WorldWideScience

Sample records for 5-year plan fy

  1. FY 1994 Annual Work Plan

    1993-10-01

    This is the third Office of Inspector General (OIG)Annual Work Plan. Its purpose is to summarize work completed in Fiscal Year (FY) 1993, identify ongoing projects from previous fiscal years which the OIG intends to continue into FY 1994, and announce planned projects which the OIG intends to begin in FY 19994.

  2. Operating plan FY 1998

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

  3. Salt repository sealing materials development program: 5-year work plan

    This plan covers 5 years (fiscal years 1986 through 1990) of work in the repository sealing materials program to support design decisions and licensing activities for a salt repository. The plan covers a development activity, not a research activity. There are firm deliverables as the end points of each part of the work. The major deliverables are: development plans for code development and materials testing; seal system components models; seal system performance specifications; seal materials specifications; and seal materials properties ''handbook.'' The work described in this plan is divided into three general tasks as follows: mathematical modeling; materials studies (salt, cementitious materials, and earthen materials); and large-scale testing. Each of the sections presents an overview, status, planned activities, and summary of program milestones. This plan will be the starting point for preparing the development plans described above, but is subject to change if preparation of the work plan indicates that a different approach or sequence is preferable to achieve the ultimate goal, i.e., support of design and licensing

  4. Planned and unplanned complex suicides: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Racette, Stéphanie; Sauvageau, Anny

    2007-03-01

    The notion of planned and unplanned complex suicides first appeared in 1974 by Marcinkowski and, since then, no systematic study of complex suicides has been published in the English forensic literature. Here, the authors present a 5-year retrospective study of complex suicides. Nineteen complex suicides were reviewed: five unplanned and 14 planned, including the first case of an unplanned complex suicide in a woman. All cases were analyzed in terms of gender, age, methods of suicide, the presence of a suicide note, and past suicide attempts, and statistically compared with a 50-case sample of simple suicides. A further comparison was established with compiled data from the literature. Similarities were revealed regarding incidence of complex suicides, male gender predominance, and types of methods used. In contrast, results showed a higher average age for planned complex suicide victims. Finally, the authors discuss the application of the complex suicide definition. PMID:17316249

  5. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    This plan covers robotics Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, activities in the Program for the next five years. These activities range from bench-scale R ampersand D to fullscale hot demonstrations at DOE sites. This plan outlines applications of existing technology to near-term needs, the development and application of enhanced technology for longer-term needs, and an initiation of advanced technology development to meet those needs beyond the five-year plan. The objective of the Robotic Technology Development (RTDP) is to develop and apply robotics technologies that will enable Environmental Restoration and Waste Management operations at DOE sites to be safer, faster and cheaper. Five priority DOE sites were visited in March 1990 to identify needs for robotics technology in ER ampersand WM operations. This 5-Year Program Plan for the RTDP detailed annual plans for robotics technology development based on identified needs. This 5-Year Program Plan discusses the overall approach to be adopted by the RTDP to aggressively develop robotics technology and contains discussions of the Program Management Plan, Site Visit and Needs Summary, Approach to Needs-Directed Technical Development, Application-Specific Technical Development, and Cross-Cutting and Advanced Technology. Integrating application-specific ER ampersand WM needs, the current state of robotics technology, and the potential benefits (in terms of faster, safer, and cheaper) of new technology, the Plan develops application-specific road maps for robotics RDDT ampersand E for the period FY 1991 through FY 1995. In addition, the Plan identifies areas where longer-term research in robotics will have a high payoff in the 5- to 20-year time frame. 12 figs

  6. Energy in the USSR during the tenth 5-year plan

    The Soviet Union is the only industrial power in the world whose economic development is based on its own fuel and energy resources. The extraction and transformation of these resources are carried-out by the fuel and energy complex, which includes the petrol, refining, gas, coal and schist and peat oils industries as well as the electro-energy industry. In 1980, at the end of the tenth 5-year plan, the increase in the extraction of petrol and gas mainly came from areas in western Siberia. The programme of nuclear plants with the help of Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia is developed. Prospect in MHD generators and in new energies are given

  7. LDRD FY 2014 Program Plan

    Anita Gianotto; Dena Tomchak

    2013-08-01

    As required by DOE Order 413.2B the FY 2014 Program Plan is written to communicate ares of investment and approximate amounts being requested for the upcoming fiscal year. The program plan also includes brief highlights of current or previous LDRD projects that have an opportunity to impact our Nation's current and future energy challenges.

  8. Photovoltaics program plan, FY 1991--FY 1995

    1991-10-01

    This program plan describes the goals and philosophy of DOE National Photovoltaics Program and its major research and development activities for fiscal years (FY) 1991 through 1995. The plan represents a consensus among researchers and manufacturers, as well as current and potential users of photovoltaics (PV). It defines the activites that we believe are necessary to continue the rapid progress toward acceptance of photovoltaics as a serious candidate for cost-competitive electric power generation by the utility, transportation, buildings, and industrial sectors. A succesful National Photovoltaics Program will help achieve many of our national priorities. The mission of the National Photovoltaics Program is to help US industry to develop photovoltaic technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States, making PV a significant part of our national energy mix. To fully achieve this, we must continue to work toward the long-term goals established in our previous program plan: reducing the price of delivered electricity to 5 to 6 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), increasing lifetimes to 30 years, and increasing module efficiencies to 15% for flat-plate and 25% for concentrator technologies. If progress continues at its current pace, we expect that the PV industry will have installed at least 1000 megawatts (MW) of capacity in the United States and 500 MW internationally by the year 2000.

  9. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan - FY96-FY98

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP) presents the recommended TFA technical program. The recommendation covers a 3-year funding outlook (FY96-FY98), with an emphasis on FY96 and FY97. In addition to defining the recommended program, this document also describes the processes used to develop the program, the implementation strategy for the program, the references used to write this report, data on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank site baselines, details on baseline assumptions and the technical elements, and a glossary

  10. Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007

    Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

    2003-01-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 2003-2007 Institutional Plan describes the strategic directions and key issues that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory management must address with the Department of Energy (DOE) in charting its future as a multiprogram national laboratory. The Plan provides an overview of the Laboratory's mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Plan facilitates the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to strengthen the Integrated Laboratory System. Preparation and review of the Institutional Plan is one element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, implemented through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the President's Management Agenda and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Plan complements the current performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California, and summarizes Best Management Practices for a potential future results-based contract as a basis for achieving DOE goals and the Laboratory's scientific and operations objectives. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Planning and Strategic Development Office from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions and DOE comments on prior years' plans. The Laboratory Mission section identifies the specific strengths of Berkeley Lab that contribute to the mission in general and the Integrated Laboratory System in particular. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies the existing activities in support of DOE Office of Science and other sponsors; support for DOE goals; and the

  11. Institutional Plan, FY1989--FY1994

    This report discusses future plans of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Topics covered are: Laboratory Mission; Special Issues; Laboratory Strategic View; Scientific Program at SLAC; Initiatives; Education and Technology Transfer Programs; Site and Facilities; and Resource Projections. 9 tabs

  12. Institutional plan FY 1998--FY 2003

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Institutional Plan has been rearranged this year as a reflection of new Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines and to better illustrate the Laboratory`s mission-oriented focus. In Section 1 of this plan, the authors set forth their vision, mission, core competencies, strategic view, and related material. This section illustrates integration with the vision, mission, priorities, and core businesses of DOE. They define strategies, tactics, and guidelines and describe how they measure progress. In Section 2, they have elaborated on how they plan to address the Laboratory`s mission, describing programs and activities in the context of their role in this mission. Section 3 contains information on their approach to managing their business and operations. First they address the most critical issue safety. In this section, they confirm that Los Alamos is addressing the DOE critical success factors and describe the initiatives and plans that make their mission successful and leads them toward their vision. Section 4 contains details of their resources. 44 figs., 56 tabs.

  13. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 (Management Publication)

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  14. RCRA implementation plan, FY 1993. Directive (Final)

    The FY'93 RCRA Implementation Plan defines national priority activities for the RCRA Subtitle C hazardous waste program, the RCRA compliance monitoring and enforcement program, and the RCRA Subtitle D municipal and industrial solid waste program. The plan continues the strategic management framework begun by EPA and the states in FY'92. The report includes facility priority setting and evaluation, permitting, corrective action, states as primary implementors of the RCRA program, waste minimization, biennial reporting system, capacity assurance plans, comprehensive state ground-water planning, compliance monitoring and enforcement, accountability, and municipal and industrial solid waste management

  15. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1984-FY 1989

    In this plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to be committed to scientific and technological research that is based on technical excellence and innovation and that provides a foundation for and a stimulus to broader and more sustained economic growth. DOE is being asked to assist in establishing a new program for Laboratory cooperation with industry, beginning with an initial focus on materials science. The current Institutional Plan thus projects growth in the materials science area as well as in other basic physical science areas and suggests a new initiative designed to extend the various technology transfer activities and to make them more effective by using ORNL as the trial Laboratory for some of these different approaches. This Institutional Plan projects a stable future for ORNL, with only modest amounts of growth in selected areas of research for the FY 1984-FY 1989 planning cycle. Summaries of the overall picture of the proposed budget and personnel levels for the current planning cycle are included. Scientific programs, laboratory resource development, and private sector interactions are discussed

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1984-FY 1989

    1983-11-01

    In this plan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continues to be committed to scientific and technological research that is based on technical excellence and innovation and that provides a foundation for and a stimulus to broader and more sustained economic growth. DOE is being asked to assist in establishing a new program for Laboratory cooperation with industry, beginning with an initial focus on materials science. The current Institutional Plan thus projects growth in the materials science area as well as in other basic physical science areas and suggests a new initiative designed to extend the various technology transfer activities and to make them more effective by using ORNL as the trial Laboratory for some of these different approaches. This Institutional Plan projects a stable future for ORNL, with only modest amounts of growth in selected areas of research for the FY 1984-FY 1989 planning cycle. Summaries of the overall picture of the proposed budget and personnel levels for the current planning cycle are included. Scientific programs, laboratory resource development, and private sector interactions are discussed.

  17. FY2004 Progress Summary and FY2005 Program Plan Statement of Work and Deliverables

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2006-01-23

    FY2004 progress summary and FY2005 program plan statement of work and deliverables for development of high average power diode-pumped solid state lasers, and complementary technologies for applications in energy and defense.

  18. FY16-20 Strategic Plan.

    Harwell, Amber Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Welcome to our FY16–FY20 Strategic Plan, which both refects our continued dedication to the work we do and reinforces the importance of the integrated Laboratories’ strategic framework to our future. This document is the result of the leadership team’s journey over the past few years in response to the needs of our nation. In an external environment that continues to change, sometimes in unexpected ways, it is critical that our mission areas and our foundation become increasingly synergistic, forming a whole whose parts are interdependent.

  19. Human Factors Regulatory Research Program Plan, FY 1989--FY 1992

    This report describes the currently ongoing (FY 1989) and planned (FY 1989-1992) Human Factors Regulatory Research Program in the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES). Examples of the influence of human factors on nuclear safety are presented, and the role of personnel is discussed. Current regulatory issues associated with human factors in the nuclear system and the purpose of the research plan are provided. The report describes the research process applied to the human factors research issues and the program activities: Personnel Performance Measurement, Personnel Subsystem, Human-System Interface. Organization and Management, and Reliability Assessment. The research being conducted within each activity is summarized along with the objectives, background information, and expected regulatory products. Budget and personnel forecasts are provided along with a summary of contractors performing some of the ongoing research. Appendices contain a chronology of human factors research at NRC, a description of the research approach, an update on human factors programs and initiatives in RES and other NRC offices, and the integration among these programs. 46 refs., 5 tabs

  20. Institutional plan. FY 1997-2002

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The FY 1997-2002 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. Of particular significance this year is the role of computing sciences in supporting a broad range of research activities, at Berkeley Lab in particular and throughout the entire Department of Energy system in general. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s mission and programs and is an element of Department of Energy`s strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives.

  1. Environmental restoration and waste management: Robotics technology development program: Robotics 5-year program plan

    This plan covers robotics Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation activities in the Program for the next five years. These activities range from bench-scale R ampersand D to full-scale hot demonstrations at DOE sites. This plan outlines applications of existing technology to near-term needs, the development and application of enhanced technology for longer-term needs, and initiation of advanced technology development to meet those needs beyond the five-year plan. The objective of the Robotic Technology Development Program (RTDP) is to develop and apply robotics technologies that will enable Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) operations at DOE sites to be safer, faster and cheaper. Five priority DOE sites were visited in March 1990 to identify needs for robotics technology in ER ampersand WM operations. This 5-Year Program Plan for the RTDP detailed annual plans for robotics technology development based on identified needs. In July 1990 a forum was held announcing the robotics program. Over 60 organizations (industrial, university, and federal laboratory) made presentations on their robotics capabilities. To stimulate early interactions with the ER ampersand WM activities at DOE sites, as well as with the robotics community, the RTDP sponsored four technology demonstrations related to ER ampersand WM needs. These demonstrations integrated commercial technology with robotics technology developed by DOE in support of areas such as nuclear reactor maintenance and the civilian reactor waste program. 2 figs

  2. 78 FR 33113 - Publication of the 5-Year Research and Evaluation Strategic Plan Program Years 2012-2017

    2013-06-03

    ... Employment and Training Administration Publication of the 5-Year Research and Evaluation Strategic Plan Program Years 2012-2017 AGENCY: Employment and Training Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Administration's (USDOL/ ETA) 5-Year Research and Evaluation Strategic Plan for 2012-2017. Under Section 171...

  3. Planning integration FY 1996 program plan. Revision 1

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MAP) Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes an agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The MYPPs for the Hanford Site programs are to provide a picture from fiscal year (FY) 1996 through FY 2002. At RL Planning and Integration Division (PID) direction, only the FY 1996 Planning Integration Program work scope has been planned and presented in this MAP. Only those known significant activities which occur after FY 1996 are portrayed in this MAP. This is due to the uncertainty of who will be accomplishing what work scope when, following the award of the Management and Integration (M ampersand I) contract

  4. FY95 software project management plan: TMACS, CASS computer systems

    The FY95 Work Plan for TMACS and CASS Software Projects describes the activities planned for the current fiscal year. This plan replaces WHC-SD-WM-SDP-008. The TMACS project schedule is included in the TWRS Integrated Schedule

  5. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2002 - FY 2007

    The national laboratory system provides a unique resource for addressing the national needs inherent in the mission of the Department of Energy. Argonne, which grew out of Enrico Fermi's pioneering work on the development of nuclear power, was the first national laboratory and, in many ways, has set the standard for those that followed. As the Laboratory's new director, I am pleased to present the Argonne National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2002 through FY 2007 on behalf of the extraordinary group of scientists, engineers, technicians, administrators, and others who re responsible for the Laboratory's distinguished record of achievement. Like our sister DOE laboratories, Argonne uses a multifaceted approach to advance U.S. R and D priorities. First, we assemble interdisciplinary teams of scientists and engineers to address complex problems. For example, our initiative in Functional Genomics will bring together biologists, computer scientists, environmental scientists, and staff of the Advanced Photon Source to develop complete maps of cellular function. Second, we cultivate specific core competencies in science and technology; this Institutional Plan discusses the many ways in which our core competencies support DOE's four mission areas. Third, we serve the scientific community by designing, building, and operating world-class user facilities, such as the Advanced Photon Source, the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, and the Argonne Tandem-Linac Accelerator System. This Plan summarizes the visions, missions, and strategic plans for the Laboratory's existing major user facilities, and it explains our approach to the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator. Fourth, we help develop the next generation of scientists and engineers through educational programs, many of which involve bright young people in research. This Plan summarizes our vision, objectives, and strategies in the education area, and it gives statistics on student and faculty participation. Finally, we

  6. Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd, editors

    2000-07-01

    The FY 2001-2005 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  7. Twenty-Five Year Site Plan FY2013 - FY2037

    Jones, William H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is the nation's premier national security science laboratory. Its mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the United States (U.S.) nuclear stockpile; reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction, proliferation, and terrorism; and solve national problems in defense, energy, and the environment. The fiscal year (FY) 2013-2037 Twenty-Five Year Site Plan (TYSP) is a vital component for planning to meet the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) commitment to ensure the U.S. has a safe, secure, and reliable nuclear deterrent. The Laboratory also uses the TYSP as an integrated planning tool to guide development of an efficient and responsive infrastructure that effectively supports the Laboratory's missions and workforce. Emphasizing the Laboratory's core capabilities, this TYSP reflects the Laboratory's role as a prominent contributor to NNSA missions through its programs and campaigns. The Laboratory is aligned with Nuclear Security Enterprise (NSE) modernization activities outlined in the NNSA Strategic Plan (May 2011) which include: (1) ensuring laboratory plutonium space effectively supports pit manufacturing and enterprise-wide special nuclear materials consolidation; (2) constructing the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF); (3) establishing shared user facilities to more cost effectively manage high-value, experimental, computational and production capabilities; and (4) modernizing enduring facilities while reducing the excess facility footprint. Th is TYSP is viewed by the Laboratory as a vital planning tool to develop an effi cient and responsive infrastructure. Long range facility and infrastructure development planning are critical to assure sustainment and modernization. Out-year re-investment is essential for sustaining existing facilities, and will be re-evaluated on an annual

  8. EPRI geothermal energy R and D 5-year program plan (1975 to 1979)

    Spencer, D.F.

    1974-10-17

    The recommended EPRI Geothermal Research and Development 5-Year Program Plan has been defined to complement and provide focus for federally sponsored geothermal energy R and D efforts. The scope of the program includes: verification of hydrothermal reservoir capability and low salinity brine heat transfer characteristics at a potential demonstration site followed by design, development and construction of a low salinity hydrothermal demonstration plant in conjunction with an electric utility or utility consortium. Development of a comprehensive set of Guidelines Manuals for use by utility management and engineers spanning the full range of geothermal resource utilization from exploration through plant startup, including not only technical, but environmental, institutional and regulatory factors. A subprogram to define the potential and requirements for Geothermal Systems. A supporting research and technology subprogram oriented toward minimizing the risk associated with utilization of low and high salinity hydrothermal sources. An Advanced Research and Technology subprogram to assess the potential of geopressure resources in conjunction with the Federal government and limited R and D on advanced concepts for utilization of hydrothermal fluids. (MHR)

  9. FY 2017 Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan - Biennial Plan Summary

    None, None

    2016-03-01

    This year’s summary report updates the Fiscal Year 2016 Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan (FY 2016 SSMP), the 25-year strategic program of record that captures the plans developed across numerous NNSA programs and organizations to maintain and modernize the scientific tools, capabilities, and infrastructure necessary to ensure the success of NNSA’s nuclear weapons mission. The SSMP is a companion to the Prevent, Counter, and Respond: A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2017-2021) report, the planning document for NNSA’s nuclear threat reduction mission. New versions of both reports are published each year in response to new requirements and challenges. Much was accomplished in FY 2015 as part of the program of record described in this year’s SSMP. The science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program allowed the Secretaries of Energy and Defense to certify for the twentieth time that the stockpile remains safe, secure, and effective without the need for underground nuclear explosive testing. The talented scientists, engineers, and technicians at the three national security laboratories, the four nuclear weapons production plants, and the national security site are primarily responsible for this continued success. Research, development, test, and evaluation programs have advanced NNSA’s understanding of weapons physics, component aging, and material properties through first-of-a-kind shock physics experiments, along with numerous other critical experiments conducted throughout the nuclear security enterprise. The multiple life extension programs (LEPs) that are under way made progress toward their first production unit dates. The W76-1 LEP is past the halfway point in total production, and the B61-12 completed three development flight tests. Critical to this success is the budget. The Administration’s budget request for NNSA’s Weapons Activities has increased for all but one of the past seven years, resulting in a total increase of

  10. 75 FR 82377 - NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    2010-12-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015 AGENCY: Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER), Oceanic and... Research (OER) is seeking comments on the revised draft OER STRATEGIC PLAN Fiscal Year (FY)...

  11. 75 FR 15686 - NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    2010-03-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015 AGENCY: Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER), Oceanic and... Research (OER) is seeking comments on the draft OER STRATEGIC PLAN Fiscal Year (FY) 2011- 2015,...

  12. FY95 capital asset implementation plan

    The Waste Isolation Division (WID) is committed to providing good stewardship for the capital assets under its operational and physical control. To achieve this goal, the WID has developed the Capital Asset Implementation Plan (CAIP) to continue to implement for FY95 Department of Energy (DOE) Order 4320.2A, Capital Asset Management Process (CAMP). The Order provides policy and elements needed to establish a credible, consistent, auditable, and technically sound process for the DOE to forecast, plan, and budget for capital assets on a functional unit level. The objective of the WIPP CAMP program is to meet the goals of DOE Order 4320.2A in the most effective and efficient manner possible in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mission. As a result, this CAIP provides a way to implement the CAMP Program using a graded approach. Continued implementation will be accomplished by improving the existing process, and establishing future goals to promote growth for the CAMP Program. The CAIP is issued annually by the WID with quarterly progress reports submitted to the DOE. This document describes the current-year program staffing, roles, responsibilities, funding, and near-term milestones. In addition, the results of past goals are discussed

  13. FY 1999 annual work plan for infrastructure program WBS 6

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-08-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 DynCorp Annual Work Plan (AWP) relates DOE-RL work breakdown structure (WBS) to Cost Accounts and to Organizational Structure. Each Cost Account includes a workscope narrative and justification performance and service standards, goals, and deliverables. Basis of estimates are included within each Cost Account to demonstrate the relationship of budget to defined workscope. The FY 1999 AWP reflects the planning assumptions and initiatives that are included in the PHMC Strategic Plan for Infrastructure Optimization which was established in FY 1998. Development of the FY 1999 AWP was in accordance with a sequential series of events and efforts described in the Infrastructure Annual Work Planning and Budget Cycle which was developed and established in conjunction with the Strategic Plan. The Strategic Plan covers a rolling five year span of time and is updated at the start of each fiscal year as the beginning of the annual work planning and budget cycle for the following fiscal year. Accordingly the planning for the FY 1999 AWP began in January 1998. Also included in the annual work planning and budget cycle, and the basis for the budget in this AWP, is the development of a requirements-based budget.

  14. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2004-2008

    Quadrel, Marilyn J.

    2004-04-15

    This Institutional Plan for FY 2004-2008 is the principal annual planning document submitted to the Department of Energy's Office of Science by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. This plan describes the Laboratory's mission, roles, and technical capabilities in support of Department of Energy priorities, missions, and plans. It also describes the Laboratory strategic plan, key planning assumptions, major research initiatives, and program strategy for fundamental science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national security.

  15. High performance computing and communications: FY 1997 implementation plan

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage, with bipartisan support, of the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. The original Program, in which eight Federal agencies participated, has now grown to twelve agencies. This Plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` FY 1996 HPCC accomplishments and FY 1997 HPCC plans. Section 3 of this Plan provides an overview of the HPCC Program. Section 4 contains more detailed definitions of the Program Component Areas, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each PCA. Appendix A provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  16. 5 Year March and Water Management Plan : Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge : 1984

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The marsh and water management plan outlines and describes management strategies for maintenance, rehabilitation, and development of managed waters on the Clarence...

  17. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1995--FY 2000

    1994-11-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years (1995-2000). Included in this report are the: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; and resource projections.

  18. National Ignition Facility (NIF) FY2015 Facility Use Plan

    Folta, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wisoff, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-12-18

    Major features of the FY2015 NIF Use Plan include: • Performing a record number of layered DT experiments with 28 planned compared with 15 in FY2014. Executing the first plutonium experiments on the NIF in support of the Science Campaigns. • Over 300 targets shots, a 57% increase compared to FY14. This is a stretch goal defined in the 120-Day Study document, and relies upon the success of many shot-rate improvement actions, as well as on the distribution of shot type selected by the users. While the Plan is consistent with this goal, the increased proportion of layered DT experiments described above reduces the margin against this goal. • Commissioning of initial ARC capability, which will support both SSP-HED and SSPICF programs. • Increase in days allocated to Discovery Science to a level that supports an ongoing program for academic use of NIF and an annual solicitation for new proposals. • Six Facility Maintenance and Reconfiguration (FM&R) periods totaling 30 days dedicated to major facility maintenance and modifications. • Utilization of the NIF Facility Advisory Schedule Committee (FASC) to provide stakeholder review and feedback on the NIF schedule. The Use Plan assumes a total FY2015 LLNL NIF Operations funding in MTE 10.7 of $229.465M and in MTE 10.3 of 47.0M. This Use Plan will be revised in the event of significant changes to the FY2015 funding or if NNSA provides FY2016 budget guidance significantly reduced compared to FY2015.

  19. The mixed waste management facility, FY95 plan

    Streit, R.

    1994-12-01

    This document contains the Fiscal Year 1995 Plan for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Major objectives to be completed during FY 1995 for the MWMF project are listed and described. This report also contains a budget plan, project task summaries, a milestone control log, and a responsibility assignment matrix for the MWMF project.

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--FY 2001

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    This report discusses the institutional plan for Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the next five years. Included in the report are: laboratory director`s statement; laboratory mission, vision, and core competencies; laboratory strategic plan; major laboratory initiatives; scientific and technical programs; critical success factors; summaries of other plans; resource projections; appendix which contains data for site and facilities, user facility, science and mathematic education and human resources; and laboratory organization chart.

  1. Argonne National Laboratory institutional plan FY 2001--FY 2006.

    Beggs, S.D.

    2000-12-07

    This Institutional Plan describes what Argonne management regards as the optimal future development of Laboratory activities. The document outlines the development of both research programs and support operations in the context of the nation's R and D priorities, the missions of the Department of Energy (DOE) and Argonne, and expected resource constraints. The Draft Institutional Plan is the product of many discussions between DOE and Argonne program managers, and it also reflects programmatic priorities developed during Argonne's summer strategic planning process. That process serves additionally to identify new areas of strategic value to DOE and Argonne, to which Laboratory Directed Research and Development funds may be applied. The Draft Plan is provided to the Department before Argonne's On-Site Review. Issuance of the final Institutional Plan in the fall, after further comment and discussion, marks the culmination of the Laboratory's annual planning cycle. Chapter II of this Institutional Plan describes Argonne's missions and roles within the DOE laboratory system, its underlying core competencies in science and technology, and six broad planning objectives whose achievement is considered critical to the future of the Laboratory. Chapter III presents the Laboratory's ''Science and Technology Strategic Plan,'' which summarizes key features of the external environment, presents Argonne's vision, and describes how Argonne's strategic goals and objectives support DOE's four business lines. The balance of Chapter III comprises strategic plans for 23 areas of science and technology at Argonne, grouped according to the four DOE business lines. The Laboratory's 14 major initiatives, presented in Chapter IV, propose important advances in key areas of fundamental science and technology development. The ''Operations and Infrastructure Strategic Plan'' in Chapter V includes

  2. Long-range research plan: FY 1984-FY 1988

    Information is presented concerning planned research activities related to LOCA and transients; LOFT; accident evaluation and mitigation; LMFBR and HTGR type reactors; facility operations and safeguards; waste management; siting and environment; and system and reliability analysis

  3. Long-Range Research Plan, FY 1985-FY 1989

    The Long-Range Research Plan (LRRP) was prepared by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to assist the NRC in coordinating its long-range research planning with the short-range budget cycles. The LRRP lays out programmatic approaches for research to help resolve regulatory issues. The plan will be updated annually. This document is divided into the following sections: operating reactor inspection, maintenance, and repair; equipment qualification; seismic research; reactor operations and risk; thermal-hydraulic transients; severe accidents; advanced concepts; radiation protection and health effects; and waste management. The following are also listed as appendices: unresolved safety issues and TMI action plan items, priorities for research program, research program outline, and research utilization report. A glossary of acronyms is included

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1997--FY 2002

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    Three major initiatives are described, which are proposed to strengthen ORNL`s ability to support the missions of the Department: neutron science, functional genomics, and distributed computing at teraflop speeds. The laboratory missions, strategic plan, scientific and technical programs, enterprise activities, laboratory operations, and resource projections are also described.

  5. A plan for administrative computing at ANL FY1991 through FY1993

    Caruthers, L.E. (ed.); O' Brien, D.E.; Bretscher, M.E.; Hischier, R.C.; Moore, N.J.; Slade, R.G.

    1990-10-01

    In July of 1988, Argonne National Laboratory management approved the restructuring of Computing Services into the Computing and Telecommunications Division, part of the Physical Research area of the Laboratory. One major area of the Computing and Telecommunications Division is Management Information Systems (MIS). A significant aspect of Management Information Systems' work is the development of proposals for new and enhanced administrative computing systems based on an analysis of informational needs. This document represent the outcome of the planning process for FY1991 through FY1993. The introduction of the FY1991 through FY1993 Long-Range Plan assesses the state of administrative computing at ANL and the implications of FY1991 funding recommendations. It includes a history of MIS planning for administrative data processing. This document discusses the strategy and goals which are an important part of administrative data processing plans for the Laboratory. It also describes the management guidelines established by the Administrative Data Processing Oversight Committee for the proposal and implementation of administrative computing systems. Summaries of the proposals for new or enhanced administrative computing systems presented by individual divisions or departments with assistance of Management Information Systems, to the Administrative Data Processing Oversight Committee are given. The detailed tables in this paper give information on how much the resources to develop and implement a given systems will cost its users. The tables include development costs, computing/operations costs, software and hardware costs, and efforts costs. They include both systems funded by Laboratory General Expense and systems funded by the users themselves.

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  7. High performance computing and communications: FY 1996 implementation plan

    NONE

    1995-05-16

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally authorized by passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991, signed on December 9, 1991. Twelve federal agencies, in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and research laboratories, have developed the Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1995 and FY 1996. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency.

  8. Subseabed Disposal Program Plan. Volume II. FY80 budget and subtask work plans

    This volume of the Subseabed Disposal Program Plan presents a breakdown of the master program structure by major activity. Each activity is described and accompanied by a specific cost plan schedule and a milestone plan. The costs have been compiled in the Cost Plan Schedules attached to each Subtask Work Plan. The FY 1980 budget for the Subseabed Disposal Program is summarized at the second level of the Work Breakdown Structure. The milestone plans for FY 80 are presented. The milestones can be changed only with the concurrence of the Sandia Subseabed Program Manager

  9. Mixed Waste Management Facility, revised FY94 Plan

    This revision of the FY94 Plan incorporates changes to work during FY94 in response to the DOE request in the DOE KD-1 decision letter of June 28,1994. This letter provided guidance of both scope and budget profile in response to the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) issued by the MWMF Project in April, 1994. This work plan only addresses work for the remainder of FY94. A revised plan for the complete project is in development and will be issued separately. Since February, 1994, the MWMF Project has been operating on DOE guidance directing that work on the CDR be completed, that only other essential work be continued to maintain the project, and that costs be maintained at approximately the January, 1994 spending levels until a KD-1 decision was made. This has formed the basis for monthly reports through June, 1994. The baseline contained in this report will become the basis for reports during the remainder of FY94

  10. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2000-2004 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; management practices and standards; and communications and trust.

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2001-2005

    Fisher, Darrell R.; Pearson, Erik W.

    2000-12-29

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Institutional Plan for FY 2001-2005 sets forth the laboratory's mission, roles, technical capabilities, and laboratory strategic plan. In the plan, major initiatives also are proposed and the transitioning initiatives are discussed. The Programmatic Strategy section details our strategic intent, roles, and research thrusts in each of the U.S. Department of Energy's mission areas. The Operations/Infrastructure Strategic Plan section includes information on the laboratory's human resources; environment, safety, and health management; safeguards and security; site and facilities management; information resources management; managaement procatices and standards; and communications and trust.

  12. FY 1992 work plan and technical progress reports

    NONE

    1992-11-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is a division of the University of Nevada System devoted to multidisciplinary scientific research. For more than 25 years, DRI has conducted research for the US Department of Energy`s Nevada Field Office (DOE/NV) in support of operations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). During that time, the research program has grown from an early focus on hydrologic studies to include the areas of geology, archaeology, environmental compliance and monitoring, statistics, database management, public education, and community relations. The range of DRI`s activities has also expanded to include a considerable amount of management and administrative support in addition to scientific investigations. DRI`s work plan for FY 1992 reflects a changing emphasis in DOE/NV activities from nuclear weapons testing to environmental restoration and monitoring. Most of the environmental projects from FY 1991 are continuing, and several new projects have been added to the Environmental Compliance Program. The Office of Technology Development Program, created during FY 1991, also includes a number of environmental projects. This document contains the FY 1992 work plan and quarterly technical progress reports for each DRI project.

  13. Westinghouse Hanford Company FY 1995 Materials Management Plan (MMP)

    The safe and sound operation of facilities and storage of nuclear material are top priorities within Hanford's environmental management, site restoration mission. The projected materials estimates, based on the Materials Management Plan (MMP) assumptions outlined below, were prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) use in long-range planning. The Hanford MMP covers the period FY 1995 through FY 2005, as directed by DOE. All DOE Richland Operations (RL) Office facilities are essentially funded by the Office of Transition and Facilities Management, Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). These facilities include PUREX, the UO3 plant, N-Reactor, T-Plant, K-Basins, FFTF, PFP and the 300 Area Fuel Fabrication facilities. Currently DP provides partial funding for the latter two facilities. Beginning in FY 1996 (in accordance with DOE-HQ MMP assumptions), EM will fund expenses related to the storage, monitoring, and safeguarding of all Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the PFP. Ownership and costs related to movement and/or stabilization of that material will belong to EM programs (excluding NE material). It is also assumed that IAEA will take over inventory validation and surveillance of EM owned SNM at this time (FY 1996)

  14. Voluntary research results for five years along the master plan on nuclear safety research. FY 2001 - 2005

    Safety Research has been conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency which took over former Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute. This report shows the voluntary research results for five years conducted from FY 2001 to FY 2005 according to the Master Plan on Nuclear Safety Research (FY 2001-2005). (author)

  15. FY 2016 - Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan

    None

    2015-03-01

    This Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Fiscal Year Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan (SSMP) is a key planning document for the nuclear security enterprise.

  16. FY 2015 - Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan

    None

    2014-04-01

    This Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Fiscal Year Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan (SSMP) is a key planning document for the nuclear security enterprise.

  17. Health in the 5th 5-years Development Plan of Iran: Main Challenges, General Policies and Strategies

    N Rostamigooran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Access to the right to the highest attainable level of health is a constitutional right that obliges governments and other players to take step to increase all individuals’ chances of obtaining good health. At the least, health and education are two crucial requirements for this as well. Iran's vision 2025 is going to lead the country to a developed state with the highest rank of economic, scientific and technological status in the region. Enjoying health, welfare, food security, social security, equal opportunities, etc, are also considered as part of characteristics of Iranian society in 2025. Although health system of Iran has many achievements in providing health services specially for the poor following the Islamic Revolution of 1979, but the evidences gathered to develop the 5th 5-years economical, social and cultural plan (5th5YDP:2011-2015, listed a variety of main challenges in stewardship, financing, resources generation and service provision functions of the existing health system. Thus, to overcome the main challenges, about 11% of general policies of 5th5YDP are directly address health related issues with emphasizing on healthy human and comprehensive health approach with considering: Integration of policy making, planning, evaluation, supervision and public financing; Developing both quantity and quality of health insurance system and reducing out-of-pocket expenditures for health services to 30% by the end of the 5th plan. The strategies of 5th5YDP adopted by the parliament as an Act will change the health system fundamentally through tuning the main drivers; so, its implementation needs brave leaders, capable managers, motivated technical staff and social mobilization.

  18. Health in the 5th 5-years Development Plan of Iran: Main Challenges, General Policies and Strategies.

    Vosoogh Moghaddam, A; Damari, B; Alikhani, S; Salarianzedeh, Mh; Rostamigooran, N; Delavari, A; Larijani, B

    2013-01-01

    Access to the right to the highest attainable level of health is a constitutional right that obliges governments and other players to take step to increase all individuals' chances of obtaining good health. At the least, health and education are two crucial requirements for this as well. Iran's vision 2025 is going to lead the country to a developed state with the highest rank of economic, scientific and technological status in the region. Enjoying health, welfare, food security, social security, equal opportunities, etc, are also considered as part of characteristics of Iranian society in 2025. Although health system of Iran has many achievements in providing health services specially for the poor following the Islamic Revolution of 1979, but the evidences gathered to develop the 5(th) 5-years economical, social and cultural plan (5(th)5YDP:2011-2015), listed a variety of main challenges in stewardship, financing, resources generation and service provision functions of the existing health system. Thus, to overcome the main challenges, about 11% of general policies of 5(th)5YDP are directly address health related issues with emphasizing on healthy human and comprehensive health approach with considering: Integration of policy making, planning, evaluation, supervision and public financing; Developing both quantity and quality of health insurance system and reducing out-of-pocket expenditures for health services to 30% by the end of the 5th plan. The strategies of 5(th)5YDP adopted by the parliament as an Act will change the health system fundamentally through tuning the main drivers; so, its implementation needs brave leaders, capable managers, motivated technical staff and social mobilization. PMID:23865015

  19. Institutional plan. FY 1998-2003

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    During the DOE Onsite Review in August 1996, Sandia`s Executive Vice President formally proposed combining Sandia`s Institutional Plan and Operating Plan, and their associated processes. The Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs subsequently approved a pilot plan to do so. This pilot plan is intended to comply with one of our new strategic objectives (see section 3.7), which entails creating an infrastructure that is a competitive advantage for our strategic missions. Therefore, Sandia`s planning organization integrated the information in the two plans and collected the data with a unified call. These data can not be combined in multiple ways, depending on customer requirements. Recently, executive management revamped Sandia`s Strategic Plan by creating eight new strategic objectives: four primary whats and four supporting hows. The new strategic objectives are set forth in chapters 3 through 5 of this document. The four primary objectives cover nuclear weapons responsibilities, nonproliferation and materials control, energy and critical infrastructures, and emerging national security threats. The major programmatic initiatives in chapter 7 are grouped accordingly. However, the programmatic descriptions in chapter 6 and the associated funding tables in chapter 9 continue to be presented by DOE Budget and Reporting Code, as in previous Sandia institutional plans. As an aid to the reader, the four primary strategic objectives in chapter 3 are cross-referenced to the program information in chapter 6.

  20. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program: National Program Plan, FY 1983

    This FY 1983 National Program Plan for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) provides specific guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1983 CFRP activities and a baseline for future year activities. This initial issue of the Plan, which will be updated annually, summarizes program objectives, summary plans and schedules, budget allocations, contractor involvement, and interfaces with other research programs. The National Program Plan is a controlling document for the Technical Program Plan, which is prepared annually by the CFRP at ORNL and is one of a hierarchical group of planning documents. The CFRP is a part of the DOE's program of research and development (R and D) on nuclear fission systems and is directed by the LMFBR Fuel Cycle Projects Division, Office of Spent Fuel Management and Reprocessing Systems at DOE-Headquarters through the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO). The strategy of the program is to maintain the capability to commit to a breeder option through a strong R and D program on breeder reprocessing and alternate fuels and fuel cycles to achieve operating and economic advantages

  1. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. National Program Plan FY 1984

    This FY 1984 National Program Plan for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) provides specific guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1984 CFRP activities and a baseline for activities in future years. This is the second issue of the Plan, which is updated anually and summarizes program objectives, summary plans and schedules, budget allocations, contractor involvement, and interfaces with other research programs. The National Program Plan is a controlling document for the Technical Program Plan, which is prepared annually by the CFRP at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is one of the hierarchical group of planning documents. The CFRP is a part of the DOE's program of research and development (R and D) on nuclear fission systems and is directed by the LMFBR Fuel Cycle Projects Division, Office of Spent Fuel Management and Reprocessing Systems at DOE-Headquarters through the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO). The strategy of the program is to maintain the capability to commit to a breeder option through a strong R and D program on breeder reprocessing and alternate fuels and fuel cycles in order to achieve operating and economic advantages

  2. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. National Program Plan, FY 1985

    This FY 1985 National Program Plan for the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) provides specific guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) for FY 1985 CFRP activities and a baseline for activities in future years. This is the third issue of the Plan, which is updated annually and summarizes program objectives, plans, and schedules, budget allocations, contractor involvements, and interfaces with other research programs. The National Program Plan is a controlling document for the Technical Program Plan, which is prepared annually by the CFRP at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is one of a hierarchical group of planning documents. The CFRP is a part of the DOE's program of research and development (R and D) on nuclear fission systems and is directed by the LMFBR Fuel Cycle Projects Division, Office of Spent Fuel Management and Reprocessing Systems at DOE-Headquarters through the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO). The strategy of the program is to maintain the capability to commit to a breeder option through a strong fuel cycle R and D program and international technical exchanges

  3. Institutional plan. FY 1998--2003

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This Institutional Plan for Argonne National Laboratory contains central elements of Argonne`s strategic plan. Chapter II of this document discusses the Laboratory`s mission and core competencies. Chapter III presents the Science and Technology Strategic Plan, which summarizes key features of the external environment, presents Argonne`s vision, and describes how the Laboratory`s strategic goals and objectives map onto and support DOE`s four business lines. The balance of the chapter comprises the science and technology area plans, organized by the four DOE business lines. Chapter IV describes the Laboratory`s ten major initiatives, which cover a broad spectrum of science and technology. Our proposal for an Exotic Beam Facility aims at, among other things, increased understanding of the processes of nuclear synthesis during and shortly after the Big Bang. Our Advanced Transportation Technology initiative involves working with US industry to develop cost-effective technologies to improve the fuel efficiency and reduce the emissions of transportation systems. The Laboratory`s plans for the future depend significantly on the success of its major initiatives. Chapter V presents our Operations and Infrastructure Strategic Plan. The main body of the chapter comprises strategic plans for human resources; environmental protection, safety, and health; site and facilities; and information management. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the business and management practices that Argonne is adopting to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of its operations. The structure and content of this document depart from those of the Institutional Plan in previous years. Emphasis here is on directions for the future; coverage of ongoing activities is less detailed. We hope that this streamlined plan is more direct and accessible.

  4. Tank Focus Area Pretreatment Program. FY 1995 Program Management Plan

    This program management plan (PMP) describes the FY 1995 project plans for the Pretreatment Program of the Tank Focus Area. The Tank Focus Area is one of five areas of environmental concerns originally identified by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technology Development (EM-50). Projects in the Tank Focus Area relate to the remediation of liquid waste stored in underground storage tanks at various US Department of Energy sites. The Pretreatment Program is an organizational unit performing work within the Tank Focus Area. The function of the Pretreatment Program is to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate new technologies, with emphasis on separations. The 11 Pretreatment Program projects for FY 1995 are (1) Cesium Extraction Testing, (2) Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, (3) Hot Cell Studies, (4) Cesium Removal Demonstration, (5) Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration, (6) Crossflow Filtration, (7) Technical Interchange with CEA, (8) TRUEX Applications, (9) NAC/NAG Process Studies (conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory), (10) NAC/NAG Process and Waste Form Studies (conducted at Florida International University), and (11) Program Management. Section 2 of this PMP contains a separate subsection for each FY 1995 project. A brief description of the project, a schedule of major milestones, and a breakdown of costs are provided for each project. The PMP also contains sections that describe the project controls that are in place. Quality assurance, document control, the project management system, and the management organization are described in these sections

  5. Tank Focus Area Pretreatment Program. FY 1995 Program Management Plan

    Morrison, M.I. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); McGinnis, C.P.; Wilkenson, W.T.; Hunt, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This program management plan (PMP) describes the FY 1995 project plans for the Pretreatment Program of the Tank Focus Area. The Tank Focus Area is one of five areas of environmental concerns originally identified by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Technology Development (EM-50). Projects in the Tank Focus Area relate to the remediation of liquid waste stored in underground storage tanks at various US Department of Energy sites. The Pretreatment Program is an organizational unit performing work within the Tank Focus Area. The function of the Pretreatment Program is to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate new technologies, with emphasis on separations. The 11 Pretreatment Program projects for FY 1995 are (1) Cesium Extraction Testing, (2) Comprehensive Supernate Treatment, (3) Hot Cell Studies, (4) Cesium Removal Demonstration, (5) Out-of-Tank Evaporator Demonstration, (6) Crossflow Filtration, (7) Technical Interchange with CEA, (8) TRUEX Applications, (9) NAC/NAG Process Studies (conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory), (10) NAC/NAG Process and Waste Form Studies (conducted at Florida International University), and (11) Program Management. Section 2 of this PMP contains a separate subsection for each FY 1995 project. A brief description of the project, a schedule of major milestones, and a breakdown of costs are provided for each project. The PMP also contains sections that describe the project controls that are in place. Quality assurance, document control, the project management system, and the management organization are described in these sections.

