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Sample records for 4qcy08 tclp results

  1. SALTSTONE 4QCY08 TCLP RESULTS

    Cozzi, A.

    2009-08-10

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the fourth quarter of the 2008 calendar year (4QCY08), Tank 50 accepted transfers of approximately 15 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste, approximately 12 kgal from Tank 710-the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 5 kgal from the H-Canyon Super Kukla campaign, and approximately 34 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF).1 During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). SRNL was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained October 29, 2008 during 4QCY08 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)2 and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver-analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge.3 B&WTSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide. A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the

  2. SALTSTONE 4QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-31

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the fourth quarter of the 2011 calendar year (4QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 10 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 4 kgal from 211H, approximately 573 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 5 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained Oct. 12, 2011 during 4QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) 2 and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  3. SALTSTONE 2QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    Eibling, R.

    2011-07-28

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the second quarter of the 2011 calendar year (2QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 15 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 2 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 63 kgal from the HCanyon Super Kukla campaign, approximately 370 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 10 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained April 5, 2011 during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSGRACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the

  4. SALTSTONE 2QCY10 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2010-10-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the second quarter of the 2010 calendar year (2QCY10), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 19 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 5 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 42 kgal from the HCanyon Super Kukla campaign, and approximately 73 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained April 4, 2010 during 2QCY10 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  5. SALTSTONE 1QCY10 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2010-06-02

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the first quarter of the 2010 calendar year (1QCY10), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 32 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 10 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 32 kgal from the H-Canyon Super Kukla campaign, and approximately 26 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained January 8, 2010 during 1QCY10 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  6. SALTSTONE 3QCY10 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2010-12-14

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2010 calendar year (3QCY10), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 76 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 7 kgal from Tank 710 - the HCanyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 57 kgal from the H-Canyon Super Kukla campaign, approximately 58 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 6 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained July 1, 2010 during 3QCY10 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total

  7. SALTSTONE 3QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    Bannochie, C.

    2012-01-12

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2011 (3QCY11). After the prescribed 32 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the third quarter of the 2011 calendar year (3QCY11), Tank 50H accepted transfers of approximately 20 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP), approximately 236 kgal from the Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 25 kgal from other sources. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (SWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained July 7, 2011 during 3QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on

  8. SALTSTONE 1QCY11 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2011-05-16

    Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver-analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  9. SALTSTONE 3QCY09 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2009-12-14

    perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&WTSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  10. SALTSTONE 2QCY08 TCLP RESULTS

    Cozzi, A

    2009-03-23

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2008 (2QCY08). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the second quarter of the 2008 calendar year (2QCY08), Tank 50 accepted transfers of approximately 21 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste, approximately 3 kgal from Tank 710--the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, and approximately 23 kgal form the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT). The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). SRNL was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained June 5, 2008, during 2QCY08 processing to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)2 and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for

  11. SALTSTONE 1QCY08 TCLP RESULTS

    Cozzi, A

    2009-01-27

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2008 (1QCY08). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the first quarter of the 2008 calendar year (1QCY08), in addition to Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste that is regularly added at approximately 10 kgal/month, Tank 50H received significant waste transfers from Tank 23H and from Tank 49H. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). SRNL was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained during 1QCY08 processing to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSGRACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium

  12. SALTSTONE 3QCY09 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2010-01-13

    perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver-analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. B&WTSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the UHCs benzene, phenols and total and amenable cyanide.

  13. SALTSTONE 2QCY09 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2009-10-29

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2009 (2QCY09). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. In the second quarter of the 2009 calendar year (2QCY09), Tank 50 accepted transfers of approximately 32 kgal from the Effluent Treatment Project (ETP) waste, approximately 4 kgal from Tank 710 - the H-Canyon General Purpose Evaporator, approximately 156 kgal from the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSS-HT), and approximately 484 kgal from Tank 23. The Saltstone Grout Sampling plan provides the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with the chemical and physical characterization strategy for the salt solution which is to be disposed of in the Z-Area Solid Waste Landfill (ISWLF). During operation, samples were collected from Tank 50H and grout samples prepared to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout to meet the requirements of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24(b) and R.61-79.268.48(a). SRNL was asked to prepare saltstone from a sample of Tank 50H obtained May 20, 2009 during 2QCY09 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&WTSGRACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis

  14. Saltstone 4QCY14 TCLP Toxicity and UTS Results

    Miller, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-25

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2014 (4QCY14). After a 47 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) . The 4QCY14 saltstone sample results show that the saltstone is Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) nonhazardous, but is greater than the universal treatment standard for land disposal. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and SDF were in a maintenance outage during the 4QCY14. Thus no processing or disposal of saltstone, as characterized by this 4QCY14 sample, occurred.

  15. Saltstone 4QCY14 TCLP Toxicity and UTS Results

    Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-03-25

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2014 (4QCY14). After a 47 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) 1 . The 4QCY14 saltstone sample results show that the saltstone is Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) nonhazardous, but is greater than the universal treatment standard for land disposal. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and SDF were in a maintenance outage during the 4QCY14. Thus no processing or disposal of saltstone, as characterized by this 4QCY14 sample, occurred.

  16. Saltstone 3QCY15 TCLP Toxicity and UTS Results

    Miller, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-12-09

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2015 (3QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP).1 The 3QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  17. Saltstone 1QCY15 TCLP Toxicity and UTS Results

    Miller, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-07-29

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2015 (1QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The 1QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  18. Saltone 2QCY15 TCLP toxicity and UTS results

    Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-01

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2015 (2QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)1. The 2QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  19. Saltstone 2QCY15 TCLP toxicity and UTS results

    Miller, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-31

    A Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2015 (2QCY15). After a 28 day cure, a sample of the SDF waste form was collected, and shipped to a certified laboratory for Toxic Characteristic and Universal Treatment Standards (UTS) analysis. The metals analysis is performed using the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP)¹. The 2QCY15 saltstone sample results meet South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents (UHC).

  20. SALTSTONE CY07 TCLP RESULTS

    Cozzi, A

    2008-06-25

    Saltstone waste forms were prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from Tank 50H samples and Z-Area premix material for each of the four quarters of calendar year 2007 (CY07). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  1. SALTSTONE 4QCY10 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.

    2011-03-31

    Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2010 (4QCY10). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  2. Saltstone 3QCY12 TCLP Results

    Eibling, R. E.

    2012-12-19

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2012 (3QCY12). After a 34 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  3. Saltstone 2QCY13 TCLP Results

    Reigel, M. M.

    2013-10-29

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the second quarter of calendar year 2013 (2QCY13). After a 49 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  4. Saltstone 4QCY12 TCLP results

    Reigel, M. M.

    2013-03-14

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2012 (4QCY12). After a 48 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  5. Saltstone 3QCY13 TCLP Results

    Miller, D. H.

    2013-12-20

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2013 (3QCY13). After a 63 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  6. Saltstone 1QCY13 TCLP Results

    Eibling, R. E.

    2013-07-08

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2013 (1QCY13). After a 49 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  7. SALTSTONE 1QCY14 TCLP RESULTS

    Miller, D.

    2014-06-19

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2014 (1QCY14). After a 64 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  8. SALTSTONE 4QCY13 TCLP RESULTS

    Miller, D.

    2014-04-23

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the fourth quarter of calendar year 2013 (4QCY13). After a 62 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  9. SALTSTONE 3QCY08 TCLP RESULTS

    Cozzi, A.

    2009-04-21

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the third quarter of calendar year 2008 (3QCY08). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  10. SALTSTONE 1QCY09 TCLP RESULTS

    Reigel, M.; Cozzi, A.

    2009-07-20

    A Saltstone waste form was prepared in the Savannah River National Laboratory from a Tank 50H sample and Z-Area premix material for the first quarter of calendar year 2009 (1QCY09). After the prescribed 28 day cure, samples of the saltstone were collected, and the waste form was shown to meet the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79.261.24 and R.61-79.268.48(a) requirements for a nonhazardous waste form with respect to RCRA metals and underlying hazardous constituents. These analyses met all quality assurance specifications of USEPA SW-846.

  11. Pb speciation versus TCLP release in army firing range soils

    A series of soil parameter and mineralogical investigative techniques were applied to assess the Pb speciation in four US Army firing range soils that presented significantly different Pb leaching regimes and soil characteristics. Soil gradation tests were complemented by total chemical analyses, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Rietveld quantification, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The bulk geotechnical, mineralogical and chemical analyses pointed to two possible Pb retention mechanisms: precipitation as lead carbonate and sorption in the case of fine-grained soils. Lead speciation and mobility was further investigated by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and sequential extraction test (SET). As the TCLP Pb concentrations did not necessarily reflect the total Pb analysis of the soils, the Pb leachability ratio (TCLP/total) was found to be controlled by soil mineralogy and its response to changes in system pH. Geochemical modeling, using Visual MINTEQ, was employed to evaluate the mechanisms that controlled the observed TCLP Pb leaching behavior. It was found that lead carbonate precipitation/dissolution reactions controlled Pb TCLP leachability in all soils, while sorptive phenomena did not seem to play a role even in the case of fine-grained soils. More specifically, TCLP Pb leachability was controlled by the pH, the available Pb and the available carbonate in solution. This indicates that geochemical modeling strongly complimented TCLP Pb analyses. Thus, geochemical modeling is an important assessment tool to evaluate the magnitude of site-specific Pb-related environmental problems in firing range soils. Carbonation reactions, involving metallic Pb, that occur during the SET obscure its ability to reliably ascertain Pb speciation. More specifically, SET lumps the extractable Pb into predetermined phase categories that may not be truly representative of the actual soil mineralogy or dominant forms of Pb in

  12. Characterization of radioactive wastes: TCLP and microwave digestion of inorganic process sludge, pyrochemical salts, and organic resins

    A modified SW-846 Method 3051 microwave leach procedure for digestion of transuranic (TRU) waste was developed using surrogates for pyrochemical salt and organic resin waste. The modified procedure uses an aqua regia acid matrix and heating profiles that vary depending on the matrix. For these surrogates adequate spike recoveries were obtained for the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) elements Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, and Se. TRU inorganic process sludge was analyzed for RCRA metals after Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extraction and microwave HNO3 acid digestion. The TCLP results show that analyte concentrations and spike recoveries for a 200mL extractor (10 g sample) are within experimental error of those obtained with the 2L extractor (100g sample). Comparison of the TCLP results with those from Method 3051 digestion of the sludge (0.5g samples) suggests that the microwave method has potential as a screening technique for the analysis of mixed waste samples. A significant advantage of the microwave leach procedures is a minimum 10-fold reduction of waste produced

  13. Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives

    Bowers, J.S.; Anson, J.R.; Painter, S.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Stabilization is a best demonstrated available technology, or BDAT. This technology traps toxic contaminants in a matrix so that they do not leach into the environment. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. In many instances, materials that can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP the federal leach test) or the Soluble Threshold Leachate Concentration (STLC the California leach test) must have high concentrations of lime or other caustic material because of the low pH of the leaching media. Both leaching media, California`s and EPA`s, have a pH of 5.0. California uses citric acid and sodium citrate while EPA uses acetic acid and sodium acetate. The concentration in the leachate is approximately ten times higher for the STLC procedure than the TCLP. These media can form ligands that provide excellent metal leaching. Because of the aggressive nature of the leaching medium, stabilized wastes in many cases will not pass the leaching tests. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation, are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens) when formulating a stabilization matrix, and they have a neutral pH. By using these clays and additives, LLNL`s highly concentrated wastewater treatment sludges have passed the TCLP and STLC tests. The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements.

  14. Stabilization of inorganic mixed waste to pass the TCLP and STLC tests using clay and pH-insensitive additives

    Stabilization traps toxic contaminants (usually both chemically and physically) in a matrix so that they do not leach into the environment. Typical contaminants are metals (mostly transition metals) that exhibit the characteristic of toxicity. The stabilization process routinely uses pozzolanic materials. Portland cement, fly ash-lime mixes, gypsum cements, and clays are some of the most common materials. In many instances, materials that can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP-the federal leach test) or the Soluble Threshold Leachate Concentration (STLC-the California leach test) must have high concentrations of lime or other caustic material because of the low pH of the leaching media. Both leaching media, California's and EPA's, have a pH of 5.0. California uses citric acid and sodium citrate while EPA uses acetic acid and sodium acetate. These media can form ligands that provide excellent metal leaching. Because of the aggressive nature of the leaching medium, stabilized wastes in many cases will not pass the leaching tests. At the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, additives such as dithiocarbamates and thiocarbonates, which are pH-insensitive and provide resistance to ligand formation, are used in the waste stabilization process. Attapulgite, montmorillonite, and sepiolite clays are used because they are forgiving (recipe can be adjusted before the matrix hardens). The most frequently used stabilization process consists of a customized recipe involving waste sludge, clay and dithiocarbamate salt, mixed with a double planetary mixer into a pasty consistency. TCLP and STLC data on this waste matrix have shown that the process matrix meets land disposal requirements

  15. Evaluation of mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of Pb and Cd in contaminated soil using TCLP, BCR and earthworms.

    Kede, Maria Luiza F M; Correia, Fabio V; Conceição, Paulo F; Junior, Sidney F Salles; Marques, Marcia; Moreira, Josino C; Pérez, Daniel V

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the reduction of mobility, availability and toxicity found in soil contaminated with lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) from Santo Amaro Municipality, Bahia, Brazil using two combined methods, commonly tested separately according to the literature: metal mobilization with phosphates and phytoextraction. The strategy applied was the treatment with two sources of phosphates (separately and mixed) followed by phytoremediation with vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.)). The treatments applied (in triplicates) were: T1-potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4); T2-reactive natural phosphate fertilizer (NRP) and; T3-a mixture 1:1 of KH2PO4 and NRP. After this step, untreated and treated soils were planted with vetiver grass. The extraction procedures and assays applied to contaminated soil before and after the treatments included metal mobility test (TCLP); sequential extraction with BCR method; toxicity assays with Eisenia andrei. The soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF) for Pb and Cd were estimated in all cases. All treatments with phosphates followed by phytoremediation reduced the mobility and availability of Pb and Cd, being KH2PO4 (T1) plus phytoremediation the most effective one. Soil toxicity however, remained high after all treatments. PMID:25386955

  16. Evaluation of Mobility, Bioavailability and Toxicity of Pb and Cd in Contaminated Soil Using TCLP, BCR and Earthworms

    Maria Luiza F. M. Kede

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate the reduction of mobility, availability and toxicity found in soil contaminated with lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd from Santo Amaro Municipality, Bahia, Brazil using two combined methods, commonly tested separately according to the literature: metal mobilization with phosphates and phytoextraction. The strategy applied was the treatment with two sources of phosphates (separately and mixed followed by phytoremediation with vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanioides (L.. The treatments applied (in triplicates were: T1—potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KH2PO4; T2—reactive natural phosphate fertilizer (NRP and; T3—a mixture 1:1 of KH2PO4 and NRP. After this step, untreated and treated soils were planted with vetiver grass. The extraction procedures and assays applied to contaminated soil before and after the treatments included metal mobility test (TCLP; sequential extraction with BCR method; toxicity assays with Eisenia andrei. The soil-to-plant transfer factors (TF for Pb and Cd were estimated in all cases. All treatments with phosphates followed by phytoremediation reduced the mobility and availability of Pb and Cd, being KH2PO4 (T1 plus phytoremediation the most effective one. Soil toxicity however, remained high after all treatments.

