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Sample records for 4e mediates resistance

  1. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum.

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M; Møller, I S; Tulinius, G; Hansen, J K R; Lund, O S; Johansen, I E

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps to linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV-W-susceptible and -resistant P. sativum genotypes revealed a polymorphism correlating with the resistance profile. Expression of eIF4E from susceptible plants in resistant plants facilitated BYMV-W infection in inoculated leaves. When cDNA of BYMV-W was agroinoculated, resistance mediated by the wlv gene frequently was overcome, and virus from these plants had a codon change causing an Arg to His change at position 116 of the predicted viral genome-linked protein (VPg). Accordingly, plants carrying the wlv resistance gene were infected upon inoculation with BYMV-W derived from cDNA with a His codon at position 116 of the VPg coding region. These results suggested that VPg determined pathogenicity on plants carrying the wlv resistance gene and that wlv corresponded to the sbm1 allele of eIF4E. PMID:17849710

  2. Involvement of the P1 cistron in overcoming eIF4E-mediated recessive resistance against Clover yellow vein virus in pea.

    Nakahara, Kenji S; Shimada, Ryoko; Choi, Sun-Hee; Yamamoto, Haruko; Shao, Jun; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2010-11-01

    Two recessive genes (cyv1 and cyv2) are known to confer resistance against Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV) in pea. cyv2 has recently been revealed to encode eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and is the same allele as sbm1 and wlm against other potyviruses. Although mechanical inoculation with crude sap is rarely able to cause infection of a cyv2 pea, biolistic inoculation of the infectious ClYVV cDNA clone does. At the infection foci, the breaking virus frequently emerges, resulting in systemic infection. Here, a derived cleaved-amplified polymorphic sequence analysis showed that the breakings were associated with a single nonsynonymous mutation on the ClYVV genome, corresponding to an amino-acid substitution at position 24 (isoleucine to valine) on the P1 cistron. ClYVV with the point mutation was able to break the resistance. This is a first report demonstrating that P1 is involved in eIF4E-mediated recessive resistance. PMID:20653413

  3. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M.; Møller, I.S.; Tulinius, G.;

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps to...... linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV...

  4. Translation control during prolonged mTORC1 inhibition mediated by 4E-BP3

    Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Alain, Tommy; Fonseca, Bruno D.; Nadon, Robert; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mTORC1 is a highly promising strategy in cancer therapy. Suppression of mTORC1 activity leads to rapid dephosphorylation of eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BP1–3) and subsequent inhibition of mRNA translation. However, how the different 4E-BPs affect translation during prolonged use of mTOR inhibitors is not known. Here we show that the expression of 4E-BP3, but not that of 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2, is transcriptionally induced during prolonged mTORC1 inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, our data reveal that 4E-BP3 expression is controlled by the transcription factor TFE3 through a cis-regulatory element in the EIF4EBP3 gene promoter. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated EIF4EBP3 gene disruption in human cancer cells mitigated the inhibition of translation and proliferation caused by prolonged treatment with mTOR inhibitors. Our findings show that 4E-BP3 is an important effector of mTORC1 and a robust predictive biomarker of therapeutic response to prolonged treatment with mTOR-targeting drugs in cancer. PMID:27319316

  5. Translation control during prolonged mTORC1 inhibition mediated by 4E-BP3.

    Tsukumo, Yoshinori; Alain, Tommy; Fonseca, Bruno D; Nadon, Robert; Sonenberg, Nahum

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mTORC1 is a highly promising strategy in cancer therapy. Suppression of mTORC1 activity leads to rapid dephosphorylation of eIF4E-binding proteins (4E-BP1-3) and subsequent inhibition of mRNA translation. However, how the different 4E-BPs affect translation during prolonged use of mTOR inhibitors is not known. Here we show that the expression of 4E-BP3, but not that of 4E-BP1 or 4E-BP2, is transcriptionally induced during prolonged mTORC1 inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, our data reveal that 4E-BP3 expression is controlled by the transcription factor TFE3 through a cis-regulatory element in the EIF4EBP3 gene promoter. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated EIF4EBP3 gene disruption in human cancer cells mitigated the inhibition of translation and proliferation caused by prolonged treatment with mTOR inhibitors. Our findings show that 4E-BP3 is an important effector of mTORC1 and a robust predictive biomarker of therapeutic response to prolonged treatment with mTOR-targeting drugs in cancer. PMID:27319316

  6. Phosphorylation of eIF4E Confers Resistance to Cellular Stress and DNA-Damaging Agents through an Interaction with 4E-T: A Rationale for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

    Alba Martínez

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E is associated with malignant progression and poor cancer prognosis. Accordingly, here we have analyzed the association between eIF4E phosphorylation and cellular resistance to oxidative stress, starvation, and DNA-damaging agents in vitro. Using immortalized and cancer cell lines, retroviral expression of a phosphomimetic (S209D form of eIF4E, but not phospho-dead (S209A eIF4E or GFP control, significantly increased cellular resistance to stress induced by DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin, starvation (glucose+glutamine withdrawal, and oxidative stress (arsenite. De novo accumulation of eIF4E-containing cytoplasmic bodies colocalizing with the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-T was observed after expression of phosphomimetic S209D, but not S209A or wild-type eIF4E. Increased resistance to cellular stress induced by eIF4E-S209D was lost upon knockdown of endogenous 4E-T or use of an eIF4E-W73A-S209D mutant unable to bind 4E-T. Cancer cells treated with the Mnk1/2 inhibitor CGP57380 to prevent eIF4E phosphorylation and mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from Mnk1/2 knockout mice were also more sensitive to arsenite and cisplatin treatment. Polysome analysis revealed an 80S peak 2 hours after arsenite treatment in cells overexpressing phosphomimetic eIF4E, indicating translational stalling. Nonetheless, a selective increase was observed in the synthesis of some proteins (cyclin D1, HuR, and Mcl-1. We conclude that phosphorylation of eIF4E confers resistance to various cell stressors and that a direct interaction or regulation of 4E-T by eIF4E is required. Further delineation of this process may identify novel therapeutic avenues for cancer treatment, and these results support the use of modern Mnk1/2 inhibitors in conjunction with standard therapy.

  7. Increased 4E-BP1 Expression Protects against Diet-Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Male Mice.

    Tsai, Shih-Yin; Rodriguez, Ariana A; Dastidar, Somasish G; Del Greco, Elizabeth; Carr, Kaili Lia; Sitzmann, Joanna M; Academia, Emmeline C; Viray, Christian Michael; Martinez, Lizbeth Leon; Kaplowitz, Brian Stephen; Ashe, Travis D; La Spada, Albert R; Kennedy, Brian K

    2016-08-16

    Obesity is a major risk factor driving the global type II diabetes pandemic. However, the molecular factors linking obesity to disease remain to be elucidated. Gender differences are apparent in humans and are also observed in murine models. Here, we link these differences to expression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), which, upon HFD feeding, becomes significantly reduced in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue of male but not female mice. Strikingly, restoring 4E-BP1 expression in male mice protects them against HFD-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Male 4E-BP1 transgenic mice also exhibit reduced white adipose tissue accumulation accompanied by decreased circulating levels of leptin and triglycerides. Importantly, transgenic 4E-BP1 male mice are also protected from aging-induced obesity and metabolic decline on a normal diet. These results demonstrate that 4E-BP1 is a gender-specific suppressor of obesity that regulates insulin sensitivity and energy metabolism. PMID:27498874

  8. PRMT5 is essential for the eIF4E-mediated 5′-cap dependent translation

    Highlights: • PRMT5 participates in syntheses of HIF-1α, c-Myc and cyclin D1 proteins. • PRMT5 promotes the 5′-cap dependent translation. • PRMT5 is required for eIF4E binding to mRNA 5′-cap. • PRMT5 is essential for eIF4E-dependent cell proliferation. - Abstract: It is becoming clear that PRMT5 plays essential roles in cell cycle progression, survival, and responses to external stresses. However, the precise mechanisms underlying such roles of PRMT5 have not been clearly understood. Previously, we have demonstrated that PRMT5 participates in cellular adaptation to hypoxia by ensuring 5′-cap dependent translation of HIF-1α. Given that c-Myc and cyclin D1 expressions are also tightly regulated in 5′-cap dependent manner, we here tested the possibility that PRMT5 promotes cell proliferation by increasing de novo syntheses of the oncoproteins. c-Myc and cyclin D1 were found to be noticeably downregulated by PRMT5 knock-down. A RNA immunoprecipitation analysis, which can identify RNA–protein interactions, showed that PRMT5 is required for the interaction among eIF4E and 5′-UTRs of HIF-1α, c-Myc and cyclin D1 mRNAs. In addition, PRMT5 knock-down inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. More importantly, ectopic expression of eIF4E significantly rescued the cell cycle progression and cell proliferation even in PRMT5-deficeint condition. Based on these results, we propose that PRMT5 determines cell fate by regulating 5′-cap dependent translation of proteins essential for proliferation and survival

  9. PRMT5 is essential for the eIF4E-mediated 5′-cap dependent translation

    Lim, Ji-Hong [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoon-Mi [Department of Food Bioscience, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gibok [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong-Joon [Departments of Pharmacology and Biomedical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Beong-Ou; Kim, Young Jun [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dong-Kug [Department of Biotechnology, College of Biomedical and Health Science, Konkuk University, Chungju 380-701, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Wan, E-mail: parkjw@snu.ac.kr [Departments of Pharmacology and Biomedical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 103 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • PRMT5 participates in syntheses of HIF-1α, c-Myc and cyclin D1 proteins. • PRMT5 promotes the 5′-cap dependent translation. • PRMT5 is required for eIF4E binding to mRNA 5′-cap. • PRMT5 is essential for eIF4E-dependent cell proliferation. - Abstract: It is becoming clear that PRMT5 plays essential roles in cell cycle progression, survival, and responses to external stresses. However, the precise mechanisms underlying such roles of PRMT5 have not been clearly understood. Previously, we have demonstrated that PRMT5 participates in cellular adaptation to hypoxia by ensuring 5′-cap dependent translation of HIF-1α. Given that c-Myc and cyclin D1 expressions are also tightly regulated in 5′-cap dependent manner, we here tested the possibility that PRMT5 promotes cell proliferation by increasing de novo syntheses of the oncoproteins. c-Myc and cyclin D1 were found to be noticeably downregulated by PRMT5 knock-down. A RNA immunoprecipitation analysis, which can identify RNA–protein interactions, showed that PRMT5 is required for the interaction among eIF4E and 5′-UTRs of HIF-1α, c-Myc and cyclin D1 mRNAs. In addition, PRMT5 knock-down inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. More importantly, ectopic expression of eIF4E significantly rescued the cell cycle progression and cell proliferation even in PRMT5-deficeint condition. Based on these results, we propose that PRMT5 determines cell fate by regulating 5′-cap dependent translation of proteins essential for proliferation and survival.

  10. Cytokine-mediated reversal of multidrug resistance

    Stein, Ulrike; Walther, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    The occurrence of the multidrug resistance phenotype still represents a limiting factor for successful cancer chemotherapy. Numerous efforts have been made to develop strategies for reversal and/or modulation of this major therapy obstacle through targeting at different levels of intervention. The phenomenon of MDR is often associated with overexpression of resistance-associated genes. Since the classical type of MDR in human cancers is mainly mediated by the P-glycoprotein encoded by the mul...

  11. Plasmid mediated quinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae

    Veldman, K.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes the occurrence of Plasmid Mediated Quinolone Resistance (PMQR) in Salmonella and E. coli from The Netherlands and other European countries. Furthermore, the genetic background of these genes was characterized. Fluoroquinolones are widely used antibiotics in both human and veter

  12. Importin 8 mediates m7G cap-sensitive nuclear import of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E.

    Volpon, Laurent; Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Osborne, Michael J; Ramteke, Anup; Sun, Qingxiang; Niesman, Ashley; Chook, Yuh Min; Borden, Katherine L B

    2016-05-10

    Regulation of nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of oncoproteins is critical for growth homeostasis. Dysregulated trafficking contributes to malignancy, whereas understanding the process can reveal unique therapeutic opportunities. Here, we focus on eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), a prooncogenic protein highly elevated in many cancers, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Typically, eIF4E is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm, where it acts in export and translation of specific methyl 7-guanosine (m(7)G)-capped mRNAs, respectively. Nuclear accumulation of eIF4E in patients who have AML is correlated with increased eIF4E-dependent export of transcripts encoding oncoproteins. The subcellular localization of eIF4E closely correlates with patients' responses. During clinical responses to the m(7)G-cap competitor ribavirin, eIF4E is mainly cytoplasmic. At relapse, eIF4E reaccumulates in the nucleus, leading to elevated eIF4E-dependent mRNA export. We have identified importin 8 as a factor that directly imports eIF4E into the nucleus. We found that importin 8 is highly elevated in untreated patients with AML, leading to eIF4E nuclear accumulation. Importin 8 only imports cap-free eIF4E. Cap-dependent changes to the structure of eIF4E underpin this selectivity. Indeed, m(7)G cap analogs or ribavirin prevents nuclear entry of eIF4E, which mirrors the trafficking phenotypes observed in patients with AML. Our studies also suggest that nuclear entry is important for the prooncogenic activity of eIF4E, at least in this context. These findings position nuclear trafficking of eIF4E as a critical step in its regulation and position the importin 8-eIF4E complex as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27114554

  13. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 is associated with the homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    Naderpour, Masoud; Lund, Ole Søgaard; Larsen, Richard;

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factors (eIFs) play a central role in potyviral infection. Accordingly, mutations in the gene encoding eIF4E have been identified as a source of recessive resistance in several plant species. In common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, four recessive genes, bc-1, bc-2, b...

  14. A Concise Li/liq. NH3 Mediated Synthesis of (4E,10Z)-Tetradeca-4,10-dienyl Acetate: The Major Sex Pheromone of Apple Leafminer Moth, Phyllonorycter ringoniella

    We have accomplished a protection free, concise, Li/liq. NH3 mediated and gram scale synthesis of (4E,10Z)-tetradeca-4,10-dienyl acetate (1), the major sex pheromone of apple leafminer moth, Phyllonorycter ringoniella starting from commercially available 1-pentyne, 1,4- dibromobutane and 4-petyne-1-ol in 24% overall yield. The Li/liq. NH3 based mono-alkynylation of dibromobutane has been introduced for the first time. The stereoselective formation of 10(Z) and 4(E) olefins are accomplished by partial hydrogenation (Lindlar's catalyst) and birch reduction respectively. The economy, efficiency, simplicity and high stereo chemical purity of this synthesis allow the potential use of pheromone 1 in integrated field studies to understand the behavioral responses of male apple leaf miner moth

  15. Adipokines mediate inflammation and insulin resistance

    Jeffrey E. Pessin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available For many years, adipose tissue was considered as an inert energy storage organ that accumulates and stores triacylglycerols during energy excess and releases fatty acids in times of systemic energy need. However, over the last two decades adipose tissue depots have been established as highly active endocrine and metabolically important organs that modulate energy expenditure and glucose homeostasis. In rodents, brown adipose tissue plays an essential role in non-shivering thermogenesis and in energy dissipation that can serve to protect against diet-induced obesity. White adipose tissue collectively referred too as either subcutaneous or visceral adipose tissue is responsible for the secretion of an array of signaling molecules, termed adipokines. These adipokines function as classic circulating hormones to communicate with other organs including brain, liver, muscle, the immune system and adipose tissue itself. The dysregulation of adipokines has been implicated in obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Recently, inflammatory responses in adipose tissue have been shown as a major mechanism to induce peripheral tissue insulin resistance. Although leptin and adiponectin regulate feeding behavior and energy expenditure, these adipokines are also involved in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Adipose tissue secrete various pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines to modulate inflammation and insulin resistance. In obese humans and rodent models, the expression of pro-inflammatory adipokines is enhanced to induce insulin resistance. Collectively, these findings have suggested that obesity-induced insulin resistance may result, at least in part, from an imbalance in the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines. Thus we will review the recent progress regarding the physiological and molecular functions of adipokines in the obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance with perspectives on future directions.

  16. Efflux Pump-Mediated Resistance in Chemotherapy

    Ughachukwu, PO; Unekwe, PC

    2012-01-01

    Efflux pump mechanisms perform important physiological functions such as prevention of toxin absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, elimination of bile from the hepatocytes, effective functioning of the blood–brain barrier and placental barrier, and renal excretion of drugs. They exist in all living cells, but those in the bacterial and mammalian cells are more important to the clinician and pharmacologist, as they constitute an important cause of antimicrobial drug resistance, which con...

  17. Overexpression of kinesins mediates docetaxel resistance in breast cancer cells.

    De, Sarmishtha; Cipriano, Rocky; Jackson, Mark W; Stark, George R

    2009-10-15

    Resistance to chemotherapy remains a major barrier to the successful treatment of cancer. To understand mechanisms underlying docetaxel resistance in breast cancer, we used an insertional mutagenesis strategy to identify proteins whose overexpression confers resistance. A strong promoter was inserted approximately randomly into the genomes of tumor-derived breast cancer cells, using a novel lentiviral vector. We isolated a docetaxel-resistant clone in which the level of the kinesin KIFC3 was elevated. When KIFC3 or the additional kinesins KIFC1, KIF1A, or KIF5A were overexpressed in the breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB 468, the cells became more resistant to docetaxel. The binding of kinesins to microtubules opposes the stabilizing effect of docetaxel that prevents cytokinesis and leads to apoptosis. Our finding that kinesins can mediate docetaxel resistance might lead to novel therapeutic approaches in which kinesin inhibitors are paired with taxanes. PMID:19789344

  18. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

    Isabel Couto; Leonard Amaral; José Melo-Cristino; Miguel Viveiros; Cláudia Palma; Elisabete Junqueira; Costa, Sofia S.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide inform...

  19. Incomplete inhibition of phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 as a mechanism of primary resistance to ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors

    Ducker, Gregory S.; Atreya, Chloe E.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Hom, Yun K.; Matli, Mary R; Benes, Cyril H.; Hann, Byron; Nakakura, Eric K.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Donner, David B.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Shokat, Kevan M.; Warren, Robert S

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth by integrating nutrient and growth factor signaling and is strongly implicated in cancer. But mTOR is not an oncogene, and which tumors will be resistant or sensitive to new ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors now in clinical trials remains unknown. We screened a panel of over 600 human cancer cell lines to identify markers of resistance and sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor PP242. RAS and PIK3CA mutations were the most significant ge...

  20. Incomplete inhibition of phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 as a mechanism of primary resistance to ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors

    Ducker, Gregory S.; Atreya, Chloe E.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Hom, Yun K.; Matli, Mary R; Benes, Cyril H.; Hann, Byron; Nakakura, Eric K.; Bergsland, Emily K.; Donner, David B.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Shokat, Kevan M.; Warren, Robert S

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates cell growth by integrating nutrient and growth factor signaling and is strongly implicated in cancer. But mTOR is not an oncogene, and which tumors will be resistant or sensitive to new ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors now in clinical trials remains unknown. We screened a panel of over 600 human cancer cell lines to identify markers of resistance and sensitivity to the mTOR inhibitor PP242. RAS and PIK3CA mutations were the most significant ge...

  1. STAT3: A Novel Molecular Mediator of Resistance to Chemoradiotherapy

    Spitzner, Melanie, E-mail: melanie.spitzner@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery, University Medicine Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, Göttingen 37075 (Germany); Ebner, Reinhard [Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Wolff, Hendrik A. [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medicine Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, Göttingen 37075 (Germany); Ghadimi, B. Michael [Department of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery, University Medicine Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, Göttingen 37075 (Germany); Wienands, Jürgen [Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, University Medicine Göttingen, Humboldtallee 34, Göttingen 37073 (Germany); Grade, Marian, E-mail: melanie.spitzner@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of General, Visceral and Pediatric Surgery, University Medicine Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, Göttingen 37075 (Germany)

    2014-09-29

    Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) represents a standard treatment for many human cancers, frequently combined with radical surgical resection. However, a considerable percentage of primary cancers are at least partially resistant to CRT, which represents a substantial clinical problem, because it exposes cancer patients to the potential side effects of both irradiation and chemotherapy. It is therefore exceedingly important to determine the molecular characteristics underlying CRT-resistance and to identify novel molecular targets that can be manipulated to re-sensitize resistant tumors to CRT. In this review, we highlight much of the recent evidence suggesting that the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a prominent role in mediating CRT-resistance, and we outline why inhibition of STAT3 holds great promise for future multimodal treatment concepts in oncology.

  2. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

    Giovanna Rincon Cruz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6'-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers.

  3. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bac...

  4. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

    Isabel Couto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide information on approaches useful to the assessment and characterization of efflux activity, as well as contributing to our understanding of the role of efflux to phenotypes of antibiotic resistance and biocide tolerance in S. aureus clinical isolates. The results described show that efflux is an important contributor to fluoroquinolone resistance in S. aureus and suggest it as a major mechanism in the early stages of resistance development. We also show that efflux plays an important role on the reduced susceptibility to biocides in S. aureus, strengthening the importance of this long neglected resistance mechanism to the persistence and proliferation of antibiotic/biocide-resistant S. aureus in the hospital environment.

  5. Growth mediated feedback and the abrupt onset of antibiotic resistance

    Barrett Deris, J.

    2010-03-01

    Recent results in our lab indicate that global gene expression will change in a growth-dependent manner for bacteria in sublethal antibiotic levels. We analyzed a system containing a constitutively expressed drug resistance gene and found that growth-mediated feedback provided a mechanism for bistable growth rates. That is, two identical cell-lines in the same antibiotic-infused media may respond with distinct growth rates. Our experimental work with cells carrying this resistance gene has shown that a rapid drop in growth occurs over a relatively small range of antibiotic. This result is consistent with a growth plateau arising in our analysis of the feedback mechanism. Furthermore, experiments have shown that a culture's degree of drug resistance depends on the initial growth conditions prior to exposure to high levels of antibiotics. This result is consistent with the predicted existence of a hysteretic regime near the growth plateau. The work reveals concrete mechanisms by which bacteria cope with high levels of antibiotics and illustrates the importance of considering growth-mediated feedback on gene circuits.

  6. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    He, Sheng Yang; Nomura, Kinya

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  7. MGMT Expression Predicts PARP-Mediated Resistance to Temozolomide.

    Erice, Oihane; Smith, Michael P; White, Rachel; Goicoechea, Ibai; Barriuso, Jorge; Jones, Chris; Margison, Geoffrey P; Acosta, Juan C; Wellbrock, Claudia; Arozarena, Imanol

    2015-05-01

    Melanoma and other solid cancers are frequently resistant to chemotherapies based on DNA alkylating agents such as dacarbazine and temozolomide. As a consequence, clinical responses are generally poor. Such resistance is partly due to the ability of cancer cells to use a variety of DNA repair enzymes to maintain cell viability. Particularly, the expression of MGMT has been linked to temozolomide resistance, but cotargeting MGMT has proven difficult due to dose-limiting toxicities. Here, we show that the MGMT-mediated resistance of cancer cells is profoundly dependent on the DNA repair enzyme PARP. Both in vitro and in vivo, we observe that MGMT-positive cancer cells strongly respond to the combination of temozolomide and PARP inhibitors (PARPi), whereas MGMT-deficient cells do not. In melanoma cells, temozolomide induced an antiproliferative senescent response, which was greatly enhanced by PARPi in MGMT-positive cells. In summary, we provide compelling evidence to suggest that the stratification of patients with cancer upon the MGMT status would enhance the success of combination treatments using temozolomide and PARPi. PMID:25777962

  8. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  9. RIN4-like proteins mediate resistance protein-derived soybean defense against Pseudomonas syringae

    Selote, Devarshi; Kachroo, Aardra

    2010-01-01

    Resistance (R) protein mediated recognition of pathogen avirulence effectors triggers signaling that induces a very robust form of species-specific immunity in plants. The soybean Rpg1-b protein mediates this form of resistance against the bacterial blight pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae expressing AvrBPgyrace4. Likewise, the Arabidopsis RPM1 protein also mediates species-specific resistance against AvrB expressing bacteria. RPM1 and Rpg1-b are non-orthologous and differ in their requirements ...

  10. Drosophila Longevity Assurance Conferred by Reduced Insulin Receptor Substrate Chico Partially Requires d4eBP.

    Hua Bai

    Full Text Available Mutations of the insulin/IGF signaling (IIS pathway extend Drosophila lifespan. Based on genetic epistasis analyses, this longevity assurance is attributed to downstream effects of the FOXO transcription factor. However, as reported FOXO accounts for only a portion of the observed longevity benefit, suggesting there are additional outputs of IIS to mediate aging. One candidate is target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1. Reduced TORC1 activity is reported to slow aging, whereas reduced IIS is reported to repress TORC1 activity. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein (4E-BP is repressed by TORC1, and activated 4E-BP is reported to increase Drosophila lifespan. Here we use genetic epistasis analyses to test whether longevity assurance mutants of chico, the Drosophila insulin receptor substrate homolog, require Drosophila d4eBP to slow aging. In chico heterozygotes, which are robustly long-lived, d4eBP is required but not sufficient to slow aging. Remarkably, d4eBP is not required or sufficient for chico homozygotes to extend longevity. Likewise, chico heterozygote females partially require d4eBP to preserve age-dependent locomotion, and both chico genotypes require d4eBP to improve stress-resistance. Reproduction and most measures of growth affected by either chico genotype are always independent of d4eBP. In females, chico heterozygotes paradoxically produce more rather than less phosphorylated 4E-BP (p4E-BP. Altered IRS function within the IIS pathway of Drosophila appears to have partial, conditional capacity to regulate aging through an unconventional interaction with 4E-BP.

  11. Peroxynitrite mediates testosterone-induced vasodilation of microvascular resistance vessels.

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P; White, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation. PMID:23318471

  12. Wallichinine reverses ABCB1-mediated cancer multidrug resistance.

    Lv, Min; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Qin, Wu-Ming; Yang, Yang; Zheng, Di-Wei; Chen, Yao; Huang, Jia-Rong; Wang, Kun; Wei, Meng-Ning; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of ABCB1 in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of cancer multidrug resistance (MDR). Wallichinine is a compound isolated from piper wallichii and works as an antagonist of platelet activiating factor receptor to inhibit the gathering of blood platelet. In this study, we investigate the effect of wallichinine on cancer MDR mediated by ABCB1 transporter. Wallichinine significantly potentiates the effects of two ABCB1 substrates vincristine and doxorubicin on inhibition of growth, arrest of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, wallichinine do not alter the sensitivity of non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Mechanistically, wallichinine blocks the drug-efflux activity of ABCB1 to increase the intracellular accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin and stimulates the ATPase of ABCB1 without alteration of the expression of ABCB1. The predicted binding mode shows the hydrophobic interactions of wallichinine within the large drug binding cavity of ABCB1. At all, our study of the interaction of wallichinine with ABCB1 presented herein provides valuable clues for the development of novel MDR reversal reagents from natural products. PMID:27508017

  13. [Classification and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance qnr genes in China--A review].

    Yan, Lei; Xu, Hai

    2016-02-01

    Quinolone antibacterial drugs, developing from the treatment of urinary tract infection in early time and now from the treatment of intestinal infection and respiratory infection, have been widely used in clinical, animal husbandry and aquaculture. Bacteria gradually become resistant to them and resistance mechanism is more and more complicated. Quinolone resistance mechanism is mainly divided into chromosome mediated resistance and plasmid mediated resistance, the latter plays an important role in spreading of antibiotic resistance. In 1998, plasmid mediated quinolone resistance mechanism was reported for the first time, namely the qnr gene mediated fluoroquinolone resistance mechanism. qnr genes can spread rapidly in different bacteria, which causes the infection difficult to control, makes the nosocomial infection popular in a wide range. In addition, qnr genes are usually associated with β-lactamase resistance gene. They exist in complex integron and integrate with the other varieties of resistance genes, which narrows the space of clinical medicine choose or drug combinations use to treat related bacterial infection and brings us a serious challenge. In this review, we provide a detailed overview for the historical discovery, classification, the resistance mechanisms of qnr genes, and the prevalence of those genes in China. PMID:27373065

  14. Selective modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated drug resistance

    Bebawy, M; Morris, M B; Roufogalis, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated with the overexpression of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein is a serious impediment to successful cancer treatment. We found that verapamil reversed resistance of CEM/VLB 100 cells to vinblastine and fluorescein-colchicine, but not to colchicine. Chlorpromazine reversed resistance to vinblastine but not to fluorescein-colchicine, and it increased resistance to colchicine. Initial influx rates of fluorescein-colchicine were similar in resistant and paren...

  15. Characterization of different plasmid-borne dihydropteroate synthases mediating bacterial resistance to sulfonamides.

    Swedberg, G; Sköld, O

    1980-01-01

    Plasmid-borne resistance to sulfonamides was studied in both newly isolated and earlier characterized R plasmids. Two different classes of drug-resistant dihydropteroate synthases were found to be responsible for most cases of plasmid-mediated sulfonamide resistance. The plasmid-coded enzymes could be completely separated from their chromosomal counterpart and also showed differences in heat stability and molecular size. The resistant and chromosomal enzymes could bind the normal substrate, p...

  16. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  17. Streptococcal tetracycline resistance mediated at the level of protein synthesis.

    Burdett, V

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of tetracycline resistance was examined in strains containing each of the three previously identified resistance determinants in Streptococcus spp. Uptake of tetracycline was measured in tetracycline-sensitive cells as well as in cells containing each of the three resistance determinants. In cells containing tetL, uptake was not observed. However, in sensitive cells and cells containing either tetM or tetN, tetracycline was accumulated approximately 25-fold against a concentrati...

  18. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistence in Arabidopsis

    Ton, J.

    2001-01-01

    Upon primary pathogen attack, plants activate a diverse array of defense mechanisms at the site of primary infection. Besides this so-called basal resistance, plants have also the ability to enhance their defensive capacity against future pathogen attack. There are at least two types of biologically induced resistance. Classic systemic acquired resistance (SAR) results from infection by a necrotizing pathogen and is dependent on endogenous accumulation of salicylic acid (SA). Root colonizatio...

  19. Cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant (class F) from Bacteroides fragilis mediates resistance in Escherichia coli by actively reducing tetracycline accumulation.