  6. FY 2001 Hanford Waste Management Strategic Plan

    We are pleased to present the 2001 Hanford Waste Management Program Strategic Plan. This plan supports the newly developed U. S. Department of Energy Site outcomes strategy. The 2001 Plan reflects current and projected needs for Waste Management Program services in support of Hanford Site cleanup, and updates the objectives and actions using new waste stream oriented logic for the strategic goals: (1) waste treatment/processing, storage, and disposal; (2) interfaces; and (3) program excellence. Overall direction for the Program is provided by the Waste Management Division, Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, U. S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Fluor Hanford, Inc. is the operating contractor for the program. This Plan documents proactive strategies for planning and budgeting, with a major focus on helping meet regulatory commitments in a timely and efficient manner and concurrently assisting us in completing programs cheaper, better and quicker. Newly developed waste stream oriented logic was incorporated to clarify Site outcomes. External drivers, technology inputs, treatment/processing, storage and disposal strategies, and stream specific strategies are included for the six major waste types addressed in this Plan (low-level waste, mixed low-level waste, contact-handled transuranic waste, remote-handled transuranic waste, liquid waste, and cesium/strontium capsules). The key elements of the strategy are identification and quantification of the needs for waste management services, assessment of capabilities, and development of cost-effective actions to meet the needs and to continuously improve performance. Accomplishment of specific actions as set forth in the Plan depends on continued availability of the required resources and funding. The primary objectives of Plan are: (1) enhance the Waste Management Program to improve flexibility, become more holistic especially by implementing new

  7. High performance computing and communications: FY 1995 implementation plan

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program was formally established following passage of the High Performance Computing Act of 1991 signed on December 9, 1991. Ten federal agencies in collaboration with scientists and managers from US industry, universities, and laboratories have developed the HPCC Program to meet the challenges of advancing computing and associated communications technologies and practices. This plan provides a detailed description of the agencies` HPCC implementation plans for FY 1994 and FY 1995. This Implementation Plan contains three additional sections. Section 3 provides an overview of the HPCC Program definition and organization. Section 4 contains a breakdown of the five major components of the HPCC Program, with an emphasis on the overall directions and milestones planned for each one. Section 5 provides a detailed look at HPCC Program activities within each agency. Although the Department of Education is an official HPCC agency, its current funding and reporting of crosscut activities goes through the Committee on Education and Health Resources, not the HPCC Program. For this reason the Implementation Plan covers nine HPCC agencies.

  8. Planning integration FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP)/Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP)

    This Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Planning Integration Program, Work Breakdown structure (WBS) Element 1.8.2, is the primary management tool to document the technical, schedule, and cost baseline for work directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). As an approved document, it establishes a binding agreement between RL and the performing contractors for the work to be performed. It was prepared by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This MYPP provides a picture from fiscal year 1995 through FY 2001 for the Planning Integration Program. The MYPP provides a window of detailed information for the first three years. It also provides 'execution year' work plans. The MYPP provides summary information for the next four years, documenting the same period as the Activity Data Sheets

  9. Institutional Plan, FY 1995--2000

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    Sandia recently completed an updated strategic plan, the essence of which is presented in chapter 4. Sandia`s Strategic Plan 1994 takes its direction from DOE`s Fueling a Competitive Economy: Strategic Plan and provides tangible guidance for Sandia`s programs and operations. Although it is impossible to foresee precisely what activities Sandia will pursue many years from now, the strategic plan makes one point clear: the application of our scientific and engineering skills to the stewardship of the nation`s nuclear deterrent will be central to our service to the nation. We will provide the necessary institutional memory and continuity, experience base, and technical expertise to ensure the continued safety, security, and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile. As a multiprogram laboratory, Sandia will also continue to focus maximum effort on a broad spectrum of other topics consistent with DOE`s enduring core mission responsibilities: Defense (related to nuclear weapons), Energy, Environment (related to waste management and environmental remediation), and Basic Science.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan: FY 1999-2004

    Garber, D.P.

    1999-01-06

    This Institutional Plan is the most comprehensive yearly "snapshot" available of Sandia National Laboratories' major programs, facilities, human resources, and budget. The document also includes overviews of our missions, organization, capabilities, planning functions, milestones, and accomplishments. The document's purpose is to provide the above information to the US Department of Energy, key congressional committees, Sandia management, and other present and potential customers. Chapter 2 presents information about Sandia's mission and summarizes our recent revision of Sandia's Strategic Plan. Chapter 3 presents an overview of Sandia's strategic objectives, chapter 4 lists laboratory goals and milestones for FY 1999, and chapter 5 presents our accomplishments during FY 1998. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized around our eight strategic objectives. The four primary objectives cover nuclear weapons responsibilities, nonproliferation and materials control, energy and critical infrastructures, and emerging national security threats. The major programmatic initiatives are presented in chapter 7. However, the programmatic descriptions in chapter 6 and the Associated funding tables in chapter 9 continue to be presented by DOE Budget and Reporting Code, as in previous Sandia institutional plans. As an aid to the reader, the four primary strategic objectives in chapter 3 are cross-referenced to the program information in chapter 6.

  11. INEEL Institutional Plan - FY 2000-2004

    Enge, Ray Stevenson

    1999-11-01

    In this first Institutional Plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus it's efforts on three strategic thrusts; (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R&D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemical from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EM's environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex - the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NE's needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this Institutional Plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this Institutional Plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

  12. LBNL Institutional Plan, FY 1996--2001. Draft

    The FY 1996-2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions

  13. LBNL Institutional Plan, FY 1996--2001. Draft

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The FY 1996-2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  14. Thermal Stabilization FY 1999 blend plan

    This Blend Plan documents the alternate feed material items for the thermal stabilization process that will be used in place of the metal items that were originally planned to be processed. Problems with resolution of the safety basis for the metal items resulted in the decision to run material that already had an established safety basis. Various in process and scrap recovery items stored in gloveboxes, plutonium oxide and plutonium oxide mixed with uranium oxide stored in 2736-Z vaults will be processed through the stabilization furnaces until the safety basis for the metal items has been resolved. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all volatile materials and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI). The stabilized material must meet LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-94 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the LOI limits are met

  15. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    Consistent with the Environmental Management's (EM's) plan titled, ''Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure'', and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided

  16. Salt Repository Project. FY-84 technical project plan

    The FY 84 technical plans for the Salt Repository Project (SRP) are briefly presented. The objectives of the project in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (CRWM) program are discused and the technical activities directed toward accomplishing these objectives are detailed. A budget is presented for each of the Level 2 Work Breakdown Structure Tasks (Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Test Facilities, Exploratory Shaft, Land Acquisition, and Program Management) in an appendix. An overall description, current status, and planned activities are presented for each of the subtasks which make up the above-mentioned Level 2 tasks. Milestones and their definitions for the plan year, as well as milestones for the outyears are also presented at this same subtask level for each subtask

  17. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  18. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  19. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration FY-95 Deployment Plan

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The FY-95 effort will fund 24 technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. Ten of these technologies will take part in the integrated field demonstration that will take place at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities in the summer of 1995. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects funded in FY-95. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for the INEL integrated field demonstration, INEL research and development (R ampersand D) demonstrations, non-INEL R ampersand D demonstrations, and office research and technical review meetings. Each project will have a test plan detailing the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of the test. Therefore, information that is specific to testing each technology is intentionally limited in this document

  20. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL's Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal

  1. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory's ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory's previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory's Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  2. ANL site response for the DOE FY1994 information resources management long-range plan

    Boxberger, L.M.

    1992-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory`s ANL Site Response for the DOE FY1994 Information Resources Management (IRM) Long-Range Plan (ANL/TM 500) is one of many contributions to the DOE information resources management long-range planning process and, as such, is an integral part of the DOE policy and program planning system. The Laboratory has constructed this response according to instructions in a Call issued in September 1991 by the DOE Office of IRM Policy, Plans and Oversight. As one of a continuing series, this Site Response is an update and extension of the Laboratory`s previous submissions. The response contains both narrative and tabular material. It covers an eight-year period consisting of the base year (FY1991), the current year (FY1992), the budget year (FY1993), the plan year (FY1994), and the out years (FY1995-FY1998). This Site Response was compiled by Argonne National Laboratory`s Computing and Telecommunications Division (CTD), which has the responsibility to provide leadership in optimizing computing and information services and disseminating computer-related technologies throughout the Laboratory. The Site Response consists of 5 parts: (1) a site overview, describes the ANL mission, overall organization structure, the strategic approach to meet information resource needs, the planning process, major issues and points of contact. (2) a software plan for DOE contractors, Part 2B, ``Software Plan FMS plan for DOE organizations, (3) computing resources telecommunications, (4) telecommunications, (5) printing and publishing.

  3. Buried waste integrated demonstration FY 94 deployment plan

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The fiscal year (FY) 1994 effort will fund thirty-eight technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for INEL field demonstrations, INEL laboratory demonstrations, non-INEL demonstrations, and paper studies. Each technology performing tests will prepare a test plan to detail the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of each test. Therefore, information specific to testing each technology is intentionally omitted from this document

  4. Office of Crystalline Repository Development FY 83 technical project plan

    The technical plan for FY 83 activities of the Office of Crystalline Repository Development is presented in detail. Crystalline Rock Project objectives are discussed in relation to the National Waste Terminal storage (NWTS) program. The plan is in full compliance with requirements mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Implementation will comply with the requirements and criteria set forth in the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations (10 CFR 60) and the Environmental Protection Agency standard (40 CFR 191). Technical approaches and the related milestones and schedules are presented for each of the Level 3 NWTS work Breakdown Structure Tasks. These are: Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Test Facilities and Excavations, Land Acquisition, and Program Management

  5. Salt Repository Project: FY 85 technical project plan

    The FY 85 technical plan for the Salt Repository Project is briefly presented. The objectives of the project in relation to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program are discussed, and the technical activities directed toward accomplishing these objectives are detailed. A budget is presented for each of the Level 2 work breakdown structure tasks (Systems, Waste Package, Site, Repository, Regulatory and Institutional, Exploratory Shaft, Test Facilities, Land Acquisition, and Project Management) in the various sections. An overall description, current status, and planned activities are presented for each of the subtasks which make up the above-mentioned Level 2 tasks. A strategy diagram and a master schedule are included and each of the milestones is also listed chronologically in the sections

  6. Buried waste integrated demonstration FY 94 deployment plan

    Hyde, R.A.; Walker, S.; Garcia, M.M.

    1994-05-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The fiscal year (FY) 1994 effort will fund thirty-eight technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for INEL field demonstrations, INEL laboratory demonstrations, non-INEL demonstrations, and paper studies. Each technology performing tests will prepare a test plan to detail the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of each test. Therefore, information specific to testing each technology is intentionally omitted from this document.

  7. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: FY 1982 project plan

    Since late FY 1977, the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project has been investigating the Nevada Test Site (NTS) area to determine whether underground rock masses on or near the NTS are suitable for the permanent isolation of spent reactor fuel or high-level radioactive wastes. During FY 1981, the Project developed, evaluated, and began exercising a method for screening the southwest NTS and contiguous lands for nuclear waste repository locations. The Project continued to concentrate on evaluating the technical acceptability of Yucca Mountain as a potential repository location. The drilling program was accelerated to meet the new Administration's decision-making schedule. In addition, media characterization and evaluation work, including studies of thermal-mechanical response and thermal degradation of minerals, continued. Engineering studies leading toward the Exploratory Shaft and repository conceptual designs were initiated. Tuff-specific waste package assessments and evaluations and far-field radionuclide release scenario analyses were also initiated. Existing environmental data inventories will be used to plan FY 1982 environmental studies in selected topical areas where additional information is needed. In addition, three other related activities are in progress within the NNWSI. The spent fuel storage test being conducted 1400 feet underground at the NTS in the Climax granite has been under way since April 1980. Work continued on two developmental field radionuclide migration experiments, one near the Climax experiment area and one in G-Tunnel at the NTS. The third major related activity is focused on the development and demonstration of the capability to safely handle, encapsulate, and store commercial spent reactor fuel in a passive interim storage made at or near the earth's surface

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  9. Oil program implementation plan FY 1996--2000

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document reaffirms the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy commitment to implement the National Oil Research Program in a way to maximize assurance of energy security, economic growth, environmental protection, jobs, improved economic competitiveness, and improved US balance of trade. There are two sections and an appendix in this document. Section 1 is background information that guided its formulation and a summary of the Oil Program Implementation Plan. This summary includes mission statements, major program drivers, oil issues and trends, budget issues, customers/stakeholders, technology transfer, measures of program effectiveness, and benefits. Section 2 contains more detailed program descriptions for the eight technical areas and the NIPER infrastructure. The eight technical areas are reservoir characterization; extraction research; exploration, drilling, and risk-based decision management; analysis and planning; technology transfer; field demonstration projects; oil downstream operations; and environmental research. Each description contains an overview of the program, descriptions on main areas, a discussion of stakeholders, impacts, planned budget projections, projected schedules with Gantt charts, and measures of effectiveness. The appendix is a summary of comments from industry on an earlier draft of the plan. Although changes were made in response to the comments, many of the suggestions will be used as guidance for the FY 1997--2001 plan.

  10. The PNNL Lab Homes Experimental Plan, FY12−FY15

    Widder, Sarah H.; Parker, Graham B.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-05-30

    The PNNL lab homes (http://labhomes.pnnl.gov/ ) are two manufactured homes recently installed immediately south of the 6th Street Warehouse on the PNNL Richland, WA campus that will serve as a project test bed for DOE, PNNL and its research partners who aim to achieve highly energy efficient and grid-responsive homes. The PNNL Lab Homes project is the first of its kind in the Pacific Northwest region. The Energy & Environment Directorate at PNNL, working with multiple sponsors, will use the identical 1,500 square-foot homes for experiments focused on reducing energy use and peak demand. Research and demonstration primarily will focus on retrofit technologies, and the homes will offer a unique, side-by-side ability to test and compare new ideas and approaches that are applicable to site-built as well as manufactured homes. The test plan has the following objectives: • To define a retrofit solution packages for moderate to cold climates that can be cost effectively deployed in the Pacific NW to save 50% of the energy needs of a typical home while enhancing the comfort and indoor air quality. The retrofit strategies would also lower the peak demands on the grid. • To leverage the unique opportunity in the lab homes to reach out to researchers, industry, and other interested parties in the building science community to collaborate on new smart and efficient solutions for residential retrofits. • To increase PNNL’s visibility in the area of buildings energy efficiency based on the communication strategy and presentation of the unique and impactful data generated in the lab homes. This document describes the proposed test plan for the lab homes to achieve these goals, through FY15. The subsequent sections will provide a brief description of each proposed experiment, summarize the timing of the experiment (including any experiments that may be run in parallel, and propose potential contributors and collaborators. For those experiments with funding information

  11. FY 1993 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to individuals and populations. The primary objective of work to be performed in FY 1993 is to complete the source term estimates and dose estimates for key radionuclides for the air and river pathways. At the end of FY 1993, the capability will be in place to estimate doses for individuals in the extended (32-county) study area, 1944--1991. Native American research will continue to provide input for tribal dose estimates. In FY 1993, the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) will decide whether demographic and river pathways data collection should be extended beyond FY 1993 levels. The FY 1993 work scopes and milestones in this document are based on the work plan discussed at the TSP Budget/Fiscal Subcommittee meeting on August 19--20, 1991. Table 1 shows the FY 1993 milestones; Table 2 shows estimated costs. The subsequent work scope descriptions are based on the milestones. This document and the FY 1992 task plans will form the basis for a contract with Battelle and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The 2-year dose reconstruction contract is expected to begin in February 1992. This contract will replace the current arrangement, whereby the US Department of Energy directly funds the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct dose reconstruction work. In late FY 1992, the FY 1993 task plans will be more fully developed with detailed technical approaches, data quality objectives, and budgeted labor hours. The task plans will be updated again in July 1993 to reflect any scope, milestone, or cost changes directed during the year by the TSP. 2 tabs

  12. Updated FY12 Ceramic Fuels Irradiation Test Plan

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is currently devoting resources to study of numerous fuel types with the aim of furthering understanding applicable to a range of reactors and fuel cycles. In FY11, effort within the ceramic fuels campaign focused on planning and preparation for a series of rabbit irradiations to be conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The emphasis of these planned tests was to study the evolution of thermal conductivity in uranium dioxide and derivative compositions as a function of damage induced by neutron damage. Current fiscal realities have resulted in a scenario where completion of the planned rabbit irradiations is unlikely. Possibilities for execution of irradiation testing within the ceramic fuels campaign in the next several years will thus likely be restricted to avenues where strong synergies exist both within and outside the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. Opportunities to augment the interests and needs of modeling, advanced characterization, and other campaigns present the most likely avenues for further work. These possibilities will be pursued with the hope of securing future funding. Utilization of synthetic microstructures prepared to better understand the most relevant actors encountered during irradiation of ceramic fuels thus represents the ceramic fuel campaign's most efficient means to enhance understanding of fuel response to burnup. This approach offers many of the favorable attributes embraced by the Separate Effects Testing paradigm, namely production of samples suitable to study specific, isolated phenomena. The recent success of xenon-imbedded thick films is representative of this approach. In the coming years, this strategy will be expanded to address a wider range of problems in conjunction with use of national user facilities novel characterization techniques to best utilize programmatic resources to support a science-based research program.

  13. Los Alamos Waste Management FY96 and FY97 Tactical Plan, March 1, 1996

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Waste Management Program (WMP) began a transition to become a open-quotes best of classclose quotes waste management program during fiscal year 1995 (FY95). A best of class waste management program means that LANL will provide cost-effective and compliant management of the minimum amount of waste. In FY94, the WMP could be characterized as a level of effort program requiring several new facilities and new LANL-developed technologies to carry out its waste management responsibilities. By the end of FY95, significant progress had been made in the transition to best of class. The FY96 WMP is realigned and reorganized. Its budget and scope of work are built upon discrete work packages. It is committed to achieving improved cost-effectiveness, providing significant tangible technical results, and to having its performance measured. During FY95, over $11,000,000 in facility and operational costs were avoided. The need for three new major facilities was reexamined and lower cost solutions, not requiring the development of new facilities, were agreed to. Technology development activities were terminated and replaced with the use of commercial facilities to achieve aggressive reductions in the Low-Level Mixed Waste legacy inventory. In addition, over $14,000,000 in improved cost-effectiveness has been included in the FY96 Baseline. An overall WMP vision, specific milestones, performance measures, and commitments are in place for FY96 to ensure that LANL continues the transition to a best of class waste management program. The following table identifies the overall vision and success indicators for FY96

  14. 75 FR 47346 - Draft Strategic Plan for FY 2010-2015

    2010-08-05

    ..., 2010. Martin R. Melone, Director, Strategic Planning and Performance Management, United States... Draft Strategic Plan for FY 2010-2015 AGENCY: United States Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice... draft strategic plan for fiscal years 2010-2015 is available for public review and comment....

  15. Site Maintenance Plan: Part 2, Site Maintenance Action Plan for FY 1994

    This Fiscal Year (FY) 1994 Site Maintenance Action Plan (SMAP) is Part II of the Site Maintenance Plan, and has been written by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to outline the requirements stated in DOE Order 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program, Chapter 1, Paragraph 3.3.1. The SMAP provides an annual status of maintenance initiatives completed and planned, a summary of performance indicators, a summary of maintenance backlog, a listing of real property and capital equipment maintenance cost estimates that were used to create the FY 1996 infrastructure and maintenance budget input, and a listing of proposed line item and general plant projects. Additionally, assumptions for various Site programs are listed to bring the Site Maintenance Plan into focus with overall Site activities. The primary mission at Hanford is to clean up the Site. In this cleanup process WHC will provide scientific and technological expertise to meet global needs, and partnership with stakeholders in the region to develop regional economic diversification. Other missions at the Hanford Site include energy research and development, and waste management and disposal activities. Their primary mission has a 30-year projected life span and will direct the shutting down and cleanup of defense production facilities and the Fast Flux Test Facility. This long-term mission requires continuous maintenance and in many instances, replacement of existing basic infrastructure, support facilities, and utilities. Without adequate maintenance and capital funding these infrastructure, support facilities, and utilities will continue to deteriorate causing an increase in backlogged work

  16. Fukushima, 5 years after

    This publication proposes an overview of the situation in Fukushima (in the plant and in its region), 5 years after the accident. As far as the plant is concerned, several issues are addressed: the withdrawal of fuel from decay pools, the management of contaminated waters, and the situation of reactors 1, 2 and 3. The radiological impact for operators is discussed in terms of radioactivity level, of occurrence of leukaemia, and of storage of radioactive wastes. The next part comments the slow return of populations and the recovery of agriculture, notably with respect to decontamination advances, and to waste management. Current perspectives for the Japanese nuclear industry are then addressed: creation of a new and stronger safety authority, and situation of the various other reactors (some are planned to be restarted, some will be dismantled, and new reactors are still being built). The last part addresses the rehabilitation of areas devastated by the tsunami, with temporary housing, urban planning comprising possibilities for the population to quickly find a shelter, and works on the coast for a better protection against tsunamis

  17. 75 FR 39493 - United States Patent and Trademark Office Draft Strategic Plan for FY 2010-2015

    2010-07-09

    ... administration and leadership of the agency is a revision of the FY 2007-2012 strategic plan. The USPTO's current... United States Patent and Trademark Office United States Patent and Trademark Office Draft Strategic Plan...) draft strategic plan for fiscal years (FY) 2010-2015 is available for public review and comment....

  18. 76 FR 13353 - Department of Commerce FY 2011-2016 Strategic Plan

    2011-03-11

    ... Department's senior leadership to develop a balanced scorecard to deploy and execute this Strategic Plan. The... further subdivided into three goals (Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Market Development and... 0605-XA34 Department of Commerce FY 2011-2016 Strategic Plan AGENCY: Department of Commerce....

  19. Environmental restoration and waste management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. FY 1993

    1993-01-15

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities undertaken to implement the FYP goals at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) installations and programs specifically for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. This SSP addresses activities and goals to be accomplished during FY93 even through the FYP focuses on FY94.

  20. Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Program Crosscut Plan, FY 1994--1999

    1993-12-01

    DOE has established a Natural Gas Coordinating Committee to ensure that all natural gas programs are conducted with a single strategic focus and without unnecessary duplication. This group prepared the FY 1993 update of the DOE Natural Gas Strategic Plan and Multi-Year Crosscut Program Plan (FY 1993-1998), which was first produced a year ago as a ``working draft`` for industry comment. This revised version incorporates these external comments and the results and recommendations of such developments as Order No. 636 of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the FERC/DOE Natural Gas Deliverability Task Force Report; the National Petroleum Council`s 1992 natural gas study, The Potential for Natural Gas in the United States; relevant provisions of the EPACT, and new policy guidance from the Clinton Administration. The overall goal of the Natural Gas RD&D Program is to improve the Nation`s ability to supply, store, transport, distribute, and utilize gas in an economically efficient and environmentally beneficial manner. In support of DOE`s missions are programs that will: improve the confidence in the continued availability of a long-term gas supply (Resource and Extraction Area); provide more cost-effective and competitive means to use natural gas in both new and existing markets (Utilization Area); develop improved and less costly means of delivering and storing gas (Delivery and Storage Area); and develop and ensure availability of low cost environmental compliance technology, and reduce regulatory barriers to efficient market operations by promoting coordinated, efficient, and innovative Federal and State regulations (Environmental/Regulatory Impact Area). Each program area has its own unique mission that contributes to the goals and mission of the overall Natural Gas Program.

  1. Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan, Rev. 1

    Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

    2001-12-10

    This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report.

  2. Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan

    Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

    2001-10-31

    This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report

  3. Savannah River Site FY 2001 Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrated Management Plan

    This document presents the SRS integrated near and long-term plans (FY 2001 through 2035) for the safe life cycle management of SNF inventories and other SFSD legacy material programs/projects that impact this mission until final disposition has been implemented

  4. 78 FR 55257 - Request for Comments on the Draft Departmental Strategic Plan for FY 2014-2018

    2013-09-10

    ... Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Strategic Planning Team, Attn... and Human Services FY 2014-2018 Strategic Plan is provided as part of the strategic planning process... strategic planning consultation process is an opportunity for the Department to refine and strengthen...

  5. FY 1991--FY 1995 Information Technology Resources Long-Range Plan

    1989-12-01

    The Department of Energy has consolidated its plans for Information Systems, Computing Resources, and Telecommunications into a single document, the Information Technology Resources Long-Range Plan. The consolidation was done as a joint effort by the Office of ADP Management and the Office of Computer Services and Telecommunications Management under the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Administration, Information, and Facilities Management. This Plan is the product of a long-range planning process used to project both future information technology requirements and the resources necessary to meet those requirements. It encompasses the plans of the various organizational components within the Department and its management and operating contractors over the next 5 fiscal years, 1991 through 1995.

  6. FY 2014 - Stockpile and Stewardship and Management Plan

    None

    2013-06-01

    This Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Fiscal Year Stockpile Stewardship and Management Plan (SSMP) is a key planning document for the nuclear security enterprise.

  7. DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21

    This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

  8. Long-range research plan. FY 1987-FY 1991. Volume 3

    The Long-Range Research Plan (LRRP) was prepared by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to assist the NRC in coordinating its long-range research planning with the short-range budget cycles. The LRRP lays out programmatic approaches for research to help resolve regulatory issues. The plan will be updated annually. It covers: operating reactor inspection, maintenance, and repair; equipment qualification; seismic research; reactor operations and risk; thermal-hydraulic transients; severe accidents; radiation protection and health effects; and waste management

  9. Long-Range Research Plan, FY 1986-FY 1990. Volume 2

    The Long-Range Research Plan (LRRP) was prepared by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) to assist the NRC in coordinating its long-range research planning with the short-range budget cycles. The LRRP lays out programmatic approaches for research to help resolve regulatory issues. The plan will be updated annually. It covers: operating reactor inspection, maintenance, and repair; equipment qualification; seismic research; reactor operations and risk; thermal-hydraulic transients; severe accidents; radiation protection and health effects; and waste management

  10. General Counsel`s office FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.5

    Moreno, S.R.

    1994-09-01

    The General Counsel`s office provides legal counsel to all levels of WHC management; administers the intellectual property program; coordinates all WHC investigative activity and supports WHC activities to ensure compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, DOE directives, contractual provisions, and other requirements. In so doing, the Office of General Counsel supports the Hanford site mission of transforming the Hanford site into an environmentally attractive and economically sustainable community. This document briefs the FY95 site support plan.

  11. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory institutional plan: FY 1996--2001

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    This report contains the operation and direction plan for the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of the US Department of Energy. The topics of the plan include the laboratory mission and core competencies, the laboratory strategic plan; the laboratory initiatives in molecular sciences, microbial biotechnology, global environmental change, complex modeling of physical systems, advanced processing technology, energy technology development, and medical technologies and systems; core business areas, critical success factors, and resource projections.

  12. Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995

    Haller, C.S.; Dove, T.H.

    1994-11-01

    This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement.

  13. Tank Waste Remediation System Tank Waste Analysis Plan. FY 1995

    This documents lays the groundwork for preparing the implementing the TWRS tank waste analysis planning and reporting for Fiscal Year 1995. This Tank Waste Characterization Plan meets the requirements specified in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, better known as the Tri-Party Agreement

  14. FY97 Geothermal R&D Program Plan

    None

    1996-09-01

    This is the Sandia National Laboratories Geothermal program plan. This is a DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form. This one is of special interest for historical work because it contains what seems to be a complete list of Sandia geothermal program publications (citations / references) from about 1975 to late 1996. (DJE 2005)

  15. FY 1992 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    None

    1991-10-01

    Phase 1 of the HEDR Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations from limited radionuclides, in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 1 ended in FY 1990. In February 1991, the TSP decided to shift the project planning approach away from phases--which were centered around completion of major portions of technical activities--to individual fiscal years (FYs), which span October of one year through September of the next. Therefore, activities that were previously designated to occur in phases are now designated in an integrated schedule to occur in one or more of the next fiscal years into FY 1995. Task plans are updated every 6 months. In FY 1992, scientists will continue to improve Phase 1 data and models to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. The plan for FY 1992 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meeting on August 19--20, 1991. The activities can be divided into four categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2) additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4) technical and communication support. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. FY 1992 task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Phase 1 of the HEDR Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations from limited radionuclides, in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 1 ended in FY 1990. In February 1991, the TSP decided to shift the project planning approach away from phases--which were centered around completion of major portions of technical activities--to individual fiscal years (FYs), which span October of one year through September of the next. Therefore, activities that were previously designated to occur in phases are now designated in an integrated schedule to occur in one or more of the next fiscal years into FY 1995. Task plans are updated every 6 months. In FY 1992, scientists will continue to improve Phase 1 data and models to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. The plan for FY 1992 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meeting on August 19--20, 1991. The activities can be divided into four categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2) additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4) technical and communication support. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. FY85 Program plan for the Defense Transuranic Waste Program (DTWP)

    The Defense TRU Waste Program (DTWP) is the focal point for the Department of Energy in national planning, integration, and technical development for TRU waste management. The scope of this program extends from the point of TRU waste generation through delivery to a permanent repository. The TRU program maintains a close interface with repository development to ensure program compatibility and coordination. The defense TRU program does not directly address commercial activities that generate TRU waste. Instead, it is concerned with providing alternatives to manage existing and future defense TRU wastes. The FY85 Program Plan is consistent with the Defense TRU Waste Program goals and objectives stated in the Defense Transuranic Waste Program Strategy Document, January 1984. The roles of participants, the responsibilities and authorities for Research and Development (R and D), the organizational interfaces and communication channels for R and D and the establishment of procedures for planning, reporting, and budgeting of all R and D activities meet requirements stated in the Technical Management Plan for the Transuranic Waste Management Program. The Program Plan is revised as needed. The work breakdown structure is reflected graphically immediately following the Administration section and is described in the subsequent narrative. Detailed budget planning (i.e., programmatic funding and capital equipment) is presented for FY85; outyear budget projections are presented for future years

  18. Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan FY1994--1999

    1993-10-01

    This report presents a five year plan for the laboratory. This plan takes advantage of the technical strengths of the lab and its staff to address issues of concern to the nation on a scope much broader than Sandia`s original mission, while maintaining the general integrity of the laboratory. The plan proposes initiatives in a number of technologies which overlap the needs of its customers and the strengths of its staff. They include: advanced manufacturing technology; electronics; information and computational technology; transportation energy technology and infrastructure; environmental technology; energy research and technology development; biomedical systems engineering; and post-cold war defense imperatives.

  19. Savannah River Site Waste Management Program Plan, FY 1993

    The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report on facilities being used to manage wastes, forces acting to change current waste management (WM) systems, and how operations are conducted. This document also reports on plans for the coming fiscal year and projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year to adequately plan for safe handling and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for developing technology for improved management of wastes

  20. NWRS Region 5 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 5, Inventory and Monitoring Program IM outlines the implementation...

  1. Fishery Management Plan Kenai National Wildlife Refuge FY 1996 - 2000

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Fishery Management Plan for the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge for the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge provides management direction necessary to ensure...

  2. Annual Burn Plan FY 94 : Brussels District Mark Twain NWR

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual burn plan for the Brussels District of Mark Twain NWR provides proposals for the Calhoun Division and the Gilbert Lake Division. Each proposal includes...

  3. NWRS Region 6 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 6, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  4. NWRS Region 2 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 2, Inventory and Monitoring Program IM outlines the implementation...

  5. NWRS Region 3 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 3, Inventory and Monitoring Program IM outlines the implementation...

  6. NWRS Region 7 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 7, Inventory and Monitoring Program IM outlines the implementation...

  7. NWRS Region 4 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 4, Inventory and Monitoring Program IM outlines the implementation...

  8. NWRS Region 8 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  9. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Institutional Plan FY2000 - FY2004

    Jefferson Lab contributes to the Department of Energy mission to develop and operate major cutting-edge scientific user facilities. Jefferson Lab's CEBAF (Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility) is a unique tool for exploring the transition between the regime where strongly interacting (nuclear) matter can be understood as bound states of protons and neutrons, and the regime where the underlying fundamental quark-and-gluon structure of matter is evident. The nature of this transition is at the frontier of the authors understanding of matter. Experiments proposed by 834 scientists from 146 institutions in 21 countries await beam time in the three halls. The authors user-customers have been delighted with the quality of the data they are obtaining. Driven by their expressed need for energies higher than the 4 GeV design energy and on the outstanding performance of their novel superconducting accelerator, the laboratory currently delivers beams at 5.5 GeV and expects to deliver energies approaching 6 GeV for experiments in the near future. Building on the success of Jefferson Lab and continuing to deliver value for the nation's investment is the focus of Jefferson Lab's near-term plans. The highest priority for the facility is to execute its approved experimental program to elucidate the quark structure of matter. The Lab plans to participate in the Strategic Simulation Initiative and benefit from the scientific opportunities that it affords. Initially, the lab will contribute its expertise in simulations for nuclear theory and accelerators, data handling, and distributed systems. As part of its SSI activities, the lab is planning to enhance its expertise in lattice QCD and simulations of photon-driven materials and chemical processes

  10. Prevent, Counter, and Respond - A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats (FY 2016-FY2020)

    None

    2015-03-01

    NNSA’s second core mission is reducing global nuclear dangers by preventing the acquisition of nuclear weapons or weapons-usable materials, countering efforts to acquire such weapons or materials, and responding to nuclear or radiological incidents. In 2015, NNSA reorganized its nonproliferation activities based on core competencies and realigned its counterterrorism and counterproliferation functions to more efficiently address both current and emerging threats and challenges. The reorganization accompanied the March 2015 release of the first ever Prevent, Counter, and Respond – A Strategic Plan to Reduce Global Nuclear Threats. This report, which NNSA will update annually, highlights key nuclear threat trends and describes NNSA’s integrated threat reduction strategy.

  11. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: Phase II program plan (FY 83-FY 84)

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is an NRC-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its goal is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly includes the uncertainties inherent in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. As currently planned, the SSMRP will be completed in September, 1984. This document presents the program plan for work to be done during the remainder of the program. In Phase I of the SSMRP, the necessary tools (both computer codes and data bases) for performing a detailed seismic risk analysis were identified and developed. Demonstration calculations were performed on the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. In the remainder of the program (Phase II) work will be concentrated on developing a simplified SSMRP methodology for routine probabilistic risk assessments, quantitative validation of the tools developed and application of the simplified methodology to a Boiling Water Reactor. (The Zion plant is a pressurized water reactor.) In addition, considerable effort will be devoted to making the codes and data bases easily accessible to the public

  12. Environmental Development Plan for Transportation Energy Conservation. FY 79 update

    Singh, M. K.; Bernard, III, M. J.

    1978-12-15

    This is the first annual update of the Environment Development Plan (EDP) for the DOE Division of Transportation Energy Conservation program. It identifies the ecosystem, resource, physical environment, health, safety, and socioeconomic concerns associated with the division's transportation programs. These programs include the research, development, demonstration and assessment (RDD and A) of seventeen transportation technologies and several strategy and policy development and implementation projects. The transportation technologies projects deal with highway transport including electric vehicles, marine transport and pipeline transport. This EDP presents a research and assessment plan for resolving any potentially adverse environmental concerns stemming from these programs.

  13. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995-2000

    1994-12-01

    This report serves as a document to describe the role PNL is positioned to take in the Department of Energy`s plans for its national centers in the period 1995-2000. It highlights the strengths of the facilities and personnel present at the laboratory, touches on the accomplishments and projects they have contributed to, and the direction being taken to prepare for the demands to be placed on DOE facilities in the near and far term. It consists of sections titled: director`s statement; laboratory mission and core competencies; laboratory strategic plan; laboratory initiatives; core business areas; critical success factors.

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  15. Technical Support Section annual work plan for FY 1997

    Adkisson, B.P.; Allison, K.L.; Effler, R.P.; Hess, R.A.; Keeble, T.A.; Odom, S.M.; Smelcer, D.R.

    1996-10-01

    The Technical Support Section (TSS) of the Instrumentation and Controls (I&C) Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides technical services such as fabrication, modification, installation, calibration, operation, repair, and preventive maintenance of instruments and other related equipment. Work performed by TSS is in support of basic and applied research and development (R&D), engineering, and instrument and computer systems managed by ORNL. Because the activities and priorities of TSS must be adapted to the technical support needs of ORNL, the TSS Annual Work Plan is derived from, and driven directly by, current trends in the budgets and activities of each ORNL division for which TSS provides support such as reductions in the staffing levels. TSS does not have an annual budget to cover operating expenses incurred in providing instrument maintenance support to ORNL. Each year, TSS contacts ORNL division finance managers or division finance officers to obtain information concerning projected funding levels of programs and facilities they manage. TSS workforce and resource projections are based on the information obtained and are weighted depending on the percentage of support provided to that division or program. The Long- Range Work Plan is based on estimates of impact of the long-range priorities and directions of the Laboratory. Identifiable proposed new facilities and programs provide additional basis for long-range planning. After identifying long-range initiatives, TSS planning includes future training requirements, re-evaluation of qualifications for new hires, and identification of essential test equipment needed in new work.

  16. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 2000-2004

    Chartock, Mike (ed.); Hansen, Todd (ed.)

    1999-08-01

    The FY 2000-2004 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab, the Laboratory) mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. To advance the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to define the Integrated Laboratory System, the Berkeley Lab Institutional Plan reflects the strategic elements of our planning efforts. The Institutional Plan is a management report that supports the Department of Energy's mission and programs and is an element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 and complements the performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions.

  17. Westinghouse Hanford Company FY 1996 Materials Management Plan (MMP)

    The safe and sound operation of facilities and the storage of nuclear material are top priorities within Hanford's environmental management, site restoration mission. The assumptions, plans and Special Nuclear Material (SNM) inventory summaries contained in this document were prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) use for interim and long- range planning. In accordance with Richland DOE field office (DOE-RL) direction, year-end inventory values were not projected over an 11 year period, as historically done in previous MMP documents. This decision was made since significant SNM movements to or from Hanford are not projected in the foreseeable future. Instead, the inventory summaries within this document reflect an ''as of date'' of June 30, 1995

  18. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    NONE

    2003-06-10

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  19. Environmental development plan for transportation programs: FY80 update

    Saricks, C.L.; Singh, M.K.; Bernard, M.J. III; Bevilacqua, O.M.

    1980-09-01

    This is the second annual update of the environmental development plan (EDP) for transportation programs. It has been prepared as a cooperative effort of the Assistant Secretaries for Conservation and Solar Energy (ASCS) Office of Transportation Programs (CS/TP) and the Environment (ASEV) Office of Environmental Assessments. EDPs identify the ecosystem, resource, physical environment, health, safety, socioeconomic, and environmental control concerns associated with DOE programs. The programs include the research, development, demonstration, and assessment (RDD and A) of 14 transportation technologies and several strategy implementation projects. This EDP update presents a research and assessment plan for resolving any potentially adverse environmental concerns arising from these programs. The EDP process provides a framework for: incorporating environmental concerns into CS/TP planning and decision processes early to ensure they are assigned the same importance as technological, fiscal, and institutional concerns in decision making; resolving environmental concerns concurrently with energy technology and strategy development; and providing a research schedule that mitigates adverse environmental effects through sound technological design or policy analysis. This EDP also describes the status of each environmental concern and the plan for its resolution. Much of ongoing DOE reseirch and technology development is aimed at resolving concerns identified in this EDP. Each EDP is intended to be so comprehensive that no concerns escape notice. Care is taken to include any CS/TP action that may eventually require an Environmental Impact Statement. Because technology demonstration and commercialization tend to raise more environmental concerns than other portions of the transportation program, most of this EDP addresses these concerns.

  20. RISMC advanced safety analysis working plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Szilard, Ronaldo H; Smith, Curtis L

    2014-09-01

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (“why is this important?”) that will make the case for stakeholder’s use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable “use case” demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  1. RISMC advanced safety analysis project plan: FY2015 - FY2019. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    In this report, the Advanced Safety Analysis Program (ASAP) objectives and value proposition is described. ASAP focuses on modernization of nuclear power safety analysis (tools, methods and data); implementing state-of-the-art modeling techniques (which include, for example, enabling incorporation of more detailed physics as they become available); taking advantage of modern computing hardware; and combining probabilistic and mechanistic analyses to enable a risk informed safety analysis process. The modernized tools will maintain the current high level of safety in our nuclear power plant fleet, while providing an improved understanding of safety margins and the critical parameters that affect them. Thus, the set of tools will provide information to inform decisions on plant modifications, refurbishments, and surveillance programs, while improving economics. The set of tools will also benefit the design of new reactors, enhancing safety per unit cost of a nuclear plant. As part of the discussion, we have identified three sets of stakeholders, the nuclear industry, the Department of Energy (DOE), and associated oversight organizations. These three groups would benefit from ASAP in different ways. For example, within the DOE complex, the possible applications that are seen include the safety of experimental reactors, facility life extension, safety-by-design in future generation advanced reactors, and managing security for the storage of nuclear material. This report provides information in five areas: (1) A value proposition (@@@why is this important?@@@) that will make the case for stakeholder's use of the ASAP research and development (R&D) products; (2) An identification of likely end users and pathway to adoption of enhanced tools by the end-users; (3) A proposed set of practical and achievable @@use case@@@ demonstrations; (4) A proposed plan to address ASAP verification and validation (V&V) needs; and (5) A proposed schedule for the multi-year ASAP.

  2. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1996--2001

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The FY 1996--2001 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory mission, strategic plan, core business areas, critical success factors, and the resource requirements to fulfill its mission in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Core Business Areas section identifies those initiatives that are potential new research programs representing major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. It also summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity, science and technology partnerships, and university and science education. The Critical Success Factors section reviews human resources; work force diversity; environment, safety, and health programs; management practices; site and facility needs; and communications and trust. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office of Planning and Communications from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories Institutional Plan: FY 1996--2001

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Sandia`s Institutional Plan is by necessity a large document. As their missions have grown and diversified over the past decades, the variety of technical and site activities has increased. The programs and activities described here cover an enormous breadth of scientific and technological effort--from the creation of new materials to the development of a Sandia-wide electronic communications system. Today, there are three major themes that greatly influence this work. First, every federally funded institution is being challenged to find ways to become more cost effective, as the US seeks to reduce the deficit and achieve a balanced federal spending plan. Sandia is evaluating its business and operational processes to reduce the overall costs. Second, in response to the Galvin Task Force`s report ``Alternative Futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories``, Sandia and the Department of Energy are working jointly to reduce the burden of administrative and compliance activities in order to devote more of the total effort to their principal research and development missions. Third, they are reevaluating the match between their missions and the programs they will emphasize in the future. They must demonstrate that Sandia`s roles--in national security, energy security, environmental integrity, and national scientific and technology agenda support--fit their special capabilities and skills and thus ensure their place in these missions for the longer planning horizon. The following areas are covered here: Sandia`s mission; laboratory directives; programmatic activities; technology partnerships and commercialization; Sandia`s resources; and protecting resources and the community.