  17. Results of vitrifying Fernald OU-4 wastes

    Three silos in Operable Unit 4 (OU-4) at the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio, contain residues from the processing of pitchblende ores. Silos 1 and 2, designated as K-65, contain the depleted ore with a BentoGrout cap over the material to reduce radon emanation, while Silo 3 contains calcined residue from processing solutions. The residues in the three silos contain radium, uranium, uranium daughters, and heavy metals (primarily lead). Vitrification tests were carried out on various mixtures of the above materials and the resulting glasses were analyzed. The vitrified residues all tested ''non-hazardous'' by the Toxicity Characteristic Leachate Procedure (TCLP) and demonstrated a high degree of durability by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The specific gravity and radon emanation of both the vitrified and non-vitrified residue were measured. Volume reductions ranging from 50 to 68 percent were obtained while the radon emanation rate was reduced by a factor of about 500,000. Radon emanation from the vitrified residue is of the same order of magnitude as emanation from natural building materials such as brick or concrete

  18. Correlation between the Results of Sequential Extraction and Effectiveness of Immobilization Treatment of Lead- and Cadmium-Contaminated Sediment

    Milena B. Dalmacija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the quality of sediment from the Great Backi Canal (Serbia, based on the pseudo-total lead (Pb and cadmium (Cd content according to the corresponding Dutch standards and Canadian guidelines, showed its severe contamination with these two metals. A microwave-assisted BCR (Community Bureau of Reference of the Commission of the European Union sequential extraction procedure was employed to assess their potential mobility and risk to the aquatic environment. Comparison of the results of sequential extraction and different criteria for sediment quality assessment has led to somewhat contradictory conclusions. Namely, while the results of sequential extraction showed that Cd comes under the high-risk category, Pb shows low risk to the environment, despite its high pseudo-total content. The contaminated sediment, irrespective of the different speciation of Pb and Cd, was subjected to the same immobilization, stabilization/solidification (S/S treatments using kaolinite, montmorillonite, kaolinite-quicklime, montmorillonite-quicklime, fly ash, zeolite, or zeolite-fly ash combination. Semi-dynamic leaching tests were conducted for Pb- and Cd-contaminated sediment in order to assess the long-term leaching behavior of these metals. In order to simulate “worst case” leaching conditions, the semi-dynamic leaching test was modified using 0.014 M acetic acid (pH = 3.25 and humic acid solutions (20 mg TOC l-1 as leachants instead of deionized water. The effectiveness of S/S treatment was evaluated by determining diffusion coefficients (De and leachability indices (LX. The standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP was applied to evaluate the extraction potential of Pb and Cd. A diffusion-based model was used to elucidate the controlling leaching mechanisms. Generally, the test results indicated that all applied S/S treatments were effective in immobilizing Pb and Cd, and the treated sediments may be considered acceptable

  19. Enceladus Results

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Here are some results from the Spectra Decomposition Algorithm on infrared spectral images of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Figure 1 is the spatial contribution of the...

  20. SAGE results

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October, 1993 is presented. The result of 69+/-10(stat)+5/-7(syst) SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU. The initial results of a measurement of experimental efficiencies are also discussed by exposing the gallium target to neutrinos from an artificial source. The capture rate of neutrinos from this source is very close to that which is expected. The result can be expressed as a ratio of the measured capture rate to the anticipated rate from the source activity. This ratio is 0.93+0.15, -0.17 where the systematic and statistical errors have been combined. To first order the experimental efficiencies are in agreement with those determined during solar neutrino measurements and in previous auxiliary measurements. One must conclude that the discrepancy between the measured solar neutrino flux and that predicted by the solar models can not arise from an experimental artifact. (author)

  1. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) projected glass compositions

    Vitrification of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level radioactive waste is scheduled to begin in late 1995. The vitrification operation will take place at the SRS Defense waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The US Department of Energy has instituted specifications which provide technical criteria which must be met by the DWPF to ensure that the waste glass will be suitable for permanent disposal in a federal geologic repository. Included in these criteria is a specification requiring DWPF to determine whether its high level, radioactive waste glass should also be classified as characteristically hazardous waste. A study was performed, using the anticipated range of glass compositions which will be produced over the lifetime of the DWPF, which definitively proved that DWPF waste glass should not be classified as characteristic hazardous waste

  2. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation{reg_sign} glass frit

    Phillips, J.A.; Hoffman, C.R.; Knutson, P.T.

    1995-03-01

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900{degrees}C to approximately 1150-1200{degrees}C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature ({ge} 1200{degrees}C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H{sub 2}O), oxygen (O{sub 2}) and carbon oxides (CO and CO{sub 2}), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}) that volatilized during glass formation.

  3. Microwave melt and offgas analysis results from a Ferro Corporation reg-sign glass frit

    In support of the Residue Treatment Technology (RTT) Microwave Solidification project, Waste Projects and Surface Water personnel conducted a series of experiments to determine the feasibility of encapsulating a surrogate sludge waste using the microwave melter. The surrogate waste was prepared by RTT and melted with five varying compositions of low melting glass frit supplied by the Ferro Corporation. Samples were melted using a 50% waste/50% glass frit and a 47.5% waste/47.5% glass frit/5% carbon powder. This was done to evaluate the effectiveness of carbon at reducing a sulfate-based surface scale which has been observed in previous experiments and in full-scale testing. These vitrified samples were subsequently submitted to Environmental Technology for toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) testing. Two of the five frits tested in this experiment merit further evaluation as raw materials for the microwave melter. Ferro frit 3110 with and without carbon powder produced a crystalline product which passed TCLP testing. The quality of the melt product could be improved by increasing the melting temperature from 900 degrees C to approximately 1150-1200 degrees C. Ferro frit 3249 produced the optimal quality of glass based on visual observations, but failed TCLP testing for silver when melted without carbon powder. This frit requires a slightly higher melting temperature (≥ 1200 degrees C) compared to frit 3110 and produces a superior product. In conjunction with this work, Surface Water personnel conducted offgas analyses using a Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (TDMS) on selected formulations. The offgas analyses identified and quantified water vapor (H2O), oxygen (O2) and carbon oxides (CO and CO2), sulfur (S) and sulfur oxides (SO and SO2), and nitrogen (N2) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) that volatilized during glass formation

  4. RESULTS RESULTING FROM AUTOFRETTAGE OF CYLINDER

    ZHU Ruilin

    2008-01-01

    Autofrettage is used to introduce advantageous residual stresses into wall of a cylinder and to even distributions of total stresses. Basic theory on autofrettage has been functioning for several decades. It is necessary to reveal profound relations between parameters in the theory. Therefore, based on the 3rd strength theory, δei/δy, δei/δy, δei′/δy, δei′/δy and their relations, as well as p/δy, are studied under ideal conditions, where δei/δy is equivalent stress of total stresses at elastoplastic juncture/yield strength, δei/δy is equivalent stress of total stresses at inside surface/yield strength, δei′/δy is equivalent stress of residual stresses at elastoplastic juncture/yield strength, δei′/δy is equivalent stress of residual stresses at inside surface/yield strength, p/δy is load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder/yield strength. Theoretical study on the parameters results in noticeable results and laws. The main idea is: to satisfy |δei′|=δy, the relation between kj and k is , where k is outside/inside radius ratio of a cylinder, kj is ratio of elastoplastic juncture radius to inside radius of a cylinder; when the plastic region covers the whole wall of a cylinder, for compressive yield not to occur after removing autofrettage pressure, the ultimate k is k=2.218 46, with k=2.218 46, a cylinder's ultimate load-bearing capacity equals its entire yield pressure, or =lnk; when kj≤=1.648 72, no matter how great k is, compressive yield never occurs after removing pa; the maximum and optimum load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is just two times the loading which an unautofrettaged cylinder can bear elastically, or , thus the limit of the load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is also just 2 times that of an unautofrettaged cylinder.

  5. TOXICITY CHARACTERISTIC LEACHING PROCEDURE APPLIED TO RADIOACTIVE SALTSTONE CONTAINING TETRAPHENYLBORATE: DEVELOPMENT OF A MODIFIED ZERO-HEADSPACE EXTRACTOR

    Crapse, K.; Cozzi, A.; Crawford, C.; Jurgensen, A.

    2006-09-30

    In order to assess the effect of extended curing times at elevated temperatures on saltstone containing Tank 48H waste, saltstone samples prepared as a part of a separate study were analyzed for benzene using a modification of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) method 1311 Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). To carry out TCLP for volatile organic analytes (VOA), such as benzene, in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) shielded cells (SC), a modified TCLP Zero-Headspace Extractor (ZHE) was developed. The modified method was demonstrated to be acceptable in a side by side comparison with an EPA recommended ZHE using nonradioactive saltstone containing tetraphenylborate (TPB). TCLP results for all saltstone samples tested containing TPB (both simulant and actual Tank 48H waste) were below the regulatory limit for benzene (0.5 mg/L). In general, higher curing temperatures corresponded to higher concentrations of benzene in TCLP extract. The TCLP performed on the simulant samples cured under the most extreme conditions (3000 mg/L TPB in salt and cured at 95 C for at least 144 days) resulted in benzene values that were greater than half the regulatory limit. Taking into account that benzene in TCLP extract was measured on the same order of magnitude as the regulatory limit, that these experimental conditions may not be representative of actual curing profiles found in the saltstone vault and that there is significant uncertainty associated with the precision of the method, it is recommended that to increase confidence in TCLP results for benzene, the maximum curing temperature of saltstone be less than 95 C. At this time, no further benzene TCLP testing is warranted. Additional verification would be recommended, however, should future processing strategies result in significant changes to salt waste composition in saltstone as factors beyond the scope of this limited study may influence the decomposition of TPB in saltstone.

  6. Total 2004 results

    This document presents the 2004 results of Total Group: consolidated account, special items, number of shares, market environment, adjustment for amortization of Sanofi-Aventis merger-related intangibles, 4. quarter 2004 results (operating and net incomes, cash flow), upstream (results, production, reserves, recent highlights), downstream (results, refinery throughput, recent highlights), chemicals (results, recent highlights), Total's full year 2004 results (operating and net income, cash flow), 2005 sensitivities, Total SA parent company accounts and proposed dividend, adoption of IFRS accounting, summary and outlook, main operating information by segment for the 4. quarter and full year 2004: upstream (combined liquids and gas production by region, liquids production by region, gas production by region), downstream (refined product sales by region, chemicals), Total financial statements: consolidated statement of income, consolidated balance sheet (assets, liabilities and shareholder's equity), consolidated statements of cash flows, business segments information. (J.S.)

  7. Total 2004 results

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    This document presents the 2004 results of Total Group: consolidated account, special items, number of shares, market environment, adjustment for amortization of Sanofi-Aventis merger-related intangibles, 4. quarter 2004 results (operating and net incomes, cash flow), upstream (results, production, reserves, recent highlights), downstream (results, refinery throughput, recent highlights), chemicals (results, recent highlights), Total's full year 2004 results (operating and net income, cash flow), 2005 sensitivities, Total SA parent company accounts and proposed dividend, adoption of IFRS accounting, summary and outlook, main operating information by segment for the 4. quarter and full year 2004: upstream (combined liquids and gas production by region, liquids production by region, gas production by region), downstream (refined product sales by region, chemicals), Total financial statements: consolidated statement of income, consolidated balance sheet (assets, liabilities and shareholder's equity), consolidated statements of cash flows, business segments information. (J.S.)

  8. Recent results from KTEV

    Bellantoni, L.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    The implications of the published KTeV K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} result for interpreting recent {Sigma}{sup +} {yields} p{mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -} results are discussed. The status of the KTeV {Xi}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}{nu} analysis is given. The KTeV |V{sub us}| result is also given.

  9. The Arising of Results

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Some Buddhist scholars have periodized the expected lifetime of the Buddha's teachings. According to them, these periods of 500 years each have different characteristics. The first is called 'the period of the results'. Therefore some scholars have claimed that only in the first 500 years after the...... Buddha results can arise. Kyobpa Jigten Sumgön has argued that results arise through practise as long as Dharma and Sangha exist....

  10. Results from SAGE

    We report the results of 11 years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE). The overall result of 84 runs during the measurement period January 1990 through March 2001 is 75.6 +5.9/-5.8 (stat.) +3.5/-3.0 (syst.) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results of each run, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs are presented

  11. Results from SAGE

    Vermul, V M; Bowles, T J; Cherry, M L; Cleveland, B T; Davis, R; Elliott, S R; Gavrin, V N; Girin, S V; Gorbachev, V V; Ibragimova, T V; Kalikhov, A V; Khairnasov, N G; Knodel, T V; Lande, K; Mirmov, I N; Nico, J S; Shikhin, A A; Teasdale, W A; Veretenkin, E P; Vermul, V M; Wark, D L; Wildenhain, P S; Wilkerson, J F; Yants, V E; Zatsepin, G T

    2002-01-01

    We report the results of 11 years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE). The overall result of 84 runs during the measurement period January 1990 through March 2001 is 75.6 +5.9/-5.8 (stat.) +3.5/-3.0 (syst.) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results of each run, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs are presented.

  12. Results from SAGE

    Vermul, V.M.; Abdurashitov, J.N.; Bowles, T.J.; Cherry, M.L.; Cleveland, B.T.; Davis, R.; Elliott, S.R.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.; Gorbachev, V.V.; Ibragimova, T.V.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Khairnasov, N.G.; Knodel, T.V.; Lande, K.; Mirmov, I.N.; Nico, J.S.; Shikhin, A.A.; Teasdale, W.A.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Wark, D.L.; Wildenhain, P.S.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Yants, V.E.; Zatsepin, G.T

    2002-07-01

    We report the results of 11 years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE). The overall result of 84 runs during the measurement period January 1990 through March 2001 is 75.6 +5.9/-5.8 (stat.) +3.5/-3.0 (syst.) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results of each run, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs are presented.

  13. Duration and Results (PECODR

    Martin Dawes

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions Results suggest a PECODR-related structure exists in medical abstracts and that there might be lexical patterns specific to these elements. More sophisticated computer-assisted lexical-semantic analysis might refine these results, and pave the way to automating PECODR indexing, and improve information retrieval in primary care.

  14. Annual results 2004

    This 2004 annual evaluation of the french RTE company (electric power transport network) provides information on the 2004 results on: institutional information, financial results, customers and market, industrial resources, environment and consultation, human resources and international aspects. (A.L.B.)

  15. Recent results from TRISTAN

    Enomoto, Ryoji [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  16. Getting Districtwide Results

    McBeath, Angus

    2006-01-01

    This monograph is based on a keynote presentation by Angus McBeath at the "Getting Districtwide Results" Conference in Long Beach, California, which was co-sponsored by the Cross City Campaign for Urban School Reform and Focus on Results. The author, a former superintendent of the Edmonton Public Schools, how his school district was "forced" and…

  17. Results from OPERA

    In this report, the details of new ντ event detected by OPERA were reported. Also first result on νμ to νe oscillation search in OPERA was described. The result excluded the high Δm2 region down to sin22θ13∼2×10−2

  18. New results from COMPASS

    Kabuß, Eva-Maria

    2015-01-01

    An overview on recent COMPASS results is given, including the extraction of the longitudinal spin structure functions interpreted with a NLO QCD fit, new results on the gluon polarisation and a measurement of pion and kaon multiplicities with a LO extraction of quark-to-hadron fragmentation functions

  19. Results from EQAS 2002

    Petersen, A.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Jensen, A.B.; Wong, Danilo Lo Fo; Evans, M.C.; Angulo, F.; Imhoff, B.; Binsztein, N.; Braam, P.; Jouan, M.; Wegener, H.C.; Seyfarth, Anne Mette

    An international external quality assurance program on serotyping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of eight Salmonella enterica strains was performed to enhance the capacity of national and regional reference laboratories in WHO Global Salm-Surv (WHO GSS). In 2002 a total of 117...... laboratories from 67 countries participated. For serotyping, almost 90 % of the results were correct. For susceptibility testing, 91 % of the results were in agreement with the expected results, and 86 % of the performed tests with the reference strain E. coli ATCC 25922 were inside the quality control range...

  20. Enova results report 2005

    In 2005 Enova entered into agreements with 186 projects that together provided an energy result of 2 TWh. The result is almost evenly divided between projects providing higher energy production and projects that reduce energy use. The energy production consists of 585 GWh in new wind power and 409 GWh in new heat energy in 2005. Overall for the period 2001 to 2005, Enova contracted for energy results of well over 6.6 TWh. Enova is doing well in relation to the objectives set for its activities

  1. Recent results from PETRA

    Recent results on the search for new particles, new thresholds and on properties of B-mesons are reported. No new particle has been observed. More stringent limits on production cross sections have been obtained. (orig.)