    Park, B. H.; Hendricks, M; Malamy, M H; Tally, F P; Levy, S. B.

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli bearing a cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant from Bacteroides fragilis expressed low-level constitutive resistance to tetracycline under aerobic, but not anaerobic, growth conditions and accumulated less tetracycline aerobically than did isogenic susceptible cells. This decreased uptake was energy dependent and reversible by increased concentrations of tetracycline, suggesting a saturable carrier-mediated active efflux mechanism. Decreased uptake was not seen when th...

  20. Alcohol-Mediated Resistance-Switching Behavior in Metal-Organic Framework-Based Electronic Devices.

    Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Hong; Shi, Wenxiong; Zhang, Weina; Yu, Jiancan; Chandran, Bevita K; Cui, Chenlong; Zhu, Bowen; Liu, Zhiyuan; Li, Bin; Xu, Cai; Xu, Zhiling; Li, Shuzhou; Huang, Wei; Huo, Fengwei; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-07-25

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have drawn increasing attentions as promising candidates for functional devices. Herein, we present MOF films in constructing memory devices with alcohol mediated resistance switching property, where the resistance state is controlled by applying alcohol vapors to achieve multilevel information storage. The ordered packing mode and the hydrogen bonding system of the guest molecules adsorbed in MOF crystals are shown to be the reason for the alcohol mediated electrical switching. This chemically mediated memory device can be a candidate in achieving environment-responsive devices and exhibits potential applications in wearable information storage systems. PMID:27311703

  1. Resistance to paclitaxel in a cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line is mediated by P-glycoprotein.

    Britta Stordal

    Full Text Available The IGROVCDDP cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line is also resistant to paclitaxel and models the resistance phenotype of relapsed ovarian cancer patients after first-line platinum/taxane chemotherapy. A TaqMan low-density array (TLDA was used to characterise the expression of 380 genes associated with chemotherapy resistance in IGROVCDDP cells. Paclitaxel resistance in IGROVCDDP is mediated by gene and protein overexpression of P-glycoprotein and the protein is functionally active. Cisplatin resistance was not reversed by elacridar, confirming that cisplatin is not a P-glycoprotein substrate. Cisplatin resistance in IGROVCDDP is multifactorial and is mediated in part by the glutathione pathway and decreased accumulation of drug. Total cellular glutathione was not increased. However, the enzyme activity of GSR and GGT1 were up-regulated. The cellular localisation of copper transporter CTR1 changed from membrane associated in IGROV-1 to cytoplasmic in IGROVCDDP. This may mediate the previously reported accumulation defect. There was decreased expression of the sodium potassium pump (ATP1A, MRP1 and FBP which all have been previously associated with platinum accumulation defects in platinum-resistant cell lines. Cellular localisation of MRP1 was also altered in IGROVCDDP shifting basolaterally, compared to IGROV-1. BRCA1 was also up-regulated at the gene and protein level. The overexpression of P-glycoprotein in a resistant model developed with cisplatin is unusual. This demonstrates that P-glycoprotein can be up-regulated as a generalised stress response rather than as a specific response to a substrate. Mechanisms characterised in IGROVCDDP cells may be applicable to relapsed ovarian cancer patients treated with frontline platinum/taxane chemotherapy.

  2. Towards rapid genotyping of resistant malaria parasites: could loop-mediated isothermal amplification be the solution?

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad

    2014-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is an innovative molecular technique that has been validated for point-of-care testing to diagnose malaria. Molecular detection and tracking of anti-malarial drug resistance is mainly based on highly sophisticated, costly and time-consuming techniques. With the validation of resistance-associated gene mutations in malaria parasites, there is a need to develop rapid, easy-to-use molecular tests for anti-malarial drug resistance genotyping. LAMP cou...

  3. Transferable plasmid-mediated resistance to streptomycin in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis.

    Guiyoule, A; Gerbaud, G; Buchrieser, C.; Galimand, M.; Rahalison, L.; Chanteau, S.; Courvalin, P; Carniel, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics was reported in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar in 1997. We describe a second Y. pestis strain with high-level resistance to streptomycin, isolated from a human case of bubonic plague in Madagascar. The resistance determinants were carried by a self-transferable plasmid that could conjugate at high frequencies to other Y. pestis isolates. The plasmid and the host bacterium were different from those previously a...

  4. Molecular studies on the mechanism of tetracycline resistance mediated by Tet(O).

    Manavathu, E K; Fernandez, C L; Cooperman, B S; Taylor, D E

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to tetracycline in Escherichia coli mediated by the Campylobacter jejuni-derived resistance determinant Tet(O) was investigated. The cloned Tet(O) protein had no detectable effect on the intracellular accumulation of tetracycline. The presence of Tet(O) markedly diminished the inhibitory effect of tetracycline on protein synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. Ribosomes prepared from tetracycline-resistant and susceptible E. coli cells bound almost identical amounts o...

  5. Masitinib Antagonizes ATP-Binding Cassette Subfamily C Member 10-Mediated Paclitaxel Resistance: A Preclinical Study

    Kathawala, Rishil J; Sodani, Kamlesh; Chen, Kang; PATEL, ATISH; Abuznait, Alaa H.; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Sun, Yue-Li; Kaddoumi, Amal; Ashby, Charles R.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel displays clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors. However, resistance to paclitaxel significantly attenuates the response to chemotherapy. The ABC transporter subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10), also known as multi-drug resistance protein 7 (MRP7) efflux transporter, is a major mediator of paclitaxel resistance. In this study, we show that masitinib, a small molecule stem-cell growth factor receptor (c-Kit) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, at non-toxic concentrations, signif...

  6. Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis: involvement of jasmonate and ethylene

    Pieterse, C.M.J.; Wees, A.C.M. van; Ton, J.; Léon-Kloosterziel, K.M.; Pelt, J.A. van; Keurentjes, J. J. B.; Knoester, M.; van Loon, L.C.

    2000-01-01

    The capacity of a plant to express a broad-spectrum systemic acquired resistance (SAR) after primary infection is well known and extensively studied. A relatively unknown form of induced disease resistance is triggered by nonpathogenic, root-colonizing rhizobacteria and is commonly referred to as rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR). Rhizosphere bacteria are present in large numbers on the root. Certain strains stimulate plant growth and are therefore called plant growth-p...

  7. Efflux Pump-mediated Drug Resistance in Burkholderia

    Nicole L Podnecky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Several members of the genus Burkholderia are prominent pathogens. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. Virtually all Burkholderia species are also resistant to polymyxin, prohibiting use of drugs like colistin that are available for treatment of infections caused by most other drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Despite clinical significance and antibiotic resistance of Burkholderia species, characterization of efflux pumps lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although efflux pumps have been described in several Burkholderia species, they have been best studied in B. cenocepacia and B. pseudomallei. As in other non-enteric Gram-negatives, efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division (RND family are the clinically most significant efflux systems in these two species. Several efflux pumps were described in B. cenocepacia, which when expressed confer resistance to clinically significant antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Three RND pumps have been characterized in B. pseudomallei, two of which confer either intrinsic or acquired resistance to aminoglycosides, macrolides, chloramphenicol, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines, trimethoprim, and in some instances trimethoprim+sulfamethoxazole. Several strains of the host-adapted B. mallei, a clone of B. pseudomallei, lack AmrAB-OprA and are therefore aminoglycoside and macrolide susceptible. B. thailandensis is closely related to B. pseudomallei, but non-pathogenic to humans. Its pump repertoire and ensuing drug resistance profile parallels that of B. pseudomallei. An efflux pump in B. vietnamiensis plays a significant role in acquired aminoglycoside resistance. Summarily, efflux pumps are significant players in Burkholderia drug resistance.

  8. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi, E-mail: drzwang@gmail.com; Yue, Wu, E-mail: drwuyue@gmail.com

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM.

  9. Differential Complement Resistance Mediates Virulence of Haemophilus influenzae Type b

    Sutton, Ann; Schneerson, Rachel; Kendall-Morris, Saundra; Robbins, John B.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to gain insight into the virulence of type b in contrast to the other Haemophilus influenzae capsular types. A relationship was found between the comparative virulence of H. influenzae types in humans and their resistance to the bactericidal effect of antibody-free complement. Type b was most resistant to the bactericidal effect of complement. The other types could be divided into three groups based upon their susceptibility to complement; this grouping was also relate...

  10. Plasmid Mediated Antibiotic Resistance in Isolated Bacteria From Burned Patients

    Beige, Fahimeh; Baseri Salehi, Majid; Bahador, Nima; Mobasherzadeh, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, the treatment of burned patients is difficult because of the high frequency of infection with antibiotic resistance bacteria. Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the level of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria and its relation with the existence of plasmid. Materials and Methods: The samples were collected from two hundred twenty hospitalized burned patients in Isfahan burn hospital during a three-month period (March 2012 to June 2012). The samp...

  11. Nanomaterial resistant microorganism mediated reduction of graphene oxide.

    Chouhan, Raghuraj S; Pandey, Ashish; Qureshi, Anjum; Ozguz, Volkan; Niazi, Javed H

    2016-10-01

    In this study, soil bacteria were isolated from nanomaterials (NMs) contaminated pond soil and enriched in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) in mineral medium to obtain NMs resistant bacteria. The isolated resistant bacteria were biochemically and genetically identified as Fontibacillus aquaticus. The resistant bacteria were allowed to interact with engineered GO in order to study the biotransformation in GO structure. Raman spectra of GO extracted from culture medium revealed decreased intensity ratio of ID/IG with subsequent reduction of CO which was consistent with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) results. The structural changes and exfoliatied GO nanosheets were also evident from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and current-voltage measurements confirmed the reduction of GO after the interaction with resistant bacteria. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of biotransformed GO revealed reduction of oxygen-containing species on the surface of nanosheets. Our results demonstrated that the presented method is an environment friendly, cost effective, simple and based on green approaches for the reduction of GO using NMs resistant bacteria. PMID:27248463

  12. Ribozyme-mediated reversal of the multidrug-resistant phenotype.

    Scanlon, K J; Ishida, H.; Kashani-Sabet, M

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the effects of suppressing c-fos oncogene expression on multidrug resistance (MDR). A2780S human ovarian carcinoma cells with resistance to actinomycin D were isolated and the resultant A2780AD cells exhibited the MDR phenotype. A hammerhead ribozyme designed to cleave fos RNA cloned into the pMAMneo plasmid was transfected into A2780AD cells. Induction of the ribozyme resulted in decreased expression of c-fos, as well as that of the MDR gene (mdr-1), c-jun, and mutant p53...

  13. Macrolide Resistance Mediated by a Bifidobacterium breve Membrane Protein

    Margolles, Abelardo; Moreno, José Antonio; van Sinderen, Douwe; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.

    2005-01-01

    A gene coding for a hypothetical membrane protein from Bifidobacterium breve was expressed in Lactococcus lactis. Immunoblotting demonstrated that this protein is located in the membrane. Phenotypical changes in sensitivity towards 21 antibiotics were determined. The membrane protein-expressing cells showed higher levels of resistance to several macrolides.

  14. [Free fatty acids: mediators of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis].

    Castro Cabezas, M; Erkelens, D W; van Dijk, H

    2002-01-19

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are involved in the transportation of energy; in the postprandial phase to the peripheral tissues and in the postabsorptive phase from the adipose tissue to the liver. In the postprandial phase, FFAs are mainly derived from hydrolysis of triglyceride-rich particles like chylomicrons and very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL). The flux of FFAs is directed to peripheral cells such as adipocytes and muscle cells. In the postabsorptive period, FFAs are transported to the liver after being released from intracellular storage in the adipocytes. Complement component 3 (C3) plays an important role in the uptake of free fatty acids by the peripheral cells and their esterification to triglycerides. Since C3 is also involved in the pathogenesis of the insulin resistance syndrome, and since a deviant FFA metabolism with an increased FFA flux to the liver may induce insulin resistance, it is hypothesized that C3 may form the missing link between FFA metabolism and insulin resistance. In addition, recent studies have increasingly indicated that atherosclerosis is in fact an inflammation-based process involving complement-dependent responses, in which FFAs seem to play a role in the complement-dependent pathway. It has recently become apparent that FFAs have a regulatory function in the transcription of DNA, in relation to lipoprotein metabolism. This is where PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha agonists ('glitazones' and fibrates respectively) are active (PPAR is an abbreviation for peroxisome proliferation activating receptor). Glitazons may play an important role in the treatment of insulin resistance and related disorders. Acquiring more knowledge about the relationship between complement and FFA metabolism may increase our understanding of these processes and provide openings for the development of new antiatherogenic strategies. PMID:11826668

  15. Coat protein-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus subgroup IB in Nicotiana benthamiana

    A Srivastava; S K Raj

    2008-06-01

    Coat protein (CP)-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup IB was demonstrated in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the fourteen independently transformed lines developed, two lines were tested for resistance against CMV by challenge inoculations. The transgenic lines exhibiting complete resistance remained symptomless throughout life and showed reduced or no virus accumulation in their systemic leaves after virus challenge. These lines also showed virus resistance against two closely related strains of CMV. This is the first report of CP-mediated transgenic resistance against a CMV subgroup IB member isolated from India.

  16. Transferable plasmid-mediated resistance to streptomycin in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis.

    Guiyoule, A; Gerbaud, G; Buchrieser, C; Galimand, M; Rahalison, L; Chanteau, S; Courvalin, P; Carniel, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated high-level resistance to multiple antibiotics was reported in a clinical isolate of Yersinia pestis in Madagascar in 1997. We describe a second Y. pestis strain with high-level resistance to streptomycin, isolated from a human case of bubonic plague in Madagascar. The resistance determinants were carried by a self-transferable plasmid that could conjugate at high frequencies to other Y. pestis isolates. The plasmid and the host bacterium were different from those previously associated with multiple-drug resistance, indicating that acquisition of resistance plasmids is occurring in this bacterial species. Emergence of resistance to streptomycin in Y. pestis represents a critical public health problem since this antibiotic is used as the first-line treatment against plague in many countries. PMID:11266293

  17. Maternal mediation, stress inoculation, and the development of neuroendocrine stress resistance in primates

    Parker, Karen J.; Buckmaster, Christine L.; Sundlass, Karan; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Lyons, David M.

    2006-01-01

    The stress inoculation hypothesis presupposes that brief intermittent stress exposure early in life induces the development of subsequent stress resistance in human and nonhuman primates. Rodent studies, however, suggest a role for maternal care rather than stress exposure per se (i.e., the maternal mediation hypothesis). To investigate these two hypotheses, we examined maternal care and the development of stress resistance after exposure to brief intermittent infant stress (IS), mother–infan...

  18. In Vitro Biochemical Study of CYP51-Mediated Azole Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Parker, Josie E.; Price, Claire L.; Nes, W. David; Kelly, Steven L.; Kelly, Diane E.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of triazole-resistant Aspergillus infections is increasing worldwide, often mediated through mutations in the CYP51A amino acid sequence. New classes of azole-based drugs are required to combat the increasing resistance to existing triazole therapeutics. In this study, a CYP51 reconstitution assay is described consisting of eburicol, purified recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus CPR1 (AfCPR1), and Escherichia coli membrane suspensions containing recombinant A. fumigatus CYP51 prote...

  19. Role of outer membrane barrier in efflux-mediated tetracycline resistance of Escherichia coli.

    Thanassi, D. G.; Suh, G S; Nikaido, H

    1995-01-01

    Accumulation of tetracycline in Escherichia coli was studied to determine its permeation pathway and to provide a basis for understanding efflux-mediated resistance. Passage of tetracycline across the outer membrane appeared to occur preferentially via the porin OmpF, with tetracycline in its magnesium-bound form. Rapid efflux of magnesium-chelated tetracycline from the periplasm was observed. In E. coli cells that do not contain exogenous tetracycline resistance genes, the steady-state level...

  20. DNA-PK mediates AKT activation and apoptosis inhibition in clinically acquired platinum resistance.

    Stronach, Euan A; Chen, Michelle; Maginn, Elaina N; Agarwal, Roshan; Mills, Gordon B; Wasan, Harpreet; Gabra, Hani

    2011-11-01

    Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS) ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinum-resistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Resensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage-mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors. PMID:22131882

  1. DNA-PK Mediates AKT Activation and Apoptosis Inhibition in Clinically Acquired Platinum Resistance12

    Stronach, Euan A; Chen, Michelle; Maginn, Elaina N; Agarwal, Roshan; Mills, Gordon B; Wasan, Harpreet; Gabra, Hani

    2011-01-01

    Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS) ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinum-resistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Resensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage-mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors. PMID:22131882

  2. Efflux-mediated multidrug resistance in Bacillus subtilis: similarities and dissimilarities with the mammalian system.

    Neyfakh, A A; Bidnenko, V E; L. B. CHEN

    1991-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis cells selected for their resistance to rhodamine 6G demonstrated a multidrug-resistance (MDR) phenotype resembling that of mammalian MDR cells. Like MDR in mammalian cells, MDR in bacteria was mediated by the efflux of the drugs from the cells. The bacterial multidrug efflux system transported similar drugs and was sensitive to similar inhibitors as the mammalian multidrug transporter, P-glycoprotein. The gene coding for the bacterial multidrug transporter, like the P-glycop...

  3. Plasmid-mediated formaldehyde resistance in Escherichia coli: characterization of resistance gene.

    Kümmerle, N; Feucht, H H; Kaulfers, P M

    1996-01-01

    The formaldehyde resistance mechanisms in the formaldehyde-resistant strain Escherichia coli VU3695 were investigated. A large (4.6-kb) plasmid DNA fragment encompassing the formaldehyde resistance gene was sequenced. A single 1,107-bp open reading frame encoding a glutathione- and NAD-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase was identified and sequenced, and the enzyme was expressed in an in vitro assay and purified. Amino acid sequence homology studies showed 62.4 to 63.2% identity with class I...

  4. Loss of CMD2-mediated resistance to cassava mosaic disease in plants regenerated through somatic embryogenesis.

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Wagaba, Henry; Moll, Theodore; Alicai, Titus; Miano, Douglas; Carrington, James C; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-09-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) and cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) are the two most important viral diseases affecting cassava production in Africa. Three sources of resistance are employed to combat CMD: polygenic recessive resistance, termed CMD1, the dominant monogenic type, named CMD2, and the recently characterized CMD3. The farmer-preferred cultivar TME 204 carries inherent resistance to CMD mediated by CMD2, but is highly susceptible to CBSD. Selected plants of TME 204 produced for RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated resistance to CBSD were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis and tested in confined field trials in East Africa. Although micropropagated, wild-type TME 204 plants exhibited the expected levels of resistance, all plants regenerated via somatic embryogenesis were found to be highly susceptible to CMD. Glasshouse studies using infectious clones of East African cassava mosaic virus conclusively demonstrated that the process of somatic embryogenesis used to regenerate cassava caused the resulting plants to become susceptible to CMD. This phenomenon could be replicated in the two additional CMD2-type varieties TME 3 and TME 7, but the CMD1-type cultivar TMS 30572 and the CMD3-type cultivar TMS 98/0505 maintained resistance to CMD after passage through somatic embryogenesis. Data are presented to define the specific tissue culture step at which the loss of CMD resistance occurs and to show that the loss of CMD2-mediated resistance is maintained across vegetative generations. These findings reveal new aspects of the widely used technique of somatic embryogenesis, and the stability of field-level resistance in CMD2-type cultivars presently grown by farmers in East Africa, where CMD pressure is high. PMID:26662210

  5. DNA-PK Mediates AKT Activation and Apoptosis Inhibition in Clinically Acquired Platinum Resistance

    Euan A. Stronach

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical resistance to chemotherapy is a frequent event in cancer treatment and is closely linked to poor outcome. High-grade serous (HGS ovarian cancer is characterized by p53 mutation and high levels of genomic instability. Treatment includes platinum-based chemotherapy and initial response rates are high; however, resistance is frequently acquired, at which point treatment options are largely palliative. Recent data indicate that platinumresistant clones exist within the sensitive primary tumor at presentation, implying resistant cell selection after treatment with platinum chemotherapy. The AKT pathway is central to cell survival and has been implicated in platinum resistance. Here, we show that platinum exposure induces an AKT-dependent, prosurvival, DNA damage response in clinically platinum-resistant but not platinum-sensitive cells. AKT relocates to the nucleus of resistant cells where it is phosphorylated specifically on S473 by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK, and this activation inhibits cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Inhibition of DNA-PK or AKT, but not mTORC2, restores platinum sensitivity in a panel of clinically resistant HGS ovarian cancer cell lines: we also demonstrate these effects in other tumor types. Re-sensitization is associated with prevention of AKT-mediated BAD phosphorylation. Strikingly, in patient-matched sensitive cells, we do not see enhanced apoptosis on combining cisplatin with AKT or DNA-PK inhibition. Insulin-mediated activation of AKT is unaffected by DNA-PK inhibitor treatment, suggesting that this effect is restricted to DNA damage–mediated activation of AKT and that, clinically, DNA-PK inhibition might prevent platinum-induced AKT activation without interfering with normal glucose homeostasis, an unwanted toxicity of direct AKT inhibitors.

  6. Contribution of T cell-mediated immunity to the resistance to staphlococcal infection

    Abscess formation in nude mice after subcutaneous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was more extensive and prolonged as compared with that in phenotypically normal littermates. Abscess formation in nude mice was augmented markedly by whole-body irradiation. Not only T cell-mediated immunity but also radiosensitive, nonimmune phagocytosis appear to contribute to the resistance against staphylococcal infection

  7. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among non-typhi Salmonella enterica isolates, USA

    We determined the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms among non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) spp. isolates from humans, food animals, and retail meat in the United States in 2007. Fifty-one (2.4%) of human isolates (n=2165), 5 (1.6%) of isolates from animal isolates (n=1915) an...

  8. Selection for pro-inflammatory mediators yields chickens with increased resistance against Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    Salmonella are a leading cause of foodborne illness and can be transmitted through consumption of contaminated poultry; therefore, increasing a flocks’ natural resistance to Salmonella could improve food safety. Previously, we characterized the heterophil-mediated innate immune response of two pare...

  9. Mobile CRISPR/Cas-mediated bacteriophage resistance in Lactococcus lactis.

    Anne M Millen

    Full Text Available Lactococcus lactis is a biotechnological workhorse for food fermentations and potentially therapeutic products and is therefore widely consumed by humans. It is predominantly used as a starter microbe for fermented dairy products, and specialized strains have adapted from a plant environment through reductive evolution and horizontal gene transfer as evidenced by the association of adventitious traits with mobile elements. Specifically, L. lactis has armed itself with a myriad of plasmid-encoded bacteriophage defensive systems to protect against viral predation. This known arsenal had not included CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins, which forms a remarkable microbial immunity system against invading DNA. Although CRISPR/Cas systems are common in the genomes of closely related lactic acid bacteria (LAB, none was identified within the eight published lactococcal genomes. Furthermore, a PCR-based search of the common LAB CRISPR/Cas systems (Types I and II in 383 industrial L. lactis strains proved unsuccessful. Here we describe a novel, Type III, self-transmissible, plasmid-encoded, phage-interfering CRISPR/Cas discovered in L. lactis. The native CRISPR spacers confer resistance based on sequence identity to corresponding lactococcal phage. The interference is directed at phages problematic to the dairy industry, indicative of a responsive system. Moreover, targeting could be modified by engineering the spacer content. The 62.8-kb plasmid was shown to be conjugally transferrable to various strains. Its mobility should facilitate dissemination within microbial communities and provide a readily applicable system to naturally introduce CRISPR/Cas to industrially relevant strains for enhanced phage resistance and prevention against acquisition of undesirable genes.

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma cells acquire the resistance to anti-cancer drugs through physical and functional interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment via two overlapping mechanisms. First, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) produce soluble factors, such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1, to activate signal transduction pathways leading to drug resistance (soluble factor-mediated drug resistance). Second, BMSCs up-regulate the expression of cell cycle inhibitors, anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family and ABC drug transporters in myeloma cells upon direct adhesion [cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR)]. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying drug resistance may greatly contribute to the advancement of cancer therapies. Recent investigations, including ours, have revealed the involvement of epigenetic alterations in drug resistance especially CAM-DR. For example, we found that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) determine the sensitivity of proteasome inhibitors and the histone methyltransferase EZH2 regulates the transcription of anti-apoptotic genes during the acquisition of CAM-DR by myeloma cells. In addition, another histone methyltransferase MMSET was shown to confer drug resistance to myeloma cells by facilitating DNA repair. These findings provide a rationale for the inclusion of epigenetic drugs, such as HDAC inhibitors and histone methylation modifiers, in combination chemotherapy for MM patients to increase the therapeutic index. PMID:27411688

  11. Esterase mediated resistance in deltamethrin resistant reference tick colony of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    Gupta, Snehil; Ajith Kumar, K G; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Nagar, Gaurav; Kumar, Sachin; Saravanan, B C; Ravikumar, Gandham; Ghosh, Srikant

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring of acaricide resistance is considered as one of the important facets of integrated tick management. In an attempt of development of resistance monitoring indicators, in the present study two reference tick lines of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus maintained in the Entomology laboratory, Indian Veterinary Research Institute (IVRI), Izatnagar, India, were studied to determine the possible contributing factors involved in development of resistance to deltamethrin. Electrophoretic profiling of esterase enzymes detected high activities of EST-1 in reference resistant tick colony designated as IVRI-IV whereas it was not detectable in reference susceptible IVRI-I line of R. (B.) microplus. Esterases were further characterized as carboxylesterase or acetylcholinesterase based on inhibitor study using PMSF, eserine sulphate, malathion, TPP and copper sulphate. It was concluded that an acetylcholinesterase, EST-1, possibly plays an important role for development of deltamethrin resistance in IVRI-IV colony of R. (B.) microplus. PMID:26979585

  12. Parallel evolution of cytochrome b mediated bifenazate resistance in the citrus red mite Panonychus citri.

    Van Leeuwen, T; Van Nieuwenhuyse, P; Vanholme, B; Dermauw, W; Nauen, R; Tirry, L

    2011-02-01

    Bifenazate is a recently developed acaricide that is mainly used to control spider mites on a variety of crops. Although first thought to be a neurotoxin, genetic evidence obtained from bifenazate resistant Tetranychus urticae strains suggested an alternative mode of action as a Qo pocket inhibitor of the mitochondrial complex III. In this study, we reveal how bifenazate resistance in strains of Panonychus citri is maternally inherited and can confer cross-resistance to the known Qo inhibitor acequinocyl. The mitochondrial genome of P. citri was sequenced and Qo pocket mutations were shown to be linked with the resistant trait. Parallel evolution of cytochrome b mediated bifenazate resistance corroborates the alternative mode of action and yet again illustrates that care should be taken when employing Qo inhibitors as crop protection compounds. PMID:20735493

  13. Tracking a refined eIF4E-binding motif reveals Angel1 as a new partner of eIF4E.

    Gosselin, Pauline; Martineau, Yvan; Morales, Julia; Czjzek, Mirjam; Glippa, Virginie; Gauffeny, Isabelle; Morin, Emmanuelle; Le Corguillé, Gildas; Pyronnet, Stephane; Cormier, Patrick; Cosson, Bertrand

    2013-09-01

    The initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is implicated in most of the crucial steps of the mRNA life cycle and is recognized as a pivotal protein in gene regulation. Many of these roles are mediated by its interaction with specific proteins generally known as eIF4E-interacting partners (4E-IPs), such as eIF4G and 4E-BP. To screen for new 4E-IPs, we developed a novel approach based on structural, in silico and biochemical analyses. We identified the protein Angel1, a member of the CCR4 deadenylase family. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence that Angel1 is able to interact in vitro and in vivo with eIF4E. Point mutation variants of Angel1 demonstrated that the interaction of Angel1 with eIF4E is mediated through a consensus eIF4E-binding motif. Immunofluorescence and cell fractionation experiments showed that Angel1 is confined to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus, where it partially co-localizes with eIF4E and eIF4G, but not with 4E-BP. Furthermore, manipulating Angel1 levels in living cells had no effect on global translation rates, suggesting that the protein has a more specific function. Taken together, our results illustrate that we developed a powerful method for identifying new eIF4E partners and open new perspectives for understanding eIF4E-specific regulation. PMID:23814182

  14. Identification of a new locus, Ptr(t), required for rice blast resistance gene Pi-ta-mediated resistance.

    Jia, Yulin; Martin, Rodger

    2008-04-01

    Resistance to the blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is proposed to be initiated by physical binding of a putative cytoplasmic receptor encoded by a nucleotide binding site-type resistance gene, Pi-ta, to the processed elicitor encoded by the corresponding avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Here, we report the identification of a new locus, Ptr(t), that is required for Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. A Pi-ta-expressing susceptible mutant was identified using a genetic screen. Putative mutations at Ptr(t) do not alter recognition specificity to another resistance gene, Pi-k(s), in the Pi-ta homozygote, indicating that Ptr(t) is more likely specific to Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition. Genetic crosses of Pi-ta Ptr(t) and Pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes suggest that Ptr(t) segregates as a single dominant nuclear gene. A ratio of 1:1 (resistant/susceptible) of a population of BC1 of Pi-ta Ptr(t) with pi-ta ptr(t) homozygotes indicates that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are linked and cosegregate. Genotyping of mutants of pi-ta ptr(t) and Pi-ta Ptr(t) homozygotes using ten simple sequence repeat markers at the Pi-ta region determined that Pi-ta and Ptr(t) are located within a 9-megabase region and are of indica origin. Identification of Ptr(t) is a significant advancement in studying Pi-ta-mediated signal recognition and transduction. PMID:18321185

  15. Role of attP in Integrase-Mediated Integration of the Shigella Resistance Locus Pathogenicity Island of Shigella flexneri

    Turner, Sally A.; Luck, Shelley N.; Sakellaris, Harry; Rajakumar, Kumar; Adler, Ben

    2004-01-01

    The Shigella resistance locus (SRL) pathogenicity island (PAI) in Shigella spp. mediates resistance to streptomycin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. It can be excised from the chromosome via site-specific recombination mediated by the P4-related int gene. Here, we show that SRL PAI attP is capable of RecA-independent, site-specific, int-mediated integration into two bacterial tRNA attB sites.