  4. Environmental Development Plan (EDP): magnetohydrodynamics program, FY 1977

    This magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) EDP identifies and examines the environmental, health, and safety issues concerning the development of the ERDA Magnetohydrodynamics Program, the environmental activities needed to resolve these issues, applicable ongoing and completed research, and a time-phased action plan for the evaluation and mitigation of environmental impacts. A schedule for environmental research, assessment, and other activities is laid out. The purpose of the EDP is to identify environmental issues and to specify actions to ensure the environmental acceptability of commercial energy technologies being developed by ERDA. The EDP also will assist in coordinating ERDA's environmental activities with those of other government agencies. This document addresses the following technologies associated with ERDA's MHD program: (1) open-cycle magnetohydrodynamics; (2) closed-cycle plasma magnetohydrodynamics; and (3) closed-cycle liquid metal magnetohydrodynamics. The proposed environmental action plan is designed to meet the following objectives: (1) develop methods for monitoring and measuring emissions; (2) characterize air emissions, water effluents, and solid wastes from MHD; (3) determine potential environmental impacts and health hazards associated with MHD; (4) model pollutant transport and transformation; (5) ensure adequate control of pollutant emissions; (6) identify and minimize occupational health and safety hazards; (7) prepare NEPA compliance documents; and (8) assess the environmental, health, and safety impacts of the commercialized industry. This EDP will be updated and revised annually to take into account the progress of technologies toward commercialization, the environmental work accomplished, and the resolution of outstanding environmental issues concerning the technologies

  5. Revised Severe Accident Research Program plan, FY 1990--1992

    For the past 10 years, since the Three Mile Island accident, the NRC has sponsored an active research program on light-water-reactor severe accidents as part of a multi-faceted approach to reactor safety. This report describes the revised Severe Accident Research Program (SARP) and how the revisions are designed to provide confirmatory information and technical support to the NRC staff in implementing the staff's Integration Plan for Closure of Severe Accident Issues as described in SECY-88-147. The revised SARP addresses both the near-term research directed at providing a technical basis upon which decisions on important containment performance issues can be made and the long-term research needed to confirm and refine our understanding of severe accidents. In developing this plan, the staff recognized that the overall goal is to reduce the uncertainties in the source term sufficiently to enable the staff to make regulatory decisions on severe accident issues. However, the staff also recognized that for some issues it may not be practical to attempt to further reduce uncertainties, and some regulatory decisions or conclusions will have to be made with full awareness of existing uncertainties. 2 figs., 1 tab

  6. Building America's Low-e Storm Window Adoption Program Plan (FY2014)

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-12-23

    Low emissivity (low-e) storm windows/panels appear to hold promise for effectively reducing existing home heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) consumption. Due to the affordability of low-e storm windows and the large numbers of existing homes that have low-performing single-pane or double-pane clear windows, a tremendous opportunity exists to provide energy savings by transforming the low-e storm window market and increasing market adoption. This report outlines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America’s planned market transformation activities in support of low-e storm window adoption during fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  7. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan (SSP) for fiscal year 1992 (FY92)

    The FY-92 Site-Specific Plan (FY-92 SSP) for environmental restoration and waste management at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is designed to provide the reader with easy access to the status of environmental restoration and waste management activities at INEL. The first chapter provides background on INIEL's physical environment, site history and mission, and general information about the site and its facilities. In addition, this chapter discusses the inter-relationships between the Site Specific Plan, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, the environmental restoration and waste management prioritization systems, and the Activity Data Sheets (ADSs) for environmental restoration and waste management. This discussion should help readers understand what the SSP is and how it fits into the environmental restoration and waste management process at INEL. This understanding should provide the reader with a better context for understanding the discussions in the SSP as well as a better feel for how and what to comment on during the public comment period that will be held from the first of September through the end of October 1991

  8. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program surveillance and maintenance plan, FY 1993--2002

    The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D ampersand D) Program at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide PORTS the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER Program. The D ampersand D Program provides collective management of the sites within the plant which require decontamination and decommissioning, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D ampersand D Program provides support to facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each inactive facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the PORTS facilities currently included in the D ampersand D Program and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2002

  9. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes ''end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made

  10. Japanese efforts on coated conductor processing and its power applications: New 5 year project for materials and power applications of coated conductors (M-PACC)

    Shiohara, Y.; Fujiwara, N.; Hayashi, H.; Nagaya, S.; Izumi, T.; Yoshizumi, M.

    2009-10-01

    Five years of Japanese national project (FY2003-FY2007) was ended last spring with remarkable success. The national project was originally aimed for development of coated conductors which have high superconductivity performance and long length enough to fabricate high temperature superconducting (HTS) electric power devices. Preliminary research and development of HTS electric power devices were carried out as well. A series of R&D results will be summarized and reviewed in this paper. The new 5 years Japanese national project has started last June (FY2008-FY2012) to develop HTS electric power applications including SMES, cables and transformers and to develop/produce coated conductors satisfying the requirements from the respective power devices. Collaborative R&D efforts by national laboratories, universities and private companies have been started with the supports of NEDO and METI. The accomplishment of the previous project will be summarized and the plans and goals of the new project will be presented in this paper.

  11. FY 1991 Task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The objectives of work in Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 are to analyze data and models used in Phase 1 and restructure the models to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty in dose estimation capability. Databases will be expanded and efforts will begin to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Project scope and accuracy requirements, once defined, can be translated into additional model and data requirements later in the project. Task plans for FY 1991 have been prepared based on activities approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in October 1990 and mid-year revisions discussed at the TSP planning/budget workshop in February 1991. The activities can be divided into two broad categories: (1) model and data development and evaluation, (2) project, technical and communication support. 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. Planning Electron cloud/Gas desorption activities in the HIF-VNL during FY06

    The Heavy-Ion Fusion (HIF) group, under the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES) funding, has been carrying out studies of e-cloud and gas primarily for our own needs. During this effort we have developed unique experimental and simulation tools that we believe have broader applications. To a limited degree, as part of OFES' charter, we can pursue basic science for plasma and accelerator research and can also pursue issues of interest in high energy physics and other areas of accelerator research. We would appreciate your suggestions on specific needs that you have for which we might be able to make contributions towards understanding and mitigation. The following list of potential tasks provides a guide to our capabilities, plus some directions that we are considering; they are designed around our facilities, but we are open to collaborating at other sites. We will be firming up our plans after funding is set for the year--we currently expect that to happen in late October. The following list of tasks for FY06 assumes significant restoration of funds by Congress to a similar level as in FY05. Each area would be studied with coordinated experimental and simulation efforts. Most of these tasks deal with electron or gas issues, the last few are more general high-brightness beam issues

  13. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  14. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency's strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended

  15. Developmental milestones record - 5 years

    ... view (but may not understand them) Has improved math skills Questions others, including parents Strongly identifies with ... milestones for children - 5 years References Feigelman S. The preschool years. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, ...

  16. The first 5 years after the dissertation.

    Hodges, L C; Poteet, G W

    1992-01-01

    To succeed in academia, nursing faculty members must devote the first 5 years following the dissertation to achieving a standard to tenure characteristic of the profession. Most institutions in the country adhere to the American Association of University Professors' guidelines for tenure. These guidelines mandate excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service. A fourth characteristic, leadership, is increasingly considered in tenure decisions. The expectations of an academic career in nursing serve as the foundation for a framework to evaluate the likelihood of success in a particular setting. A detailed 5-year plan for achieving tenure is proposed. PMID:1634654

  17. Integrated Task Plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, FY 1992 through May 1994

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objective of work to be performed through May 1994 is to (1) determine the project's appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups), (2) determine the project's appropriate level of accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project, (3) complete model and data development, and (4) estimate doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS), representative individuals, and special populations as described herein. The plan for FY 1992 through May 1994 has been prepared based on activities and budgets approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) at its meetings on August 19--20, 1991, and April 23--25, 1992. The activities can be divided into four broad categories: (1) model and data evaluation activities, (2)additional dose estimates, (3) model and data development activities, and (4)technical and communication support

  18. Technology Integration Division FY 1992 Public Participation Program Management and Implementation Plan

    The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD), to develop and apply existing and innovative environmental restoration and waste management technologies to the cleanup to Department of Energy (DOE) sites and facilities in accordance with applicable regulations, is to be carried out through the central mechanisms of the Integrated Demonstration (ID) and Integrated Program (IP). Regulations include provisions for public participation in DOE decision making regarding IDs. Beyond these requirements, DOE seeks to foster a more open culture in which public participation, based on two-way communication between DOE and the public, is not only welcomed, but actively encouraged. The public to which the Program is addressed actually consists of several distinct ''publics:'' state and local government officials; Indian tribes; citizen groups and individuals concerned about specific issues; citizen groups or individuals who are opinion leaders in their communities; other federal agencies; private industry; and academia involved in IDs. Participation of these publics in decision making means that their concerns, needs, objectives, and other input are identified by two-way communication between them and DOE, and that these factors are considered when decisions made about OTD activities. This plan outlines the TIPs Public Participation Program goals, objectives, and steps to be taken during Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 to move toward those goals and objectives, based on the challenges and opportunities currently recognized or assumed

  19. FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993

  20. Quantitative Analysis on Scientific and Technical Literature of Polygonatum Mill. in the llth 5-Year-Plan Period in China%“十一五”我国黄精属科技文献计量分析

    胡一民; 姜程曦

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the literature regarding research on Polygonatum between 2006 and 2010 was retrieved with CNKI (China National Knowledge Internet) and statistical analysis was made on the date distribution, journal distribution, authors as well as the medical materials and resources, cultivation physiology, pest and disease control, processing, chemical composition, pharmacology,clinical applications and other related research. The scientific research on Polygonatum in the lhh 5-year-plan period in China was analyzed according to the statistical results aimed to provide reference for further scientific research on Polygonatum.%利用《中国知网》检索2006年-2010年有关黄精研究的文献,对其年代分布、期刊分布、作者及有关药材与资源、栽培生理及病虫害、加工与炮制、化学成分、药理、临床以及其他有关方面研究情况进行统计分析,根据统计结果对我国“十一五”期间黄精科研情况进行分析,意在为进一步开展黄精的科学研究工作提供参考。

  1. Hanford environmental management program multi-year work plan FY1998

    The Environmental Support FY 1998 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP), consisting of the Hanford Environmental Management Program (HEMP) and the Effluent and Environmental Monitoring (EEM) Program MYWP is prepared to specifically establish the execution year's work scope, budget targets, and schedule baselines. The work plan contains the work breakdown structure (WBS) and the WBS dictionary, milestone listings and milestone description sheets, and cost targets that the program manager will use to manage program work for the fiscal year. Where activities required to maintain or attain compliance with environmental requirements and agreements are impacted as a result of a reduction of the authorized funds, the ''Work Authorization'' identifies the impacted scope and requires the Contracting Officer's or Assistant Manager-Contracting Officer's Representative signature. Change requests will be submitted to RL by the contractor for approval, further documenting the impacts of any environmental and agreement noncompliances as a result of funding limitations. This is the first year that the MYWPs are submitted under the new Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC). The MYWPs are structured differently than in prior years. The MYWP is divided into two main sections. Section One is titled the ''Project Summary Section'' and Section Two is titled the ''Additional Sections at the Project Baseline Summaries Level''. Section One is where the major project summary-level information is provided. Section Two is designed to detail the information for each Project Baseline Summary (PBS) that falls under the purview of the major project listed in Section One. Considering all of the PHMC MYWPs, the HEMP and EEM programs are the one exception to the above description. HEMP and EEM are two of five separate programs that are organized under one common PBS that is titled Mission Support (PBS number-sign RL-OT01). RL has given guidance that HEMP and EEM will be submitted as one common MYWP

  2. Renewal plan of the JMTR hot laboratory for the irradiation test of high burn-up fuels in FY2008

    Refurbishment of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), which is recognized as one of important facilities in Japan for safety research, is in progress by the JAEA. In 'Extensive safety research of light-water reactor (LWR) fuels and materials' under a contract with the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan, the irradiation tests are planned in order to examine integrity of the LWR fuels and structure materials. For the irradiation tests of high burnup fuels and irradiated materials in the JMTR, modification of the hot laboratory facilities are needed, which are (1) preparing of documents books for strengthening JMTR hot-lab. cell-shielding, (2) detailed design of the capsule assembling device, (3) safety analysis for domestic transportation cask, and (4) confirmation test of diamond drill of fuel-rod center-hole processing. This paper summarizes investigation results for the design and manufacture, future on these equipments conducted in FY2008. (author)

  3. Renewal plan of the JMTR hot laboratory for the irradiation test of high burn-up fuels in FY2007

    Refurbishment of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), which is recognized as one of important facilities in Japan for safety research, is in progress by the JAEA. In 'Extensive safety research of light-water reactor (LWR) fuels and materials' under a contract with the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan, the irradiation tests are planned in order to examine integrity of the LWR fuels and structure materials. For the irradiation tests of high burnup fuels and irradiated materials in the JMTR, modifications of the hot laboratory facilities are needed, which are (1) strengthening JMTR hot-lab. cell-shielding, (2) the capsule assembling device, (3) domestic transportation cask, (4) fuel-rod center-hole processing device, (5) master-slave manipulators, (6) power manipulator, and (7) scanning electron microscope. In FY2007, above related modifications were investigated. This paper summarizes the investigation results of them. (author)

  4. 78 FR 71704 - Request for Comments on Draft SBA Strategic Plan for FY 2014-2018

    2013-11-29

    ... plan is available on SBA's Web site at http://www.sba.gov/about-sba/sba_performance/strategic_planning... Strategic Plan is provided for public input as part of the strategic planning process under the Government...://www.sba.gov/about-sba/sba_performance/strategic_planning . Jonathan I. Carver, Associate...

  5. 78 FR 69412 - Draft FY 2014-2018 EPA Strategic Plan; Availability

    2013-11-19

    ... submitting comments. Fax: ATTN: Vivian Daub, Director, Planning Staff, Fax number: (202) 564-1808. Mail: ATTN: Vivian Daub, Director, Planning Staff, Office of Planning, Analysis, and Accountability (Mail Code 2723A... for receipt. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Vivian Daub, Director, Planning Staff, Office...

  6. Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Prescribed Burn Plan FY 85

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Prescribed Burn Plan for Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR lists the planned unit prescriptions during the 1985 fiscal year. Approximately onethird of...

  7. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) FY2000

    JENSEN, C.E.

    2000-01-10

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities (individual responsibilities), plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities (tank inspection). Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance of the work and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria be discovered.

  8. Financial services FY 1996 site support program plan, WBS 6.10.4. Revision 1

    This program plan outlines the financial services to be provided to the Hanford reservation by the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The topics of the plan include the Hanford strategic plan, program mission, program strategy, technical requirements baseline, schedule baseline, cost baseline, performance measures, technical objectives, program performance and program funding required

  9. Engineering Task Plan for the Ultrasonic Inspection of Hanford Double-Shell Tanks - FY 2001

    This document facilitates the ultrasonic examination of Hanford double-shell tanks. Included are a plan for engineering activities, plan for performance demonstration testing, and a plan for field activities. Also included are a Statement of Work for contractor performance and a protocol to be followed should tank flaws that exceed the acceptance criteria are found

  10. 75 FR 34736 - Draft FY 2011-2015 EPA Strategic Plan

    2010-06-18

    ..., states, tribes, local government, industry, the academic community, non-governmental organizations, and... instructions for submitting comments. Fax: ATTN: Vivian Daub, Director, Planning Staff, Fax number: (202) 564-1808. Mail: ATTN: Vivian Daub, Director, Planning Staff. Office of Planning, Analysis,...

  11. Geothermal Energy Draft Multi-Year Program Plan: FY 1996-2000

    None

    1995-03-03

    This is an internal DOE Geothermal Program planning and control document. The Five Year Plans and Multi-Year Plans usually included more detailed rationales and projections than other similar reports. Many of these reports were issued only in draft form.

  12. Radiological control FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.4

    The 1995 Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) brings year planning and execution year planning into a single document. The plan presented consists of the following four major sections: Overview and Introduction - Health physics has been renamed Radiological Control (RadCon) with the role of protecting workers, the public and the environment from the harmful effects of radiation resulting from the DOE Hanford Site Operations; Cost Baselines which contains cost, technical and schedule baselines; Execution Year work Plan - cost summaries and detailed descriptions of the work to be done; Appendix - including brief description of other project activities directly coupled to RadCon

  13. Information resources management long-range plan, FY1994--1998

    This document describes IRM activities and the information technology resources and capabilities of the Department, the future requirements, and the strategies and plans to satisfy the identified requirements. The long-range planning process provides the systematic means to meet this objective and assists the Department in assuring that information technology (IT) support is provided in an efficient, effective, and timely manner so that its programmatic missions can be accomplished. Another important objective of the Plan is to promote better understanding, both within and external to the Department, of its IT environment, requirements, issues, and recommended solutions. This DOE IRM Plan takes into consideration the IRM requirements of approximately 50 different sites. The annual long-range planning cycle for supporting this Plan was initiated by a Call in August 1991 for site plans to be submitted in February 1992 by those Departmental components and contractors with major IRM requirements

  14. Information resources management long-range plan, FY1994--1998

    1993-04-01

    This document describes IRM activities and the information technology resources and capabilities of the Department, the future requirements, and the strategies and plans to satisfy the identified requirements. The long-range planning process provides the systematic means to meet this objective and assists the Department in assuring that information technology (IT) support is provided in an efficient, effective, and timely manner so that its programmatic missions can be accomplished. Another important objective of the Plan is to promote better understanding, both within and external to the Department, of its IT environment, requirements, issues, and recommended solutions. This DOE IRM Plan takes into consideration the IRM requirements of approximately 50 different sites. The annual long-range planning cycle for supporting this Plan was initiated by a Call in August 1991 for site plans to be submitted in February 1992 by those Departmental components and contractors with major IRM requirements.

  15. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    This report provides an overview of the major Environmental Restoration (ER) concerns at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The identified solid waste management units at PGDP are listed. In the Department of Energy (DOE) Five Year Plan development process, one or more waste management units are addressed in a series of activity data sheets (ADSs) which identify planned scope, schedule, and cost objectives that are representative of the current state of planned technical development for individual or multiple sites

  16. Environmental compliance program FY 1999 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.8.2.3

    Giese, K.A.

    1998-08-28

    The Environmental Compliance Program is developing and implementing a PHMC-wide chemical management system with the goal being to: (1) manage and control chemicals from procurement through use and final disposition; (2) develop and maintain procedures for identifying and evaluating hazards and environmental impacts present in facilities, and the hazard classification of the facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) may promulgate the final rule, 1 0 CFR 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment in FY 1999. This rule establishes controls for the release of radioactive material and limits for the amount of radiation exposure to the public and the environment. It will be applicable to activities of DOE contractors at the Hanford site. This rule is expected to replace the bulk of DOE Orders 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and 5400. 1, General Environmental Protection Program. In doing so, these Orders will be backed by the Price-Anderson enforcement procedures and carry penalties for non-compliance.

  17. Report of interim evaluation of Horonobe Underground Research Project Plan in FY2004

    The research results on the ground in the first step, until 2004 FY, and the research program of drift work in the second step are evaluated. On the first step, development of the geological environment research technologies, the monitoring technologies and the basic engineering technologies in the deep underground, long period stability of geological environment, and improvement of the geological disposal technologies, and the stability evaluation methods are investigated and these research results were high in estimation. The research program in the second step contains to obtain the geological environment data at sinking shaft, the effects of sinking on the geological environment, validity of the geological environment model in the first step and around the shaft are estimated. Validity of monitoring technologies of geological environment on the ground, engineering technologies of work, maintenance and management of shaft are evaluated. The fault, upheaval, submergence, change of sea level and climate are determined by earthquakes measurements, GPS and time-stratigraphic classification. The geological disposal technologies are improved by storage of data, better model and verification of engineering element techniques. Test program of materials transition in the geological disposal system is work out. (S.Y.)

  18. Environmental compliance program FY 1999 multi-year work plan, WBS 1.8.2.3

    The Environmental Compliance Program is developing and implementing a PHMC-wide chemical management system with the goal being to: (1) manage and control chemicals from procurement through use and final disposition; (2) develop and maintain procedures for identifying and evaluating hazards and environmental impacts present in facilities, and the hazard classification of the facilities. The US Department of Energy (DOE) may promulgate the final rule, 1 0 CFR 834, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment in FY 1999. This rule establishes controls for the release of radioactive material and limits for the amount of radiation exposure to the public and the environment. It will be applicable to activities of DOE contractors at the Hanford site. This rule is expected to replace the bulk of DOE Orders 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment and 5400. 1, General Environmental Protection Program. In doing so, these Orders will be backed by the Price-Anderson enforcement procedures and carry penalties for non-compliance

  19. Airspace Systems Program: Next Generation Air Transportation System Concepts and Technology Development FY2010 Project Plan Version 3.0

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the FY2010 plan for the management and execution of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project. The document was developed in response to guidance from the Airspace Systems Program (ASP), as approved by the Associate Administrator of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD), and from guidelines in the Airspace Systems Program Plan. Congress established the multi-agency Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) in 2003 to develop a vision for the 2025 Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) and to define the research required to enable it. NASA is one of seven agency partners contributing to the effort. Accordingly, NASA's ARMD realigned the Airspace Systems Program in 2007 to "directly address the fundamental research needs of the Next Generation Air Transportation System...in partnership with the member agencies of the JPDO." The Program subsequently established two new projects to meet this objective: the NextGen-Airspace Project and the NextGen-Airportal Project. Together, the projects will also focus NASA s technical expertise and world-class facilities to address the question of where, when, how and the extent to which automation can be applied to moving aircraft safely and efficiently through the NAS and technologies that address optimal allocation of ground and air technologies necessary for NextGen. Additionally, the roles and responsibilities of humans and automation influence in the NAS will be addressed by both projects. Foundational concept and technology research and development begun under the NextGen-Airspace and NextGen-Airportal projects will continue. There will be no change in NASA Research Announcement (NRA) strategy, nor will there be any change to NASA interfaces with the JPDO, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Research Transition Teams (RTTs), or other stakeholders

  20. Computing Division two-year operational plan, FY 1981-1982

    Euald, R.H.; Worlton, W.J.; McCormick, M.

    1981-02-01

    This report is a comprehensive planning guide for the Computing Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for fiscal years 1981 and 1982. Subjects discussed include critical issues, programmatic requiements, hardware plans, software projects, direct user services, research projects, and projections of future developments.

  1. Computing Division two-year operational plan, FY 1981-1982

    This report is a comprehensive planning guide for the Computing Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for fiscal years 1981 and 1982. Subjects discussed include critical issues, programmatic requiements, hardware plans, software projects, direct user services, research projects, and projections of future developments

  2. FY 1995 remedial investigation work plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E. [eds.

    1994-09-01

    Field activities to support the remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2, specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs containing significant sources of contamination at ORNL. The RI of WAG 2 is developed in three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upgradient WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate reevaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Specifically, Phase 2 activities are required to track key areas to determine if changes have occurred in WAG 2 that would require (1) interim remedial action to protect human health and the environment or (2) changes in remedial action plans and schedules for WAG2 because of changing contaminant release patterns in upslope WAGs or because of the effects of interim remedial or removal actions in other WAGs. This report defines activities to be conducted in FY 1995 for completion of the Phase 1 RI and initiation of limited Phase 2 field work.

  3. FY 1995 remedial investigation work plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Field activities to support the remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2, specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs containing significant sources of contamination at ORNL. The RI of WAG 2 is developed in three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upgradient WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate reevaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Specifically, Phase 2 activities are required to track key areas to determine if changes have occurred in WAG 2 that would require (1) interim remedial action to protect human health and the environment or (2) changes in remedial action plans and schedules for WAG2 because of changing contaminant release patterns in upslope WAGs or because of the effects of interim remedial or removal actions in other WAGs. This report defines activities to be conducted in FY 1995 for completion of the Phase 1 RI and initiation of limited Phase 2 field work

  4. Savannah River Site Waste Management Program Plan, FY 1993. Revision 1

    1993-06-01

    The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report on facilities being used to manage wastes, forces acting to change current waste management (WM) systems, and how operations are conducted. This document also reports on plans for the coming fiscal year and projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year to adequately plan for safe handling and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for developing technology for improved management of wastes.

  5. Savannah River Site Interim Waste Management Program Plan FY 1991--1992

    Chavis, D.M.

    1992-05-01

    The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report of how Waste Management's operations are conducted, what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year. In addition, this document projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year in order to adequately plan for safe handling, storage, and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site and for developing technology for improved management of wastes. In this document, work descriptions and milestone schedules are current as of December 1991.

  6. Savannah River Site Interim Waste Management Program Plan FY 1991--1992

    Chavis, D.M.

    1992-05-01

    The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report of how Waste Management`s operations are conducted, what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year. In addition, this document projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year in order to adequately plan for safe handling, storage, and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site and for developing technology for improved management of wastes. In this document, work descriptions and milestone schedules are current as of December 1991.

  7. Savannah River Site Interim Waste Management Program Plan FY 1991--1992

    The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report of how Waste Management's operations are conducted, what facilities are being used to manage wastes, what forces are acting to change current waste management systems, and what plans are in store for the coming fiscal year. In addition, this document projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year in order to adequately plan for safe handling, storage, and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site and for developing technology for improved management of wastes. In this document, work descriptions and milestone schedules are current as of December 1991

  8. Prescribed Burning Plan for FY 1988 : Parker River National Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the 1988 prescribed burning plan for Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Treatment #1 is the area consisting of the fresh water marsh inside the Stage...

  9. Chief Financial Officer FY 1997 status report and five-year plan

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 (CFO Act) establishes the legal framework for improved Federal financial management. The Act requires the agency CFO to prepare, and annually revise, a plan to implement the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Federal Financial Management Status Report and Five-Year Plan. This is the sixth Status Report and Five-Year Plan submission to OMB by the Department of Energy (DOE). Financial management at the Department operates in an environment of Government-wide efforts to improve financial management and implements legislation and administrative provisions which stress the need for change. This report sets forth the Department`s plans for financial management improvements in the coming years. It also highlights several new initiatives completed or currently underway that will significantly improve the overall effectiveness of financial management at the Department of Energy.

  10. Annual plan for administration of St. Marks Refuge for 1933 F.Y.

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan outlines developments and activities that will take place on St. Marks Refuge during 1933. Improvements will be made to buildings, water sources, and...

  11. Quality assurance FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.5

    This report is a summary of the quality assurance plan and program for the Westinghouse Hanford Company. The quality assurance plan verifies that the appropriate quality assurance programs and controls are applied to activities that affect quality related to work in: waste management; environmental activities (restoration, remediation, and monitoring); implementation of environmental, state, local, and federal regulations; tri-party agreement activities; facility operation and deactivation/transition to shutdown; new facility construction and operation

  12. Financial services FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.4

    Vodney, E.P.

    1994-09-01

    This is the signed Financial Service fiscal year 1995 Site Support Program Plan, Work Breakdown Structure 6.10.4, for the Hanford site. This plan is intended to enable the contractor to accomplish the following: ensure financial integrity in all Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operation while supporting the programmatic activities of WHC, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, and other Hanford contractors; provide efficient and effective financial services, and value added audits and review that enable management to enhance future operational results.

  13. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones

  14. HAMMER FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan: WBS number-sign 8.2

    The Hazardous Material Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center -- known simply as HAMMER -- is being developed to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) and others dedicated to improving worker health, safety and productivity. HAMMER is a training and education program for hazardous material, waste management, and emergency response workers. HAMMER is managed by the DOE Richland Operations Office under Work Breakdown Structure (8.2). The 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) includes the Execution Year data and provides the information for Programmatic Fiscal Year Site Management System Execution Baseline, as well as the detailed work plan for performance evaluation of the authorized work. The MYPP incorporates various planning methodologies to define the program and provides essential program integration, and a fully developed technical, cost, and schedule baseline. The MYPP will be utilized by WHC Program and Department Managers as the baseline management tool for status and progress monitoring, performance enhancement, impact analysis studies, and as the basis for detailed fiscal year and near-term planning

  15. DynCorp Tricities Services, Inc. Hanford fire department FY 1998 annual work plan

    Good, D.E.

    1997-08-19

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the U.S. Department of Energy operated Hanford site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. This fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This plan provides a program overview, program baselines, and schedule baseline.

  16. DynCorp Tricities Services, Inc. Hanford fire department FY 1998 annual work plan

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the U.S. Department of Energy operated Hanford site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. This fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This plan provides a program overview, program baselines, and schedule baseline

  17. West Valley Demonstration Project community relations plan FY 1990/91

    The purpose of the Community Relations Plan is to fully inform the community about the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and provide opportunities for public input. A sound approach to community relations is essential to the creation and maintenance of public awareness and community support. The WVDP is a matter of considerable public interest because it deals with nuclear waste. The mission of the WVDP is to solve an existing environmental concern by solidifying high-level radioactive waste and transporting the solidified waste to a federal repository for permanent disposal. The public requires evidence of the continued commitment and demonstrated progress of the industry and government in carrying out the mission in order to sustain confidence that the WVDP is being managed well and will be discussed successfully completed. For this reason, a comprehensive communication plan is essential for the successful completion of the WVDP

  18. Expedited technology demonstration project. Project baseline revision 2.2 and FY96 plan

    The Expedited Technology Demonstration Project Plan, Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) current baseline. The revised plan will focus efforts specifically on the demonstration of an integrated Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) system. In addition to the MSO primary unit, offgas, and salt recycle subsystems, the demonstrations will include feed preparation and feed delivery systems, and the generation of robust final forms from process mineral residues. A simplified process flow chart for the expedited demonstration is provided. To minimize costs and to accelerate the schedule for deployment, the integrated system will be staged in an existing facility at LLNL equipped to handle hazardous and radioactive materials. The MSO systems will be activated in fiscal year 97, followed by the activation of feed preparation and final forms in fiscal year 98

  19. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Commercialization Action Plans second quarter, FY-94

    The Federal Government is extremely good at creating knowledge and developing new technology. However, our declining market share in many industries points to a weakness in our ability to successfully commercialize new discoveries. BWID assembled a team of qualified experts with expertise in technology transfer and broad-based technology knowledge to assist with this effort. Five new technologies were chosen to develop commercialization action plans. They include Dig-Face Characterization, Imaging Infrared Interferometer for Waste Characterization, Tensor Magnetic Gradiometer, Very Early Time Electromagnetic System, and Virtual Environment Generation of Buried Waste. Each plan includes a short description of the technology, a market overview, a list of potential customers, a description of competitors and the technology's competitive advantage, the status of intellectual property, the status of technology transfer, a table of action items, commercialization contacts, and program contacts

  20. NASA/DOE/DOD nuclear propulsion technology planning: Summary of FY 1991 interagency panel results

    Clark, John S.; Wickenheiser, Timothy J.; Doherty, Michael P.; Marshall, Albert; Bhattacharryya, Samit K.; Warren, John

    1992-01-01

    Interagency (NASA/DOE/DOD) technical panels worked in 1991 to evaluate critical nuclear propulsion issues, compare nuclear propulsion concepts for a manned Mars mission on a consistent basis, and to continue planning a technology development project for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI). Panels were formed to address mission analysis, nuclear facilities, safety policy, nuclear fuels and materials, nuclear electric propulsion technology, and nuclear thermal propulsion technology. A summary of the results and recommendations of the panels is presented.

  1. Special initiatives FY 1996 multi-year program plan (MYPP) WBS 5.0. Revision 1

    The Special Initiatives mission supports programmatic requests for service to DOE offices, other organizations and agencies. These requests can include the following: Supporting priority DOE initiatives, researching special programs, studying locating new activities ar the Hanford Site, producing specialty materials, providing consulting support to other sites, and managing a broad spectrum of US and international test programs. The Special Initiatives Program discussed in this plan consists of the following elements: space power programs, advanced programs, special programs, and program strategy

  2. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory institutional plan -- FY 2000--2004

    Enge, R.S.

    1999-12-01

    In this first institutional plan prepared by Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the INEEL will focus its efforts on three strategic thrusts: (1) Environmental Management stewardship for DOE-EM, (2) Nuclear reactor technology for DOE-Nuclear Energy (NE), and (3) Energy R and D, demonstration, and deployment (initial focus on biofuels and chemicals from biomass). The first strategic thrust focuses on meeting DOE-EMs environmental cleanup and long-term stewardship needs in a manner that is safe, cost-effective, science-based, and approved by key stakeholders. The science base at the INEEL will be further used to address a grand challenge for the INEEL and the DOE complex--the development of a fundamental scientific understanding of the migration of subsurface contaminants. The second strategic thrust is directed at DOE-NEs needs for safe, economical, waste-minimized, and proliferation-resistant nuclear technologies. As NE lead laboratories, the INEEL and ANL will pursue specific priorities. The third strategic thrust focuses on DOE's needs for clean, efficient, and renewable energy technology. As an initial effort, the INEEL will enhance its capability in biofuels, bioprocessing, and biochemicals. The content of this institutional plan is designed to meet basic DOE requirements for content and structure and reflect the key INEEL strategic thrusts. Updates to this institutional plan will offer additional content and resource refinements.

  3. Soviet business chaos seen lasting 5 years

    This paper reports that companies seeking work in the collapsing Soviet Union can expect political uncertainty for another 5 years. PW discussed changes in the Soviet Union and offered advice on dealing with officials of the central government and Soviet republics at a recent meeting in Houston with executives of oil field service companies. That meeting preceded reports of the Russian federation, Ukraine, and Byelorussia agreeing to form a Slavic commonwealth

  4. Overheads, Safety Analysis and Engineering FY 1995 Site Support Program Plan WBS 6.3.5

    The Safety Analysis ampersand Engineering (SA ampersand E) department provides core competency for safety analysis and risk documentation that supports achievement of the goals and mission as described in the Hanford Mission Plan, Volume I, Site Guidance (DOE-RL 1993). SA ampersand E operations are integrated into the programs that plan and conduct safe waste management, environmental restoration, and operational activities. SA ampersand E personnel are key members of task teams assigned to eliminate urgent risks and inherent threats that exist at the Hanford Site. Key to ensuring protection of public health and safety, and that of onsite workers, are the products and services provided by the department. SA ampersand E will continue to provide a leadership role throughout the DOE complex with innovative, cost-effective approaches to ensuring safety during environmental cleanup operations. The SA ampersand E mission is to provide support to direct program operations through safety analysis and risk documentation and to maintain an infrastructure responsive to the evolutionary climate at the Hanford Site. SA ampersand E will maintain the appropriate skills mix necessary to fulfill the customers need to conduct all operations in a safe and cost-effective manner while ensuring the safety of the public and the onsite worker

  5. Safeguards and Security FY 1996 Program Plan: WBS 6.6

    The Safeguards and Security (SAS) Program is based upon integrity, competence and innovation in the protection of the public and Hanford resources through: (1) outstanding assistance, oversight, education, and counsel to their customers to ensure the protection of the public, site personnel, assets, and information; (2) value-added and cost-effective solutions to Hanford issues; and (3) risk management techniques to ensure effective asset protection, site accessibility, and the flexibility to adapt to changing customer needs. This plan is divided into two parts: overview and SAS WBS (work breakdown structure) dictionary sheets. The overview is divided into vision and mission, goals and objectives, assumptions and priorities, milestones, and a summary. The SAS WBS dictionary sheets are divided into department overhead, general and administrative, sitewide support, Hanford patrol, traffic safety, and locksmith services

  6. Safeguards and Security FY 1996 Program Plan: WBS 6.6

    Lee, F.D.

    1995-08-01

    The Safeguards and Security (SAS) Program is based upon integrity, competence and innovation in the protection of the public and Hanford resources through: (1) outstanding assistance, oversight, education, and counsel to their customers to ensure the protection of the public, site personnel, assets, and information; (2) value-added and cost-effective solutions to Hanford issues; and (3) risk management techniques to ensure effective asset protection, site accessibility, and the flexibility to adapt to changing customer needs. This plan is divided into two parts: overview and SAS WBS (work breakdown structure) dictionary sheets. The overview is divided into vision and mission, goals and objectives, assumptions and priorities, milestones, and a summary. The SAS WBS dictionary sheets are divided into department overhead, general and administrative, sitewide support, Hanford patrol, traffic safety, and locksmith services.

  7. Martin Marietta Energy Systems Environmental Management Plan, FY 1985-1989

    Furth, W.F.; Cowser, K.E.; Jones, C.G.; Mitchell, M.E.; Perry, T.P.A.; Stair, C.L.; Stinton, L.H.

    1985-05-01

    This plan contains the most recent revisions (as of April 1, 1985) identifying and resolving environmental problems during the next five years at the four installations managed for DOE by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). These installations are Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The report is not an exhaustive catalogue of environmental programs for which funds will be or have been requested. The thrust is to categorize the environmental challenges by the nature of the challenge. The challenges are identified by categories: (1) radioactive waste, (2) hazardous waste, (3) co-contaminated waste (hazardous and radioactive contaminated), (4) conventional waste, (5) monitoring, and (6) remedial actions and decommissioning.

  8. Martin Marietta Energy Systems Environmental Management Plan, FY 1985-1989

    This plan contains the most recent revisions (as of April 1, 1985) identifying and resolving environmental problems during the next five years at the four installations managed for DOE by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). These installations are Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (Y-12), and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The report is not an exhaustive catalogue of environmental programs for which funds will be or have been requested. The thrust is to categorize the environmental challenges by the nature of the challenge. The challenges are identified by categories: (1) radioactive waste, (2) hazardous waste, (3) co-contaminated waste (hazardous and radioactive contaminated), (4) conventional waste, (5) monitoring, and (6) remedial actions and decommissioning

  9. Test plan for sonic drilling at the Hanford Site in FY 1993

    This test plan describes the field demonstration of the sonic drilling system being conducted as a coordinated effort between the VOC-Arid ID (Integrated Demonstration) and the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride ERA (Expedited Response Action) programs at Hanford. The purpose of this test is to evaluate the Water Development Corporation's drilling system, modify components as necessary and determine compatible drilling applications for the sonic drilling method for use at facilities in the DOE complex. The sonic demonstration is being conducted as the first field test under the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) which involves the US Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Westinghouse Hanford Company and Water Development Corporation. The sonic drilling system will be used to drill a 45 degree vadose zone well, two vertical wells at the VOC-Arid ID site, and several test holes at the Drilling Technology Test Site north of the 200 Area fire station. Testing at other locations will depend on the performance of the drilling method. Performance of this technology will be compared to the baseline drilling method (cable-tool)

  10. Hanford fire department FY 1999 annual work plan WBS 6.5.7

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing a full range of services at the lowest possible cost to customers. These services include fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, the general public, or interest of the U. S. Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education

  11. Hanford fire department FY 99 annual work plan WBS 6.5.7

    GOOD, D.E.

    1999-02-24

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing a full range of services at the lowest possible cost to customers. These services include fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, the general public, or interest of the U. S. Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education.

  12. Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty research and development FY95-96 program plan

    None

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the United States Government`s (USG) research and development (R&D) functions for monitoring nuclear explosions in the context of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This responsibility includes the November 1993 transfer of the Department of Defense`s (DoD) CTBT R&D responsibility to DOE. The DOE research program builds on the broad base of USG expertise developed historically and includes R&D for detecting, locating, identifying, and characterizing nuclear explosions in all environments. The Office of Research and Development (NN-20), within the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, formulates and executes the efforts necessary to meet the Department`s responsibilities. The following DOE laboratories as a team will support NN-20 in implementing the program plan: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. DOE has committed to a cooperative program that draws upon the core competencies of the national laboratories and upon the strengths of other government agencies and the private sector (academia and industry). The integration of resources under a common direction will allow the program to be flexible and responsive to changing technical and policy requirements while maximizing the effectiveness of funding appropriations. DOE will develop and demonstrate appropriate technologies, algorithms, procedures, and integrated systems in a cost-effective and timely manner. The program comprises seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound monitoring; on-site inspection; space-based monitoring; and automated data processing elements.

  13. FY 2004 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...This Supplement to the Presidents Budget for Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 summarizes the NITRD agencies coordinated research activities and FY 2004 plans, as required...

  14. Expedited technology demonstration project (Revised mixed waste management facility project) Project baseline revision 4.0 and FY98 plan

    The re-baseline of the Expedited Technology Demonstration Project (Revised Mixed Waste Facility Project) is designated as Project Baseline Revision 4.0. The last approved baseline was identified as Project Baseline Revision 3.0 and was issued in October 1996. Project Baseline Revision 4.0 does not depart from the formal DOE guidance followed by, and contained in, Revision 3.0. This revised baseline document describes the MSO and Final Forms testing activities that will occur during FY98, the final year of the ETD Project. The cost estimate for work during FY98 continues to be $2.OM as published in Revision 3.0. However, the funds will be all CENRTC rather than the OPEX/CENTRC split previously anticipated. LLNL has waived overhead charges on ETD Project CENRTC funds since the beginning of project activities. By requesting the $2.OM as all CENTRC a more aggressive approach to staffing and testing can be taken. Due to a cost under- run condition during FY97 procurements were made and work was accomplished, with the knowledge of DOE, in the Feed Preparation and Final Forms areas that were not in the scope of Revision 3.0. Feed preparation activities for FY98 have been expanded to include the drum opening station/enclosure previously deleted

  15. Five-Year Implementation Plan For Advanced Separations and Waste Forms Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (FY 2011 to FY 2015)

    Not Listed

    2011-03-01

    DOE-NE separations research is focused today on developing a science-based understanding that builds on historical research and focuses on combining a fundamental understanding of separations and waste forms processes with small-scale experimentation coupled with modeling and simulation. The result of this approach is the development of a predictive capability that supports evaluation of separations and waste forms technologies. The specific suite of technologies explored will depend on and must be integrated with the fuel development effort, as well as an understanding of potential waste form requirements. This five-year implementation plan lays out the specific near-term tactical investments in people, equipment and facilities, and customer capture efforts that will be required over the next five years to quickly and safely bring on line the capabilities needed to support the science-based goals and objectives of INL’s Advanced Separations and Waste Forms RD&D Capabilities Strategic Plan.

  16. Site-directed subsurface environmental initiative: Five year summary and plan for fundamental research in subsoils and in groundwater, FY 1989-FY 1993

    The overall goal of this research initiative is to develop the necessary scientific basis for resolution of key technical obstacles to defining and remediating contamination at DOE and other waste sites. To accomplish this goal, the resouces of the national laboratories, universities, and DOE sites will be fully utilized to develop and demonstrate improved, cost-effective, and environmentally acceptable techniques for predicting the behavior of contaminants and reducing their concentrations in ground water. This document is a preliminary plan to set general research directions for a program extending into the 1990s. The needs and milestones identified in this plan may change with additional guidance from DOE sites. Promising research opportunities will be identified as part of national laboratory submissions of preliminary proposals

  17. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    Weissenberger, S. (ed.)