  2. Microenterprise Results Reporting

    US Agency for International Development — Microenterprise Results Reporting (MRR) is an annual report to the U.S. Congress providing funding and program data on USAID's microenterprise activities. The MRR...

  3. Ibis DDT test results

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains test results from a study done to determine the organochlorine levels in the livers of white-faced ibis from Stillwater Wildlife Management...

  4. Haiti DevResults

    US Agency for International Development — DevResults is a web-based portfolio management system that tracks program data for the Haiti Mission that was awarded in April of 2013. (The Mozambique and/or...

  5. Transacsys PLC - Final Results

    2002-01-01

    Final results from Transacsys PLC. A subsidary of this company was set up to develop the CERN EDH system into a commercial product but incurred too much financial loss so the project was cancelled (1/2 page).

  6. Gene expression results

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — qPCR results for Vitellogenin This dataset is associated with the following publication: Armstrong, B., J. Lazorchak , K. Jensen , H. Haring , M.E. Smith, R. Flick...

  7. Cholesterol testing and results

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000386.htm Cholesterol testing and results To use the sharing features ... can tell you what your goal should be. Cholesterol Tests Some cholesterol is considered good and some ...

  8. HMS Summary of Results

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Data set of summary results from a Hydrologic Modeling System run for Two Ponds NWR. Data includes peak discharge, total precipitation, total loss, total excess,...

  9. ATLAS physics results

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been successfully taking data since the end of 2009 in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and in heavy ion collisions. In these lectures, some of the most recent ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results.

  10. Compilation of results 1987

    A compilation is carried out which in concentrated form presents reports on research and development within the nuclear energy field covering a two and a half years period. The foregoing report was edited in December 1984. The projects are presendted with title, project number, responsible unit, person to contact and short result reports. The result reports consist of short summaries over each project. (L.F.)

  11. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Chen, Xin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM) Higgs results, such as $H\\to\\gamma\\gamma,ZZ,WW,\\tau\\tau,\\mu\\mu,b\\bar{b}$, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM) results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  12. Combining Affymetrix microarray results

    Doerge RW

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the use of microarray technology becomes more prevalent it is not unusual to find several laboratories employing the same microarray technology to identify genes related to the same condition in the same species. Although the experimental specifics are similar, typically a different list of statistically significant genes result from each data analysis. Results We propose a statistically-based meta-analytic approach to microarray analysis for the purpose of systematically combining results from the different laboratories. This approach provides a more precise view of genes that are significantly related to the condition of interest while simultaneously allowing for differences between laboratories. Of particular interest is the widely used Affymetrix oligonucleotide array, the results of which are naturally suited to a meta-analysis. A simulation model based on the Affymetrix platform is developed to examine the adaptive nature of the meta-analytic approach and to illustrate the usefulness of such an approach in combining microarray results across laboratories. The approach is then applied to real data involving a mouse model for multiple sclerosis. Conclusion The quantitative estimates from the meta-analysis model tend to be closer to the "true" degree of differential expression than any single lab. Meta-analytic methods can systematically combine Affymetrix results from different laboratories to gain a clearer understanding of genes' relationships to specific conditions of interest.

  13. Higgs Results from CMS

    Bornheim, Adolf

    2014-03-01

    The Nobel Prize in physics 2013 has been awarded to François Englert and Peter W. Higgs for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles which plays a crucial role in our understanding of electro-weak symmetry breaking. I will review the experimental results manifesting the discovery of the so called Higgs boson from the perspective of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration. The review is based on the final results from the proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy, collected in 2011 and 2012 in the initial run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Results on the properties of the new particle with a mass around 125 GeV, all in agreement with the expectations for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, are highlighted. Latest results on the couplings between the Higgs and fermionic fields, in particular the final results of searches for a Higgs boson decaying into a b-quark or a tau-lepton pair, are presented. Non-SM Higgs searches are briefly summarized. Future perspectives for Higgs physics with CMS at LHC for the next data taking period starting in 2015 and beyond are discussed. CMS Collaboration.

  14. Total 2003 Results

    This document presents the 2003 results of Total Group: consolidated account, special items, number of shares, market environment, 4. quarter 2003 results, full year 2003 results, upstream (key figures, proved reserves), downstream key figures, chemicals key figures, parent company accounts and proposed dividends, 2004 sensitivities, summary and outlook, operating information by segment for the 4. quarter and full year 2003: upstream (combined liquids and gas production by region, liquids production by region, gas production by region), downstream (refinery throughput by region, refined product sales by region, chemicals), impact of allocating contribution of Cepsa to net operating income by business segment: equity in income (loss) and affiliates and other items, Total financial statements: consolidated statement of income, consolidated balance sheet (assets, liabilities and shareholder's equity), consolidated statements of cash flows, business segments information. (J.S.)

  15. Recent results from PEP

    Preliminary results are presented for the data taken by the MARK II and MAC collaborations at the PEP storage ring. Results include measurements of QED processes, limits on the weak couplings g/sub V/ and g/sub A/, limits on anomalous lepton production, the measurement of the tau lifetime, scale violation in inclusive hadron production, Monte Carlo independent tests of QCD using energy-energy correlations and single jet energy moments, measurements of the properties of three jet events, and measurements of proton, neutral kaon, lambda and proton pair yields

  16. Recent results from PEP

    Hollebeek, R.

    1981-10-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the data taken by the MARK II and MAC collaborations at the PEP storage ring. Results include measurements of QED processes, limits on the weak couplings g/sub V/ and g/sub A/, limits on anomalous lepton production, the measurement of the tau lifetime, scale violation in inclusive hadron production, Monte Carlo independent tests of QCD using energy-energy correlations and single jet energy moments, measurements of the properties of three jet events, and measurements of proton, neutral kaon, lambda and proton pair yields.

  17. HIGGS RESULTS FROM ATLAS

    Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This document presents the most recent ATLAS results on the searches for additional heavy scalars, which could confirm the existence of an extended Higgs sector. The new results include searches for charged as well as for neutral heavy Higgs bosons, decaying to a variety of final states. All analyses are performed using the 2015 LHC pp collision data at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb−1 recorded with the ATLAS detector.

  18. Results from SAGE II

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66-13+18 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73-16+18 (stat) -75 (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69-11+11 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  19. New Results from RENO

    Seo, Seon-hee

    2013-01-01

    RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is an experiment dedicated to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle {\\theta}_13 using reactor neutrinos in Korea. Our first result measured in 2012 using about 220 live days of data showed non-zero {\\theta}_13 value with 4.9 {\\sigma} significance. In March 2013 we updated our first result with improvements in both statistical and systematic errors using 403 live days of data. The measured value using rate-only analysis is sin^2(2{\\theta}...

  20. Recent CMS Results

    Dorigo, Tommaso

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment obtained a large number of groundbreaking results from the analysis of 7- and 8-TeV proton-proton collisions produced so far by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In this brief summary only a sample of those results will be discussed. A new particle with mass m(H) = 125.3 +- 0.4(stat.) +- 0.5(syst.) GeV and characteristics compatible with those expected for a standard model Higgs boson has been observed in its decays to photon pairs, WW pairs, and ZZ pairs. Searches for the...

  1. FLUCTUATION RESULTS FRO PHENIX.

    MITCHELL, J.T.

    2005-04-21

    The PHENIX Experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has made measurements of event-by-event fluctuations in the net charge, the mean transverse momentum, and the charged particle multiplicity as a function of collision energy, centrality, and transverse momentum in heavy ion collisions. The results of these measurements will be reviewed and discussed.

  2. Review of LEP results

    Parodi, F

    2001-01-01

    I present a review of the results obtained during 10 years of activity in b-physics at LEP. Special emphasis is put on measurements that attained precisions not even envisaged at the beginning of the LEP programme (V/sub ub/ and Delta m/sub s/). Finally the impact of these measurements on the CKM parameters determination is presented. (16 refs).

  3. Recent MILC spectrum results

    Bernard, C.; Blum, T.; DeGrand, T. A.; DeTar, C.; Gottlieb, Steve; Heller, Urs M.; Hetrick, J.; McNeile, C.; K. Rummukainen(University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland); Sugar, R. L.; Toussaint, Doug; Wingate, M

    1996-01-01

    We report on results from three spectrum calculations with staggered quarks: 1) a quenched calculation with the standard action for the gluons and quarks; 2) a quenched calculation with improved actions for both the gluons and quarks; and 3) a calculation with two flavors of dynamical quarks using the standard actions for the gluons and quarks.

  4. NIH Research to Results

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... of stem cells to repair or replace damaged brain tissue is also a new avenue of research. Another important area of research involves the development ...

  5. Andrzej Lasota's selected results

    Józef Myjak

    2008-01-01

    In this article we recall Andrzej Lasota's selected results which either indicated new directions of research, or layed the foundations for new approaches, or solved interesting problems. The area of mathematical interests of Professor Andrzej Lasota was very large: ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, dynamical systems, multifunctions, differential inclusions, functional differential equations, equations with retarded arguments, ergodic theory, invariant measures,...

  6. Results of CPLEAR

    The CPLEAR experiment uses tagged K0 and K0 produced in pp annihilation at rest to measure CP-, T- and CPT-violation parameters in the neutral kaon system. The results of these measurements and some implications are reported. (orig.)

  7. Roadmap of Infinite Results

    Srba, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive summary of equivalence checking results for infinite-state systems. References to the relevant papers will be updated continuously according to the development in the area. The most recent version of this document is available from the web-page http://www.brics.dk/~srba/roadmap....

  8. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Chen, Xin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The updated Higgs measurements in different search channels with Run 1 data is reviewed. Results for Beyound Standard Model Higgs searches such as the charged Higgs, the invisible decay and the tensor coupling are also given. Finally, prospects for Run2/3 Higgs search are briefly shown.

  9. Recent CDF results

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-11-01

    As of November of 2007, the CDF detector has recorded approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data. This contribution describes some of the most recent and most relevant results from the CDF collaboration in all areas of its wide physics program, as well as some insights into the Tevatron reach for Higgs searches within the next few years.

  10. Physics results from ALICE

    Ramello, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    In this lecture I present the status of experimental search and study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma in Pb-Pb collisions at the CERN LHC by the ALICE Collaboration based on the data-taking during years 2010-13 (LHC Run 1), as well as results from pp and p-Pb collisions

  11. Chapter 5: Monitoring results

    Poel, Bart; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund; Schultz, Jørgen Munthe

    2003-01-01

    The monitoring results from the IEA Task 13 project "Advanced solar low energy houses" are described in this chapter. The underlying information was collected in the form of questionnaires. The questionnaires were formulated in such a way that participants are provided with a uniform lay-out to f...

  12. Top Quark Results

    ATLAS collaboration; LHCb collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of top quarks from Run-I and Run-II of the LHC are presented. Results on differential and inclusive top quark production cross sections, measured by the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, and measurements of top quark properties and mass are reported.

  13. Quantitative QCD: recent results

    We discuss some recent results in the phenomenology of perturbative QCD. Special emphasis is put on the ambiguities of the theoretical predictions and on low they affect the determination of the physical parameters. Recent calculations concerning jet and photon production at large momentum transfer are reviewed and two examples of calculations in the next-to-next to leading logarithm approximation are mentioned. (author)

  14. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  15. RTE annual results 2005

    This annual report presents the results of the RTE (Electric power Transport Network). The year 2005 is marked by the new status of RTE, as a limited company. The financial good performances, the market, the open network, the environmental policy, the human resources and the european and international relations are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  16. Neutrino mass: Recent results

    Some recent developments in the experimental search for neutrino mass are discussed. Simpson and Hime report finding new evidence for a 17-keV neutrino in the β decay of 3H and 35S. New data from Los Alamos on the electron neutrino mass as measured in tritium beta decay give an upper limit of 13.5 eV at the 95% confidence level. This result is not consistent with the long-standing ITEP result of 26(5) eV within a ''model-independent'' range of 17 to 40 eV. It now appears that the electron neutrino is not sufficiently massive to close the universe by itself. 38 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Solar results purchasing

    Solar Thermal water heating has made little market penetration in some European countries. The main barriers to market development are: Long payback periods for the technology; Difficulties for the end-user in meeting the initial capital costs of the installation; Lack of confidence in the delivered energy that can be expected from the technology. The third barrier has been addressed using the concept of Guaranteed Solar Results (GSR). This project has addressed the other two main barriers using the concept of Solar Results Purchasing, (SRP) which combines GSR with Third Party Financing. The work was carried out in the UK, France, and Spain. The project used a uniform approach across the three countries. Each team calculated solar performance using an English version of the SOLO programme developed by TECSOL in France to encode the methodology for GSR model contracts. (author)

  18. Recent results from HELIOS

    Back B. B.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfer and inelastic scattering reactions using light-ion beams and stable or long-lived targets have traditionally provided detailed information on the structure of nuclei near the line of beta stability. Such studies can now be extended to nuclei away from the line of β-stability as radioactive beams are becoming available at a number of facilities around the world, including the CARIBU facility at Argonne. These measurements must, however, be carried out in inverse kinematics, resulting in a loss of the effective experimental resolution when conventional detection schemes are employed. The HELIOS spectrometer is based on a new concept, that is especially well suited for such studies by reducing the resolution problem, providing simple particle identification, and giving high detection efficiency with moderate Si detector area. In this talk, the HELIOS concept and results from the first series of experiments will be presented.

  19. Final NOMAD results on $\

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S A; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R D; Daniels, D C; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Dignan, T; Di Lella, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gosset, J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O L; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D V; Kuznetsov, V E; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; La Rotonda, L; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Lévy, J M; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Méchain, X; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Naumov, D V; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, Alfredo; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Yu; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P; Krasnoperov, A V

    2001-01-01

    Results from the nu_tau appearance search in a neutrino beam using the full NOMAD data sample are reported. A new analysis unifies all the hadronic tau decays, significantly improving the overall sensitivity of the experiment to oscillations. The "blind analysis" of all topologies yields no evidence for an oscillation signal. In the two-family oscillation scenario, this sets a 90% C.L. allowed region in the sin^2(2theta)-Delta m^2 plane which includes sin^2(2theta)nu_tau oscillation hypothesis results in sin^2(2theta)<1.5 x 10^{-2} at large Delta m^2 and Delta m^2 < 5.9 eV^2/c^4 at sin^2(2theta)=1. We also derive limits on effective couplings of the tau lepton to nu_mu or nu_e.

  20. Recent results from CMS

    Schöfbeck Robert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN collected a dataset of 19.5fb−1 during 8 TeV proton-proton operation. A large number of groundbreaking results were obtained from the analysis of this dataset, among them the discovery of the Higgs boson and precision measurements of important Standard Model parameters, for example the mass of the top quark. Subtle processes like the production of a Z boson by fusion of two W bosons have been measured for the first time. Moreover, many searches for physics beyond the Standard model have been carried out, both in the context of supersymmetry and beyond, which often provide tight constraints in model parameter space. This brief summary is a a short overview of the most important recent CMS results at 7 and 8 TeV.

  1. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    Reitz, G.

    1995-02-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD`s). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  2. New results from RENO

    Seo, Seon-Hee; RENO Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino oscillation is well known but one of the oscillation parameters, θ13, has not been well measured until 2012. The main goal of RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is to measure the θ13 using reactor neutrinos. RENO is located in Yonggwang, South Korea, where there are six reactor cores with a total of 16.5 GWth. By detecting the electron anti-neutrinos from nuclear fission processes from the reactors, RENO measured (4.9 sigma) the θ13 in 2012 with 220 live days of data. Since then we have been updating our results more precisely with increased statistics and improved systematics. In this talk, we would like to present our new results (800 live days of data) obtained by a shape analysis method. Excess of neutrino-like events at 5 MeV seen in our data is also discussed.

