

  14. Intracluster correlation coefficients in cluster randomized trials: empirical insights into how should they be reported.

    Grimshaw Jeremy M; Campbell Marion K; Elbourne Diana R

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Increasingly, researchers are recognizing that there are many situations where the use of a cluster randomized trial may be more appropriate than an individually randomized trial. Similarly, the need for appropriate standards of reporting of cluster trials is more widely acknowledged. Methods In this paper, we describe the results of a survey to inform the appropriate reporting of the intracluster correlation coefficient (ICC) – the statistical measure of the clustering ef...

  15. Evaluation of cluster-randomized trials on maternal and child health research in developing countries

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sen, Pranab Kumar

    2009-01-01

    To summarize and evaluate all publications including cluster-randomized trials used for maternal and child health research in developing countries during the last 10 years.METHODS:All cluster-randomized trials published between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed, and those that met our criteria for inclusion were evaluated further. The criteria for inclusion were that the trial should have been conducted in maternal and child health care in a developing country and that the conclusions should have b...

  16. Randomized clinical trial comparing percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale (PFO using the Amplatzer PFO Occluder with medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism (PC-Trial: rationale and design

    Schuler Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown an association of cryptogenic stroke and embolism with patent foramen ovale (PFO, but the question how to prevent further events in such patients is unresolved. Options include antithrombotic treatment with warfarin or antiplatelet agents or surgical or endovascular closure of the PFO. The PC-Trial was set up to compare endovascular closure and best medical treatment for prevention of recurrent events. Methods The PC-Trial is a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of percutaneous closure of the PFO using the Amplatzer PFO occluder with best medical treatment in patients with cryptogenic embolism, i.e. mostly cryptogenic stroke. Warfarin for 6 months followed by antiplatelet agents is recommended as medical treatment. Randomization is stratified according to patients age ( Discussion patients were randomized in 29 centers of Europe, Canada, and Australia. Randomization started February 2000. Enrollment of 414 patients was completed in February 2009. All patients will be followed-up longitudinally. Follow-up is maintained until the last enrolled patient is beyond 2.5 years of follow-up (expected in 2011. Trial Registration Trial listed in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00166257 and sponsored by AGA Medical, Plymouth, MN, USA

  17. Focus on Function – a randomized controlled trial comparing two rehabilitation interventions for young children with cerebral palsy

    Russell Dianne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with cerebral palsy receive a variety of long-term physical and occupational therapy interventions to facilitate development and to enhance functional independence in movement, self-care, play, school activities and leisure. Considerable human and financial resources are directed at the "intervention" of the problems of cerebral palsy, although the available evidence supporting current interventions is inconclusive. A considerable degree of uncertainty remains about the appropriate therapeutic approaches to manage the habilitation of children with cerebral palsy. The primary objective of this project is to conduct a multi-site randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a task/context-focused approach compared to a child-focused remediation approach in improving performance of functional tasks and mobility, increasing participation in everyday activities, and improving quality of life in children 12 months to 5 years of age who have cerebral palsy. Method/Design A multi-centred randomized controlled trial research design will be used. Children will be recruited from a representative sample of children attending publicly-funded regional children's rehabilitation centers serving children with disabilities in Ontario and Alberta in Canada. Target sample size is 220 children with cerebral palsy aged 12 months to 5 years at recruitment date. Therapists are randomly assigned to deliver either a context-focused approach or a child-focused approach. Children follow their therapist into their treatment arm. Outcomes will be evaluated at baseline, after 6 months of treatment and at a 3-month follow-up period. Outcomes represent the components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health, including body function and structure (range of motion, activities (performance of functional tasks, motor function, participation (involvement in formal and informal activities, and environment (parent

  18. African HIV/AIDS trials are more likely to report adequate allocation concealment and random generation than North American trials.

    Nandi Siegfried

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to good methodological quality is necessary to minimise bias in randomised conrolled trials (RCTs. Specific trial characteristics are associated with better trial quality, but no studies to date are specific to HIV/AIDS or African trials. We postulated that location may negatively impact on trial quality in regions where resources are scarce. METHODS: 1 To compare the methodological quality of all HIV/AIDS RCTs conducted in Africa with a random sample of similar trials conducted in North America; 2 To assess whether location is predictive of trial quality. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and LILACS. Eligible trials were 1 randomized, 2 evaluations of preventive or treatment interventions for HIV/AIDS, 3 reported before 2004, and 4 conducted wholly or partly (if multi-centred in Africa or North America. We assessed adequacy of random generation, allocation concealment and masking of assessors. Using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses we evaluated the association between location (Africa versus North America and these domains. FINDINGS: The African search yielded 12,815 records, from which 80 trials were identified. The North American search yielded 13,158 records from which 785 trials were identified and a random sample of 114 selected for analysis. African trials were three times more likely than North American trials to report adequate allocation concealment (OR = 3.24; 95%CI: 1.59 to 6.59; p<0.01 and twice as likely to report adequate generation of the sequence (OR = 2.36; 95%CI: 1.20 to 4.67; p = 0.01, after adjusting for other confounding factors. Additional significant factors positively associated with quality were an a priori sample size power calculation, restricted randomization and inclusion of a flow diagram detailing attrition. We did not detect an association between location and outcome assessor masking. CONCLUSIONS: The higher quality of reporting of methodology in African trials is

  19. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    Marie Pirotta; Roberta Chow; Ian Relf

    2008-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or b...

  20. Prevention trial in the Cherokee Nation: design of a randomized community trial.

    Komro, Kelli A; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Boyd, Misty; Boyd, B J; Kominsky, Terrence; Pettigrew, Dallas; Tobler, Amy L; Lynne-Landsman, Sarah D; Livingston, Melvin D; Livingston, Bethany; Molina, Mildred M Maldonado

    2015-02-01

    Despite advances in prevention science and practice in recent decades, the U.S. continues to struggle with significant alcohol-related risks and consequences among youth, especially among vulnerable rural and Native American youth. The Prevention Trial in the Cherokee Nation is a partnership between prevention scientists and Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health to create, implement, and evaluate a new, integrated community-level intervention designed to prevent underage drinking and associated negative consequences among Native American and other youth living in rural high-risk underserved communities. The intervention builds directly on results of multiple previous trials of two conceptually distinct approaches. The first is an updated version of CMCA, an established community environmental change intervention, and the second is CONNECT, our newly developed population-wide intervention based on screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) research. CMCA direct-action community organizing is used to engage local citizens to address community norms and practices related to alcohol use and commercial and social access to alcohol among adolescents. The new CONNECT intervention expands traditional SBIRT to be implemented universally within schools. Six key research design elements optimize causal inference and experimental evaluation of intervention effects, including a controlled interrupted time-series design, purposive selection of towns, random assignment to study condition, nested cohorts as well as repeated cross-sectional observations, a factorial design crossing two conceptually distinct interventions, and multiple comparison groups. The purpose of this paper is to describe the strong partnership between prevention scientists and behavioral health leaders within the Cherokee Nation, and the intervention and research design of this new community trial. PMID:24615546

  1. Kangaroo mother care for infantile colic: a randomized clinical trial

    Reza Saeidi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Infantile colic has been defined as episodes of excessive and persistent crying without known medical cause. Kangaroo mother care is a new method for baby care with several advantages. A universally available and biologically sound method of care for all newborns, with three components: skin-to-skin contact, exclusive breastfeeding, support to the mother-infant dyad. This study designed for evaluating Kangaroo mother care on infantile colic.  "n"nMethods: This study was a randomized controlled trial. From 1th may 2008 to 1 may 2009 a total of 70 children, aged 3-12 weeks with persistent colic symptoms were studied. The children were referred to Sheikh clinic, Mashhad, Iran, because of excessive crying. Normal mother-infant pairs were recruited at 3 to 12 weeks of age after obtaining baseline for two days. Subjects divided randomly to kangaroo care or conventional care group and mothers in both groups filled diary for seven days. "n"nResults: In the beginning of the study, the infants in kangaroo care group had 3.5 hr/d crying and after the intervention, it decreased to 1.7 hr/d, the difference were significant (p<0.05. But there were no difference in feeding duration between

  2. A large-scale field trial of thin-layer capping of PCDD/F-contaminated sediments: Sediment-to-water fluxes up to 5 years post-amendment.