    1980-01-01

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80.

  18. Electronics Engineering Research. Final report, FY 1979

    Accomplishments in Electronics Engineering Research (EER) during FY79 spanned a broad range of technologies, from high-speed microelectronics to digital image enhancement; from underground probing with electromagnetic waves to detecting neutrons with a small solid-state device; and from computer systems to aid engineers, to software tools to aid programmers. This report describes the overall EER program and its objectives, summarizes progress made in FY79, and outlines plans for FY80

  19. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1993

    1994-08-01

    This report reviews the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) Program from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993 (fiscal year [FY] 1993). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The FY 1993 budget authority (BA) for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $40.1 million in operating funds and $0.9 million in capital equipment funds. An additional $4.8 million in capital equipment funds were made available for the new Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) that will house the in-house PV laboratories beginning in FY 1994. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with more than $23.7 million (nearly 59%) of the FY 1993 operating funds going to 70 subcontractors. In FY 1993, DOE assigned certain other PV subcontracting efforts to the DOE Golden Field Office (DOE/GO), and assigned responsibility for their technical support to the NREL PV Program. An example is the PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) Project. These DOE/GO efforts are also reported in this document.

  20. FY 2005 Supplement to the President`s Budget

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — The Supplement to the President`s FY 2005 Budget reports on the FY 2004 research and development R and D activities and FY 2005 plans of the multiagency Networking...

  1. The Alcohol Warning and Adolescents: 5-Year Effects.

    MacKinnon, David P.; Nohre, Liva; Pentz, Mary Ann; Stacy, Alan W.

    2000-01-01

    Examined the effect of alcohol warning labels on adolescents during the first 5 years that the warning was required. Surveys of 10th and 12th grade students over 5 years indicated that the initial positive effects of the labels on adolescents leveled off after 3.5 years. The labels have not affected adolescents' beliefs about alcohol or…

  2. General Counsel`s Office FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan: WBS 6.10.5. Revision 1

    Moreno, S.R.

    1995-09-01

    This is the General Counsel`s Office site support program plan for the US DOE Hanford site. The topics addressed in the program plan include a mission statement, description of activities, program objectives, planning assumptions, program constraints, work breakdown structure, milestone list, milestone description sheets, and activity detail.

  3. Institutional plan FY 1999--FY 2004

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos has a well-defined and nationally important mission: to reduce the global nuclear danger. This central national security mission consists of four main elements: stockpile stewardship, nuclear materials management, nonproliferation and arms control, and cleanup of the environmental legacy of nuclear weapons activities. The Laboratory provides support for and ensures confidence in the nation`s nuclear stockpile without nuclear testing. This challenge requires the Laboratory to continually hone its scientific acumen and technological capabilities to perform this task reliably using an interdisciplinary approach and advanced experimental and modeling techniques. In the last two National Defense Authorization Acts, Congress identified the need to protect the nation from the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, which includes nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, and their potential use by terrorists. Los Alamos is applying multidisciplinary science and engineering skills to address these problems. In addition, the Laboratory`s critical programmatic roles in stockpile stewardship and threat reduction are complemented by its waste management operations and environmental restoration work. Information on specific programs is available in Section 2 of this document.

  4. Institutional plan: Supplements, FY 1998--FY 2003

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This supplement contains summaries of the projects, both DOE and non-DOE, that the Argonne National Laboratory conducts. DOE projects include nuclear energy, energy research, energy efficiency, fossil energy, defense programs, non-proliferation and national security, environmental management, and civilian radioactive waste management. The second part of this report contains descriptions of the Argonne National Lab site and facilities. Budget information is also presented.

  5. FY2005 Progress Summary and FY2006 Program Plan Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    Ebbers, C

    2006-03-24

    goals were met. Nine crystal boules were successfully grown to produce 14 slabs. In addition, we have prepared the way to scale the Yb:S-FAP crystals to the next growth diameter (10-inch diameter as opposed to 7-inch diameter). An outside contract was placed with Northrop-Grumman to scaleup the Yb:S-FAP crystal size. The following sections discuss the above accomplishments in more technical detail and are followed by plans and a budget request for FY2006.

  6. FY 1996 Congressional budget request: Budget highlights

    1995-02-01

    The FY 1996 budget presentation is organized by the Department`s major business lines. An accompanying chart displays the request for new budget authority. The report compares the budget request for FY 1996 with the appropriated FY 1995 funding levels displayed on a comparable basis. The FY 1996 budget represents the first year of a five year plan in which the Department will reduce its spending by $15.8 billion in budget authority and by $14.1 billion in outlays. FY 1996 is a transition year as the Department embarks on its multiyear effort to do more with less. The Budget Highlights are presented by business line; however, the fifth business line, Economic Productivity, which is described in the Policy Overview section, cuts across multiple organizational missions, funding levels and activities and is therefore included in the discussion of the other four business lines.

  7. FY 1987 program summary document: Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management

    This document describes the Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM) Program as supported by the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 1987 Budget Request to Congress. It specifically addresses the program's organization, objectives, strategies, and plans for FY 1987

  8. [FY 2014 progress report]: Addressing Structural Uncertainty in a Decision-Making Framework to Inform Scaup Conservation Planning

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This progress report for the Addressing Structural Uncertainty in a DecisionMaking Framework to Inform Scaup Conservation Planning project covers activities during...

  9. 75 FR 66724 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 5-Year Review

    2010-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of availability of a 5-year review for the U.S. Distinct Population... electronic message to Shelley.norton@noaa.gov . Electronic copies of the 5-year review are available...

  10. Environmental support FY 1995 multi-year program plan/fiscal year work plan WBS 1.5.2/7.4.11

    The multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) is the programmatic planning baseline document for technical, schedule, and cost data. The MYPP contains data by which all work is managed, performed and controlled. The integrated planning process, defined by RL, is redicted on establishment of detailed data in the MYPP. The MYPP includes detailed information for the data elements including Level II critical path schedules, cost estimate detail, and updated technical data to be done annually. There will be baseline execution year and out year approval with work authorization for execution. The MYPP will concentrate on definition of the scope, schedule, cost and program element level critical path schedules that show the relationship of planned activities. The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) is prepared for each program to provide the basis for authorizing fiscal year work. The MYPP/FYWP will be structured into three main areas: (1) Program Overview; (2) Program Baselines; (3) Fiscal Year Work Plan

  11. Oklahoma State Plan FY 91-93: Part B of the Education of the Handicapped Act and Its Amendments.

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Div. of Special Education.

    This document contains Oklahoma's State Plan for education of students with disabilities in fiscal years 1991-93, along with the following support materials: the Oklahoma Policies and Procedures Manual for Special Education; the text of selected Oklahoma state laws on special education; a set of Oklahoma interagency agreements; a guide for parents…

  12. Spent nuclear fuels project: FY 1995 multi-year program plan, WBS number-sign 1.4

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) program is to safely, reliably, and efficiently manage, condition, transport, and store Department of Energy (DOE)-owned SNF, so that it meets acceptance criteria for disposal in a permanent repository. The Hanford Site Spent Nuclear Fuel strategic plan for accomplishing the project mission is: Establish near-term safe storage in the 105-K Basins; Complete national Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process to obtain a decision on how and where spent nuclear fuel will be managed on the site; Define and establish alternative interim storage on site or transport off site to support implementation of the NEPA decision; and Define and establish a waste package qualified for final disposition. This report contains descriptions of the following: Work Breakdown Structure; WBS Dictionary; Responsibility Assignment Matrix; Program Logic Diagrams; Program Master Baseline Schedule; Program Performance Baseline Schedule; Milestone List; Milestone Description Sheets; Cost Baseline Summary by Year; Basis of Estimate; Waste Type Data; Planned Staffing; and Fiscal Year Work Plan

  13. Encapsulating Peritoneal Sclerosis – A 5 Year Experience

    Spence, Robert; Gillespie, Scott; Loughrey, Maurice; Gardiner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Title Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis – A 5 year experience Aim Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is a rare, life-threatening condition, characterised by a progressive, intra-abdominal inflammatory process resulting in fibrotic visceral constriction. We report the aetiology, management, and outcome of EPS in Belfast. Method All patients diagnosed with EPS in Belfast over the past 5 years are included. Presentation, aetiology, imaging, pathology, and outcome are retrospectively analy...

  14. Reduction of mercury in plant effluents data management implementation plan FY 1998 Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    The purpose of the Data Management Implementation Plan (DMIP) is to document the requirements and responsibilities for managing, using, and archiving data used for the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluents (RMPE) project. The DMIP was created for the RMPE project in accordance with the guidance given in Environmental Data Management Implementation Handbook for the Environmental Restoration Program (ES/ER/TM- 88/R 1) and in ''Developing, implementing, and Maintaining Data Management Implementation Plans'' (EMEF/ER-P2216, Rev. 0). This document reflects the state of the RMPE project and the types of environmental monitoring planned as they existed through March 16, 1998. The scope of this document is the management of the RMPE project's environmental information, which includes electronic or hard copy records describing environmental processes or conditions. The RMPE program was established as a best management practice to address sources in the Y-12 Plant that contribute mercury to plant effluents being discharged to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek. The strategy is multifaceted: reroute clean water through clean conduits; clean, reline, and/or replace mercury-contaminated water conduits; eliminate or reduce accumulations of mercury in tanks and sumps; isolate inaccessible mercury from contact with water; and install treatment capability for streams where the source(s) cannot be eliminated or mitigated to acceptable levels. The RMPE project database consists of data from surface water monitoring and sediment sampling at locations of interest within the Y-12 Plant. This DMIP describes the types and sources of RMPE data, other data systems relevant to the RMPE project, the different data management interactions and flow of information involved in processing RMPE data, and the systems used in data management

  15. Reduction of mercury in plant effluents data management implementation plan, FY 1998, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Fischer, K.N.; Forsberg, V.M.

    1998-03-26

    The purpose of the Data Management Implementation Plan (DMIP) is to document the requirements and responsibilities for managing, using, and archiving data used for the Reduction of Mercury in Plant Effluents (RMPE) project. The DMIP was created for the RMPE project in accordance with the guidance given in Environmental Data Management Implementation Handbook for the Environmental Restoration Program (ES/ER/TM- 88/R 1) and in ``Developing, implementing, and Maintaining Data Management Implementation Plans`` (EMEF/ER-P2216, Rev. 0). This document reflects the state of the RMPE project and the types of environmental monitoring planned as they existed through March 16, 1998. The scope of this document is the management of the RMPE project`s environmental information, which includes electronic or hard copy records describing environmental processes or conditions. The RMPE program was established as a best management practice to address sources in the Y-12 Plant that contribute mercury to plant effluents being discharged to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek. The strategy is multifaceted: reroute clean water through clean conduits; clean, reline, and/or replace mercury-contaminated water conduits; eliminate or reduce accumulations of mercury in tanks and sumps; isolate inaccessible mercury from contact with water; and install treatment capability for streams where the source(s) cannot be eliminated or mitigated to acceptable levels. The RMPE project database consists of data from surface water monitoring and sediment sampling at locations of interest within the Y-12 Plant. This DMIP describes the types and sources of RMPE data, other data systems relevant to the RMPE project, the different data management interactions and flow of information involved in processing RMPE data, and the systems used in data management.

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project FY 1996 Multi-Year Program Plan WBS No. 1.4.1, Revision 1

    This document describes the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project portion of the Hanford Strategic Plan for the Hanford Reservation in Richland, Washington. The SNF Project was established to evaluate and integrate the urgent risks associated with N-reactor fuel currently stored at the Hanford site in the K Basins, and to manage the transfer and disposition of other spent nuclear fuels currently stored on the Hanford site. An evaluation of alternatives for the expedited removal of spent fuels from the K Basin area was performed. Based on this study, a Recommended Path Forward for the K Basins was developed and proposed to the U.S. DOE

  17. FY 1995 Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Watkins, D.R.; Herbes, S.E. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this project is to provide key information needed by decision makers to expedite the process of environmental restoration and to provide the data base required by the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs that contain significant sources of contamination at ORNL. Field activities to support the remedial investigation for the RI portion include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2 [consisting of White Oak Creek (WOC) and associated tributaries and floodplain, White Oak Lake (WOL), and White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE)], specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upslope WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate revaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Overall RI objectives, consistent with ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program strategic objectives to reduce risks and comply with environmental regulations, are discussed in the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation Plan.

  18. FY 1995 Remedial Investigation Work Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    The purpose of this project is to provide key information needed by decision makers to expedite the process of environmental restoration and to provide the data base required by the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 2 is the major drainage system downgradient of other WAGs that contain significant sources of contamination at ORNL. Field activities to support the remedial investigation for the RI portion include characterization of the nature and extent of contamination in WAG 2 [consisting of White Oak Creek (WOC) and associated tributaries and floodplain, White Oak Lake (WOL), and White Oak Creek Embayment (WOCE)], specifically to support risk-based remediation decisions. The project consists of three phases: Phase 1, initial scoping characterization to determine the need for early action; Phase 2, interim activities during remediation of upslope WAGs to evaluate potential changes in the contamination status of WAG 2 that would necessitate revaluation of the need for early action; and Phase 3, completion of the RI process following remediation of upslope WAGs. Overall RI objectives, consistent with ORNL Environmental Restoration (ER) Program strategic objectives to reduce risks and comply with environmental regulations, are discussed in the WAG 2 Remedial Investigation Plan

  19. FY 1990 environmental research programs for the Nevada Operations Office. Work plan and quarterly reports, first through fourth quarter reports

    NONE

    1990-11-01

    This work includes a wide range of research and support activities associated with the Weapons Testing Program conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Ongoing and new environmental research programs to be conducted by DRI over the period of this contract include archaeological studies and site mitigation plans; offsite community radiation monitoring support; environmental compliance activities related to state and federal regulations; hydrologic assessment of containment of underground nuclear detonations; hydrology/radionuclide investigations designed to better understand and predict the possible subsurface movement of radionuclides at the NTS; and support of various statistical and data management and design activities. In addition to these, archaeological and other activities will be carried out in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Other areas of the overall program which require DRI support are classified security activities, radiation safety and training, quality assurance and control, computer protection and historical data management, derivative classification of DRI documents, and preparation of any special reports not included in the requirements of the individual projects.

  20. Assessment of caries prevalence among children below 5 years old

    Prabhu, Poornima; Rajajee, K. T. S. S.; Sudheer, K. A.; Jesudass, G.

    2014-01-01

    Context: In the current scenario of developing countries, dental caries has been a long-standing challenge in the oral health issue and still on the rise. Aim: The aim of the following study is to estimate the caries prevalence in the primary dentition among children below 5 years of age. Meterials and Methods: Study population included both boys and girls below 5 years old attending KGF Dental College and Hospital, Karnataka. A simple random sampling method was used. A total of 672 children ...

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Tank Closure Plan and Grout Development Status Report for FY 1999

    Lewis, B.E.

    2000-05-08

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities across the country have radioactive waste underground storage tanks, which will require either complete removal of the tank contents and tank shells or in-place stabilization of sludge heels. Complete removal of the sludge and tank shells can become costly while providing little benefit to health, safety, and the environment. An alternative to the removal of the residual wastes and tank shells is the use of in situ solidification and stabilization techniques to immobilize the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and radioactive components present in waste storage tanks. One technology for in situ remediation of tank wastes is Ground Environmental Service's (GES's) Multi-Point-Injection (MPI.) technology. MPI technology is a patented delivery system, which uses simple and inexpensive injection tools for rapid delivery of grout or other treatment agents, as well as for the emplacement of subsurface barriers. Through the use of tailored grout formulations in conjunction with a system of specially designed grout injection tools, MPI technology is capable of producing a uniform mixture of sludge and grout. Grouts can be tailored for the immobilization of specific RCRA and radioactive constituents. The system of injection tools is designed to maximize the mixing efficiency of the grout with the wastes in the tank. MPI technology has been successfully demonstrated on the solidification of shallow buried wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and in large-scale pumping and mixing tests in both cylindrical and horizontal simulated waste tanks. Hot demonstration of the technology will be accomplished during the closure of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tank at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in fiscal year 2000. This report describes the closure plan for the OHF tanks and presents the status of grout formulation development at ORNL.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Tank Closure Plan and Grout Development Status Report for FY 1999

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities across the country have radioactive waste underground storage tanks, which will require either complete removal of the tank contents and tank shells or in-place stabilization of sludge heels. Complete removal of the sludge and tank shells can become costly while providing little benefit to health, safety, and the environment. An alternative to the removal of the residual wastes and tank shells is the use of in situ solidification and stabilization techniques to immobilize the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and radioactive components present in waste storage tanks. One technology for in situ remediation of tank wastes is Ground Environmental Service's (GES's) Multi-Point-Injection (MPI.) technology. MPI technology is a patented delivery system, which uses simple and inexpensive injection tools for rapid delivery of grout or other treatment agents, as well as for the emplacement of subsurface barriers. Through the use of tailored grout formulations in conjunction with a system of specially designed grout injection tools, MPI technology is capable of producing a uniform mixture of sludge and grout. Grouts can be tailored for the immobilization of specific RCRA and radioactive constituents. The system of injection tools is designed to maximize the mixing efficiency of the grout with the wastes in the tank. MPI technology has been successfully demonstrated on the solidification of shallow buried wastes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant and in large-scale pumping and mixing tests in both cylindrical and horizontal simulated waste tanks. Hot demonstration of the technology will be accomplished during the closure of the Old Hydrofracture Facility (OHF) tank at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in fiscal year 2000. This report describes the closure plan for the OHF tanks and presents the status of grout formulation development at ORNL

  3. 26 CFR 1.410(a)-5 - Year of service; break in service.

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Year of service; break in service. 1.410(a)-5 Section 1.410(a)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.410(a)-5 Year of service; break in service. (a) Year...

  4. Dietary predictors of 5-year changes in waist circumference

    Halkjaer, Jytte; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim;

    2009-01-01

    , whereas snack foods intake was positively associated. Sex differences occurred for vegetables, high-fat dairy products, and processed meat. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a diet low in fruits and red meat and high in snack foods was associated with larger waist circumference gains in both sexes......, baseline diet (192 items food frequency questionnaire), body mass index, and selected potential confounders (eg, smoking status, sport activities, and intake of alcoholic beverages). Multiple linear regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: For women, 5-year difference in waist circumference was...... inversely related to intake from red meat, vegetables, fruit, butter, and high-fat dairy products, whereas intake from potatoes, processed meat, poultry, and snack foods was positively associated. For men, red meat and fruit intakes were inversely associated with 5-year difference in waist circumference...

  5. Circumcision: a refined technique and 5 year review.

    S. C. Tucker; Cerqueiro, J.; Sterne, G.D.; Bracka, A.

    2001-01-01

    The vast majority of circumcisions currently performed in the UK are for phimosis or balanitis and the patients are not looking for the denuded glans appearance of a ritual circumcision. We present a refinement of the sleeve technique of circumcision, which involves Horton's test to define the proximal incision margin, and bipolar electro-dissection. A review of all patients undergoing circumcision at the Wordsley Plastic Surgery Unit, in a 5-year period, has shown this technique to be safe w...

  6. A 5-year retrospective clinical study of the Dentium implants

    Lee, Jeong-Yol; Park, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Choi, Yong-Geun; Kim, Young-Soo; Huh, Jung-Bo; Shin, Sang-Wan

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate cumulative survival rate (CSR) of Implantium implants followed for 5 years and association between risk factors and the CSR. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of two hundred forty-nine Implantium Implants System (Dentium, Seoul, Korea) placed in ninety-five patients from 2004 to 2009 were investigated with several identified risk factors (sex, systemic disease, smoking, alchohol, reason of tooth loss, length, arch (maxilla or mandible), ...

  7. Undergraduates’ opinion after 5-year experience with rotary endodontic instruments

    Flávia Sens Fagundes Tomazinho; Gisele Aihara Haragushiku; Flares Baratto Filho; Denise Piotto Leonardi; Maria da Graça Kfouri Lopes; Alexandre Moro

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Dentistry evolution in the past few years has revolutionized daily practice in some specialties. One of these revolutions has occurred in Endodontics due to the advancement of rotary techniques for root canal preparation and its subsequent incorporation into the teaching of Dentistry undergraduates. Objective: The aim of this study was to report a 5-year experience on the undergraduate laboratorial and clinical use of rotary endodontic preparation at a private university. Materi...

  8. Prone Breast Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: 5-Year Results

    Osa, Etin-Osa O.; DeWyngaert, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Roses, Daniel [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Speyer, James [Department of Medical Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Guth, Amber; Axelrod, Deborah [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Fenton Kerimian, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Goldberg, Judith D. [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: Silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To report the 5-year results of a technique of prone breast radiation therapy delivered by a regimen of accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concurrent boost to the tumor bed. Methods and Materials: Between 2003 and 2006, 404 patients with stage I-II breast cancer were prospectively enrolled into 2 consecutive protocols, institutional trials 03-30 and 05-181, that used the same regimen of 40.5 Gy/15 fractions delivered to the index breast over 3 weeks, with a concomitant daily boost to the tumor bed of 0.5 Gy (total dose 48 Gy). All patients were treated after segmental mastectomy and had negative margins and nodal assessment. Patients were set up prone: only if lung or heart volumes were in the field was a supine setup attempted and chosen if found to better spare these organs. Results: Ninety-two percent of patients were treated prone, 8% supine. Seventy-two percent had stage I, 28% stage II invasive breast cancer. In-field lung volume ranged from 0 to 228.27 cm{sup 3}, mean 19.65 cm{sup 3}. In-field heart volume for left breast cancer patients ranged from 0 to 21.24 cm{sup 3}, mean 1.59 cm{sup 3}. There was no heart in the field for right breast cancer patients. At a median follow-up of 5 years, the 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence was 0.82% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.65%-1.04%). The 5-year cumulative incidence of regional recurrence was 0.53% (95% CI 0.41%-0.69%), and the 5-year overall cumulative death rate was 1.28% (95% CI 0.48%-3.38%). Eighty-two percent (95% CI 77%-85%) of patients judged their final cosmetic result as excellent/good. Conclusions: Prone accelerated intensity modulated radiation therapy with a concomitant boost results in excellent local control and optimal sparing of heart and lung, with good cosmesis. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1005, a phase 3, multi-institutional, randomized trial is ongoing and is evaluating the equivalence of a similar dose and

  9. FY 90 annual research plan

    1990-01-01

    The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) was established by the DOE to perform contract research for government and industrial clients. The emphasis of the DOE program is immediate near- and mid-term concerns of domestic oil and gas producibility. Its primary purpose is to improve the fundamental understanding of domestic oil and gas resources and the chemical, physical, and biological phenomena that govern the occurrence and recovery of these resources in addition to their associated environmental issues. The near-term objective of the DOE program is to maintain access to resources presently being produced in domestic oil and gas fields, and to decrease the rate of decline of domestic production. NIPER projects in chemical flooding, gas injection, steam injection, and microbial EOR address near-term concerns of domestic oil production. Further, problems associated with the utilization of heavier fossil feedstocks are being addressed. The mid-term objective of the DOE program is to maximize the recovery efficiency of discovered oil and gas through improved understanding of the resource and to develop advanced extraction and instrumentation techniques. The objective also emphasizes an expanded understanding of the environment. NIPER projects dealing with the quantification of reservoir heterogeneities, pore structure analysis, and fluid flow in porous media are designed to improve extraction technologies. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Synovial Sarcoma in the Foot of a 5-Year-Old ChildA Case Report.

    Lepow, Gary M; Grimmer, Daniel L; Lemar, Onya V; Bridges, Evan A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present a rare finding of synovial sarcoma in a 5-year-old child. Most soft-tissue masses of the foot are too often presumed to be small and benign; therefore, compared with soft-tissue sarcomas, they are difficult to clinically differentiate and treat. A 5-year-old girl presented with a painful lesion that was diagnosed as synovial sarcoma after an excisional biopsy was performed. This was an unexpected finding of synovial sarcoma involving the tibialis posterior tendon of her right foot. The patient presented with an 8-month history of tenderness and an antalgic gait. We would like to encourage that all soft-tissue tumors of the foot be preoperatively evaluated with the aid of diagnostic imaging so that a well-planned biopsy assessment can be performed, with adequate margins excised. PMID:27489968

  11. Implementation of a new CT colonography service: 5 Year experience

    Aim: To describe our experience using a 5 year audit of computed tomography colonography (CTC) practice and identify factors that influence diagnostic performance to guide implementation in other centres. Material and methods: Consecutive patients referred for CTC at a single institution over a 5 year period were identified, and reporting rates and positive predictive value (PPV) calculated for small polyps, large polyps, and colorectal cancer. Diagnostic performance was compared using the Chi-squared test, and trends over time were examined with logistic regression. The effect of faecal tagging and an intravenous spasmolytic were investigated using Fisher's exact test. Results: In total, 4355 CTC examinations were performed. Overall reporting rates and PPV were 17% and 92%, respectively. Negative predictive value (NPV) for cancer was 99.9%. A significant decrease in reporting rate (p < 0.001) was accompanied by an increase in PPV for small polyps (p = 0.02) following the introduction of faecal tagging. Adequacy rates for CTC improved over time (96% to 99%), with improved adequacy rates when using a spasmolytic, 98% versus 96% without. A significant difference in reporting rates, but not PPV, was found between radiologists. Conclusion: Accurate colonic investigation using CTC can be delivered safely to a high-risk patient population at a single centre. Faecal tagging and an intravenous spasmolytic improve diagnostic performance

  12. Mlýnský potok Restoration: 5 year Evaluation

    Procházka, J.; Hakrová, P.; Hartvich, P.; Pokorný, Jan; Pechar, Libor

    Leiden: Backhuys Publishers, 2005 - (Vymazal, J.), s. 82-90 ISBN 90-5782-153-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : brook trout * fish * Glyceria fluitans * macrophytes * stream restoration Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality

  13. April 25, 2003, FY2003 Progress Summary and FY2002 Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers,and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, synergistic effort to develop inertial fusion energy (IFE). This program is building a physics and technology base to complement the laser-fusion science being pursued by DOE Defense programs in support of Stockpile Stewardship. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The current LLNL proposal is a companion document to the one submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. The NRL and LLNL proposals also jointly pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, target physics, materials and power plant economics. This proposal requests continued funding in FY03 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1 kW, 100 J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser, as well as research into high gain fusion target design, fusion chamber issues, and survivability of the final optic element. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments. The HAPL Program pursues technologies needed for laser-driven IFE. System level considerations indicate that a rep-rated laser technology will be needed, operating at 5-10 Hz. Since a total energy of ∼2 MJ will ultimately be required to achieve suitable target gain with direct drive targets, the architecture must be scaleable. The Mercury Laser is intended to offer such an architecture. Mercury is a solid state laser that incorporates diodes, crystals and gas cooling technologies

  14. April 25, 2003, FY2003 Progress Summary and FY2002 Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers,and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    Meier, W; Bibeau, C

    2005-10-25

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, synergistic effort to develop inertial fusion energy (IFE). This program is building a physics and technology base to complement the laser-fusion science being pursued by DOE Defense programs in support of Stockpile Stewardship. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The current LLNL proposal is a companion document to the one submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. The NRL and LLNL proposals also jointly pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, target physics, materials and power plant economics. This proposal requests continued funding in FY03 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1 kW, 100 J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser, as well as research into high gain fusion target design, fusion chamber issues, and survivability of the final optic element. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments. The HAPL Program pursues technologies needed for laser-driven IFE. System level considerations indicate that a rep-rated laser technology will be needed, operating at 5-10 Hz. Since a total energy of {approx}2 MJ will ultimately be required to achieve suitable target gain with direct drive targets, the architecture must be scaleable. The Mercury Laser is intended to offer such an architecture. Mercury is a solid state laser that incorporates diodes, crystals and gas cooling technologies.

  15. Docetaxel- and 5-FU-concurrent radiotherapy in patients presenting unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a FNCLCC-ACCORD/0201 randomized phase II trial's pre-planned analysis and case report of a 5.5-year disease-free survival

    To explore possible improvement in the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC) we performed a randomized, non-comparative phase II study evaluating docetaxel - plus either daily continuous 5 FU or weekly cisplatin concurrent to radiotherapy. We report here the results of the docetaxel plus 5 FU regimen stopped according to the interim analysis. The docetaxel plus cisplatin arm was continued. Forty (40) chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable LAPC were randomly assigned (1:1) to either continuous fluorouracil (5-FU) 200 mg/m2/day (protracted IV) and docetaxel (DCT) 20 mg/m2/week or DCT 20 mg/m2 and cisplatin (CDDP) 20 mg/m2, plus concurrent radiotherapy for a period of 6 weeks. The radiation dose to the primary tumor was 54 Gy in 30 fractions. The trial's primary endpoint was the 6-month crude non-progression rate (NPR). Secondary endpoints were tolerance, objective response rate, and overall survival. Accrual was to be stopped if at 6 months more than 13 disease progressions were observed in 20 patients. Eighteen (18) progressions occurred at 6 months in the 5-FU-DCT arm. Six-month NPR was 10% (95%CI: 0-23). Six and 12-month survivals were 85% (95%CI: 64-95) and 40% (95%CI: 22-61); median overall survival was 10.1 months. Median progression-free survival was 4.3 months. We report the case of one patient who was amenable to surgery and has been in complete response (CR) for 5.5 years. Toxicities grade ≥ 3 were reported in 75% of patients; no treatment-related death occurred. Severe toxicities were mainly vomiting (35%), abdominal pain (10%) and fatigue (10%). Combination of 5-FU, docetaxel and radiotherapy has inadequate efficacy in the treatment of LAPC despite good tolerance for the 5-FU-DCT regimen.

  16. Environmental Measurements Laboratory 2002 Unit Performance Plan

    None

    2001-10-01

    This EML Unit Performance Plan provides the key goals and performance measures for FY 2002 and continuing to FY 2003. The purpose of the Plan is to inform EML's stakeholders and customers of the Laboratory's products and services, and its accomplishments and future challenges. Also incorporated in the Unit Performance Plan is EML's Communication Plan for FY 2002.

  17. Modifiable diarrhoea risk factors in Egyptian children aged <5 years.

    Mansour, A M; Mohammady, H El; Shabrawi, M El; Shabaan, S Y; Zekri, M Abou; Nassar, M; Salem, M E; Mostafa, M; Riddle, M S; Klena, J D; Messih, I A Abdel; Levin, S; Young, S Y N

    2013-12-01

    By conducting a case-control study in two university hospitals, we explored the association between modifiable risk behaviours and diarrhoea. Children aged bacterial pathogens using standard techniques and tested by ELISA to detect rotavirus and Cryptosporidium spp. Four hundred cases and controls were enrolled between 2007 and 2009. The strongest independent risk factors for diarrhoea were: presence of another household member with diarrhoea [matched odds ratio (mOR) 4.9, 95% CI 2.8-8.4] in the week preceding the survey, introduction to a new kind of food (mOR 3, 95% CI 1.7-5.4), and the child being cared for outside home (mOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3-5.2). While these risk factors are not identifiable, in some age groups more easily modifiable risk factors were identified including: having no soap for handwashing (mOR 6.3, 95% CI 1.2-33.9) for children aged 7-12 months, and pacifier use (mOR 1.9, 95% CI 1.0-3.5) in children aged 0-6 months. In total, the findings of this study suggest that community-based interventions to improve practices related to sanitation and hygiene, handwashing and food could be utilized to reduce the burden of diarrhoea in Egyptian children aged <5 years. PMID:23433452

  18. Undergraduates’ opinion after 5-year experience with rotary endodontic instruments

    Flávia Sens Fagundes Tomazinho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentistry evolution in the past few years has revolutionized daily practice in some specialties. One of these revolutions has occurred in Endodontics due to the advancement of rotary techniques for root canal preparation and its subsequent incorporation into the teaching of Dentistry undergraduates. Objective: The aim of this study was to report a 5-year experience on the undergraduate laboratorial and clinical use of rotary endodontic preparation at a private university. Material and methods: Data survey was performed by using a questionnaire composed of nine objective questions; the questionnaire was answered by the undergraduates. Results: The results showed a positive acceptance regarding the undergraduate teaching of the rotary technique (94.7%. The following advantages were highlighted: faster root canal preparation (91.6% and reduction of patient’s stress (80.9%. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the experience with the two undergraduate groups was excellent due to the high acceptance level of the new technique by the students.

  19. USGS Alaska IfSAR and DEM Acquisition Plan Objectives for FY15 - FY17 from The National Map 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Elevation Data Set (NED)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior - The annual Alaska IfSAR and DEM acquisition plan is part of the 3DEP initiative to collect high-quality...

  20. FY15 Final Annual Report for the Regional Test Centers.

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) manages four of the five PV Regional Test Centers (RTCs). This report reviews accomplishments made by the four Sandia-managed RTCs during FY2015 (October 1, 2014 to September 30, 2015) as well as some programmatic improvements that apply to all five sites. The report is structured by Site first then by Partner within each site followed by the Current and Potential Partner summary table, the New Business Process, and finally the Plan for FY16 and beyond. Since no official SOPO was ever agreed to for FY15, this report does not include reporting on specific milestones and go/no-go decisions.

  1. Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site – FY 2010 Status Report

    Fayer, Michael J.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Herrington, Ricky S.; Felmy, Diana

    2010-10-27

    This report summarizes the recharge data collected in FY 2010 at five locations on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Average monthly precipitation and temperature conditions in FY 2010 were near normal and did not present an opportunity for increased recharge. The recharge monitoring data confirmed those conditions, showing normal behavior in water content, matric head, and recharge rates. Also provided in this report is a strategy for recharge estimation for the next 5 years.

  2. Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture. A 5-year experience.

    Brathwaite, C E; Rodriguez, A; Turney, S Z; Dunham, C M; Cowley, R

    1990-12-01

    Blunt traumatic cardiac rupture is associated with a high rate of mortality. A review of the computerized trauma registry (1983 to 1988) identified 32 patients with this injury (ages 19 to 65 years; mean age, 39.5 years; 21 men and 11 women). Twenty-one patients (65.6%) were injured in vehicular crashes, 3 (9.4%) in pedestrian accidents, 3 (9.4%) in motorcycle accidents; 3 (9.4%) sustained crush injury; 1 (3.1%) was injured by a fall; and 1 (3.1%) was kicked in the chest by a horse. Anatomic injuries included right atrial rupture (13[40.6%]), left atrial rupture (8 [25%]), right ventricular rupture (10[31.3%]), left ventricular rupture (4[12.5%]), and rupture of two cardiac chambers (3 [9.4%]). Diagnosis was made by thoracotomy in all 20 patients presenting in cardiac arrest. In the remaining 12 patients, the diagnosis was established in seven by emergency left anterolateral thoracotomy and in five by subxyphoid pericardial window. Seven of these 12 patients (58.3%) had clinical cardiac tamponade and significant upper torso cyanosis. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS), Trauma Score (TS), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score were 33.8, 13.2, and 14.3, respectively, among survivors and 51.5, 8.3, and 7.0 for nonsurvivors. The overall mortality rate was 81.3% (26 of 32 patients), the only survivors being those presenting with vital signs (6 of 12 patients [50%]). All patients with rupture of two cardiac chambers or with ventricular rupture died. The mortality rate from myocardial rupture is very high. Rapid prehospital transportation, a high index of suspicion, and prompt surgical intervention contribute to survival in these patients. PMID:2256761

  3. Hangman Restoration Project Year-End Report FY2008.

    Coeur d' Alene Tribe Department of Natural Resources.

    2008-11-12

    This report covers the main goals of FY2008 from which the Work Elements were derived. The goals and products are listed by heading and the associated work elements are referenced in the text. A list of the FY2008 Work Elements is included as Appendix A. FY2008 witnessed the completion of the hntkwipn Management Plan and the first substantive efforts to restore the important habitats encompassed by the mitigation properties in the Upper Hangman Watershed. Native grasses were planted and germination was evaluated. Also, drain tiles that greatly altered the hydrologic function of the Sheep and Hangman Creek Flood Plains were removed and/or disrupted. Preparation for future restoration efforts were also made in FY2008. Designs were produced for the realignment of Sheep Creek and the decommissioning of seven drainage ditches within hntkwipn. A prioritization plan was drafted that greatly expands the area of focus for restoring native fish population in Hangman Creek.

  4. Conceptual design study of fusion experimental reactor (FY86 FER)

    This report describes the results of conceptual design study on plant systems for the Fusion Experimental Reactor (FY86 FER). Design studies for FER plant systems have been continued from FY85, especially for design modifications made in accordance with revisions of plasma scaling parameters and system improvements. This report describes 1) system construction, 2) site and reactor building plan, 3) repaire and maintenance system, 4) tritium circulation system, 5) heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, 6) tritium clean-up system, 7) cooling and baking system, 8) waste treatment and storage system, 9) control system, 10) electric power system, 11) site factory plan, all of which are a part of FY86 design work. The plant systems described in this report generally have been based on the FY86 FER (ACS Reactor) which is an one of the six candidates for FER. (author)

  5. Clinical spectrum and outcome of pulmonary nocardiosis: 5-year experience

    Singh, Akashdeep; Chhina, Deepinder; Soni, RK; Kakkar, Chandan; Sidhu, US

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary nocardiosis is a rare but a life-threatening infection caused by Nocardia spp. The diagnosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus higher mortality. Aim: In this study, we aim to evaluate the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis. Methods: A retrospective, 5-year (2009–2014) review of demographic profile, risk factors, clinical manifestations, imaging findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with pulmonary nocardiosis admitted to a tertiary care hospital. Results: The median age of the study subjects was 54 years (range, 16–76) and majority of them (75%) were males. The risk factors for pulmonary nocardiosis identified in our study were long-term steroid use (55.6%), chronic lung disease (52.8%), diabetes (27.8%), and solid-organ transplantation (22.2%). All the patients were symptomatic, and the most common symptoms were cough (91.7%), fever (78%), and expectoration (72%). Almost two-third of the patients were initially misdiagnosed and the alternative diagnosis included pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 7), community-acquired pneumonia (n = 5), lung abscess (n = 4), invasive fungal infection (n = 3), lung cancer (n = 2), and Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 2). The most common radiographic features were consolidation (77.8%) and nodules (56%). The mortality rate for indoor patients was 33% despite treatment. Higher mortality rate was observed among those who had brain abscess (100.0%), HIV positivity (100%), need for mechanical ventilation (87.5%), solid-organ transplantation (50%), and elderly (age > 60 years) patients (43%). Conclusion: The diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis is often missed and delayed resulting in delay in appropriate treatment and thus high mortality. A lower threshold for diagnosing pulmonary nocardiosis needs to be exercised, in chest symptomatic patients with underlying chronic lung diseases or systemic immunosuppression, for the early diagnosis

  6. A 5-year experience with an elective scholarly concentrations program

    Paul George

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem: Programs that encourage scholarly activities beyond the core curriculum and traditional biomedical research are now commonplace among US medical schools. Few studies have generated outcome data for these programs. The goal of the present study was to address this gap. Intervention: The Scholarly Concentration (SC Program, established in 2006 at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, is a 4-year elective program that not only encourages students to pursue scholarly work that may include traditional biomedical research but also seeks to broaden students’ focus to include less traditional areas. We compared characteristics and academic performance of SC students and non-SC students for the graduating classes of 2010–2014. Context: Approximately one-third of our students opt to complete an SC during their 4-year undergraduate medical education. Because this program is additional to the regular MD curriculum, we sought to investigate whether SC students sustained the academic achievement of non-SC students while at the same time producing scholarly work as part of the program. Outcome: Over 5 years, 35% of students elected to enter the program and approximately 81% of these students completed the program. The parameters that were similar for both SC and non-SC students were age at matriculation, admission route, proportion of undergraduate science majors, and number of undergraduate science courses. Most academic indicators, including United States Medical Licensing Examinations scores, were similar for the two groups; however, SC students achieved more honors in the six core clerkships and were more likely to be inducted into the medical school's two honor societies. Residency specialties selected by graduates in the two groups were similar. SC students published an average of 1.3 peer-reviewed manuscripts per student, higher than the 0.8 manuscripts per non-SC student (p=0.013. Conclusions: An elective, interdisciplinary

  7. Fasting Plasma Insulin at 5 Years of Age Predicted Subsequent Weight Increase in Early Childhood over a 5-Year Period-The Da Qing Children Cohort Study.

    Yan Yan Chen

    Full Text Available The association between hyperinsulinemia and obesity is well known. However, it is uncertain especially in childhood obesity, if initial fasting hyperinsulinemia predicts obesity, or obesity leads to hyperinsulinemia through insulin resistance.To investigate the predictive effect of fasting plasma insulin on subsequent weight change after a 5-year interval in childhood.424 Children from Da Qing city, China, were recruited at 5 years of age and followed up for 5 years. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, fasting plasma insulin, glucose and triglycerides were measured at baseline and 5 years later.Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age was significantly correlated with change of weight from 5 to 10 years (ΔWeight. Children in the lowest insulin quartile had ΔWeight of 13.08±0.73 kg compare to 18.39±0.86 in the highest insulin quartile (P<0.0001 in boys, and similarly 12.03±0.71 vs 15.80±0.60 kg (P<0.0001 in girls. Multivariate analysis showed that the predictive effect of insulin at 5 years of age on subsequent weight gain over 5 years remained statistically significant even after the adjustment for age, sex, birth weight, TV-viewing time and weight (or body mass index at baseline. By contrast, the initial weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent changes in insulin level 5 years later. Children who had both higher fasting insulin and weight at 5 years of age showed much higher levels of systolic blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and triglycerides at 10 years of age.Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age predicts weight gain and cardiovascular risk factors 5 year later in Chinese children of early childhood, but the absolute weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent change in fasting insulin.

  8. Factors associated with vaccination coverage in children < 5 years in Angola

    Manuel Falcão Saturnino de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze vaccination coverage and factors associated with a complete immunization scheme in children < 5 years old. METHODS This cross-sectional household census survey evaluated 1,209 children < 5 years old living in Bom Jesus, Angola, in 2010. Data were obtained from interviews, questionnaires, child immunization histories, and maternal health histories. The statistical analysis used generalized linear models, in which the dependent variable followed a binary distribution (vaccinated, unvaccinated and the association function was logarithmic and had the children’s individual, familial, and socioeconomic factors as independent variables. RESULTS Vaccination coverage was 37.0%, higher in children < 1 year (55.0% and heterogeneous across neighborhoods; 52.0% of children of both sexes had no immunization records. The prevalence rate of vaccination significantly varied according to child age, mother’s level of education, family size, ownership of household appliances, and destination of domestic waste. CONCLUSIONS Vulnerable groups with vaccination coverage below recommended levels continue to be present. Some factors indicate inequalities that represent barriers to full immunization, indicating the need to implement more equitable policies. The knowledge of these factors contributes to planning immunization promotion measures that focus on the most vulnerable groups.

  9. FY 10 Multifamily Initial Endorsements

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — In FY 2010, HUD's Multifamily's 18 Hubs initially endorsed 1011 loans totaling $11.3 billion and providing 170,672 units/ beds. FY 10's $11.3 billion is the highest...

  10. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    VanVliet, J.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1997-09-01

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL`s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer`s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL.