  3. New Results from RENO

    ,

    2013-01-01

    RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is an experiment dedicated to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle {\\theta}_13 using reactor neutrinos in Korea. Our first result measured in 2012 using about 220 live days of data showed non-zero {\\theta}_13 value with 4.9 {\\sigma} significance. In March 2013 we updated our first result with improvements in both statistical and systematic errors using 403 live days of data. The measured value using rate-only analysis is sin^2(2{\\theta}_13) = 0.100 +/- 0.010 (stat) +/- 0.015 (sys.) corresponding to 6.3 {\\sigma} significance. RENO has been taking data almost continuously since August 2011 and we have reached more than 800 live days of data that is currently being analyzed.

  4. Enova. Result Report 2003

    Enova is a state enterprise owned by the Oil and Energy Department, and it has been operative since 1st of January 2002. Its main objective is to work for the advancement of a more environmental energy consumption and energy production in Norway. 500 million NOK are annually administered by Enova and allocated to different energy projects. A brief account of the results from 2003 is presented

  5. Enova. Result Report 2004

    Enova is a state enterprise owned by the Oil and Energy Department, and has been operative since 1st of January 2002. Its main vision is to be a driving force for future-oriented energy solutions. The Energy fund is administered by Enova, and the resources are distributed to different projects that contribute to energy savings and new, environmental technology. A brief account of the results from 2004 is presented

  6. Theoretical Results on Neutrinos

    Zhou, Shun

    2015-01-01

    In this talk, I first summarize our current knowledge about the fundamental properties of neutrinos and emphasize the remaining unsolved problems in neutrino physics. Then, recent theoretical results on neutrino mass models are introduced. Different approaches to understanding tiny neutrino masses, lepton flavor mixing and CP violation are presented. Finally, I report briefly some new progress in the studies of astrophysical neutrinos, including keV sterile neutrinos, supernova neutrinos and ultrahigh-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  7. Results from AMANDA

    Hill, Gary C.; collaboration, for the AMANDA

    2001-01-01

    The AMANDA (Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array) detector, located at the South Pole station, Antarctica, was recently expanded with the addition of six new strings, completing the phase referred to as AMANDA-II. This detector has been calibrated and in operation since January 2000. The first data analyses are currently underway. In this report we present an update on the results from the AMANDA-B10 detector, which operated during the austral winter 1997.

  8. Results from PLUTO

    Results on the reaction e+ e- → μ+ μ- are presented. The data were taken with the PLUTO detector at the c.m. energy of 34.7 GeV. In the integrated luminosity of 44000 nb-1 taken, a forward backward asymmetry of -(12.0 + or - 3.2)% is observed for abs. value costheta <1 which is in agreement with the standard model

  9. Results from SAGE

    The Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. Beginning in September 1992, SAGE II data were taken with 55 tons of Ga and with significantly reduced backgrounds. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October 1993 is presented. The result of 69 ± 10 +5/-7 SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU

  10. Overview of HERMES results

    Van Hulse Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    The HERMES experiment has collected a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized. This allowed for a series of diverse and unique measurements. Among them are measurements that provide information on the threedimensional structure of the nucleon, both in momentum space and in position space. Results of measurements of exclusive ω production on an unpolarized and transversely polarized n...

  11. Assessing ultrasonic examination results

    Amongst nondestructive examination methods, the ultrasonic examination plays an important role. The reason why its scope of application is so wide is because the sound conducting capacity is the only property the material of a test specimen has to have. As the fields are so manifold, only main aspects can be described briefly. The list of references, however, is very extensive and gives plenty of information of all the problems concerning the assessment of ultrasonic examination results. (orig./RW)

  12. Space Shuttle radargrammetry results

    Leberl, F.; Domik, G.; Raggam, J.; Cimino, J.; Kobrick, M.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results on the radargrammetric processing of SIR-A and SIR-B data are presented. Radargrammetric processing was applied to images of the Trinity National Forest in Northern California, the islands of Cephalonia, Ithaka, and Sardegna, Mt. Shasta, and Cordon La Grasa, Argentina. The preliminary processing of the SIR-A and SIR-B data has produced digital elevation models, stereo models, and a contour map.

  13. Recent results from LEP

    A Gurtu

    2000-04-01

    Recent results from the LEP collider at CERN are presented: on the identification of +- → +- and the determination of the mass and width and limits on its anomalous couplings; the search for the Standard Model and non-minimal Higgs; search for SUSY and other new particles. Fits to all electroweak data leading to predictions of the Higgs mass within the Standard Model are presented.

  14. GIRAFFE test results summary

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  15. Recent CMS Results

    Dorigo, Tommaso

    2012-01-01

    The CMS experiment obtained a large number of groundbreaking results from the analysis of 7- and 8-TeV proton-proton collisions produced so far by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In this brief summary only a sample of those results will be discussed. A new particle with mass m(H) = 125.3 +- 0.4(stat.) +- 0.5(syst.) GeV and characteristics compatible with those expected for a standard model Higgs boson has been observed in its decays to photon pairs, WW pairs, and ZZ pairs. Searches for the rare decays B_d -> mu mu and B_s -> mu mu have allowed to set limits on the branching fractions which are close to standard model predictions, strongly constraining new physics models. The top quark has been studied with great detail, obtaining among other results the world's best measurement of its mass as m(top) = 173.49 +- 0.43(stat. + JES) +- 0.98(syst.) GeV. New physics models have been strongly constrained with the available data.

  16. Pressure locking test results

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  17. Recent BABAR Results

    Eigen, Gerald [University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  18. Results from neutrino experiments

    Recent (first or/and the best) results from the neutrino experiments are reviewed and their implications for the theory are discussed. The sense of the experiments is the searching for neutrino masses, mixing and interactions beyond the standard model. Present laboratory experiments give upper bounds on the masses and the mixing which are at the level of predictions of the ''electroweak see-saw''. Positive indications of nonzero lepton mixing follow from studies of the solar and atmospheric neutrinos. (author). 95 refs, 11 figs

  19. Mersenne Numbers: consolidated results

    Haworth, Guy McCrossan; Holmes, Steve; Hunt, David; Lake, Tom; Reddaway, Stewart

    1986-01-01

    This document provides and comments on the results of the Lucas-Lehmer testing and/or partial factorisation of all Mersenne Numbers Mp = 2^p-1 where p is prime and less than 100,000. Previous computations have either been confirmed or corrected. The LLT computations on the ICL DAP is the first implementation of Fast-Fermat-Number-Transform multiplication in connection with Mersenne Number testing. This paper championed the disciplines of systematically testing the Mp, and of double-so...

  20. Latest LHCb results

    Martinelli Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCb experiment is one of the major research projects at the Large Hadron Collider. Its acceptance and instrumentation is optimised to perform high-precision studies of flavour physics and particle production in a unique kinematic range at unprecedented collision energies. Using large data samples accumulated in the years 2010-2012, the LHCb collaboration has conducted a series of measurements providing a sensitive test of the Standard Model and strengthening our knowledge of flavour physics, QCD and electroweak processes. The status of the experiment and some of its recent results are presented here.

  1. Results in the Past

    Wang, Ge

    2010-01-01

    Past research results include the following: • Modern CT scanners that use spiral-beam scanning and perform >100-million scans annually in the USA • Construction of the only 500nm resolution micro-CT system on the East Coast and the only 50nm nano-CT system with the interior tomography capability in the world from inside the walls of SAM-CT x-ray imaging facility • With further promise to handle large objects, reduce radiation dose, and improve temporal resolution, Interior tomography has alr...

  2. Scientific results report 1980

    The report describes in concise form the research tasks and results of the work groups pulsed irradiation, reaction kinematics and insulators and plastics in the field of 'radiation chemistry' of the Hahn-Meitner Institute, Berlin. The main topic of investigation was the kinetics and dynamics of fast chemical processes, the setting-up of chemical reaction mechanisms and research of chemical physical properties of highly reactive species (radicals, ions, electrons). A list of publications and lectures as well as teaching contributions of the institute's scientists, diploma and doctor theses performed in the institute and guest lectures held there is also given. (RB)

  3. First LHC Results

    Horn, Claus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since four month the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is producing proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV offering the potential of directly producing dark matter particles in an energy range never reached before in accelerator-based particle physics. First the performance and first Standard Model measurements of the general purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS is presented. This talk then focuses on their potential to detect dark matter candidates. Results from ongoing physics analyzes are presented and expectations for possible future discoveries are discussed.

  4. Recent results from ARGUS

    The ARGUS experiment, running at the DORIS II storage ring, has been collecting data on e+e- collisions near 10 GeV region since the end of 1982. The ARGUS detector, designed specifically for large acceptance and high resolution spectroscopy in the UPSILON resonances region, has produced a prolific amount of new results in recent months. Some of these are presented here. The subject matters include topics from charm and beauty spectroscopy and weak decays of charm mesons, beauty mesons and the tauon

  5. Latest LHCb results

    Martinelli, Maurizio

    2014-11-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the major research projects at the Large Hadron Collider. Its acceptance and instrumentation is optimised to perform high-precision studies of flavour physics and particle production in a unique kinematic range at unprecedented collision energies. Using large data samples accumulated in the years 2010-2012, the LHCb collaboration has conducted a series of measurements providing a sensitive test of the Standard Model and strengthening our knowledge of flavour physics, QCD and electroweak processes. The status of the experiment and some of its recent results are presented here.

  6. Recent result from RENO

    Seo, Hyunkwan; RENO Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) started data-taking from August, 2011 and has measured the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 by observing the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos. Antineutrinos from the six reactors at Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant in Korea are detected and compared by the two identical detectors located in the near and far distances from the reactor array center. We present new results on precisely measured sin 22θ13 value and |Δm2 ee| based on spectral analysis using the 800 days of data sample, which are taken from August, 2011 to Dec., 2013.

  7. Recent results from CMS

    Dordevic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    The highlights of the most recent CMS results with 13 TeV data will be presented in this overview. The Standard Model precision measurements, including the top quark production, will be shown first. This will be followed by the presentation of Higgs boson studies with the early 13 TeV data. Then the focus will shift to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, including the searches for several Supersymmetric scenarios, using different analysis techniques. The talk will conclude with searches for the exotic resonances, with an emphasis on studies of the high-mass diphoton production.

  8. Cleanroom energy benchmarking results

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang

    2001-09-01

    A utility market transformation project studied energy use and identified energy efficiency opportunities in cleanroom HVAC design and operation for fourteen cleanrooms. This paper presents the results of this work and relevant observations. Cleanroom owners and operators know that cleanrooms are energy intensive but have little information to compare their cleanroom's performance over time, or to others. Direct comparison of energy performance by traditional means, such as watts/ft{sup 2}, is not a good indicator with the wide range of industrial processes and cleanliness levels occurring in cleanrooms. In this project, metrics allow direct comparison of the efficiency of HVAC systems and components. Energy and flow measurements were taken to determine actual HVAC system energy efficiency. The results confirm a wide variation in operating efficiency and they identify other non-energy operating problems. Improvement opportunities were identified at each of the benchmarked facilities. Analysis of the best performing systems and components is summarized, as are areas for additional investigation.

  9. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP joint, rotate the digit by about 120° for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50° to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters.

  10. First result from Qweak

    Armstrong, David S. [William and Mary College, JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Initial results are presented from the recently-completed Q{sub weak} experiment at Jefferson Lab. The goal is a precise measurement of the proton's weak charge Q{sub w}{sup p}, to yield a test of the standard model and to search for evidence of new physics. The weak charge is extracted from the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic {rvec e}p scattering at low momentum transfer, Q{sup 2} = 0.025 GeV{sup 2}. A 180 {micro} A longitudinally-polarized 1.16 GeV electron beam was scattered from a 35 cm long liquid hydrogen at small angles, 6 {degrees} < {theta} < 12 {degrees} Scattered electrons were analyzed in a toroidal magnetic field and detected using an array of eight Cerenkov detectors arranged symmetrically about the beam axis. The initial result, from 4% of the complete data set, is Q{sub W}{sup p} = 0.064 ± 0.012, in excellent agreement with the standard model expectation. Full analysis of the data is expected to yield a value for the weak charge to about 5% precision.

  11. Latest Double Chooz results

    Lasserre, Thierry; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    I report the latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the θ13 neutrino mixing angle. Two detectors are located at distances of 400 m and 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power station (France) to measure the disappearance of electron antineutrinos. The far detector has been taking data since 2011, accumulating a live time of 467.90 days (66.5 GW-ton-year). In this article we focus on the latest measurement using neutrino-induced neutron capture on hydrogen. A new analysis improved the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties, leading to sin2 2θ 13 = 0.095+0.039 -0.038. When combined with the Gadolinium-based analysis this leads to sin2 2θ13 = 0.088+0.33 -0.033. The distortion from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is confirmed. The near detector started data taking in 2014 and first results shall be reported in 2016.

  12. Organic Separation Test Results

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  13. Archeomagnetic Results From Spain

    Chauvin, A.; Gomez-Paccard, M.; Lanos, P.; Osete, M.; McIntosh, G.; Thiriot, J.

    2007-05-01

    A first secular variation (SV) curve for the Iberian Peninsula was computed by hierarchical Bayesian method using a total of 134 archaeomagnetic directions with ages ranging from 775 BC to 1959 A.D. A general agreement is observed between the Iberian curve and the French and German SV curves, excepted between the 11th and 14th centuries. The analysis of these three reference curves indicates that SV in western Europe is characterized by three major directional changes at 125, 200, and 1350 A.D. It is suggested that these cusps are regional features of the geomagnetic field. Archeointensity studies were also conducted on 24 Spanish archeomagnetic sites (220 AD to 1959 AD). Intensity data were obtained using the original Thellier method with anisotropy and cooling rates corrections. Our new 24 data, together with 62 previously published results, were used to recover, by Bayesian modelling, the geomagnetic field intensity evolution over the past two millennia for western Europe. Our results indicate that the geomagnetic intensity remains more or less constant between the 1st and 4th centuries, and between the 13th and 15th centuries, whereas an important decrease occurs during the last 5 centuries. The evolution of the Earth's magnetic field intensity during High Middle Ages remains uncertain. The available geomagnetic global models predict reasonably well our data.

  14. Double Chooz: Latest results

    Crespo-Anadón, J I

    2014-01-01

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the ...

  15. Recent results from LHCf

    Menjo H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment is one of the LHC forward experiments. The aim of LHCf is to provide critical calibration data of hadronic intraction models used in air shower simulations. The LHCf has completed the operations for p-p collisions with a collision energy of √s = 0.9 and 7 TeV p-p in 2010 and for p-Pb collisions with a collision energy per nucleon of √sNN = 5.02. The recent LHCf result of forward neutron energy spectra at 7 TeV p-p collision and forward π0 spectra at p-Pb collisions are presented in this paper.

  16. Recent Results from Phobos

    García, Edmundo; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.