    Cornelissen, Gerard; Schaanning, Morten; Gunnarsson, Jonas S; Eek, Espen

    2016-04-01

    The longer-term effect (3-5 y) of thin-layer capping on in situ sediment-to-surface water fluxes was monitored in a large-scale field experiment in the polychlorinated dibenzodioxin and dibenzofuran (PCDD/F) contaminated Grenlandfjords, Norway (4 trial plots of 10,000 to 40,000 m(2) at 30 to 100 m water depth). Active caps (designed thickness 2.5 cm) were established in 2 fjords, consisting of dredged clean clay amended with powdered activated carbon (PAC) from anthracite. These active caps were compared to 2 nonactive caps in one of the fjords (designed thickness 5 cm) consisting of either clay only (i.e., without PAC) or crushed limestone. Sediment-to-water PCDD/F fluxes were measured in situ using diffusion chambers. An earlier study showed that during the first 2 years after thin-layer capping, flux reductions relative to noncapped reference fields were more extensive at the fields capped with nonactive caps (70%-90%) than at the ones with PAC-containing caps (50%-60%). However, the present work shows that between 3 and 5 years after thin-layer capping, this trend was reversed and cap effectiveness in reducing fluxes was increasing to 80% to 90% for the PAC caps, whereas cap effectiveness of the nonactive caps decreased to 20% to 60%. The increasing effectiveness over time of PAC-containing "active" caps is explained by a combination of slow sediment-to-PAC mass transfer of PCDD/Fs and bioturbation by benthic organisms. The decreasing effectiveness of "nonactive" limestone and clay caps is explained by deposition of contaminated particles on top of the caps. The present field data indicate that the capping efficiency of thin active caps (i.e., enriched with PAC) can improve over time as a result of slow diffusive PCDD/F transfer from sediment to PAC particles and better mixing of the PAC by bioturbation. PMID:26012529

  3. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  4. Anaesthesiological strategies in elective craniotomy: randomized, equivalence, open trial – The NeuroMorfeo trial

    Guzzetti Stefano

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have attempted to determine the "best" anaesthetic technique for neurosurgical procedures in patients without intracranial hypertension. So far, no study comparing intravenous (IA with volatile-based neuroanaesthesia (VA has been able to demonstrate major outcome differences nor a superiority of one of the two strategies in patients undergoing elective supratentorial neurosurgery. Therefore, current practice varies and includes the use of either volatile or intravenous anaesthetics in addition to narcotics. Actually the choice of the anaestesiological strategy depends only on the anaesthetists' preferences or institutional policies. This trial, named NeuroMorfeo, aims to assess the equivalence between volatile and intravenous anaesthetics for neurosurgical procedures. Methods/Design NeuroMorfeo is a multicenter, randomized, open label, controlled trial, based on an equivalence design. Patients aged between 18 and 75 years, scheduled for elective craniotomy for supratentorial lesion without signs of intracranial hypertension, in good physical state (ASA I-III and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS equal to 15, are randomly assigned to one of three anaesthesiological strategies (two VA arms, sevoflurane + fentanyl or sevoflurane + remifentanil, and one IA, propofol + remifentanil. The equivalence between intravenous and volatile-based neuroanaesthesia will be evaluated by comparing the intervals required to reach, after anaesthesia discontinuation, a modified Aldrete score ≥ 9 (primary end-point. Two statistical comparisons have been planned: 1 sevoflurane + fentanyl vs. propofol + remifentanil; 2 sevoflurane + remifentanil vs. propofol + remifentanil. Secondary end-points include: an assessment of neurovegetative stress based on (a measurement of urinary catecholamines and plasma and urinary cortisol and (b estimate of sympathetic/parasympathetic balance by power spectrum analyses of electrocardiographic tracings recorded

  5. Register or electronic health records enriched randomized pragmatic trials: The future of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness trials?

    Joakim Ramsberg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For many interventions in health care, there is limited information on efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness even long after they have been implemented. To decide between treatments, the randomized controlled trial (RCT provides the strongest evidence. This creates a problem because RCTs are very expensive, logistically challenging and generally cumbersome. Observational studies are inexpensive, but create weaker evidence. The pragmatic randomized trial, enriched with routinely collected register or electronic health record  (EHR data may be a solution to this dilemma since they are much less costly than traditional RCTs but create much stronger evidence than observational studies. Pragmatic randomized trials mean that patients in routine care are randomly allocated to alternative treatments. The outcome of the treatment is then followed up in existing registers with patient data. This means that it is possible to 1 follow patients in the normal care situation - unlike the often artificial situation in the traditional RCT, 2 that the costs are low, even for large studies and 3 that a broad spectrum of outcomes, including both health and economic outcomes, can be collected. Pragmatic randomized trials using register or EHR data in principle lend themselves well to health economic evaluations. We have identified a number of such trials in the literature. Very few, however, include economic outcomes.

  6. Robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy versus open transthoracic esophagectomy for resectable esophageal cancer, a randomized controlled trial (ROBOT trial

    van der Sluis Pieter C

    2012-11-01

    open transthoracic esophagectomy as surgical treatment for resectable esophageal cancer. If our hypothesis is proven correct, RATE will result in a lower percentage of postoperative complications, lower blood loss, and shorter hospital stay, but with at least similar oncologic outcomes and better postoperative quality of life compared with open transthoracic esophagectomy. The study started in January 2012. Follow-up will be 5 years. Short-term results will be analyzed and published after discharge of the last randomized patient. Trial registration Dutch trial register: NTR3291 ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01544790

  7. Celecoxib-related gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events in a randomized trial for gastric cancer prevention

    Guo-Shuang Feng; Harry HX Xia; Ji-You Li; Shiu Kum Lam; Wei-Cheng You; Jun-Ling Ma; Benjamin CY Wong; Lian Zhang; Wei-Dong Liu; Kai-Feng Pan; Lin Shen; Xiao-Dong Zhang; Jie Li

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the long-term risk of gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events induced by celecoxib in a population-based, randomized, double-blind,placebo-controlled study.METHODS: From 2004 to 2006, a total of 1024 Chinese patients (aged 35 to 64 years) with severe chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia were randomly assigned to receive 200 mg of celecoxib twice daily or placebo in Linqu County (Shandong Province, China), a high-risk area of gastric cancer. All gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events occurred were recorded and the patients were followed up for 1.5 years after treatment. At the end of the trial, a systematic interview survey about other adverse events was conducted.RESULTS: Gastroduodenal ulcer was detected in 19 of 463 (3.72%) patients who Received: celecoxib and 17 of 473 (3.31%) patients who Received placebo,respectively (odds ratio = 1.13, 95% CI = 0.58-2.19).Cardiovascular (CV) events occurred in 4 patients who received celecoxib and in 5 patients who received placebo,respectively.Compared with those who received placebo,patients who received celecoxib had no significant increase in occurrence of Cvevents (hazard ratio = 0.84,95% CI =0.23-3.15).Among the adverse events acquired by interview survey,only the frequency of bloating was significantly higher in patients treated with celecoxib than in those treated with placebo.CONCLUSION:Treatment of gastric cancer with celecoxib is not associated with increased risk of gastroduodenal ulcer and cardiovascular events.

  8. Randomized clinical trial of total vs. subtotal hysterectomy

    Gimbel, Helga; Zobbe, Vibeke; Ottesen, Bent S;

    2002-01-01

    To ensure the internal validity of a trial it is recommended to undertake a validation study of the method measuring the outcome.......To ensure the internal validity of a trial it is recommended to undertake a validation study of the method measuring the outcome....