  11. Environmental management compliance reengineering project, FY 1997 report

    Through an integrated reengineering effort, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is successfully implementing process improvements that will permit safe and compliant operations to continue during the next 5 years, even though $80 million was removed from the Environmental Management (EM) program budget. A 2-year analysis, design, and implementation project will reengineer compliance-related activities and reduce operating costs by approximately $17 million per year from Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 through 2002, while continuing to meet the INEEL''s environment, safety, and health requirements and milestone commitments. Compliance reengineer''s focus is improving processes, not avoiding full compliance with environmental, safety, and health laws. In FY 1997, compliance reengineering used a three-phase approach to analyze, design, and implement the changes that would decrease operating costs. Implementation for seven specific improvement projects was completed in FY 1997, while five projects will complete implementation in FY 1998. During FY 1998, the three-phase process will be repeated to continue reengineering the INEEL

  12. 75 FR 57254 - American Community Survey 5-Year Data Product Plans

    2010-09-20

    ... estimates. On March 6, 2009, the Census Bureau published a Federal Register notice (74 FR 9785) that... characteristics. Narrative profiles provide clear, concise, textual descriptions of the data included in the data... policy research and analysis organizations, non-governmental organizations, and a private sector...

  13. Feedback following the Industry Engagement of the NNSA Unique Identifier and Global Monitoring 5 year plan

    White-Horton, Jessica L [ORNL; Whitaker, J Michael [ORNL; Durbin, Karyn R. [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA

    2013-01-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration s project for developing a unique identifier and a concept for a global monitoring system for UF6 cylinders made significant progress on developing functional requirements and a concept of operation for such a system. The multi-laboratory team is working to define the functional requirements for both the unique identifier and the global monitoring system and to develop a preliminary concept of operations to discuss with key industry stakeholders. Team members began meeting with industry representatives in January 2013 to discuss the preliminary concept and solicit feedback and suggestions. The team has met with representatives from United States Enrichment Corporation, Cameco, URENCO, Honeywell/ConverDyn, and others. This paper presents an overview of the preliminary concept of operations and shares the feedback obtained from the industry engagement meetings.

  14. USGS Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) Stewardship Plan Objectives for FY15 from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior - The annual Watershed Boundary Dataset (WBD) stewardship plan is to maintain watershed boundary data through...

  15. USGS National Map Corps VGI Structures Acquisition Plan Objectives for FY15 from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) USGS National Structures Dataset

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior - The annual National Map Corps Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) structures acquisition plan is to add...

  16. USGS National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) Stewardship Plan Objectives for FY15 from the The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior - The annual National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) stewardship plan is to maintain hydrography data in the NHD over...

  17. USGS Geographic Names Acquisition Plan Objectives for FY15 from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior - The annual Geographic Names acquisition plan is to collect geographic name data over the United States and its...

  18. NCPV FY 1998 Annual Report

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) from October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998 (FY 1998). The NCPV is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996-2000. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to make PV a significant part of the domestic economy--as an industry and as an energy resource. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NCPV provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals

  19. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R ampersand D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R ampersand D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics

  20. Exploratory Research and Development Fund, FY 1990

    1992-05-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Exploratory R D Fund FY 1990 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the projects supported and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of an Exploratory R D Fund (ERF) planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, projection selection, implementation, and review. The research areas covered in this report are: Accelerator and fusion research; applied science; cell and molecular biology; chemical biodynamics; chemical sciences; earth sciences; engineering; information and computing sciences; materials sciences; nuclear science; physics and research medicine and radiation biophysics.

  1. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan FY97-FY99

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major tank remediation problem with approximately 332 tanks storing over 378,000 ml of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Most of the tanks have significantly exceeded their life spans. Approximately 90 tanks across the DOE complex are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents are potentially explosive. These tanks must be remediated and made safe. How- ever, regulatory drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Therefore, the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) began operation in October 1994. The focus area manages, coordinates, and leverages technology development to provide integrated solutions to remediate problems that will accelerate safe and cost-effective cleanup and closure of DOE's national tank system. The TFA is responsible for technology development to support DOE's four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), INEL (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1991--FY 1996

    1991-02-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- one of DOE's major multiprogram laboratories -- focuses its resources on energy research and development (R D). To be able to meet these R D challenges, the Laboratory must achieve excellence in its operations relative to environmental, safety, and health (ES H) protection and to restore its aging facility infrastructure. ORNL's missions are carried out in compliance with all applicable ES H regulations. The Laboratory conducts applied R D in energy technologies -- in conservation; fission; magnetic fusion; health and environmental protection; waste management; renewable resources; and fossil energy. Experimental and theoretical research is undertaken to investigate fundamental problems in physical, chemical, materials, computational, biomedical, earth, and environmental sciences; to advance scientific knowledge; and to support energy technology R D. ORNL designs, builds, and operates unique research facilities for the benefit of university, industrial, and national laboratory researchers. The Laboratory serves as a catalyst in bringing national and international research elements together for important scientific and technical collaborations. ORNL helps to prepare the scientific and technical work force of the future by offering innovative and varied learning and R D experiences at the Laboratory for students and faculty from preschool level through postdoctoral candidates. The transfer of science and technology to US industries and universities is an integral component of ORNL's R D missions. ORNL also undertakes research and development for non-DOE sponsors when such work is synergistic with DOE mission. 66 figs., 55 tabs.

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan, FY 1990--FY 1995

    1989-11-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is one of DOE's major multiprogram energy laboratories. ORNL's program missions are (1) to conduct applied research and engineering development in support of DOE's programs in fusion, fission, fossil, renewables (biomass), and other energy technologies, and in the more efficient conversion and use of energy (conservation) and (2) to perform basic scientific research in selected areas of the physical and life sciences. These missions are to be carried out in compliance with environmental, safety, and health regulations. Transfer of science and technology is an integral component of our missions. A complementary mission is to apply the Laboratory's resources to other nationally important tasks when such work is synergistic with the program missions. Some of the issues addressed include education, international competitiveness, hazardous waste research and development, and selected defense technologies. In addition to the R D missions, ORNL performs important service roles for DOE; these roles include designing, building, and operating user facilities for the benefit of university and industrial researchers and supplying radioactive and stable isotopes that are not available from private industry. Scientific and technical efforts in support of the Laboratory's missions cover a spectrum of activities. In fusion, the emphasis is on advanced studies of toroidal confinement, plasma heating, fueling systems, superconducting magnets, first-wall and blanket materials, and applied plasma physics. 69 figs., 49 tabs.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1983-FY 1988

    The report is broken down into the following sections: director's overview; laboratory role and mission; description of the laboratory; scientific and technical activities; technology transfer program; personnel resources; university and industry interactions; site and facilities development; and resource projections and analyses

  5. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan FY 1985-FY 1990

    The primary mission of ORNL is to carry out applied research and engineering in fusion, fission, and other energy technologies, and scientific research in basic physical and life sciences. ORNL designs and provides research facilities. An important part of ORNL's mission is the manufacture and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes that are not available from the private sector. To fulfull its mission, ORNL focuses its scientific and technical efforts on: (1) magnetic fusion, with emphasis on applied plasma physics, experimental and design studies of confinement configurations, development of plasma heating and fueling systems, development of prototype superconducting confinement magnets, and testing of candidate first-wall and blanket materials; (2) nuclear fission, focused on development of nuclear fuel reprocessing, materials testing and development for high-temperature gas-cooled and advanced converter reactors, and technologies for managing nuclear waste; (3) biological and environemental research, with emphasis on interaction of energy-related physical and chemical agents with living organisms; (4) conservation and renewable energy, with emphasis on generic research for high-temperature materials, power systems, biomass production, energy storage, and technology development for buildings and industry; (5) fossil energy, focused on development of materials for fossil fuel applications and on health and environmental effects of coal conversion systems; and (6) basic research in physical sciences, with emphasis in materials research on radiation effects, neutron scattering, and photovoltaic conversion; in chemical science on aqueous solutions; and in nuclear physics on heavy-ion reactions

  6. Tanks focus area multiyear program plan FY97-FY99

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) continues to face a major tank remediation problem with approximately 332 tanks storing over 378,000 ml of high-level waste (HLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste across the DOE complex. Most of the tanks have significantly exceeded their life spans. Approximately 90 tanks across the DOE complex are known or assumed to have leaked. Some of the tank contents are potentially explosive. These tanks must be remediated and made safe. How- ever, regulatory drivers are more ambitious than baseline technologies and budgets will support. Therefore, the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) began operation in October 1994. The focus area manages, coordinates, and leverages technology development to provide integrated solutions to remediate problems that will accelerate safe and cost-effective cleanup and closure of DOE`s national tank system. The TFA is responsible for technology development to support DOE`s four major tank sites: Hanford Site (Washington), INEL (Idaho), Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (Tennessee), and Savannah River Site (SRS) (South Carolina). Its technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: safety, characterization, retrieval, pretreatment, immobilization, and closure.

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1991--FY 1996

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- one of DOE's major multiprogram laboratories -- focuses its resources on energy research and development (R ampersand D). To be able to meet these R ampersand D challenges, the Laboratory must achieve excellence in its operations relative to environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) protection and to restore its aging facility infrastructure. ORNL's missions are carried out in compliance with all applicable ES ampersand H regulations. The Laboratory conducts applied R ampersand D in energy technologies -- in conservation; fission; magnetic fusion; health and environmental protection; waste management; renewable resources; and fossil energy. Experimental and theoretical research is undertaken to investigate fundamental problems in physical, chemical, materials, computational, biomedical, earth, and environmental sciences; to advance scientific knowledge; and to support energy technology R ampersand D. ORNL designs, builds, and operates unique research facilities for the benefit of university, industrial, and national laboratory researchers. The Laboratory serves as a catalyst in bringing national and international research elements together for important scientific and technical collaborations. ORNL helps to prepare the scientific and technical work force of the future by offering innovative and varied learning and R ampersand D experiences at the Laboratory for students and faculty from preschool level through postdoctoral candidates. The transfer of science and technology to US industries and universities is an integral component of ORNL's R ampersand D missions. ORNL also undertakes research and development for non-DOE sponsors when such work is synergistic with DOE mission. 66 figs., 55 tabs

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory institutional plan FY 1985-FY 1990

    1984-11-01

    The primary mission of ORNL is to carry out applied research and engineering in fusion, fission, and other energy technologies, and scientific research in basic physical and life sciences. ORNL designs and provides research facilities. An important part of ORNL's mission is the manufacture and sale of radioactive and stable isotopes that are not available from the private sector. To fulfull its mission, ORNL focuses its scientific and technical efforts on: (1) magnetic fusion, with emphasis on applied plasma physics, experimental and design studies of confinement configurations, development of plasma heating and fueling systems, development of prototype superconducting confinement magnets, and testing of candidate first-wall and blanket materials; (2) nuclear fission, focused on development of nuclear fuel reprocessing, materials testing and development for high-temperature gas-cooled and advanced converter reactors, and technologies for managing nuclear waste; (3) biological and environemental research, with emphasis on interaction of energy-related physical and chemical agents with living organisms; (4) conservation and renewable energy, with emphasis on generic research for high-temperature materials, power systems, biomass production, energy storage, and technology development for buildings and industry; (5) fossil energy, focused on development of materials for fossil fuel applications and on health and environmental effects of coal conversion systems; and (6) basic research in physical sciences, with emphasis in materials research on radiation effects, neutron scattering, and photovoltaic conversion; in chemical science on aqueous solutions; and in nuclear physics on heavy-ion reactions.

  9. NREL photovoltaic program FY 1997 annual report

    McConnell, R.D.; Hansen, A.; Smoller, S.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R and D) activities under the NREL PV Program from October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997 (FY 1997). The NREL PV Program is part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE National Photovoltaics Program Plan for 1996--2000. The FY 1997 budget authority for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $39.3 million in operating funds and $0.4 million in capital equipment funds. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with $21.8 million (55% of PV funds) going to some 84 subcontractors. Cost sharing by industry added almost $8.8 million to the subcontract R and D activities with industry.

  10. Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner.

  11. Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S ampersand M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S ampersand M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner

  12. Surveillance and maintenance plan for Waste Area Groupings at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, for FY 1993--2002. Environmental Restoration Program

    Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.; Jones, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Waste Area Grouping (WAG) Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) program was designed for the management of sites contaminated with radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from the end of their operating life until final facility disposition or site stabilization in accordance with environmental regulations and good management practices. Program objectives include (1) S&M of sites/facilities awaiting final disposition; (2) planning for safe and orderly final closure at each site/facility; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish final disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner.

  13. FY97 ICCS prototype specification

    The ICCS software team will implement and test two iterations of their software product during FY97. This document specifies the products to be delivered in that first prototype and projects the direction that the second prototype will take. Detailed specification of the later iteration will be written when the results of the first iteration are complete. The selection of frameworks to be implemented early is made on a basis of risk analysis from the point of view of future development in the ICCS project. The prototype will address risks in integration of object- oriented components, in refining our development process, and in emulation testing for FEP devices. This document is a specification that identifies products and processes to undertake for resolving these risks. The goals of this activity are to exercise our development process at a modest scale and to probe our architecture plan for fundamental limits and failure modes. The product of the iterations will be the framework software which will be useful in future ICCS code. Thus the FY97 products are intended for internal usage by the ICCS team and for demonstration to the FEP software developers of the strategy for integrating supervisory software with FEP computers. This will be the first of several expected iterations of the software development process and the performance measurements that ICCS will demonstrate, intended to support confidence in our ability to meet project RAM goals. The design of the application software is being carried out in a separate WBS 1.5.2 activity. The design activity has as its FY97 product a series of Software Design Documents that will specify the functionality of the controls software of ICCS. During the testing of this year''s prototypes, the application functionality needed for test will be provided by sample maintenance controls. These are early precursors of controls that can be used for low level device control. Since the devices under test will be represented by

  14. Pattern of Rheumatic Fever in Egyptian Children Younger Than 5 Years

    Ibrahim, L. A.; Fattouh, A. M.; Hamza, H. S.; Attia, W. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is common between 5-15 years, uncommon with different presentation 25 in children below 5 years. The aim of this study is to assess the frequency and characterize the pattern of 26 presentation of rheumatic fever (RF) in Egyptian children younger than 5 years. Study Design: Retrospective study. Place and Duration of the Study: Pediatric department, cardiology division, Cairo University Children’s Hospital, 5 years follow up. Methodology: We retrospectiv...

  15. 76 FR 40394 - Final Plan for Fiscal Year 2011

    2011-07-08

    ... Register on January 12, 2011 (76 FR 2135). The deadline for submitting comments on the Proposed Plan was... FY 2011 Proposed Plan OJJDP published its Proposed Plan for FY 2011 in the Federal Register (76 FR... pornography, and the increasing number of sexual predators who use the Internet and other electronic media...

  16. 75 FR 28287 - Final Plan for Fiscal Year 2010

    2010-05-20

    ... December 1, 2009 (74 FR 62821). The deadline for submitting comments on the Proposed Plan was January 15... FY 2010 Proposed Plan OJJDP published its Proposed Plan for FY 2010 in the Federal Register (74 FR... proliferation of child pornography, and the increasing number of sexual predators who use the Internet and...

  17. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1996 Annual Report

    1997-08-01

    This report summarizes the in-house and subcontract research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaics (PV) Program from October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996 (fiscal year [FY] 1996). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The mission of the DOE National Photovoltaics Program is to: "Work in partnership with U.S. industry to develop and deploy photovoltaic technology for generating economically competitive electric power, making photovoltaics an important contributor to the nation's and the world's energy use and environmental improvement. The two primary goals of the national program are to (1) maintain the U.S. PV industry's world leadership in research and technology development and (2) help the U.S. industry remain a major, profitable force in the world market. The NREL PV Program provides leadership and support to the national program toward achieving its mission and goals.

  18. Hypomineralized second primary molars: Prevalence data in Dutch 5-year-olds

    Elfrink, M.E.C.; Schuller, A.A.; Weerheijm, K.L.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional observational study was to report on the prevalence of hypomineralizations in second primary molars in 5-year-old Dutch children. In the study 386 (45% girls) 5-year-old Dutch children, all insured by a Health Insurance Fund, participated. Scoring criteria for molar i

  19. Early Number and Arithmetic Performance of Ecuadorian 4-5-Year-Olds

    Bojorque, Gina; Torbeyns, Joke; Moscoso, Jheni; Van Nijlen, Daniël; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at (a) constructing a reliable and valid test to assess Ecuadorian 4-5-year olds' number and arithmetic skills; (b) providing empirical data on Ecuadorian 4-5-year olds' number and arithmetic skills; and (c) confronting these children's actual performances with the performances expected by national experts in this domain. We…

  20. A 5-year longitudinal study of fatigue in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis.

    Tersteeg, I.M.; Koopman, F.S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J.M.; Beelen, A.; Nollet, F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To study the severity and 5-year course of fatigue in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis (LOSP) and to identify physical and psychosocial determinants of fatigue. Design: Prospective cohort study with 5 measurements over 5 years. Setting: University hospital.Participants:

  1. A 5-Year Longitudinal Study of Fatigue in Patients With Late-Onset Sequelae of Poliomyelitis

    I.M. Tersteeg; F.S. Koopman; J.M. Stolwijk-Swüste; A. Beelen; F. Nollet

    2011-01-01

    Tersteeg IM, Koopman FS, Stolwijk-Swuste JM, Beelen A, Nollet F, on behalf of the CARPA Study Group. A 5-year longitudinal study of fatigue in patients with late-onset sequelae of poliomyelitis. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2011; 92:899-904. Objectives: To study the severity and 5-year course of fatigue in

  2. 77 FR 5491 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of 5-Year Review for Sei Whales

    2012-02-03

    ...; Initiation of 5-Year Review for Sei Whales AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic...; request for information. SUMMARY: NMFS announces a 5-year review of sei whales (Balaenoptera borealis... of any such information on sei whales that has become available since that has become available...

  3. Summary of BISON Development Activities: NEAMS FY14 Report

    Williamson, R. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Novascone, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hales, J. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, B. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Liu, W. [Anatech, Inc.; Pastore, G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Perez, D. M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gardner, R. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Stafford, D. S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gamble, K. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This summary report contains an overview of work performed under the work package entitled “FY2014 NEAMS INL-Engineering Scale Fuel Performance & Interface with RPL Tools.” A first chapter identifies the specific FY-14 milestones, providing a basic description of the associated work and references to related detailed documentation. Where applicable, a representative technical result is provided. A second chapter summarizes substantial additional work including 1) efforts to improve numerical convergence and contact in BISON, 2) development of capability to simulate hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy cladding and 3) efforts to enhance collaborative work with the Halden Research Program. A final chapter briefly outlines planned future work.

  4. Summary of BISON Development Activities: NEAMS FY14 Report

    This summary report contains an overview of work performed under the work package entitled ''FY2014 NEAMS INL-Engineering Scale Fuel Performance & Interface with RPL Tools.'' A first chapter identifies the specific FY-14 milestones, providing a basic description of the associated work and references to related detailed documentation. Where applicable, a representative technical result is provided. A second chapter summarizes substantial additional work including 1) efforts to improve numerical convergence and contact in BISON, 2) development of capability to simulate hydrogen behavior in Zircaloy cladding and 3) efforts to enhance collaborative work with the Halden Research Program. A final chapter briefly outlines planned future work.

  5. FY09-FY10 NITRD Budget Cross Cut

    Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President — This data set represents a cross cut of 13 Federal agencies R&D budget in the area of networking and information technology for FY09 and FY10 brokendown by...

  6. Characteristics of 49 patients who survived for 5 years following radical radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer: the potential for cure

    Purpose: To investigate the long-term curative potential of radical radiation therapy (RT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by studying characteristics of patients from a large prospective database who survived > 5 years after RT, and by analyzing survival beyond 5 years. Methods and Materials: Five-year survivors were identified from a database containing information on 488 patients given radical RT following presentation to the Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute with NSCLC between 1984 and 1990. Additional data were obtained from case notes of survivors. RT was computed tomography (CT)-planned, conventionally-fractionated, and given without chemotherapy. Results: Actuarial survival for 49 5-year survivors was 65% at 10 years. Five 5-year survivors had documented disease progression within the first 5 years and subsequently died. Of 44 patients free-from-progression (FFP) at 5 years, an estimated 81% remained FFP in the second 5 years. Age and histology were not significant prognostic factors, and only 22 patients (4.5%) had weight loss > 10%. For 277 patients who had not undergone thoracotomy, median RT dose was 60 Gy and survival at 5 and 10 years was 7% and 3%, respectively. For 207 patients who received radical RT post-thoracotomy, median dose was 60 Gy and survival at 5 and 10 years was 24% and 18%, respectively. Five-year survivors of post-thoracotomy RT had been treated for gross residual disease (n = 10), positive-margin (n = 6), or probable microscopic residual disease (n = 17). Failure to regain ECOG performance status = 0 post-thoracotomy was associated with reduced survival (p 5 years after radical RT for NSCLC remained FFP in the following 5 years and were apparently cured. RT alone can cure small but significant numbers of patients. Long-term results of combined chemotherapy/RT protocols, which are associated with increased median survival, are awaited for comparison

  7. The Seismic Category I Structures Program results for FY 1987

    The accomplishments of the Seismic Category I Structures Program for FY 1987 are summarized. These accomplishments include the quasi-static load cycle testing of large shear wall elements, an extensive analysis of previous data to determine if equivalent linear analytical models can predict the response of damaged shear wall structures, and code committee activities. In addition, previous testing and results that led to the FY 1987 program plan are discussed and all previous data relating to shear wall stiffness are summarized. Because separate reports have already summarized the experimental and analytical work in FY 1987, this report will briefly highlight this work and the appropriate reports will be references for a more detailed discussion. 12 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs

  8. Supporting countries in establishing and strengthening NITAGs: lessons learned from 5 years of the SIVAC initiative.

    Adjagba, Alex; Senouci, Kamel; Biellik, Robin; Batmunkh, Nyambat; Faye, Pape Coumba; Durupt, Antoine; Gessner, Bradford D; da Silva, Alfred

    2015-01-29

    To empower governments to formulate rational policies without pressure from any group, and to increase the use of evidence-based decision-making to adapt global recommendations on immunization to their local context, the WHO has recommended on multiple occasions that countries should establish National Immunization Technical Advisory Groups (NITAGs). The World Health Assembly (WHA) reinforced those recommendations in 2012 when Member States endorsed the Decade of Vaccines Global Vaccine Action Plan (GVAP). NITAGs are multidisciplinary groups of national experts responsible for providing independent, evidence-informed advice to health authorities on all policy-related issues for all vaccines across all populations. In 2012, according to the WHO-UNICEF Joint Reporting Form, among 57 countries eligible for immunization program financial support from the GAVI Alliance, only 9 reported having a functional NITAG. Since 2008, the Supporting Independent Immunization and Vaccine Advisory Committees (SIVAC) Initiative (at the Agence de Médecine Préventive or AMP) in close collaboration with the WHO and other partners has been working to accelerate and systematize the establishment of NITAGs in low- and middle-income countries. In addition to providing direct support to countries to establish advisory groups, the initiative also supports existing NITAGs to strengthen their capacity in the use of evidence-based processes for decision-making aligned with international standards. After 5 years of implementation and based on lessons learned, we recommend that future efforts should target both expanding new NITAGs and strengthening existing NITAGs in individual countries, along three strategic lines: (i) reinforce NITAG institutional integration to promote sustainability and credibility, (ii) build technical capacity within NITAG secretariats and evaluate NITAG performance, and (iii) increase networking and regional collaborations. These should be done through the development

  9. Causes of Mortality in Newborns and Children Under 5 Years of Age in Northern Iran

    FS Sharifi

    2002-01-01

    1- A survey of the causes of mortality in newborns and children under 5 years of age during 10 years (1988-1997) in northern Iran (Regions eastern and western bandpey, gatab and kolagarmahalleh in province babol) revealed following results: Average incidence of mortality in newborns and children under 5 years of age was 10.5 and 4 per thousand respectively. The most frequently encountered causes of death in children under 5 years of age were congenital anomalies (20.2%), infections (16.8%), p...

  10. Care for overweight children attending the 5-year preventive child health examination in general practice

    Andersen, Merethe Kousgaard; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    -assessed overweight at the 5-year preventive child health examination (PCHE).Results. Out of 1135 children attending the 5-year PCHE, 171 were assessed overweight by the GP. According to the Danish body mass index (kg/m(2)) growth charts, 147 children were overweight. The GPs addressed their concern about the child...... cases.Conclusion. Various care activities were carried out for most children with GP-assessed overweight at the 5-year PCHE. However, the GP did not raise concern about the child's weight with the parents in almost one third of the children. It seems that there is a potential for improving the...

  11. Liquid effluent/Hanford Environmental compliance FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan/Fiscal Year Work Plan, WBS 1.2.2.1 and 1.2.2.2

    1994-09-01

    This document details the program effort to eliminate the use of the soil column for liquid effluent treatment and to manage current and future liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site, in a safe responsible cost effective and legally compliant mannger. This should be achieved through planning, public and stakeholder interaction, definition of requiremtns for generators, and provision of timely treatment, stroage, disposal capability, and waste minimization of waste streams.

  12. Liquid effluent/Hanford Environmental compliance FY 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan/Fiscal Year Work Plan, WBS 1.2.2.1 and 1.2.2.2

    This document details the program effort to eliminate the use of the soil column for liquid effluent treatment and to manage current and future liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site, in a safe responsible cost effective and legally compliant mannger. This should be achieved through planning, public and stakeholder interaction, definition of requiremtns for generators, and provision of timely treatment, stroage, disposal capability, and waste minimization of waste streams

  13. HIV Decline Falls Short of U.S. 5-Year Goal

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158705.html HIV Decline Falls Short of U.S. 5-Year Goal ... 2016 FRIDAY, May 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Although HIV infection and transmission rates in the United States ...

  14. Otologic surgeries in National Ear Care Centre, Kaduna, Nigeria: A 5 years review

    Grema Umar Sambo; Aminu Bakari; Musa Thomas Samdi; Garba Mohammed Mainasara; Joseph Yohanna; Abdullahi Musa Kirfi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Otologic surgeries that endure are based on a detailed knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the temporal bone. Ear surgeries are challenging to most otolaryngologists practicing in Nigeria. The aim was to present a 5 years review of indications, types, complications, success, and limitations of the ear surgeries at the study center. Materials and Methods: A 5 years retrospective review of all the otologic surgeries are done under general and local anesthesia from Jul...

  15. Outcome and Prognostic Factors for Traumatic Endophthalmitis over a 5-Year Period

    Simona Delia Nicoară; Iulian Irimescu; Tudor Călinici; Cristina Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the outcome and identify the prognostic factors of traumatic endophthalmitis over a 5-year period. Methods. We reviewed the medical records of all the traumatic endophthalmities that we treated in our department over the last 5 years (2009–2013). We extracted the following parameters: age, gender, wound anatomy, associated ocular lesions, treatment, and initial and final visual acuities. We used the program SPSS version 20.0.0. for the statistical analysis of our data. Re...

  16. Satellite Power System (SPS) FY 79 Program Summary

    1980-01-01

    The Satellite Power System (SPS) program is a joint effort of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). It is managed by the SPS Project Office within DOE's Office of Energy Research. SPS project organization is shown in Figure 1. The SPS Project Office was established in 1978 and is responsible for the planning, management and integration of SPS research in four areas: systems definition, environmental assessment, societal assessment, and comparative assessment. In fulfilling its responsibilities, the SPS Project Office directs research and assessment efforts to determine the feasibility of the SPS concept, funds organizations supporting the program, and disseminates information developed from project research and assessments. The objective of the SPS program is to develop an initial understanding of the technical feasibility, the economic practicality, and the social and environmental acceptability of the SPS concept. This is being accomplished through implementation of the Concept Development and Evaluation Program Plan which is scheduled for completion by the end of FY 1980. The SPS Project Office annually issues a Program Summary which describes the research undertaken during the preceding fiscal year. This Program Summary covers FY 1979. It includes work completed in FY 1977 and FY 1978 in order to give a comprehensive picture of the DOE involvement in the SPS concept development and evaluation process.

  17. Institutional Plan FY 1999-2003

    Hughes, P.J.

    1999-02-08

    Computational science is becoming an increasingly important component of Pacific Northwest's support to DOE's major missions. The advanced parallel computing systems in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), coupled with new modeling and simulation software, data management tools, and user interfaces, are providing solutions to previously intractable problems. Research focuses on developing software and other tools to address computational challenges in molecular science, environmental management, global climate change, advanced materials and manufacturing processes, molecular biology, and information management. The Graphics and Visualization Laboratory is part of EMSL'S Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF). The MSCF contains a 512-processor IBM RISC System/6000 scalable power parallel computer system that provides the advanced computing capability needed to address ''Grand Challenge'' environmental research problems. The MSCF provides an integrated computing environment with links to facilities in the DOE complex, universities, and industry. The image inserts are graphical representations of simulations performed with software developed at the Laboratory.

  18. FY12 CPD Formula Allocation

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 budget for the Department of Housing and Urban Development has been enacted. This spreadsheet provide full-year allocations for the Office...

  19. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Anemia Among Children Under 5 Years of Age--Uganda, 2009.

    Menon, Manoj P; Yoon, Steven S

    2015-09-01

    Anemia in children under 5 years of age, defined by the World Health Organization as a hemoglobin concentration anemia among children under five in Uganda was 72% in 2006. The 2009 Uganda Malaria Indicator Survey was conducted in late 2009 and revealed that over 60% of children less than 5 years of age were anemic and that over half of children tested positive for malaria via a rapid diagnostic test. Children with concomitant malaria infection, and in households without any type of mosquito net were more likely to be anemic, confirming that children under 5 years, are vulnerable to both the threat of malaria and anemia and the beneficial effect of malaria prevention tools. However, prevention and treatment of other factors associated with the etiology of anemia (e.g., iron deficiency) are likely necessary to combat the toll of anemia in Uganda. PMID:26055748

  20. The effect of standard lumbar discectomy on segmental motion: 5-year follow-up using radiostereometry

    Halldin, K.; Zoëga, B.; Nyberg, P.; Kärrholm, J.; Lind, B. I.

    2005-01-01

    We measured the effects of lumbar discectomy on segmental motion over a period of 5 years. Twenty-four patients with lumbar disc herniation were treated by standard lumbar discectomy at the L4–L5 or L5–S1 level. Peroperatively, tantalum markers were inserted into L4, L5, and the sacrum. Radiostereometric analysis was performed at discharge from hospital and 5 years postoperatively. The treated level was compared with the corresponding untreated level. Thus, patients who had discectomy at the ...

  1. Analysis of 5-year survivors of esophageal cancer treated with radiation and chemotherapy

    From 1967 to 1980, 240 cases of esophageal cancer, consisting of 153 curative and 87 palliative cases, were treated with a combination of radiation and chemotherapy. The five-year survival rate in 124 curative cases given a dose of more than 50 Gy was 12.9 %, and 17 cases survived more than 5 years. In the 5-year survivors, T1 in the advancement of tumors, less than 7 cm in length, and cancer of both the serrated and tumorous types were characteristic factors, indicating a good prognosis. These cases were irradiated with a dose of 60 - 70 Gy and the tumors showed a high response to irradiation. (author)

  2. A 5 year prospective study of patient-relevant outcomes after total knee replacement

    Nilsdotter, A-K; Toksvig-Larsen, S; Roos, E M

    2008-01-01

    men, mean age 71 (51-86) assigned for TKR at the Department of Orthopaedics at Lund University Hospital were included in the study. The self-administered questionnaires Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and SF-36 were mailed preoperatively and 6 months, 12 months and at 5 years......OBJECTIVE: To prospectively describe self-reported outcomes up to 5 years after total knee replacement (TKR) in Osteoarthritis (OA) and to study which patient-relevant factors may predict outcomes for pain and physical function (PF). METHODS: 102 consecutive patients with knee OA, 63 women and 39...

  3. Advanced energy projects: FY 1988 research summaries

    This report contains: Program Description; Summaries of Projects Active in FY 1988; Sample Statement of Work; FY 1988 Program Data; Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Projects; Investigator Index; and Institutional Index

  4. Verbal Competence in Narrative Retelling in 5-Year-Olds with Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate

    Klintö, Kristina; Salameh, Eva-Kristina; Lohmander, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research regarding expressive language performance in children born with cleft palate is sparse. The relationship between articulation/phonology and expressive language skills also needs to be further explored. Aims: To investigate verbal competence in narrative retelling in 5-year-old children born with unilateral cleft lip and palate…

  5. Jejunal Intramural Hematoma with Bowel Obstruction in a 5-year-old Boy: A Case Report

    Intramural hematoma of the jejunum is rare and can be classified as trauma-related or occurring spontaneously. Spontaneous intramural hematoma commonly occurs in patients treated with warfarin. We report a case of intramural hematoma of the jejunum with intestinal obstruction in a 5-year-old boy who had neither a definite history of trauma nor the tendency to bleed

  6. Effects of A 2.5-Year Campus-Wide Intervention to Reduce College Drinking

    Seo, Dong-Chul; Owens, Dee; Gassman, Ruth; Kingori, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study reports on the results of a 2.5-year college-wide, coordinated intervention that was implemented from June 2007 to December 2009 to reduce the amount and frequency of students' alcohol consumption. Design: Quasi-experimental study using a one-group (freshmen living on campus) pretest/posttest design ("N"…

  7. Haematoma-like primary intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma in a 5-year-old girl

    We present CT and MRI of an intracranial malignant fibrous histiocytoma in a 5-year-old girl with headache and vomiting. This case is unusual particular by virtue of its radiological appearances and the young age of the patient. (orig.)

  8. Hands as Companions of the Mind: Essential Practical Life for the 5-Year-Old

    Gilder, Sharon Allen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous observations in Montessori classrooms led veteran Montessorians Pamela W. Trumble and Eleni Bokas to the conclusion that a universal need exists to bring integrity back to Practical Life, especially for 5-year-olds. Maria Montessori's observations over a century ago revealed the importance of Practical Life and its relationship to the…

  9. A Multidimensional Scaling Study of Visual Memory of 5-Year Olds and Adults

    Arabie, Phipps; And Others

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of memory development using nonmetric multidimensional scaling. Judgments of similarities between complex objects were obtained from 5-year-olds and adults under two conditions: (1) when objects were simultaneously present at the time of comparison, and (2) when the objects were not simultaneously present and had to be compared on…

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Small Diameter Straumann Implants in Partially Edentulous Patients: A 5-Year Retrospective Study

    S. OZER

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate small-diameter (3.3 mm Straumann® dental implants placed in the maxilla or the mandible over a period of 5 years in function.Materials and Methods: Twenty- eight partially edentulous patients received a total of 48 implants over a 5-year period. After the standard healing period (3 to 6 months, the implants were restored with single-tooth prostheses or fixed partial dentures. All patients were followed according to a strict maintenance program with regular recalls. The cumulative survival rates of implants were analyzed and prosthetic complications were assessed.Results: After 5 years of function, one single 10-mm-long implant in the maxillary premolar region was lost because of recurrent peri-implant infection in a female patient. Two single 10-mm-long maxillary implants placed in the posterior region were lost due to body fracture. The cumulative 5-year survival rate of the implants was 93.75 %. The most common prosthetic complication was loosening of the occlusal screw.Conclusion: Within the limited observation period and the number of patients included in this study, it may be concluded that the use of small-diameter implants appears to be predictable if clinical guidelines are followed and appropriate prosthetic restorations are provided. However, it should be noted that fatigue fracture may occur.

  11. Masticatory function and patient satisfaction with implant-supported mandibular overdentures: a prospective 5-year study

    Bakke, Merete; Holm, Betty; Gotfredsen, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of treatment with implant-supported mandibular overdentures in terms of biting and chewing, in entirely satisfied and not fully satisfied patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve edentulous patients who had worn dentures for at least 5 years...

  12. The Development of Regulatory Functions from Birth to 5 Years: Insights from Premature Infants

    Feldman, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    This study examined physiological, emotional, and attentional regulatory functions as predictors of self-regulation in 125 infants followed 7 times from birth to 5 years. Physiological regulation was assessed by neonatal vagal tone and sleep-wake cyclicity; emotion regulation by response to stress at 3, 6, and 12 months; and attention regulation…

  13. Nutrition and mental development of 4-5-year old children on macrobiotic diets.

    Herens, M.C.; Dagnelie, P.C.; Kleber, R.J.; Mol, M.C.; Staveren, van W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mental development of 4–5-year old children on macrobiotic diets (almost devoid of animal foods and fat) with long-term growth deficits, was studied using the Snijders-Oomen Non-verbal Intelligence (SON) scale. In addition, food consumption and behavioural style of the children, and family and paren

  14. The introduction of the 5-year impact factor : does it benefit statistics journals?

    van Nierop, Erjen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effects of the introduction of 5-year impact factors. We collect impact factor data for all disciplines available in the Journal Citation Reports. For all these categories, we give insights into the relationship between the traditional 2-year impact factor and the n

  15. 5-year Mortality in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single Center Study in Tripoli

    Buargub Mahdia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the 5-year mortality of patients undergoing maintenance hemo-dialysis (HD at Al-Shat center Tripoli, we reviewed during June 2007 the records of all the HD patients initiated on HD from Jun 2000 and Jan 2002.There were 124 patients in the study, 77 males (63.6% and 47 (36.4% females, with a mean age of 49 ± 14 years. Diabetic nephropathy (DN was the underlying kidney disease in 34 (27.4% patients. After 5 years; 3 patients were transferred to other centers, 18 (14.9% patients underwent kidney transplan-tation. Out of the 103 patients who continued on hemodialysis, 53 (51.4% expired during the 5-year follow-up. Mortality was associated with older age (p< 0.001 and odd ratio (OR of 4.2 for age > 50 years and DN (p< 0.002 and OR of 3.9. Mortality rate in diabetics was 74.1% and significantly associated with male sex (p< 0.0067 and OR of 2.4, older age (p< 0.004, presence of hypertension (p< 0.003 and OR of 3.9, type 1 diabetes (OR 1.6, and elevated mean body weight (p< 0.046. Mortality was also relatively higher in black patients (OR of 2.0 and smokers (OR of 1.39. In conclusion, the overall 5- year mortality for dialysis patients was elevated and higher in the diabetics.

  16. Influence of Emotional Facial Expressions on 3-5-Year-Olds' Face Recognition

    Freitag, Claudia; Schwarzer, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments examined 3- and 5-year-olds' recognition of faces in constant and varied emotional expressions. Children were asked to identify repeatedly presented target faces, distinguishing them from distractor faces, during an immediate recognition test and during delayed assessments after 10 min and one week. Emotional facial expression…

  17. The effects of oil pollution on Antarctic benthic diatom communities over 5 years

    Highlights: • We examine the impact of hydrocarbon pollution on Antarctic benthic diatoms. • The effect of standard synthetic lubricant oil and a biodegradable oil were examined. • There were significant effects from both treatments for over 5 years. • There was little difference between the different types of oil. - Abstract: Although considered pristine, Antarctica has not been impervious to hydrocarbon pollution. Antarctica’s history is peppered with oil spills and numerous abandoned waste disposal sites. Both spill events and constant leakages contribute to previous and current sources of pollution into marine sediments. Here we compare the response of the benthic diatom communities over 5 years to exposure to a commonly used standard synthetic lubricant oil, an alternative lubricant marketed as more biodegradable, in comparison to a control treatment. Community composition varied significantly over time and between treatments with some high variability within contaminated treatments suggesting community stress. Both lubricants showed evidence of significant effects on community composition after 5 years even though total petroleum hydrocarbon reduction reached approximately 80% over this time period. It appears that even after 5 years toxicity remains high for both the standard and biodegradable lubricants revealing the temporal scale at which pollutants persist in Antarctica

  18. Intranasal LH-RH treatment of cryptorchidism. A clinical trial and 5 years follow-up

    Thorup, Jørgen Mogens; Mauritzen, K; Skakkebaek, N E

    1987-01-01

    The effect of intranasal LH-RH on cryptorchidism was investigated in 45 prepubertal boys with 68 undescended testes. A daily dose of 1.2 mg LH-RH was given for 4 weeks. A total of 16 testes (24%) descended. Follow-up examination 5 years later showed that relapse had occurred in two cases. Fifty-t...

  19. Efficacy and safety of raltegravir for treatment of HIV for 5 years in the BENCHMRK studies

    Eron, Joseph J; Cooper, David A; Steigbigel, Roy T; Clotet, Bonaventura; Gatell, Jose M; Kumar, Princy N; Rockstroh, Jurgen K; Schechter, Mauro; Markowitz, Martin; Yeni, Patrick; Loutfy, Mona R; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Strohmaier, Kim M; Wan, Hong; Barnard, Richard Jo; Nguyen, Bach-Yen T; Teppler, Hedy; Pedersen, Court

    2013-01-01

    Two randomised, placebo-controlled trials-BENCHMRK-1 and BENCHMRK-2-investigated the efficacy and safety of raltegravir, an HIV-1 integrase strand-transfer inhibitor. We report final results of BENCHMRK-1 and BENCHMRK-2 combined at 3 years (the end of the double-blind phase) and 5 years (the end ...

  20. Predictors of ADHD Persistence in Girls at 5-Year Follow-Up

    Mick, Eric; Byrne, Deirdre; Fried, Ronna; Monuteaux, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this study was to examine the age-dependent remission from ADHD in girls transitioning through childhood into adolescence and early adulthood. Method: We conducted a 5-year prospective follow-up study of 123 girls with ADHD and 106 non-ADHD control girls aged between 6 and 17 years at ascertainment. ADHD was considered…

  1. How Do 5-Year-Olds Understand Questions? Differences in Languages across Europe

    Sauerland, Uli; Grohmann, Kleanthes K.; Guasti, Maria Teresa; Andelkovic, Darinka; Argus, Reili; Armon-Lotem, Sharon; Arosio, Fabrizio; Avram, Larisa; Costa, João; Dabašinskiene, Ineta; de López, Kristine; Gatt, Daniela; Grech, Helen; Haman, Ewa; van Hout, Angeliek; Hrzica, Gordana; Kainhofer, Judith; Kamandulyte-Merfeldiene, Laura; Kunnari, Sari; Kovacevic, Melita; Kuvac Kraljevic, Jelena; Lipowska, Katarzyna; Mejias, Sandrine; Popovic, Maša; Ruzaite, Jurate; Savic, Maja; Sevcenco, Anca; Varlokosta, Spyridoula; Varnava, Marina; Yatsushiro, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    The comprehension of constituent questions is an important topic for language acquisition research and for applications in the diagnosis of language impairment. This article presents the results of a study investigating the comprehension of different types of questions by 5-year-old, typically developing children across 19 European countries, 18…

  2. A Case Series of Marijuana Exposures in Pediatric Patients Less than 5 Years of Age

    Wang, George Sam; Narang, Sandeep K.; Wells, Kathryn; Chuang, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: In Colorado, there has been a large increase in medical marijuana dispensaries and licenses for the use of medical marijuana over the past year. This is a retrospective case series of marijuana exposures that have presented to the emergency department (ED) in children less than 5 years of age. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart…

  3. Sexual function in multiple sclerosis. A 5-year follow-up study

    Stenager, E; Stenager, E N; Jensen, K

    1996-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction is known to occur in multiple sclerosis (MS). The purpose of the study is to describe the change in sexual function and symptoms in a longitudinal study. Forty-nine patients (27 females, 22 males) with definite MS were interviewed and examined with 5 years interval. The number of...