    2007-02-01

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  17. Results of DT experiments

    The results of TFTR DT experiments are reviewed with the author' comments. A maximum fusion power of 10.7MW was produced in TFTR deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments, using nearly equal concentrations of deuterium and tritium. The particle diffusivities of tritium and 4He, and the deuterium thermal diffusivity are of similar magnitudes. Measurements of the loss of alpha particles in DT plasmas show no new loss mechanism. Initial measurements of alpha ash from DT reactions indicate that the transport coefficients of alpha ash are consistent with those for helium introduced to the plasma by gas puffing. DT plasmas with enhanced energy confinement have been obtained in the high poloidal beta. ICRF heating of a DT plasma has demonstrated ion and electron heating. (author)

  18. New results in percolation

    In this reprint some new results in percolation are reported. As a basic model the two-dimensional system, consisting of the phases with different conductivities, is considered. The phases are placed in a random way and in the double periodic structure also. For two-phase case it is shown that effective conductivity essentially depends on the microgeometry of the medium and the generalization of the Dykhne formula for the parallelogram unit cell is obtained. The percolation under quantum Hall effect conditions is studied by the general approach, using the symmetry of the system. The features of current percolation in QHE regime are established, and the effective characteristics and the local current distributions are found. For the problem of nonlinear percolation the new duality relations for critical exponents, described effective nonlinear current- voltage characteristics, are found. These duality relations are checked by the numerical simulations. (author)

  19. Results from SNO

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is an underground heavy water Cherenkov detector for studying solar neutrinos. SNO is capable of performing both flavor sensitive and flavor blind measurements of the solar neutrino flux. The first charged current (CC) measurement is found to be: ψSNOCC(νe) = 1.75 ± 0.07(stat.)-0.11+0.12(sys.) ± 0.05 (theor.) x 106 cm-2s-1 and the elastic scattering fluxes (ES) is: ψSNOES(νx) = 2.39 ± 0.34(stat.)-0.14+0.16 (sys.) x 106 cm-2s-1. The ψSNOCC(νe) result, when combined with the high statistics elastic scattering (ES) measurement from Super-Kamiokande, provide a strong evidence for solar neutrino flavor transformation (3.3σ). The deduced total solar neutrino flux is in good agreement with standard solar model predictions. No significant distortion in the energy spectrum is observed

  20. Recent results from ANTARES

    Trovato Agata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating 40 km off the coast of France since 2007, the ANTARES detector is the largest deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere with an instrumented volume of more than 0.01 cubic kilometers. It consists of an array of 885 photomultipliers detecting the Cherenkov light induced by charged leptons produced by neutrino interactions in and around the detector. The primary goal of ANTARES is to search for astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV–PeV range. This comprises generic searches for any diffuse cosmic neutrino flux as well as more specific searches for astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The search program also includes multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. The ANTARES observatory is sensitive to a wide-range of other phenomena, from atmospheric neutrino oscillations to dark matter annihilation. In this contribution, recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope will be presented.

  1. VRAC: Simulation Results #1

    Huc, Florian

    2009-01-01

    In order to make full use of geographic routing techniques developed for large scale networks, nodes must be localized. However, localization and virtual localization techniques in sensor networks are dependent either on expensive and sometimes unavailable hardware (e.g. GPS) or on sophisticated localization calculus (e.g. triangulation) which are both error-prone and with a costly overhead. Instead of localizing nodes in a traditional 2-dimensional space, we use directly the raw distance to a set of anchors to route messages in a multi-dimensional space. This should enable us to use any geographic routing protocol in a robust and efficient manner in a very large range of scenarios. We test this technique for two different geographic routing algorithms, namely GRIC and ROAM. The simulation results show that using the raw coordinates does not decrease their efficiency.

  2. Recent results from CMS

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in center-of-mass energy, a new energy frontier has been opened by the Large Hadron Collider. More than 25 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=13 TeV have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS experiments during 2016. This enormous dataset can be used to test the Standard Model in a complete new regime with tremendous precision and it has the potential to unveil new physics or set strong bounds on it. In this talk some of the most recent results made public by the CMS Collaboration will be presented. The focus will mainly be on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, with particular emphasis on searches for dark matter candidates.

  3. Payment by Results

    Brendan A. Rapple

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the public is demanding that it exercise more control over how tax dollars are spent in the educational sphere, with multitudes also canvassing that education become closely aligned to the marketplace's economic forces. In this paper I examine an historical precedent for such demands, i.e. the comprehensive 19th century system of accountability, "Payment by Results," which endured in English and Welsh elementary schools from 1862 until 1897. Particular emphasis is focused on the economic market-driven aspect of the system whereby every pupil was examined annually by an Inspector, the amount of the governmental grant being largely dependent on the answering. I argue that this was a narrow, restrictive system of educational accountability though one totally in keeping with the age's pervasive utilitarian belief in laissez-faire. I conclude by observing that this Victorian system might be suggestive to us today when calls for analogous schemes of educational accountability are shrill.

  4. MUNU final results

    Daraktchieva, Zornitza, E-mail: Zornitza.Daraktchieva@unine.ch [Institute de Physique, A.-L. Breguet 1, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    The MUNU detector has been designed to study {nu}{sub e}{sup Macron }e{sup -} elastic scattering at low energy. The central tracking detector is a 1 m{sup 3} Time Projection Chamber surrounded by an anti-Compton detector. In this paper the results from final analysis of the data recorded at 3-bar and 1-bar pressure are presented. At 3-bar a new upper limit on the neutrino magnetic moment {mu}{sub {nu}}<9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}(7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11}){mu}{sub B} at 90 (68%) C.L. is derived. At 1-bar pressure electron tracks down to 80 keV are measured in the TPC. A {sup 137}Cs photopeak is reconstructed by measuring both the energy and direction of the Compton electrons in the TPC.

  5. Overview of HERMES results

    Van Hulse, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    The HERMES experiment has collected a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized. This allowed for a series of diverse and unique measurements. Among them are measurements that provide information on the threedimensional structure of the nucleon, both in momentum space and in position space. Results of measurements of exclusive ω production on an unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon target, sensitive to the distribution in transverse-position and longitudinalmomentum space, are discussed as well as the three-dimensional extraction of azimuthal asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, sensitive to twist-2 and twist-3 distributions in three-dimensional momentum space.

  6. Overview of HERMES results

    Van Hulse Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The HERMES experiment has collected a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized. This allowed for a series of diverse and unique measurements. Among them are measurements that provide information on the threedimensional structure of the nucleon, both in momentum space and in position space. Results of measurements of exclusive ω production on an unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon target, sensitive to the distribution in transverse-position and longitudinalmomentum space, are discussed as well as the three-dimensional extraction of azimuthal asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, sensitive to twist-2 and twist-3 distributions in three-dimensional momentum space.

  7. Recent results from ZEUS

    Recent results on deep inelastic scattering from the ZEUS collaboration are reviewed. These include studies of neutral and charged currents at high Q2, fragmentation and perturbative QCD, and information on the quark and gluon content of the proton. Information on the gluon density in the proton is obtained from a wide variety of processes, leading to a consistent picture of a steep rise of the gluon density at low x. Preliminary measurements of F2 extending to new regimes at both high and low Q2 and x are presented based on 1994 data. Analysis of events with a large rapidity gap with respect to the direction of the proton beam is consistent with factorisation of the cross-section into a flux factor and a structure function, and can be interpreted as an indication of point-like constituents inside the pomeron. (orig.)

  8. Scientific results - report 1981

    During the year under report 1981, five working groups were active in the field of nuclear chemistry: neutron diffraction, radiation damage in solids, reactor chemistry, trace element research in bio-medicine and geo-chemistry. The objectives of the R+D projects ranged from the more basic research to the development of technological processes. Nuclear inspection methodes that have already been developed (e.g. neutron diffraction, trace element analysis) have increasingly been used in an interdisciplinary way. Besides these R+D projects the project of increase of power of the BER II was pursued also in 1981, and further planning documents on the extension of the BER II have been established. The report informs about the most important results of the single sections. A list of the publications (with abstracts) and lectures, also by guest scientists, is attached. (RB)

  9. Results and discussion

    The author deals with the experimental study of sorption, desorption and vertical migration of radionuclides in Sr-85 and Cs-137 in selected soil samples from around of NPP Bohunice and NPP Mochovce and other localities of the Slovakia. The influence of different materials [concurrent ions (K+, Ca2+, NH4+, pH), organic matter (peat) and zeolite, humidity] on kinetic of sorption and desorption of strontium and cesium as well as distribution coefficient (KD) and transfer coefficients in followed samples of soils were followed. Obtained adsorption isotherm are presented and discussed. Using the Tessiere's sequential extraction analysis a gross variability in binding of radionuclides on soils was found. The obtained results were processed with the correlation analysis and the compartment model

  10. Areva - 2011 Annual results

    Areva's backlog established at 45.6 billion euros at the end of 2011, significantly increasing at the end of a year marked by the Fukushima accident, confirms the commercial dynamism of the group alongside its customers and reinforces the visibility on its future business level. In a difficult context, the slight decline in revenue in 2011 demonstrates the robustness of Areva's integrated model, resting mainly on recurring business generated in relation to Areva's customers' nuclear installed base, and benefiting from the development of Areva's renewable energies operations. Free operating cash flow before tax, although down over the whole year in 2011, improved in the second half, showing the first effects of Areva's stronger focus on cash generation and debt management. After the success of Areva's bond issue in September 2011, the Group's liquidity remains high at the end of 2011. The Areva teams are now dedicating all of their efforts to the deployment of the 'Action 2016' strategic action plan, which had already yielded its first positive results at the end of 2011, with an improvement in the cost structure of Areva's operations, an increase in order intake, and the launch of several disposals of minority interests. Summary of the 2011 financial results: - Backlog: euro 45.6 bn, +3.1% vs. 2010, i.e +6.7% over 3 months; - Revenue: euro 8.872 bn, i.e -2.6% vs. 2010; - Operating income: - euro 1.923 bn; - Net income attributable to equity owners of the parent: - euro 2.424 bn; - EBITDA: euro 1.068 bn ( euro 420 m excluding Siemens impact); - Free operating cash flow before tax: - euro 2.397 bn (- euro 1.366 bn excluding Siemens impacts), improvement over the second half; - Decrease in net debt of euro 124 m for the year; - Significant drop in general and administrative expenses, with a noticeable reduction between the first and the second half; - Launch of several disposals of minority interests

  11. Report on Results 2000

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses work being carried out in Norway to promote energy efficiency and the production of new renewable energy. An overall review of the quantifiable results of last year's activities at national level is available. It will serve to initiate an annual reporting tradition. The report represents a step towards an ongoing process for improved targeting and management of national efforts. During the course of the year 2000, NVE has evaluated and adjusted its activities and established a system involving indicators and reporting procedures. It is also important to take notice of the long-term work being undertaken to influence people's attitudes, even though this work is difficult to assess. NVE is investing in i.a. measures aimed at children and young people. Apart from directly influencing future energy users, this investment is also having an effect due to the children's encouragement of their parents to engage in more energy and environment-friendly behaviour. Published in 2000, the IEA report ''Trends in Norwegian Stationary Energy Use'' shows that total Norwegian energy consumption per GDP is not much higher than in other IEA countries, when adjusted for cold climate and industrial structure. However, Norwegians do stand out as intensive users of electricity. The IEA report shows a reduction of 10 TWh in energy usage when compared to the projected post 1990 figures. Energy efficiency activities have contributed towards this reduction. However, the potential for a more rational use of energy in Norway is still substantial and well documented. Based on experience most enterprises could save around 10% of energy used just by making changes to their operations, i.e. without major investments. Furthermore, the potential is growing because of massive technological developments in respect of energy usage, production and distribution. With this in mind, it is necessary to take full advantage of the extensive knowledge

  12. Experimental results: an update

    This article is a summary of experimental results from highest energy cosmic ray measurements, focusing on data and analyses that became available after 1999. The structure of the article is as follows. In Section 2 the currently available data of highest energy cosmic ray fluxes are compared. Systematic features in the energy spectrum are discussed and the question of compatibility of the data with the existence of a GZK (Greisin-Zatsepin-Kuzmin) cutoff is addressed. In Section 3 we summarize new results on studies of the arrival direction distribution and in Section 4 a compilation of recent composition measurements is presented. In Section 5 we give conclusions and an outlook, briefly describing some of the very promising detector projects planned or currently under construction. The 6 main conclusions we highlight are briefly: 1) Cosmic rays with energies exceeding 1020 eV do exist; 2) The arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays is, within the statistics of the measurements, isotropic even at the highest energies. There is only a small but statistically significant anisotropy at ∼ 1018 eV; 3) The mass composition of ultra high energy cosmic rays seems to become lighter with increasing energy; 4) There are no indications of a substantial fraction of ultra-high energy gamma-rays in the cosmic ray flux; 5) Experiments with larger collection area and new detection techniques are needed to significantly increase the statistics of the observed events. The combination of different detection techniques in single experiments will be the key to understanding systematic effects due to detection methods and our limited theoretical understanding of extensive air showers at ultra high energy. Uniform coverage of the northern and southern sky is mandatory for progressing in determining the arrival direction distribution and possible differences of the fluxes observed at the northern and southern hemisphere; 6) Parallel to the experimental efforts of collecting many

  13. Results from LHCf Experiment

    Tricomi Alessia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment has taken data in 2009 and 2010 p-p collisions at LHC at √s = 0.9 TeV and √s = 7 TeV. The measurement of the forward neutral particle spectra produced in proton-proton collisions at LHC up to an energy of 14 TeV in the center of mass system are of fundamental importance to calibrate the Monte Carlo models widely used in the high energy cosmic ray (HECR field, up to an equivalent laboratory energy of the order of 1017 eV. In this paper the first results on the inclusive photon spectrum measured by LHCf is reported. Comparison of this spectrum with the model expectations show significant discrepancies, mainly in the high energy region. In addition, perspectives for future analyses as well as the program for the next data taking period, in particular the possibility to take data in p-Pb collisions, will be discussed.

  14. Results from hadron colliders

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for bar p + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: σtot = 72.1 ± 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z → bar qq. Precision measurements of MW by UA2 and CDF give an average value MW = 80.13 ± 0.30 GeV/c2. When combined with measurements of MZ from LEP and SLC this number gives sin2θW = 0.227 ± 0.006, or mtop = 130-60+40 GeV/c2 from the EWK radiative correction term Δr. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above MW: mtop > 89 GeV/c2 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing ET signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range mtop 2 look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs

  15. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  16. Results from SNO

    Chan, Yuen-dat

    2001-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is an underground heavy water Cherenkov detector for studying solar neutrinos. SNO is capable of performing both flavor sensitive and flavor blind measurements of the solar neutrino flux. The first charged current (CC) measurement is found to be: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) = 1.75 {+-} 0.07(stat.){sub -0.11}{sup +0.12}(sys.) {+-} 0.05 (theor.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the elastic scattering fluxes (ES) is: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup ES}({nu}{sub x}) = 2.39 {+-} 0.34(stat.){sub -0.14}{sup +0.16} (sys.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) result, when combined with the high statistics elastic scattering (ES) measurement from Super-Kamiokande, provide a strong evidence for solar neutrino flavor transformation (3.3{sigma}). The deduced total solar neutrino flux is in good agreement with standard solar model predictions. No significant distortion in the energy spectrum is observed.

  17. ALOS-2 initial results

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  18. Results from PLUTO

    Recent results obtained with the PLUTO detector at the e+e- storage ring PETRA are reviewed. The validity of QED has been successfully tested in five independent reactions at spacelike momentum transfers up to -850 GeV2 and timelike momentum transfers up to 1000 GeV2. We are performing a detailed study of hadron production through 2 γ interactions. In particular we have measured the total hadronic γγ cross section and have determined the radiative width of the f0 meson to be GAMMA (f → γγ) = (2.3 +- 0.5 +- 0.35) keV. The first indication for the production of large P(t) jets in 2γ interactions is presented. We find no evidence for a tt threshold in the rate of inclusive muons. Finally we give a lower limit (95% c.1.) of 13 GeV on the mass of a spin 0 electron expected from supersymmetry

  19. Lower gastrointestinal endoscopies results

    Ahmet Bozdağ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Endoscopic examinations have great potential in early diagnosis of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas with reducing to colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. We aimed to evaluate for diagnostic purposeful lower gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in the second step state hospital retrospectively Methods: Between June 2010 and June 2013, we evaluated 278 patients with rectal bleeding, constipation and abdominal pain detected by lower gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures retrospectively. Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.8 ± 16.8 (15-90 year, respectively. 172 (61.9% of the patients were male and 106 (38.1% of the patients were female. 116 (41.7% of the patients was performed rectosigmoidoscopy and 162 (58.3% of the patients was performed colonoscopy. 51(18.3% of our patients were normal. 10 (3.6% of patients had colorectal cancer, 11(3.9% of patients had inflammatory bowel disease, 8 (2.9% of patients had parasitosis, 31(11.1% of patients had colorectal polyps, 12 (4.3% , in patients had diverticular disease, 2 (0.7% patients had rectal ulcer, 25 (9% patients had anal fissure and 159 (57.2% of the patients had hemorrhoidal disease. Conclusion: Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is a method been the gold standard with a low complication rate and that can be easily applied in the evaluation to pathology of colorectal and anal canal. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (4: 580-582

  20. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  1. Simpler images, better results

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  2. ESR teleradiology survey: results.