  9. Pragmatic vs explanatory trials: the Pragmascope tool to help measure differences in protocols of mental health randomized controlled trials

    Tosh, Graeme; Soares-Weiser, Karla; Adams, Clive E.

    2011-01-01

    In the pragmatic-explanatory continuum, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) can at one extreme investigate whether a treatment could work in ideal circumstances (explanatory), or at the other extreme, whether it would work in everyday practice (pragmatic). How explanatory or pragmatic a study is can have implications for clinicians, policy makers, patients, researchers, funding bodies, and the public. There is an increasing need for studies to be open and pragmatic; however, explanatory trial...

  10. Evaluation of cluster-randomized trials on maternal and child health research in developing countries

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sen, Pranab Kumar

    2009-01-01

    To summarize and evaluate all publications including cluster-randomized trials used for maternal and child health research in developing countries during the last 10 years. METHODS: All cluster-randomized trials published between 1998 and 2008 were reviewed, and those that met our criteria for...... inclusion were evaluated further. The criteria for inclusion were that the trial should have been conducted in maternal and child health care in a developing country and that the conclusions should have been made on an individual level. Methods of accounting for clustering in design and analysis were......, and the trials generally improved in quality. CONCLUSIONS: Shortcomings exist in the sample-size calculations and in the analysis of cluster-randomized trials conducted during maternal and child health research in developing countries. Even though there has been improvement over time, further progress...

  11. Transparency of Outcome Reporting and Trial Registration of Randomized Controlled Trials Published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

    Marleine Azar

    Full Text Available Confidence that randomized controlled trial (RCT results accurately reflect intervention effectiveness depends on proper trial conduct and the accuracy and completeness of published trial reports. The Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology (JCCP is the primary trials journal amongst American Psychological Association (APA journals. The objectives of this study were to review RCTs recently published in JCCP to evaluate (1 adequacy of primary outcome analysis definitions; (2 registration status; and, (3 among registered trials, adequacy of outcome registrations. Additionally, we compared results from JCCP to findings from a recent study of top psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals.Eligible RCTs were published in JCCP in 2013-2014. For each RCT, two investigators independently extracted data on (1 adequacy of outcome analysis definitions in the published report, (2 whether the RCT was registered prior to enrolling patients, and (3 adequacy of outcome registration.Of 70 RCTs reviewed, 12 (17.1% adequately defined primary or secondary outcome analyses, whereas 58 (82.3% had multiple primary outcome analyses without statistical adjustment or undefined outcome analyses. There were 39 (55.7% registered trials. Only two trials registered prior to patient enrollment with a single primary outcome variable and time point of assessment. However, in one of the two trials, registered and published outcomes were discrepant. No studies were adequately registered as per Standard Protocol Items: Recommendation for Interventional Trials guidelines. Compared to psychosomatic and behavioral medicine journals, the proportion of published trials with adequate outcome analysis declarations was significantly lower in JCCP (17.1% versus 32.9%; p = 0.029. The proportion of registered trials in JCCP (55.7% was comparable to behavioral medicine journals (52.6%; p = 0.709.The quality of published outcome analysis definitions and trial registrations in JCCP is

  12. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: Results from a Pilot Randomized Trial

    Goldstein, Tina R.; Fersch-Podrat, Rachael K.; Rivera, Maribel; Axelson, David A.; Merranko, John; Yu, Haifeng; Brent, David A.; Birmaher, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a pilot randomized trial of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) versus psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU) for adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP).

  13. Predictors of Missed Research Appointments in a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Stéphanie J.E. Becker

    2014-09-01

     Younger patients with no college education, who believe their health can be controlled, are more likely to miss a research appointment when enrolled in a randomized placebo injection-controlled trial

  14. Evaluation of occupational health interventions using a randomized controlled trial: challenges and alternative research designs

    Schelvis, R.M; Oude Hengel, K.M.; Burdorf, A.; Blatter, B.M.; Strijk, J.E.; Beek, A.J. van

    2015-01-01

    Occupational health researchers regularly conduct evaluative intervention research for which a randomized controlled trial (RCT) may not be the most appropriate design (eg, effects of policy measures, organizational interventions on work schedules). This article demonstrates the appropriateness of a

  15. A randomized trial on folic acid supplementation and risk of recurrent colorectal adenoma

    Background: Evidence from observational studies suggests that inadequate folate status enhances colorectal carcinogenesis, but results from some randomized trials do not support this hypothesis. Objective: To assess the effect of folic acid supplementation on recurrent colorectal adenoma, we conduc...

  16. Randomized controlled trial of the Pentax AWS, Glidescope, and Macintosh laryngoscopes in predicted difficult intubation.

    Malik, M A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential for the Pentax AWS and the Glidescope to reduce the difficulty of tracheal intubation in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

  17. Assessment of risk of bias in randomized clinical trials in surgery

    Gurusamy, K S; Gluud, C; Nikolova, D; Davidson, B R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) with low risk of bias is considered the highest level of evidence available for evaluating an intervention. Bias in RCTs may overestimate or underestimate the true effectiveness of an intervention. METHODS: The causes of bias in...... surgical trials as described by The Cochrane Collaboration, and the methods that can be used to avoid them, are reviewed. RESULTS: Blinding is difficult in many surgical trials but careful trial design can reduce the bias risk due to lack of blinding. It is possible to conduct surgical trials with low risk...... of bias by using appropriate trial design. CONCLUSION: The risk of providing a treatment based on a biased effect estimate must be balanced against the difficulty of conducting trials with very low risk of bias. Better understanding of the risk of bias may result in improved trials with a closer...

  18. Systematic review: The relation between nutrition and nosocomial pneumonia: randomized trials in critically ill patients

    Cook, Deborah; de Jonghe, Bernard; Heyland, Daren

    1997-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of enteral nutrition on nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients as summarized in randomized clinical trials. Study identification and selection Studies were identified through MEDLINE, SCISEARCH, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, bibliographies of primary and review articles, and personal files. Through duplicate independent review, we selected randomized trials evaluating approaches to nutrition and their relation to nosocomial pneumonia. Data abstraction I...

  19. Platelet-rich fibrin versus albumin in surgical wound repair: a randomized trial with paired design

    Danielsen, Patricia L; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad

    2010-01-01

    To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial.......To study the effects of autologous platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) versus human albumin on incisional wound breaking strength and subcutaneous collagen deposition in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a randomized trial....

  20. Components of effective randomized controlled trials of hydrotherapy programs for fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review

    Luke Perraton; Zuzana Machotka; Saravana Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Luke Perraton, Zuzana Machotka, Saravana KumarInternational Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaAim: Previous systematic reviews have found hydrotherapy to be an effective management strategy for fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the components of hydrotherapy programs used in randomized controlled trials.Method: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials was conducted. Onl...

  1. Computer-Aided Diabetes Education: A Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Boren, Suzanne Austin; Gunlock, Teira L.; Krishna, Santosh; Kramer, Teresa C.

    2006-01-01

    Computer-aided diabetes education is the application of technology to provide information on diabetes self-management as well as test the users’ knowledge and provide feedback. The objective of this paper was to evaluate the impact of computer-aided diabetes education in improving health outcomes. We identified reports of randomized controlled trials through systematic electronic database searches. Three eligibility criteria were applied: randomized controlled trial; evaluation of a computeri...

  2. Randomized controlled trial of artesunate or artemether in Vietnamese adults with severe falciparum malaria

    White Nicholas J; Chuong Ly V; Sinh Dinh X; Chau Tran TH; Mai Nguyen TH; Day Nicholas; Tuan Phung Q; Phu Nguyen H; Farrar Jeremy; Hien Tran T

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Both artemether and artesunate have been shown to be superior to quinine for the treatment of severe falciparum malaria in Southeast Asian adults, although the magnitude of the superiority has been greater for artesunate than artemether. These two artemisinin derivatives had not been compared in a randomized trial. Methods A randomized double blind trial in 370 adults with severe falciparum malaria; 186 received intramuscular artesunate (2.4 mg/kg immediately followed by 1...