  4. Effectiveness of Multipurpose Unit Early Classroom Intervention Program for 4-5-Year-Old Children

    Celebioglu Morkoc, Ozlem; Aktan Acar, Ebru

    2014-01-01

    This research examined the effectiveness of Multipurpose Unit Early Classroom Intervention Program (MUECIP) prepared for 4-5-year-old (48-60 months) children whose development is at risk because of their families' socioeconomic conditions. The research adopted a preliminary test-final test control group trial model. The research participants…

  5. Secondary Science Teachers' Use of Technology in the Classroom during Their First 5 Years

    Bang, EunJin; Luft, Julie A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technology use of beginning secondary science teachers and explored factors facilitating or inhibiting their use of technology. The researchers collected and analyzed interviews and observational data from 95 teachers over a 5-year period. The results show that teachers used PowerPoint the most and other software the least…

  6. 76 FR 61402 - Draft Nuclear Regulatory Commission Fiscal Year 2012-2016 Strategic Plan

    2011-10-04

    ... COMMISSION Draft Nuclear Regulatory Commission Fiscal Year 2012-2016 Strategic Plan AGENCY: Nuclear....S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, FY 2012-2016 Strategic Plan,'' dated September 2011. The NRC's draft FY 2012-2016 strategic plan describes the agency's mission and strategic objective, which...

  7. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2000

    Sale, M. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cada, G. F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dauble, D. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, B. N. [Consultant; Sommers, G. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL); Flynn, J. V. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Brookshier, P. A. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2001-04-17

    This report describes the activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Program during Fiscal Year 2000 (October 1, 1999, to September 30, 2000). Background, current activities, and future plans are presented in the following sections for all components of the Program. Program focus for FY 2000 was on (1) advanced turbine development, (2) basic and applied R&D, (3) environmental mitigation, (4) low head/low power hydropower technology, and (5) technology transfer.

  8. Panama City Fisheries Resources Office: FY 2007 Annual Report

    2008-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS FOR FY 2007 1. Completed a three-year Gulf sturgeon population study on the Escambia River, Florida. The population was estimated at 451 fish. 2. Implemented the Gulf Striped Bass Restoration Plan by coordinating the 24th Annual Morone Workshop, leading the technical committee, transporting broodfish, coordinating stocking on the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) river system, and evaluating post-stocking success. 3. Completed a survey to document the extent of aquati...

  9. DOE Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program: Annual report, FY 1986

    The activities of HAZWRAP for the past fiscal year were organized into seven principal areas: technical analysis and technology transfer; regulatory analysis; strategic planning;information systems; program administration; technology adaptation; and technology demonstration. The scope, major FY 1986 accomplishments, and future directions for each of these areas are described in the following sections of this report. Listings of reports produced through the SCO are given in Appendixes A and B for the current year and since the program started, respectively

  10. Respiratory Viruses Associated Hospitalization among Children Aged <5 Years in Bangladesh: 2010-2014.

    Nusrat Homaira

    Full Text Available We combined hospital-based surveillance and health utilization survey data to estimate the incidence of respiratory viral infections associated hospitalization among children aged < 5 years in Bangladesh.Surveillance physicians collected respiratory specimens from children aged <5 years hospitalized with respiratory illness and residing in the primary hospital catchment areas. We tested respiratory specimens for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, influenza, adenovirus and rhinoviruses using rRT-PCR. During 2013, we conducted a health utilization survey in the primary catchment areas of the hospitals to determine the proportion of all hospitalizations for respiratory illness among children aged <5 years at the surveillance hospitals during the preceding 12 months. We estimated the respiratory virus-specific incidence of hospitalization by dividing the estimated number of hospitalized children with a laboratory confirmed infection with a respiratory virus by the population aged <5 years of the catchment areas and adjusted for the proportion of children who were hospitalized at the surveillance hospitals.We estimated that the annual incidence per 1000 children (95% CI of all cause associated respiratory hospitalization was 11.5 (10-12. The incidences per 1000 children (95% CI per year for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus and influenza infections were 3(2-3, 0.5(0.4-0.8, 0.4 (0.3-0.6, 0.4 (0.3-0.6, and 0.4 (0.3-0.6 respectively. The incidences per 1000 children (95%CI of rhinovirus-associated infections among hospitalized children were 5 (3-7, 2 (1-3, 1 (0.6-2, and 3 (2-4 in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively.Our data suggest that respiratory viruses are associated with a substantial burden of hospitalization in children aged <5 years in Bangladesh.

  11. Respiratory Viruses Associated Hospitalization among Children Aged <5 Years in Bangladesh: 2010-2014

    Homaira, Nusrat; Luby, Stephen P.; Hossain, Kamal; Islam, Kariul; Ahmed, Makhdum; Rahman, Mustafizur; Rahman, Ziaur; Paul, Repon C.; Bhuiyan, Mejbah Uddin; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Sohel, Badrul Munir; Banik, Kajal Chandra; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Willby, Melisa; Rahman, Mahmudur; Bresee, Joseph; Ramirez, Katharine-Sturm; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background We combined hospital-based surveillance and health utilization survey data to estimate the incidence of respiratory viral infections associated hospitalization among children aged < 5 years in Bangladesh. Methods Surveillance physicians collected respiratory specimens from children aged <5 years hospitalized with respiratory illness and residing in the primary hospital catchment areas. We tested respiratory specimens for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, human metapneumovirus, influenza, adenovirus and rhinoviruses using rRT-PCR. During 2013, we conducted a health utilization survey in the primary catchment areas of the hospitals to determine the proportion of all hospitalizations for respiratory illness among children aged <5 years at the surveillance hospitals during the preceding 12 months. We estimated the respiratory virus-specific incidence of hospitalization by dividing the estimated number of hospitalized children with a laboratory confirmed infection with a respiratory virus by the population aged <5 years of the catchment areas and adjusted for the proportion of children who were hospitalized at the surveillance hospitals. Results We estimated that the annual incidence per 1000 children (95% CI) of all cause associated respiratory hospitalization was 11.5 (10–12). The incidences per 1000 children (95% CI) per year for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus and influenza infections were 3(2–3), 0.5(0.4–0.8), 0.4 (0.3–0.6), 0.4 (0.3–0.6), and 0.4 (0.3–0.6) respectively. The incidences per 1000 children (95%CI) of rhinovirus-associated infections among hospitalized children were 5 (3–7), 2 (1–3), 1 (0.6–2), and 3 (2–4) in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, respectively. Conclusion Our data suggest that respiratory viruses are associated with a substantial burden of hospitalization in children aged <5 years in Bangladesh. PMID:26840782

  12. Under-5 Year Mortality: Result of In-Hospital Study, Tehran, Iran

    Nojomi Marzieh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In July 2003, the Bellagio Study Group on Child Survival estimated that the lives of 6 million children could be saved each year if 23 proven interventions were universally available in the 42 countries re-sponsible for 90% of child deaths in 2000. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of important causes of mortality among under-5 year old children in hospitals, Tehran, Iran. Information about Mortality data of under-5 year old children from 16 hospitals in the West of Tehran was collected. The study period was conducted from 1 October 2005 to 30 March 2006. Educated health personnel in each hospital interviewed parents of children who died in hospital and filled out a checklist. 142 under-5 year old children died over the course of study, of whom, 118 (83% were neonates (under 28 days-old, 53.5% had low birth weights (< 2500 Kg, 62 (43% were girls and 80 (57% boys. The most common cause of under-5 year death was due to certain conditions originating in the perinatal period (ICD-10: P00-P96 (68%. Congenital abnormalities (12% and pneumonia (5% were the second and third most common causes respectively. Among 28-day to one-year old children, the leading cause of death was pneumonia (27.3%, while for children being 1 to 5 years of age, this included pneumonia and chronic hepatitis (about 30%. Overall, the most common causes of death were disorders related to short gestation and low birth weight. Therefore, achievement of the millennium development goal of reducing child mortality by two-thirds from 1990 rate will depend on renewed efforts to prevent and control low birth weight, preterm delivery, pneumonia, and infectious diseases in our setting.

  13. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1990

    Summers, K.A. (ed.)

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaics Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The SERI subcontracted PV research and development represents most of the subcontracted R D that is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaics Program. This report covers fiscal year (FY) 1990: October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. During FY 1990, the SERI PV program started to implement a new DOE subcontract initiative, entitled the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) Project.'' Excluding (PVMaT) because it was in a start-up phase, in FY 1990 there were 54 subcontracts with a total annualized funding of approximately $11.9 million. Approximately two-thirds of those subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of over $3.3 million. Cost sharing by industry added another $4.3 million to that $11.9 million of SERI PV subcontracted R D. The six technical sections of this report cover the previously ongoing areas of the subcontracted program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, and the University Participation Program. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs discuss approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1990, and future research directions. Another section introduces the PVMaT project and reports the progress since its inception in FY 1990. Highlights of technology transfer activities are also reported.

  14. Endocrine dysfunction following traumatic brain injury: a 5-year follow-up nationwide-based study

    Yang, Wei-Hsun; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Ting-Chung; Kuo, Ting-Yu; Cheng, Chun-Yu; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic endocrine dysfunction is a complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is lack of long-term follow-up and large sample size studies. This study included patients suffering from TBI registered in the Health Insurance Database. Endocrine disorders were identified using the ICD codes: 244 (acquired hypothyroidism), 253 (pituitary dysfunction), 255 (disorders of the adrenal glands), 258 (polyglandular dysfunction), and 259 (other endocrine disorders) with at least three outpatient visits within 1 year or one admission diagnosis. Overall, 156,945 insured subjects were included in the final analysis. The 1- and 5-year incidence rates of post-traumatic endocrinopathies were 0.4% and 2%, respectively. The risks of developing a common endocrinopathy (p endocrine dysfunction after TBI increased during the entire 5-year follow-up period. Skull bone fracture and intracranial hemorrhage may be associated with short and long-term post-traumatic pituitary dysfunction, respectively. PMID:27608606

  15. Short communication. Growth and nodulation of cowpea after 5 years of consecutive composted tannery sludge amendment

    Ana R. L. Miranda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tannery industry releases high amounts of tannery sludge which are currently composted and used in agricultural soils. The consecutive amendment of such composted tannery sludge (CTS may affect soil microrganisms, such as rhizobia. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 5-year repeated CTS amendment on growth, nodulation, and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. CTS was applied in different amounts (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 Mg/ha to a sandy soil. Amendment of CTS increased soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC, sodium and chromium content. Plant growth, nodulation, N accumulation, and cowpea yield increased up to 10 Mg/ha; however, above this rate, these variables decreased. After 5 years of CTS amendment, the increase in soil chemical properties, particularly EC and Na content, exerted negative effects on the growth, nodulation, and yield of cowpea.

  16. Separable sustained and selective attention factors are apparent in 5-year-old children

    Underbjerg, Mette; George, Melanie S; Thorsen, Poul;

    2013-01-01

    In adults and older children, evidence consistent with relative separation between selective and sustained attention, superimposed upon generally positive inter-test correlations, has been reported. Here we examine whether this pattern is detectable in 5-year-old children from the healthy...... population. A new test battery (TEA-Ch(J)) was adapted from measures previously used with adults and older children and administered to 172 5-year-olds. Test-retest reliability was assessed in 60 children. Ninety-eight percent of the children managed to complete all measures. Discrimination of visual and...... auditory stimuli were good. In a factor analysis, the two TEA-Ch(J) selective attention tasks (one visual, one auditory) loaded onto a common factor and diverged from the two sustained attention tasks (one auditory, one motor), which shared a common loading on the second factor. This pattern, which...

  17. Clinical Case Report on Treatment of Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: 5-Year Follow-up.

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Ho, Ya-Ping; Ho, Kun-Yen; Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Wen-Chen; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is a distinct type of periodontal disease associated with considerably more rapid periodontal tissue destruction than chronic periodontitis. This study presents the 5-year follow-up of a patient with GAgP. A 29-year-old man reported experiencing increasing gingival recession. He was treated using cause-related therapy, provisional splints, and flap surgery combined with allograft grafting and was followed up for 5 years. This case study shows that elimination of infectious microorganisms and meticulous long-term maintenance provide an effective treatment modality for aggressive periodontitis cases. This treatment modality can restore the masticatory function and provide the GAgP patient with improved quality of life. PMID:25909527

  18. Developmental potential in the first 5 years for children in developing countries.

    Grantham-McGregor, Sally; Cheung, Yin Bun; Cueto, Santiago; Glewwe, Paul; Richter, Linda; Strupp, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Many children younger than 5 years in developing countries are exposed to multiple risks, including poverty, malnutrition, poor health, and unstimulating home environments, which detrimentally affect their cognitive, motor, and social-emotional development. There are few national statistics on the development of young children in developing countries. We therefore identified two factors with available worldwide data--the prevalence of early childhood stunting and the number of people living in absolute poverty--to use as indicators of poor development. We show that both indicators are closely associated with poor cognitive and educational performance in children and use them to estimate that over 200 million children under 5 years are not fulfilling their developmental potential. Most of these children live in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. These disadvantaged children are likely to do poorly in school and subsequently have low incomes, high fertility, and provide poor care for their children, thus contributing to the intergenerational transmission of poverty. PMID:17208643

  19. Measles Antibody Titres In 0-5 Years Children At Aligarh

    Kandpal S D

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: What is the level of measles antibodies in 0-5 year children? Objectives: 1.To assess the pattern of decline of maternal antibodies in 0-9 months infants. 2. To estimate the seropositivity for measles antibodies in vaccinated 9 months infants. Study design: Cross- sectional. Setting: Rural areas of District Aligarh, U.P. Participants: 456 children in the age group of 0-5 years. Statistical analysis: Percentages, correlation coefficient. Results: 1. In all the study subjects below 9 months of age, the transplacentally acquired maternal measles antibodies showed a linear decline with increase in age. Out of 202 study subjects who had been immunized against measles 195(96.50% were seropositive and 7(3.5% were seronegative for measles antibodies.

  20. Bone marrow cytology in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors 5 years following exposure

    Bone marrow aspiration smears obtained from 35 individuals, 5 years following exposure to the Hiroshima atomic bomb, were intensively evaluated for radiation related cytologic abnormalities. No definite radiation related changes were observed, but some findings were very suggestive. The most interesting of these was the occurrence of internuclear bridges joining erythroid precursors in the marrow smears of seven (20%) of the heavily exposed survivors. Although not specific it is likely that this lesion is indicative of residual stem cell damage and some degree of ineffectual erythropoiesis. The bone marrow morphologic lesions may be good markers of residual radiation damage but they are too infrequent in their occurrence to be of value as a biologic dosimeter. The findings in this study also suggest that a gradual disappearance of radiation induced late bone marrow changes continues for periods of 3 to 5 years or more following high dose acute radiation exposure. (author)

  1. Surveillance of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after stopping mass drug administration in Menoufiya Governorate, Egypt.

    Moustafa, M A; Thabet, H S; Saad, G A; El-Setouhy, M; Mehrez, M; Hamdy, D M

    2014-05-01

    The World Health Organization recommends that before lymphatic filariasis elimination in an area can be confirmed, an additional survey should be performed at least 5 years after stopping mass drug administration. The current study aimed to determine the status of lymphatic filariasis 5 years after cessation ofthe mass drug administration in 3 sentinel Egyptian villages in Menoufiya Governorate. The rapid immunochromatographic card test (ICT) and a new commercial antibody detection kit (CELISA®) were used. All 1321 primary-school children aged 6-7 years old were ICT negative but 27 children were antibody positive. All households surveyed in one village with the highest antibody prevalence were ICT negative, indicating an absence of lymphatic filariasis. The CELISA antibody kit needs more standardization and development to be useful under field conditions. We conclude that lymphatic filariasis is no longer a public health problem in these villages and other villages with similar epidemiological conditions. PMID:24952286

  2. ISCR FY2005 Annual Report

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R

    2006-02-02

    Large-scale scientific computation and all of the disciplines that support and help validate it have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy (DOE). The maturation of simulation as a fundamental tool of scientific and engineering research is underscored in the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) June 2005 finding that ''computational science has become critical to scientific leadership, economic competitiveness, and national security''. LLNL operates several of the world's most powerful computers--including today's single most powerful--and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed, most notably the molecular dynamics simulation that sustained more than 100 Teraflop/s and won the 2005 Gordon Bell Prize. Ultrascale simulation has been identified as one of the highest priorities in DOE's facilities planning for the next two decades. However, computers at architectural extremes are notoriously difficult to use in an efficient manner. Furthermore, each successful terascale simulation only points out the need for much better ways of interacting with the resulting avalanche of data. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to the core missions of LLNL than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, LLNL must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In FY 2005, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) served as one of LLNL's main bridges to the academic community with a program of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty

  3. New spontaneous breast seroma 5 years after augmentation: a case report

    Chourmouzi, Danai; Vryzas, Trantafillos; Drevelegas, Antonios

    2009-01-01

    The case of a 36 year old woman who experienced a late, spontaneous breast seroma 5 years after augmentation in the absence of any known precipitating factors is reported. Although seroma is not an uncommon complication in the immediate postoperative period, it is extremely rare as a late complication of breast implantation. Magnetic resonance imaging is a reliable method to confirm the diagnosis of late seroma formation. Surgery is the preferred treatment.

  4. Delayed tumor resection in a 5-year-old child with bilateral Wilms tumor

    Carmichael, Samuel P.; Pulliam, Joseph F.; D'Orazio, John A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the case of a 5-year-old girl whose abdominal pain and distension were caused by Wilms tumor of the kidney. Because of the bilateral nature of her disease, she was spared biopsy or initial nephrectomy as part of her treatment course. Rather, she was treated presumptively for Wilms tumor based primarily on radiologic findings. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of vincristine, dactinomycin and doxorubicin was given to facilitate nephron-sparing surgery for tumor resection. Her ini...

  5. CORRELATION BETWEEN PENIS LENGTH AND ANTHOPOMETRY OF 5 YEAR OLD CHILDREN

    Doddy Kurnia Indrawan; Bikin Suryawan; Lanang Sidiartha; Arimbawa *

    2013-01-01

    Short penis still a problem for parents. Penis lenght is associated with  weight and considered abnormal in obese children. The purpose of this study was to find out the correlation between penis length and the anthropometry children aged 5 years. A cross sectional study was conducted, at the Division of Endocrinology, Department of Child Health, Medical Faculty of Udayana University, Sanglah Hospital Denpasar, during October 2010, at TK Sayang Ibu Sanglah Hospital. The calculation of the sam...

  6. Cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine in a 5-year-old girl

    Kim, Jung Ryul; Song, Ji Hun; Lee, Ju Hong [Chonbuk National University, Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Jeonju (Korea); Lee, Sang Yong [Chonbuk National University, Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Jeonju (Korea); Yoo, Wan Hee [Chonbuk National University, Medical School, Department of Rheumatology, Jeonju (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fractures of the tibial spine usually occur in children aged 8 to 14 years. Usually, radiographs will demonstrate a tibial spine fracture, with the degree of displacement. Tibial spine fractures in younger children have not been reported in the previously published literature. We report a tibial spine fracture that occurred in 5-year-old girl. The cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine was not revealed by radiographs because it was limited to the cartilaginous portion of the proximal tibia. (orig.)

  7. Cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine in a 5-year-old girl

    Fractures of the tibial spine usually occur in children aged 8 to 14 years. Usually, radiographs will demonstrate a tibial spine fracture, with the degree of displacement. Tibial spine fractures in younger children have not been reported in the previously published literature. We report a tibial spine fracture that occurred in 5-year-old girl. The cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine was not revealed by radiographs because it was limited to the cartilaginous portion of the proximal tibia. (orig.)

  8. MYOCARDIAL BRIDGING - CLINICAL AND ANGIOGRAPHIC PROFILE IN LAST 5 YEARS; A STUDY OF 129 CASES

    Abhilash S P; Krishna Kumar B; Praveen Velappan; PrabhaniniGupta; Sunita Viswanathan; A. George Koshy

    2010-01-01

    Aims of study : To assess the clinical and angiographical profile of myocardial bridging from consecutive coronary angiograms done over last 5 years at Medical college, Thiruvananthapuram. To assess the risk of cardiovascular events and the risk of accelerated atherosclerosis in isolated myocardial bridging. Methods : Consecutive coronary angiograms done at Medical college Thiruvananthapuram from 04/02/2005 to 31/03/2010 were reviewed for myocardial bridging. A total of 10492 coronary angiogr...

  9. Renal Stone Associated with the Ketogenic Diet in a 5-Year Old Girl with Intractable Epilepsy

    Choi, Ji Na; Song, Ji Eun; Shin, Jae Il; Kim, Heung Dong; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Jae Seung

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a 5-year-old girl who developed a renal stone while following the ketogenic diet to treat refractory seizure disorder. Three months after initiating the ketogenic diet, she developed severe abdominal pain and vomiting. The spot urine calcium-to-creatinine (Ca/Cr) ratio and 24-hour urine evaluation showed hypercalciuria. Computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed a stone in the right ureteropelvic junction, resulting in hydronephrosis of the right kidney. The renal s...

  10. Born Near the Limit of Viability – Developmental Outcomes 2.5 Years Later

    Månsson, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Although advances in neonatal care have resulted in increased survival rates among extremely preterm infants (born < 28 gestational weeks), they still face substantial morbidity risks during the neonatal period. The question of possible later outcomes is a key issue faced by health care professionals working with these infants. Objectives The objective of the present thesis was to explore developmental outcomes of extremely preterm birth at corrected age 2.5 years. The included ...

  11. Social competence of 3 to 5-year-old children born with low birth weight

    Nurul Komariah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Low birth weight (LBW has long been used as an indicator of public health. Low birth weight is not a proxy for any dimension of other maternal or perinatal health outcomes. Low birth weight infants require special care, and have more chronic conditions, learning delays, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders compared to infants of normal birth weight (NBW. Social competence is viewed as a primary component of healthy function and development and is an important predictor of academic and financial success. Objective To examine social competence of children aged 3-5 years born with low birth weight. Methods This cross-sectional study was undertaken in Palembang in 2012. Subjects consisted of children aged 3-5 years attended a preschool in the Seberang Ulu I District, Palembang, and were divided into two groups: low birth weight (LBW and normal birth weight (NBW. Social competence was assessed by observation and Interaction Rating Scale (IRS and Parenting Style questionnaire (PSQ. Chi-square analysis was used to compare social competence between the two groups. Multivariate regression logistic analysis was used to assess for the dominant factors that may affect a child’s social competence. Results Low birth weight children aged 3 to 5 years had a 1.435 times higher risk of low social competence compared to normal birth weight children of similar age. (RP 1.435; 95%CI 1.372 to 13.507; P=0.019. Multivariate regression logistic analysis revealed that parenting style was a dominant factor affecting social competence. Conclusion Social competence in 3 to 5-year-old children born with low birth weight is lower compared to those with normal birth weight. [Paediatr Indones. 2015;55:158-63.].

  12. Central Venous Catheters for Chemotherapy of Solid Tumors – Our Results in the Last 5 Years

    Žganjer, Mirko; Čizmić, Ante; Butković, Diana; MATOLIĆ, MARTINA; Karaman-Ilić, Maja; Stepan, Jasminka

    2008-01-01

    Central venous catheters provide an easy access for intravenous medications. Having a central line in place will relieve a child from the discomfort and danger of multiple regular intravenous lines for chemotherapy. The use of indwelling central venous catheters has become commonplace in the management of children undergoing oncological treatment. There are two types of central lines commonly used. There are Broviac catheters and Port-A-Cath (PAC) catheters. In the last 5 years we...

  13. Implementation of cerebral microdialysis at a community-based hospital: A 5-year retrospective analysis

    Chen, Jeff W; Rogers, Shana L.; Gombart, Zoe J.; Adler, David E.; Cecil, Sandy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cerebral microdialysis (MD) provides valuable information about brain metabolism under normal and pathologic conditions. The CMA 600 microdialysis analyzer received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for clinical use in the United States in 2005. Since then, cerebral MD has been increasingly utilized nationally in the multimodal monitoring of traumatic brain injury (TBI), stroke, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, and brain tumors. We describe a 5-year, single-institu...

  14. Posttraumatic stress disorder among Danish soldiers 2.5 years after military deployment in Afghanistan

    Hellerup, Janne; Andersen, Søren Bo; Høgh (Hogh), Annie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) implicates research regarding factors besides the preceding traumatic event. This study investigated the influence of predisposing personality traits on development of PTSD in a group of Danish Soldiers deployed to Afghanistan ...... Spearman¡'s rho significant relationships were identified between pre-existing personality traits of neuroticism and agreeableness with development of PTSD symptoms 2.5 years after homecoming, however, a number of additional cofounders were identified....

  15. GLOBAL STRATEGY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN 5 YEARS AND YOUNGER

    Pedersen, Soren; Hurd, Suzanne; Lemanske, Robert; Becker, Allan; Zar, Heather; Sly, Peter; Soto-Quiroz, Manuel; Wong, Gary; Bateman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood and the leading cause of childhood morbidity from chronic disease as measured by school absences, emergency department visits, and hospitalizations1. Many scientific advances have improved our understanding of asthma and our ability to manage and control it effectively. However, in children 5 years and younger, the clinical symptoms of asthma are variable and non-specific. Furthermore, neither airflow limitation nor...

  16. Development of Speech Intelligibility Measurement Test for 3 to 5 Years Old Normal Children

    Fatemeh Hoseyni; Zahra Agha Rasouli; Farhad Torabi Nezhad; Sara Heydari

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim: Speech intelligibility is defined as a measure of effectiveness of understanding speech. It has many applications such as nomination of speech disorder intensity. Different methods and speech tasks have been designed for assessment of speech intelligibility amongst which word identification tasks have high validity. This study aimed to provide a test to measure speech intelligibility among children aged 3 to 5 years old.Methods: Many words were collected and content validi...

  17. Childhood leukaemia incidence below the age of 5 years near French nuclear power plants

    Laurier, D [Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, IRSN/DRPH/SRBE, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses cedex (France); Hemon, D; Clavel, J [INSERM Unit 754, Villejuif (France)], E-mail: Dominique.laurier@irsn.fr

    2008-09-01

    A recent study indicated an excess risk of leukaemia among children under the age of 5 years living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Germany. We present results relating to the incidence of childhood leukaemia in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in France for the same age range. These results do not indicate an excess risk of leukaemia in young children living near French nuclear power plants. (note)

  18. Intraindividual variation in plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D measures 5 years apart among postmenopausal women

    Meng, Jennifer E.; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Andrews, Christopher A; LaMonte, Michael J.; Horst, Ronald L.; Genco, Robert J.; Millen, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Current literature examining associations between vitamin D and chronic disease generally use a single assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), assuming an individual’s 25(OH)D concentration is consistent over time. Methods We investigated the intraindividual variability between two measures of plasma 25(OH)D concentrations collected ~5 years apart (1997-2000 to 2002-2005) in 672 postmenopausal women participating in the Women’s Health Initiative. Plasma 25(OH)D was assessed using the DiaSorin LIAISON® chemiluminescence immunoassay. The within-pair coefficient of variation (CV) was 4.9% using blinded quality control samples. Mean and standard deviations (SD) of 25(OH)D at the two time points were compared using a paired t-test. An intraindividual CV and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to assess intraindividual variability. A Spearman correlation coefficient (r) assessed the strength of the association between the two measures and concordance in vitamin D status at two time points Results Mean 25(OH)D concentrations (nmol/L) significantly increased over time from 60.0 (SD=22.2) to 67.8 (SD=22.2) (p<0.05). The CV was 24.6%, the ICC (95% Confidence Interval (CI)) was 0.59 (0.54-0.64), and the Spearman r was 0.61 (95% CI=0.56-0.66). Greater concordance over 5 years was observed in participants with sufficient compared to deficient or inadequate baseline 25(OH)D concentrations (weighted kappa=0.39). Reliability measures were moderately influenced by season of blood draw and vitamin D supplement use. Conclusion There is moderate intraindividual variation in 25(OH)D concentrations over approximately 5 years. Impact These data support the use of a one-time measure of blood 25(OH)D in prospective studies with ≤ 5 years of follow-up. PMID:22523182

  19. Fertility issues in Simmental cows in Central Croatia: a 5-year study

    Zobel, Robert; TKALCIC, Suzana; COLE, Wendell

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the fertility trends in dairy cows in Central Croatia and compare the trends and causes of infertility and subfertility during a 5-year period. A total of 12,060 Simmental cows and heifers were included in the study. The animals were examined by vaginoscopy, transrectal palpation, and ultrasonography on a regular basis. Fertility problems that included infertility and subfertility were diagnosed in 56.61% of all observed animals. The total number of ...

  20. Predictors of Emotional Distress and Wellbeing 2–5 Years After Stroke

    Bergersen, H.; A.-K. Schanke; K. S. Sunnerhagen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To identify predictors of emotional distress and psychological wellbeing in stroke survivors 2–5 years after discharge from comprehensive rehabilitation. Material and Methods. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-30), and questions regarding life situations were mailed to former patients. Multiple regression analyses were performed. Results. The responses from 68 participants (37% women), of an average age of 58 years old, were us...

  1. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF UNDER - NUTRITION IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 0-5 YEARS FROM RURAL AREAS OF DEHRADUN

    Megha Luthra; Surekha Kishore; Kajal Jain

    2010-01-01

    Background: Under nutrition is a major problem in India. This is a study conducted in rural catchment areas of Department of Community Medicine, SGRRMC, Dehradun to asses the same. Objectives: To find out prevalence of under nutrition in children in the age group of 0-5 years and also to study its epidemiological correlates. Methods :All registered children of RHTC Mothrowala during October to December2009 were studied. Detailed histories were taken & growth chartingwas done using growth ...

  2. Bifocal Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormalities in a 5-Year Old Boy: A Case Report

    K. G. Snoek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the extremely unusual case of a 5-year-old boy with a bifocal (cervical as well as lumbar spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORAs. The MRI showed cord oedema at the level of C2 and T10. We propose that during the motor vehicle crash severe propulsion of the head with a flexed lumbar region resulted in a traction injury to the lower thoracic and lumbar spine and maximum flexion caused SCIWORA in C2.

  3. Long-term (5 year) safety of bronchial thermoplasty: Asthma Intervention Research (AIR) trial.

    Thomson, NC; Rubin, AS; Niven, RM; Corris, PA; Siersted, HC; Olivenstein, R.; Pavord, ID; McCormack, D.; Laviolette, M.; Shargill, NS; Cox, G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a bronchoscopic procedure that improves asthma control by reducing excess airway smooth muscle. Treated patients have been followed out to 5 years to evaluate long-term safety of this procedure. METHODS: Patients enrolled in the Asthma Intervention Research Trial were on inhaled corticosteroids ≥200 μg beclomethasone or equivalent + long-acting-beta2-agonists and demonstrated worsening of asthma on long-acting-β2-agonist withdrawal. Following initial...

  4. Long term (5 Year) safety of bronchial thermoplasty: Asthma Intervention Research (AIR) trial

    Thomson, N C; Rubin, A.S.; Niven, R. M.; Corris, P A; Siersted, H. C.; Olivenstein, R.; Pavord, I.D.; McCormick, D.; Laviolette, M.; Shargill, N.S.; Cox, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bronchial thermoplasty (BT) is a bronchoscopic procedure that improves asthma control by reducing excess airway smooth muscle. Treated patients have been followed out to 5 years to evaluate long-term safety of this procedure. Methods: Patients enrolled in the Asthma Intervention Research Trial were on inhaled corticosteroids ≥200 μg beclomethasone or equivalent + long-acting-beta2-agonists and demonstrated worsening of asthma on long-acting-β2-agonist withdrawal. ...

  5. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment - FY 2001

    The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks science and technology development needs expressed by the five DOE tank waste sites. TFA's annual program development process is iterative and involves the following steps: Collection of site needs; Needs analysis; Development of technical responses and initial prioritization; Refinement of the program for the next fiscal year; Formulation of the Corporate Review Budget (CRB); Preparation of Program Execution Guidance (PEG) for the next FY Revision of the Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP). This document describes the outcomes of the first phase of this process, from collection of site needs to the initial prioritization of technical activities. The TFA received site needs in October - December 2000. A total of 170 site needs were received, an increase of 30 over the previous year. The needs were analyzed and integrated, where appropriate. Sixty-six distinct technical responses were drafted and prioritized. In addition, seven strategic tasks were approved to compete for available funding in FY 2002 and FY 2003. Draft technical responses were prepared and provided to the TFA Site Representatives and the TFA User Steering Group (USG) for their review and comment. These responses were discussed at a March 15, 2001, meeting where the TFA Management Team established the priority listing in preparation for input to the DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) budget process. At the time of publication of this document, the TFA continues to finalize technical responses as directed by the TFA Management Team and clarify the intended work scopes for FY 2002 and FY 2003

  6. Tanks Focus Area Site Needs Assessment - FY 2001

    Allen, Robert W.; Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Nickola, Cheryl L.

    2001-04-30

    The TFA uses a systematic process for developing its annual program that draws from the tanks science and technology development needs expressed by the five DOE tank waste sites. TFA's annual program development process is iterative and involves the following steps: Collection of site needs; Needs analysis; Development of technical responses and initial prioritization; Refinement of the program for the next fiscal year; Formulation of the Corporate Review Budget (CRB); Preparation of Program Execution Guidance (PEG) for the next FY Revision of the Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP). This document describes the outcomes of the first phase of this process, from collection of site needs to the initial prioritization of technical activities. The TFA received site needs in October - December 2000. A total of 170 site needs were received, an increase of 30 over the previous year. The needs were analyzed and integrated, where appropriate. Sixty-six distinct technical responses were drafted and prioritized. In addition, seven strategic tasks were approved to compete for available funding in FY 2002 and FY 2003. Draft technical responses were prepared and provided to the TFA Site Representatives and the TFA User Steering Group (USG) for their review and comment. These responses were discussed at a March 15, 2001, meeting where the TFA Management Team established the priority listing in preparation for input to the DOE Office of Science and Technology (OST) budget process. At the time of publication of this document, the TFA continues to finalize technical responses as directed by the TFA Management Team and clarify the intended work scopes for FY 2002 and FY 2003.

  7. Decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book FY 1998

    Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 was very successful in terms of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) project completions. This photobriefing book highlights these projects and activities in one ongoing project. Brief descriptions of projects planned for the future are also provided. Two D and D projects funded by the US DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM-40) were completed safely and on schedule in FY 1998: (1) Argonne Thermal Source Reactor (ATSR) was a low-power research reactor that operated from 1950 to 1989; and (2) The Building 594 (a.k.a. 579) Waste Ion-Exchange Facility was an obsolete facility constructed in the 1950s to process waste fluids from a collecting lagoon. Field work at one project was ongoing during FY 1998: (1) Chicago Pile 5 (CP-5) was a 5-megawatt, heavy water-moderated, enriched uranium-fueled reactor used to produce neutrons for scientific research from 1954-79. The reactor was shut down and defueled in 1979. D and D is scheduled to be completed in FY 2000. Project experience has lent itself to developing unique staff capabilities. The D and D group was chosen as lead organization for a project supported with operating funds provided by Argonne's Plant Facilities and Services (PFS) Division. This project was also completed safely and on schedule in FY 1998: (1) The Building 200/205 Pneumatic Transfer Tube was constructed in the late 1960s between Hot Cell M-4 in Building 200 and a glove box in Room F-131, Building 205, and used to transfer irradiated fuel specimens and other samples between the two buildings

  8. Comparison of Undernutrition Prevalence of Children under 5 Years in China between 2002 and 2013

    YU Dong Mei; ZHAO Li Yun; YANG Zhen Yu; CHANG Su Ying; YU Wen Tao; FANG Hong Yun; WANG Xun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the undernutrition status of children under 5-year in China, and study the trend between 2002 and 2013. Methods The study was based on two national surveys. Undernutrition wasdetermined against WHOs 2006 growth standards.The prevalence in 2013 and 2002 was weighted by China sixth National Population Census (2010). The relationship between undernutrition and gender/age groups/different areas use weighted logistic regression. Results The results indicated the overall prevalence of stunting, underweight, and wasting of Chinese children under 5-year was 8.1%, 2.4%, and 1.9% in 2013, respectively. The prevalence of stunting was higher for children aged 12-47 month, while underweight was higher for children aged 48-59 month. The prevalence of undernutrition was higher in rural areas than in urban areas, especially in poor rural areas. There was a decline of stunting, underweight, and wastingbetween 2002 and 2013 among the children, with greater reduction in rural areas than in urban areas. Conclusion The prevalence of undernutrition of children under 5-year remains high in rural areas especially in poor rural areas in China. It is urgent totake action to control undernutrition in the vulnerable areas and subgroups.

  9. Outcome and Prognostic Factors for Traumatic Endophthalmitis over a 5-Year Period.

    Nicoară, Simona Delia; Irimescu, Iulian; Călinici, Tudor; Cristian, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the outcome and identify the prognostic factors of traumatic endophthalmitis over a 5-year period. Methods. We reviewed the medical records of all the traumatic endophthalmities that we treated in our department over the last 5 years (2009-2013). We extracted the following parameters: age, gender, wound anatomy, associated ocular lesions, treatment, and initial and final visual acuities. We used the program SPSS version 20.0.0. for the statistical analysis of our data. Results. During the last 5 years, we treated 14 traumatic endophthalmities, representing 46.66% of all types of endophthalmities. The infection rate in open globe injuries was 8.13% and 34.78%, if an intraocular foreign body (IOFB) was associated. All the patients were males with the median age of 37 years. Initial visual acuities varied between light perception and 0.4 and the timing of treatment from a few hours to 10 days. We administered antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drugs, systemically and intravitreally, in all cases. We performed pars plana vitrectomy in 64.28% of cases. In 57.14% of cases, the final visual acuity was 0.1 or more. Conclusions. IOFBs increased significantly the risk for endophthalmitis. The worse prognostic factors were retinal detachment at presentation and delayed treatment. This trial is registered with IRCT2014082918966N1. PMID:25302113

  10. Development of Speech Intelligibility Measurement Test for 3 to 5 Years Old Normal Children

    Fatemeh Hoseyni

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Speech intelligibility is defined as a measure of effectiveness of understanding speech. It has many applications such as nomination of speech disorder intensity. Different methods and speech tasks have been designed for assessment of speech intelligibility amongst which word identification tasks have high validity. This study aimed to provide a test to measure speech intelligibility among children aged 3 to 5 years old.Methods: Many words were collected and content validity was assessed by 9 speech-language pathologists and 1 linguist. Thirty four words with a content validity above 70% were chosen as the test words and the speech-language pathologists collected suitable pictures for the words. One hundred boys and girls aged 3 to 5 years participated in the study. Inter-rater reliability was administered to assess the test reliability.Results: An interclass correlation coefficient of 0.85 and spearman correlation coefficient of 0.81 was obtained for the speech intelligibility test.Conclusion: Speech intelligibility test has appropriate validity and reliability and is suitable for assessment of intelligibility in 3 to 5 years old children.

  11. Timing and risk factors for clinical fractures among postmenopausal women: a 5-year prospective study

    Rinkens Paula ELM

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many risk factors for fractures have been documented, including low bone-mineral density (BMD and a history of fractures. However, little is known about the short-term absolute risk (AR of fractures and the timing of clinical fractures. Therefore, we assessed the risk and timing of incident clinical fractures, expressed as 5-year AR, in postmenopausal women. Methods In total, 10 general practice centres participated in this population-based prospective study. Five years after a baseline assessment, which included clinical risk factor evaluation and BMD measurement, 759 postmenopausal women aged between 50 and 80 years, were re-examined, including undergoing an evaluation of clinical fractures after menopause. Risk factors for incident fractures at baseline that were significant in univariate analyses were included in a multivariate Cox survival regression analysis. The significant determinants were used to construct algorithms. Results In the total group, 12.5% (95% confidence interval (CI 10.1–14.9 of the women experienced a new clinical fracture. A previous clinical fracture after menopause and a low BMD (T-score Conclusion In postmenopausal women, clinical fractures cluster in time. One in two women with a recent clinical fracture had a new clinical fracture within 5 years, regardless of BMD. The 5-year AR for a first clinical fracture was much lower and depended on BMD.

  12. The prevalence of dental erosion in 5-year-old preschoolers in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Gopinath, Vellore Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the percentage of 5-year-old preschoolers in Sharjah, affected by dental erosion and to assess the predictors. Materials and Methods: A total of 403 5-year-old children were examined of which 48.14% (n = 194) were boys and 51.86% (n = 209) were girls; 31.27% (n = 126) were Emirati and 68.73% (n = 277) were non-Emirati Arabs. Examination of dental erosion was confined to palatal surfaces of maxillary incisors using the erosion index described in the UK National Survey of Children's Dental Health, 1993. Dental caries was charted using the World Health Organization 1997 criteria. Results: In the sample of 403 5-year-old preschoolers examined, dental erosion was apparent in 237 (58.80%) children, with 55.09% showing the dissolution of enamel and 3.72% exhibiting exposed dentin. Predictors of dental erosion as determined by logistic regression concluded that compared to Emirati citizens other Arab nationalities have 0.27 times the odds (95% confidence interval [CI] =0.18–0.42) of having tooth erosion (P dental erosion compared to children who drink water (P dental erosion. Caries experience and consumption of acidic drinks were associated with dental erosion. PMID:27095899

  13. Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans: a 5-year review of the natural history using clinical and MRI evaluation

    Although MRI prognostic features for juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) have been determined, the natural history of JOCD on serial MRI has not been fully documented. To document the natural history of JOCD on serial MRI and to correlate this with arthroscopy and clinical outcome over a 5-year follow-up. Twenty-one knees in 19 patients (15 boys, 4 girls; age range 5-15 years) with JOCD underwent MRI and clinical follow-up over 5 years. Lesions were classified as stable or unstable on MRI and compared with clinical and arthroscopic data. On 5-year follow-up, 17 of 19 patients were asymptomatic and 2 of 19 had minimal pain. Fourteen arthroscopies were performed on 11/21 knees. One of twenty-one had fragment fixation. On initial MRI, eight knees had marked fragmentation, high signal at the fragment/bone interface and incomplete defects in the hyaline cartilage (MRI stage III-stable), but no tear. Of these, five had arthroscopy, all confirming intact cartilage. One of twenty-one knees was unstable (MRI stage IVb) with a detached osteochondral fragment, requiring surgery. Despite extensive subchondral bone changes on MRI, all cases with intact cartilage (95%) improved with conservative treatment. Early MRI allows prompt diagnosis and institution of conservative treatment. This results in healing and avoidance of surgery in most patients. (orig.)

  14. FY 1997 cost savings report

    With the end of the cold war, funding for the Environmental Management program increased rapidly as nuclear weapons production facilities were shut down, cleanup responsibilities increased, and facilities were transferred to the cleanup program. As funding for the Environmental Management (EM) program began to level off in response to Administration and Congressional efforts to balance the Federal budget, the program redoubled its efforts to increase efficiency and get more productivity out of every dollar. Cost savings and enhanced performance are an integral pair of Hanford Site operations. FY1997 was the third year of a cost savings program that was initially defined in FY 1995. The definitions and process remained virtually the same as those used in FY 1996

  15. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan for fiscal year 1992

    The Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Annual Implementation Work Plan (AIWP) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1992 presents Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1992. The AIWP focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which BPA has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the AIWP includes objectives, background, progress to date in achieving the objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1992. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. In October 1988, BPA and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA) initiated a collaborative and cooperative Implementation Planning Process (IPP). The IPP provided opportunities in FY 1991 for the fish and wildlife agencies. Tribes, and other interested parties to be involved in planning FY 1992 Program implementation. This planing process contributed to the development of this year's AIWP. The joint BPA/CBFWA IPP is expected to continue in FY 1992. The FY 1992 AIWP emphasizes continuation of 143 ongoing, or projected ongoing Program projects, tasks, or task orders, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. The FY 1992 AIWP also contains 10 new Program projects or tasks that are planned to start in FY 1992

  16. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2011

    none, none

    2012-04-27

    Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). Going forward in FY 2012, the LDRD program also supports the Goals codified in the new DOE Strategic Plan of May, 2011. The LDRD program also supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Brief summares of projects and accomplishments for the period for each division are included.