  16. Potyviral resistance derived from cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris carrying bc-3 co-segregates with homozygotic presence of a mutated eIF4E allele

    Naderpour, M; Lund, O Søgaard; Larsen, R;

    2008-01-01

    In common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, four recessive genes, bc-1, bc-2, bc-3 and bc-u control resistance to potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV). To identify candidates for the bc-genes, we cloned and sequenced homologues of genes encoding cap...

  17. Ferulic acid reverses ABCB1-mediated paclitaxel resistance in MDR cell lines.

    Muthusamy, Ganesan; Balupillai, Agilan; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Shanmugam, Mohana; Gunaseelan, Srithar; Mary, Beaulah; Prasad, N Rajendra

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The use of the dietary phytochemicals as chemosensitizing agents to enhance the efficacy of conventional cytostatic drugs has recently gained the attention as a plausible approach for overcoming the drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a naturally occurring diet-based phenolic acid, ferulic acid, could sensitize paclitaxel efficacy in ABCB1 overexpressing (P-glycoprotein) colchicine selected KB Ch(R)8-5 cell line. In vitro drug efflux assays demonstrated that ferulic acid inhibits P-glycoprotein transport function in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. However, ferulic acid significantly downregulates ABCB1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Cytotoxicity assay reveals that ferulic acid decreased paclitaxel resistance in KBCh(R)8-5 and HEK293/ABCB1 cells, which indicates its chemosensitizing potential. Clonogenic cell survival assay and apoptotic morphological staining further confirm the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in drug resistant KB Ch(R)8-5 cell lines. Ferulic acid treatment enhances paclitaxel mediated cell cycle arrest and upregulates paclitaxel-induced apoptotic signaling in KB resistant cells. Hence, it has been concluded that downregulation of ABCB1 and subsequent induction of paclitaxel-mediated cell cycle arrest and apoptotic signaling may be the cause for the chemosensitizing potential of ferulic acid in P-gp overexpressing cell lines. PMID:27262378

  18. Sleeping Beauty-Mediated Drug Resistance Gene Transfer in Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells.

    Hyland, Kendra A; Olson, Erik R; McIvor, R Scott

    2015-10-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system can insert sequences into mammalian chromosomes, supporting long-term expression of both reporter and therapeutic genes. Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are an ideal therapeutic gene transfer target as they are used in therapy for a variety of hematologic and metabolic conditions. As successful SB-mediated gene transfer into human CD34(+) HPCs has been reported by several laboratories, we sought to extend these studies to the introduction of a therapeutic gene conferring resistance to methotrexate (MTX), potentially providing a chemoprotective effect after engraftment. SB-mediated transposition of hematopoietic progenitors, using a transposon encoding an L22Y variant dihydrofolate reductase fused to green fluorescent protein, conferred resistance to methotrexate and dipyridamole, a nucleoside transport inhibitor that tightens MTX selection conditions, as assessed by in vitro hematopoietic colony formation. Transposition of individual transgenes was confirmed by sequence analysis of transposon-chromosome junctions recovered by linear amplification-mediated PCR. These studies demonstrate the potential of SB-mediated transposition of HPCs for expression of drug resistance genes for selective and chemoprotective applications. PMID:26176276

  19. Epidemiology of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in bacterial isolates from animals and foods with co-resistance to several antibiotics

    Ferreira, Eugénia; Francisco, Ana Patrícia; Jones-Dias, Daniela; Manageiro, Vera; Caniça, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    Background: The use of (fluoro)quinolones both in humans and animals has contributed to the selection of resistant bacteria, limiting the agents available for treatment. This study aims to search for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants to give information about these expanding resistance mechanisms, their capacity of dissemination among different bacteria by mobile elements, and the role that they play in facilitating co-resistance to several antimicrobials. Methods: ...

  20. Effect of methylxanthines derived from pentoxifylline on P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistance

    In this paper study of multidrug resistance (MDR) antitumor agents - P-glycoprotein (PGP) is presented. The ability of pentoxifylline (PTX) to depress resistance mediated by overexpression of PGP in mouse leukemic cell line L 121 ONCR resistant to vincristine (VCR) was described earlier. PTX depressed the resistance of these cells in a dose and time dependent manner. This effect was accompanied by increased level of [3H]-vincristine accumulation by these cells. The methylxanthines with different length of this aliphatic side chain were synthesized and their capability to depress MDR was tested. The results indicated that the position of carbonyl group plays a crucial role for the ability of the derivative to depress MDR of L 121 ONCR cells. (authors)

  1. Metallo beta lactamase mediated resistance in Carbapenem resistant gram-negative bacilli: A cause for concern

    Malini Jagannatha Rao, Shruti A Harle, Padmavathy M, Umapathy BL, Navaneeth BV

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The emergence of acquired metallo-β-lactamases (MBL in Gram-negative bacilli is becoming a therapeutic challenge, as these enzymes usually possess a broad hydrolysis profile that includes carbapenems, extended-spectrum β-lactams. Aim: To detect Extended spectrum β-lactamases and metallo-β-lactamase in carbapenem resistant Gram negative clinical isolates from various clinical specimens and to evaluate their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Material and Methods: A total of 100 non duplicates imipenem resistant isolates were tested for the presence of extended spectrum β-lactamases by phenotypic confirmatory test, metallo-β-lactamases by Double disk synergy test with various distances from edge to edge (10mm,15mm,20mm, between the IPM and EDTA and combined disc test. Result: Of the 100 IMP resistant isolates screened 30 (30% were MBL positive by phenotypic methods, i.e., double disk synergy test and combined disc test. Co-existence of Extended spectrum β-lactamases and MBL were detected in 3 (30%. All the 30 MBL positive isolates had shown synergy at (100% at 10 mm distance, 27 (90% isolates had shown synergy at 15 mm distance and 13 (43.4% isolates were shown synergy at 20 mm distance. All the 30 MBLs producers were multidrug resistant and 27 (90% were sensitive to colistin (CL. All MBL positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa were sensitive to polymyxin B (100µg. Conclusion: Microbiologists are now facing a challenge of drug resistance due to MBL production. Although CLSI guidelines do not quote about the ESBL detection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa MBLs and ESBL have to be detected in them. The use of combination tests would increase the sensitivity to detect the presence of MBL among the clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacilli. The spread of MBL producing Gram negative organism can be prevented if they are detected in all isolates and routinely adopted in all laboratories.

  2. CRITICAL ROLE OF STAT3 IN IL-6-MEDIATED DRUG RESISTANCE IN HUMAN NEUROBLASTOMA

    Ara, Tasnim; Nakata, Rie; Sheard, Michael A.; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Buettner, Ralf; Groshen, Susan G.; Ji, Lingyun; Yu, Hua; Jove, Richard; Seeger, Robert C.; DeClerck, Yves A

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. Here we have evaluated the role of STAT3 in environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR) in human neuroblastoma. We determined that STAT3 was not constitutively active in most neuroblastoma cell lines but was rapidly activated upon treatment with interleukin-6 (IL-6) alone and in combination with the soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R). Treatment of neuroblastoma cells with IL-6 protected them from drug-induced apoptosis in a STAT3-de...

  3. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated multidrug resistance determinants in fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria isolated from sewage and surface water.

    Osińska, Adriana; Harnisz, Monika; Korzeniewska, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are fully synthetic broad-spectrum antibacterial agents that are becoming increasingly popular in the treatment of clinical and veterinary infections. Being excreted during treatment, mostly as active compounds, their biological action is not limited to the therapeutic site, but it is moved further as resistance selection pressure into the environment. Water environment is an ideal medium for the aggregation and dissemination of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB), and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which can pose a serious threat to human health. Because of this, the aim of this study was to determine the number of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria (FQRB) and their share in total heterotrophic plate counts (HPC) in treated wastewater (TWW), and upstream and downstream river water (URW, DRW) samples where TWW is discharged. The spread of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants and the presence/absence of resistance genes to other most popular antibiotic groups (against tetracyclines and beta-lactams) in selected 116 multiresistant isolates were investigated. The share of FQRB in total HPC in all samples was rather small and ranged from 0.7 % in URW samples to 7.5 % in TWW. Bacteria from Escherichia (25.0 %), Acinetobacter (25.0 %), and Aeromonas (6.9 %) genera were predominant in the FQRB group. Fluoroquinolone resistance was mostly caused by the presence of the gene aac(6')-1b-cr (91.4 %). More rarely reported was the occurrence of qnrS, qnrD, as well as oqxA, but qnrA, qnrB, qepA, and oqxB were extremely rarely or never noted in FQRB. The most prevalent bacterial genes connected with beta-lactams' resistance in FQRB were bla TEM, bla OXA, and bla CTX-M. The bla SHV was less common in the community of FQRB. The occurrence of bla genes was reported in almost 29.3 % of FQRB. The most abundant tet genes in FQRB were tet(A), tet(L), tet(K), and tet(S). The prevalence of tet genes was observed in 41.4

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factor-21 May Mediate Growth Hormone Resistance in Anorexia Nervosa

    Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Misra, Madhusmita; Goldstein, Mark; Miller, Karen K.; Klibanski, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Context: Anorexia nervosa (AN), a state of chronic nutritional deprivation, is characterized by GH resistance with elevated GH levels and decreased levels of IGF-I. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21, a hormone produced in the liver and adipocytes, is induced in the liver by fasting and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α agonists. In a transgenic mouse model, FGF-21 reduces IGF-I levels by inhibiting signal transducer and activator of transcription-5, a mediator of the intracellular ...

  5. Valproic acid overcomes transforming growth factor-β-mediated sorafenib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Wakai, Toshifumi; Kubota, Masayuki; Osawa, Mami; Hirose, Yuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Fujimaki, Shun; Takamura, Masaaki; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor approved for hepatocellular carcinoma, but rarely causes tumor regression in patients with chronic liver diseases. To investigate whether growth factor-mediated signaling is involved in sorafenib resistance, HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells were exposed to epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) prior to treatment with sorafenib. Furthermore, to identify an effective combination treatment wit...

  6. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in expanded spectrum beta lactamase producing enterobacteriaceae in Morocco.

    Bouchakour, Mohammed; Zerouali, Khalid; Gros Claude, Jean David Perrier; Amarouch, Hamid; El Mdaghri, Naima; Courvalin, Patrice; Timinouni, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although independently acquired, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance appears to be linked with extended-spectrum or AmpC-type beta-lactamases. Since no data are available in African countries, the prevalence of qnr genes at the University Hospital Ibn Rochd, Casablanca, Morocco, was investigated. METHODOLOGY: Between October 2006 and March 2007, the following 39 randomly selected non-duplicate Enterobacteriaceae producing an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), representin...

  7. Bordetella pertussis acquires resistance to complement-mediated killing in vivo.

    Pishko, Elizabeth J; Betting, David J; Hutter, Christina S; Harvill, Eric T

    2003-09-01

    In order to initially colonize a host, bacteria must avoid various components of the innate immune system, one of which is complement. The genus Bordetella includes three closely related species that differ in their ability to resist complement-mediated killing. Bordetella parapertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica resist killing in naïve serum, a characteristic that may aid in efficient respiratory tract colonization and has been attributed to expression of O antigen. Bordetella pertussis lacks O antigen and is sensitive to naïve serum in vitro, yet it also efficiently colonizes the respiratory tract. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that B. pertussis may have an alternate mechanism to resist complement in vivo. While a number of reports on serum sensitivity of the bordetellae have been published, we show here that serum concentration and growth conditions can greatly alter the observed level of sensitivity to complement and that all but one strain of B. pertussis observed were sensitive to some level of naïve serum in vitro, particularly when there was excess complement. However, B. pertussis rapidly acquires increased resistance in vivo to naïve serum that is specific to the alternative pathway. Resistance is not efficiently acquired by B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica mutants lacking O antigen. This B. pertussis-specific mechanism of complement resistance does not appear to be dependent on either brkA or other genes expressed specifically in the Bvg(+) phase. This in vivo acquisition of alternative pathway resistance suggests that there is a novel O antigen-independent method by which B. pertussis evades complement-mediated killing. PMID:12933835

  8. The mTORC1/4E-BP pathway coordinates hemoglobin production with L-leucine availability

    Chung, Jacky; Bauer, Daniel E.; Ghamari, Alireza; Nizzi, Christopher P.; Deck, Kathryn M.; Kingsley, Paul D.; Yien, Yvette Y.; Huston, Nicholas C.; Chen, Caiyong; Schultz, Iman J.; Dalton, Arthur J.; Wittig, Johannes G.; Palis, James; Orkin, Stuart H.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Cantor, Alan B.; Paw, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, the mechanisms by which diverse cell types acquire distinct amino acids and how cellular function adapts to their availability are fundamental questions in biology. Here, we found that increased neutral essential amino acid (NEAA) uptake was a critical component of erythropoiesis. As red blood cells matured, expression of the amino acid transporter gene Lat3 increased, which increased NEAA import. Inadequate NEAA uptake by pharmacologic inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of LAT3 triggered a specific reduction in hemoglobin production in zebrafish embryos and murine erythroid cells through the mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1)/4E-BP (eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein) pathway. CRISPR-mediated deletion of members of the 4E-BP family in murine erythroid cells rendered them resistant to mTORC1 and LAT3 inhibition and restored hemoglobin production. These results identify a developmental role for LAT3 in red blood cells and demonstrate that mTORC1 serves as a homeostatic sensor that couples hemoglobin production at the translational level to sufficient uptake of NEAAs, particularly L-leucine. PMID:25872869

  9. Interferon-γ : The Major Mediator of Resistance against Toxoplasma gondii

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Orellana, Manuel A.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Remington, Jack S.

    1988-04-01

    Mice were injected with a monoclonal antibody to interferon-γ to examine the importance of endogenous production of this lymphokine in resistance against infection with the sporozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Mice with intraperitoneal infections of T. gondii that received no antibody survived and developed chronic T. gondii infection, whereas the infected mice that received the monoclonal antibody died of toxoplasmosis. The activation of macrophages, which kill T. gondii in vivo, was inhibited by administration of the monoclonal antibody, but the production of antibodies to T. gondii was not suppressed. The fact that an antibody to interferon-γ can eliminate resistance to acute Toxoplasma infection in mice suggests that this lymphokine is an important mediator of host resistance to this parasite.

  10. Plasmid mediated tetracycline resistance of Vibrio parahaemolyticus associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND in shrimps

    Jee Eun Han

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most important problems in public health, veterinary medicine and aquaculture. Importantly, plasmid mediated antibiotic resistance of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from shrimp can potentially be transferred through transposition, conjugation and plasmid uptake to different bacterial species in aquaculture systems. In this study, we evaluated the antibiotic resistance pattern in V. parahaemolyticus strains associated with acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND from penaeid shrimp and identified AHPND strains from Mexico showed a high level of resistance to tetracycline (≥5 μg/mL and have the tetB gene coding tetracycline resistance. In particular, the tetB gene was carried in a single copy plasmid (named as pTetB-VA1 comprising 5162-bp with 40% G + C content from the strain (13-511/A1. The plasmid pTetB-VA1 consists of 9 ORFs encoding tetracycline resistant and repressor proteins, transcriptional regulatory proteins and transposases and showed a 99% sequence identity to other tet gene plasmids (pIS04_68 and pAQU2.

  11. Repair of 3-methyladenine and abasic sites by base excision repair mediates glioblastoma resistance to temozolomide

    John R Silber

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alkylating agents have long played a central role in the adjuvant therapy of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. More recently, inclusion of temozolomide (TMZ, an orally administered methylating agent with low systemic toxicity, during radiotherapy and afterward has markedly improved survival. Extensive in vitro and in vivo evidence has shown that TMZ-induced O6-methylguanine (O6-meG mediates GBM cell killing. Moreover, low or absent expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, the sole human repair protein that removes O6-meG from DNA, is frequently associated with longer survival in GBMs treated with TMZ, promoting interest in developing inhibitors of MGMT to counter resistance. However, the clinical efficacy of TMZ is unlikely to be due solely to O6-meG, as the agent produces approximately a dozen additional DNA adducts, including cytotoxic N3-methyladenine (3-meA and abasic sites. Repair of 3-meA and abasic sites, both of which are produced in greater abundance than O6-meG, is mediated by the base excision repair (BER pathway, and occurs independently of removal of O6-meG. These observations indicate that BER activities are also potential targets for strategies to potentiate TMZ cytotoxicity. Here we review the evidence that 3-meA and abasic sites mediate killing of GBM cells. We also present in vitro and in vivo evidence that alkyladenine-DNA–glycosylase, the sole repair activity that excises 3-meA from DNA, and Ape1, the major human abasic site endonuclease, mediate TMZ resistance in GBMs and represent potential anti-resistance targets.

  12. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants among carbapeneme non-susceptible Enterobacter cloacae.

    Shifeng Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Simultaneous resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS isolates will inevitably create problems. The present study was performed to characterize the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs among the CNS Enterobacter cloacae (E. cloacae isolates in a Chinese teaching hospital, and to acquire their molecular epidemiological characteristics. METHODS: The β-lactamases genes (including class A carbapenemase genes bla(KPC and bla(SME, metallo-β-lactamase genes (MBLs bla(IMP, bla(VIM and bla(NDM, and extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs,bla(CTX-M, bla(TEM and bla(SHV, QRDs (including qnrA, qnrB, qnrS and aac(6'-Ib-cr and ARDs (including aac(6'-Ib, armA and rmtB of these 35 isolates were determined by PCR and sequenced bidirectionally. The clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS: Of the 35 isolates, 9 (25.7% harbored a carbapenemase gene; 23 (65.7% carried ESBLs; 24 (68.6% were QRD positive; and 27 (77.1% were ARD positive. Among the 5 bla(IMP-8 positive strains, 4 (80% contained both ESBL and QRD genes, and all the 5 (100% harbored ARD genes. Of the 23 ESBLs positive isolates, 6 (26.1% were carbapenemase positive, 14 (60.9% were QRD positive, and 18 (78.3% were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 35 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. cloacae isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. CONCLUSION: QRD and ARD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. cloacae isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. The CNS E. cloacae isolate co-expressing bla(NDM-1, bla(IMP-26, qnrA1 and qnrS1 was first reported.

  13. Reversal of in vitro cellular MRP1 and MRP2 mediated vincristine resistance by the flavonoid myricetin

    Zanden, J.J. van; Mul, A. de; Wortelboer, H.M.; Usta, M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Cnubben, N.H.P.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of myricetin on either MRP1 or MRP2 mediated vincristine resistance in transfected MDCKII cells were examined. The results obtained show that myricetin can inhibit both MRP1 and MRP2 mediated vincristine efflux in a concentration dependent manner. The IC50 values fo

  14. Fibrocyte-like cells mediate acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy with bevacizumab.

    Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Goto, Hisatsugu; Saijo, Atsuro; Trung, Van The; Aono, Yoshinori; Ogino, Hirokazu; Kuramoto, Takuya; Tabata, Sho; Uehara, Hisanori; Izumi, Keisuke; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Hidefusa; Gotoh, Masashi; Kakiuchi, Soji; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Yano, Seiji; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab exerts anti-angiogenic effects in cancer patients by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). However, its use is still limited due to the development of resistance to the treatment. Such resistance can be regulated by various factors, although the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we show that bone marrow-derived fibrocyte-like cells, defined as alpha-1 type I collagen-positive and CXCR4-positive cells, contribute to the acquired resistance to bevacizumab. In mouse models of malignant pleural mesothelioma and lung cancer, fibrocyte-like cells mediate the resistance to bevacizumab as the main producer of fibroblast growth factor 2. In clinical specimens of lung cancer, the number of fibrocyte-like cells is significantly increased in bevacizumab-treated tumours, and correlates with the number of treatment cycles, as well as CD31-positive vessels. Our results identify fibrocyte-like cells as a promising cell biomarker and a potential therapeutic target to overcome resistance to anti-VEGF therapy. PMID:26635184

  15. Heparanase mediates a novel mechanism in lapatinib-resistant brain metastatic breast cancer

    Lixin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPSE is the dominant mammalian endoglycosidase and important tumorigenic, angiogenic, and pro-metastatic molecule. Highest levels of HPSE activity have been consistently detected in cells possessing highest propensities to colonize the brain, emphasizing the therapeutic potential for targeting HPSE in brain metastatic breast cancer (BMBC. Lapatinib (Tykerb is a small-molecule and dual inhibitor of human epidermal growth factor receptor1 and 2 (EGFR and HER2, respectively which are both high-risk predictors of BMBC. It was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic breast cancer. However, its role is limited in BMBC whose response rates to lapatinib are significantly lower than those for extracranial metastasis. Because HPSE can affect EGFR phosphorylation, we examined Roneparstat, a non-anticoagulant heparin with potent anti-HPSE activity, to inhibit EGFR signaling pathways and BMBC onset using lapatinib-resistant clones generated from HER2-transfected, EGFR-expressing MDA-MB-231BR cells. Cell growth, EGFR pathways, and HPSE targets were assessed among selected clones in the absence or presence of Roneparstat and/or lapatinib. Roneparstat overcame lapatinib resistance by inhibiting pathways associated with EGFR tyrosine residues that are not targeted by lapatinib. Roneparstat inhibited the growth and BMBC abilities of lapatinib-resistant clones. A molecular mechanism was identified by which HPSE mediates an alternative survival pathway in lapatinib-resistant clones and is modulated by Roneparstat. These results demonstrate that the inhibition of HPSE-mediated signaling plays important roles in lapatinib resistance, and provide mechanistic insights to validate the use of Roneparstat for novel BMBC therapeutic strategies.

  16. Chromosomally and Extrachromosomally Mediated High-Level Gentamicin Resistance in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Sendi, Parham; Furitsch, Martina; Mauerer, Stefanie; Florindo, Carlos; Kahl, Barbara C; Shabayek, Sarah; Berner, Reinhard; Spellerberg, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a leading cause of sepsis in neonates. The rate of invasive GBS disease in nonpregnant adults also continues to climb. Aminoglycosides alone have little or no effect on GBS, but synergistic killing with penicillin has been shown in vitro. High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in GBS isolates, however, leads to the loss of a synergistic effect. We therefore performed a multicenter study to determine the frequency of HLGR GBS isolates and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms leading to gentamicin resistance. From eight centers in four countries, 1,128 invasive and colonizing GBS isolates were pooled and investigated for the presence of HLGR. We identified two strains that displayed HLGR (BSU1203 and BSU452), both of which carried the aacA-aphD gene, typically conferring HLGR. However, only one strain (BSU1203) also carried the previously described chromosomal gentamicin resistance transposon designated Tn3706. For the other strain (BSU452), plasmid purification and subsequent DNA sequencing resulted in the detection of plasmid pIP501 carrying a remnant of a Tn3 family transposon. Its ability to confer HLGR was proven by transfer into an Enterococcus faecalis isolate. Conversely, loss of HLGR was documented after curing both GBS BSU452 and the transformed E. faecalis strain from the plasmid. This is the first report showing plasmid-mediated HLGR in GBS. Thus, in our clinical GBS isolates, HLGR is mediated both chromosomally and extrachromosomally. PMID:26729498

  17. Reversal of MRP7 (ABCC10-mediated multidrug resistance by tariquidar.

    Yue-Li Sun

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance protein 7 (MRP7, ABCC10 is a recently discovered member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family which are capable of conferring resistance to a variety of anticancer drugs, including taxanes and nucleoside analogs, in vivo. MRP7 is highly expressed in non-small cell lung cancer cells, and Mrp7-KO mice are highly sensitive to paclitaxel, making MRP7 an attractive chemotherapeutic target of non-small cell lung cancer. However, only a few inhibitors of MRP7 are currently identified, with none of them having progressed to clinical trials. We used MRP7-expressing cells to investigate whether tariquidar, a third generation inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, could inhibit MRP7-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR. We found that tariquidar, at 0.1 and 0.3 µM, significantly potentiated the sensitivity of MRP7-transfected HEK293 cells to MRP7 substrates and increased the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel. We further demonstrated that tariquidar directly impaired paclitaxel efflux and could downregulate MRP7 protein expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner after prolonged treatment. Our findings suggest that tariquidar, at pharmacologically achievable concentrations, reverses MRP7-mediated MDR through inhibition of MRP7 protein expression and function, and thus represents a promising therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of chemoresistant cancer patients.

  18. Trefoil Factor 3 Is Oncogenic and Mediates Anti-Estrogen Resistance in Human Mammary Carcinoma

    Nagarajan Kannan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report herein that trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 is oncogenic and mediates anti-estrogen resistance in human mammary carcinoma. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased cell proliferation and survival, enhanced anchorage-independent growth, and promoted migration and invasion. Moreover, forced expression of TFF3 increased tumor size in xenograft models. Conversely, depletion of endogenous TFF3 with small interfering RNA (siRNA decreased the oncogenicity and invasiveness of mammary carcinoma cells. Neutralization of secreted TFF3 by antibody promoted apoptosis, decreased cell growth in vitro, and arrested mammary carcinoma xenograft growth. TFF3 expression was significantly correlated to decreased survival of estrogen receptor (ER-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Forced expression of TFF3 in mammary carcinoma cells increased ER transcriptional activity, promoted estrogen-independent growth, and produced resistance to tamoxifen and fulvestrant in vitro and to tamoxifen in xenograft models. siRNA-mediated depletion or antibody inhibition of TFF3 significantly enhanced the efficacy of antiestrogens. Increased TFF3 expression was observed in tamoxifen-resistant (TAMR cells and antibody inhibition of TFF3 in TAMR cells improved tamoxifen sensitivity. Functional antagonism of TFF3 therefore warrants consideration as a novel therapeutic strategy for mammary carcinoma.

  19. Esters of the Marine-Derived Triterpene Sipholenol A Reverse P-GP-Mediated Drug Resistance

    Yongchao Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that several sipholane triterpenes, sipholenol A, sipholenone E, sipholenol L and siphonellinol D, have potent reversal effect for multidrug resistance (MDR in cancer cells that overexpressed P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1. Through comparison of cytotoxicity towards sensitive and multi-drug resistant cell lines, we identified that the semisynthetic esters sipholenol A-4-O-acetate and sipholenol A-4-O-isonicotinate potently reversed P-gp-mediated MDR but had no effect on MRP1/ABCC1 and BCRP/ABCG2-mediated MDR. The results from [3H]-paclitaxel accumulation and efflux studies suggested that these two triterpenoids were able to increase the intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel by inhibiting its active efflux. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that these two compounds did not alter the expression levels of P-gp when treated up to 72 h. These sipholenol derivatives also stimulated the ATPase activity of P-gp membranes, which suggested that they might be substrates of P-gp. Moreover, in silico molecular docking studies revealed the virtual binding modes of these two compounds into human homology model of P-gp. In conclusion, sipholenol A-4-O-acetate and sipholenol A-4-O-isonicotinate efficiently inhibit the P-gp and may represent potential reversal agents for the treatment of multidrug resistant cancers.

  20. Horizontal Transfer of Plasmid-Mediated Cephalosporin Resistance Genes in the Intestine of Houseflies (Musca domestica).

    Fukuda, Akira; Usui, Masaru; Okubo, Torahiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Houseflies are a mechanical vector for various types of bacteria, including antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB). If the intestine of houseflies is a suitable site for the transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs), houseflies could also serve as a biological vector for ARB. To clarify whether cephalosporin resistance genes are transferred efficiently in the housefly intestine, we compared with conjugation experiments in vivo (in the intestine) and in vitro by using Escherichia coli with eight combinations of four donor and two recipient strains harboring plasmid-mediated cephalosporin resistance genes and chromosomal-encoded rifampicin resistance genes, respectively. In the in vivo conjugation experiment, houseflies ingested donor strains for 6 hr and then recipient strains for 3 hr, and 24 hr later, the houseflies were surface sterilized and analyzed. In vitro conjugation experiments were conducted using the broth-mating method. In 3/8 combinations, the in vitro transfer frequency (Transconjugants/Donor) was ≥1.3 × 10(-4); the in vivo transfer rates of cephalosporin resistance genes ranged from 2.0 × 10(-4) to 5.7 × 10(-5). Moreover, cephalosporin resistance genes were transferred to other species of enteric bacteria of houseflies such as Achromobacter sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescens. These results suggest that houseflies are not only a mechanical vector for ARB but also a biological vector for the occurrence of new ARB through the horizontal transfer of ARGs in their intestine. PMID:26683492

  1. The Arabidopsis ISR1 locus is required for rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance against different pathogens

    Ton, J.; Pelt, J.A. van; Loon, L.C. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, non-pathogenic, root-colonizing Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS417r bacteria trigger an induced systemic resistance (ISR) that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). In contrast to SAR, WCS417r-mediated ISR is controlled by a salicylic

  2. Functional analysis of seven genes encoding eight translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) isoforms in Drosophila

    Hernandez, G; Altmann, M; J. Sierra; Urlaub, H.; Diez del Corral, R; Schwartz, P.; Rivera-Pomar, R

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila genome-sequencing project has revealed a total of seven genes encoding eight eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) isoforms. Four of them (eIF4E-1,2, eIF4E-3, eIF4E-4 and eIF4E-5) share exon/intron structure in their carboxy-terminal part and form a cluster in the genome. All eIF4E isoforms bind to the cap (m⁷GpppN) structure. All of them, except eIF4E-6 and eIF4E-8 were able to interact with Drosophila eIF4G or eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP). eIF4E-1, eIF4E-2, eIF4E-3, eIF4E-...

  3. [Molecular physiology of receptor mediated endocytosis and its role in overcoming multidrug resistance].

    Severin, E S; Posypanova, G A

    2011-06-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis plays important role in the selective uptake of proteins at the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Endocytosis regulates many processes of cell signalling by controlling the number of functional receptors on the cell surface. The article reviews the mechanism of clathrin-dependent endocytosis and the possibility of using this phenomenon for the targeted delivery of drugs. Use of certain proteins as targeting component of drug delivery systems can significantly improve the selectivity of this drug, as well as to overcome the multidrug resistance of cells resulting from the activity of the ABC-transporters. PMID:21874867

  4. Molecular analysis of diverse elements mediating VanA glycopeptide resistance in enterococci

    Palepou, M.F.I.; Adebiyi, A.M.A.; Tremlett, C.H.;

    1998-01-01

    Differences were examined among 24 distinct elements mediating VanA-type glycopeptide resistance in enterococci isolated from hospital patients and non-human sources in the UK. The methods used included long-PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (L-PCR RFLP) analysis and DNA hybridization......-like insertion sequences. Among VanA elements with alterations downstream of vanX, seven lacked vanY, one lacked both vanY and vanZ, and ten had copies of insertion sequence IS1216V between vanX and vanY. All VanA elements of group D (from geographically and temporally diverse enterococci) were...