  3. A randomized clinical trial evaluating the success rate of ethanol wet bonding technique and two adhesives

    Vajihesadat Mortazavi; Pouran Samimi; Mojgan Rafizadeh; Shantia Kazemi

    2012-01-01

    Background : Composite resin restorations may have a short lifespan due to the degradation of resin-dentin interface. Ethanol wet bonding technique may extend the longevity of resin-dentin bond. The purpose of this one year randomized clinical trial was to compare clinical performance of two adhesives with ethanol wet bonding technique. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was performed on 36 non-carious cervical lesions in 12 patients restored with composite resin using ...

  4. A descriptive analysis of a representative sample of pediatric randomized controlled trials published in 2007

    Thomson Denise

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs are the gold standard for trials assessing the effects of therapeutic interventions; therefore it is important to understand how they are conducted. Our objectives were to provide an overview of a representative sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 and assess the validity of their results. Methods We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials using a pediatric filter and randomly selected 300 RCTs published in 2007. We extracted data on trial characteristics; outcomes; methodological quality; reporting; and registration and protocol characteristics. Trial registration and protocol availability were determined for each study based on the publication, an Internet search and an author survey. Results Most studies (83% were efficacy trials, 40% evaluated drugs, and 30% were placebo-controlled. Primary outcomes were specified in 41%; 43% reported on adverse events. At least one statistically significant outcome was reported in 77% of trials; 63% favored the treatment group. Trial registration was declared in 12% of publications and 23% were found through an Internet search. Risk of bias (ROB was high in 59% of trials, unclear in 33%, and low in 8%. Registered trials were more likely to have low ROB than non-registered trials (16% vs. 5%; p = 0.008. Effect sizes tended to be larger for trials at high vs. low ROB (0.28, 95% CI 0.21,0.35 vs. 0.16, 95% CI 0.07,0.25. Among survey respondents (50% response rate, the most common reason for trial registration was a publication requirement and for non-registration, a lack of familiarity with the process. Conclusions More than half of this random sample of pediatric RCTs published in 2007 was at high ROB and three quarters of trials were not registered. There is an urgent need to improve the design, conduct, and reporting of child health research.

  5. Cognitive benefits of social dancing and walking in old age: the Dancing Mind randomized controlled trial

    Dafna eMerom

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A physically active lifestyle has the potential to prevent cognitive decline and dementia, yet the optimal type of physical activity/exercise remains unclear. Dance is of special interest as it complex sensorimotor rhythmic activity with additional cognitive, social and affective dimensions. Objectives: to determine whether dance benefits executive function more than walking, an activity that is simple and functional. Methods: Two-arm randomised controlled trial among community-dwelling older adults. The intervention group received 1 hour of ballroom dancing twice weekly over 8 months (~69sessions in local community dance studios. The control group received a combination of a home walking program with a pedometer and optional biweekly group-based walking in local community park to facilitate socialisation. Main outcomes: Main outcomes: executive function tests: processing speed and task shift by the Trail Making Tests (TMT, response inhibition by the Stroop Colour-Word Test (SCWT, working memory by the Digit Span Backwards (DSB test, immediate and delayed verbal recall by the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and visuospatial recall by the Brief Visuospatial Memory Test (BVST. Results: One hundred and fifteen adults (69.5 years, SD6.4 completed baseline and delayed baseline (3 weeks apart before being randomised to either dance (n=60 or walking (n=55. Of those randomized, 79 (68% completed the follow-up measurements (32 weeks from baseline. In the dance group only, ‘non-completers’ had significant lower baseline scores on all executive function tests than those completed the full program. Intention-to-treat analyses showed no group effect. In a random effects model including participants who completed all measurements, adjusted for baseline score and covariates (age, education, estimated verbal intelligence, community, a between group effect in favour of dance was noted only for BVST total learning (Cohen’s D Effect size

  6. EEG Neurofeedback for ADHD: Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Randomized Pilot Feasibility Trial

    Arnold, L. Eugene; Lofthouse, Nicholas; Hersch, Sarah; Pan, Xueliang; Hurt, Elizabeth; Bates, Bethany; Kassouf, Kathleen; Moone, Stacey; Grantier, Cara

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Preparing for a definitive randomized clinical trial (RCT) of neurofeedback (NF) for ADHD, this pilot trial explored feasibility of a double-blind, sham-controlled design and adherence/palatability/relative effect of two versus three treatments/week. Method: Unmedicated 6- to 12-year-olds with "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  7. Acupuncture for treating polycystic ovary syndrome: guidance for future randomized controlled trials*

    Wu, Yan; Robinson, Nicola; Hardiman, Paul J.; Taw, Malcolm B.; Zhou, Jue; Wang, Fang-Fang; Qu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To provide guidance for future randomized controlled trials (RCTs) based on a review concerning acupuncture for treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in October 2015 using MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCISEARCH, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group trials register, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and...

  8. The design and protocol of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis: A multicenter randomized controlled trial

    Li Jingdao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have already reported encouraging results in the prophylactic therapy of migraine by acupuncture, but there seems to be a lack of high quality randomized controlled trials from China. We design and perform a randomized controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture compared with flunarizine in the prophylactic therapy of patients with migraine without aura in China. Methods This trial is a multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial. The 140 migraine patients are randomly allocated to two different groups. The acupuncture groups (n = 70 is treated with acupuncture and placebo medicine; while the control group (n = 70 is treated with sham acupuncture and medicine (Flunarizine. Both Flunarizine and placebo are taken 10 mg once per night for the first 2 weeks and then 5 mg once per night for the next 2 weeks. Patients in both groups receive 12 sessions of verum/sham acupuncture in 4 weeks. Discussion The study design and the long term clinical practice of acupuncturists guarantee a high external validity for the results. The results of our trial will be helpful to supply the evidence on the efficacy of acupuncture for migraine prophylaxis in China. Trial Registration The trial is registered at Controlled Clinical Trials: ISRCTN49839714.

  9. Survey and Practice of Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    LI Ting-qian; MAO Bing; WANG Gang; CHANG Jing; WANG Lei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been generally accepted as the gold standard in the evaluation of clinical effectiveness. Readers need to understand the trial design, implementation, results, analysis and interpretation, so as to fully understand the results of RCTs. Thus, the investigators of RCTs have to report these items in a complete, accurate and clear manner.

  10. A brief history of the randomized controlled trial. From oranges and lemons to the gold standard.

    Meldrum, M L

    2000-08-01

    This article discusses the history and development of randomized clinical trial methodology, the reasons for its status and authority as a method of therapeutic evaluation, and the continuing role of clinical judgement in designing, interpreting, and applying the findings of trials. PMID:10949771

  11. Getting added value from using qualitative research with randomized controlled trials: a qualitative interview study.

    O Cathain, A.; Goode, J.; Drabble, S J; Thomas, K.J.; Rudolph, A; Hewison, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Qualitative research is undertaken with randomized controlled trials of health interventions. Our aim was to explore the perceptions of researchers with experience of this endeavour to understand the added value of qualitative research to the trial in practice. Methods A telephone semi-structured interview study with 18 researchers with experience of undertaking the trial and/or the qualitative research. Results Interviewees described the added value of qualitative research for the...

  12. New drugs with novel therapeutic characteristics. Have they been subject to randomized controlled trials?

    Lexchin, Joel

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how many randomized controlled trials on the safety or efficacy of new drugs are published when these drugs are first marketed in Canada, and to determine the quality of the information in those trials. DESIGN: A MEDLINE search was conducted on each drug identified as having novel therapeutic characteristics and first marketed between 1990 and 2000. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of trials dealing with the safety or efficacy of each drug published at the time the drug w...