    2016-08-01

    With recent developments of teleradiology technology and services, it has become necessary to better evaluate its extent and use among different countries in Europe. With this goal in mind, the ESR launched two specific surveys intended to gather the current state of adoption and implementation of teleradiology in clinical practice. A special focus on differentiating between insourcing teleradiology services among partners of the same organisation and outsourcing to external services was an essential part of the design of these surveys. The first survey was addressed to 44 national societies of different countries in Europe, while the second survey was intended for all practicing radiologist ESR members. While the results of these surveys reported here may provide a wealth of information to better understand the trends in adoption of teleradiology in Europe, they only represent a snapshot at a certain point in time. The rapid development of telecommunication tools as well as a fundamental change in practice and healthcare economics will certainly influence these observations in the upcoming years. These data, however, will provide objective and relevant parameters for supporting the efforts of experts and policy makers in promoting appropriate criteria and guidelines for adequate use of teleradiology in clinical practice. Main Messages • Understand concepts and challenges of teleradiology • Provide insight into current trends and solutions for teleradiology • Compare differences in teleradiolgy strategies between countries in Europe • Establish a reference on statistical data of usage of teleradiology in Europe. PMID:27188379

  3. Climax granite test results

    The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) program, is carrying out in situ rock mechanics testing in the Climax granitic stock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This summary addresses only those field data taken to date that address thermomechanical modeling for a hard-rock repository. The results to be discussed include thermal measurements in a heater test that was conducted from October 1977 through July 1978, and stress and displacement measurements made during and after excavation of the canister storage drift for the Spent Fuel Test (SFT) in the Climax granite. Associated laboratory and field measurements are summarized. The rock temperature for a given applied heat load at a point in time and space can be adequately modeled with simple analytic calculations involving superposition and integration of numerous point source solutions. The input, for locations beyond about a meter from the source, can be a constant thermal conductivity and diffusivity. The value of thermal conductivity required to match the field data is as much as 25% different from laboratory-measured values. Therefore, unless we come to understand the mechanisms for this difference, a simple in situ test will be required to obtain a value for final repository design. Some sensitivity calculations have shown that the temperature field is about ten times more sensitive to conductivity than to diffusivity under the test conditions.The orthogonal array was designed to detect anisotropy. After considering all error sources, anisotropic efforts in the thermal field were less than 5 to 10%

  4. Areva: 2014 annual results

    The scale of the net loss for 2014 illustrates the twofold challenge confronting AREVA: continuing stagnation of the nuclear operations, lack of competitiveness and difficulties in managing the risks inherent in large projects. The group understands how serious this situation is. A comprehensive strategic review of operations was undertaken beginning in November 2014 and is being carried out without compromise. As a result, AREVA is now able to announce a solid transformation plan that sets a challenging but economically realistic course for its teams. First, AREVA will refocus on its core business: mastery of key nuclear processes essential to operators around the globe. This strategic redeployment will lead to the revision of certain goals, whether in the management of new reactor projects or in renewable energies. AREVA's objective is to achieve excellence as a high value-added supplier of products and services. Secondly, AREVA, whose resources had been marshaled to support a spurt of growth in nuclear power, must now adapt to new market realities and become competitive once again. The group's most urgent task is recovery and securing its future by immediately launching a far-reaching competitiveness plan founded on organizational simplification, quality of operations, and a completely revamped approach to managing risk in large projects. Last but not least, AREVA must ensure sustainable financing for its activities. A financing plan will be clarified before publication of the half-year financial statements. This document presents the key financial data of the group, its strategic road-map and its operating and financing plans

  5. AREVA annual results 2009

    AREVA expanded its backlog and increased its revenues compared with 2008, on strong installed base business and dynamic major projects, fostering growth in operating income of 240 million euros. As announced previously, Areva is implementing a financing plan suited to its objectives of profitable growth. The plan was implemented successfully in 2009, including the conclusion of an agreement, under very satisfactory terms, to sell its Transmission and Distribution business for 4 billion euros, asset sales for more than 1.5 billion euros, and successful bond issues of 3 billion euros. The plan will continue in 2010 with a capital increase, the completion of asset disposals and cost reduction and continued operational performance improvement programs. Areva bolstered its Renewable Energies business segment by supplementing its offshore wind power and biomass businesses with the acquisition of Ausra, a California-based leader in concentrated solar power technology. Despite the sale of T and D, Areva is maintaining its financial performance outlook for 2012: 12% average annual revenue growth to 12 billion euros in 2012, double digit operating margin and substantially positive free operating cash flow. Annual results 2009: - For the group as a whole, including Transmission and Distribution: Backlog: euros 49.4 bn (+2.5%), Revenues: euros 14 bn (+6.4%), Operating income: euros 501 m (+20.1%); - Nuclear and Renewable Energies perimeter: Backlog: euros 43.3 bn (+1.8%), Strong revenue growth: +5.4% to euros 8.5 bn, Operating income before provision for the Finnish project in the first half of 2009: euros 647 m, Operating income: euros 97 m, for a euros 240 m increase from 2008; - Net income attributable to equity holders of the parent: euros 552 m, i.e. euros 15.59 per share; - Net debt: euros 6,193 m; - Pro-forma net debt, including net cash to be received from the sale of T and D in 2010: euros 3,022 m; - Dividend of euros 7.06 per share to be proposed during the Annual

  6. Overview of MAST results

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L. V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  7. Montmorillonite stability - experimental results

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Several repository concepts for spent nuclear fuel comprise a bentonite buffer which encloses the fuel containers. The function of this bentonite buffer is critically dependent on the properties of the swelling mineral in the bentonite, which typically is montmorillonite in commercial high quality bentonites. The physical and chemical properties of the montmorillonite in bentonites have consequently been studied in various types of analyses in several countries, and the results have been the basis for the design of the bentonite buffer with respect to size, degree of compaction etc (SKB TR-10-47). Significant changes in the montmorillonite structure with time may change the properties of the bentonite buffer and jeopardize the isolating function. In nature, illite is the most common alteration product from montmorillonite, and a 50% alteration reduces, for instance, the swelling pressure by one order of magnitude. Fortunately, the process is very slow at typical repository temperatures, and also in the perspective of repository life-time no significant alteration is expected according to the available kinetic models. The models are, however, based on laboratory batch experiments performed at temperatures, which by necessity are much higher than what is planned for in a repository. Alternatively, the models are based on natural montmorillonite-to-illite alteration in e.g. deep sediments. In both cases there are divergences from repository conditions which limit the arguments for the bentonite buffer stability. The mechanism by which the montmorillonite-to-illite reaction takes place is not fully understood, but the overall process may be represented by the following schematic reaction: Na+ montmorillonite + K+ + Al3+ → illite + SiO2 + Na+. Aluminum may be supplied from the bentonite itself, but potassium has to be transported to the buffer from an external source in order to give a significant alteration in a

  8. Overview of MAST results

    structures following field lines in the edge. These filaments rotate toroidally with the edge plasma and, away from the X-points, accelerate radially outwards from the edge up to 20cm. Studies of disruptions on MAST demonstrate a complex evolution of core energy loss and resultant divertor power loads, including phases where the target heat flux width is broadened by a factor 8. Observations of energetic particle modes driven by super-Alfvenic beam ions provide support for a model for the non-linear evolution of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (AE) forming BGK waves. AE activity reduces to low levels with increasing β. Plasma start-up without a central solenoid and in a manner compatible with future large ST devices has been demonstrated using breakdown at a quadrupole magnetic null. Closed flux surface plasmas with peak plasma currents up to 370 kA have been generated and sustained for 0.3s. New error field correction coils have extended the operational space for low density plasmas and enabled scaling studies of error field induced locked mode formation in the ST. (author)

  9. Evaluating the applicability of regulatory leaching tests for assessing lead leachability in contaminated shooting range soils.

    Cao, Xinde; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2008-04-01

    The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) is the current US-EPA standard protocol to evaluate metal leachability in wastes and contaminated soils. However, application of TCLP to assess lead (Pb) leachability from contaminated shooting range soils may be questionable. This study determined Pb leachability in the range soils using TCLP and another US-EPA regulatory leaching method, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP). Possible mechanisms that are responsible for Pb leaching in each leaching protocol were elucidated via X-ray diffraction (XRD). Soil samples were collected from the backstop berms at four shooting ranges, with Pb concentrations ranging from 5,000 to 60,600 mg kg(-1) soil. Lead concentrations in the TCLP leachates were from 3 to 350 mg l(-1), with all but one soil exceeding the USEPA non-hazardous waste disposal limit of 5 mg l(-1). However, continued dissolution of metallic Pb particles from spent Pb bullets and its re-precipitation as cerussite (PbCO(3)) prevented the TCLP extraction from reaching equilibrium at the end of the standard leaching period (18 h). Thus, the standard one-point TCLP test would either over- or under-estimate Pb leachability in shooting range soils. Lead concentration in the SPLP leachates ranged from 0.021 to 2.6 mg l(-1), with all soils above the USEPA regulatory limit of 0.015 mg l(-1). In contrast to TCLP, SPLP leaching had reached equilibrium, with regard to both pH and Pb concentrations, within the standard 18 h leaching period, and the analytical SPLP results were in good agreement with those derived from modeling. Thus, we concluded that SPLP is a more appropriate alternative than TCLP for assessing lead leachability in range soils. PMID:18204911

  10. Evaluation of Mobility, Bioavailability and Toxicity of Pb and Cd in Contaminated Soil Using TCLP, BCR and Earthworms

    Kede, Maria Luiza F. M.; Fabio V. Correia; Conceição, Paulo F.; Sidney F. Salles Junior; Marcia Marques; Moreira, Josino C.; Pérez, Daniel V.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the reduction of mobility, availability and toxicity found in soil contaminated with lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) from Santo Amaro Municipality, Bahia, Brazil using two combined methods, commonly tested separately according to the literature: metal mobilization with phosphates and phytoextraction. The strategy applied was the treatment with two sources of phosphates (separately and mixed) followed by phytoremediation with vetiver grass (Veti...

  11. Aesthetic rhinoplasty: Avoiding unfavourable results

    Kulwant S Bhangoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in plastic surgery. It is not surprising that a significant number of patients end up with unfavourable outcomes. Many of these unfavourable outcomes could be the result of poor judgment and wrong decision making. Most frequently, the unfavourable outcome is the result of errors in surgical technique. In this paper, unfavourable outcomes resulting from errors in surgical technique are discussed under the heading of each operative step. Poor placement of intra-nasal incision can result in internal valve obstruction. Bad columellar scars can result from errors during open rhinoplasty. Unfavourable results associated with skeletonisation are mentioned. Tip plasty, being the most difficult part of rhinoplasty, can result in lack of tip projection, asymmetry and deformities associated with placement of tip grafts. Over-resection of the lower lateral cartilages during tip plasty can also result in pinched nose, alar collapse causing external valve obstruction and other alar rim deformities. Humpectomy can result in open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and over-resection resulting in saddle nose. The so-called poly beak deformity is also a preventable unfavourable outcome when dealing with a large dorsal hump. Complications resulting from osteotomies include narrowing of nasal airway, open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and asymmetry of the bony wall resulting from incomplete or green stick fractures. Judicious use of grafts can be very rewarding. By the same token, grafts also carry with them the risk of complications. Allografts can result in recurrent infection, atrophy of the overlying skin and extrusion resulting in crippling deformities. Autografts are recommended by the author. Unfavourable results from autografts include displacement of graft, visibility of the graft edges, asymmetry, warping, and resorption.

  12. Solar neutrino results from SAGE

    The results of ten years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American gallium solar neutrino experiment (SAGE) are reported. The overall result of 70 runs during the measurement period from January 1990 to October 1999 is 75.4-6.8+7.0 (stat.) -3.0+3.5 (syst) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results on each run, and the results of combined analysis of all runs during each year, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs during monthly and bimonthly periods are presented

  13. Solar neutrino results from SAGE

    We report the results of ten years of solar neutrino observation by the Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE). The overall result of 70 runs during the measurement period January 1990 to October 1999 is 75.4 + 7.0/-6.8 (stat.) +3.5/-3.0 (syst.) SNU. This represents only slightly more than half of the predicted standard solar model rate of 129 SNU. The individual results of each run, and the results of combined analysis of all runs during each year, as well as the results of combined analysis of all runs during monthly and bimonthly periods are presented

  14. CCTF CORE I test results

    This report presents the results of the following CCTF CORE I tests conducted in FY. 1980. (1) Multi-dimensional effect test, (2) Evaluation model test, (3) FLECHT coupling test. On the first test, one-dimensional treatment of the core thermohydrodynamics was discussed. On the second and third tests, the test results were compared with the results calculated by the evaluation model codes and the results of the corresponding FLECHT-SET test (Run 2714B), respectively. The work was performed under contracts with the Atomic Energy Bureau of Science and Technology Agency of Japan. (author)

  15. Results from Super-Kamiokande

    Super-Kamiokande has updated the results on solar and atmospheric neutrinos with data corresponding to 830-920 live days. We here present the results on the energy spectrum and day-night variation of solar neutrinos. We also present the updated results on the zenith-angle distributions of fully-contained events, partially-contained events, through-going muons and stopping muons produced by atmospheric neutrinos. A new analysis for distinguishing νμ → ντ and νμ → νs oscillations is presented. The results disfavors νμ → νs oscillation at about 2σ level

  16. Top physics results at CDF

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  17. The vector resultant phase shifter

    A new type of voltage controlled phase shifter developed by HIRFL laboratory is better than mechanical phase shifter in all respects of performance, price, and reliability. It's principle is based on vector composition, so this new phase shifter is called vector resultant voltage controlled phase shifter. This new phase shifter has been applied in HIRFL phase stabilization system and satisfactory result has been obtained

  18. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  19. MER ARA pyroshock test results

    Chang, Kurng Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the shock test results achieved in the MER ARA/brush motor pyroshock qualification. The results of MER flight system pyrofiring tests in comparison with the ARA shock test requirements are discussed herein. Alternate test methods were developed in an effort to qualify the critical MER equipment for adequate performance in the actual flight pyroshock condition.

  20. [The "incorrect" laboratory result. II: Common misinterpretations of laboratory results].

    Thiery, J; Fiedler, G M

    2004-04-01

    In the second part of our review the most frequent misinterpretations of laboratory results in the daily clinical practise are discussed. Special attention has been given to frequent misinterpretations in the analysis of electrolytes, enzymes and hormones in plasma/serum (pseudohyperkalemia, macroenzymes, macroprolactinemia). Misinterpretations of the testing of blood gases, serum glucose, lipid concentrations, and calcium are described in greater detail. In addition, potential errors in the urinanalysis and the importance of adequate sampling of blood specimens for coagulation testing are described. The hematological results can be misinterpreted in the presence of EDTA-induced pseudothrombocytenia and of irregular immunoglobulines. Immunological methods themselves can lead to misinterpretations of the laboratory result, e. g. caused by the high dose hook effect and interferences in the presence of rheumatoid factor or HAMA. Finally clinical relevant errors in the therapeutic drug monitoring are discussed which are associated with the limited specificity of the antibodies in the commonly used immunological tests. PMID:15151138

  1. New QCD results from LEP

    Wengler, T

    2004-01-01

    I review recent QCD results from LEP. The emphasis is on results that represent new studies and on puzzling disagreements of theory and experiment. Further results are nevertheless mentioned by reference. The new studies discussed in more detail are the most precise measurement of unbiased gluon jets to date, strong evidence of color coherence in 3-jet events, and an, albeit unsuccessful, search for penta-quarks. As yet unexplained disagreements are observed in photon-photon collisions for high momentum charged particle and single jet production, and for the total cross section of b-quark production.