  5. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    He, Sheng Yang; Nomura, Kinya

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  6. 4E-BP restrains eIF4E phosphorylation

    Müller, David; Lasfargues, Charline; El Khawand, Sally; Alard, Amandine; Schneider, Robert J.; Bousquet, Corinne; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Martineau, Yvan

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mRNA translation is dependent on the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Through its simultaneous interaction with the mRNA cap structure and with the ribosome-associated eIF4G adaptor protein, eIF4E physically posits the ribosome at the 5′ extremity of capped mRNA. eIF4E activity is regulated by phosphorylation on a unique site by the eIF4G-associated kinase MNK. eIF4E assembly with the eIF4G-MNK sub-complex can be however antagonized by the hypophosphorylated forms of eIF4E-binding pr...

  7. Metabolic requirements for hormone-induced resistance to antibody-complement mediated killing of tumor cells

    Line-1 guinea pig hepatoma cells are susceptible to killing by anti-Forssman IgM antibody plus guinea pig complement (GPC). When these tumor cells are incubated with insulin, epinephrine, hydrocortisone, or prednisolone, the cells show a marked reduction in their susceptibility to antibody-C-mediated killing. If the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA, RNA, and protein is impaired by pretreatment with metabolic inhibitors, x-irradiation, or culture in nutrient-deficient media, the hormones are no longer effective in rendering the cells resistant to killing. If only DNA synthesis is impaired, but not RNA and protein synthesis, the hormones are effective. The inability of cells inhibited in their macromolecular synthesis to be rendered resistant to killing after hormone treatment is not due to an inability of the cells to bind hormone

  8. Neither load nor systemic hormones determine resistance training-mediated hypertrophy or strength gains in resistance-trained young men

    Morton, Robert W.; Oikawa, Sara Y.; Wavell, Christopher G.; Mazara, Nicole; McGlory, Chris; Quadrilatero, Joe; Baechler, Brittany L.; Baker, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    We reported, using a unilateral resistance training (RT) model, that training with high or low loads (mass per repetition) resulted in similar muscle hypertrophy and strength improvements in RT-naïve subjects. Here we aimed to determine whether the same was true in men with previous RT experience using a whole-body RT program and whether postexercise systemic hormone concentrations were related to changes in hypertrophy and strength. Forty-nine resistance-trained men (23 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) performed 12 wk of whole-body RT. Subjects were randomly allocated into a higher-repetition (HR) group who lifted loads of ∼30-50% of their maximal strength (1RM) for 20–25 repetitions/set (n = 24) or a lower-repetition (LR) group (∼75–90% 1RM, 8–12 repetitions/set, n = 25), with all sets being performed to volitional failure. Skeletal muscle biopsies, strength testing, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, and acute changes in systemic hormone concentrations were examined pretraining and posttraining. In response to RT, 1RM strength increased for all exercises in both groups (P muscle fiber cross-sectional area increased following training (P hypertrophy were found. In congruence with our previous work, acute postexercise systemic hormonal rises are not related to or in any way indicative of RT-mediated gains in muscle mass or strength. Our data show that in resistance-trained individuals, load, when exercises are performed to volitional failure, does not dictate hypertrophy or, for the most part, strength gains. PMID:27174923

  9. Host-plant-mediated effects of Nadefensin on herbivore and pathogen resistance in Nicotiana attenuata

    Baldwin Ian T

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adage from Shakespeare, "troubles, not as single spies, but in battalions come," holds true for Nicotiana attenuata, which is commonly attacked by both pathogens (Pseudomonas spp. and herbivores (Manduca sexta in its native habitats. Defense responses targeted against the pathogens can directly or indirectly influence the responses against the herbivores. Nadefensin is an effective induced defense gene against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (PST DC3000, which is also elicited by attack from M. sexta larvae, but whether this defense protein influences M. sexta's growth and whether M. sexta-induced Nadefensin directly or indirectly influences PST DC3000 resistance are unknown. Results M. sexta larvae consumed less on WT and on Nadefensin-silenced N. attenuata plants that had previously been infected with PST DC3000 than on uninfected plants. WT plants infected with PST DC3000 showed enhanced resistance to PST DC3000 and decreased leaf consumption by M. sexta larvae, but larval mass gain was unaffected. PST DC3000-infected Nadefensin-silenced plants were less resistant to subsequent PST DC3000 challenge, and on these plants, M. sexta larvae consumed less and gained less mass. WT and Nadefensin-silenced plants previously damaged by M. sexta larvae were better able to resist subsequent PST DC3000 challenges than were undamaged plants. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Na-defensin directly mediates defense against PST DC3000 and indirectly against M. sexta in N. attenuata. In plants that were previously infected with PST DC3000, the altered leaf chemistry in PST DC3000-resistant WT plants and PST DC3000-susceptible Nadefensin-silenced plants differentially reduced M. sexta's leaf consumption and mass gain. In plants that were previously damaged by M. sexta, the combined effect of the altered host plant chemistry and a broad spectrum of anti-herbivore induced metabolomic responses was more

  10. Combinatorial Genetic Modeling of pfcrt-Mediated Drug Resistance Evolution in Plasmodium falciparum

    Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J.; Modchang, Charin; Musset, Lise; Chookajorn, Thanat; Fidock, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance continuously threatens global control of infectious diseases, including malaria caused by the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum. A critical parasite determinant is the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT), the primary mediator of chloroquine (CQ) resistance (CQR), and a pleiotropic modulator of susceptibility to several first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy partner drugs. Aside from the validated CQR molecular marker K76T, P. falciparum parasites have acquired at least three additional pfcrt mutations, whose contributions to resistance and fitness have been heretofore unclear. Focusing on the quadruple-mutant Ecuadorian PfCRT haplotype Ecu1110 (K76T/A220S/N326D/I356L), we genetically modified the pfcrt locus of isogenic, asexual blood stage P. falciparum parasites using zinc-finger nucleases, producing all possible combinations of intermediate pfcrt alleles. Our analysis included the related quintuple-mutant PfCRT haplotype 7G8 (Ecu1110 + C72S) that is widespread throughout South America and the Western Pacific. Drug susceptibilities and in vitro growth profiles of our combinatorial pfcrt-modified parasites were used to simulate the mutational trajectories accessible to parasites as they evolved CQR. Our results uncover unique contributions to parasite drug resistance and growth for mutations beyond K76T and predict critical roles for the CQ metabolite monodesethyl-CQ and the related quinoline-type drug amodiaquine in driving mutant pfcrt evolution. Modeling outputs further highlight the influence of parasite proliferation rates alongside gains in drug resistance in dictating successful trajectories. Our findings suggest that P. falciparum parasites have navigated constrained pfcrt adaptive landscapes by means of probabilistically rare mutational bursts that led to the infrequent emergence of pfcrt alleles in the field. PMID:26908582

  11. RETROVIRAL MEDIATED EFFICIENT TRANSFER ANDEXPRESSION OF MULTIPLE DRUG RESISTANCE GENE TO HUMAN LEUKEMIC CELLS

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate retroviral-mediated transfer and expression of human multidrug resistance (MDR) gene MDR1 in leukemic cells. Methods: Human myeloid cells, K562 and NB4, were infected by MDR retrovirus from the producer PA317/HaMDR, and the resistant cells were selected with cytotoxic drug. The transfer and expression of MDR1 gene was analyzed by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry (FCM) and semisolid colonies cultivation. Results: The resistant cells, K562/MDR and NB4/MDR, in which integration of the exogenous MDR1 gene was confirmed by PCR analysis, displayed a typical MDR phenotype. The expression of MDR1 transgene was detected on truncated as well as full-length transcripts. Moreover, the resistant cells were P-glycoprotein postiive at 78.0% to 98.7% analyzed with FCM. The transduction efficieny in K562 cells was studied on suspension cultures and single-cell colonies. The transduction was more efficient in coculture system (67.9%~ 72.5%) than in supernatant system (33.1%~ 46.8%), while growth factors may improve the efficiency. Conclusion: Retrovirus could allow a functional transfer and expression of MDR1 gene in human leukemia cells, and MDR1 might act as a dominant selectable gene for coexpression with the genes of interest in gene therapy.

  12. Fungal metabolic plasticity and sexual development mediate induced resistance to arthropod fungivory.

    Döll, Katharina; Chatterjee, Subhankar; Scheu, Stefan; Karlovsky, Petr; Rohlfs, Marko

    2013-11-22

    Prey organisms do not tolerate predator attack passively but react with a multitude of inducible defensive strategies. Although inducible defence strategies are well known in plants attacked by herbivorous insects, induced resistance of fungi against fungivorous animals is largely unknown. Resistance to fungivory is thought to be mediated by chemical properties of fungal tissue, i.e. by production of toxic secondary metabolites. However, whether fungi change their secondary metabolite composition to increase resistance against arthropod fungivory is unknown. We demonstrate that grazing by a soil arthropod, Folsomia candida, on the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans induces a phenotype that repels future fungivores and retards fungivore growth. Arthropod-exposed colonies produced significantly higher amounts of toxic secondary metabolites and invested more in sexual reproduction relative to unchallenged fungi. Compared with vegetative tissue and asexual conidiospores, sexual fruiting bodies turned out to be highly resistant against fungivory in facultative sexual A. nidulans. This indicates that fungivore grazing triggers co-regulated allocation of resources to sexual reproduction and chemical defence in A. nidulans. Plastic investment in facultative sex and chemical defence may have evolved as a fungal strategy to escape from predation. PMID:24068353

  13. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance; interactions between human, animal and environmental ecologies

    Laurent ePOIREL

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to quinolones and fluoroquinolones is being increasingly reported among human but also veterinary isolates during the last two to three decades, very likely as a consequence of the large clinical usage of those antibiotics. Even if the principle mechanisms of resistance to quinolones are chromosome-encoded, due to modifications of molecular targets (DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, decreased outer-membrane permeability (porin defect and overexpression of naturally-occurring efflux, the emergence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR has been reported since 1998. Although these PMQR determinants confer low-level resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, they are a favorable background for selection of additional chromosome-encoded quinolone resistance mechanisms. Different transferable mechanisms have been identified, corresponding to the production of Qnr proteins, of the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6’-Ib-cr, or of the QepA-type or OqxAB-type efflux pumps. Qnr proteins protect target enzymes (DNA gyrase and type IV topoisomerase from quinolone inhibition (mostly nalidixic acid. The AAC(6’-Ib-cr determinant acetylates several fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Finally, the QepA and OqxAB efflux pumps extrude fluoroquinolones from the bacterial cell. A series of studies have identified the environment to be a reservoir of PMQR genes, with farm animals and aquatic habitats being significantly involved. In addition, the origin of the qnr genes has been identified, corresponding to the waterborne species Shewanella sp. Altogether, the recent observations suggest that the aquatic environment might constitute the original source of PMQR genes, that would secondly spread among animal or human isolates.

  14. Identification of a novel plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene, mcr-2, in Escherichia coli, Belgium, June 2016.

    Xavier, Basil Britto; Lammens, Christine; Ruhal, Rohit; Kumar-Singh, Samir; Butaye, Patrick; Goossens, Herman; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2016-07-01

    We identified a novel plasmid-mediated colistin-resistance gene in porcine and bovine colistin-resistant Escherichia coli that did not contain mcr-1. The gene, termed mcr-2, a 1,617 bp phosphoethanolamine transferase harboured on an IncX4 plasmid, has 76.7% nucleotide identity to mcr-1. Prevalence of mcr-2 in porcine colistin-resistant E. coli (11/53) in Belgium was higher than that of mcr-1 (7/53). These data call for an immediate introduction of mcr-2 screening in ongoing molecular epidemiological surveillance of colistin-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:27416987

  15. Blast resistance of CC-NB-LRR protein Pb1 is mediated by WRKY45 through protein–protein interaction

    Inoue, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Nagao; Matsushita, Akane; Xinqiong, Liu; Nakayama, Akira; Sugano, Shoji; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Panicle blast 1 (Pb1) is a panicle blast resistance gene derived from the indica rice cultivar “Modan.” Pb1 encodes a coiled-coil–nucleotide-binding site–leucine-rich repeat (CC-NB-LRR) protein and confers durable, broad-spectrum resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae races. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Pb1-mediated blast resistance. The Pb1 protein interacted with WRKY45, a transcription factor involved in induced resistance via the salicylic acid signaling pathway tha...

  16. Reversion of P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Multidrug Resistance in Human Leukemic Cell Line by Diallyl Trisulfide

    Qing Xia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is the major obstacle in chemotherapy, which involves multiple signaling pathways. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS is the main sulfuric compound in garlic. In the present study, we aimed to explore whether DATS could overcome P-glycoprotein-(P-gp-mediated MDR in K562/A02 cells, and to investigate whether NF-κB suppression is involved in DATS-induced reversal of MDR. MTT assay revealed that cotreatment with DATS increased the response of K562/A02 cells to adriamycin (the resistance reversal fold was 3.79 without toxic side effects. DATS could enhance the intracellular concentration of adriamycin by inhibiting the function and expression of P-gp, as shown by flow cytometry, RT-PCR, and western blot. In addition, DATS resulted in more K562/A02 cell apoptosis, accompanied by increased expression of caspase-3. The expression of NF-κB/p65 (downregulation was significantly linked to the drug-resistance mechanism of DATS, whereas the expression of IκBα was not affected by DATS. Our findings demonstrated that DATS can serve as a novel, nontoxic modulator of MDR, and can reverse the MDR of K562/A02 cells in vitro by increasing intracellular adriamycin concentration and inducing apoptosis. More importantly, we proved for the first time that the suppression of NF-κB possibly involves the molecular mechanism in the course of reversion by DATS.

  17. Reversion of p-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in human leukemic cell line by diallyl trisulfide.

    Xia, Qing; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Li, Hui-Qing; Diao, Yu-Tao; Li, Xiao-Li; Cui, Jia; Chen, Xue-Liang; Li, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle in chemotherapy, which involves multiple signaling pathways. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is the main sulfuric compound in garlic. In the present study, we aimed to explore whether DATS could overcome P-glycoprotein-(P-gp-)mediated MDR in K562/A02 cells, and to investigate whether NF-κB suppression is involved in DATS-induced reversal of MDR. MTT assay revealed that cotreatment with DATS increased the response of K562/A02 cells to adriamycin (the resistance reversal fold was 3.79) without toxic side effects. DATS could enhance the intracellular concentration of adriamycin by inhibiting the function and expression of P-gp, as shown by flow cytometry, RT-PCR, and western blot. In addition, DATS resulted in more K562/A02 cell apoptosis, accompanied by increased expression of caspase-3. The expression of NF-κB/p65 (downregulation) was significantly linked to the drug-resistance mechanism of DATS, whereas the expression of IκBα was not affected by DATS. Our findings demonstrated that DATS can serve as a novel, nontoxic modulator of MDR, and can reverse the MDR of K562/A02 cells in vitro by increasing intracellular adriamycin concentration and inducing apoptosis. More importantly, we proved for the first time that the suppression of NF-κB possibly involves the molecular mechanism in the course of reversion by DATS. PMID:22919419

  18. Tangeretin, a citrus pentamethoxyflavone, antagonizes ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance by inhibiting its transport function.

    Feng, Sen-Ling; Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Liu, Zhong-Qiu; Xie, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and tumor metastasis are the main causes of chemotherapeutic treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. In this study, at achievable nontoxic plasma concentrations, citrus flavonoid tangeretin has been shown to reverse ABCB1-mediated cancer resistance to a variety of chemotherapeutic agents effectively. Co-treatment of cells with tangeretin and paclitaxel activated apoptosis as well as arrested cell cycle at G2/M-phase. Tangeretin profoundly inhibited the ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin, and flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the expression of ABCB1. Moreover, it stimulated the ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. The molecular docking results indicated a favorable binding of tangeretin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled ABCB1 transporter. The overall results demonstrated that tangeretin could sensitize ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells to chemotherapeutical agents by directly inhibiting ABCB1 transporter function, which encouraged further animal and clinical studies in the treatment of resistant cancers. PMID:27058921

  19. IFN-gamma-inducible Irga6 mediates host resistance against Chlamydia trachomatis via autophagy.

    Munir A Al-Zeer

    Full Text Available Chlamydial infection of the host cell induces Gamma interferon (IFNgamma, a central immunoprotector for humans and mice. The primary defense against Chlamydia infection in the mouse involves the IFNgamma-inducible family of IRG proteins; however, the precise mechanisms mediating the pathogen's elimination are unknown. In this study, we identify Irga6 as an important resistance factor against C. trachomatis, but not C. muridarum, infection in IFNgamma-stimulated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We show that Irga6, Irgd, Irgm2 and Irgm3 accumulate at bacterial inclusions in MEFs upon stimulation with IFNgamma, whereas Irgb6 colocalized in the presence or absence of the cytokine. This accumulation triggers a rerouting of bacterial inclusions to autophagosomes that subsequently fuse to lysosomes for elimination. Autophagy-deficient Atg5-/- MEFs and lysosomal acidification impaired cells surrender to infection. Irgm2, Irgm3 and Irgd still localize to inclusions in IFNgamma-induced Atg5-/- cells, but Irga6 localization is disrupted indicating its pivotal role in pathogen resistance. Irga6-deficient (Irga6-/- MEFs, in which chlamydial growth is enhanced, do not respond to IFNgamma even though Irgb6, Irgd, Irgm2 and Irgm3 still localize to inclusions. Taken together, we identify Irga6 as a necessary factor in conferring host resistance by remodelling a classically nonfusogenic intracellular pathogen to stimulate fusion with autophagosomes, thereby rerouting the intruder to the lysosomal compartment for destruction.

  20. Initial infection of roots and leaves reveals different resistance phenotypes associated with coat protein gene-mediated resistance to Potato mop-top virus.

    Germundsson, Anna; Sandgren, Maria; Barker, Hugh; Savenkov, Eugene I; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2002-05-01

    Resistance to the pomovirus Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) was studied in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Saturna) and Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the coat protein (CP) gene of PMTV. The incidence of PMTV infections was reduced in tubers of the CP-transgenic potatoes grown in the field in soil infested with the viruliferous vector, Spongospora subterranea. However, in those tubers that were infected, all three virus RNAs were detected and virus titres were high. The CP-transgenic N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with PMTV using two methods. Following mechanical inoculation of leaves, no RNA 3 (the CP-encoding RNA homologous to the transgene) was detected in leaves, but in some plants low amounts of RNA 3 were detected in roots; RNA 2 was readily detected in leaves and roots of several plants. Inoculation of roots using viruliferous S. subterranea resulted in infection of roots in all plants and the three PMTV RNAs were detected. However, no systemic movement of PMTV from roots to the above-ground parts was observed, indicating a novel expression of resistance. These data indicate that the CP gene-mediated resistance to PMTV specifically restricts accumulation of PMTV RNA 3, and is more effective in leaves than roots. Furthermore, expression of resistance is different depending on whether leaves or roots are inoculated. Data do not exclude the possibility that both a protein-mediated and an RNA-mediated resistance mechanism are involved. PMID:11961276

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E from Pisum sativum

    Crystals of N-terminally truncated eIF4E from pea were obtained and X-ray data were recorded in-house to a resolution of 2.2 Å. Crystals of an N-terminally truncated 20 kDa fragment of Pisum sativum eIF4E (ΔN-eIF4E) were grown by vapour diffusion. X-ray data were recorded to a resolution of 2.2 Å from a single crystal in-house. Indexing was consistent with primitive monoclinic symmetry and solvent-content estimations suggested that between four and nine copies of the eIF4E fragment were possible per crystallographic asymmetric unit. eIF4E is an essential component of the eukaryotic translation machinery and recent studies have shown that point mutations of plant eIF4Es can confer resistance to potyvirus infection

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea with -amylase inhibitor gene for insect resistance

    S Ignacimuthu; S Prakash

    2006-09-01

    Chickpea is the world’s third most important pulse crop and India produces 75% of the world’s supply. Chickpea seeds are attacked by Callosobruchus maculatus and C. chinensis which cause extensive damage. The -amylase inhibitor gene isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds was introduced into chickpea cultivar K850 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 288 kanamycin resistant plants were regenerated. Only 0.3% of these were true transformants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and Southern hybridization confirmed the presence of 4.9 kb -amylase inhibitor gene in the transformed plants. Western blot confirmed the presence of -amylase inhibitor protein. The results of bioassay study revealed a significant reduction in the survival rate of bruchid weevil C. maculatus reared on transgenic chickpea seeds. All the transgenic plants exhibited a segregation ratio of 3:1.

  3. Modulation of P-Glycoprotein Mediated Multidrug Resistance (Mdr in Cancer Using Chemosensitizers.

    Velingkar V.S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR is one of the main obstacles in the chemotherapy of cancer. MDR is associated with the over expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, resulting in increased efflux of chemotherapy from cancer cells. Inhibiting P-gp as a method to reverse MDR in cancer patients has been studied extensively, but the results have generally been disappointing. First-generation agents were limited by unacceptable toxicity, whereas second-generation agents had bettertolerability but were confounded by unpredictable pharmacokinetic interactions and interactions with other transporter proteins. Third-generation inhibitors have high potency and specificity for P-gp. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic studies to date have shown no appreciable impact on drug metabolism and no clinically significant drug interactions with common chemotherapy agents. Third-generation P-gp inhibitors have shown promise in clinical trials. The continued development of these agents may establish the true therapeutic potential of P-gp-mediated MDR reversal.

  4. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Methods Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. Results The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. Conclusions This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia. PMID:26909312

  5. Fluoroquinolone induction of phage-mediated gene transfer in multidrug-resistant Salmonella.

    Bearson, Bradley L; Brunelle, Brian W

    2015-08-01

    Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibiotics that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase activity, which can cause DNA damage and result in bacterial cell death. In response to DNA damage, bacteria induce an SOS response to stimulate DNA repair. However, the SOS response may also induce prophage with production of infectious virions. Salmonella strains typically contain multiple prophages, and certain strains including phage types DT120 and DT104 contain prophage that upon induction are capable of generalised transduction. In this study, strains of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 were exposed to fluoroquinolones important for use in human and veterinary disease therapy to determine whether prophage(s) are induced that could facilitate phage-mediated gene transfer. Cultures of MDR S. Typhimurium DT120 and DT104 containing a kanamycin resistance plasmid were lysed after exposure to fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin). Bacterial cell lysates were able to transfer the plasmid to a recipient kanamycin-susceptible Salmonella strain by generalised transduction. In addition, exposure of DT120 to ciprofloxacin induced the recA gene of the bacterial SOS response and genes encoded in a P22-like generalised transducing prophage. This research indicates that fluoroquinolone exposure of MDR Salmonella can facilitate horizontal gene transfer, suggesting that fluoroquinolone usage in human and veterinary medicine may have unintended consequences, including the induction of phage-mediated gene transfer from MDR Salmonella. Stimulation of gene transfer following bacterial exposure to fluoroquinolones should be considered an adverse effect, and clinical decisions regarding antibiotic selection for infectious disease therapy should include this potential risk. PMID:26078016

  6. Overexpression of the 14α-Demethylase Target Gene (CYP51) Mediates Fungicide Resistance in Blumeriella jaapii

    Ma, Zhonghua; Proffer, Tyre J.; Jacobs, Janette L.; Sundin, George W.

    2006-01-01

    Sterol demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides are widely used to control fungi pathogenic to humans and plants. Resistance to DMIs is mediated either through alterations in the structure of the target enzyme CYP51 (encoding 14α-demethylase), through increased expression of the CYP51 gene, or through increased expression of efflux pumps. We found that CYP51 expression in DMI-resistant (DMIR) isolates of the cherry leaf spot pathogen Blumeriella jaapii was increased 5- to 12-fold compared to ...

  7. Persistent androgen receptor-mediated transcription in castration-resistant prostate cancer under androgen-deprived conditions

    Decker, Keith F.; Zheng, Dali; He, Yuhong; Bowman, Tamara; Edwards, John R.; Jia, Li

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that mediates androgen action in target tissues. Upon ligand binding, the AR binds to thousands of genomic loci and activates a cell-type specific gene program. Prostate cancer growth and progression depend on androgen-induced AR signaling. Treatment of advanced prostate cancer through medical or surgical castration leads to initial response and durable remission, but resistance inevitably develops. In castration-resistant ...

  8. Prevalence of aac(6'-Ib-cr plasmid-mediated and chromosome-encoded fluoroquinolone resistance in Enterobacteriaceae in Italy

    Frasson Ilaria

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The spread of aac(6'-Ib-cr plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants was evaluated in 197 enterobacterial isolates recovered in an Italian teaching hospital. The aac(6'-Ib-cr gene was found exclusively in Escherichia coli strains. The gene was located on a plasmid which presented additional ESBL genes. Most of the clinical strains were clonally related and displayed three point mutations at the topoisomerase level which conferred high resistance to fluoroquinolones.

  9. Six1 overexpression at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes promotes differentiation resistance and EMT

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • Six1 expression increases during HPV16-mediated transformation. • Six1 overexpression causes differentiation resistance in HPV16-immortalized cells. • Six1 overexpression in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes activates MAPK. • Activation of MAPK promotes EMT and differentiation resistance. • Six1 overexpression reduces Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling

  10. Six1 overexpression at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes promotes differentiation resistance and EMT

    Xu, Hanwen [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Pirisi, Lucia [Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Creek, Kim E., E-mail: creekk@sccp.sc.edu [Department of Drug Discovery and Biomedical Sciences, South Carolina College of Pharmacy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory discovered that SIX1 mRNA expression increased during in vitro progression of HPV16-immortalized human keratinocytes (HKc/HPV16) toward a differentiation-resistant (HKc/DR) phenotype. In this study, we explored the role of Six1 at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation by overexpressing Six1 in HKc/HPV16. We found that Six1 overexpression in HKc/HPV16 increased cell proliferation and promoted cell migration and invasion by inducing epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, the overexpression of Six1 in HKc/HPV16 resulted in resistance to serum and calcium-induced differentiation, which is the hallmark of the HKc/DR phenotype. Activation of MAPK in HKc/HPV16 overexpressing Six1 is linked to resistance to calcium-induced differentiation. In conclusion, this study determined that Six1 overexpression resulted in differentiation resistance and promoted EMT at early stages of HPV16-mediated transformation of human keratinocytes. - Highlights: • Six1 expression increases during HPV16-mediated transformation. • Six1 overexpression causes differentiation resistance in HPV16-immortalized cells. • Six1 overexpression in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes activates MAPK. • Activation of MAPK promotes EMT and differentiation resistance. • Six1 overexpression reduces Smad-dependent TGF-β signaling.

  11. Macrophage Akt1 Kinase-Mediated Mitophagy Modulates Apoptosis Resistance and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Deshane, Jessy S; Ryan, Alan J; Thannickal, Victor J; Carter, A Brent

    2016-03-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disorder with increasing incidence. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis. Mitophagy, the selective engulfment of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagasomes, is important for cellular homeostasis and can be induced by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we show Akt1 induced macrophage mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitophagy. Mice harboring a conditional deletion of Akt1 in macrophages (Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre) and Park2(-/-) mice had impaired mitophagy and reduced active transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Although Akt1 increased TGF-β1 expression, mitophagy inhibition in Akt1-overexpressing macrophages abrogated TGF-β1 expression and fibroblast differentiation. Importantly, conditional Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre mice and Park2(-/-) mice had increased macrophage apoptosis and were protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, IPF alveolar macrophages had evidence of increased mitophagy and displayed apoptosis resistance. These observations suggest that Akt1-mediated mitophagy contributes to alveolar macrophage apoptosis resistance and is required for pulmonary fibrosis development. PMID:26921108

  12. NPM and BRG1 Mediate Transcriptional Resistance to Retinoic Acid in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

    Nichol, Jessica N; Galbraith, Matthew D; Kleinman, Claudia L; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Miller, Wilson H

    2016-03-29

    Perturbation in the transcriptional control of genes driving differentiation is an established paradigm whereby oncogenic fusion proteins promote leukemia. From a retinoic acid (RA)-sensitive acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line, we derived an RA-resistant clone characterized by a block in transcription initiation, despite maintaining wild-type PML/RARA expression. We uncovered an aberrant interaction among PML/RARA, nucleophosmin (NPM), and topoisomerase II beta (TOP2B). Surprisingly, RA stimulation in these cells results in enhanced chromatin association of the nucleosome remodeler BRG1. Inhibition of NPM or TOP2B abrogated BRG1 recruitment. Furthermore, NPM inhibition and targeting BRG1 restored differentiation when combined with RA. Here, we demonstrate a role for NPM and BRG1 in obstructing RA differentiation and implicate chromatin remodeling in mediating therapeutic resistance in malignancies. NPM mutations are the most common genetic change in patients with acute leukemia (AML); therefore, our model may be applicable to other more common leukemias driven by NPM. PMID:26997274

  13. Repressed PKCδ activation in glycodelin-expressing cells mediates resistance to phorbol ester and TGFβ.

    Hautala, Laura C; Koistinen, Riitta; Koistinen, Hannu

    2016-10-01

    Glycodelin is a glycoprotein mainly expressed in well-differentiated epithelial cells in reproductive tissues. In normal secretory endometrium, the expression of glycodelin is abundant and regulated by progesterone. In hormone-related cancers glycodelin expression is associated with well-differentiated tumors. We have previously found that glycodelin drives epithelial differentiation of HEC-1B endometrial adenocarcinoma cells, resulting in reduced tumor growth in a preclinical mouse model. Here we show that glycodelin-transfected HEC-1B cells have repressed protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) activation, likely due to downregulation of PDK1, and are resistant to phenotypic change and enhanced migration induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). In control cells, which do not express glycodelin, the effects of PMA were abolished by using PKCδ and PDK1 inhibitors, and knockdown of PKCδ, MEK1 and 2, or ERK1 and 2 by siRNAs. Similarly, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-induced phenotypic change was only seen in control cells, not in glycodelin-producing cells, and it was mediated by PKCδ. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that PKCδ, via MAPK pathway, is involved in the glycodelin-driven cell differentiation rendering the cells resistant to stimulation by PMA and TGFβ. PMID:27373413

  14. Detection of plasmid-mediated IMP-1 metallo-β-lactamase and quinolone resistance determinants in an ertapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae isolate

    Li-rong CHEN; Hong-wei ZHOU; Jia-chang CAI; Rong ZHANG; Gong-xiang CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of carbapenem resistance and the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr in a clinical isolate of Enterobacter cloacae. Methods: An ertapenem-resistant E. cloacae ZY106, which was isolated from liquor puris of a female gastric cancer patient in a Chinese hospital, was investigated. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by agar dilution method. Conjugation experiments, isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analyses of plasmid-mediated carbapenemases and quinolone resistance determinants were preformed to confirm the genotype. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were examined by urea-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Urea-SDS-PAGE). Results: Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MCs) of imipenem, mer-openem, and ertapenem for ZY106 were 2,4, and 16 ug/ml, respectively. Conjugation studies with Escherichia coli resulted in the transfer of significantly reduced carbapenem susceptibility. ZY106 produced IMP-1 metallo-p-lactamase and CTX-M-3 extended-spectrum P-lactamase, and E. coli transconjugant produced IMP-1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant qnrSI was detected in ZY106. Transfer of the qnrSI-encoding-plasmid into E. coli by conjugation resulted in intermediate resistance to ciprofloxacin in E. coli transconjugant. Urea-SDS-PAGE analysis of OMPs showed that ZY106 lacked an OMP of approximately 38 KDa. Conclusion: It is the first IMP-1-producing Enterobacteriaceae in China and the first report of a clinical isolate that harbors both blaIMP and qnrS genes as well. The blaIMP-1, blaCTX-M-3, and qnrSl are encoded at three different plasmids. IMP-1 combined with the loss of an OMP possibly resulted in ertapenem resistance and reduced imipenem and mero-penem susceptibility in E. cloacae.