  13. Effectiveness of papain gel in venous ulcer treatment: randomized clinical trial1

    Ana Luiza Soares Rodrigues; Beatriz Guitton Renaud Baptista de Oliveira; Débora Omena Futuro; Silvia Regina Secoli

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the effectiveness of 2% papain gel compared to 2% carboxymethyl cellulose in the treatment of chronic venous ulcer patients. METHOD: randomized controlled clinical trial with 12-week follow-up. The sample consisted of 18 volunteers and 28 venous ulcers. In the trial group, 2% papain gel was used and, in the control group, 2% carboxymethyl cellulose gel. RESULTS: the trial group showed a significant reduction in the lesion area, especially between the fifth and twelfth wee...

  14. Lessons learned from EVOLVE for the planning of future global randomized trials in chronic kidney disease

    Parfrey, P S; Block, G A; Correa-Rotter, R.; Drueke, T B; Floege, J; Herzog, C. A.; London, G. M.; Mahaffey, K. W.; Moe, S. M.; Wheeler, D C; Chertow, G M

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the calcimimetic cinacalcet on cardiovascular disease in patients undergoing hemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism (sHPT) was evaluated in the EVOLVE trial. This was the largest (in size) and longest (in duration) randomized controlled clinical trial undertaken in this population. During planning, execution, analysis and reporting of the trial many lessons were learned, including those related to the use of a composite cardiovascular primary endpoint, definition of end...

  15. Fluoxetine for poststroke depression A randomized placebo controlled clinical trial

    Yan Kong; Wanli Dong; Chunfeng Liu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that poststroke depression(PSD) may be related with the disequilibrium between noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) caused by cerebral injury. The injured regions involve noradrenergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurons as well as conduction pathway.The levels of noradrenaline and 5-HT would be decreased.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of fluoxetine on preventing against PSD and recovery of neurologic function, and analyze the relationship of fluoxetine and the 5-HT level.DESIGN: A randomized controlled clinical trial.SETTING: Department of Neurology, First Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University.PARTICIPANTS: Ninety consecutive patients, 47 female and 43 male, were recruited who admitted to hospital for recent stroke in the Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between September 2003 and February 2005. Subjects were aged (64±7) years, ranging from 47 to 79 years old. They all met the diagnosis criteria of various cerebrovascular diseases formulated in the 4th National Cerebrovascular Disease Conference and confirmed as stroke by skull CT or MRI; The time from onset to tentative administration was less than 7 days; The patients had clear consciousness, without obvious language disorder. They were randomized into treatment group (n =48) and placebo group (n =42).METHODS: ①All the patients were given routine treatment according to treatment guideline of cerebrovascular disease after admission. Patients in the treatment group and placebo group received 20 mg/d fluoxetine and placebo (component: vitamin C) for 8 weeks, respectively. ② Neurologic deficit was assessed according to 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) and Activity of Daily Living Scale (ADL) before and at 2,4 and 8 weeks after test, separately; Meanwhile, the levels of platelet 5-HT and plasma 5-HT were determined. Grading criteria of HAMD intergral depression: non-depression < 8 points

  16. Randomized Trial of Hyperfractionation Versus Conventional Fractionation in T2 Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Vocal Cord (RTOG 9512)

    Trotti, Andy, E-mail: andy.trotti@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of South Florida H. Lee Moffittt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Zhang, Qiang [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bentzen, Søren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Emami, Bahman [Department of Radiation Therapy, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Hammond, M. Elizabeth [Department of Pathology, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Morrison, William H. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sagar, Stephen M. [McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Ridge, John A. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Fu, Karen K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California (emeritus), San Francisco, California (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: To compare hyperfractionation versus standard fractionation for T2N0 vocal cord carcinoma in a randomized controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Patients with T2 vocal cord cancer were stratified by substage (T2a vs T2b) and randomly assigned to receive either hyperfractionation (HFX) to 79.2 Gy in 66 fractions of 1.2 Gy given twice a day, or standard fractionation (SFX) to 70 Gy in 35 fractions given once a day. The trial was designed to detect a 55% reduction in the local failure hazard rate with 80% statistical power. Results: Between April 1996 and July 2003, a total of 250 patients were enrolled. Of 239 patients analyzable for outcomes, 94% were male, 83% had a Karnofsky performance status of 90-100, and 62% had T2a tumor. Median follow-up for all surviving patients was 7.9 years (range, 0.6-13.1 years). The 5-year local control (LC) rate was 8 points higher but not statistically significant (P=.14 for HFX [78%] vs SFX [70%]), corresponding to a 30% hazard rate reduction. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 49% versus 40% (P=.13) and overall survival (OS) was 72% versus 63% (P=.29). HFX was associated with higher rates of acute skin, mucosal, and laryngeal toxicity. Grade 3-4 late effects were similar with a 5-year cumulative incidence of 8.5% (3.4%-13.6%) after SFX and 8.5% (3.4%-13.5%) after HFX. Conclusions: The 5-year local control was modestly higher with HFX compared to SFX for T2 glottic carcinoma, but the difference was not statistically significant. These results are consistent with prior studies of hyperfractionation showing a benefit in local control. Substaging by T2a versus T2b carries prognostic value for DFS and OS. For cost and convenience reasons other altered fractionation schedules have been adopted in routine practice.

  17. Protocol for the Osteoporosis Choice trial. A pilot randomized trial of a decision aid in primary care practice

    Tulledge-Scheitel Sidna M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bisphosphonates can reduce fracture risk in patients with osteoporosis, but many at-risk patients do not start or adhere to these medications. The aims of this study are to: (1 preliminarily evaluate the effect of an individualized 10-year osteoporotic fracture risk calculator and decision aid (OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE for postmenopausal women at risk for osteoporotic fractures; and (2 assess the feasibility and validity (i.e., absence of contamination of patient-level randomization (vs. cluster randomization in pilot trials of decision aid efficacy. Methods/Design This is a protocol for a parallel, 2-arm, randomized trial to compare an intervention group receiving OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE to a control group receiving usual primary care. Postmenopausal women with bone mineral density T-scores of STEOPOROSIS CHOICE on five outcomes: (a patient knowledge regarding osteoporosis risk factors and treatment; (b quality of the decision-making process for both the patient and clinician; (c patient and clinician acceptability and satisfaction with the decision aid; (d rate of bisphosphonate use and adherence, and (e trial processes (e.g., ability to recruit participants, collect patient outcomes. To capture these outcomes, we will use patient and clinician surveys following each visit and video recordings of the clinical encounters. These video recordings will also allow us to determine the extent to which clinicians previously exposed to the decision aid were able to recreate elements of the decision aid with control patients (i.e., contamination. Pharmacy prescription profiles and follow-up phone interviews will assess medication start and adherence at 6 months. Discussion This pilot trial will provide evidence of feasibility, validity of patient randomization, and preliminary efficacy of a novel approach -- decision aids -- to improving medication adherence for postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporotic fractures. The results will inform

  18. Validating intramyocardial bone marrow stem cell therapy in combination with coronary artery bypass grafting, the PERFECT Phase III randomized multicenter trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Donndorf Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the last decade continuous efforts have been made to translate regenerative cell therapy protocols in the cardiovascular field from ‘bench to bedside’. Successful clinical introduction, supporting safety, and feasibility of this new therapeutic approach, led to the initiation of the German, Phase III, multicenter trial - termed the PERFECT trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00950274, in order to evaluate the efficacy of surgical cardiac cell therapy on left ventricular function. Methods/Design The PERFECT trial has been designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, multicenter trial, analyzing the effect of intramyocardial CD 133+ bone marrow stem cell injection in combination with coronary artery bypass grafting on postoperative left ventricular function. The trial includes patients aged between 18 and 79 years presenting with a coronary disease with indication for surgical revascularization and reduced global left ventricular ejection fraction as assessed by cardiac magnet resonance imaging. The included patients are treated in the chronic phase of ischemic cardiomyopathy after previous myocardial infarction. Discussion Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in combination with intramyocardial CD133+ cell injection will have a higher LV ejection fraction than patient who undergo CABG alone, measured 6 months after the operation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00950274