  17. Percutaneous Nucleoplasty Using Coblation Technique for the Treatment of Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain: 5-year Follow-up Results

    Da-Jiang Ren; Xiu-Mei Liu; Sui-Yong Du; Tian-Sheng Sun; Zhi-Cheng Zhang; Fang Li

    2015-01-01

    Background:This study evaluated the efficacy of percutaneous nucleoplasty using coblation technique for the treatment of chronic nonspecific low back pain (LBP),after 5 years of follow-up.Methods:From September 2004 to November 2006,172 patients underwent percutaneous nucleoplasty for chronic LBP in our department.Forty-one of these patients were followed up for a mean period of 67 months.Nucleoplasty was performed at L3/4 in 1 patient;L4/5 in 25 patients;L5/S1 in 2 patients;L3/4 and L4/5 in 2 patients;L4/5 and L5/S1 in 7 patients;and L3/4,L4/5,and L5/S1 in 4 patients.Patients were assessed preoperatively and at 1 week,1 year,3 years,and 5 years postoperatively.Pain was graded using a 10-cm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the percentage reduction in pain score was calculated at each postoperative time point.The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used to assess disability-related to lumbar spine degeneration,and patient satisfaction was assessed using the modified MacNab criteria.Results:There were significant differences among the preoperative,1-week postoperative,and 3-year postoperative VAS and ODI scores,but not between the 3-and 5-year postoperative scores.There were no significant differences in age,sex,or preoperative symptoms between patients with effective and ineffective treatment,but there were significant differences in the number of levels treated,Pfirrmann grade of intervertebral disc degeneration,and provocative discography findings between these two groups.Excellent or good patient satisfaction was achieved in 87.9% of patients after 1 week,72.4% after 1 year,67.7% after 3 years,and 63.4% at the last follow-up.Conclusions:Although previously published short-and medium-term outcomes after percutaneous nucleoplasty appeared to be satisfactory,our long-term follow-up results show a significant decline in patient satisfaction over time.Percutaneous nucleoplasty is a safe and simple technique,with therapeutic effectiveness for the treatment of

  18. Dental Health Status in 3-5 Year Old Kindergarten Children in Tehran-Iran in 2003

    M. Ghandahari-Motlagh

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Assessing oral hygiene in children plays an important role in determining the health status of communities and evaluating national health promotion programs. In 1997 in Geneva, international organizations agreed on the global goal of achieving a minimum of 90% caries free teeth in 5 year old children.Purpose: This study was aimed to assess the oral health status in Iranian children.Materials and Methods: Among kindergarten children residing in the capital of Iran,Tehran, 400 children between the ages of three and five years were randomly selected and participated in this study. Their deciduous teeth were examined and the health index of dmft was determined for each child. The collected data were analyzed using the oneway ANOVA (with Tukey–Kramer multiple comparisons test for Post Hoc test, t test,and chi square test.Results: In this age group, only 48.3% of the children had no tooth decay. This information shows how far we are from accomplishing the aforementioned goal. A significant increase in tooth decay in these children was correlated with neglecting oral and dental hygiene, and also failing to brush the teeth regularly and wash the mouth after consuming sweets (P<0.001. Unfortunately, visits to dentists for regular checkups are not frequent enough, and dental caries was seen more in children who did not have regular visits than those who did (P<0.001.Conclusion: More accurate planning seems necessary to achieve 90% caries free teeth in 5 year old children. More emphasis must be placed on prevention programs and educating public to observe dental hygiene by brushing the teeth regularly, washing the mouth after consuming sweets, and paying their dentists regular visits.

  19. Gestational Age at Birth and 'Body-Mind' Health at 5 Years of Age: A Population Based Cohort Study.

    Cronin, Frances M; Segurado, Ricardo; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M; Kelleher, Cecily C; Tremblay, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified the effects of prematurity on the neonate's physical health, however few studies have explored the effects of prematurity on both the physical and mental health of the child as they develop. Secondary analysis of data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a longitudinal study of infants (n = 18 818, born 2000-2002 in the United Kingdom) was performed. Effects of gestational age at birth on health outcomes at 5 years were measured using parental rating of their children's general health and severity of behavior problems. The association between parent's general health ratings and behavior problem ratings was low: 86% of those reporting serious behavior problems (5% of the sample, n = 764) rated their child as being in excellent, very good, or good health. Still, a gradient of increasing risk of poorer outcome with decreasing gestational age was observed for a composite health measure (poor/fair health and/or serious behavior problems), suggesting an association with prematurity for this composite assessment of health status. The greatest contribution to the childhood composite health measure at 5 years was for children born at 32-36 weeks gestation: population attributable fractions for having poor outcomes was 3.4% (Bonferroni-adjusted 95% confidence interval 1.1%-6.2%), compared to 1% (0.2-2.3) for birth at less than 32 weeks. Results suggest that preterm children, by school entry, are not only at high risk of physical health problems, but also of behavioral health problems. The recognition of, and response to comprehensive health and well-being outcomes related to prematurity are important in order to correctly plan and deliver adequate paediatric health services and policies. PMID:26975048

  20. Gestational Age at Birth and ‘Body-Mind’ Health at 5 Years of Age: A Population Based Cohort Study

    Segurado, Ricardo; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M.; Kelleher, Cecily C.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have identified the effects of prematurity on the neonate’s physical health, however few studies have explored the effects of prematurity on both the physical and mental health of the child as they develop. Secondary analysis of data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a longitudinal study of infants (n = 18 818, born 2000–2002 in the United Kingdom) was performed. Effects of gestational age at birth on health outcomes at 5 years were measured using parental rating of their children’s general health and severity of behavior problems. The association between parent’s general health ratings and behavior problem ratings was low: 86% of those reporting serious behavior problems (5% of the sample, n = 764) rated their child as being in excellent, very good, or good health. Still, a gradient of increasing risk of poorer outcome with decreasing gestational age was observed for a composite health measure (poor/fair health and/or serious behavior problems), suggesting an association with prematurity for this composite assessment of health status. The greatest contribution to the childhood composite health measure at 5 years was for children born at 32–36 weeks gestation: population attributable fractions for having poor outcomes was 3.4% (Bonferroni-adjusted 95% confidence interval 1.1%–6.2%), compared to 1% (0.2–2.3) for birth at less than 32 weeks. Results suggest that preterm children, by school entry, are not only at high risk of physical health problems, but also of behavioral health problems. The recognition of, and response to comprehensive health and well-being outcomes related to prematurity are important in order to correctly plan and deliver adequate paediatric health services and policies. PMID:26975048

  1. Survivorship after Arthroscopic Management of Glenohumeral Osteoarthritis with a Minimum 5 year Follow-up

    Mitchell, Justin; Horan, Marilee P.; Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Menge, Travis; Tahal, Dimitri S.; Millett, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We previously reported clinical improvement and pain relief following arthroscopic management of glenohumeral osteoarthritis (GHOA) at 2 years. The purpose of this study was to determine 5 year survivorship for the comprehensive arthroscopic management (CAM) procedure for the treatment of GHOA. Methods: This study had prior IRB approval. The CAM procedure was performed on a consecutive series of 42 young patients (44 shoulders) with GHOA who otherwise met criteria for shoulder arthroplasty but instead opted for joint preservation. The procedure included glenohumeral chondroplasty, capsular release, and synovectomy, humeral osteoplasty, axillary nerve neurolysis, subacromial decompression, loose body removal, microfracture and biceps tenodesis. Only patients who were a minimum of 5 years out from surgery were included in the study. Patients completed a subjective questionnaire, and further surgical intervention of the index shoulder was noted for survivorship analysis. Failure was defined as progression to TSA. Kaplan Meier survivorship analysis was performed. Results: Forty-two patients (with 44 shoulders) underwent a CAM procedure between 1/2006-12/2009 and were included. All patients were self-described recreational athletes. Seven patients were former collegiate or professional athletes. Mean follow-up was 5.9 years (range, 5 years to 8.1 years). Mean age at surgery was 52 (range 27- 68) years old in 13 women and 29 men. Eleven shoulders (26%) failed and progressed to TSA at a mean of 2.9 years (1.0-5.4 years). Shoulder status (progression to TSA or not) at minimum 5 years (range 5.3 - 9.4 years) was known for 95% (42/44). One patient progressed to another surgery for stiffness at a mean of 5.6 months and another patient underwent a revision CAM procedure at 7.9 years. From this cohort, Kaplan Meier survivorship was 92% at 1 year, 85.7% at 3 years, and 75.3% survivorship at 5 years. Conclusion: The long term durability of arthroscopic management for

  2. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    Lewis, Will [comp.

    2006-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  3. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail

  4. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director's Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  5. Biological and Environmental Research Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, FY 1992--1994

    1992-01-01

    This report is the 1992--1994 Program Director`s Overview Report for Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program, and as such it addresses KP-funded work at ORNL conducted during FY 1991 and in progress during FY 1992; it also serves as a planning document for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994. Non-BER funded work at ORNL relevant to the mission of OHER is also discussed. The second section of the report describes ORNL facilities and resources used by the BER program. The third section addresses research management practices at ORNL. The fourth, fifth, and sixth sections address BER-funded research in progress, program accomplishments and research highlights, and program orientation for the remainder of FY 1992 through FY 1994, respectively. Work for non-BER sponsors is described in the seventh section, followed by a discussion of significant near and long-term issues facing BER work at ORNL in the eighth section. The last section provides a statistical summary of BER research at ORNL. Appendices supplement the above topics with additional detail.

  6. FY 1990 report on the development of wood-waste/agri-waste pyrolytic gasification technology and utilization technology of gas product; 1990 nendo mokushitsukei haikibutsu no netsubunkai gas ka gijutsu to seisei gas no riyo gijutsu kaihatsu hokokusho

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    It is urgently necessary for the Philippines, which has no promising energy source to replace imported oil and lacks hard currencies, to reduce dependence on oil. The country, consisting of a number of islands, has faced many difficulties in construction of large-scale power transmission grids covering wide areas, which greatly retard development of local industries and dissemination of electricity. Therefore, great expectations have been placed on the techniques this project plans to develop for utilization of wastes as the energy source. This 5-year project (FY 1990 to 1994) is aimed at joint research and development of (thermal decomposition/gasification and power generation system) for transforming large quantities of wood-wastes/agri-wastes left unutilized into electric power, in which thermal decomposition/gasification of the wastes is combined with gas engine/power generator systems, and thereby to establish the systems suitable for the developing country. The major R and D results obtained in FY 1990 as the initial year include negotiations with the Philippines, on-the-spot surveys for the demonstration plant sites and conditions, and conceptual designs of the demonstration plant. (NEDO)

  7. 77 FR 26361 - Medicaid Program; State Plan Home and Community-Based Services, 5-Year Period for Waivers...

    2012-05-03

    ..., disease, condition, or residential setting, but could include risk factors or take into account service..., 2008 Federal Register (73 FR 18676), we published a proposed rule to amend Medicaid regulations to.... Psychosocial rehabilitation services. Clinic services (whether or not furnished in a facility). The HCBS...

  8. 38 CFR 8.26 - Renewal of National Service Life Insurance on the 5-year level premium term plan.

    2010-07-01

    ... period of his or her insurance under conditions which would entitle the insured to continued insurance protection but for such expiration, such insurance, if subject to renewal under this paragraph shall...

  9. Liver disease in Viet Nam: screening, surveillance, management and education: a 5-year plan and call to action.

    Gish, Robert G; Bui, Tam D; Nguyen, Chuc T K; Nguyen, Duc T; Tran, Huy V; Tran, Diem M T; Trinh, Huy N

    2012-02-01

    Despite a high prevalence of liver disease in Viet Nam, there has been no nationwide approach to the disease and no systematic screening of at-risk individuals. Risk factors include chronic hepatitis B (estimated prevalence of 12%), chronic hepatitis C (at least 2% prevalence), and heavy consumption of alcohol among men. This combination of factors has resulted in liver cancer being the most common cause of cancer death in Viet Nam. There is a general lack of understanding by both the general public and health-care providers about the major risk to health that liver disease represents. We report here the initial steps taken as part of a comprehensive approach to liver disease that will ultimately include nationwide education for health-care providers, health educators, and the public; expansion of nationwide screening for hepatitis B and C followed by hepatitis B virus vaccination or treatment of chronic hepatitis B and/or hepatitis C; education about alcoholic liver disease; long-term surveillance for liver cancer; reduction of infection transmission related to medical, commercial, and personal re-use of contaminated needles, syringes, sharp instruments, razors, and inadequately sterilized medical equipment; and ongoing collection and analysis of data about the prevalence of all forms of liver disease and the results of the expanded screening, vaccination, and treatment programs. We report the beginning results of our pilot hepatitis B screening program. We believe that this comprehensive nationwide approach could substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality from liver disease and greatly lessen the burden in terms of both lives lost and health-care costs. PMID:22098550

  10. Health in the 5th 5-years Development Plan of Iran: Main Challenges, General Policies and Strategies

    N Rostamigooran; MH Salarianzedeh; Alikhani, S; B Damari; Vosoogh Moghaddam, A; A Delavari; Larijani, B

    2013-01-01

    Access to the right to the highest attainable level of health is a constitutional right that obliges governments and other players to take step to increase all individuals’ chances of obtaining good health. At the least, health and education are two crucial requirements for this as well. Iran's vision 2025 is going to lead the country to a developed state with the highest rank of economic, scientific and technological status in the region. Enjoying health, welfare, food security, social secur...

  11. Assessment of Iron Overload in Homozygous and Heterozygous Beta Thalassemic Children below 5 Years of Age

    Dhiraj J. Trivedi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thalassemia is a genetic disease having 3-7% carrier rate in Indians. It is transfusion dependent anemia having high risk of iron overloading. A clinical symptom of iron overload becomes detectable in second decade causing progressive liver, heart and endocrine glands damage. There is a need to assess iron overload in thalassemics below 5 years of age to protect them from complications at later age of life. Aims and objectives: Present study was undertaken to estimate serum iron status and evaluate serum transferrin saturation in both homozygous & heterozygous form of thalassemia as an index of iron overload among children of one to five years of age. Materials and Methods: Clinically diagnosed thirty cases of β thalassemia major & thirty cases of β thalassemia minor having severe anemia, hepatospleenomegaly and between 1 year to 5 years of age were included in study group and same age matched healthy controls were included in the study. RBC indices and HbA, HbA2 and HbF were estimated along with serum iron & serum Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC and serum transferrin levels. Results: Significant difference was observed in hemoglobin levels between control and both beta thalassemia groups. Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV and Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH values were reduced. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed the elevated levels of HbF and HbA2 in both beta thalassemia groups. Among serum iron parameters, serum iron, TIBC and transferrin saturation were elevated whereas serum transferrin levels were low in thalassemia major in children below 5 years of age. Conclusion: Although clinical symptoms of iron overload have been absent in thalassemic children below five years of age, biochemical iron overloading has started at much lower age which is of great concern.

  12. Calcineurin activity in tacrolimus-treated renal transplant patients early after and 5 years after transplantation.

    Mortensen, D M; Koefoed-Nielsen, P B; Jørgensen, K A

    2006-10-01

    The pharmacodynamic (PD) action of tacrolimus (FK) within the T-cell is inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase (CaN). Determination of CaN activity provides us with an important PD marker. Eleven renal transplant patients treated with FK were investigated on day 14 following transplantation and 5 years later. Blood samples drawn before as well as 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours after oral intake of FK were analyzed for CaN activity and blood FK concentrations. Twenty healthy subjects had one blood sample drawn for CaN activity, which was measured as the release of (32)P from a phosphorylated peptide. Radioactivity of (32)P was quantitated by liquid scintillation counting with the results converted to units of CaN utilizing a calibration curve. On day 14, we observed significant inhibition of CaN activity at T:1, 2, and 3 compared with the predose level (P = .002; P = .015; P = .015). Furthermore, all measured CaN activities were significantly different from those observed in healthy nonmedicated subjects. In contrast, at 5 years posttransplant only the CaN activity at T:2 was significantly inhibited compared with the predose level (P = .02). Additionally, all CaN activities at this time were not significantly different from CaN activities in the healthy subjects. We were not able to demonstrate individual CaN activity profiles in the patients. The lack of CaN inhibition at 5 years after transplantation despite relevant drug concentrations, probably reflected the lower drug dose used long after transplantation. This result raises the question of whether CaN inhibition is necessary to hold graft function and whether FK possess CaN-independent mechanisms of action. PMID:17098028

  13. Annual Papanicolaou screening for 5 years among human papillomavirus-negative women

    Primary human papilloma virus (HPV) screening is more effective than cytology in reducing the risk of cervical cancer, but screening intervals should be extended in HPV-negative women. However, some Markov models predicted that long intervals are associated with an excess risk of cervical cancer. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the real-life risks and benefits of annual Papanicolaou (Pap) screening in HPV-negative women with normal cytology. Women with negative Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) results and normal cytology at the time of inclusion in the Hannover HPV screening trial underwent annual Pap smears for 5 years. A subgroup was randomly selected for retesting with cytology, HC2, and colposcopy 60–68 months after recruitment. Of 4236 women included, 3406 had at least one Pap smear, but only 1185 attended all five annual screening visits. The proportion of women with at least one abnormal smear was 14.4% in 60 months. The probability of abnormal smears increased continuously over time. No case of ≥ CIN2+ was observed during 5 years. Of 605 women selected for subgroup analysis, 292 agreed to be retested (48.3%). The rate of high-risk HPV at 60–68 months was 3.0% (9/296). The long-term risk of high-grade neoplasia after an initial negative HC2 test and normal cytology result was low, while the rate of false-positive abnormal Pap smears was significant and increased constantly over time. Pap smear screening of HPV-negative women more frequently than every 5 years could be potentially harmful and seems to be of little clinical value

  14. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  15. Diffuse, retroperitoneal mesenteric and intrahepatic periportal plexiform neurofibroma in a 5-year-old boy

    We present a case of plexiform neurofibroma involving the retroperitoneum, mesentery, and liver in a 5-year-old boy who underwent evaluation for extent of a palpable left neck mass. The mass had intrathoracic extension with great vessel encasement and extension into the abdomen. Abdominal CT revealed a diffuse low-attenuation non-enhancing mass encasing the retroperitoneal vessels with serpiginous extension into the liver along the portal vein. This spread pattern of plexiform neurofibroma is an unusual manifestation of neurofibromatosis in a young child. (orig.)

  16. A case of spontaneous gastric rupture in a 5 years girl

    D. Salerno

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of spontaneous gastric rupture in a child of 5 years old. The patient reached us in a serious condition; the anamnesis was negative for traumatic events or gastrointestinal disorders. An abdominal X-ray and CT scan revealed free air and fluid in the abdominal cavity, leading to the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal perforation. Submitted to urgent surgery, a rupture of the posterior wall of the stomach was found that was treated with gastrectomy “à la demande”. The surgery follow-up was regular. Morphological and immunohistochemical study showed some muscular abnormalities of the muscular gastric wall.

  17. Short communication. Growth and nodulation of cowpea after 5 years of consecutive composted tannery sludge amendment

    Ana R. L. Miranda; Luis A. P. L. Nunes; Mara L. J. Oliveira; Wanderley J. Melo; Ademir S. F. Araujo

    2014-01-01

    Tannery industry releases high amounts of tannery sludge which are currently composted and used in agricultural soils. The consecutive amendment of such composted tannery sludge (CTS) may affect soil microrganisms, such as rhizobia. In this study, we evaluated the effects of 5-year repeated CTS amendment on growth, nodulation, and yield of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) CTS was applied in different amounts (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 Mg/ha) to a sandy soil. Amendment of CTS increased soil pH, electr...

  18. 5 year Survey of Carcinoma Breast at No.(2) Military Hospital (1987 to 1991)

    Over 250 cases of carcinoma of Breast in different stages, treated by Joint Cancer Clinic (JCC) of No (2) Military Hospital over 5 years (1987 to 1991) were analysed. Different combination of drugs CMF, CMF(P),CMFVP and COFA regimes were given either alone on in combination with local radiation therapy after surgery- lumpectomy or extended simple mastectomy. Hormonal therapy was also added to the standard method of treatment in most of the cases. Results were evaluated in different arms of treatment. The value of immunotherapy and neochemotherapy were also studied

  19. Conservative management of chronic gastric volvulus:44 cases over 5 years

    Yao-Chun; Hsu; Chin-Lin; Perng; Jai-Jen; Tsai; Hwai-Jeng; Lin

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate clinical outcomes of patients with chronic gastric volvulus(GV)who were managed conservatively over a 5-year period.METHODS:A total of 44 consecutive patients with chronic GV,as diagnosed by barium study between October 2002 and July 2008 were investigated.All of these patients received conservative management initially without anatomical correction.Their clinical manifestations,diagnostic work-ups,and clinical outcomes were analyzed.We sought to identify independent risk factors for poor...

  20. Study visit carbon sinks Peugeot. Evaluation after 5 years and perspectives

    In the framework of its project of the climatic change control, PSA Peugeot Citroen, decided to involve in the decrease of the carbon dioxide emissions. In parallel to the vehicles consumption decrease and the biofuels utilization, the group developed since 5 years a pilot project of carbon sink. This project aims to study the impact of a trees plantation, at a big scale, on the atmospheric carbon dioxide fixation. This document is a first evaluation after the phase of trees plantation. (A.L.B.)

  1. Prevalence of obesity among 2- 5 years old children of Amritsar: A comparison of three criteria

    Navdeep Kaur; Sharda Sidhu

    2013-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study of 1879 subjects (949 boys and 930 girls) to define the prevalence of overweight and obesity using three reference standards. The study involved affluent preschool children (2-5 years of age) from six crèches, fifteen play-pen and three public schools of Amritsar city. Weight and height was obtained for each child and body mass index was calculated according to the formula weight (kg)/ height (m)². The prevalence of overweight and obesity was then determined u...

  2. Urinary phthalates from 168 girls and boys measured twice a year during a 5-year period

    Mouritsen, A; Frederiksen, H; Sørensen, K;

    2013-01-01

    . Methods: This was a longitudinal study of 168 healthy children (84 girls) examined every 6 months for 5 years. Serum levels of dehydroepiandrostenedione sulfate (DHEAS), Δ4-androstenedione, testosterone, and urinary morning excretion of 14 phthalate metabolites, corresponding to 7 different phthalate......Background: Little is known about the possible deleterious effects of phthalate exposure on endogenous sex steroid levels in children. Objective: Our objective was to investigate whether urinary phthalate metabolite levels are associated with circulating adrenal androgen levels and age at puberty...

  3. Diffuse, retroperitoneal mesenteric and intrahepatic periportal plexiform neurofibroma in a 5-year-old boy

    Fenton, L.Z. [Dept. of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States); Foreman, N. [Dept. of Oncology, The Children' s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States); Wyatt-Ashmead, J. [Dept. of Pathology, The Children' s Hospital, Denver, CO (United States)

    2001-09-01

    We present a case of plexiform neurofibroma involving the retroperitoneum, mesentery, and liver in a 5-year-old boy who underwent evaluation for extent of a palpable left neck mass. The mass had intrathoracic extension with great vessel encasement and extension into the abdomen. Abdominal CT revealed a diffuse low-attenuation non-enhancing mass encasing the retroperitoneal vessels with serpiginous extension into the liver along the portal vein. This spread pattern of plexiform neurofibroma is an unusual manifestation of neurofibromatosis in a young child. (orig.)

  4. Diarrhea Caused by Rotavirus in Children Less than 5 Years of Age in Hanoi, Vietnam

    Nguyen, Trung Vu; Le Van, Phung; Le Huy, Chinh; Weintraub, Andrej

    2004-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses are the major cause of diarrhea in young children worldwide. From March 2001 to April 2002, 836 children less than 5 years of age were investigated in Hanoi, Vietnam. This included 587 children with diarrhea and 249 age-matched controls. Group A rotavirus was identified in 46.7% of the children with diarrhea and 3.6% of the controls, which was a significant difference. Within the diarrhea group, the highest prevalence was seen in children from 13 to 24 months of age, and t...

  5. Giant parietal lobe infantile gliosarcoma in a 5-year-old child

    Hemant V Savant

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative frequency of pediatric gliosarcoma (GSM is 1.9% among glioblastomas and 0.5% among pediatric central nervous system tumors. A 5-year-old female child came to us with history of fever and loss of appetite since 2 weeks and right sided weakness since 4 days. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large heterogeneously enhancing space occupying lesion in the left parieto-occipital region. A parieto-occipital craniotomy with radical excision of tumor was performed. The patient was given adjuvant therapy following surgery and survived until 9 months following surgery. The etiopathogenesis, treatment modalities and prognosis of GSM is discussed.

  6. Sudden Onset Monoparesis and Dysarthria in a 5-Year-Old boy: A Case Report

    Okhovat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Moyamoya disease (MD is a disorder caused by blocked arteries at the base of the brain. As the normal blood vessels narrow and become blocked, a person may suffer a stroke. The MD mainly affects children, although adults may have the condition. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries. Case Presentation We report a 5-year-old boy, who was presented with sudden right hand monoparesis and dysarthria. Conclusions The patient was investigated with magnetic resonance angiography and diagnosed as MD.

  7. Multi-Year Program Plan 2011-2015

    none,

    2010-12-01

    The Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan, FY 2011 – 2015, outlines the scientific research and technologies developments for the five-year timeframe (beyond the FY 2010 base year) that need to be undertaken to help meet the Administration's goals for reductions in oil consumption and carbon emissions from the ground transport vehicle sector of the economy.

  8. National Cemetery Administration Summary of Veteran and Non-Veteran Interments: FY2000 to FY2012

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Total Veteran and Non-Veteran Interments at National Cemetery, and shown by Interment Type of Casket or Cremain, FY2000 to FY2012. Non-Veteran includes dependents,...

  9. Predictors of heroin relapse: Personality traits, impulsivity, COMT gene Val158met polymorphism in a 5-year prospective study in Shanghai, China.

    Su, Hang; Li, Zhibin; Du, Jiang; Jiang, Haifeng; Chen, Zhikang; Sun, Haiming; Zhao, Min

    2015-12-01

    Relapse is a typical feature of heroin addiction and rooted in genetic and psychological determinants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of personality traits, impulsivity, and COMT gene polymorphism (rs4680) on relapse to heroin use during 5-year follow up. 564 heroin dependent patients were enrolled in compulsory drug rehabilitation center. 12 months prior to their release, personality traits were measured by BIS-11 (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11) and Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). The COMT gene rs4680 polymorphism was genotyped using a DNA sequence detection system. The heroin use status was evaluated for 5 years after discharged. Among the 564 heroin-dependent patients, 500 were followed for 5 years after discharge and 53.0% (n = 265) were considered as relapsed to heroin use according to a strict monitor system. Univariate analysis showed that age, having ever been in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), the total scores and non-planning scores of BIS-11, and the COMT rs4680 gene variants were different between relapse and abstinent groups. Logistic regression analysis showed higher BIS total score, having ever been in MMT and younger first heroin use age are the predictors of relapse to heroin use during 5 years follow-up, and the COMT rs4680 gene had an interaction with BIS scores. Our findings indicated that the impulsive personality traits, methadone use history, and onset age could predict relapse in heroin-dependent patients during 5 year's follow up. The COMT gene showed a moderational effect in part the relationship of impulsivity with heroin relapse. PMID:26345603

  10. Analysis of the 5-year final dataset of the Supernova Legacy Survey project

    The Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) is a program that aims at discovering and photometrically following hundreds of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Its goal is to measure the expansion history of the Universe in order to constrain the nature of the dark energy, namely its equation of state wDE. The survey completed its data taking during summer 2008 after 5 years of program. This thesis work consists in the analysis of these 5 years of SNLS data and the photometry of the 419 Type Ia supernovae discovered and spectroscopically identified. For each supernova, the light-curves are produced in the gMrMiMzM bands, calibrated and fitted with a spectrophotometric model. A new photometric method which does not make use of any pixel re-sampling has also been implemented and tested. This method preserves the pixels statistical properties, and produces this way more accurate flux measurement statistical uncertainties, that can be propagated to cosmological measurements. Both photometry results were checked and compared using calibration stars and supernovae, proving that the accuracy of the new method flux measurement uncertainty is indeed better, and that the photometric accuracy and stability of both techniques are similar. A sample of supernovae with unprecedented statistics and quality is now available for cosmological analysis. With the complement of an external nearby supernovae sample, a measurement within 5% of the dark energy equation of state of dark energy is thus for the first time within reach. (author)

  11. Electroencephalographic (EEG) Photoparoxysmal Responses Under 5 Years of Age: Diagnostic Implications and Peculiarities.

    Binelli, Simona; Ragona, Francesca; Canafoglia, Laura; Freri, Elena; Saletti, Veronica; Casazza, Marina; Gilioli, Isabella; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Visani, Elisa; Panzica, Ferruccio; Granata, Tiziana; Riva, Daria; Franceschetti, Silvana

    2015-11-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) photoparoxysmal response has been little investigated in very young patients. We studied 5055 patients aged less than 5 years with no acquired brain damage, who underwent EEG recording. We determined the prevalence and significance of photoparoxysmal response induced by 1 to 20 Hz photic stimulation. Fifty-three showed photoparoxysmal response and were diagnosed as having Dravet syndrome (11), epileptic encephalopathy with myoclonic seizures (8), neurodegenerative disorders (8), benign idiopathic epilepsies (9), and static disorders with a known or suspected genetic origin (17). Photoparoxysmal response occurred in response to 1 to 5 Hz trains in 41.5% subjects. In most patients with epileptic encephalopathies, photoparoxysmal response was a transient finding: in 53.2%, it failed to be replicated in the recordings performed more than 6 months after initial evaluation. Photoparoxysmal response is rare in patients aged less than 5 years and has some peculiarities such as occurrence with low-frequency stimuli. Its distribution in specific conditions indicates that photoparoxysmal response may be useful in diagnostic workup. PMID:25944474

  12. A 5-Year Investigation of Children's Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Radiation Therapy for Localized Ependymoma

    Purpose: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies have the potential to preserve cognitive outcomes in children with ependymoma; however, functional behavior remains uninvestigated. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intelligence quotient (IQ) and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years after irradiation in children diagnosed with ependymoma. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 123 children with intracranial ependymoma. Mean age at irradiation was 4.60 years (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.85-5.35). Serial neurocognitive evaluations, including an age-appropriate IQ measure and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS), were completed before irradiation, 6 months after treatment, and annually for 5 years. A total of 579 neurocognitive evaluations were included in these analyses. Results: Baseline IQ and VABS were below normative means (P<.05), although within the average range. Linear mixed models revealed stable IQ and VABS across the follow-up period, except for the VABS Communication Index, which declined significantly (P=.015). Annual change in IQ (−.04 points) did not correlate with annual change in VABS (−.90 to +.44 points). Clinical factors associated with poorer baseline performance (P<.05) included preirradiation chemotherapy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement, number and extent of surgical resections, and younger age at treatment. No clinical factors significantly affected the rate of change in scores. Conclusions: Conformal and intensity modulated radiation therapies provided relative sparing of functional outcomes including IQ and adaptive behaviors, even in very young children. Communication skills remained vulnerable and should be the target of preventive and rehabilitative interventions.

  13. Neutron star crustal cooling in KS 1731-260 14.5 years into quiescence

    Merritt, Rachael L; Brown, Edward F; Page, Dany; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Deibel, Alex; Homan, Jeroen; Miller, Jon M; Wijnands, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Crustal cooling of accretion-heated neutron stars provides insight into the stellar interior of neutron stars. The neutron star X-ray transient, KS 1731-260, was in outburst for 12.5 years before returning to quiescence in 2001. We have monitored the cooling of this source since then through Chandra and XMM-Newton observations. Here, we present a 150 ks Chandra observation of KS 1731-260 taken in August 2015, about 14.5 years into quiescence, and 6 years after the previous observation. We find that the neutron star surface temperature is consistent with the previous observation, suggesting that crustal cooling has likely stopped and the crust has reached thermal equilibrium with the core. Using a theoretical crust thermal evolution code, we fit the observed cooling curves and constrain the core temperature (T$_c = 9.35\\pm0.25\\times10^7$ K), composition (Q$_{imp} = 4.4^{+2.2}_{-0.5}$) and level of extra shallow heating required (Q$_{sh} = 1.36\\pm0.18$ MeV/nucleon). We find that the presence of a low thermal co...

  14. Bayesian analysis of white noise levels in the 5-year WMAP data

    Groeneboom, N E; Gorski, K; Huey, G; Jewell, J; Wandelt, B

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new Bayesian method for estimating white noise levels in CMB sky maps, and apply this algorithm to the 5-year WMAP data. We assume that the amplitude of the noise RMS is scaled by a constant value, alpha, relative to a pre-specified noise level. We then derive the corresponding conditional density, P(alpha | s, C_l, d), which is subsequently integrated into a general CMB Gibbs sampler. We first verify our code by analyzing simulated data sets, and then apply the framework to the WMAP data. For the foreground-reduced 5-year WMAP sky maps, we find that the posterior means typically range between alpha=1.005 +- 0.001 and alpha=1.010 +- 0.001 depending on differencing assembly, indicating that the noise level of these maps are underestimated by 0.5-1.0%. The same problem is not observed for the uncorrected WMAP sky maps. The only difference between these two cases is that the nominal white noise level for the foreground-reduced map is specified to be lower than that of the raw maps. This is likely in...

  15. The relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children

    Seyede Zohre Mousavi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Oral stereognosis is the ability to recognize the objects placed in the mouth; this plays a significant role in speech sounds production. Since the children with hearing loss have articulation disorders, this study aimed to clear the relation of hearing loss degrees and oral stereognosis in 5-year-old children.Methods: In this cross-sectional non-invasive study, 40 children of 5-year-old (30 children with different degrees of hearing loss and 10 normal children were involved. Oral steriognostic test was done for all of them and the Mann-Whitney U was used for statistical analysis.Results: There were significant differences between the mean of oral stereognostic ability between the normal children and the children with severe (p<0.01 or profound hearing loss (p=0.05. There was no significant difference between the mean of oral stereognostic ability among the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss compared with together. Besides, there was no significant difference between the mean of the time of diagnosis among all of hearing loss and normal children.Conclusion: The study shows that the children with moderate, severe and profound hearing loss have inefficient oral stereognosis in comparison with the normal children.

  16. A 5-year prospective observational study of the outcomes of international treatment guidelines for Crohn's disease.

    Cullen, Garret

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Therapeutic strategies for patients with Crohn\\'s disease are based on American and European guidelines. High rates of corticosteroid dependency and low remission rates are identified as weaknesses of this therapy and as justification for early introduction of biologic agents (top-down treatment) in moderate\\/severe Crohn\\'s disease. We reviewed outcomes and corticosteroid-dependency rates of patients with moderate-to-severe disease who were treated according to the international guidelines. METHODS: Consecutive patients (102) newly diagnosed with Crohn\\'s disease in 2000-2002 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Severity of disease was scored using the Harvey-Bradshaw Index (HBI). Disease was classified by Montreal classification. Five-year follow-up data were recorded. RESULTS: Seventy-two patients had moderate\\/severe disease at diagnosis (HBI >8). Fifty-four (75%) had nonstricturing, nonpenetrating disease (B1). Sixty-four (89%) received corticosteroids, and 44 (61%) received immunomodulators. Twenty-one patients (29%) received infliximab. Thirty-nine patients (54%) required resection surgery. At a median of 5 years, 66 of 72 (92%) patients with moderate\\/severe disease were in remission (median HBI, 1). Twenty-five patients (35%) required neither surgery nor biologic therapy. CONCLUSIONS: When international treatment guidelines are strictly followed, Crohn\\'s disease patients can achieve high rates of remission and low rates of morbidity at 5 years. Indiscriminate use of biologic agents therefore is not appropriate for all patients with moderate-to-severe disease.

  17. Normal paediatric bone marrow: magnetic resonance imaging appearances from birth to 5 years

    Bone marrow (BM) assessment is an important aspect of paediatric MRI, with the marrow cavity visible on almost every clinical MR examination. In practice, however, assessment for marrow infiltration in paediatric patients can be challenging. Our aim was to review the MRI appearance of normal BM from 0 to 5 years. Consecutive body MR examinations over 7 years were retrospectively reviewed in patients aged 0–5 years. Patients with anticipated BM abnormality were excluded. All patients had imaging of the spine and/or pelvis with T1-weighted (T1)±T2 with fat saturation, post-contrast T1-weighted, diffusion-weighted or out-of-phase sequences. Nineteen patients were included: nine (47%) infants, 11 (58%) boys, mean age 18.2 months (range 1 day to 3 years and 10 months). On T1 imaging, 69% infant marrow sites and 24% in children >1 year were isointense, the remainder were hyperintense. One hundred per cent BM was T2 fat saturation hyperintense. Enhancement following contrast was seen in 16% of BM sites. Restricted diffusion was seen in 100% infant BM and 50% BM in children >1 year. On out-of-phase imaging, no signal loss was seen in infants, and 21% BM in children >1 year showed signal loss. Due to normal age-related differences in BM histology, MRI for marrow assessment in infants and young children can be misleading and may mimic marrow infiltration.

  18. CLINICO – EPIDEMIOLOGY OF U TI IN UNDER 5 YEARS OF AGE IN CHILDREN

    Sonali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are a common , potentially serious , and often occult bacterial infections of childhood . UTI is more frequent in females than males at all ages with the exception of the neonatal period . Urinary tract infections imply invasion of urinary tract by pathogens which may involve the upper or lower urinary tract depending on the infection in kidney , bladder and urethra . OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of UTI in febrile children be low 5years of age and to know the aetiological profile of UTI among the same group of children with fever . METHODS: This cross sectional observational study included all febrile children from one month to 5years of age , admitted in Pediatric ward in MGM Me dical College , Kishanganj , Bihar . RESULTS: Overall incidence rate of UTI in the present study was 6% with maximum incidence in children <2years of age . Among culture positive cases majority (50% grew E . coli . DMSA revealed renal cortical scarring in 42 . 8 5% cases following UTI . CONCLUSION: From the present study it can be concluded that UTI is a common bacterial infection in infant and children . Rapid evaluation and treatment of UTI is important to prevent renal parenchymal damage and renal scarring or ren al failure .

  19. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

    1988-11-01

    The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

  20. Assessment of dental caries predictors in 6-year-old school children - results from 5-year retrospective cohort study

    Masood Mohd; Yusof Norashikin; Hassan Mohamed Ibrahim; Jaafar Nasruddin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This was a retrospective cohort study undertaken to assess the rate and pattern of dental caries development in 6-year-old school children followed-up for a period of 5 years, and to identify baseline risk factors that were associated with 5 years caries experience in Malaysian children. Methods This 5-years retrospective cohort study comprised primary school children initially aged 6 years in 2004. Caries experience of each child was recorded annually using World Health O...

  1. Evaluation of 5-Year Trends in Knee Society Scores Stratified by Comorbidities: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study.

    Jauregui, Julio J; Issa, Kimona; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Harwin, Steven F; Given, Kristin; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) are reliable procedures for treating end-stage knee osteoarthritis with excellent long-term outcomes. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate temporal trends of Knee Society Scores (KSS) after TKA and to identify potential demographic and comorbid factors that affect these outcomes. This prospective study evaluated 281 patients (108 men and 173 women) with a mean age of 66 years (range, 39-80 years) who underwent primary TKA (minimum follow-up 5 years). During each follow-up visit, KS objective, function, and total scores were evaluated. The effects of different demographics and comorbidities on outcomes were further analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Following TKA, peak mean KSS were observed at 1-year follow-up (mean, 92 points), after which there was no significant difference in scores at 5 years compared with 1-year follow-up (mean, 92 points). KS function scores were observed to be unchanged from preoperative levels (mean, 53 points) and at 6 weeks (mean, 56 points). These were significantly higher at 3 months (mean, 78 points) and reached a maximum mean peak at 1 year (mean, 85 points). KS objective scores increased earlier than function scores. The demographic variables and comorbidities that demonstrated a significantly negative impact in KS function scores were increased age, female gender, higher body mass index, and several medical comorbidities including immunological and neurological disease, and neoplasm. Race was the only variable that significantly decreased the KS objective scores. KSS after TKA follow temporal trends with scores initially unchanged from preoperative levels for the objective component, but the scores increased for the functional component. All components demonstrated higher levels compared with preoperative scores by 3 months and peaked at 1-year follow-up. At 5-year follow-up, all mean KSS were unchanged relative to peak scores seen at 1 year. Various patient

  2. Prognosis for Emergency Physician with Substance Abuse Recovery: 5-year Outcome Study

    John S. Rose

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency physicians (EPs are reported to have a higher rate of substance use disorder (SUD than most specialties, although little is known about their prognosis. We examined the outcomes of emergency physician compared to other physicians in the treatment of substance use disorders in Physician Health Programs (PHP. Methods: This study used the dataset from a 5-year, longitudinal, cohort study involving 904 physicians with diagnoses of SUD consecutively admitted to one of 16 state PHPs between 1995 and 2001. We compared 56 EPs to 724 other physicians. Main outcome variables were rates of relapse, successful completion of monitoring, and return to clinical practice. Results: EPs had a higher than expected rate of SUD (odds ratio [OR] 2.7 confidence interval [CI]: 2.1–3.5, p,0.001. Half of each group (49% of EPs and 50% of the others enrolled in a PHP due to alcohol-related problems. Over a third of each group (38% of EPs and 34% of the others enrolled due to opioid use. During monitoring by the PHPs, 13% of EPs had at least one positive drug test compared to 22% of the other physicians; however, this difference was not significant (p¼0.13. At the end of the 5-year follow-up period, 71% of EPs and 64% of other physicians had completed their contracts and were no longer required to be monitored (OR 1.4 [CI: 0.8-2.6], p ¼ 0.31. The study found that the proportion of EPs (84% continuing their medical practice was generally as high as that of other physicians (72% (OR 2.0 [CI: 1.0–4.1], p ¼ 0.06. Conclusion: In the study EPs did very well in the PHPs with an 84% success rate in completion and return to clinical practice at 5 years. Of the 3 outcome variables measured, rates of relapse, successful completion of monitoring, and return to clinical practice, EPs had a high rate of success on all variables compared to the other physician cohort. These data support the conclusion that EM physicians do well following treatment of SUD

  3. Long-term efficacy of risedronate: a 5-year placebo-controlled clinical experience

    Sorensen, O H; Crawford, G M; Mulder, H; Hosking, D J; Gennari, C; Mellstrom, D; Pack, S; Wenderoth, D; Cooper, C; Reginster, J-Y

    2003-01-01

    Limited placebo-controlled data are available to assess the long-term fracture efficacy of bisphosphonates. In order to determine the effects of 5 years of risedronate treatment, we extended a 3-year, placebo-controlled vertebral fracture study in osteoporotic women for an additional 2 years; women...... who entered the extension study continued to receive 5 mg risedronate or placebo according to the original randomization, with maintenance of blinding. End points included vertebral and nonvertebral fracture assessments, bone mineral density measurements, and changes in biochemical markers of bone...... turnover. A total of 265 women (placebo, 130; 5 mg risedronate, 135) entered the study extension and 220 (83%) completed the additional 2 years. Fracture results observed in the study extension were consistent with those observed in the first 3 years. The risk of new vertebral fractures was significantly...