  2. Customer interruption cost and results

    Eua-Arporn, B.; Bisarnbutra, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand)

    1997-12-31

    Results of a comprehensive study on short-term direct impacts and consumer interruption costs, incurred as a result of power supply interruption, were discussed. The emphasis was on questionnaire development, general responses and the average customer damage function of some selected sectors. The customer damage function was established for each category of customers (agriculture, industry, mining, wholesale, retail merchandising, residential, etc) as well as for different locations. Results showed that the average customer damage function depended mostly on customer category. Size and location were not significant factors. 5 refs., 7 tabs.

  3. MAXIPOL: Data Analysis and Results

    Wu, J. H. P.; Zuntz, J.; Abroe, M. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. (Johannes); Borrill, J.; Collins, J.; Hanany, S.; A. H. Jaffe; Johnson, B. R.; Jones, T.; Lee, A.T.; Matsumura, T; Rabii, B.; Renbarger, T.

    2006-01-01

    We present results from and the analysis of data from MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). MAXIPOL is the first CMB experiment to obtain results using a rotating half-wave plate as a rapid polarization modulator. We report results from observations of a sky area of 8 deg^2 with 10-arcmin resolution, providing information up to l~700. We use a maximum-likelihood method to estimate maps of the Q and U Stokes parameter...

  4. Solar neutrino results from SAGE

    We report the status of the Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE). The solar neutrino result for SAGE III, 20 runs during the measuring period May 1995 through December 1997, is 56.7 +9.3/-8.7(stat.)+4.6/-4.8(syst.) SNU. The combined result for 57 measurements from 1990 through 1997 (SAGE I+II+III) is 66.9 +7.1/-6.8 (stat) +5.4/-5.7 (syst) SNU. The final result of the SAGE 51Cr experiment to check the response of SAGE to low energy neutrinos is also presented

  5. Results of Neptunium Disposal Testing

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of neptunium solution from H-Canyon Tank 16.4 and the properties of the resulting slurry. This work investigated slurry properties from a single neutralization protocol and limited storage times

  6. Results from NA61/SHINE

    Unger M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize recent results from NA61/SHINE relevant for heavy ion physics, neutrino oscillations and the interpretation of air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  7. Electroweak phase transition recent results

    Csikor, Ferenc

    2000-01-01

    Recent results of four-dimensional (4d) lattice simulations on the finite temperature electroweak phase transition (EWPT) are discussed. The phase transition is of first order in the SU(2)-Higgs model below the end point Higgs mass 66.5$\\pm$1.4 GeV. For larger masses a rapid cross-over appears. This result completely agrees with the results of the dimensional reduction approach. Including the full Standard Model (SM) perturbatively the end point is at 72.1$\\pm$1.4 GeV. Combined with recent LEP Higgs mass lower bounds, this excludes any EWPT in the SM. A one-loop calculation of the static potential makes possible a precise comparison of the lattice and perturbative results. Recent 4d lattice studies of the Minimal Supersymmetric SM (MSSM) are also mentioned.

  8. Electroweak experimental results at LEP

    Recent data on precision tests of the standard model at LEP are presented and compared with the theoretical expectations. These results are obtained by a preliminary analysis of all the data collected at LEP between 1990 and 1995

  9. Retrospective Evaluation of Colonoscopy Results

    Yaşar M et al.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is the retrospective evaluation of colonoscopy results between 2005 January- 2009 December in General Surgery Department of Düzce University.Materials and Methods: Admitted to our department with lower gastrointestinal symptoms, and colonoscopy is indicated 500 male and 538 female total 1038 patients were performed flexible colonoscopic examinations after bowel cleansing.Results: According to results of colonoscopic findings, 42.9% No pathology, 32.5% Hemorrhoids, 17.6% Anal fissures were detected.Conclusion: As a result of this study, half of patients admitted to our surgical clinic with lower gastrointestinal complaints have no pathology and in the other half of patients have various pathologies such as hemorrhoids and anal fissures.

  10. Results-Oriented Educational Leadership

    Grãdinaru Cãtãlin; Toma Sorin-George

    2014-01-01

    All types of organizations, including educational ones, are results-oriented as increasing competition drives them towards achieving performance. Educational system reform has always represented a fundamental issue that concerns many stakeholders. In this respect, the implementation of a results-oriented approach in education demands responsible and efficient leadership. The aims of our paper are to briefly present the school as an educational organization, and to emphasize the relationship b...

  11. Disclosure of stress test results

    Berlin, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Should regulatory bank examinations be made public? Regulators have argued that the confidentiality of the examination process promotes frank exchanges between bankers and examiners and that public disclosure of examination results could have a chilling effect. I examine the tradeoffs in a world in which examination results can be kept confidential, but regulatory interventions are observable by market participants, as they typically are for stress tests. Inducing banks to communicate truthfu...

  12. Summary of Results from COBE

    Smoot, George F.

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a summary of major cosmological results from the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite mission. The results include a precise measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation intensity, discovery and maps of the CMB anisotropy, large scale observations of the CMB polarization, and the detection and measurement of the diffuse infrared background. This summary was occassioned by and is part of the proceedings for the 3K Cosmology Conference held at Rome in...

  13. Summary of Results from COBE

    Smoot, G F

    1999-01-01

    This work presents a summary of major cosmological results from the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite mission. The results include a precise measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation intensity, discovery and maps of the CMB anisotropy, large scale observations of the CMB polarization, and the detection and measurement of the diffuse infrared background. This summary was occassioned by and is part of the proceedings for the 3K Cosmology Conference held at Rome in October 1998.

  14. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    Wood, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  15. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J.W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carr, R.; Casale, M.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Gaier, T.C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Haissinski, J.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I.J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Smoot, G.F.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Watson, C.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early universe, was launched on May 2009 and has been surveying the microwave and submillimetre sky since August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration publicly released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck operations, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper describes the mission and its performance, and gives an overview of the processing and analysis of the data, the characteristics of the data, the main scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. Scientific results include robust support for the standard, six parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements for the parameters that define this model, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for some of these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different fr...

  16. Catastrophic disruption experiments: Recent results

    Martelli, G.; Ryan, E. V.; Nakamura, A. M.; Giblin, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progress in the field of catastrophic disruption experiments over the past 4 years, since the publication of the review paper by Fujiwara et al. (1989). We describe the development of new techniques to produce shattering impacts relevant to the study of the collisional evolution of the asteroids, and summarize the results from numerous experiments which have been performed to date, using a variety of materials for both the impactor and the targets. Some of these, such as ice-on-ice, loose aggregates and pressurized targets, are quite new and have provided novel and exciting results. Some of the gaps existing previously in the data on fragment ejection-angle distributions, as well as translational and rotational velocity fields (including fine fragments) have been filled, and these new results will be surveyed.

  17. INFCE - essential results and consequences

    The results of INFCE are summarized. The conference was organized because there had been agreement that its results would not be legally binding upon the 66 countries and 5 international organizations participating, but only constitute recommendations for national energy policies. After some basic statements and a description of some results of the study, such as the availability of nuclear fuels; uranium enrichment; long-term guarantees of the availability of technology, fuel and heavy water; reprocessing; plutonium handling; fuel recycling; fast breeders; spent fuel management; waste treatment and final storage; advanced fuel cycles and reactor concepts, the author makes a first evaluation: The study in general had not confirmed U.S. efforts seeking postponement. Instead, it had supported the German non-proliferation policy, which integrates countries into existing international control systems instead of depriving them of supplies of nuclear materials and, in this way, of the peaceful uses of such materials. (HSCH)

  18. Results from PHENIX at RHIC

    Tannenbaum, M J

    2009-01-01

    Results from PHENIX at RHIC in p-p and Au+Au collisions are presented from the perspective of measurements in p-p collisions at the CERN ISR which serve as a basis for many of the techniques used. Notable results include the equality of the suppression of inclusive pi0 and direct electrons (from the decay of heavy quarks) in the range of transverse momentuum 4 < pT < 9 GeV/c in central Au+Au collisions. This result appears to strongly disfavor the explanation of suppression as due to radiative energy loss of partons traversing a Quark Gluon Plasma but opens up a fundamental discussion of how Fermions get mass, whether all six quarks are nearly massless in a QGP and how to test this.

  19. Result-Based Public Governance

    Boll, Karen

    Within the public sector, many institutions are either steered by governance by targets or result-based governance. The former sets up quantitative internal production targets, while the latter advocates that production is planned according to outcomes which are defined as institution......-produced effects on individuals or businesses in society; effects which are often produced by ‘nudging’ the citizenry in a certain direction. With point of departure in these two governance-systems, the paper explores a case of controversial inspection of businesses’ negative VAT accounts and it describes the...... performance measure that guides the inspectors’ inspection (or nudging) of the businesses. The analysis shows that although a result-based governance system is advocated on a strategic level, performance measures which are not ‘result-based’ are developed and used in the daily coordination of work. The paper...

  20. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J.-Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from

  1. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  2. Impossibility results for distributed computing

    Attiya, Hagit

    2014-01-01

    To understand the power of distributed systems, it is necessary to understand their inherent limitations: what problems cannot be solved in particular systems, or without sufficient resources (such as time or space). This book presents key techniques for proving such impossibility results and applies them to a variety of different problems in a variety of different system models. Insights gained from these results are highlighted, aspects of a problem that make it difficult are isolated, features of an architecture that make it inadequate for solving certain problems efficiently are identified

  3. Recent QCD Results from ATLAS

    Sinervo, Pekka; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has performed studies of a wide range of QCD phenomena, from soft particle to hard photon and jet production. Among recent results are the measurement of Z event shape observables sensitive to the modelling of the underlying event, and the measurement of diffractive dijet production with a large rapidity gap, which tests the interplay of soft and hard phenomena. The inelastic pp cross section, a fundamental property of the strong interaction, is measured. Precision measurements of the isolated high pT inclusive photon cross section at cms energies of 8TeV test the theoretical predictions and constrain parton density functions. An overview of these results is given.

  4. First results from SAGE II

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76+21-18(stat)+5-7(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74+13-12(stat)+5-7(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  6. Audit result and its users

    Shalimova Nataliya S.

    2014-01-01

    The article identifies essence of the “audit result” and “users of audit result” notions and characteristics of the key audit results user. It shows that in order to give a wide characteristic of users it is expedient to unite all objects, which could be used (audit report, fact of refusal to conduct audit and information that is submitted to managers in the process of audit) with the term “audit result” and classify it depending on the terms of submission by final and intermediate result. Th...

  7. Neutrinos: summary of new results

    After a short presentation of the neutrino mass-mixing parameters, the core of the paper will be devoted to the recent experimental results from SNO, KamLAND and K2K. As a conclusion, I will discuss possible CP violation measurements with neutrinos. The paper is structured as follows: 1 Neutrino Oscillations Physics; 2 New results in solar neutrinos; 2.1 The SNO experiment; 2.2 The KamLAND experiment; 4 Opening the road toward a measurement of neutrino CP violation?

  8. First results from SAGE II

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76-18+21 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74-12+13 (stat) -7+5 (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models

  9. VERITAS: Status and Early Results

    A new generation of observatories have revolutionized the study of the very high energy gamma-ray sky. The recently-commissioned VERITAS observatory, an array of four 12 m diameter imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes designed to search for gamma-ray sources in the energy band between 100 GeV and 50 TeV, is one of these new instruments. VERITAS has been taking scientific data with three or more telescopes since November 2006. We discuss the thrust of the VERITAS observation program and present results from these early observations, including new results on the sources IC433, LSI+61 303, 1ES 1218+304 and M87. (author)

  10. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  11. B0s Oscillation Results

    Willocq, S

    2002-01-01

    We review new studies of the time dependence of B0s - B0s-bar mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of dms > 14.4 ps-1 at the 95% C.L.

  12. NA48: rare decay results

    Recent results on the kaon rare decays: KS → γγ, KS,L → π+π-e+e- and KS → π0e+e- measured in NA48 experiment at CERN, are presented in this paper. These results are based on data taken in 1998 and 1999, during 2 days in 1999 data was recorded with a factor 200 higher beam intensity than the usual KS beam, resulting in 2.3 * 108 KS decays. Among other results the following branching ratios have been computed : BR(KS → γγ) = (2.58 ± 0.36 ± 0.22)*10-6, BR(KL → π+π-e+e-) = (3.1 ± 0.1 ± 0.2)*10-7, BR(KS → π+π-e+e-) = (4.3 ± 0.2 ± 0.3)*10-5 and BR(KS → π0e+e-) -7. (A.C.)

  13. Juridical utilization of dosimetric results

    The problems of the legal use of the results of dosimetry, for the solution of an action for instance, are considered first with respect to civil and occasionally administrative third part liability law making a distinction between common law and the special regime of civil liability for nuclear damage, secondly with respect to social security law

  14. Crime and punishment: Further results

    Garoupa, Nuno

    1998-01-01

    I consider a general specification of criminals' objective function and argue that, when the general non-expected utility theory is substituted for the traditional expected utility theory, the high-fine-low-probability result (Becker, 1968) only holds under specific and strong restrictions.

  15. New ATLAS Higgs physics results

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    New Higgs physics results from the ATLAS experiment using the full Run-1 LHC dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 25 fb-1, of proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV and 8 TeV, will be presented.

  16. ATLAS H(125) difermion results

    Shabalina, Elizaveta; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present a summary of the recent measurements of the Standard Model Higgs production in fermionic decay modes. New results are presented for the dimuon Higgs decays, for Higgs decaying in a $b\\bar{b}$ pair in the VH and ttH production modes and in the VBF channel with photon production.

  17. State Test Results Are Predictable

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these…

  18. Complexity Results in Epistemic Planning

    Bolander, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Holm; Schwarzentruber, Francois

    Epistemic planning is a very expressive framework that extends automated planning by the incorporation of dynamic epistemic logic (DEL). We provide complexity results on the plan existence problem for multi-agent planning tasks, focusing on purely epistemic actions with propositional precondition...

  19. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  20. Results-based management - Developing one's key results areas (KRAs).

    Kansal, Om Prakash; Goel, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    In spite of aspiring to be a good manager, we public health experts fail to evaluate ourselves against our personal and professional goals. The Key Result Areas (KRAs) or key performance indicators (KPIs) help us in setting our operational (day-to-day) and/or strategic (long-term) goals followed by grading ourselves at different times of our careers. These shall help in assessing our strengths and weaknesses. The weakest KRA should set the maximum extent to which one should use his/her skills and abilities to have the greatest impact on his/her career. PMID:26021650

  1. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    ,

    2014-01-01

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important baseline for the interpretation of data in heavy ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and initial patron energy loss, and it is interesting to study the dependence on impact parameter and kinematic region. Heavy quark production is a good measurement to probe the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has experiment has ability to study the CNM effects by measuring heavy quark production in $d$$+$Au collisions at variety of kinematic ranges. Comparisons of heavy quark production at different rapidities allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on momentum fraction. Furthermore, comparisons to the results from heavy ion collisions (Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu) measured by PHENIX provide insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are disc...

  2. Forget about data, deliver results

    Walter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    High-energy astrophysics space missions have pioneered and demonstrated the power of legacy data sets for generating new discoveries, especially when analysed in ways original researchers could not have anticipated. The only way to ensure that the data of present observatories can be effectively used in the future is to allow users to perform on-the-fly data analysis to produce straightforwardly scientific results for any sky position, time and energy intervals without requiring mission specific software or detailed instrumental knowledge. Providing a straightforward interface to complex data and data analysis makes the data and the process of generating science results available to the public and higher education and promotes the visibility of the investment in science to the society. This is a fundamental step to transmit the values of science and to evolve towards a knowledge society.