  19. Transfusion of fresh frozen plasma in non-bleeding ICU patients -TOPIC TRIAL: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Müller Marcella CA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fresh frozen plasma (FFP is an effective therapy to correct for a deficiency of multiple coagulation factors during bleeding. In past years, use of FFP has increased, in particular in patients on the Intensive Care Unit (ICU, and has expanded to include prophylactic use in patients with a coagulopathy prior to undergoing an invasive procedure. Retrospective studies suggest that prophylactic use of FFP does not prevent bleeding, but carries the risk of transfusion-related morbidity. However, up to 50% of FFP is administered to non-bleeding ICU patients. With the aim to investigate whether prophylactic FFP transfusions to critically ill patients can be safely omitted, a multi-center randomized clinical trial is conducted in ICU patients with a coagulopathy undergoing an invasive procedure. Methods A non-inferiority, prospective, multicenter randomized open-label, blinded end point evaluation (PROBE trial. In the intervention group, a prophylactic transfusion of FFP prior to an invasive procedure is omitted compared to transfusion of a fixed dose of 12 ml/kg in the control group. Primary outcome measure is relevant bleeding. Secondary outcome measures are minor bleeding, correction of International Normalized Ratio, onset of acute lung injury, length of ventilation days and length of Intensive Care Unit stay. Discussion The Transfusion of Fresh Frozen Plasma in non-bleeding ICU patients (TOPIC trial is the first multi-center randomized controlled trial powered to investigate whether it is safe to withhold FFP transfusion to coagulopathic critically ill patients undergoing an invasive procedure. Trial Registration Trial registration: Dutch Trial Register NTR2262 and ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01143909

  20. Randomized controlled trials in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Police, Rachel L; Trask, Peter C; Wang, Jianmin; Olivares, Robert; Khan, Shahnaz; Abbe, Adeline; Colosia, Ann; Njue, Annete; Sherril, Beth; Ruiz-Soto, Rodrigo; Kaye, James A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2016-10-01

    This systematic literature review evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of interventions used in relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Primary efficacy outcomes were objective response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival. Safety endpoints were grade 3/4 toxicities, serious adverse events and withdrawals or deaths due to toxicity. Studies were selected if they were randomized controlled trials reporting on the efficacy or safety of treatments for relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma, and if outcomes were reported separately from trials that included other lymphoid neoplasms. We used the Bucher method for conducting adjusted indirect comparisons within a meta-analysis. We identified 10 randomized controlled trials of treatments for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. The most prominent drug investigated (alone or in combination) was rituximab. Most trials did not report median overall survival. Two trials reported median event-free survival (range, 1.2-23.2 months). Six of ten trials reported objective response rate (range, 9-93%). Meta-analysis showed only one statistically significant result: rituximab + bortezomib yielded a significantly higher objective response rate than rituximab monotherapy (relative risk, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.11-1.47). Otherwise, there were no discernable differences in overall survival or progression-free survival, partly due to insufficient reporting of results in the clinical trials. The relatively small number of randomized controlled trials, few overlapping treatment arms, and variability in the randomized controlled trial features and in the endpoints studied complicate the formal comparison of therapies for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphoma. Additional well-designed randomized controlled trials are needed to fully understand the relative outcomes of older and more recently developed therapies. PMID:26320127

  1. The Sonoma Water Evaluation Trial (SWET): A randomized drinking water intervention trial to reduce gastrointestinal illness in older adults

    Objectives. We estimate the risk of highly credible gastrointestinal illness (HCGI) among adults 55 and older in a community drinking tap water meeting current U.S. standards. Methods. We conducted a randomized, triple-blinded, crossover trial in 714 households (988 indiv...

  2. Maternal Dietary Counseling Reduces Consumption of Energy-Dense Foods among Infants: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Vitolo, Marcia Regina; Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Campagnolo, Paula Dal Bo; Hoffman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact of a dietary counseling in reducing the intake of energy-dense foods by infants. Design: A randomized controlled trial. Setting and Participants: Sao Leopoldo, Brazil. Mothers and infants of a low-income-group population were randomized into intervention (n = 163) and received dietary counseling during 10 home…

  3. Intention-to-Treat Analysis in Partially Nested Randomized Controlled Trials with Real-World Complexity

    Schweig, Jonathan David; Pane, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Demands for scientific knowledge of what works in educational policy and practice has driven interest in quantitative investigations of educational outcomes, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have proliferated under these conditions. In educational settings, even when individuals are randomized, both experimental and control students are…

  4. Understanding Statistical Power in Cluster Randomized Trials: Challenges Posed by Differences in Notation and Terminology

    Spybrook, Jessaca; Hedges, Larry; Borenstein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Research designs in which clusters are the unit of randomization are quite common in the social sciences. Given the multilevel nature of these studies, the power analyses for these studies are more complex than in a simple individually randomized trial. Tools are now available to help researchers conduct power analyses for cluster randomized…

  5. A Data Management System Integrating Web-Based Training and Randomized Trials

    Muroff, Jordana; Amodeo, Maryann; Larson, Mary Jo; Carey, Margaret; Loftin, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a data management system (DMS) developed to support a large-scale randomized study of an innovative web-course that was designed to improve substance abuse counselors' knowledge and skills in applying a substance abuse treatment method (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy; CBT). The randomized trial compared the performance…

  6. Efficacy of the "Responsive Classroom" Approach: Results from a 3-Year, Longitudinal Randomized Controlled Trial

    Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Larsen, Ross A. A.; Baroody, Alison E.; Curby, Timothy W.; Ko, Michelle; Thomas, Julia B.; Merritt, Eileen G.; Abry, Tashia; DeCoster, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    This randomized controlled field trial examined the efficacy of the Responsive Classroom (RC) approach on student achievement. Schools (n = 24) were randomized into intervention and control conditions; 2,904 children were studied from end of second to fifth grade. Students at schools assigned to the RC condition did not outperform students at…

  7. The Efficacy of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Chinese Families: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Leung, Cynthia; Tsang, Sandra; Sin, Tammy C. S.; Choi, Siu-yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to examine the efficacy of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) in Hong Kong Chinese families, using randomized controlled trial design. Methods: The participants included 111 Hong Kong Chinese parents with children aged 2--7 years old, who were randomized into the intervention group (n = 54) and control group (n…

  8. A Parent-Adolescent Intervention to Increase Sexual Risk Communication: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Villarruel, Antonia M.; Cherry, Carol Loveland; Cabriales, Esther Gallegos; Ronis, David L.; Zhou, Yan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports results of a randomized controlled trial designed to test an intervention to increase parent-adolescent sexual risk communication among Mexican parents. Data were analyzed from parents (n = 791) randomly assigned to an HIV risk reduction or health promotion intervention. Measures were administered at pretest, posttest, and 6-…

  9. Effects of a Visiting Service for Older Widowed Individuals: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Onrust, Simone; Willemse, Godelief; Van Den Bout, Jan; Cuijpers, Pim

    2010-01-01

    The loss of the partner is an important risk factor for developing serious psychological problems. In this study the authors examined the effect of the visiting service on the mental health and quality of life of older widowed individuals. They conducted a pragmatic randomized trial. All respondents were randomly assigned to a visiting service (n…

  10. Outcomes from a School-Randomized Controlled Trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program

    Brown, Eric C.; Low, Sabina; Smith, Brian H.; Haggerty, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial of Steps to Respect: A Bullying Prevention Program conducted in 33 California elementary schools. Schools were matched on school demographic characteristics and assigned randomly to intervention or waitlisted control conditions. Outcome measures were obtained from (a) all school…

  11. Effect of Art Production on Negative Mood: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Bell, Chloe E.; Robbins, Steven J.