  15. In Vitro Biochemical Study of CYP51-Mediated Azole Resistance in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Warrilow, Andrew G S; Parker, Josie E; Price, Claire L; Nes, W David; Kelly, Steven L; Kelly, Diane E

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of triazole-resistant Aspergillus infections is increasing worldwide, often mediated through mutations in the CYP51A amino acid sequence. New classes of azole-based drugs are required to combat the increasing resistance to existing triazole therapeutics. In this study, a CYP51 reconstitution assay is described consisting of eburicol, purified recombinant Aspergillus fumigatus CPR1 (AfCPR1), and Escherichia coli membrane suspensions containing recombinant A. fumigatus CYP51 proteins, allowing in vitro screening of azole antifungals. Azole-CYP51 studies determining the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) showed that A. fumigatus CYP51B (Af51B IC50, 0.50 μM) was 34-fold more susceptible to inhibition by fluconazole than A. fumigatus CYP51A (Af51A IC50, 17 μM) and that Af51A and Af51B were equally susceptible to inhibition by voriconazole, itraconazole, and posaconazole (IC50s of 0.16 to 0.38 μM). Af51A-G54W and Af51A-M220K enzymes were 11- and 15-fold less susceptible to inhibition by itraconazole and 30- and 8-fold less susceptible to inhibition by posaconazole than wild-type Af51A, confirming the azole-resistant phenotype of these two Af51A mutations. Susceptibility to voriconazole of Af51A-G54W and Af51A-M220K was only marginally lower than that of wild-type Af51A. Susceptibility of Af51A-L98H to inhibition by voriconazole, itraconazole, and posaconazole was only marginally lower (less than 2-fold) than that of wild-type Af51A. However, Af51A-L98H retained 5 to 8% residual activity in the presence of 32 μM triazole, which could confer azole resistance in A. fumigatus strains that harbor the Af51A-L98H mutation. The AfCPR1/Af51 assay system demonstrated the biochemical basis for the increased azole resistance of A. fumigatus strains harboring G54W, L98H, and M220K Af51A point mutations. PMID:26459890

  16. Host-Mediated Bioactivation of Pyrazinamide: Implications for Efficacy, Resistance, and Therapeutic Alternatives

    Via, Laura E.; Savic, Rada; Weiner, Danielle M.; Zimmerman, Matthew D.; Prideaux, Brendan; Irwin, Scott M.; Lyon, Eddie; O’Brien, Paul; Gopal, Pooja; Eum, Seokyong; Lee, Myungsun; Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Dutta, Noton K.; Shim, TaeSun; Cho, Jeong Su; Kim, Wooshik; Karakousis, Petros C.; Lenaerts, Anne; Nuermberger, Eric; Barry, Clifton E.; Dartois, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Pyrazinamide has played a critical role in shortening therapy against drug-sensitive, drug-resistant, active, and latent tuberculosis (TB). Despite widespread recognition of its therapeutic importance, the sterilizing properties of this 60-year-old drug remain an enigma given its rather poor activity in vitro. Here we revisit longstanding paradigms and offer pharmacokinetic explanations for the apparent disconnect between in vitro activity and clinical impact. We show substantial host-mediated conversion of prodrug pyrazinamide (PZA) to the active form, pyrazinoic acid (POA), in TB patients and in animal models. We demonstrate favorable penetration of this pool of circulating POA from plasma into lung tissue and granulomas, where the pathogen resides. In standardized growth inhibition experiments, we show that POA exhibits superior in vitro potency compared to PZA, indicating that the vascular supply of host-derived POA may contribute to the in vivo efficacy of PZA, thereby reducing the apparent discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo activity. However, the results also raise the possibility that subinhibitory concentrations of POA generated by the host could fuel the emergence of resistance to both PZA and POA. In contrast to widespread expectations, we demonstrate good oral bioavailability and exposure in preclinical species in pharmacokinetic studies of oral POA. Baseline exposure of oral POA can be further increased by the xanthine oxidase inhibitor and approved gout drug allopurinol. These promising results pave the way for clinical investigations of oral POA as a therapeutic alternative or an add-on to overcome PZA resistance and salvage this essential TB drug. PMID:26086040

  17. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Ryohei Katayama

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1 overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression.

  18. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  19. Pyramids of QTLs enhance host–plant resistance and Bt-mediated resistance to leaf-chewing insects in soybean

    Ortega, María A.; All, John N.; Boerma, H. Roger; Parrott, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Key message QTL-M and QTL-E enhance soybean resistance to insects. Pyramiding these QTLs with cry1Ac increases protection against Bt-tolerant pests, presenting an opportunity to effectively deploy Bt with host–plant resistance genes. Abstract Plant resistance to leaf-chewing insects minimizes the need for insecticide applications, reducing crop production costs and pesticide concerns. In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], resistance to a broad range of leaf-chewing insects is found in PI 22935...

  20. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor 1α Mediates Resistance to mTOR-Directed Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer

    Colin D. Weekes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The factors preventing the translation of preclinical findings supporting the clinical development mTOR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer therapy remain undetermined. Stromal cell.derived factor 1α (SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling was examined as a representative microenvironmental factor able to promote mTOR-targeted therapy resistance in pancreatic cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Primary pancreas explant xenografts and in vitro experiments were used to perform pharmacodynamic analyses of SDF-1α-CXCR4 regulation of the mTOR pathway. Combinatorial effects of CXCR4, EGFR, and mTOR pharmacologic inhibition were evaluated in temsirolimus-resistant and -sensitive xenografts. Intratumoral gene and protein expressions of mTOR pathway effectors cyclin D1, c-Myc, and VEGF were evaluated. RESULTS: Baseline intratumoral SDF-1α gene expression correlated with temsirolimus resistance in explant models. SDF-1α stimulation of pancreatic cells resulted in CXCR4-mediated PI3-kinase-dependent S6-RP phosphorylation (pS6-RP on exposure to temsirolimus. Combinatorial therapy with AMD3465 (CXCR4 small-molecule inhibitor and temsirolimus resulted in effective tumor growth inhibition to overcome temsirolimus resistance. In contrast, SDF-1α exposure induced a temsirolimus-resistant phenotype in temsirolimus-sensitive explants. AMD3465 inhibited CXCR4-mediated intratumoral S6-RP phosphorylation and cyclin D and c-myc gene expression. Next, CXCR4 promoted intratumoral EGFR expression in association with temsirolimus resistance. Treatment with AMD3465, temsirolimus- and erlotinib-mediated tumor growth inhibition to overcome temsirolimus resistance in the explant model. Lastly, SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling increased intratumoral VEGF gene and protein expression. CONCLUSIONS: SDF-1α-CXCR4 signaling represents a microenvironmental factor that can maintain mTOR pathway fidelity to promote resistance to mTOR-targeted therapy in pancreatic cancer by a variety of mechanisms

  1. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein mediates tumor cell resistance to antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Evans, M K; Sauer, S J; Nath, S; Robinson, T J; Morse, M A; Devi, G R

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest, distinct subtype of breast cancer. High expression of epidermal growth factor receptors [EGFR or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)] in IBC tumors has prompted trials of anti-EGFR/HER2 monoclonal antibodies to inhibit oncogenic signaling; however, de novo and acquired therapeutic resistance is common. Another critical function of these antibodies is to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), which enables immune effector cells to engage tumors and deliver granzymes, activating executioner caspases. We hypothesized that high expression of anti-apoptotic molecules in tumors would render them resistant to ADCC. Herein, we demonstrate that the most potent caspase inhibitor, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), overexpressed in IBC, drives resistance to ADCC mediated by cetuximab (anti-EGFR) and trastuzumab (anti-HER2). Overexpression of XIAP in parental IBC cell lines enhances resistance to ADCC; conversely, targeted downregulation of XIAP in ADCC-resistant IBC cells renders them sensitive. As hypothesized, this ADCC resistance is in part a result of the ability of XIAP to inhibit caspase activity; however, we also unexpectedly found that resistance was dependent on XIAP-mediated, caspase-independent suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, which otherwise occurs during ADCC. Transcriptome analysis supported these observations by revealing modulation of genes involved in immunosuppression and oxidative stress response in XIAP-overexpressing, ADCC-resistant cells. We conclude that XIAP is a critical modulator of ADCC responsiveness, operating through both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms. These results suggest that strategies targeting the effects of XIAP on caspase activation and ROS suppression have the potential to enhance the activity of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26821068

  2. Response to mTOR inhibition: activity of eIF4E predicts sensitivity in cell lines and acquired changes in eIF4E regulation in breast cancer

    Bartlett John MS

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhibitors of the kinase mTOR, such as rapamycin and everolimus, have been used as cancer therapeutics with limited success since some tumours are resistant. Efforts to establish predictive markers to allow selection of patients with tumours likely to respond have centred on determining phosphorylation states of mTOR or its targets 4E-BP1 and S6K in cancer cells. In an alternative approach we estimated eIF4E activity, a key effector of mTOR function, and tested the hypothesis that eIF4E activity predicts sensitivity to mTOR inhibition in cell lines and in breast tumours. Results We found a greater than three fold difference in sensitivity of representative colon, lung and breast cell lines to rapamycin. Using an assay to quantify influences of eIF4E on the translational efficiency specified by structured 5'UTRs, we showed that this estimate of eIF4E activity was a significant predictor of rapamycin sensitivity, with higher eIF4E activities indicative of enhanced sensitivity. Surprisingly, non-transformed cell lines were not less sensitive to rapamycin and did not have lower eIF4E activities than cancer lines, suggesting the mTOR/4E-BP1/eIF4E axis is deregulated in these non-transformed cells. In the context of clinical breast cancers, we estimated eIF4E activity by analysing expression of eIF4E and its functional regulators within tumour cells and combining these scores to reflect inhibitory and activating influences on eIF4E. Estimates of eIF4E activity in cancer biopsies taken at diagnosis did not predict sensitivity to 11-14 days of pre-operative everolimus treatment, as assessed by change in tumour cell proliferation from diagnosis to surgical excision. However, higher pre-treatment eIF4E activity was significantly associated with dramatic post-treatment changes in expression of eIF4E and 4E-binding proteins, suggesting that eIF4E is further deregulated in these tumours in response to mTOR inhibition. Conclusions

  3. The B-cell receptor orchestrates environment-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance in B-cell malignancies.

    Shain, K H; Tao, J

    2014-08-01

    Specific niches within the lymphoma tumor microenvironment (TME) provide sanctuary for subpopulations of tumor cells through stromal cell-tumor cell interactions. These interactions notably dictate growth, response to therapy and resistance of residual malignant B cells to therapeutic agents. This minimal residual disease (MRD) remains a major challenge in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and contributes to subsequent disease relapse. B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling has emerged as essential mediator of B-cell homing, survival and environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR). Central to EMDR are chemokine- and integrin-mediated interactions between lymphoma and the TME. Further, stromal cell-B cell adhesion confers a sustained BCR signaling leading to chemokine and integrin activation. Recently, the inhibitors of BCR signaling have garnered a substantial clinical interest because of their effectiveness in B-cell disorders. The efficacy of these agents is, at least in part, attributed to attenuation of BCR-dependent lymphoma-TME interactions. In this review, we discuss the pivotal role of BCR signaling in the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of TME-mediated lymphoma survival and drug resistance. PMID:24037527

  4. Cefditoren and ceftriaxone enhance complement-mediated immunity in the presence of specific antibodies against antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal strains.

    Elisa Ramos-Sevillano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Specific antibodies mediate humoral and cellular protection against invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae by activating complement mediated immunity, promoting phagocytosis and stimulating bacterial clearance. The emergence of pneumococcal strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance is of great concern worldwide and a serious threat for public health. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Flow cytometry was used to determine whether complement-mediated immunity against three antibiotic-resistant S. pneumoniae clinical isolates is enhanced in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone. The binding of acute phase proteins such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component, and of complement component C1q, to pneumococci was enhanced in the presence of serum plus either of these antibiotics. Both antibiotics therefore trigger the activation of the classical complement pathway against S. pneumoniae. C3b deposition was also increased in the presence of specific anti-pneumococcal antibodies and sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefditoren and ceftriaxone confirming that the presence of these antibiotics enhances complement-mediated immunity to S. pneumoniae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using cefditoren and ceftriaxone to promote the binding of acute phase proteins and C1q to pneumococci, and to increase C3b deposition, when anti-pneumococcal antibodies are present, might help reduce the impact of antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae infections.

  5. Sodium Orthovanadate-Resistant Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Show Defects in Golgi-Mediated Protein Glycosylation, Sporulation and Detergent Resistance

    Kanik-Ennulat, C.; Montalvo, E.; Neff, N

    1995-01-01

    Orthovanadate is a small toxic molecule that competes with the biologically important oxyanion orthophosphate. Orthovanadate resistance arises spontaneously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid cells by mutation in a number of genes. Mutations selected at 3 mM sodium orthovanadate have different degrees of vanadate resistance, hygromycin sensitivity, detergent sensitivity and sporulation defects. Recessive vanadate-resistant mutants belong to at least six genetic loci. Most mutants are defecti...

  6. Physical size of the donor locus and transmission of Haemophilus influenzae ampicillin resistance genes by deoxyribonucleic acid-mediated transformation

    The properties of donor deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) from three clinical isolates and its ability to mediate the transformation of competent Rd strains to ampicillin resistance were examined. A quantitative technique for determining the resistance of individual Haemophilus influenzae cells to ampicillin was developed. When this technique was used, sensitive cells failed to tolerate levels of ampicillin greater than 0.1 to 0.2 μg/ml, whereas three resistant type b β-lactamase-producing strains could form colonies 1- to 3-μg/ml levels of the antibiotic. DNA extracted from the resistant strains elicited transformation of the auxotrophic genes in a multiply auxotrophic Rd strain. For two of the donors, transformation to ampicillin resistance occurred after the uptake of a single DNA molecule approximately 104-fold less frequently than transformation of auxotrophic loci and was not observed to occur at all with the third. The frequency of transformation to ampicillin resistance was two- to fivefold higher in strain BC200 (Okinaka and Barnhart, 1974), which was cured of a defective prophage. All three clinical ampicillin-resistant strains were poor recipients, but the presence of the ampicillin resistant genes in strain BC200 did not reduce its competence

  7. Resistance to the macrocyclic lactone moxidectin is mediated in part by membrane transporter P-glycoproteins: Implications for control of drug resistant parasitic nematodes

    Elizabeth E. Bygarski

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to determine if the resistance mechanism to moxidectin (MOX is similar of that to ivermectin (IVM and involves P-glycoproteins (PGPs. Several Caenorhabditis elegans strains were used: an IVM and MOX sensitive strain, 13 PGP deletion strains and the IVM-R strain which shows synthetic resistance to IVM (by creation of three point mutations in genes coding for α-subunits of glutamate gated chloride channels [GluCls] and cross-resistance to MOX. These strains were used to compare expression of PGP genes, measure motility and pharyngeal pumping phenotypes and evaluate the ability of compounds that inhibit PGP function to potentiate sensitivity or reverse resistance to MOX. The results suggest that C. elegans may use regulation of PGPs as a response mechanism to MOX. This was indicated by the over-expression of several PGPs in both drug sensitive and IVM-R strains and the significant changes in phenotype in the IVM-R strain in the presence of PGP inhibitors. However, as the inhibitors did not completely disrupt expression of the phenotypic traits in the IVM-R strain, this suggests that there likely are multiple avenues for MOX action that may include receptors other than GluCls. If MOX resistance was mediated solely by GluCls then exposure of the IVM-R strain to PGP inhibitors should not have affected sensitivity to MOX. Targeted gene deletions showed that protection of C. elegans against MOX involves complex mechanisms and depends on the PGP gene family, particularly PGP-6. While the results presented are similar to others using IVM, there were some important differences observed with respect to PGPs which may play a role in the disparities seen in the characteristics of resistance to IVM and MOX. The similarities are of concern as parasites resistant to IVM show some degree but not complete cross-resistance to MOX; this could impact nematodes that are resistant to IVM.

  8. MicroRNA-138 promotes acquired alkylator resistance in glioblastoma by targeting the Bcl-2-interacting mediator BIM.

    Stojcheva, Nina; Schechtmann, Gennadi; Sass, Steffen; Roth, Patrick; Florea, Ana-Maria; Stefanski, Anja; Stühler, Kai; Wolter, Marietta; Müller, Nikola S; Theis, Fabian J; Weller, Michael; Reifenberger, Guido; Happold, Caroline

    2016-03-15

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults with a median survival below 12 months in population-based studies. The main reason for tumor recurrence and progression is constitutive or acquired resistance to the standard of care of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ/RT→TMZ). Here, we investigated the role of microRNA (miRNA) alterations as mediators of alkylator resistance in glioblastoma cells. Using microarray-based miRNA expression profiling of parental and TMZ-resistant cultures of three human glioma cell lines, we identified a set of differentially expressed miRNA candidates. From these, we selected miR-138 for further functional analyses as this miRNA was not only upregulated in TMZ-resistant versus parental cells, but also showed increased expression in vivo in recurrent glioblastoma tissue samples after TMZ/RT→TMZ treatment. Transient transfection of miR-138 mimics in glioma cells with low basal miR-138 expression increased glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, miR-138 overexpression increased TMZ resistance in long-term glioblastoma cell lines and glioma initiating cell cultures. The apoptosis regulator BIM was identified as a direct target of miR-138, and its silencing mediated the induced TMZ resistance phenotype. Altered sensitivity to apoptosis played only a minor role in this resistance mechanism. Instead, we identified the induction of autophagy to be regulated downstream of the miR-138/BIM axis and to promote cell survival following TMZ exposure. Our data thus define miR-138 as a glioblastoma cell survival-promoting miRNA associated with resistance to TMZ therapy in vitro and with tumor progression in vivo. PMID:26887050

  9. Seleção de linhagens de feijoeiro com tipo de grão carioca e com os alelos co-4 e co-5 de resistência à antracnose Selection of common bean strains with carioca grain type, and with the alleles co-4 and co-5 for anthracnose resistance

    Eduardo Henrique Keller Marcondes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, identificar linhagens de feijão que reúnam, além da resistência à antracnose, alta produtividade de grãos do tipo carioca e resistência à mancha angular. Foram utilizadas 194 linhagens F5:6 extraídas de sete famílias segregantes, selecionadas do cruzamento entre os genitores H147 e B1. A linhagem H147 possui grãos tipo carioca, portadora do alelo Co-5, que confere resistência a várias raças de Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. A linhagem B1 também possui grãos tipo carioca e é portadora do alelo Co-4, que confere resistência a outro grupo de raças do mesmo patógeno. As linhagens foram avaliadas na safra das águas 2005/2006, em Lavras, com a cultivar Talismã e H147 como testemunhas, com base na produtividade e tipo de grãos. Foram selecionadas 99 linhagens, as quais foram avaliadas na safra da seca/2006, juntamente com a testemunha Talismã, com base na produtividade, tipo de grão e resistência à mancha angular. Dessas 99 linhagens, foram selecionadas 24, as quais foram avaliadas na safra de inverno/2006 em Lavras e Lambari, com base no tipo de grão e produtividade. Essas 24 linhagens foram inoculadas com a raça 321 de C. lindemuthianum, que quebra a resistência conferida pelo alelo Co-4, mas não o Co-5. Para verificar a presença do alelo Co4 foi utilizado um marcador SCAR que amplifica um fragmento de 950 pb por meio do primer SAS 13. Foi possível identificar 14 linhagens que possuem a pirâmide de alelos Co-4/Co-5 e entre elas, quatro destacaram-se em todos os caracteres avaliados.The objective of the research was to identify bean strains that possess at the same time resistance to anthracnose, high grain yield of Carioca grain type and resistance to angular leaf spot. 194 strains F5:6 were taken from seven segregating families derived from the cross H147 x B1. The H147 line has Carioca grain type and Co-5 resistance allele to several races of C. lindemuthianum. The B1 line also has the

  10. Sgt1, but not Rar1, is essential for the RB-mediated broad-spectrum resistance to potato late blight

    Wielgus Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late blight is the most serious potato disease world-wide. The most effective and environmentally sound way for controlling late blight is to incorporate natural resistance into potato cultivars. Several late blight resistance genes have been cloned recently. However, there is almost no information available about the resistance pathways mediated by any of those genes. Results We previously cloned a late blight resistance gene, RB, from a diploid wild potato species Solanum bulbocastanum. Transgenic potato lines containing a single RB gene showed a rate-limiting resistance against all known races of Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen. To better understand the RB-mediated resistance we silenced the potato Rar1 and Sgt1 genes that have been implicated in mediating disease resistance responses against various plant pathogens and pests. The Rar1 and Sgt1 genes of a RB-containing potato clone were silenced using a RNA interference (RNAi-based approach. All of the silenced potato plants displayed phenotypically normal growth. The late blight resistance of the Rar1 and Sgt1 silenced lines were evaluated by a traditional greenhouse inoculation method and quantified using a GFP-tagged P. infestans strain. The resistance of the Rar1-silenced plants was not affected. However, silencing of the Sgt1 gene abolished the RB-mediated resistance. Conclusion Our study shows that silencing of the Sgt1 gene in potato does not result in lethality. However, the Sgt1 gene is essential for the RB-mediated late blight resistance. In contrast, the Rar1 gene is not required for RB-mediated resistance. These results provide additional evidence for the universal role of the Sgt1 gene in various R gene-mediated plant defense responses.

  11. Small RNAs and Gene Network in a Durable Disease Resistance Gene--Mediated Defense Responses in Rice.

    Hanming Hong

    Full Text Available Accumulating data have suggested that small RNAs (sRNAs have important functions in plant responses to pathogen invasion. However, it is largely unknown whether and how sRNAs are involved in the regulation of rice responses to the invasion of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, which causes bacterial blight, the most devastating bacterial disease of rice worldwide. We performed simultaneous genome-wide analyses of the expression of sRNAs and genes during early defense responses of rice to Xoo mediated by a major disease resistance gene, Xa3/Xa26, which confers durable and race-specific qualitative resistance. A large number of sRNAs and genes showed differential expression in Xa3/Xa26-mediated resistance. These differentially expressed sRNAs include known microRNAs (miRNAs, unreported miRNAs, and small interfering RNAs. The candidate genes, with expression that was negatively correlated with the expression of sRNAs, were identified, indicating that these genes may be regulated by sRNAs in disease resistance in rice. These results provide a new perspective regarding the putative roles of sRNA candidates and their putative target genes in durable disease resistance in rice.

  12. Aggregation of TMV CP plays a role in CP functions and in Coat-Protein Mediated Resistance

    Asurmendi, S.; Berg, R H; Smith, T J; Bendhamane, M.; Beachy, R N

    2007-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein (CP) in absence of RNA self-assembles into several different structures depending on pH and ionic strength. Transgenic plants that produce self-assembling CP are resistant to TMV infection, a phenomenon referred to as coat protein mediated resistance (CP-MR). The mutant CP Thr42Trp (CPT42W) produces enhanced CP-MR compared to wild type CP. To establish the relationship between the formation of 20S CP aggregates and CP-MR, virus-like particles (VLPs) pro...

  13. Presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants and mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase in Salmonella enterica isolates with resistance and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Casas, Monique Ribeiro Tiba; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Soares, Flávia Barrosa; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias; Fernandes, Sueli Aparecida

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, the emergence and spread of resistance to nalidixic acid are usually associated with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among Salmonella serotypes. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms associated with resistance to fluoroquinolone and the clonal relatedness of Salmonella strains isolated from human and nonhuman origins, in a 5-year period in São Paulo, Brazil. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Salmonella isolates was performed. PCR and DNA sequencing were accomplished to identify mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes and to determine the fluoroquinolone determinants. The strains presented MIC to ciprofloxacin ranging from 0.125 to 8.0 mg/L (all nonsusceptible). From these, 16 strains (17.5%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥1 mg/L) and belonging to serotypes Typhimurium, I. 4,5,12:i:-, Enteritidis, and Heidelberg. Amplification and DNA sequencing of topoisomerases genes identified multiple amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC. No mutations were identified in GyrB, and 1 amino acid substitution was identified in ParE. Among the 16 Salmonella strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, 8 S. I. 4,5,12:i:- presenting mutations in gyrA and parE genes were grouped into the same pulsotype. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants: qnrB, aac(6')-lb-cr, and oqxA/B were detected among 13 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to report Salmonella isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin in Brazil. Indeed, this is the first detection of PMQR determinants in Salmonella strains from Sao Paulo State. These findings alert for the potential spread of quinolone resistance of Salmonella strains, particularly in S. I. 4,5,12:i:-, a prevalent serotype implicated in human disease and foodborne outbreaks. PMID:26971183

  14. Seawater is a reservoir of multi-resistant Escherichia coli, including strains hosting plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases genes

    IsabelHenriques

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine antibiotic resistance (AR dissemination in coastal water, considering the contribution of different sources of faecal contamination. Samples were collected in Berlenga, an uninhabited island classified as Natural Reserve and visited by tourists for aquatic recreational activities. To achieve our aim, AR in Escherichia coli isolates from coastal water was compared to AR in isolates from two sources of faecal contamination: human-derived sewage and seagull faeces. Isolation of E. coli was done on Chromocult agar. Based on genetic typing 414 strains were established. Distribution of E. coli phylogenetic groups was similar among isolates of all sources. Resistances to streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalothin and amoxicillin were the most frequent. Higher rates of AR were found among seawater and faeces isolates, except for last-line antibiotics used in human medicine. Multi-resistance rates in isolates from sewage and seagull faeces (29% and 32% were lower than in isolates from seawater (39%. Seawater AR profiles were similar to those from seagull faeces and differed significantly from sewage AR profiles. Nucleotide sequences matching resistance genes blaTEM, sul1, sul2, tet(A and tet(B, were present in isolates of all sources. Genes conferring resistance to 3rd generation cephalosporins were detected in seawater (blaCTX-M-1 and blaSHV-12 and seagull faeces (blaCMY-2. Plasmid-mediated determinants of resistance to quinolones were found: qnrS1 in all sources and qnrB19 in seawater and seagull faeces. Our results show that seawater is a relevant reservoir of AR and that seagulls are an efficient vehicle to spread human-associated bacteria and resistance genes. The E. coli resistome recaptured from Berlenga coastal water was mainly modulated by seagulls-derived faecal pollution. The repertoire of resistance genes covers antibiotics critically important for humans, a potential risk for human health.

  15. A set of vectors for introduction of antibiotic resistance genes by in vitro Cre-mediated recombination

    Vassetzky Yegor S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Introduction of new antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmids of interest is a frequent task in molecular cloning practice. Classical approaches involving digestion with restriction endonucleases and ligation are time-consuming. Findings We have created a set of insertion vectors (pINS carrying genes that provide resistance to various antibiotics (puromycin, blasticidin and G418 and containing a loxP site. Each vector (pINS-Puro, pINS-Blast or pINS-Neo contains either a chloramphenicol or a kanamycin resistance gene and is unable to replicate in most E. coli strains as it contains a conditional R6Kγ replication origin. Introduction of the antibiotic resistance genes into the vector of interest is achieved by Cre-mediated recombination between the replication-incompetent pINS and a replication-competent target vector. The recombination mix is then transformed into E. coli and selected by the resistance marker (kanamycin or chloramphenicol present in pINS, which allows to recover the recombinant plasmids with 100% efficiency. Conclusion Here we propose a simple strategy that allows to introduce various antibiotic-resistance genes into any plasmid containing a replication origin, an ampicillin resistance gene and a loxP site.

  16. Transcriptomics and knockout mutant analysis of rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis

    Verhagen, B.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A classic example of induced resistance is triggered after infection by a necrotizing pathogen, rendering uninfected,distal parts more resistant to subsequent pathogen attack, and is often referred to as systemic acquired resistance (SAR). A phenotypically comparable type of induced resistance is triggered after root colonization of plants by selected strains of non-pathogenic Pseudomonas spp., and is often called induced systemic resistance (ISR). In contrast to pathogen-induced SAR, rhizoba...