  3. Results from PLUTO at PETRA

    Results obtained at the e+e- storage ring PETRA by the PLUTO collaboration at c.m. energies of 13, 17 and 27.4 GeV are presented. New limits on QED cut-off parameters are determined from Bhabha scattering; at 27.4 GeV the limits are Λsub(+) > 38 GeV and Λsub(-) > 60 GeV. The measured values of the total hadronic cross section, and the study of the jet character of the hadronic events are well consistent with the expected production of b mesons (with qsub(b) = 1/3), but do not require additional new quarks with charge 2/3. Hadronic events from two-photon exchange processes are observed with comparable rates as events from one-photon exchange. First results on the hadronic cross section in γγ collisions are given. (orig.)

  4. Recent results on tau decays

    New preliminary ARGUS results on τ decays are presented. We have measured the inclusive 3-prong branching ratio as well as the exclusive branching ratios for 6 major τ decay channels: τ- → ε-ν-bareντ.τ- → μ-ν-barμντ.τ- → π- /K-ντ.τ- → π-π-π-ντ.τ- → π-π0ντ and τ- → π- π- π+ π0 ντ†. Our results are in contradiction to the recent CELLO measurements, which indicate that the τ decay problem disappeared. A search was made for 26 different neutrinoless τ decays. No evidence has been found, that the τ decay problem might be connected to such neutrinoless decays. In addition, the hadronic final states of τ decays into π π0ντ and π-π-π+ντ have been analyzed. (author)

  5. First Physics Results from ALICE

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The main purpose of ALICE is to investigate the properties of a state of deconfined nuclear matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy flavour measurements will play a crucial role in this investigation. The physics programme of ALICE has started by studying proton-proton collisions at unprecedented high energies. We will present the first results on open heavy flavour and quarkonia in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at both mid- and forward-rapidities. We will conclude with the prospects for heavy flavour and quarkonium measurements in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Also presented are first results of neutral meson reconstruction and its perspectives, as well as further physics studies. (author)

  6. First results from SAGE II

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation); Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W. [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Elliott, S.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Cherry, M.L. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    1995-07-10

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sup +21}{sub {minus}18}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sup +13}{sub {minus}12}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  7. Basic results on braid groups

    Gonzalez-Meneses, Juan

    2010-01-01

    These are Lecture Notes of a course given by the author at the French-Spanish School "Tresses in Pau", held in Pau (France) in October 2009. It is basically an introduction to distinct approaches and techniques that can be used to show results in braid groups. Using these techniques we provide several proofs of well known results in braid groups, namely the correctness of Artin's presentation, that the braid group is torsion free, or that its center is generated by the full twist. We also recall some solutions of the word and conjugacy problems, and that roots of a braid are always conjugate. We also describe the centralizer of a given braid. Most proofs are classical ones, using modern terminology. I have chosen those which I find simpler or more beautiful.

  8. Geometric Results for Compressible Magnetohydrodynamics

    Arter, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Recently, compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) has been elegantly formulated in terms of Lie derivatives. This paper exploits the geometrical properties of the Lie bracket to give new insights into the properties of compressible MHD behaviour, both with and without feedback of the magnetic field on the flow. These results are expected to be useful for the solution of MHD equations in both tokamak fusion experiments and space plasmas.

  9. Evaluating the RELM Test Results

    Sachs, Michael K.; Ya-Ting Lee; Turcotte, Donald L.; Holliday, James R.; Rundle, John B.

    2012-01-01

    We consider implications of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) test results with regard to earthquake forecasting. Prospective forecasts were solicited for M≥4.95 earthquakes in California during the period 2006–2010. During this period 31 earthquakes occurred in the test region with M≥4.95. We consider five forecasts that were submitted for the test. We compare the forecasts utilizing forecast verification methodology developed in the atmospheric sciences, specifically for torn...

  10. Categorization Axioms for Clustering Results

    Yu, Jian; Xu, Zongben

    2014-01-01

    Cluster analysis has attracted more and more attention in the field of machine learning and data mining. Numerous clustering algorithms have been proposed and are being developed due to diverse theories and various requirements of emerging applications. Therefore, it is very worth establishing an unified axiomatic framework for data clustering. In the literature, it is an open problem and has been proved very challenging. In this paper, clustering results are axiomatized by assuming that an p...

  11. Recent DIII-D results

    This paper summarizes the recent DIII-D experimental results and the development of the relevant hardware systems. The DIII-D program focuses on divertor solutions for next generation tokamaks such as International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), and on developing configurations with enhanced confinement and stability properties that will lead to a more compact and economical fusion reactor. The DIII-D program carries out this research in an integrated fashion

  12. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    Pennington, Michael R. [JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  13. Presentation of RTE results 2003

    For RTE, the financial year 2003 was marked by a number of achievements: our financial performances registered a clear improvement, above objectives, with turnover growing strongly; net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002; the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%; and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years

  14. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    Pennington, M R

    2014-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  15. Solar neutrino results from SAGE

    The solar neutrino capture rate measured by the Russian-American Gallium Experiment on metallic gallium during the period January 1990 through December 1997 is (67.2-7.0-3.0+7.2+3.5) SNU, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This result represents a 7 σ depression in the neutrino flux compared with predicted standard solar model rates. The experimental procedures and data analysis are presented

  16. VERITAS: Status and Latest Results

    Maier, G

    2007-01-01

    VERITAS is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array designed to study astrophysi cal sources of very-high-energy gamma radiation. Located in southern Arizona, USA, the array consists of four 12m-diameter imaging Cherenkov telescopes. All four telescopes have been deployed at the basecamp of the Whipple Observatory and began full operation in early 2007. This paper describes the operational status of VERITAS, outlines the initial performance parameters of the instrument, and presents the latest results that have been obtained.

  17. Recent HERMES Results on DVCS

    Krauss, B.; collaboration, for the HERMES

    2005-01-01

    The interference of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Bremsstrahlung leads to a beam-charge asymmetry that can be observed for exclusive photon production in the collision of high energy leptons and nucleons/nuclei. Recent results for a hydrogen and a deuterium target are reported and a consistent tendency for a rise of the cosine phi coefficient with momentum transfer |t| has been found.

  18. Results from the FDIRC prototype

    We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment, and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage with partial electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking with an angular resolution of ∼1.5 mrad, track position resolution of 5–6 mm, start time resolution of 70 ps, and a muon low-energy cutoff of ∼2 GeV provided by an iron range stack. The quartz focusing photon camera couples to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and is read out by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 MaPMTs providing 768 pixels. We used IRS2 waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that the new optics design works very well, including: (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) S/N ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which consists primarily of ambiguities in possible photon paths to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOPmeasured–TOPexpected resolutions, and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds. We also describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance. - Highlights: • We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). • The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking. • We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that new optics design works very well. • We describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance

  19. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  20. Audit result and its users

    Shalimova Nataliya S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies essence of the “audit result” and “users of audit result” notions and characteristics of the key audit results user. It shows that in order to give a wide characteristic of users it is expedient to unite all objects, which could be used (audit report, fact of refusal to conduct audit and information that is submitted to managers in the process of audit with the term “audit result” and classify it depending on the terms of submission by final and intermediate result. The article offers to define audit results user as a person, persons or category of persons for whom the auditor prepares the audit report and, in cases, envisaged by international standards of the audit and domestic legislative and regulatory acts, provides other additional information concerning audit issues. In order to identify the key audit results user the article distributes all audit tasks into two groups depending on possibilities of identification of users. The article proves that the key user should be identified especially in cases of a mandatory audit and this process should go in interconnection with the mechanism of allocation of a key user of financial reports. It offers to consider external users with direct financial interests, who cannot request economic subjects directly to provide information and who should rely on general financial reports and audit report when receiving significant portion of information they need, as the key user. The article makes proposals on specification of the categorical mechanism in the sphere of audit, which are the basis for audit quality assessment, identification of possibilities and conditions of appearance of the necessary and sufficient trust to the auditor opinion.

  1. First half 2006 financial results

    Areva provides technological solutions for highly reliable nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. The group is the world leader in nuclear power and the only company to cover all industrial activities in this field. This Press release presents the first half 2006 financial results: the overall performance and the performance by division (front end, reactors and services, back end, transmission and distribution). (A.L.B.)

  2. Results of CRESST phase I

    Results of the CRESST experiment at Gran Sasso using 262 g sapphire calorimeters with tungsten phase transition thermometers are presented. Calibration and analysis methods are described. Data taken in 2000 have been used to place limits on WIMP dark matter particles in the galactic halo. The sapphire detectors are especially sensitive for low-mass WIMPS with spin-dependent interaction and improve on existing limits in this region

  3. Results of CRESST phase I

    Pröbst, F; Bruckmayer, M; Bucci, C; Cooper, S; Di Stefano, P; Feilitzsch, F V; Frank, T; Hauff, D; Jagemann, T; Jochum, J; Keeling, R; Kraus, H; Marchese, J; Ramachers, Y; Schnagl, J; Seidel, W; Sergeyev, I; Stark, M; Stodolsky, L; Wulandari, H

    2002-01-01

    Results of the CRESST experiment at Gran Sasso using 262 g sapphire calorimeters with tungsten phase transition thermometers are presented. Calibration and analysis methods are described. Data taken in 2000 have been used to place limits on WIMP dark matter particles in the galactic halo. The sapphire detectors are especially sensitive for low-mass WIMPS with spin-dependent interaction and improve on existing limits in this region.

  4. Recent double beta decay results

    Balysh, A. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Beck, M. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Belyaev, S.T. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Bensch, F.; Bockholt, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Demehin, A.; Gurov, A. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Heusser, G.; Hirsch, M.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H.V. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Kondratenko, I.; Lebedev, V.I. (Kurchatov Institute, 123 182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Maier, B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany)); Mueller, A. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare LNGS, 67010 Assergi (Italy)); Petry, F.; Piepke, A.; Strecker, H.; Voellinger, M.; Zuber, K. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, W-6900 Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-02-01

    The status and recent results of second generation [beta][beta]-experiments using isotopically enriched source materials are described. These experiments are at present the most sensitive tools to distinguish Dirac from Majorana neutrinos. The at present most advanced experimental techniques, namely the use of high-resolution calorimetric detectors and of time projection chambers are compared. New limits on the Majorana neutrino mass as well as for the Majoron-neutrino coupling are presented.

  5. Labeling Clusters of Search Results

    Nycander, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This project evaluates different algorithms which could be used in a summary information retrieval (IR) application for Swedish texts. Instead of the traditional search results the summary application would generate a summary document of the various subtopics of an IR query. First it is noted that in order to nd subtopics of a query, some kind of document clustering is needed. k-means is chosen as a candidate document clustering algorithm and evaluated in the environment of an IR application....

  6. MAXIPOL: Data Analysis and Results

    Wu, J H P; Abroe, M E; Ade, P A R; Bock, J; Borrill, J; Collins, J; Hanany, S; Jaffe, A H; Johnson, B R; Jones, T; Lee, A T; Matsumura, T; Rabii, B; Renbarger, T; Richards, P L; Smoot, G F; Stompor, R; Tran, H T; Winant, C D

    2006-01-01

    We present results from and the analysis of data from MAXIPOL, a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). MAXIPOL is the first CMB experiment to obtain results using a rotating half-wave plate as a rapid polarization modulator. We report results from observations of a sky area of 8 deg^2 with 10-arcmin resolution, providing information up to l~700. We use a maximum-likelihood method to estimate maps of the Q and U Stokes parameters from the demodulated time streams, and then both Bayesian and frequentist approaches to compute the EE, EB, and BB power spectra. Detailed formalisms of the analyses are given. A variety of tests show no evidence for systematic errors. The Bayesian analysis gives weak evidence for an EE signal. The EE power is 55^{+51}_{-45} \\mu K^2 at the 68% confidence level for l=151-693. Its likelihood function is asymmetric and skewed positive such that with a uniform prior the probability of a positive EE power is 96%. The powers ...

  7. Presentation of RTE results 2003

    In 2003, RTE recorded a clear improvement in its financial results, and continued its debt reduction programme. The financial year 2003 was marked by a clear improvement in RTE's financial performance: results exceeded objectives, with turnover growing strongly, net income reached levels almost three times higher than those recorded in 2002, the economic rate of return rose to 7.1%, and debt was reduced by 470 Meuros. These results are explained by the substantial improvement in productivity, which has risen by 5% per year on average over the last three years. Net income has almost tripled due to RTE's improved productivity completed by a significant rise in its turnover and stabilizing operating costs RTE's finances therefore remain healthy, enabling the company to continue its debt reduction programme. Satisfactory economic and financial rates of return. Deadlines facing RTE in 2004: in application of the second European Directive, adopted on 26 June 2003, RTE faces two major deadlines in 2004: - the implementation of the 2. phase in the process of opening up the French electricity market, - its legal independence. On 1 July 2004, the market will be opened up to competition for all professional customers. At that date RTE, like all other electricity transmission system operators (TSOs) in the European Union, should be a legally independent body. The new central role of TSOs in Europe: how are electricity transmission system operators in other EU countries organised?

  8. SAVNET. Current developments and results

    Complete text of publication follows. Important results have been acquired using the measurements of VLF amplitude and phase signals from the South America VLF Network (SAVNET) stations. This network, which is an international project lead by Brazil in cooperation with Peru and Argentina, started operating in April 2006, and now counts on eight stations (Atibaia, Palmas, Santa Maria and Estacao Antarctica Comandante Ferraz in Brazil; Piura, Punta-Lobos and Ica, in Peru; CASLEO, in Argentina). Researches, through the last decades, have been demonstrated the versatility of the VLF technique for many scientific and technological purposes. In this work, we summarize some recent relevant results with SAVNET data bases. Studying the daily C-region post sunrise hump (PSRH) parameter time series, two periods with distinct behavior patterns were observed: one, from March to October, which is characterized by a slow variability well related to the mean solar illumination over the VLF propagation paths; and another period with more variability possibly related to the temperature and Nitric Oxide concentration variations as by space instruments, between October and March. Furthermore, the analysis of phase and amplitude daily variations show seasonal effects which were removed and the remaining signals compared to the incident solar Lyman-α radiation. These results along with future initiatives using SAVNET will be outlined in this presentation.

  9. Presentation of the results 97

    Gaz de France (GDF) presents in a press kit the main results achieved in 1997. The European community has formulated a project of definition of rules concerning the natural gas market. Minima values for annual consumptions have been defined and the consumption and use of natural gas in EC countries is described. The financial results of GDF in 1997 are compared with previous years. Net sales grew by nearly 1 billion french francs to reach 55 billion. Overall sales were down by 4% but the share of natural gas in french energy consumption increased and sales to industrial users went up in particular due to new cogeneration plants installed in 1996. A comparison of gas prices in Europe is given for the years 1985 to 1998. The efforts of GDF to offer increased quality of services concerning in particular safety aspects as checking programs and installation of new safeguard appliances are described. The efforts of GDF to increase the energy market share of natural gas resulted in the development of new products like cogeneration, air conditioning and fuels for automotive needs. (C.B.)

  10. Results Evaluation in Reduction Rhinoplasty

    Arima, Lisandra Megumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Final results evaluation after rhinoplasty is a not a topic widely studied from the patient's viewpoint. Objective:Evaluate the satisfaction of the patients submitted to reduction rhinoplasty, from the questionnaire Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE. Method: Longitudinal study, retrospective cut type, of the preoperative and postoperative satisfaction. The sample was composed by 28 patients who were submitted to rhinoplasty and answered the ROE questionnaire. Three variables were obtained: satisfaction note that the patient had with his/her image before the surgery; note of satisfaction with the current appearance; the difference of the average satisfaction notes between postoperative and preoperative approaches. Results: The postoperative note was higher than the preoperative in all patients. We noticed a difference between the average of the postoperative and preoperative of 48.3 (p75 considered to be an excellent outcome (67.9%. Conclusions: The ROE questionnaire is a helpful tool to show the satisfaction of the patient submitted to reduction rhinoplasty. About 92% of the patients submitted to reduction rhinoplasty consider the postoperative result to be good or excellent.