    2007-01-01

    Art therapists have long held that art production causes reductions in stress and elevations in mood (Rubin, 1999). The authors examined this claim in a randomized, controlled trial. Fifty adults between the ages of 18 and 30 were randomly assigned to either create an art work or to view and sort a series of art prints. Three measures of overall…

  12. Part versus Whole: A Randomized Trial of Central Venous Catheterization Education

    Chan, Angela; Singh, Sunita; Dubrowski, Adam; Pratt, Daniel D.; Zalunardo, Nadia; Nair, Parvarthy; McLaughlin, Kevin; Ma, Irene W. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheterization (CVC) is a complex but commonly performed procedure. How best to teach this complex skill has not been clearly delineated. We conducted a randomized trial of the effects of two types of teaching of CVC on skill acquisition and retention. We randomly assigned novice internal medicine residents to learning CVC in-part…

  13. Randomized clinical trial of single- versus multi-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Rosenberg, J; Al-Tayar, H;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are no randomized studies that compare outcomes after single-incision (SLC) and conventional multi-incision (MLC) laparoscopic cholecystectomy under an optimized perioperative analgesic regimen. METHODS: This patient- and assessor-blinded randomized three-centre clinical trial...

  14. Pilot Randomized trial of Fibrinogen in Trauma Haemorrhage (PRooF-iTH)

    Steinmetz, Jacob; Sørensen, Anne Marie; Henriksen, Hanne Hee;

    2016-01-01

    haemorrhage in need of haemostatic resuscitation. METHODS/DESIGN: This is a single-centre, randomized (1:1, active:placebo), placebo-controlled, double-blinded, investigator-initiated phase II trial. The trial population consists of 40 adult patients (>18 years) with traumatic, critical bleeding admitted...... after the intervention. The follow-up period on safety events and mortality will be until day 30. To detect a difference in the change from baseline to the 15-minute post-randomization measurement of 6-8 mm in TEG® functional fibrinogen maximum amplitude with a power of 0.90 and alpha of 0.05, we...... require 19 patients in each group. We have chosen to include 40 patients, 20 evaluable patients in each randomization group in case of attrition, in the present trial. DISCUSSION: Patients considered to be included in the trial will temporarily have a compromised consciousness because of the acute...

  15. OPPORTUNITY: a randomized clinical trial of growth hormone on outcome in hemodialysis patients

    Kopple, J.D.; Cheung, A.K.; Christiansen, J.S.;

    2008-01-01

    , and HRQoL, and has a favorable safety profile. DESIGN/MEASUREMENTS: This is a prospective, double-blind, multicenter, randomized clinical trial involving 2500 MHD patients, up to 50% with diabetes mellitus, from 22 countries. Patients are randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive daily injections of GH (20......, uncontrolled hypertension, chronic use of high-dose glucocorticoids, or immunosuppressive agents and pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: The OPPORTUNITY Trial is the first large-scale randomized clinical trial in adult MHD patients evaluating the response to GH of such clinical endpoints as mortality, morbidity, markers......-related quality of life (HRQoL), which are significantly and positively associated with survival in MHD patients. The OPPORTUNITY Trial will examine whether GH reduces mortality and morbidity and improves overall health in hypoalbuminemic MHD patients. HYPOTHESIS: The primary hypothesis is that daily recombinant...

  16. How pragmatic or explanatory is the randomized, controlled trial? The application and enhancement of the PRECIS tool to the evaluation of a smoking cessation trial

    Selby Peter; Brosky Gerald; Oh Paul I; Raymond Vincent; Ranger Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous explanatory randomized trials support the efficacy of chronic disease interventions, including smoking cessation treatments. However, there is often inadequate adoption of these interventions for various reasons, one being the limitation of generalizability of the explanatory studies in real-world settings. Randomized controlled trials can be rated as more explanatory versus pragmatic along 10 dimensions. Pragmatic randomized clinical trials generate more realisti...

  17. A critical appraisal of the evidence for using cardiotocography plus ECG ST interval analysis for fetal surveillance in labor. Part I: The randomized controlled trials

    Olofsson, Per; Ayres-de-Campos, Diogo; Kessler, Jörg; Tendal, Britta; Yli, Branislava Markovic; Devoe, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    We reappraised the five randomized controlled trials that compared cardiotocography plus ECG ST interval analysis (CTG+ST) vs. cardiotocography. The numbers enrolled ranged from 5681 (Dutch randomized controlled trial) to 799 (French randomized controlled trial). The Swedish randomized controlled trial (n = 5049) was the only trial adequately powered to show a difference in metabolic acidosis, and the Plymouth randomized controlled trial (n = 2434) was only powered to show a difference in ope...

  18. Effects of zinc supplementation on subscales of anorexia in children: A randomized controlled trial

    Khademian, Majid; Farhangpajouh, Neda; Shahsanaee, Armindokht; Bahreynian, Maryam; Mirshamsi, Mehran; Roya KELISHADI

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to assess the effects of zinc supplementation on improving the appetite and its subscales in children. Methods: This study was conducted in 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. It had two phases. At the first step, after validation of the Child Eating Behaviour Questionaire (CEBQ), it was completed for 300 preschool children, who were randomly selected. The second phase was conducted as a randomized controlled trial. Eighty of these children were randomly selected, and were rand...

  19. Acupuncture in the Inpatient Acute Care Setting: A Pragmatic, Randomized Control Trial

    Jeannette Painovich; Herman, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of acupuncture in a hospital setting. Methods. This 18-month pragmatic randomized controlled trial used a two-tiered consent process for all patients admitted to the acute care unit by study physician groups. The primary study comparison was between those randomized (using biased-coin randomization after initial consent) to be offered acupuncture or not. The primary outcome was length of stay (LOS). Other measures include costs, self-repor...

  20. Effects of Vitamin D Intake on FEV1 and COPD Exacerbation: A Randomized Clinical Trial Study

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of vitamin D intake on COPD exacerbation and FEV1 in the patients with severe and very severe COPD. Methods: This double blind placebo control randomized clinical trial study was done in the Ashayer university hospital in Khorramabad in 2012. Eighty eight patients with severe and very severe COPD were randomly selected from those who recoursed to the internal medicine clinic of Ashayer hospital. They were randomly allocated to case and placebo gro...

  1. The B-VITAGE trial: A randomized trial of homocysteine lowering treatment of depression in later life

    van Bockxmeer Frank

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide and depressive symptoms are common in later life. Observational evidence suggests that depression is more prevalent among people with high plasma homocysteine (tHcy, but the results of randomized trials to date have been unable to show that lowering tHcy through the supplementation of vitamins B6, B12 and folate benefits depressive symptoms. We designed the B-VITAGE trial to determine whether adjunctive treatment with vitamins B6, B12 and folate increases the efficacy of standard antidepressant treatment. Methods/Design The B-VITAGE trial is a 12-month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of daily citalopram (20 to 40 mg plus B12(0.4 mg, B6 (25 mg and folic acid (2 mg or citalopram (20 to 40 mg plus placebo for the treatment of depression in later life. The trial aims to recruit over 300 older adults with major depression (DSM-IV and has been powered to detect the impact of an intervention associated with moderate effect size. Depressive symptoms will be rated with the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS. The trial has two main outcomes of interest: a reduction of 50% or more in the MADRS total score between baseline and week 12 and the remission of the depressive episode at weeks 12, 26 and 52 according to DSM-IV criteria. We hypothesize that subjects randomly allocated to the vitamin arm of the study will be more likely to show a clinically significant improvement and achieve and maintain remission of symptoms at 12, 26 and 52 weeks. Secondary outcomes of interest include compliance with treatment, reduction in the severity of depressive symptoms, switching to different antidepressants, the use of non-pharmacological antidepressant treatments, response to treatment according to MTHFRC677T genotype, and changes in cognitive function over 52 weeks. Conclusions The results of this trial will clarify whether the systematic use of B

  2. Electrocardiographic changes associated with smoking and smoking cessation: outcomes from a randomized controlled trial.