  17. Relationship of Adiposity and Insulin Resistance Mediated by Inflammation in a Group of Overweight and Obese Chilean Adolescents

    Leiva Laura; Blanco Estela; Díaz Erik; Gahagan Sheila; Reyes Marcela; Lera Lydia; Burrows Raquel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The mild chronic inflammatory state associated with obesity may be an important link between adiposity and insulin resistance (IR). In a sample of 137 overweight and obese Chilean adolescents, we assessed associations between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), IR and adiposity; explored sex differences; and evaluated whether hs-CRP mediated the relationship between adiposity and IR. Positive relationships between hs-CRP, IR and 2 measures of adiposity were found. Hs-CRP wa...

  18. Role of Class A Penicillin-Binding Proteins in PBP5-Mediated β-Lactam Resistance in Enterococcus faecalis

    Arbeloa, Ana; Segal, Heidi; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Josseaume, Nathalie; Dubost, Lionnel; Brouard, Jean-Paul; Gutmann, Laurent; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Arthur, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Peptidoglycan polymerization complexes contain multimodular penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) of classes A and B that associate a conserved C-terminal transpeptidase module to an N-terminal glycosyltransferase or morphogenesis module, respectively. In Enterococcus faecalis, class B PBP5 mediates intrinsic resistance to the cephalosporin class of β-lactam antibiotics, such as ceftriaxone. To identify the glycosyltransferase partner(s) of PBP5, combinations of deletions were introduced in all t...

  19. Vibrio cholerae O139 Multiple-Drug Resistance Mediated by Yersinia pestis pIP1202-Like Conjugative Plasmids▿

    Pan, Jing-Cao; Ye, Rong; Wang, Hao-Qiu; Xiang, Hai-Qing; ZHANG Wei; Yu, Xin-Fen; Meng, Dong-Mei; He, Zhe-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    A conjugative plasmid, pMRV150, which mediated multiple-drug resistance (MDR) to at least six antibiotics, including ampicillin, streptomycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, was identified in a Vibrio cholerae O139 isolate from Hangzhou, eastern China, in 2004. According to partial pMRV150 DNA sequences covering 15 backbone regions, the plasmid is most similar to pIP1202, an IncA/C plasmid in an MDR Yersinia pestis isolate from a Madagascar bubon...

  20. LncRNA HOTAIR Enhances the Androgen-Receptor-Mediated Transcriptional Program and Drives Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Ali Zhang; Jonathan C. Zhao; Jung Kim; Ka-wing Fong; Yeqing Angela Yang; Debabrata Chakravarti; Yin-Yuan Mo; Jindan Yu

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding the mechanisms of androgen receptor (AR) activation in the milieu of low androgen is critical to effective treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we report HOTAIR as an androgen-repressed lncRNA, and, as such, it is markedly upregulated following androgen deprivation therapies and in CRPC. We further demonstrate a distinct mode of lncRNA-mediated gene regulation, wherein HOTAIR binds to the AR protein to block its interaction with the E3 ubiquiti...

  1. SlWRKY70 is required for Mi-1-mediated resistance to aphids and nematodes in tomato.

    Atamian, Hagop S; Eulgem, Thomas; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2012-02-01

    Plant resistance (R) gene-mediated defense responses against biotic stresses include vast transcriptional reprogramming. In several plant-pathogen systems, members of the WRKY family of transcription factors have been demonstrated to act as both positive and negative regulators of plant defense transcriptional networks. To identify the possible roles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) WRKY transcription factors in defense mediated by the R gene Mi-1 against potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae, and root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne javanica, we used tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing and transcriptionally suppressed SlWRKY70, a tomato ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY70 gene. Silencing SlWRKY70 attenuated Mi-1-mediated resistance against both potato aphid and RKN showing that SlWRKY70 is required for Mi-1 function. Furthermore, we found SlWRKY70 transcripts to be inducible in response to aphid infestation and RKN inoculation. Mi-1-mediated recognition of these pests modulates this transcriptional response. As previously described for AtWRKY70, we found SlWRKY70 transcript levels to be up-regulated by salicylic acid and suppressed by methyl jasmonate. This indicates that some aspects of WRKY70 regulation are conserved among distantly related eudicots. PMID:21898085

  2. β-catenin is regulated by USP9x and mediates resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in breast cancer.

    Ouyang, Wen; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Bo; Yang, Chunxu; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Fuxiang; Xie, Conghua

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the regulatory mechanisms of decoy receptor expression in TRAIL-resistant breast cancer MCF-7 cells, cytotoxicity and apoptosis assays were applied to examine sensitivity to TRAIL in breast cancer cells. Immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation were used to detect the co-localization and interaction of USP9x and β-catenin. Luciferase assay was used to examine activity of the DcR1/DcR2/OPG reporter. Overexpression/silencing of β-catenin was performed to confirm β-catenin mediated transcription of the decoy receptors. Additionally, silencing of USP9x was performed to prove that USP9X stabilizes β-catenin and mediates TRAIL-resistance. It was found that USP9x interacted with β-catenin and inhibited the degradation of β-catenin through the deubiquitination of β-catenin. Luciferase reporter assays showed induction of DcR1/DcR2/OPG reporter activity observed upon co-transfection of β-catenin and Tcf-4. The overexpression/silencing of β-catenin further confirmed the role of β-catenin in the regulation of transcription of the decoy receptors. Silencing of USP9x directly evidenced that USP9x affected the protein expression level of β-catenin, the transcription level of the decoy receptors, and reversed TRAIL-resistance of MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, USP9x interacted with and stabilized β-catenin through deubiquitination to mediate transcription of the decoy receptors in breast cancer cells. Our results offer new insights into the mechanisms of resistance to TRAIL, and USP9x could potentially be a therapeutic target for TRAIL-resistant breast cancers. PMID:26717875

  3. The small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-BHG712 antagonizes ABCC10-mediated paclitaxel resistance: a preclinical and pharmacokinetic study

    Kathawala, Rishil J; Wei, Liuya; Anreddy, Nagaraju; Chen, Kang; PATEL, ATISH; Alqahtani, Saeed; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Sodani, Kamlesh; Kaddoumi, Amal; Ashby, Charles R.; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel exhibits clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors. However, resistance to paclitaxel significantly attenuates the response to chemotherapy. The ABC transporter subfamily C member 10 (ABCC10), also known as multi-drug resistance protein 7 (MRP7) efflux transporter, is a major mediator of paclitaxel resistance. Here, we determine the effect of NVP-BHG712, a specific EphB4 receptor inhibitor, on 1) paclitaxel resistance in HEK293 cells transfected with ABCC10, 2) the g...

  4. Altered Cultivar Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage Seedlings Mediated by Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene

    Young Hee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum, black spot (Alternaria brassicicola and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR gene expression in both cultivars. In this study, exogenous application of SA suppressed basal defenses to C. higginsianum in the 1st leaves of the susceptible cultivar and cultivar resistance of the 2nd leaves of the resistant cultivar. SA also enhanced susceptibility of the susceptible cultivar to A. brassicicola. By contrast, SA elevated disease resistance to Xcc in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible cultivar. Methyl jasmonate (MJ treatment did not affect the disease resistance to C. higginsianum and Xcc in either cultivar, but it compromised the disease resistance to A. brassicicola in the resistant cultivar. Treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC ethylene precursor did not change resistance of the either cultivar to C. higginsianum and Xcc. Effect of ACC pretreatment on the resistance to A. brassicicola was not distinguished between susceptible and resistant cultivars, because cultivar resistance of the resistant cultivar was lost by prolonged moist dark conditions. Taken together, exogenously applied SA, JA and ethylene altered defense signaling crosstalk to three diseases of anthracnose, black spot and black rot in a cultivar-dependent manner.

  5. Prevalence and characterization of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in Aeromonas spp. isolated from South African freshwater fish.

    Chenia, Hafizah Yousuf

    2016-08-16

    An increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant Aeromonas spp., which are both fish and emerging opportunistic human pathogens, has been observed worldwide. Quinolone-resistant Aeromonas spp. isolates are increasingly being observed in clinical and environmental settings, and this has been attributed primarily to target gene alterations, efflux, and transferable quinolone resistance. Thirty-four Aeromonas spp., obtained from freshwater aquaculture systems, were screened for the presence of GyrA and ParC substitutions, efflux activity and the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, qnr and aac-6'-Ib-cr. Although 44% of isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid, the majority were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. The predominant GyrA substitution was Ser-83→Val among Aeromonas veronii isolates whilst Aeromonas hydrophila isolates displayed a Ser-83→Ile substitution, and Ser-80→Ile substitutions were observed in ParC. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluoro(quinolones) were determined in the presence and absence of the efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Addition of PAβN had no effect on the levels of fluoro(quinolone) resistance observed for these isolates. Although no aac-6'-Ib-cr variant genes were identified, qnrB and qnrS were detected for 41% and 24% of isolates, respectively, by Southern hybridization and confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Quinolone resistance in these fish-associated Aeromonas isolates was related to mutations in the quinolone resistance determining regions of GyrA and ParC and presence of qnrB and qnrS. The presence of qnr alleles in Aeromonas spp. isolates may facilitate high-level fluoroquinolone resistance and potentially serve as reservoirs for the dissemination of qnr genes to other aquatic microbes. PMID:27180024

  6. Effects of Halides on Plasmid-Mediated Silver Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Gupta, Amit; Maynes, Maria; Silver, Simon

    1998-01-01

    Silver resistance of sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and resistance plasmid-containing J53(pMG101) was affected by halides in the growth medium. The effects of halides on Ag+ resistance were measured with AgNO3 and silver sulfadiazine, both on agar and in liquid. Low concentrations of chloride made the differences in MICs between sensitive and resistant strains larger. High concentrations of halides increased the sensitivities of both strains to Ag+.

  7. Prevalence of Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes among Ciprofloxacin-Nonsusceptible Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Blood Cultures in Korea

    Hee Young Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES:To analyze the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR determinants in ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from patients at a tertiary care hospital in Korea.

  8. Allele characterization of genes required for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance identifies Rpg5 as the R gene.

    Arora, D; Gross, T; Brueggeman, R

    2013-11-01

    A highly virulent form of the wheat stem rust pathogen Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK is virulent on both wheat and barley, presenting a major threat to world food security. The recessive and temperature-sensitive rpg4 gene is the only effective source of resistance identified in barley (Hordeum vulgare) against P. graminis f. sp. tritici race TTKSK. Efforts to position clone rpg4 localized resistance to a small interval on barley chromosome 5HL, tightly linked to the rye stem rust (P. graminis f. sp. secalis) resistance (R) gene Rpg5. High-resolution genetic analysis and post-transcriptional gene silencing of the genes at the rpg4/Rpg5 locus determined that three tightly linked genes (Rpg5, HvRga1, and HvAdf3) are required together for rpg4-mediated wheat stem rust resistance. Alleles of the three genes were analyzed from a diverse set of 14 domesticated barley lines (H. vulgare) and 8 wild barley accessions (H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum) to characterize diversity that may determine incompatibility (resistance). The analysis determined that HvAdf3 and HvRga1 code for predicted functional proteins that do not appear to contain polymorphisms determining the compatible (susceptible) interactions with the wheat stem rust pathogen and were expressed at the transcriptional level from both resistant and susceptible barley lines. The HvAdf3 alleles shared 100% amino acid identity among all 22 genotypes examined. The P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines with HvRga1 alleles containing the limited amino acid substitutions unique to the susceptible varieties also contained predicted nonfunctional rpg5 alleles. Thus, susceptibility in these lines is likely due to the nonfunctional RPG5 proteins. The Rpg5 allele analysis determined that 9 of the 13 P. graminis f. sp. tritici race QCCJ-susceptible barley lines contain alleles that either code for predicted truncated proteins as the result of a single nucleotide substitution, resulting in a

  9. Sensitivity of global translation to mTOR inhibition in REN cells depends on the equilibrium between eIF4E and 4E-BP1.

    Stefano Grosso

    Full Text Available Initiation is the rate-limiting phase of protein synthesis, controlled by signaling pathways regulating the phosphorylation of translation factors. Initiation has three steps, 43S, 48S and 80S formation. 43S formation is repressed by eIF2α phosphorylation. The subsequent steps, 48S and 80S formation are enabled by growth factors. 48S relies on eIF4E-mediated assembly of eIF4F complex; 4E-BPs competitively displace eIF4E from eIF4F. Two pathways control eIF4F: 1 mTORc1 phosphorylates and inactivates 4E-BPs, leading to eIF4F formation; 2 the Ras-Mnk cascade phosphorylates eIF4E. We show that REN and NCI-H28 mesothelioma cells have constitutive activation of both pathways and maximal translation rate, in the absence of exogenous growth factors. Translation is rapidly abrogated by phosphorylation of eIF2α. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of mTORc1 leads to the complete dephosphorylation of downstream targets, without changes in methionine incorporation. In addition, the combined administration of mTORc1 and MAPK/Mnk inhibitors has no additive effect. The inhibition of both mTORc1 and mTORc2 does not affect the metabolic rate. In spite of this, mTORc1 inhibition reduces eIF4F complex formation, and depresses translocation of TOP mRNAs on polysomes. Downregulation of eIF4E and overexpression of 4E-BP1 induce rapamycin sensitivity, suggesting that disruption of eIF4F complex, due to eIF4E modulation, competes with its recycling to ribosomes. These data suggest the existence of a dynamic equilibrium in which eIF4F is not essential for all mRNAs and is not displaced from translated mRNAs, before recycling to the next.

  10. Polycistronic artificial miRNA-mediated resistance to Wheat dwarf virus in barley is highly efficient at low temperature.

    Kis, András; Tholt, Gergely; Ivanics, Milán; Várallyay, Éva; Jenes, Barnabás; Havelda, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Infection of Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) strains on barley results in dwarf disease, imposing severe economic losses on crop production. As the natural resistance resources against this virus are limited, it is imperative to elaborate a biotechnological approach that will provide effective and safe immunity to a wide range of WDV strains. Because vector insect-mediated WDV infection occurs during cool periods in nature, it is important to identify a technology which is effective at lower temperature. In this study, we designed artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) using a barley miRNA precursor backbone, which target different conservative sequence elements of the WDV strains. Potential amiRNA sequences were selected to minimize the off-target effects and were tested in a transient sensor system in order to select the most effective constructs at low temperature. On the basis of the data obtained, a polycistronic amiRNA precursor construct (VirusBuster171) was built expressing three amiRNAs simultaneously. The construct was transformed into barley under the control of a constitutive promoter. The transgenic lines were kept at 12-15 °C to mimic autumn and spring conditions in which major WDV infection and accumulation take place. We were able to establish a stable barley transgenic line displaying resistance to insect-mediated WDV infection. Our study demonstrates that amiRNA technology can be an efficient tool for the introduction of highly efficient resistance in barley against a DNA virus belonging to the Geminiviridae family, and this resistance is effective at low temperature where the natural insect vector mediates the infection process. PMID:26136043

  11. Adaptive drug resistance mediated by root-nodulation-cell division efflux pumps.

    Daniels, C; Ramos, J L

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major therapeutic problem. Bacteria use the same mechanisms for developing resistance to antibiotics as they do for developing resistance to biocide compounds present in some cleaning and personal care products. Root-nodulation-cell division (RND) family efflux pumps are a common means of multidrug resistance, and induction of their expression can explain the observed cross-resistance found between antibiotics and biocides in laboratory strains. Hence, there is a relationship between the active chemicals used in household products, organic solvents and antibiotics. The widespread use of biocide-containing modern-day household products may promote the development of microbial resistance and, in particular, cross-resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19220351

  12. Modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in K562 leukemic cells by indole-3-carbinol

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major problems in the treatment of cancer. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mdr gene is a highly conserved protein, acts as a multidrug transporter, and has a major role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by naturally occurring compounds is an effective strategy to overcome MDR. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic, and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. In the present investigation, the potential of I3C to modulate P-gp expression was evaluated in vinblastine (VBL)-resistant K562 human leukemic cells. The resistant K562 cells (K562/R10) were found to be cross-resistant to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DXR), and other antineoplastic agents. I3C at a nontoxic dose (10 x 10-3 M) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of VBL time dependently in VBL-resistant human leukemia (K562/R10) cells but had no effect on parent-sensitive cells (K562/S). The Western blot analysis of K 562/R 10 cells showed that I3C downregulates the induced levels of P-gp in resistant cells near to normal levels. The quantitation of immunocytochemically stained K562/R10 cells showed 24%, 48%, and 80% decrease in the levels of P-gp by I3C for 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. The above features thus indicate that I3C could be used as a novel modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and may be effective as a dietary adjuvant in the treatment of MDR cancers

  13. Nuclear hormone receptor DHR96 mediates the resistance to xenobiotics but not the increased lifespan of insulin-mutant Drosophila.

    Afschar, Sonita; Toivonen, Janne M; Hoffmann, Julia Marianne; Tain, Luke Stephen; Wieser, Daniela; Finlayson, Andrew John; Driege, Yasmine; Alic, Nazif; Emran, Sahar; Stinn, Julia; Froehlich, Jenny; Piper, Matthew D; Partridge, Linda

    2016-02-01

    Lifespan of laboratory animals can be increased by genetic, pharmacological, and dietary interventions. Increased expression of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, together with resistance to xenobiotics, are frequent correlates of lifespan extension in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila, and mice. The Green Theory of Aging suggests that this association is causal, with the ability of cells to rid themselves of lipophilic toxins limiting normal lifespan. To test this idea, we experimentally increased resistance of Drosophila to the xenobiotic dichlordiphenyltrichlorethan (DDT), by artificial selection or by transgenic expression of a gene encoding a cytochrome P450. Although both interventions increased DDT resistance, neither increased lifespan. Furthermore, dietary restriction increased lifespan without increasing xenobiotic resistance, confirming that the two traits can be uncoupled. Reduced activity of the insulin/Igf signaling (IIS) pathway increases resistance to xenobiotics and extends lifespan in Drosophila, and can also increase longevity in C. elegans, mice, and possibly humans. We identified a nuclear hormone receptor, DHR96, as an essential mediator of the increased xenobiotic resistance of IIS mutant flies. However, the IIS mutants remained long-lived in the absence of DHR96 and the xenobiotic resistance that it conferred. Thus, in Drosophila IIS mutants, increased xenobiotic resistance and enhanced longevity are not causally connected. The frequent co-occurrence of the two traits may instead have evolved because, in nature, lowered IIS can signal the presence of pathogens. It will be important to determine whether enhanced xenobiotic metabolism is also a correlated, rather than a causal, trait in long-lived mice. PMID:26787908

  14. Nisin resistance of Listeria monocytogenes is increased by exposure to salt stress and is mediated via LiaR.

    Bergholz, Teresa M; Tang, Silin; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2013-09-01

    Growth of Listeria monocytogenes on refrigerated, ready-to-eat food is a significant food safety concern. Natural antimicrobials, such as nisin, can be used to control this pathogen on food, but little is known about how other food-related stresses may impact how the pathogen responds to these compounds. Prior work demonstrated that exposure of L. monocytogenes to salt stress at 7°C led to increased expression of genes involved in nisin resistance, including the response regulator liaR. We hypothesized that exposure to salt stress would increase subsequent resistance to nisin and that LiaR would contribute to increased nisin resistance. Isogenic deletion mutations in liaR were constructed in 7 strains of L. monocytogenes, and strains were exposed to 6% NaCl in brain heart infusion broth and then tested for resistance to nisin (2 mg/ml Nisaplin) at 7°C. For the wild-type strains, exposure to salt significantly increased subsequent nisin resistance (P salt-induced nisin resistance of wild-type strains, ΔliaR strains were significantly more sensitive to nisin (P monocytogenes against subsequent inactivation by nisin. Transcript levels of LiaR-regulated genes were induced by salt stress, and lmo1746 and telA were found to contribute to LiaR-mediated salt-induced nisin resistance. These data suggest that environmental stresses similar to those on foods can influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes to antimicrobials such as nisin, and potential cross-protective effects should be considered when selecting and applying control measures for this pathogen on ready-to-eat foods. PMID:23851083

  15. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteremia in a university hospital in Taiwan, 2001-2015.

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Teng, Ching-Hao; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from bacteremia in Taiwan in 2001-2015. During the study period, 248 (21.2%) of 1171 isolates were identified as levofloxacin-resistant. The results of phylogenetic group analysis showed that 38.7% of the FQ-resistant isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2, 23.4% to group B1, 22.6% to groupA, 14.9% to group D, and 0.4% belonged to group F. FQ-resistant isolates were highly susceptible to cefepime (91.5%), imipenem (96.0%), meropenem (98.8%), amikacin (98.0%), and fosfomycin (99.6%), as determined by the agar dilution method. β-lactamases, including blaTEM (66.1%), blaCMY-2 (16.5%), blaCTX-M (5.2%), blaDHA-1 (1.6%), and blaSHV-12 (1.6%), were found in FQ-resistant isolates. The results of PCR and direct sequencing showed that 37 isolates (14.9%) harbored plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrS1, coexistence of qnrB4 and qnrS1, oqxAB, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were found in 1, 4, 4, 1, 15, and 14 isolates, respectively. PMQR genes were successfully transfered for 11 (29.7%) of the 37 PMQR-harboring isolates by conjugation to E. coli C600. These findings indicate that qnr genes remained rare in E. coli but demonstrate the potential spread of oqxAB and aac(6')-Ib-c in Taiwan. PMID:27573927

  16. Molecular mechanism of the qnrA gene-mediated quionlone resistance in Gram-negative bacteria

    SONG SHENG XIAO; JIAN LU; WEI YUAN WU; CHUANG HONG WU; LI XIA WEN

    2007-01-01

    To explore the prevalence of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene qnrA in Gramnegative bacteria and to investigate its molecular genetic background and resistance profile in isolates harboring this gene, a total of 629 nalidixic acid-resistant isolates of non-repetitive Gram-negative bacteria were collected from clinical specimens between April 2004 and April 2006 and these isolates were screened for qnrA gene by PCR using specific primers combined with DNA sequencing. The extended spectnan β-lactamase (ESBL) or AmpC-producing isolates were distinguished by the phenotypic confirmatory test combined with DNA sequencing, and the antibiotics susceptibility test for qnrA-positive isolates was carried out by Kirby-Bauer and E-test method. To detect the location of the qnrA gene, plasmid conjugation and Southern hybridization were performed and the integron structure containing the qnrA gene was cloned by PCR strategy and sequenced by primer walking. It was demonstrated that the incidence of the qnrA-positive strains in nalidixic acid-resistant bacteria was 1.9% (12/629), in which the detection rates for Klebiesiella pneumoniae. Enterobacter cloacae, Enterobacter aerogenes,Citrobacter freundii and Salmonella choeraesuis were 2.2% (3/138), 17. 1% (6/35), 9. 1%(1/11), 12.5% (1/8), and 14.3% (1/7), respectively. The qnrA gene was found to be embedded in the complex su/1-type integron located on plasmids with varied size (80-180 kb). Among them, 4qnrA-positive isolates carried integron In37 and 8 isolates carried a novel integron, temporarily designated as InX. All the qnrA-positive isolates were ESBL-producing and transferable for the multi-drug resistance. It is concluded that the plasmid-mediated drug-resistance mechanism exists in the quinolone resistant strains of isolates from hospitals in Guangdong area, but the incidence was rather low. Nevertheless, it is still possible that the horizontal transfer of the resistant qnrA gene might lead to the spreading of

  17. Plasmid Mediated Antibiotic and Heavy Metal Resistance in Bacillus Strains Isolated From Soils in Rize, Turkey

    Elif SEVİM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen Bacillus strains which were isolated from soil samples were examined for resistance to 17 different antibiotics (ampicillin, methicillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, cephalotine, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, tobramycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, vancomycin, oxacilin, neomycin, kanamycin and, novabiocin and to 10 different heavy metals (copper, lead, cobalt, chrome, iron, mercury, zinc, nickel, manganese and, cadmium and for the presence of plasmid DNA. A total of eleven strains (67% were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The most common resistance was observed against methicillin and oxacillin. The most resistance strains were found as Bacillus sp. B3 and Bacillus sp. B11. High heavy metal resistance against copper, chromium, zinc, iron and nickel was detected, but mercury and cobalt resistance was not detected, except for 3 strains (B3, B11, and B12 which showed mercury resistance. It has been determined that seven Bacillus strains have plasmids. The isolated plasmids were transformed into the Bacillus subtilis W168 and it was shown that heavy metal and antibiotic resistance determinants were carried on these plasmids. These results showed that there was a correlation between plasmid content and resistance for both antibiotic and heavy metal resistance

  18. HDAC4-regulated STAT1 activation mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    Stronach, Euan A; Alfraidi, Albandri; Rama, Nona; Datler, Christoph; Studd, James B; Agarwal, Roshan; Guney, Tankut G; Gourley, Charlie; Hennessy, Bryan T; Mills, Gordon B; Mai, Antonello; Brown, Robert; Dina, Roberto; Gabra, Hani

    2011-07-01

    Ovarian cancer frequently acquires resistance to platinum chemotherapy, representing a major challenge for improving patient survival. Recent work suggests that resistant clones exist within a larger drug-sensitive cell population prior to chemotherapy, implying that resistance is selected for rather than generated by treatment. We sought to compare clinically derived, intrapatient paired models of initial platinum response and subsequent resistant relapse to define molecular determinants of evolved resistance. Transcriptional analysis of a matched cell line series from three patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer before and after development of clinical platinum resistance (PEO1/PEO4/PEO6, PEA1/PEA2, PEO14/PEO23) identified 91 up- and 126 downregulated genes common to acquired resistance. Significantly enhanced apoptotic response to platinum treatment in resistant cells was observed following knockdown of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 4, FOLR2, PIK3R1, or STAT1 (P < 0.05). Interestingly, HDAC4 and STAT1 were found to physically interact. Acetyl-STAT1 was detected in platinum-sensitive cells but not in HDAC4 overexpressing platinum-resistant cells from the same patient. In resistant cells, STAT1 phosphorylation/nuclear translocation was seen following platinum exposure, whereas silencing of HDAC4 increased acetyl-STAT1 levels, prevented platinum-induced STAT1 activation, and restored cisplatin sensitivity. Conversely, matched sensitive cells were refractory to STAT1 phosphorylation on platinum treatment. Analysis of 16 paired tumor biopsies taken before and after development of clinical platinum resistance showed significantly increased HDAC4 expression in resistant tumors [n = 7 of 16 (44%); P = 0.04]. Therefore, clinical selection of HDAC4-overexpressing tumor cells upon exposure to chemotherapy promotes STAT1 deacetylation and cancer cell survival. Together, our findings identify HDAC4 as a novel, therapeutically tractable target to counter platinum

  19. Rutin-Mediated Priming of Plant Resistance to Three Bacterial Pathogens Initiating the Early SA Signal Pathway.

    Wei Yang

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and have many diverse functions, including UV protection, auxin transport inhibition, allelopathy, flower coloring and insect resistance. Here we show that rutin, a proud member of the flavonoid family, could be functional as an activator to improve plant disease resistances. Three plant species pretreated with 2 mM rutin were found to enhance resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 in rice, tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana respectively. While they were normally propagated on the cultural medium supplemented with 2 mM rutin for those pathogenic bacteria. The enhanced resistance was associated with primed expression of several pathogenesis-related genes. We also demonstrated that the rutin-mediated priming resistance was attenuated in npr1, eds1, eds5, pad4-1, ndr1 mutants, and NahG transgenic Arabidopsis plant, while not in either snc1-11, ein2-5 or jar1 mutants. We concluded that the rutin-priming defense signal was modulated by the salicylic acid (SA-dependent pathway from an early stage upstream of NDR1 and EDS1.

  20. Rutin-Mediated Priming of Plant Resistance to Three Bacterial Pathogens Initiating the Early SA Signal Pathway.

    Yang, Wei; Xu, Xiaonan; Li, Yang; Wang, Yingzi; Li, Ming; Wang, Yong; Ding, Xinhua; Chu, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in the plant kingdom and have many diverse functions, including UV protection, auxin transport inhibition, allelopathy, flower coloring and insect resistance. Here we show that rutin, a proud member of the flavonoid family, could be functional as an activator to improve plant disease resistances. Three plant species pretreated with 2 mM rutin were found to enhance resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, Ralstonia solanacearum, and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 in rice, tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana respectively. While they were normally propagated on the cultural medium supplemented with 2 mM rutin for those pathogenic bacteria. The enhanced resistance was associated with primed expression of several pathogenesis-related genes. We also demonstrated that the rutin-mediated priming resistance was attenuated in npr1, eds1, eds5, pad4-1, ndr1 mutants, and NahG transgenic Arabidopsis plant, while not in either snc1-11, ein2-5 or jar1 mutants. We concluded that the rutin-priming defense signal was modulated by the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent pathway from an early stage upstream of NDR1 and EDS1. PMID:26751786

  1. Aspartyl Protease-Mediated Cleavage of BAG6 Is Necessary for Autophagy and Fungal Resistance in Plants.

    Li, Yurong; Kabbage, Mehdi; Liu, Wende; Dickman, Martin B

    2016-01-01

    The Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family is an evolutionarily conserved group of cochaperones that modulate numerous cellular processes. Previously we found that Arabidopsis thaliana BAG6 is required for basal immunity against the fungal phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea. However, the mechanisms by which BAG6 controls immunity are obscure. Here, we address this important question by determining the molecular mechanisms responsible for BAG6-mediated basal resistance. We show that Arabidopsis BAG6 is cleaved in vivo in a caspase-1-like-dependent manner and via a combination of pull-downs, mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid assays, and chemical genomics, we demonstrate that BAG6 interacts with a C2 GRAM domain protein (BAGP1) and an aspartyl protease (APCB1), both of which are required for BAG6 processing. Furthermore, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy established that BAG6 cleavage triggers autophagy in the host that coincides with disease resistance. Targeted inactivation of BAGP1 or APCB1 results in the blocking of BAG6 processing and loss of resistance. Mutation of the cleavage site blocks cleavage and inhibits autophagy in plants; disease resistance is also compromised. Taken together, these results identify a mechanism that couples an aspartyl protease with a molecular cochaperone to trigger autophagy and plant defense, providing a key link between fungal recognition and the induction of cell death and resistance. PMID:26739014

  2. [Transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with increased resistance to the storage pest obtained by Agrobacterium tumefaciens--mediated].