  4. Thrombolysis of the basilar artery: 5-year results from the Saarland stroke registry

    Acute thrombosis of the basilar artery has a fatal outcome if left untreated. The relatively good prognosis with intra-arterial thrombolysis makes it the therapy of choice for acute basilar thrombosis. In the Saarland stroke registry, we analyzed 47 patients with angiographically proven basilar artery thrombosis within the last 5 years. We observed a better outcome in patients with good income, with recanalization, and a short time between onset of symptoms and start of thrombolysis. The complications, such as intracerebral bleedings, occurred only in the group treated with rt-PA. Intra-arterial thrombolysis with urokinase or rt-PA is a relatively safe therapy, but should be performed in neuroradiological centers. With progressing symptoms the therapeutic window can be stretched up to 12 h, but coma lasting for more than 4 h is related to a bad outcome. (orig.)

  5. Torpedo maculopathy with an anisometropic amblyopia in a 5-year-old Caucasian girl: case report

    Marco Dutra-Medeiros

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report a clinical case of asymptomatic female Caucasian children with torpedo maculopathy. A 5-year-old girl was referred to our clinic for routine evaluation. The ophthalmic examination revealed best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 in both eyes, without any changes in the biomicroscopy. Fundus examination showed normal findings in one eye, whereas in the contralateral eye it disclosed, in the temporal sector of the macular region, a whitish, atrophic, oval chorioretinal lesion with clearly defined margins. Posterior evaluations documented the stability of the lesion. Torpedo maculopathy diagnosis is based on its characteristic shape and peculiar location. The differential diagnosis has to be estabilished versus choroidal lesions (melanoma and nevus, congenital or iatrogenic hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and particularly versus the congenital pigmented lesions associated with Gardner's syndrome.

  6. Delayed tumor resection in a 5-year-old child with bilateral Wilms tumor.

    Carmichael, Samuel P; Pulliam, Joseph F; D'Orazio, John A

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a 5-year-old girl whose abdominal pain and distension were caused by Wilms tumor of the kidney. Because of the bilateral nature of her disease, she was spared biopsy or initial nephrectomy as part of her treatment course. Rather, she was treated presumptively for Wilms tumor based primarily on radiologic findings. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy consisting of vincristine, dactinomycin and doxorubicin was given to facilitate nephron-sparing surgery for tumor resection. Her initial chemotherapeutic course was complicated by tumor lysis syndrome manifested by elevated serum uric acid and was treated effectively with hyperhydration and alkalization of intravenous fluids. The patient's disease responded well to chemotherapy, and she underwent successful tumor excision after 12 weeks of chemotherapy. The resected tumor was identified as anaplastic Wilms tumor, illustrating that pathologic identification of Wilms tumor is possible even after multiple cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and marked tumor shrinkage. PMID:24964423

  7. The magnetosphere, ionosphere, and atmosphere as a system - Dynamics Explorer 5 years later

    Hoffman, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Dynamics Explorer (DE) program summarizes its accomplishments during the first 5 years since the launch of the two DE satellites. This introduction to six review articles provides background information and a brief history of the program, especially citing the contributions of many people to its development. The principal investigators who had primary responsibility to implement the program are listed, together with the instruments they provided. Orbital information and approaches and constraints to data acquisition are explained. The brief description of the ground data processing and analysis system provides information on access to data catalogs and data sets. Each review article is then placed in the context of the categories of scientific objectives of the program.

  8. [Research review on apoplectic urinary incontinence treated with acupuncture-moxibustion in recent 5 years].

    Song, Feng-Jun; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Shi-Li; Fang, Jun-Hui; Liu, Hai-Fei

    2011-10-01

    The relevant documents of apoplectic urinary incontinence treated with acupuncture-moxibustion in recent 5 years have been collated and analyzed in aspect of current situation of acupuncture-moxibustion treatment, acupoint selection, manipulation and problems. The result indicates that the main therapy for this disease is acupuncture-moxibustion combined with electroacupuncture or other methods, and the acupuncture-moxibustion therapy is superior to the medicine. The clinical research has made considerable progress and the great importance has been attached to the research method. The main problems are low credibility of total quality, inconsistent curative course, incomplete case of illness, missing of quality control, disordered standards of clinical diagnosis and curative effect evaluation, varied observation index and phatic discussion of mechanism. It is suggested to carry on scientific research, enhance research lever, expand mind, innovate ideas, and establish uniformed standards of diagnosis and curative effect evaluation and observation index. PMID:22043698

  9. The thermoregulatory theory of yawning: what we know from over 5 years of research.

    Gallup, Andrew C; Eldakar, Omar T

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 5 years numerous reports have confirmed and replicated the specific brain cooling and thermal window predictions derived from the thermoregulatory theory of yawning, and no study has found evidence contrary to these findings. Here we review the comparative research supporting this model of yawning among homeotherms, while highlighting a recent report showing how the expression of contagious yawning in humans is altered by seasonal climate variation. The fact that yawning is constrained to a thermal window of ambient temperature provides unique and compelling support in favor of this theory. Heretofore, no existing alternative hypothesis of yawning can explain these results, which have important implications for understanding the potential functional role of this behavior, both physiologically and socially, in humans and other animals. In discussion we stress the broader applications of this work in clinical settings, and counter the various criticisms of this theory. PMID:23293583

  10. Stable glomerular filtration rate in normotensive IDDM patients with stable microalbuminuria. A 5-year prospective study

    Mathiesen, E R; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Hommel, E; Deckert, T; Parving, H H

    1997-01-01

    patients with persistent microalbuminuria (mean urinary albumin excretion [UAE] 84 mg/24 h [range 30-300]) were followed prospectively for 5 years of clinical examinations that included the measurement of GFR (51Cr-labeled EDTA clearance) at least once a year. The mean GFR at baseline was 120 +/- 18 ml x...... min-1.1 x 73 m-2. RESULTS: Using multiple regression analysis, the rate of decline in GFR was independently correlated to onset of diabetic nephropathy (P < 0.001) and systolic blood pressure (sBP) at baseline (P < 0.05). Increase in UAE was correlated to the mean HbA1c during the observation period...

  11. Superselective radioembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma: 5-year results of a prospective study.

    Rösler, H; Triller, J; Baer, H U; Geiger, L; Beer, H F; Becker, C; Blumgart, L H

    1994-10-01

    Twenty patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were followed up to 5 years after transarterial radiotherapy with 90Y-resin particles. Diagnostic radioembolizations of 99mTc-macroaggregates facilitated scintigraphic assessment of activity distribution, dose evaluation and final procedural verification. The overall survival rates were 56, 38 and 14% (after 1, 2 and 3 years, resp.). Patients with unifocal HCC and a single feeding artery (n = 7) even presented 83, 67 and 40% (2 alive after 2.75 and 4 years). With multiple arteries (n = 7), the longest survival was 26 months. Patients with multifocal HCC survived up to 33 months after selective radioembolization. Quality of life was improved in all. Survival was positively correlated with absorbed dose but residual/recurrent tumour occurred even after > or = 300 Gy. Post-treatment symptoms were minimal (35 applications), pulmonary shunt rates were correctly predicted and pulmonary complications avoided. PMID:7997379

  12. Superselective radioembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma: 5-year results of a prospective study

    Roesler, H. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)); Triller, J. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)); Baer, H.U. (Clinic of Visceral Surgery, Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)); Geiger, L. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)); Beer, H.F. (Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)); Becker, C. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)); Blumgart, L.H. (Clinic of Visceral Surgery, Paul Scherrer-Inst., Villigen (Switzerland))

    1994-10-01

    Twenty patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) were followed up to 5 years after transarterial radiotherapy with [sup 90]Y-resin particles. Diagnostic radioembolizations of [sup 99m]Tc-macroaggregates facilitated scintigraphic assessment of activity distribution, dose evaluation and final procedural verification. The overall survival rates were 56, 38 and 14% (after 1, 2 and 3 years, resp.). Patients with unifocal HCC and a single feeding artery (n = 7) even presented 83, 67 and 40% (2 alive after 2.75 and 4 years). With multiple arteries (n = 7), the longest survival was 26 months. Patients with multifocal HCC survived up to 33 months after selective radioembolization. Quality of life was improved in all. Survival was positively correlated with absorbed dose but residual/recurrent tumor occurred even after [>=]300 Gy. Post-treatment symptoms were minimal (35 applications), pulmonary shunt rates were correctly predicted and pulmonary complications avoided. (orig.)

  13. Montelukast reduces asthma exacerbations in 2- to 5-year-old children with intermittent asthma

    Bisgaard, Hans; Zielen, Stefen; Garcia-Garcia, María Luz;

    2005-01-01

    The PREVIA study was designed to investigate the role of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, in the prevention of viral-induced asthma exacerbations in children aged 2 to 5 years with a history of intermittent asthma symptoms. The study was a 12-month multicenter, double-blind, parallel......-group study of patients with asthma exacerbations associated with respiratory infections and minimal symptoms between episodes. Patients were randomized to receive oral montelukast 4 or 5 mg (depending on age) (n = 278) or placebo (n = 271) once per day for 12 months. Caregivers recorded children's symptoms......, beta-agonist use, and health care resource use in a diary card. Over 12 months of therapy, montelukast significantly reduced the rate of asthma exacerbations by 31.9% compared with placebo. The average rate of exacerbation episodes per patient was 1.60 episodes per year on montelukast compared with 2...

  14. Central venous catheters for chemotherapy of solid tumors--our results in the last 5 years.

    Zganjer, Mirko; Cizmić, Ante; Butković, Diana; Matolić, Martina; Karaman-Ilić, Maja; Stepan, Jasminka

    2008-09-01

    Central venous catheters provide an easy access for intravenous medications. Having a central line in place will relieve a child from the discomfort and danger of multiple regular intravenous lines for chemotherapy. The use of indwelling central venous catheters has become commonplace in the management of children undergoing oncological treatment. There are two types of central lines commonly used. There are Broviac catheters and Port-A-Cath (PAC) catheters. In the last 5 years we inserted 194 catheters in 175 children. We inserted 121 Broviac catheters and 73 PAC catheters. During the follow up of 39382 catheter days 44 complications were observed. In Broviac group the median follow up was 155 days and in PAC group was 230 days. We observed differences in the incidence between two devices. In Broviac group infections were more frequent and in PAC group other complications were more frequent than infections. PMID:18982750

  15. Transgenic plants: a 5-year update on oral antipathogen vaccine development.

    Hernández, Marisela; Rosas, Gabriela; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Fragoso, Gladis; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Sciutto, Edda

    2014-12-01

    The progressive interest in transgenic plants as advantageous platforms for the production and oral delivery of vaccines has led to extensive research and improvements in this technology over recent years. In this paper, the authors examine the most significant advances in this area, including novel approaches for higher yields and better containment, and the continued evaluation of new vaccine prototypes against several infectious diseases. The use of plants to deliver vaccine candidates against viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic parasites within the last 5 years is discussed, focusing on innovative expression strategies and the immunogenic potential of new vaccines. A brief section on the state of the art in mucosal immunity is also included. PMID:25158836

  16. Atlantoaxial rotatory subluxation as a cause of torticollis in a 5-year-old girl.

    Bagouri, Elmunzar; Deshmukh, Sandeep; Lakshmanan, Palaniappan

    2014-01-01

    Many patients present to the emergency department complaining of a sore or stiff neck and lateral flexion of the neck with contralateral rotation. Under the pressure of the breaching time and busy shifts some of the patients are discharged to the care of their general practitioners without adequate investigations. While most of the cases are due to benign causes, torticollis can be due to many congenital and acquired pathologies, some of which may need further investigation and urgent management. Atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), tumours of the base of the skull and infections are among these causes. Delayed diagnosis may lead to worsening neurology and complicate the management. We report a case of a 5-year-old girl who presented to our fracture clinic with a fractured clavicle and torticollis; her subsequent investigations confirmed the diagnosis of AAS. Our patient responded to non-operative treatment and improved with no neurological complications. PMID:24832710

  17. A case of ocular thelaziasis in a 2.5 years old Holstein heifer

    Mousa Daradka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 2.5-years-old, Holstein lactating dairy cow was presented to the Veterinary Health Center with severe conjunctivitis and exuberant granulation tissue formation of the left eye. Upon close examination of the eye, a 2-cm long slender-shaped nematode was found in the conjunctival sac. The nematode was examined by a veterinary parasitologist and determined to be Thelazia species. The exuberant granulation tissue was surgically removed and a total of 0.5 mL of 1% levamisole was injected subconjunctivally. Levamesole was also injected subcutaneously at a dose of 10 mg/kg of body weight and repeated after 15 days. The cow made a complete recovery within 25 days following treatment. This is the first case report of ocular thelaziasis in dairy cattle in Jordan.

  18. A 5-year experience of the changing management of ectopic pregnancy.

    Berry, Janet; Davey, Mark; Hon, Mei-See; Behrens, Renée

    2016-07-01

    This retrospective audit reviewed all ectopic pregnancies over a 5-year period in a district general hospital setting. Of 215 ectopic pregnancies identified, notes were available for 208 (97%). 202 cases were determined to have been diagnosed and managed as ectopic pregnancies. Six cases were excluded as they were pregnancies of unknown location managed as such. The proportion of patients managed non-surgically has increased following the introduction of our consultant-led early pregnancy assessment unit from 25% prior to 31% currently. The success rates have improved in both those managed expectantly (50%-73%) and those with methotrexate (75%-90%). There has been a corresponding drop in those managed surgically from 75% to 69%, and a reduction in negative laparoscopies from 13% to 6%. Provided recommended criteria and follow-up are adhered to, non-surgical management has been shown to have comparative safety to traditional surgical management with acceptable efficacy and patient acceptability. PMID:27012598

  19. Advanced paternal age and mortality of offspring under 5 years of age

    Urhoj, S K; Jespersen, Louise Norman; Nissen, Marie;

    2014-01-01

    and external causes. What is known already: Advanced paternal age has previously been associated with adverse reproductive outcomes and some long term health problems in the offspring. This is possibly due to specific point mutations, a condition known to increase in the sperm with increasing paternal......Study question: Do children born to fathers of advanced age have an increased risk of dying before the age of 5 years? Summary answer: Children born to fathers aged 40 years or more have an increased risk of dying in early childhood due to an excess risk of fatal congenital anomalies, malignancies...... Labour Market Research, the Medical Birth Registry and the Registry of Causes of Death was linked using the unique civil registry number. Hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to estimate the risk of under-five mortality. The effect of paternal age was examined using restricted...

  20. Cardiovascular risk factors and 5-year mortality in the Copenhagen Stroke Study

    Kammersgaard, Lars Peter; Olsen, Tom Skyhøj

    2005-01-01

    Cox proportional hazards analyses adjusted for age, gender, stroke severity, and risk factor profile. RESULTS: In Kaplan-Meier analyses atrial fibrillation (AF), ischemic heart disease, diabetes, and previous stroke were associated with increased mortality, while smoking and alcohol intake were...... associated with decreased mortality. No association was found for hypertension or intermittent claudication. In the final Cox proportional hazard model predictors of 5-year mortality were AF (hazard ratio, HR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.7), diabetes (HR 1.3; 95% CI 1.0-1.6), smoking (HR 1.2; 95% CI 1.0-1.4), and...... previous stroke (HR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1-1.7), after adjustment for age, gender, and stroke severity. CONCLUSIONS: AF, diabetes, smoking, and previous stroke significantly affect long-term survival. Although smoking and daily alcohol consumption appeared to be associated with improved survival in the univariate...

  1. "Growth Chart Study in Children Under 5 Years Old in Rural Area of Khoramabad Province"

    F Majlesi

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Growth chart is the best measure for weight monitoring of children. Most factors that affect child heath show their effect on child weight. This cross sectional and descriptive analytical study was achieved to estimate malnutrition prevalence and effective factors in children under 5 years old in rural area of Khoramabad province. 555 girls and 570 boys were chosen from health houses by cluster sampling. Data were gathered through questionnaires. verbal interviews and child weighing. Nutritional status was estimated via weight/age index and the data were analysed by chi-square test. The results show 7.7% malnutrition among the children in this area. Factors that influence the nutritional status were: Frequency of diarrhea and acute respiratory infection, birth weight, duration of breast feeding and milk formula.

  2. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    Pinilla, Severin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU. We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  3. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients diagnosed with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: a 5-year review.

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this article was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients diagnosed with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with PNES in a 5-year period. RESULTS: Fifty patients with PNES were identified, giving an estimated incidence of 0.91\\/100,000 per annum. Thirty-eight were included for review, 15 of whom were male (39%). Eighteen patients had been diagnosed with epilepsy as well as PNES (47%). We demonstrated a gender difference in our patients, with males having higher seizure frequencies, more antiepileptic drug use, and a longer interval before diagnosis of PNES. Females were diagnosed with other conversion disorders more often than males. Impaired social function was observed in PNES, as was resistance to psychological interventions with a subsequent poor response to treatments. CONCLUSIONS: PNES remains a difficult condition to treat, and may affect males in proportions higher than those described in previous studies.

  4. Highlights from the Fermi Large Area Telescope after 5 years of operations

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has been exploring the high-energy γ-ray sky since its launch on June 11, 2008. After 5 years of essentially flawless operations, the LAT collected more than 800 million γ rays from 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV. With its uniform coverage of the sky, the LAT allowed the first high statistics observations of γ-ray sources of known classes as well as the discovery of new emitters. The LAT also allowed a detailed study of the diffuse γ-ray emission, which constitutes roughly 90% of the LAT photons, and constrains cosmic-ray production and propagation in our own Galaxy. In this talk I will review the status and the performance of the LAT and describe some of the most important scientific results

  5. Symptomatic imperforate Cowper's syringocele in a 5-year-old boy

    Background. Cowper's syringocele is a rare anomaly in childhood. It is caused by the obstruction of the duct of Cowper's gland. Depending of the type and size of the syringocele, and the age of the patient, the treatment for symptomatic lesions could be endoscopic deroofing or open perineal surgery. Case report. We report a case of symptomatic imperforate syringocele in a 5-year-old boy. Although the syringocele are usually best shown on voiding cysto-urethrography, there was not any detectable extrinsic impression or filling defect in the bulbar urethra. Ultrasonography guided perineal puncture with contrast filling of the cystic lesion was used to detect the connection of the Cowper's duct to the ventral surface of bulbar urethra. Conclusions. In imperforate syringocele, ultrasonography could be useful imaging technique especially in young patients, to evaluate urethra and perineal lesions and for percutaneous guided procedures. (author)

  6. Predictors and consequences of childhood depressive symptoms: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Nolen-Hoeksema, S; Girgus, J S; Seligman, M E

    1992-08-01

    A 5-year longitudinal study investigated the interrelationships among children's experiences of depressive symptoms, negative life events, explanatory style, and helplessness behaviors in social and achievement situations. The results revealed that early in childhood, negative events, but not explanatory style, predicted depressive symptoms; later in childhood, a pessimistic explanatory style emerged as a significant predictor of depressive symptoms, alone and in conjunction with negative events. When children suffered periods of depression, their explanatory styles not only deteriorated but remained pessimistic even after their depression subsided, presumably putting them at risk for future episodes of depression. Some children seem repeatedly prone to depressive symptoms over periods of at least 2 years. Depressed children consistently showed helpless behaviors in social and achievement settings. PMID:1500598

  7. Status of medical education reform at Saga Medical School 5 years after introducing PBL.

    Oda, Yasutomo; Koizumi, Shunzo

    2008-03-01

    In Japan, problem-based learning (PBL) is a relatively new method of educating medical students that is reforming the face of medical education throughout the world, including Asia. It shifts from teacher-centered learning strategies (for example, lectures in large auditoriums) to student-centered, self-directed learning methods (for example, active discussions and problem-solving by students in small groups under the guidance of faculty tutors). Upon a recommendation by the Japan Model Core Curriculum, Saga Medical School introduced a PBL curriculum 5 years ago. A full PBL curriculum was adopted from the McMaster model through Hawaii. A description of how PBL was implemented into the 3rd and 4th year (Phase III curriculum) is given. The overall result has been good. Students who experienced PBL had increased scores on the National Medical License Exam, and Saga increased its ranking from 56th to 19th of the 80 medical schools in Japan. A key step was introduction of the educational scaffolding in PBL Step 0. Students were allowed to see page one of the PBL case, containing the chief complaint, on the weekend before meeting in small groups. Despite a perceived overall benefit to student learning, symptoms of superficial discussions by students have been observed recently. How this may be caused by poor case design is discussed. Other problems, including "silent tutors" and increased faculty workload, are discussed. It is concluded that after 5 years, Saga's implementation of a PBL curriculum has been successful. However, many additional issues, including motivation of students and preparation for PBL in the first 2 years, must still be resolved in the future. This is the first description of the positive and negative outcomes associated with the reform of medical education and the introduction of PBL to a traditional medical school curriculum in Japan. PMID:18364287

  8. Antenatal hydronephrosis: Negative predictive value of normal postnatal ultrasound - a 5-year study

    Moorthy, I.; Joshi, N.; Cook, J.V. E-mail: jcook@epsom-sthelier.nhs.uk; Warren, M

    2003-12-01

    AIM: To determine whether normal postnatal ultrasound, as part of a strict screening protocol for the detection and follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis, effectively excludes the majority of babies with congenital urinary tract abnormalities that would otherwise present with a urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all babies who had postnatal follow-up of antenatally detected hydronephrosis over a 5-year period at our institution, a district general Trust with a specialist paediatric unit. We then studied all babies presenting with urinary tract infection before their first birthday to our institution over the same period. By cross-referencing these two study groups we were able to determine which babies developed a urinary tract infection having been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. RESULTS: Four hundred and twenty-five babies had postnatal follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis. Of these, 284 were investigated with ultrasound alone. In the same 5-year period, 230 babies presented with urinary tract infection before their first birthday. Only three of these babies had been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. The negative predictive value of a normal postnatal ultrasound was therefore 98.9% (281/284) for babies who subsequently presented with a urinary tract infection before their first birthday. CONCLUSION: Careful antenatal and postnatal ultrasound with strict protocols is effective in detecting congenital renal tract abnormalities. Infants discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound are highly unlikely to still have an undetected urinary tract abnormality. We suggest that all babies with antenatal hydronephrosis are started on prophylactic antibiotics at birth, pending further investigation. All babies without features of severe obstruction antenatally should have their postnatal ultrasound delayed for a month. We recommend selective use of micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG

  9. Antenatal hydronephrosis: Negative predictive value of normal postnatal ultrasound - a 5-year study

    AIM: To determine whether normal postnatal ultrasound, as part of a strict screening protocol for the detection and follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis, effectively excludes the majority of babies with congenital urinary tract abnormalities that would otherwise present with a urinary tract infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all babies who had postnatal follow-up of antenatally detected hydronephrosis over a 5-year period at our institution, a district general Trust with a specialist paediatric unit. We then studied all babies presenting with urinary tract infection before their first birthday to our institution over the same period. By cross-referencing these two study groups we were able to determine which babies developed a urinary tract infection having been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. RESULTS: Four hundred and twenty-five babies had postnatal follow-up of antenatal hydronephrosis. Of these, 284 were investigated with ultrasound alone. In the same 5-year period, 230 babies presented with urinary tract infection before their first birthday. Only three of these babies had been previously discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound. The negative predictive value of a normal postnatal ultrasound was therefore 98.9% (281/284) for babies who subsequently presented with a urinary tract infection before their first birthday. CONCLUSION: Careful antenatal and postnatal ultrasound with strict protocols is effective in detecting congenital renal tract abnormalities. Infants discharged after normal postnatal ultrasound are highly unlikely to still have an undetected urinary tract abnormality. We suggest that all babies with antenatal hydronephrosis are started on prophylactic antibiotics at birth, pending further investigation. All babies without features of severe obstruction antenatally should have their postnatal ultrasound delayed for a month. We recommend selective use of micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG

  10. Henoch schonlein purpura--a 5-year review and proposed pathway.

    Louise Watson

    Full Text Available Henoch Schonlein Purpura (HSP is the commonest systemic vasculitis of childhood typically presenting with a palpable purpuric rash and frequently involving the renal system. We are the first group to clinically assess, critically analyse and subsequently revise a nurse led monitoring pathway for this condition.A cohort of 102 children presenting with HSP to a secondary/tertiary level UK paediatric hospital over a five year period, were monitored using a nurse led care pathway. Using this cohort, the incidence (6.21 cases per 100,000 children per year and natural disease course of HSP nephritis (46% initial renal inflammation; 9% subsequent renal referral; 1% renal biopsy and immunosuppression was determined. Older patients were at higher risk of requiring a renal referral (renal referral 12.3 (8.4-13.5 years vs. normal outcome 6.0 (3.7-8.5 years; p<0.01. A normal urinalysis on day 7 had a 97% (confidence interval 90 to 99% negative predictive value in predicting a normal renal outcome.Using this data and existing literature base, The Alder Hey Henoch Schonlein Purpura Pathway was developed, a revised pathway for the screening of poor renal outcome in HSP. This is based on a six-month monitoring period for all patients presenting with HSP, which importantly prioritises patients according to the urine findings on day 7 and thus intensively monitors those at higher risk of developing nephritis. The pathway could be easily adapted for use in different settings and resources.The introduction of a standardised pathway for the monitoring of HSP will facilitate the implementation of disease registries to further our understanding of the condition and permit future clinical trials.

  11. Disability in young adults following major trauma: 5 year follow up of survivors

    Connelly James B

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injuries are a major cause of mortality and morbidity in young people. Despite this, the long-term consequences for young survivors of severe injury are relatively unexplored. Methods Population based cohort study involving 5 year post injury structured interview of all cases of major trauma (Injury Severity Score > 15 identified retrospectively for 12 month period (1988 to 1989 within former Yorkshire Health Authority area of the United Kingdom. Results 125 individuals aged 11–24 years at time of injury were identified. Of these, 109 (87% were interviewed. Only 20% (95% CI 14–29% of those interviewed reported no disability. Mean Office of Population Census and Surveys (OPCS disability score of the remainder was 7.5 (median 5.8, range 0.5 to 19.4. The most commonly encountered areas of disability were behaviour (54%, 95% CI 45–63%, intellectual functioning (39%, 95% CI 31–49% and locomotion (29%, 95% CI 22–39%. Many respondents reported that their daily lives were adversely affected by their health problems for example, causing problems with work, 54% (95% CI 45–63%, or looking after the home, 28% (95% CI 21–38%. Higher OPCS scores were usually but not always associated with greater impact on daily activities. The burden of caring responsibilities fell largely on informal carers. 51% (95% CI 42–61% of those interviewed would have liked additional help to cope with their injury and disability. Conclusion The study has revealed significant disability amongst a cohort of young people 5 years post severe injury. Whilst many of these young people were coping well with the consequences of their injuries, others reported continuing problems with the activities of daily life. The factors underpinning the young people's differing experiences and social outcome should be explored.

  12. Otologic surgeries in National Ear Care Centre, Kaduna, Nigeria: A 5 years review

    Grema Umar Sambo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Otologic surgeries that endure are based on a detailed knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the temporal bone. Ear surgeries are challenging to most otolaryngologists practicing in Nigeria. The aim was to present a 5 years review of indications, types, complications, success, and limitations of the ear surgeries at the study center. Materials and Methods: A 5 years retrospective review of all the otologic surgeries are done under general and local anesthesia from July, 2009 to July, 2014. Results: There were 1067 patients who had ear, nose, and throat surgeries within the period under review, out of which 68 were ear surgeries. Prevalence was 6.37%, there were 25 (37% males and 43 (63% females, male: female 1:1.7. Age ranged from 1 to 58 years, mean age 21 ± 6 years. Chronic suppurative otitis media was the most common diagnosis 39 (57.4% and indication for tympanoplasty 31 (46.6%. Meatocanaloplasty was the least with 2 (2.9%, mastoidectomy 7 (10.3%, myringotomy and grommet insertion 11 (16.2%, excisional biopsy 7 (10.3%, foreign body removal 4 (5.90%, tympanomastoidectomy 3 (4.40%, and pinnaplasty 3 (4.40%. Forty-one (60.3% achieved resolution of symptoms while 8 (11.8% had persistence of symptoms. One (1.5% had revision surgery. The success rate is about 60.3% within the period under review. Postoperative complications (facial nerve paralysis, persistence discharge from the mastoid cavity, worsened deafness, postauricular fistula were seen in 14 (20.6%. While 4 (5.9% were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Ear surgeries are still underdeveloped when compared to nose and throat surgeries in our center. Complication (chronic suppurative otitis media was the most common indication for ear surgery. Provision of adequate training facilities, especially in the field of otology and review of the training curriculum for otorhinolaryngology residency in Nigeria is indispensable.

  13. FY-2E Delivered And FY-3A Performs Well

    2009-01-01

    @@ The FY-2E meteorological satellite was delivered to China Meteorological Administration (CMA) on May 19, 2009. Developed by Shanghai Academy of Spacefiight Technology (SAST), a subsidiary of CASC, the satellite was launched atop a LM-3A from Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC). The satellite passed in-orbit testing on February 28,2009 and all the onboard systems performed well when the satellite was in the Earth's shadow.

  14. FY2002 Progress Summary Program Plan, Statement of Work and Deliverables for Development of High Average Power Diode-Pumped Solid State Lasers, and Complementary Technologies, for Applications in Energy and Defense

    Bayramian, A; Bibeau, C; Beach, R; Behrendt, B; Ebbers, C; Latkowski, J; Meier, W; Payne, S; Perkins, J; Schaffers, K; Skulina, K; Ditmire, T; Kelly, J; Waxer, L; Rudi, P; Randles, M; Witter, D; Meissner, H; Merissner, O

    2001-12-13

    The High Average Power Laser Program (HAPL) is a multi-institutional, coordinated effort to develop a high-energy, repetitively pulsed laser system for Inertial Fusion Energy and other DOE and DOD applications. This program is building a laser-fusion energy base to complement the laser-fusion science developed by DOE Defense programs over the past 25 years. The primary institutions responsible for overseeing and coordinating the research activities are the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and LLNL. The current LLNL proposal is a companion proposal to that submitted by NRL, for which the driver development element is focused on the krypton fluoride excimer laser option. Aside from the driver development aspect, the NRL and LLNL companion proposals pursue complementary activities with the associated rep-rated laser technologies relating to target fabrication, target injection, final optics, fusion chamber, materials and power plant economics. This report requests continued funding in FY02 to support LLNL in its program to build a 1kW, 100J, diode-pumped, crystalline laser. In addition, research in high gain laser target design, fusion chamber issues and survivability of the final optic element will be pursued. These technologies are crucial to the feasibility of inertial fusion energy power plants and also have relevance in rep-rated stewardship experiments.

  15. Prevalent Opportunistic Infections Associated with HIV-positive Children 0-5 years in Benin City, Nigeria

    Imade, P. E.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 620 HIV positive children 0-5 years attending University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, were examined in this study. They were grouped into less than 1 year and 1-5 years based on CDC classification system. 218 children were under 1 year and 402 were 1-5 years. The overall results showed that malaria infection recorded the highest prevalence with 71.10% in less than 1 year and 76.37% in 1-5 years. This was followed by Oral Candidiasis 38.07% in less than 1 year and 50% in 1-5 years. Bacteraemia had 23.40% and 30.60% in less than 1 year and 1-5 years respectively. Diarrhoea, 14.22% in less than 1 year and 17.66% in 1-5 years. Otitis media had 10.55% and 10.95% in less than 1 year and 1-5 years respectively. Similarly, 590 apparently healthy HIV-negative children within the same age group were evaluated for the presence of these infections. There was a statistical significance between opportunistic infections and HIV infection (P < 0.001. Malaria infection was the most prevalent opportunistic infection in this population and may probably be due to environmental condition of this locality as well as the low immune status of the children.

  16. What happens to cavitated primary teeth over time? A 3.5-year prospective cohort study in China

    Hu, X.; Chen, X.; Fan, M.; Mulder, J.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data showed that among 5-year-old Chinese, 96.7% of cavitated primary teeth were left untreated. The study aimed to report on the course of cavitated primary teeth within the Chinese health-care system over a period of 3.5 years. METHODS: Selection of high caries risk children for inclus

  17. 75 FR 16833 - Preliminary Revised 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2007-2012

    2010-04-02

    ... Minerals Management Service Preliminary Revised 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing... Revised 5-Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2007- 2012. This is the Preliminary Revised Program... relative environmental sensitivity analysis and the Secretary's revisions to the leasing schedule...

  18. 76 FR 70156 - Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017

    2011-11-10

    ... Value Section 18 of the OCSLA requires receipt of fair market value for OCS oil and gas leases and the... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing... on the Proposed 5-Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 (``Proposed Program''). This...

  19. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi;

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  20. FY 1976 operation program of PNC

    The operational program of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation for FY 1976 is amended as follows. The development of power reactors, amounting to 16,368 billion (government subsidy) and 38,829 billion, covers the development of the fast breeder reactors, JOYO and MONJU, the development of the advanced thermal reactor ATR (heavy water reactor), the operation and preparation of equipments and facilities for common purposes, and the planning and management of research and development. The work on the experimental reactor JOYO will be advanced with the continuation of integral performance tests aiming at reaching criticality by the end of 1976. The sector experiments of the prototype reactor core will be carried out in the fast critical assembly (FCA) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). PNC plans to participate in the BIZET experiment program, designed jointly with West Germany and the UK. The criticality of the prototype ATR will be attained in 1977. The facilities for plutonium fuel development and fuel material inspection will be introduced. Development of nuclear fuel, amounting to 2,303 billion (government subsidy) and 11,137 billion, covers the oversea surveys, the domestic prospecting in the Tohno district, the research at Ningyo-Toge mine, the utilization of plutonium, nuclear fuel cycle, and the development of uranium enrichment by centrifuges and cascades. The reprocessing of spent fuel amounting to 2,804 billion (government subsidy) and 13,985 billion, covers the reprocessing facilities and the development of techniques. (Iwakiri, K.)

  1. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  2. CAES Annual Report FY 2011

    Kortny Rolston

    2011-10-01

    The Center for Advanced Energy Studies was created to lead research programs important to the nation, attract students and faculty to the Idaho universities and act as a catalyst for technology-based economic development. CAES is striving to meet those goals by continuing to develop its infrastructure and equipment capabilities, expand its research portfolio and bolster Idaho's energy workforce. This Annual Report details the progress CAES made in FY 2011 toward fulfilling its research, education and economic development missions.

  3. Ethanol annual report FY 1990

    Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. ISCR annual report FY 1998

    Fitzgerald, John M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-05-03

    Advances in scientific computing research have never been more vital to the core missions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory than they are today. These advances are evolving so rapidly, and over such a broad front of computational science, that to remain on the leading edge, the Laboratory must collaborate with many academic centers of excellence. In FY 1998, ISCR dramatically expanded its interactions with academia through collaborations, visiting faculty, guests and a seminar series. The pages of this annual report summarize the activities of the 63 faculty members and 34 students who participated in ISCR collaborative activities during FY 1998. The 1998 ISCR call for proposals issued by the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP) resulted in eight awards made by the University of California Office of the President to research teams at UC San Diego, UC Davis, UC Los Angeles, and UC Berkeley. These projects are noted. ISCR is now part of the Laboratory's Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). Many CASC scientists participate actively in ISCR University collaborations, as noted. The eight collaborations shown represent innovative research efforts supported by ISCR in FY 1998. Abstracts discussing each of these collaborations begin on page 79. The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) established Academic Strategic Alliances Program (ASAP) centers located at: Stanford University; California Institute of Technology; University of Chicago; University of Utah, Salt Lake; and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. The ASCI Alliances strategy was established to enhance overall ASCI goals by establishing technical interactions between the Department of Energy, Defense Programs laboratories (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories), and leading-edge research-and-development universities in the United States. ISCR has partnered with the LLNL ASCI Program Office to facilitate these collaborations. In FY

  5. Rotavirus gastroenteritis in children under 5 years in the Kingdom of Bahrain: hospital-based surveillance

    Al Musawi M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Muna Al Musawi,1 Hassan Zainaldeen,2 Fakrudeen Shafi,3 Sameh Anis,4 Rodrigo DeAntonio51Public Health Directorate, Ministry of Health, Manama, the Kingdom of Bahrain; 2Pediatric Department, Salmaniya Medical Complex, the Kingdom of Bahrain, Manama; 3GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Bangalore, India; 4GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Middle East and North Africa; 5GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines, Wavre, BelgiumPurpose: Rotavirus (RV is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age worldwide. This study assessed the role of RV as a cause of gastroenteritis (GE-associated hospitalization in children, generating baseline information to evaluate the potential impact of the RV vaccine in reducing RVGE disease burden in the Kingdom of Bahrain.Methods: This single, pediatric hospital-based surveillance study was conducted over a period of 12 months beginning April 1, 2006. A total of 314 children aged under 5 years and hospitalized due to GE were enrolled in the study, following collection of written informed consent from parents/guardians. Stool samples were tested for the presence of RV using enzyme immunoassay, and a random subset of RV-positive samples was further genotyped using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and reverse hybridization assay.Results: Of 314 enrolled children, 239 were included in the final analysis. RV was detected in 107 children (44.8%, mostly in the 6–23 months age group (82/107; 76.6%. RVGE occurred throughout the year, with the highest proportion occurring during April (26/42; 61.9%. G1P[8] was the most commonly detected RV strain (10/17; 58.8% in the limited number of samples analyzed. Vomiting and severe RVGE were more commonly observed in RV-positive than RV-negative children before hospitalization (P = 0.0008 and 0.0204, respectively.Conclusion: In our study, RV accounted for over 40% of GE-associated hospitalizations and particularly affected children under 2 years of age. These

  6. A 5 Year Study of Carbon Fluxes from a Restored English Blanket Bog

    Worrall, F.; Dixon, S.; Evans, M.

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to measure the effects of ecological restoration on blanket peat water table depths, DOC concentrations and CO2 fluxes. In April 2003 the Bleaklow Plateau, an extensive area of deep blanket peat in the Peak District National Park, northern England, was devegetated by a wildfire. As a result the area was selected for large scale restoration. In this study we considered a 5-year study of four restored sites in comparison to both an unrestored, bare peat control and to vegetated control that did not require restoration. Results suggested that sites with revegetation alongside slope stabilisation had the highest rates of photosynthesis and were the largest net (daylight hours) sinks of CO2. Bare sites were the largest net sources of CO2 and had the deepest water table depths. Sites with gully wall stabilisation were between 5-8 times more likely to be net CO2 sinks than the bare sites. Revegetation without gully flow blocking using plastic dams did not have a large effect on water table depths in and around the gullies investigated whereas a blocked gully had water table depths comparable to a naturally revegetating gully. A ten centimetre lowering in water table depth decreased the probability of observing a net CO2 sink, on a given site, by up to 30%. With respect to DOC the study showed that the average soil porewater DOC concentration on the restored sites rose significantly over the 5 year study representing a 34% increase relative to the vegetated control and an 11% increase relative to the unrestored, bare control. Soil pore water concentrations were not significantly different from surface runoff DOC concentrations and therefore restoration as conducted by this study would have contributed to water quality deterioration in the catchment. The most important conclusion of this research was that restoration interventions were apparently effective at increasing the likelihood of net CO2 sink behaviour and raising water tables on degraded

  7. Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Environmental Safety Health (ES and H) FY 2000 and FY 2001 Execution Commitment Summary

    REEP, I.E.

    2000-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the Safety and Health (S&H) resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 2000 and 2001 information and data contained in the Richland Operations Environment, Safefy and Health Fiscal Year 2002 Budget-Risk Management Summary (RL 2000a) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2001 activities are based on the President's Amended Congressional Budget Request of $689.6 million for funding Ofice of Environmental Management (EM) $44.0 million for Fast Flux Test Facility standby less $7.0 million in anticipated DOE, Headquarters holdbacks for Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE); and $55.3 million for Safeguards and Security (SAS). Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2003 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2001. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2001 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H guidance contained in the FY 2002 Field Budget Call (DOE 2000).

  8. Hanford Site Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) FY 1999 and FY 2000 Execution Commitment Summary

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the S&H resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 2000 information (Sieracki 1999) and data contained in the ''Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk Management Summary'' (RL 1999) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2000 finding of Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) activities is based on the President's budget of $1,065.1 million and $28.0 million, plus $2.7 million carryover finding, respectively, as of October 31, 1999. Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2002 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2000. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 1999 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H ''Guidance for FY200l Budget Formulations and Execution'' (DOE 1999).

  9. FY 1999 Annual Self-Evaluation Report of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Randy R. LaBarge

    1999-11-05

    This is a report of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (Pacific Northwest's) FY1999 Annual Self-Evaluation Report. This report summarizes our progress toward accomplishment of the critical outcomes, objectives, and performance indicators as delineated in the FY1999 Performance Evaluation & Fee Agreement. It also summarizes our analysis of the results of Pacific Northwest's Division and Directorate annual self-assessments, and the implementation of our key operational improvement initiatives. Together, these provide an indication of how well we have used our Integrated Assessment processes to identify and plan improvements for FY2000. As you review the report you will find areas of significantly positive progress; you will also note areas where I believe the Laboratory could make improvements. Overall, however, I believe you will be quite pleased to note that we have maintained, or exceeded, the high standards of performance we have set for the Laboratory.

  10. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2006

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2006 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  11. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2010

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2010 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges and the Henson FSA Tract of the North MS Refuge...

  12. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2007

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2007 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  13. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2004

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2004 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  14. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2008

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2008 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  15. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2012

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2012 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  16. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2013

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2013 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  17. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2011

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2011 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges and the Henson FSA Tract of the North MS Refuge...

  18. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2009

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2009 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  19. Annual Habitat Work Plan, North Mississippi Refuges Complex 2005

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Annual habitat work plan outlines tasks to be completed in FY 2005 on Dahomey, Tallhatchie, Coldwater River Refuges of the North MS Refuge Complex. Report also...

  20. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. FY 1979 peer review summaries and related documentation

    The NNWSI FY 1979 Project Plan (NVO-196-9) describes the accomplishment plan and objectives of the FY 1979 investigations. Three critical tasks and one critical subtask were selected by Project management for in-depth external peer review at meetings held at the DOE/NV in Las Vegas. The four technical peer review meetings held during FY 1979 were conducted to obtain an external assessment of the sufficiency and quality of the four selected critical investigative segments of the NNWSI. Peer reviewers representing appropriate fields of expertise were invited to attend each meeting. Within about two weeks of each meeting, the invited reviewers summarized their impressions of the technical activities presented to them and transmitted their summaries and recommendations to DOE/NV by letter. This document is a compilation, according to the individual meetings, of all correspondence between reviewers and Project personnel that is relevant to the technical activities of the NNWSI. The section for each meeting briefly summarizes the major activities of the NNWSI being reviewed and the effects of the reviewers comments and recommendations on Project planning. Each section also includes a list of the invited peer reviewers, a meeting agenda, and a copy of all technical correspondence relating to the review meeting. General impressions of the overall peer review process and improvements to be incorporated into future peer review activities are discussed in the next section as an introduction to the four subsequent sections which are devoted to the individual FY 1979 peer reviews