    Adam D Gepner

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cardiovascular disease (CVD can be detected and quantified by analysis of the electrocardiogram (ECG; however the effects of smoking and smoking cessation on the ECG have not been characterized. METHODS: Standard 12-lead ECGs were performed at baseline and 3 years after subjects enrolled in a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of smoking cessation pharmacotherapies. ECGs were interpreted using the Minnesota Code ECG Classification. The effects of (i smoking burden on the prevalence of ECG findings at baseline, and (ii smoking and smoking cessation on ECG changes after 3 years were investigated by multivariable and multinomial regression analyses. RESULTS: At baseline, 532 smokers were (mean [SD] 43.3 (11.5 years old, smoked 20.6 (7.9 cigarettes/day, with a smoking burden of 26.7 (18.6 pack-years. Major and minor ECG criteria were identified in 87 (16.4% and 131 (24.6% of subjects, respectively. After adjusting for demographic data and known CVD risk factors, higher pack-years was associated with major ECG abnormalities (p = 0.02, but current cigarettes/day (p = 0.23 was not. After 3 years, 42.9% of subjects were abstinent from smoking. New major and minor ECG criteria were observed in 7.2% and 15.6% of subjects respectively, but in similar numbers of abstinent subjects and continuing smokers (p>0.2 for both. Continuing smokers showed significant reduction in current smoking (-8.4 [8.8] cigarettes/day, p<0.001 compared to baseline. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, major ECG abnormalities are independently associated with lifetime smoking burden. After 3 years, smoking cessation was not associated with a decrease in ECG abnormalities, although cigarettes smoked/day decreased among continuing smokers.

  3. Blinding Techniques in Randomized Controlled Trials of Laser Therapy: An Overview and Possible Solution

    Ian Relf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level laser therapy has evidence accumulating about its effectiveness in a variety of medical conditions. We reviewed 51 double blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs of laser treatment. Analysis revealed 58% of trials showed benefit of laser over placebo. However, less than 5% of the trials had addressed beam disguise or allocation concealment in the laser machines used. Many of the trials used blinding methods that rely on staff cooperation and are therefore open to interference or bias. This indicates significant deficiencies in laser trial methodology. We report the development and preliminary testing of a novel laser machine that can blind both patient and operator to treatment allocation without staff participation. The new laser machine combines sealed preset and non-bypassable randomization codes, decoy lights and sound, and a conical perspex tip to overcome laser diode glow detection.

  4. Sublingual immunotherapy in youngsters : adherence in a randomized clinical trial

    Roder, E.; Berger, M. Y.; de Groot, H.; van Wijk, R. Gerth

    2008-01-01

    Background Adherence is essential for effective treatment. Although several trials on the efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in youngsters have been published, few contain data on medication intake. Objective We aimed to quantify adherence both to study protocol and medication intake as wel

  5. Acute migraine therapy: recent evidence from randomized comparative trials

    Mett, A.; Tfelt-Hansen, P.

    2008-01-01

    (1) A wide array of data regarding acute migraine treatment are available, but few trials strictly adhere to International Headache Society guidelines for patient inclusion criteria. (2) Triptans appear to have similar efficacy profiles, but among newer triptans, almotriptan offers improved toler...

  6. Beyond Randomized Controlled Trials in Attempted Suicide Research

    Hatcher, Simon; Sharon, Cynthia; Coggan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence about what is the best treatment for people who present to hospital after self harm. Most treatment trials have been small and involved unrepresentative groups of patients which result in inconclusive findings. Here we note some of the characteristics of attempted suicide which make it a difficult subject to study. We…

  7. Randomized controlled trials in frontotemporal dementia: cognitive and behavioral outcomes

    Miller, Justin B; Banks, Sarah J; Léger, Gabriel C; Cummings, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Progress has been made in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Targets for intervention have been identified, therapies are being developed, and clinical trials are advancing. A major challenge for FTD research is that multiple underlying pathologies can be associated with heterogeneous phenotypes. The neuropsychological profiles associated with FTD spectrum disorders often include executive dysfunction, language impairments and behavioral disturb...

  8. Stability, Survival, and Tolerability of an Auditory Osseointegrated Implant for Bone Conduction Hearing: Long-Term Follow-Up of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    den Besten, Christine A.; Stalfors, Joacim; Wigren, Stina; Blechert, Johan Ivarsson; Flynn, Mark; Eeg-Olofsson, Måns; Aggarwal, Rohini; Green, Kevin; Nelissen, Rik C.; Mylanus, Emmanuel A. M.; Hol, Myrthe K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare implant stability, survival, and soft tissue reactions for a novel (test) and previous generation (control) percutaneous auditory osseointegrated implant for bone conduction hearing at long-term follow-up of 5 years. Study Design: Single follow-up visit of a previously completed multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. Patients: Fifty-seven of the 77 participants of a completed randomized controlled trial on a new auditory osseointegrated implant underwent a single follow-up visit 5 years after implantation, which comprised implant stability measurements and collection of Holgers scores. Additionally, implant survival was recorded for all 77 patients from the original trial. Results: The test implant showed significantly higher implant stability quotient (ISQ) values compared with the control implant throughout the 5-year follow-up. Mean area under the curve of ISQ high from baseline to 5 years was 71.6 (standard deviation [SD] ±2.0) and 66.7 (SD ±3.4) for the test and control implant, respectively (p < 0.0001). For both implants, the mean ISQ value recorded at 5 years was higher compared with implantation (test group +2.03 [SD ±2.55, within group p < 0.0001] and control group +2.25 [SD ±4.95, within group p = 0.12]). No difference was noticed in increase from baseline between groups (p = 0.64). Furthermore, evaluation of soft tissue reactions continued to show superiority of the test implant. At the 5-year follow-up visit, one patient (2.5%) presented with a Holgers grade 2 in the test group, compared with four patients (23.5%) in the control group (p = 0.048); no patient presented with more severe soft tissue reactions. Excluding explantations, the survival rate was 95.8% for the test group and 95.0% for the control group. The corresponding rates including explantations were 93.9 and 90.0%. Conclusion: The test implant showed superiority in terms of higher mean ISQ values and less adverse soft tissue reactions, both

  9. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study: 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial.

    Stupp, R.; Hegi, M.E.; Mason, W.P.; Bent, M.J. van den; Taphoorn, M.J.B.; Janzer, R.C.; Ludwin, S.K.; Allgeier, A.; Fisher, B.; Belanger, K.; Hau, P.; Brandes, A.A.; Gijtenbeek, J.M.M.; Marosi, C.; Vecht, C.J.; Mokhtari, K.; Wesseling, P.; Villa, S.; Eisenhauer, E.; Gorlia, T.; Weller, M.; Lacombe, D.; Cairncross, J.G.; Mirimanoff, R.O.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2004, a randomised phase III trial by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC) reported improved median and 2-year survival for patients with glioblastoma treated with concomitant and ad

  10. Effects of radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiotherapy alone on survival in glioblastoma in a randomised phase III study : 5-year analysis of the EORTC-NCIC trial

    Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E.; Mason, Warren P.; van den Bent, Martin J.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.; Janzer, Robert C.; Ludwin, Samuel K.; Allgeier, Anouk; Fisher, Barbara; Belanger, Karl; Hau, Peter; Brandes, Alba A.; Gijtenbeek, Johanna; Marosi, Christine; Vecht, Charles J.; Mokhtari, Karima; Wesseling, Pieter; Villa, Salvador; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Gorlia, Thierry; Weller, Michael; Lacombe, Denis; Cairncross, J. Gregory; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Background In 2004, a randomised phase III trial by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group (NCIC) reported improved median and 2-year survival for patients with glioblastoma treated with concomitant and adj