    Bi, Rui-Ming; Jia, Hai-Yan; Feng, De-Shun; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2006-05-01

    The transgenic wheat of improved resistance to the storage pest was production. We have introduced the cowpea trypsin inhibitor gene (CpTI) into cultured embryonic callus cells of immature embryos of wheat elite line by Agrobacterium-mediated method. Independent plantlets were obtained from the kanamycin-resistant calli after screening. PCR and real time PCR analysis, PCR-Southern and Southern blot hybridization indicated that there were 3 transgenic plants viz. transformed- I, II and III (T- I, T-II and T-III). The transformation frequencies were obviously affected by Agrobacterium concentration, the infection duration and transformation treatment. The segregations of CpTI in the transgenic wheat progenies were not easily to be elucidated, and some transgenic wheat lines (T- I and T-III) showed Mendelian segregations. The determinations of insect resistance to the stored grain insect of wheat viz. the grain moth (Sitotroga cerealella Olivier) indicated that the 3 transgenic wheat progeny seeds moth-resistance was improved significantly. The seed moth-eaten ratio of T- I, T-II, T-III and nontransformed control was 19.8%, 21.9%, 32.9% and 58.3% respectively. 3 transgenic wheat T1 PCR-positive plants revealed that the 3 transgenic lines had excellent agronomic traits. They supplied good germplasm resource of insect-resistance for wheat genetic improvement. PMID:16755923

  3. RNA interference-mediated hTERT inhibition enhances TRAIL-induced apoptosis in resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Zhang, Ru-Gang; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Yang, Liu-Qin; Yang, Shi-Ming; Wang, Rong-Quan; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Peng, Gui-Yong; Fang, Dian-Chun

    2010-04-01

    TRAIL has been reported to induce apoptosis in a variety of tumor cell types including hepato-cellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. However, considerable numbers of HCC cells, especially some highly malignant tumors, show resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The molecular mechanisms that regulate sensitivity versus resistance of tumor cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis remain poorly defined. It has been shown that human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT) is overexpressed in human HCCs. In this study, we investigated the effects and the mechanisms of hTERT RNAi on the TRAIL-induced apoptosis of HCC cells that exhibit resistance to TRAIL. Our results indicate that hTERT RNAi sensitizes TRAIL-resistant HCC cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. hTERT RNAi-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is accompanied up-regulation of procaspases-8 and -9, inhibition of telomerase activity and loss of telomere length. Our results suggest that hTERT RNAi overcame the resistance of the HCC cells against TRAIL, at least in part, via the mitochondrial type II apoptosis pathway and telomerase-dependent pathway. PMID:20204286

  4. Identification of an Acinetobacter baumannii zinc acquisition system that facilitates resistance to calprotectin-mediated zinc sequestration.

    M Indriati Hood

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that accounts for up to 20 percent of infections in intensive care units worldwide. Furthermore, A. baumannii strains have emerged that are resistant to all available antimicrobials. These facts highlight the dire need for new therapeutic strategies to combat this growing public health threat. Given the critical role for transition metals at the pathogen-host interface, interrogating the role for these metals in A. baumannii physiology and pathogenesis could elucidate novel therapeutic strategies. Toward this end, the role for calprotectin- (CP-mediated chelation of manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn in defense against A. baumannii was investigated. These experiments revealed that CP inhibits A. baumannii growth in vitro through chelation of Mn and Zn. Consistent with these in vitro data, Imaging Mass Spectrometry revealed that CP accompanies neutrophil recruitment to the lung and accumulates at foci of infection in a murine model of A. baumannii pneumonia. CP contributes to host survival and control of bacterial replication in the lung and limits dissemination to secondary sites. Using CP as a probe identified an A. baumannii Zn acquisition system that contributes to Zn uptake, enabling this organism to resist CP-mediated metal chelation, which enhances pathogenesis. Moreover, evidence is provided that Zn uptake across the outer membrane is an energy-dependent process in A. baumannii. Finally, it is shown that Zn limitation reverses carbapenem resistance in multidrug resistant A. baumannii underscoring the clinical relevance of these findings. Taken together, these data establish Zn acquisition systems as viable therapeutic targets to combat multidrug resistant A. baumannii infections.

  5. Balance between MKK6 and MKK3 mediates p38 MAPK associated resistance to cisplatin in NSCLC.

    Eva M Galan-Moya

    Full Text Available The p38 MAPK signaling pathway has been proposed as a critical mediator of the therapeutic effect of several antitumor agents, including cisplatin. Here, we found that sensitivity to cisplatin, in a system of 7 non-small cell lung carcinoma derived cell lines, correlated with high levels of MKK6 and marked activation of p38 MAPK. However, knockdown of MKK6 modified neither the response to cisplatin nor the activation of p38 MAPK. Deeper studies showed that resistant cell lines also displayed higher basal levels of MKK3. Interestingly, MKK3 knockdown significantly decreased p38 phosphorylation upon cisplatin exposure and consequently reduced the response to the drug. Indeed, cisplatin poorly activated MKK3 in resistant cells, while in sensitive cell lines MKK3 showed the opposite pattern in response to the drug. Our data also demonstrate that the low levels of MKK6 expressed in resistant cell lines are the consequence of high basal activity of p38 MAPK mediated by the elevated levels of MKK3. This finding supports the existence of a regulatory mechanism between both MAPK kinases through their MAPK. Furthermore, our results were also mirrored in head and neck carcinoma derived cell lines, suggesting our observations boast a potential universal characteristic in cancer resistance of cisplatin. Altogether, our work provides evidence that MKK3 is the major determinant of p38 MAPK activation in response to cisplatin and, hence, the resistance associated with this MAPK. Therefore, these data suggest that the balance between both MKK3 and MKK6 could be a novel mechanism which explains the cellular response to cisplatin.

  6. Ethylene Contributes to maize insect resistance1-Mediated Maize Defense against the Phloem Sap-Sucking Corn Leaf Aphid.

    Louis, Joe; Basu, Saumik; Varsani, Suresh; Castano-Duque, Lina; Jiang, Victoria; Williams, W Paul; Felton, Gary W; Luthe, Dawn S

    2015-09-01

    Signaling networks among multiple phytohormones fine-tune plant defense responses to insect herbivore attack. Previously, it was reported that the synergistic combination of ethylene (ET) and jasmonic acid (JA) was required for accumulation of the maize insect resistance1 (mir1) gene product, a cysteine (Cys) proteinase that is a key defensive protein against chewing insect pests in maize (Zea mays). However, this study suggests that mir1-mediated resistance to corn leaf aphid (CLA; Rhopalosiphum maidis), a phloem sap-sucking insect pest, is independent of JA but regulated by the ET-signaling pathway. Feeding by CLA triggers the rapid accumulation of mir1 transcripts in the resistant maize genotype, Mp708. Furthermore, Mp708 provided elevated levels of antibiosis (limits aphid population)- and antixenosis (deters aphid settling)-mediated resistance to CLA compared with B73 and Tx601 maize susceptible inbred lines. Synthetic diet aphid feeding trial bioassays with recombinant Mir1-Cys Protease demonstrates that Mir1-Cys Protease provides direct toxicity to CLA. Furthermore, foliar feeding by CLA rapidly sends defensive signal(s) to the roots that trigger belowground accumulation of the mir1, signifying a potential role of long-distance signaling in maize defense against the phloem-feeding insects. Collectively, our data indicate that ET-regulated mir1 transcript accumulation, uncoupled from JA, contributed to heightened resistance to CLA in maize. In addition, our results underscore the significance of ET acting as a central node in regulating mir1 expression to different feeding guilds of insect herbivores. PMID:26253737

  7. Effects of halides on plasmid-mediated silver resistance in Escherichia coli

    Gupta, A.; Maynes, M.; Silver, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    1998-12-01

    Silver resistance of sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and resistance plasmid-containing J53(pMG101) was affected by halides in the growth medium. The effects of halides on Ag{sup +} resistance were measured with AgNO{sub 3} and silver sulfadiazine, both on agar and in liquid. Low concentrations of chloride made the differences in MICs between sensitive and resistant strains larger. High concentrations of halides increased the sensitivities of both strains to Ag{sup +}. The purpose of this report is to set out easy-to-use conditions for measuring silver sensitivity and resistance in familiar and widely used media, Luria-Bertani (LB) agar and broth, so as to facilitate wider identification of silver resistance in nature.

  8. ADAM17-Dependent c-MET-STAT3 Signaling Mediates Resistance to MEK Inhibitors in KRAS Mutant Colorectal Cancer

    Sandra Van Schaeybroeck

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no approved targeted therapies for advanced KRAS mutant (KRASMT colorectal cancer (CRC. Using a unique systems biology approach, we identified JAK1/2-dependent activation of STAT3 as the key mediator of resistance to MEK inhibitors in KRASMT CRC in vitro and in vivo. Further analyses identified acute increases in c-MET activity following treatment with MEK inhibitors in KRASMT CRC models, which was demonstrated to promote JAK1/2-STAT3-mediated resistance. Furthermore, activation of c-MET following MEK inhibition was found to be due to inhibition of the ERK-dependent metalloprotease ADAM17, which normally inhibits c-MET signaling by promoting shedding of its endogenous antagonist, soluble “decoy” MET. Most importantly, pharmacological blockade of this resistance pathway with either c-MET or JAK1/2 inhibitors synergistically increased MEK-inhibitor-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in vitro and in vivo in KRASMT models, providing clear rationales for the clinical assessment of these combinations in KRASMT CRC patients.

  9. Cefoxitin resistance mediated by loss of a porin in clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli

    Ananthan S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Porins are outer membrane protein (OMP that form water filled channels that permit the diffusion of small hydrophilic solutes like -lactam antibiotics across the outer membrane. Two major porins that facilitate diffusion of antimicrobials have been described in Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli. The present study was carried out to examine the role of porins among Extended Spectrum -Lactamase (ESBL and AmpC -Lactamase positive strains of Klebsiella spp. and E.coli. METHODS: Preparation of OMP from phenotypically characterized clinical isolates K.pneumoniae and E.coli and the separation of the proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were performed as per a previously described procedure. RESULTS: OMP analysis revealed that cefoxitin and ceftazidime resistance was mediated by loss of a porin Omp K35 in the isolates of K.pneumoniae and E.coli. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of porin mediated resistance mechanism against cefoxitin was observed among the multidrug resistant K.pneumoniae and E.coli.

  10. Identification of a Novel Membrane Transporter Mediating Resistance to Organic Arsenic in Campylobacter jejuni

    Shen, Zhangqi; Luangtongkum, Taradon; Qiang, Zhiyi; Jeon, Byeonghwa; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Qijing

    2014-01-01

    Although bacterial mechanisms involved in the resistance to inorganic arsenic are well understood, the molecular basis for organic arsenic resistance has not been described. Campylobacter jejuni, a major food-borne pathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans, is highly prevalent in poultry and is reportedly resistant to the arsenic compound roxarsone (4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid), which has been used as a feed additive in the poultry industry for growth promotion. In this study, we re...

  11. The cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant on Tn4400 mediates tetracycline degradation as well as tetracycline efflux.

    Park, B. H.; Levy, S. B.

    1988-01-01

    Escherichia coli containing the cryptic tetracycline resistance determinant (class F) from the Bacteroides fragilis transposon Tn4400 on plasmid pGAT400 expressed a detoxification of tetracycline as well as an active efflux of tetracycline. This finding concurs with the report of detoxification for a related tetracycline resistance determinant from B. fragilis on Tn4351 (B. S. Speer and A. Salyers, J. Bacteriol. 170:1423-1429, 1987), which specifies a 10-fold-higher resistance than Tn4400. In...

  12. 16S rRNA Mutation-Mediated Tetracycline Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    Gerrits, Monique; de Zoete, M.R.; Arents, Niek; Kuipers, Ernst; Kusters, Johannes

    2002-01-01

    textabstractMost Helicobacter pylori strains are susceptible to tetracycline, an antibiotic commonly used for the eradication of H. pylori. However, an increase in incidence of tetracycline resistance in H. pylori has recently been reported. Here the mechanism of tetracycline resistance of the first Dutch tetracycline-resistant (Tet(r)) H. pylori isolate (strain 181) is investigated. Twelve genes were selected from the genome sequences of H. pylori strains 26695 and J99 as potential candidate...

  13. Energy-dependent efflux mediated by class L (tetL) tetracycline resistance determinant from streptococci.

    McMurry, L M; Park, B. H.; Burdett, V; Levy, S. B.

    1987-01-01

    The class L (TetL) tetracycline resistance determinant from streptococci specified resistance and an energy-dependent decreased accumulation of tetracycline in both Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. Using E. coli, we showed that the reduced uptake resulted from active efflux. The streptococcal class M determinant, known to render the protein synthesis machinery of S. faecalis resistant to tetracycline inhibition, did not alter tetracycline transport in either host.

  14. Multidrug resistance mediated by a bacterial homolog of the human multidrug transporter MDR1.

    van Veen, Hendrik W.; Venema, Koen; Bolhuis, Henk; Oussenko, Irina; Kok, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Resistance of Lactococcus lactis to cytotoxic compounds shares features with the multidrug resistance phenotype of mammalian tumor cells. Here, we report the gene cloning and functional characterization in Escherichia coli of LmrA, a lactococcal structural and functional homolog of the human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein MDR1. LmrA is a 590-aa polypeptide that has a putative topology of six alpha-helical transmembrane segments in the N-terminal hydrophobic domain, followed by a hydrophi...

  15. Neutralization resistance of virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 Infection is regulated by the gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    Durham, Natasha D; Yewdall, Alice W; Chen, Ping; Lee, Rebecca; Zony, Chati; Robinson, James E; Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can spread efficiently from infected to uninfected T cells through adhesive contacts called virological synapses (VSs). In this process, cell-surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) initiates adhesion and viral transfer into an uninfected recipient cell. Previous studies have found some HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera to be less effective at blocking VS-mediated infection than infection with cell-free virus. Here we employ sensitive flow cytometry-based infection assays to measure the inhibitory potency of HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera against cell-free and VS-mediated infection. To various degrees, anti-Env MAbs exhibited significantly higher 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)s) against VS-mediated infection than cell-free infection. Notably, the MAb 17b, which binds a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope on gp120, displayed a 72-fold reduced efficacy against VS-mediated inocula compared to cell-free inocula. A mutant with truncation mutation in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) which is unable to modulate Env fusogenicity in response to virus particle maturation but which can still engage in cell-to-cell infection was tested for the ability to resist neutralizing antibodies. The ΔCT mutation increased cell surface staining by neutralizing antibodies, significantly enhanced neutralization of VS-mediated infection, and had reduced or no effect on cell-free infection, depending upon the antibody. Our results suggest that the gp41 CT regulates the exposure of key neutralizing epitopes during cell-to-cell infection and plays an important role in immune evasion. Vaccine strategies should consider immunogens that reflect Env conformations exposed on the infected cell surface to enhance protection against VS-mediated HIV-1 spread. PMID:22553332

  16. Emergence of integron borne PER-1 mediated extended spectrum cephalosporin resistance among nosocomial isolates of Gram-negative bacilli

    Anand Prakash Maurya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pseudomonas extended resistant (PER enzymes are rare type of extended-spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs that confer third generation cephalosporin resistance. These are often integron borne and laterally transmitted. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emergence of integron borne cephalosporin resistant PER-1 gene in diverse incompatibility (Inc group plasmids among Gram-negative bacteria. Methods: A total of 613 consecutive, non-duplicate, Gram-negative bacteria of Enterobacteriaceae family and non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from different clinical specimens during a period of 18 months. For amplification and detection of blaPER, multiplex PCR was done. For understanding the genetic environment of blaPER-1, integrase gene PCR and cassette PCR (59 be was performed. Gene transferability experiment was carried out and PCR based replicon typing was performed for incompatibility group typing of plasmids using 18 pairs of primers. An inhibitor based method was used for phenotypic detection of intrinsic resistance. Results: Multiplex PCR and sequencing confirmed that 45 isolates were harbouring blaPER-1. Both class 1 and class 2 integrons were observed among them. Integrase and cassette PCR (59 be PCR results confirmed that the resistant determinant was located within class 1 integron. Transformation and conjugation experiments revealed that PER-1 was laterally transferable and disseminated through diverse Inc plasmid type. Efflux pump mediated carbapenem resistance was observed in all isolates. All isolates belonged to heterogenous groups. Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrates the dissemination of cephalosporins resistant, integron borne blaPER-1 in hospital setting in this part of the country and emphasizes on the rational use of third generation cephalosporins to slow down the expansion of this rare type of ESBL gene.

  17. Emergence of clonally related multidrug resistant Haemophilus influenzae with penicillin-binding protein 3-mediated resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, Norway, 2006 to 2013.

    Skaare, D; Anthonisen, I L; Kahlmeter, G; Matuschek, E; Natås, O B; Steinbakk, M; Sundsfjord, A; Kristiansen, B E

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to cephalosporins in Haemophilus influenzae is usually caused by characteristic alterations in penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3), encoded by the ftsI gene. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins is associated with high-level PBP3-mediated resistance (high-rPBP3), defined by the second stage S385T substitution in addition to a first stage substitution (R517H or N526K). The third stage L389F substitution is present in some high-rPBP3 strains. High-rPBP3 H. influenzae are considered rare outside Japan and Korea. In this study, 30 high-rPBP3 isolates from Norway, collected between 2006 and 2013, were examined by serotyping, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), ftsI sequencing, detection of beta-lactamase genes and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. MICs were interpreted according to clinical breakpoints from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Respiratory isolates predominated (proportion: 24/30). The 30 isolates included one serotype f isolate, while the remaining 29 lacked polysaccharide capsule genes. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (cefixime, 29 isolates/30 isolates; cefepime, 28/30; cefotaxime, 26 /30; ceftaroline, 26/30; ceftriaxone, 14/30), beta-lactamase production (11/30) and co-resistance to non-beta-lactams (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 13/30; tetracycline, 4/30; chloramphenicol, 4/30; ciprofloxacin, 3/30) was frequent. The N526K substitution in PBP3 was present in 23 of 30 isolates; these included a blood isolate which represents the first invasive S385T + N526K isolate reported from Europe. The L389F substitution, present in 16 of 30 isolates, coincided with higher beta-lactam MICs. Non-susceptibility to meropenem was frequent in S385T + L389F + N526K isolates (8/12). All 11 beta-lactamase positive isolates were TEM-1. Five clonal groups of two to 10 isolates with identical MLST-ftsI allelic profiles were observed, including the first reported high-rPBP3

  18. Genetic transfer of non-P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) in somatic cell fusion : Dissection of a compound MDR phenotype

    EIJDEMS, EWHM; BORST, P; JONGSMA, APM; de Jong, Steven; DEVRIES, EGE; VANGROENIGEN, M; VERSANTVOORT, CHM; NIEUWINT, AWM; BAAS, F

    1992-01-01

    A non-P-glycoprotein-mediated mechanism of multidrug resistance (non-Pgp MDR) bas been identified in doxorubicin-selected sublines of the human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines SW-1573. These sublines are cross-resistant to daunorubicin, VP16-213, Vinca alkaloids, colchicine, gramicidin D, a

  19. Enhanced resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in transgenic mice expressing a soluble form of herpesvirus entry mediator

    Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family used as a cellular receptor by virion glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Both human and mouse forms of HVEM can mediate entry of HSV-1 but have no entry activity for pseudorabies virus (PRV). To assess the antiviral potential of HVEM in vivo, three transgenic mouse lines expressing a soluble form of HVEM (HVEMIg) consisting of an extracellular domain of murine HVEM and the Fc portion of human IgG1 were generated. All of the transgenic mouse lines showed marked resistance to HSV-1 infection when the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with HSV-1, but not to PRV infection. The present results demonstrate that HVEMIg is able to exert a significant antiviral effect against HSV-1 infection in vivo

  20. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols prevent palmitate-induced renal epithelial mesenchymal transition by alleviating dipeptidyl peptidase-4-mediated insulin resistance.

    Huang, Chien-Ning; Wang, Chau-Jong; Yang, Yi-Sun; Lin, Chih-Li; Peng, Chiung-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy has a significant socioeconomic impact, but its mechanism is unclear and needs to be examined. Hibiscus sabdariffa polyphenols (HPE) inhibited high glucose-induced angiotensin II receptor-1 (AT-1), thus attenuating renal epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Recently, we reported HPE inhibited dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 (DPP-4, the enzyme degrades type 1 glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1)), which mediated insulin resistance signals leading to EMT. Since free fatty acids can realistically bring about insulin resistance, using the palmitate-stimulated cell model in contrast with type 2 diabetic rats, in this study we examined if insulin resistance causes renal EMT, and the preventive effect of HPE. Our findings reveal that palmitate hindered 30% of glucose uptake. Treatment with 1 mg mL(-1) of HPE and the DPP-4 inhibitor linagliptin completely recovered insulin sensitivity and palmitate-induced signal cascades. HPE inhibited DPP-4 activity without altering the levels of DPP-4 and the GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R). HPE decreased palmitate-induced phosphorylation of Ser307 of insulin receptor substrate-1 (pIRS-1 (S307)), AT-1 and vimentin, while increasing phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (pPI3K). IRS-1 knockdown revealed its essential role in mediating downstream AT-1 and EMT. In type 2 diabetic rats, it suggests that HPE concomitantly decreased the protein levels of DPP-4, AT-1, vimentin, and fibronectin, but reversed the in vivo compensation of GLP-1R. In conclusion, HPE improves insulin sensitivity by attenuating DPP-4 and the downstream signals, thus decreasing AT-1-mediated tubular-interstitial EMT. HPE could be an adjuvant to prevent diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26514092

  1. Comparative analysis of conjugative plasmids mediating gentamicin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Goering, R. V.; Ruff, E A

    1983-01-01

    Five gentamicin-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were found to contain self-transmissible plasmids of 32 to 37 megadaltons in size. Restriction endonuclease digests of the plasmids were markedly similar to those of reference plasmids of unrelated geographical origin, thus suggesting the significant contribution of common conjugal plasmids to the emergence of gentamicin resistance in S. aureus populations.

  2. Counteracting oxidative phosphorylation-mediated resistance of melanomas to MAPK pathway inhibition.

    McQuade, Jennifer L; Vashisht Gopal, Yn

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) induces resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors in melanoma. However, therapeutic targeting of mitochondria is challenging. In a recent study, we showed that inhibition of mTOR kinase activity resensitized resistant melanomas by indirectly inhibiting OxPhos via a novel mechanism. Here, we discuss the implications of these findings. PMID:27308473

  3. Comparative transcript profiling of Lr1- and Lr34-mediated leaf rust resistance in wheat

    Leaf rust caused by the fungus Puccinia triticina is a widespread disease of wheat. Host resistance strategies to control leaf rust have relied upon race-specific and non-race specific leaf rust resistance (Lr) genes. Although race-specific Lr genes are efficient in halting pathogen growth, high lev...

  4. Tetracycline resistance element of pBR322 mediates potassium transport.

    Dosch, D C; Salvacion, F F; Epstein, W

    1984-01-01

    The tetracycline resistance element of plasmid pBR322 partially complements the potassium transport defect of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants having markedly impaired K+ transport. The plasmid increases K+ transport. The Tn10 element does not result in increased transport, demonstrating that the effect is not general for elements that increase resistance to tetracycline.

  5. Symbiont-mediated adaptation by planthoppers and leafhoppers to resistant rice varieties

    Ferrater, J.B.; Jong, de P.W.; Dicke, M.; Chen, Y.H.; Horgan, F.G.

    2013-01-01

    For over 50 years, host plant resistance has been the principal focus of public research to reduce planthopper and leafhopper damage to rice in Asia. Several resistance genes have been identified from native varieties and wild rice species, and some of these have been incorporated into high-yielding

  6. IncA/C Plasmid-Mediated Florfenicol Resistance in the Catfish Pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri

    Florfenicol has recently been approved for the treatment of enteric septicemia of catfish caused by Edwardsiella ictaluri. Here we report the identification of florfenicol resistance in a clinical isolate of E. ictaluri. Resistance in this isolate is associated with a mobile IncA/C plasmid conferrin...

  7. Induction of Interferon Pathways Mediates In Vivo Resistance to Oncolytic Adenovirus

    Liikanen, Ilkka; Monsurrò, Vladia; Ahtiainen, Laura; Raki, Mari; Hakkarainen, Tanja; Diaconu, Iulia; Escutenaire, Sophie; Hemminki, Otto; Dias, João D; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Marzioni, Daniela; Colombatti, Marco; Hemminki, Akseli

    2011-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses are an emerging experimental approach for treatment of tumors refractory to available modalities. Although preclinical results have been promising, and clinical safety has been excellent, it is also apparent that tumors can become virus resistant. The resistance mechanisms acquired by advanced tumors against conventional therapies are increasingly well understood, which has allowed development of countermeasures. To study this in the context of oncolytic adenovirus, we developed two in vivo models of acquired resistance, where initially sensitive tumors eventually gain resistance and relapse. These models were used to investigate the phenomenon on RNA and protein levels using two types of analysis of microarray data, quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Interferon (IFN) signaling pathways were found upregulated and Myxovirus resistance protein A (MxA) expression was identified as a marker correlating with resistance, while transplantation experiments suggested a role for tumor stroma in maintaining resistance. Furthermore, pathway analysis suggested potential therapeutic targets in oncolytic adenovirus-resistant cells. Improved understanding of the antiviral phenotype causing tumor recurrence is of key importance in order to improve treatment of advanced tumors with oncolytic adenoviruses. Given the similarities between mechanisms of action, this finding might be relevant for other oncolytic viruses as well. PMID:21792178

  8. Impact of food animal trade on the spread of mcr-1-mediated colistin resistance, Tunisia, July 2015.

    Grami, Raoudha; Mansour, Wejdene; Mehri, Wahib; Bouallègue, Olfa; Boujaâfar, Noureddine; Madec, Jean-Yves; Haenni, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    We report a high prevalence of MCR-1 and CTX-M-1-producing Escherichia coli in three Tunisian chicken farms. Chickens were imported from France or derived from French imported chicks. The same IncHI2-type plasmid reported to carry those genes in cattle in France and in a food sample in Portugal was found in Tunisian chickens of French origin. This suggests a significant impact of food animal trade on the spread of mcr-1-mediated colistin resistance in Europe. PMID:26940999

  9. Proteolysis of the barley receptor-like protein kinase RPG1 by a proteasome pathway is correlated with Rpg1-mediated stem rust resistance

    Nirmala, Jayaveeramuthu; Dahl, Stephanie; Steffenson, Brian J.; Kannangara, C. Gamini; von Wettstein, Diter; Chen, Xianming; Kleinhofs, Andris

    2007-01-01

    In plants, disease resistance mediated by the gene-for-gene mechanism involves the recognition of specific effector molecules produced by the pathogen either directly or indirectly by the resistance-gene products. This recognition triggers a series of signals, thereby serving as a molecular switch in regulating defense mechanisms by the plants. To understand the mechanism of action of the barley stem rust resistance gene Rpg1, we investigated the fate of the RPG1 protein in response to infect...

  10. Two novel ALK mutations mediate acquired resistance to the next generation ALK inhibitor alectinib

    Katayama, Ryohei; Friboulet, Luc; Koike, Sumie; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Khan, Tahsin M.; Gainor, Justin F.; Iafrate, A. John; Takeuchi, Kengo; Taiji, Makoto; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The first-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib is a standard therapy for patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Several next-generation ALK-TKIs have entered the clinic and have shown promising activity in crizotinib-resistant patients. As patients still relapse even on these next-generation ALK-TKIs, we examined mechanisms of resistance to the next-generation ALK-TKI alectinib and potential strategies to overcome this resistance. Experimental Design We established a cell line model of alectinib resistance, and analyzed a resistant tumor specimen from a patient who had relapsed on alectinib. We developed Ba/F3 models harboring alectinib-resistant ALK mutations and evaluated the potency of other next-generation ALK-TKIs in these models. We tested the antitumor activity of the next-generation ALK-TKI ceritinib in the patient with acquired resistance to alectinib. To elucidate structure-activity-relationships of ALK mutations, we performed computational thermodynamic simulation with MP-CAFEE. Results We identified a novel V1180L gatekeeper mutation from the cell line model and a second novel I1171T mutation from the patient who developed resistance to alectinib. Both ALK mutations conferred resistance to alectinib as well as to crizotinib, but were sensitive to ceritinib and other next-generation ALK-TKIs. Treatment of the patient with ceritinib led to a marked response. Thermodynamics simulation suggests that both mutations lead to distinct structural alterations that decrease the binding affinity with alectinib. Conclusions We have identified two novel ALK mutations arising after alectinib exposure which are sensitive to other next generation ALK-TKIs. The ability of ceritinib to overcome alectinib-resistance mutations suggests a potential role for sequential therapy with multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs. PMID:25228534

  11. Introduction of a rice blight resistance gene, Xa21, into five Chinese rice varieties through an Agrobacterium-mediated system

    2000-01-01

    A cloned gene, Xa21 was transferred into five widely-used Chinese rice varieties through an Agrobacterium-mediated system, and over 110 independent transgenic lines were obtained. PCR and Southern analysis of transgenic plants revealed the integration of the whole Xa21 gene into the host genomes. The integrated Xa21 gene was stably inherited, and segregated in a 3∶1 ratio in the selfed T1 generation when one copy of the gene was integrated in the transformants. Inoculation tests displayed that transgenic T0 plants and Xa21 PCR-positive T1 plants were highly resistant to bacterial blight disease. The selected Xa21 homozygous resistant transgenic lines with desirable qualities may be propagated as new varieties or utilized in hybrid rice breeding.

  12. Salicylic acid is required for Mi-1-mediated resistance of tomato to whitefly Bemisia tabaci, but not for basal defense to this insect pest.

    Rodríguez-Álvarez, C I; López-Climent, M F; Gómez-Cadenas, A; Kaloshian, I; Nombela, G

    2015-10-01

    Plant defense to pests or pathogens involves global changes in gene expression mediated by multiple signaling pathways. A role for the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway in Mi-1-mediated resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to aphids was previously identified and its implication in the resistance to root-knot nematodes is controversial, but the importance of SA in basal and Mi-1-mediated resistance of tomato to whitefly Bemisia tabaci had not been determined. SA levels were measured before and after B. tabaci infestation in susceptible and resistant Mi-1-containing tomatoes, and in plants with the NahG bacterial transgene. Tomato plants of the same genotypes were also screened with B. tabaci (MEAM1 and MED species, before known as B and Q biotypes, respectively). The SA content in all tomato genotypes transiently increased after infestation with B. tabaci albeit at variable levels. Whitefly fecundity or infestation rates on susceptible Moneymaker were not significantly affected by the expression of NahG gene, but the Mi-1-mediated resistance to B. tabaci was lost in VFN NahG plants. Results indicated that whiteflies induce both SA and jasmonic acid accumulation in tomato. However, SA has no role in basal defense of tomato against B. tabaci. In contrast, SA is an important component of the Mi-1-mediated resistance to B. tabaci in tomato. PMID:26032615

  13. Intrinsic caspase-8 activation mediates sensitization of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to erlotinib/cell-cycle inhibitors combination treatment

    Orzáez, M; Guevara, T; Sancho, M; Pérez-Payá, E

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor, as erlotinib, have an established role in treating several cancer types. However, resistance to erlotinib, particularly in breast cancer cell lines, and erlotinib treatment-associated disorders have also been described. Also, methods and combination therapies that could reverse resistance and ameliorate non-desirable effects represent a clinical challenge. Here, we show that the ATP non-competitive CDK2/cyclin A inhibitor NBI1 sensitizes erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to the combination treatment (co-treatment) for apoptosis-mediated cell death. Furthermore, in erlotinib-sensitive cells, the effective dose of erlotinib was lower in the presence of NBI1. The analysis in the breast cancer MDA-MB-468 erlotinib-resistant and in lung cancer A549 cell lines of the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis induced by co-treatment highlighted that the accumulation of DNA defects and depletion of cIAP and XIAP activates the ripoptosome that ultimately activates caspases-8 and -10 and apoptosis. This finding could have significant implications for future treatment strategies in clinical settings. PMID:23096116

  14. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase.

    Sagatova, Alia A; Keniya, Mikhail V; Wilson, Rajni K; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D A; Monk, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  15. Valproic acid reduces insulin-resistance, fat deposition and FOXO1-mediated gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat.

    Khan, Sabbir; Kumar, Sandeep; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidences highlighted the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in insulin-resistance, gluconeogenesis and islet function. HDACs can modulate the expression of various genes, which directly or indirectly affect glucose metabolism. This study was aimed to evaluate the role of valproic acid (VPA) on fat deposition, insulin-resistance and gluconeogenesis in type-2 diabetic rat. Diabetes was developed in Sprague-Dawley rats by the combination of high-fat diet and low dose streptozotocin. VPA at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg/day and metformin (positive control) 150 mg/kg twice daily for 10 weeks were administered by oral gavage. Insulin-resistance, dyslipidemia and glycemia were evaluated by biochemical estimations, while fat accumulation and structural alteration were assessed by histopathology. Protein expression and insulin signaling were evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. VPA treatment significantly reduced the plasma glucose, HbA1c, insulin-resistance, fat deposition in brown adipose tissue, white adipose tissue and liver, which are comparable to metformin treatment. Further, VPA inhibited the gluconeogenesis and glucagon expression as well as restored the histopathological alterations in pancreas and liver. Our findings provide new insights on the anti-diabetic role of VPA in type-2 diabetes mellitus by the modulation of insulin signaling and forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1)-mediated gluconeogenesis. Since VPA is a well established clinical drug, the detailed molecular mechanisms of the present findings can be further investigated for possible clinical use. PMID:26944797

  16. Activation of Multiple ERBB Family Receptors Mediates Glioblastoma Cancer Stem-like Cell Resistance to EGFR-Targeted Inhibition

    Paul A. Clark

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR signaling is strongly implicated in glioblastoma (GBM tumorigenesis. However, molecular agents targeting EGFR have demonstrated minimal efficacy in clinical trials, suggesting the existence of GBM resistance mechanisms. GBM cells with stem-like properties (CSCs are highly efficient at tumor initiation and exhibit therapeutic resistance. In this study, GBMCSC lines showed sphere-forming and tumor initiation capacity after EGF withdrawal from cell culture media, compared with normal neural stem cells that rapidly perished after EGF withdrawal. Compensatory activation of related ERBB family receptors (ERBB2 and ERBB3 was observed in GBM CSCs deprived of EGFR signal (EGF deprivation or cetuximab inhibition, suggesting an intrinsic GBM resistance mechanism for EGFR-targeted therapy. Dual inhibition of EGFR and ERBB2 with lapatinib significantly reduced GBM proliferation in colony formation assays compared to cetuximab-mediated EGFR-specific inhibition. Phosphorylation of downstream ERBB signaling components (AKT, ERK1/2 and GBM CSC proliferation were inhibited by lapatinib. Collectively, these findings show that GBM therapeutic resistance to EGFR inhibitors may be explained by compensatory activation of EGFR-related family members (ERBB2, ERBB3 enabling GBM CSC proliferation, and therefore simultaneous blockade of multiple ERBB family members may be required for more efficacious GBM therapy.

  17. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase

    Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Wilson, Rajni K.; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  18. Possible transfer of plasmid mediated third generation cephalosporin resistance between Escherichia coli and Shigella sonnei in the human gut.

    Rashid, Harunur; Rahman, Mahbubur

    2015-03-01

    Choice of antibiotic for treatment of serious bacterial infection is rapidly diminishing by plasmid mediated transfer of antibiotic resistance. Here, we report a possible horizontal transfer of plasmid carrying third-generation-cephalosporin (TGC) resistance between Escherichia coli and Shigella sonnei. Two different types of colonies were identified in MacConkey agar plate from a faecal specimen collected from a patient with shigellosis. The colonies were identified as E. coli and S. sonnei. Both of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin, azithromycin, nalidixic acid, ceftriaxone, cefixime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime and susceptible to co-amoxiclave, amikacin, imipenam, astreonam, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, mecillinam. These two strains were positive for extended spectrum β-lactamase. We were able to transfer ESBL producing property from both ceftriaxone-resistant isolates to the ceftriaxone susceptible recipient E. coli K12 and S. sonnei. Plasmid profile analysis revealed that the first-generation E. coli K12 and S. sonnei transconjugants harbored a 50MDa R plasmid, as two-parent ESBL-producing S. sonnei and E. coli strains. Similar patterns of ESBL producing plasmid and transferable antimicrobial phenotype suggests that the ESBL producing plasmid might transferred between E. coli and S. sonnei through conjugation in the human gut. PMID:25461693

  19. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir, E-mail: wsol@faf.cuni.cz

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  20. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  1. Viral RNA trafficking is inhibited in replicase-mediated resistant transgenic tobacco plants.

    Nguyen, L; Lucas, W J; Ding, B.; Zaitlin, M

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Turkish Samsun NN) plants expressing a truncated replicase gene sequence from RNA-2 of strain Fny of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) are resistant to systemic CMV disease. This is due to suppression of virus replication and cell-to-cell movement in the inoculated leaves of these plants. In this study, microinjection protocols were used to directly examine cell-to-cell trafficking of CMV viral RNA in these resistant plants. CMV RNA fluorescently labeled wi...

  2. Multi-Drug Resistance Mediated by Class 1 Integrons in Aeromonas Isolated from Farmed Freshwater Animals.

    Deng, Yuting; Wu, Yali; Jiang, Lan; Tan, Aiping; Zhang, Ruiquan; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas is regarded as an important pathogen of freshwater animals but little is known about the genetics of its antimicrobial resistance in Chinese aquaculture. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of integrons and characterize multidrug resistant Aeromonas spp. isolated from diseased farmed freshwater animals. These animal samples included fish, ornamental fish, shrimp, turtles, and amphibians which were collected from 64 farms in Guangdong province of South China. One hundred and twelve Aeromonas spp. isolates were examined for antimicrobial resistance phenotypes and the presence of class 1 integron sequences. Twenty-two (19.6%) of these isolates carried a class 1 integron comprising six different gene insertion cassettes including drfA12-orfF-aadA2, drfA12-orfF, aac(6')-II-bla OXA-21 -cat3, catB3, arr-3, and dfrA17. Among these, drfA12-orfF-aadA2 was the dominant gene cassette array (63.6%, 14/22) and this is the first report of aac(6')-II-bla OXA-21 -cat3 in an Aeromonas hydrophila isolate from a Chinese giant salamander (Andrias davidianus). All the integron-positive strains were resistant to more than five agents and 22 contained other resistance genes including bla CTX-M-3, bla TEM-1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and tetA. All integron-positive isolates also contained mutations in the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDR). Our investigation demonstrates that freshwater animals can serve as a reservoir for pathogenic Aeromonas strains containing multiple drug-resistance integrons. This data suggests that surveillance for antimicrobial resistance of animal origin and a prudent and responsible use of antimicrobials in aquaculture is necessary in these farms. PMID:27379065

  3. Mutations in the 16S rRNA Genes of Helicobacter pylori Mediate Resistance to Tetracycline

    Trieber, Catharine A.; Taylor, Diane E.

    2002-01-01

    Low-cost and rescue treatments for Helicobacter pylori infections involve combinations of several drugs including tetracycline. Resistance to tetracycline has recently emerged in H. pylori. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of two tetracycline-resistant clinical isolates (MIC = 64 μg/ml) were determined and compared to the consensus H. pylori 16S rRNA sequence. One isolate had four nucleotide substitutions, and the other had four substitutions and two deletions. Natural transformation with the 16S ...

  4. Molecular processes as basis for plasmid-mediated bacterial UV-light resistance and mutagenesis

    The increase of UV-resistance and UV-induced mutagenesis by lambda 1 pint intmid as well as molecular-genetic mechanisms of plasmid participation in reparation and DNA replication and its degradation after UV-irradiation in plasmid cells on pKM101 plasmid model have been investigated. Data testifying to the necessity of intmid integration in chromosome as obligatory stage of intmid participation in increasing UV-resistance of bacterial cells are obtained. It has been found that intmid raises UV-resistance of cells and increases respectively the UV-induced reverants efficiency. On the basis of the experiment data the conclusion is drawn that the intmid capacity to raise UV-resistance and, possibly, mutagenesis is bound not only with its integration into chromosome but also with pol A+ chromosome replication by dependendent imtmid replication complex. It is shown that pKM101 plasmid ensures functioning in E coli cells of inducible, chloroamphenicol-resistant DNA replication, highly resistant to UV-light harmful effect and that the volume of excision reparation in E. coli cells carrying pKM101 plasmid is increased as compared with the volume of reparation in plasmid legs cells. The combination of the data obtained gives grounds to the authors to assume that inducible replication, inducible reparation of DNA and inducible decrease of DNA degradation determined by pKM101 plasmid may serve as recA+lexA+ basis dependent increase of UV-resistance and mutagenesis and that these processes provide the possibility of functioning of integrative replication mechanism of plasmid participation in ensuring UV-resistance and mutagenesis of plants

  5. Decreased Skin-Mediated Detoxification Contributes to Oxidative Stress and Insulin Resistance

    Xing-Xing Liu; Chang-Bin Sun; Ting-Tong Yang; Da Li; Chun-Yan Li; Yan-Jie Tian; Ming Guo; Yu Cao; Shi-Sheng Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The skin, the body's largest organ, plays an important role in the biotransformation/detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endogenous toxic substances, but its role in oxidative stress and insulin resistance is unclear. We investigated the relationship between skin detoxification and oxidative stress/insulin resistance by examining burn-induced changes in nicotinamide degradation. Rats were divided into four groups: sham-operated, sham-nicotinamide, burn, and burn-nicotinamide. Ra...

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Transporter Mdr1p-Mediated Uptake of a Novel Antifungal Compound

    Sun, Nuo; Li, Dongmei; Fonzi, William; Xin LI; Zhang, Lixin; Calderone, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The activity of many anti-infectious drugs has been compromised by the evolution of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. For life-threatening fungal infections, such as those caused by Candida albicans, overexpression of MDR1, which encodes an MDR efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), often confers resistance to chemically unrelated substances, including the most commonly used azole antifungals. As the development of new and efficacious antifungals has lagged far behind the ...

  7. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A

    Sylvie eBaucheron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e. in gyrA, gyrB, or parC correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  8. Overcoming ABC transporter-mediated multidrug resistance: Molecular mechanisms and novel therapeutic drug strategies.

    Li, Wen; Zhang, Han; Assaraf, Yehuda G; Zhao, Kun; Xu, Xiaojun; Xie, Jinbing; Yang, Dong-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is a key determinant of cancer chemotherapy failure. One of the major causes of multidrug resistance is the enhanced efflux of drugs by membrane ABC transporters. Targeting ABC transporters projects a promising approach to eliminating or suppressing drug resistance in cancer treatment. To reveal the functional mechanisms of ABC transporters in drug resistance, extensive studies have been conducted from identifying drug binding sites to elucidating structural dynamics. In this review article, we examined the recent crystal structures of ABC proteins to depict the functionally important structural elements, such as domains, conserved motifs, and critical amino acids that are involved in ATP-binding and drug efflux. We inspected the drug-binding sites on ABC proteins and the molecular mechanisms of various substrate interactions with the drug binding pocket. While our continuous battle against drug resistance is far from over, new approaches and technologies have emerged to push forward our frontier. Most recent developments in anti-MDR strategies include P-gp inhibitors, RNA-interference, nano-medicines, and delivering combination strategies. With the advent of the 'Omics' era - genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics - these disciplines play an important role in fighting the battle against chemoresistance by further unraveling the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and shed light on medical therapies that specifically target MDR. PMID:27449595

  9. Optimization by Molecular Fine Tuning of Dihydro-β-agarofuran Sesquiterpenoids as Reversers of P-Glycoprotein-Mediated Multidrug Resistance.

    Callies, Oliver; Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Gamarro, Francisco; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Castanys, Santiago; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2016-03-10

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a crucial role in the development of multidrug resistance (MDR), a major obstacle for successful chemotherapy in cancer. Herein, we report on the development of a natural-product-based library of 81 dihydro-β-agarofuran sesquiterpenes (2-82) by optimization of the lead compound 1. The compound library was evaluated for its ability to inhibit P-gp-mediated daunomycin efflux in MDR cells. Selected analogues were further analyzed for their P-gp inhibition constant, intrinsic toxicity, and potency to reverse daunomycin and vinblastine resistances. Analogues 6, 24, 28, 59, and 66 were identified as having higher potency than compound 1 and verapamil, a first-generation P-gp modulator. SAR analysis revealed the size of the aliphatic chains and presence of nitrogen atoms are important structural characteristics to modulate reversal activity. The present study highlights the potential of these analogues as modulators of P-gp mediated MDR in cancer cells. PMID:26836364

  10. Induction of methotrexate resistance by retroviral-mediated transfer of a mutant dihydrofolate reductase gene

    Methotrexate (MTX), a folate analog which inhibits the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), is an effective antineoplastic drug. However, MTX-induced myelosuppression limits the effectiveness of this agent. Selective induction of MTX resistance in bone marrow stem cells, prior to treatment with MTX, might prevent this toxicity and improve the therapeutic index of the drug. In these studies drug resistance was transferred to mouse and human bone marrow stem cells by retroviral expression vectors containing coding sequences of a mutant DHFR with a decreased affinity for MTX. Three retroviral expression vectors were analyzed. The CIS DR vector contained the mutant DHFR gene inserted into the replication-defective amphotropic 4070 virus, Cistor. The other vectors contained the mutant DHFR inserted into either the env region (SDHT1) or gag-pol region (SDHT2) of a replication-defective spleen focus-forming virus. All three constructs induced approximately a 200-fold resistance to MTX when transfected into NIH3T3 cells. Amphotropic infectious retroviruses were obtained by transfecting the mutant DHFR vectors into a packaging cell line, which supplied the gag, pol, and env proteins for virus production. Virus titers of 4.5 x 103 colony-forming units (CFU)/ml (CIS DR), 1.5 x 104 CFU/ml (SDHT2), and 5 x 105 CFU/ml (SDHT1) were measured by the transfer of MTX resistance to NIH3T3 cells. The amphotropic SDHT1 virus efficiently induced MTX resistance in cells of several species, including mouse NIH3T3 cells (5 x 105 CFU/ml), monkey CV1 cells (4 x 103 CFU/ml), and human MCF-7 cells (6 x 104 CFU/ml). When cocultured with SDHT1 virus-producing cells, both mouse and human bone marrow cells could be infected and rendered resistant to MTX. Mouse cytotoxic T lymphocytes and mouse helper T lymphocytes can also be made resistant to MTX

  11. Reversal of efflux mediated antifungal resistance underlies synergistic activity of two monoterpenes with fluconazole.

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat

    2013-01-23

    Thymol (THY) and carvacrol (CARV), the principal chemical components of thyme oil have long been known for their wide use in medicine due to antimicrobial and disinfectant properties. This study, however, draws attention to a possible synergistic antifungal effect of these monoterpenes with azole antimycotic-fluconazole. Resistance to azoles in Candida albicans involves over-expression of efflux-pump genes MDR1, CDR1, CDR2 or mutations and over-expression of target gene ERG11. The inhibition of drug efflux pumps is considered a feasible strategy to overcome clinical antifungal resistance. To put forward this approach, we investigated the combination effects of these monoterpenes and FLC against 38 clinically obtained FLC-sensitive, and eleven FLC-resistant Candida isolates. Synergism was observed with combinations of THY-FLC and CARV-FLC evaluated by checkerboard microdilution method and nature of the interactions was calculated by FICI. In addition, antifungal activity was assessed using agar-diffusion and time-kill curves. The drug efflux activity was determined using two dyes, Rhodamine6G (R6G) and fluorescent Hoechst 33342. No significant differences were observed in dye uptakes between FLC-susceptible and resistant isolates, incubated in glucose free buffer. However, a significantly higher efflux was recorded in FLC-resistant isolates when glucose was added. Both monoterpenes inhibited efflux by 70-90%, showing their high potency to block drug transporter pumps. Significant differences, in the expression levels of CDR1 and MDR1, induced by monoterpenes revealed reversal of FLC-resistance. The selectively fungicidal characteristics and ability to restore FLC susceptibility in resistant isolates signify a promising candidature of THY and CARV as antifungal agents in combinational treatments for candidiasis. PMID:23111348

  12. Mechanistic Nanotherapeutic Approach Based on siRNA-Mediated DJ-1 Protein Suppression for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    Schumann, Canan; Chan, Stephanie; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Khal, Shannon; Moskal, Vitaliya; Shah, Vidhi; Alani, Adam W G; Taratula, Olena; Taratula, Oleh

    2016-06-01

    We report an efficient therapeutic modality for platinum resistant ovarian cancer based on siRNA-mediated suppression of a multifunctional DJ-1 protein that is responsible for the proliferation, growth, invasion, oxidative stress, and overall survival of various cancers. The developed therapeutic strategy can work alone or in concert with a low dose of the first line chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, to elicit a maximal therapeutic response. To achieve an efficient DJ-1 knockdown, we constructed the polypropylenimine dendrimer-based nanoplatform targeted to LHRH receptors overexpressed on ovarian cancer cells. The quantitative PCR and Western immunoblotting analysis revealed that the delivered DJ-1 siRNA downregulated the expression of targeted mRNA and corresponding protein by more than 80% in various ovarian cancer cells. It was further demonstrated that siRNA-mediated DJ-1 suppression dramatically impaired proliferation, viability, and migration of the employed ovarian cancer cells. Finally, the combinatorial approach led to the most pronounced therapeutic response in all the studied cell lines, outperforming both siRNA-mediated DJ-1 knockdown and cisplatin treatment alone. It is noteworthy that the platinum-resistant cancer cells (A2780/CDDP) with the highest basal level of DJ-1 protein are most susceptible to the developed therapy and this susceptibility declines with decreasing basal levels of DJ-1. Finally, we interrogate the molecular underpinnings of the DJ-1 knockdown effects in the treatment of the ovarian cancer cells. By using various experimental techniques, it was revealed that DJ-1 depletion (1) decreases the activity of the Akt pathway, thereby reducing cellular proliferation and migration and increasing the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin on ovarian cancer cells; (2) enhances the activity of p53 tumor suppressor protein therefore restoring cell cycle arrest functionality and upregulating the Bax-caspase pathway, triggering cell death; and (3

  13. Haemoglobin modulates salicylate and jasmonate/ethylene-mediated resistance mechanisms against pathogens

    Mur, Luis A J; Sivakumaran, Anushen; Mandon, Julien;

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a role in defence against hemibiotrophic pathogens mediated by salicylate (SA) and also necrotrophic pathogens influenced by jasmonate/ethylene (JA/Et). This study examined how NO-oxidizing haemoglobins (Hb) encoded by GLB1, GLB2, and GLB3 in Arabidopsis could influence both...

  14. PROTOPLAST FORMATION AND DNA-MEDIATED TRANSFORMATION OF FUSARIUM-CULMORUM TO HYGROMYCIN-B RESISTANCE

    CURRAGH, HJ; MOOIBROEK, H; WESSELS, JGH; MARCHANT, R; MULLAN, E

    1993-01-01

    This work involved firstly optimizing the protoplast yields for F. culmorum 159026, then setting up a system for DNA-mediated transformation. Higher protoplast yields and more rapid regeneration were obtained when the organic stabilizers sucrose and sorbitol were used rather than NH4Cl. Successful t

  15. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing enhances antiviral response in porcine cells

    Type I interferons (IFN) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the master regulator of IFN transcription. The role of 4EBPs in the negat...

  16. Mechanisms of human insulin resistance and thiazolidinedione-mediated insulin sensitization

    Sears, D. D.; Hsiao, G.; Hsiao, A.; Yu, J. G.; Courtney, C. H.; Ofrecio, J. M.; Chapman, J.; Subramaniam, S.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular and tissue defects associated with insulin resistance are coincident with transcriptional abnormalities and are improved after insulin sensitization with thiazolidinedione (TZD) PPARγ ligands. We characterized 72 human subjects by relating their clinical phenotypes with functional pathway alterations. We transcriptionally profiled 364 biopsies harvested before and after hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, at baseline and after 3-month TZD treatment. We have identified molecular and functional characteristics of insulin resistant subjects and distinctions between TZD treatment responder and nonresponder subjects. Insulin resistant subjects exhibited alterations in skeletal muscle (e.g., glycolytic flux and intramuscular adipocytes) and adipose tissue (e.g., mitochondrial metabolism and inflammation) that improved relative to TZD-induced insulin sensitization. Pre-TZD treatment expression of MLXIP in muscle and HLA-DRB1 in adipose tissue from insulin resistant subjects was linearly predictive of post-TZD insulin sensitization. We have uniquely characterized coordinated cellular and tissue functional pathways that are characteristic of insulin resistance, TZD-induced insulin sensitization, and potential TZD responsiveness. PMID:19841271

  17. Precision microbiome reconstitution restores bile acid mediated resistance to Clostridium difficile

    Buffie, Charlie G.; Bucci, Vanni; Stein, Richard R.; McKenney, Peter T.; Ling, Lilan; Gobourne, Asia; No, Daniel; Liu, Hui; Kinnebrew, Melissa; Viale, Agnes; Littmann, Eric; van den Brink, Marcel R. M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Taur, Ying; Sander, Chris; Cross, Justin R.; Toussaint, Nora C.; Xavier, Joao B.; Pamer, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tracts of mammals are colonized by hundreds of microbial species that contribute to health, including colonization resistance against intestinal pathogens. Many antibiotics destroy intestinal microbial communities and increase susceptibility to intestinal pathogens. Among these, Clostridium difficile, a major cause of antibiotic-induced diarrhoea, greatly increases morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Which intestinal bacteria provide resistance to C. difficile infection and their in vivo inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. Here we correlate loss of specific bacterial taxa with development of infection, by treating mice with different antibiotics that result in distinct microbiota changes and lead to varied susceptibility to C. difficile. Mathematical modelling augmented by analyses of the microbiota of hospitalized patients identifies resistance-associated bacteria common to mice and humans. Using these platforms, we determine that Clostridium scindens, a bile acid 7α-dehydroxylating intestinal bacterium, is associated with resistance to C. difficile infection and, upon administration, enhances resistance to infection in a secondary bile acid dependent fashion. Using a workflow involving mouse models, clinical studies, metagenomic analyses, and mathematical modelling, we identify a probiotic candidate that corrects a clinically relevant microbiome deficiency. These findings have implications for the rational design of targeted antimicrobials as well as microbiome-based diagnostics and therapeutics for individuals at risk of C. difficile infection.

  18. STAT1 pathway mediates amplification of metastatic potential and resistance to therapy.

    Nikolai N Khodarev

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditionally IFN/STAT1 signaling is connected with an anti-viral response and pro-apoptotic tumor-suppressor functions. Emerging functions of a constitutively activated IFN/STAT1 pathway suggest an association with an aggressive tumor phenotype. We hypothesized that tumor clones that constitutively overexpress this pathway are preferentially selected by the host microenvironment due to a resistance to STAT1-dependent cytotoxicity and demonstrate increased metastatic ability combined with increased resistance to genotoxic stress. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report that clones of B16F1 tumors grown in the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice demonstrate variable transcriptional levels of IFN/STAT1 pathway expression. Tumor cells that constitutively overexpress the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1(H genotype are selected by the lung microenvironment. STAT1(H tumor cells also demonstrate resistance to IFN-gamma (IFNgamma, ionizing radiation (IR, and doxorubicin relative to parental B16F1 and low expressors of the IFN/STAT1 pathway (STAT1(L genotype. Stable knockdown of STAT1 reversed the aggressive phenotype and decreased both lung colonization and resistance to genotoxic stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results identify a pathway activated by tumor-stromal interactions thereby selecting for pro-metastatic and therapy-resistant tumor clones. New therapies targeted against the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway may provide an effective strategy to treat or sensitize aggressive tumor clones to conventional cancer therapies and potentially prevent distant organ colonization.

  19. Expression of Aeromonas caviae ST pyruvate dehydrogenase complex components mediate tellurite resistance in Escherichia coli

    Potassium tellurite (K2TeO3) is harmful to most organisms and specific mechanisms explaining its toxicity are not well known to date. We previously reported that the lpdA gene product of the tellurite-resistant environmental isolate Aeromonas caviae ST is involved in the reduction of tellurite to elemental tellurium. In this work, we show that expression of A. caviae ST aceE, aceF, and lpdA genes, encoding pyruvate dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide transacetylase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, respectively, results in tellurite resistance and decreased levels of tellurite-induced superoxide in Escherichia coli. In addition to oxidative damage resulting from tellurite exposure, a metabolic disorder would be simultaneously established in which the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex would represent an intracellular tellurite target. These results allow us to widen our vision regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in bacterial tellurite resistance by correlating tellurite toxicity and key enzymes of aerobic metabolism.

  20. Mediation of herbivore attack and induced resistance by plant vigor and ontogeny

    Santos, Jean Carlos; Fernandes, G. Wilson

    2010-11-01

    A large number of insect galls induced by Contarinia sp. (Cecidomyiidae) on cashew plants, Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae), and induced resistance (hypersensitivity) against galling were observed in five restored different-aged stands in the Amazonian tropical rain forest. We tested three hypotheses: (1) the effect of age-dependent changes on the attack by Contarinia sp. and on induced resistance of A. occidentale to herbivory (plant ontogeny - herbivory hypothesis); (2) the effect of leaf size on the oviposition preference by the gall-midge (plant vigor hypothesis), and (3) whether past attack could influence future attack and induced resistance (attack prediction hypothesis). Tree age positively influenced attack levels and gall density. The leaves of older trees experienced four-fold greater attack and supported two-fold more galls. Hypersensitive response was also positively affected by tree age. This induced resistance was six-fold higher on older trees. Therefore, we suggest that induced resistance in A. occidentale was age-dependent, hence supporting the plant ontogeny - herbivory hypothesis. Higher preference of Contarinia sp. on larger sized leaves of A. occidentale was only observed in old stands, hence providing support for the plant vigor hypothesis. The same trend was observed in hypersensitive response. Only two older plots (5-7-year-old) were better predictors of current attack and resistance of A. occidentale, hence supporting the attack prediction hypothesis. Our results suggest that plant development is an important factor that contributes to the structuring of interactions between host plant and insect herbivores. However, more information about ontogenetic changes and regeneration processes is needed to understand plant-herbivore interactions in the Amazonian forest.

  1. Artesunate induces ROS-mediated apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant T leukemia cells.

    Thomas Efferth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major obstacle for successful cancer treatment often is the development of drug resistance in cancer cells during chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel drugs with improved efficacy against tumor cells and with less toxicity on normal cells. Artesunate (ART, a powerful anti-malarial herbal compound, has been shown to inhibit growth of various tumor cell lines in vitro and of xenografted Kaposi's sarcoma in mice in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ART exerts its cytotoxicity have not been elucidated. The ART-class of anti-malarial compounds is attractive due to their activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax strains. Another salient feature of these compounds is the lack of severe side effects in malaria patients. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used T-cell leukemias as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of ART-induced apoptosis. The most typical anticancer drugs are DNA intercalators such as Doxorubicin. To investigate drug sensitivity and resistance, we chose a Doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cell line and investigated the killing effect of ART on these cells. We show that ART induces apoptosis in leukemic T cells mainly through the mitochondrial pathway via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a mechanism different from Doxorubicin. This is confirmed by the fact that the antioxidant N-Acetyle-Cysteine (NAC could completely block ROS generation and, consequently, inhibited ART-induced apoptosis. Therefore, ART can overcome the Doxorubicin-resistance and induce the Doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cells to undergo apoptosis. We also show that ART can synergize with Doxorubicin to enhance apoptotic cell death in leukemic T cells. This synergistic effect can be largely explained by the fact that ART and Doxorubicin use different killing mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies raise the possibility to develop ART in

  2. Angiogenin mediates androgen-stimulated growth of prostate cancer cells and correlates with castration resistance

    Li, Shuping; Hu, Miaofen G.; Sun, Yeqing; YOSHIOKA, NORIE; IBARAGI, SOICHIRO; Sheng, Jinghao; Sun, Guangjie; Kishimoto, Koji; Hu, Guo-fu

    2013-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a critical effector of prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen-dependent PCa rely on the function of AR for growth and progression. Many castration-resistant PCa continue to depend on AR signaling for survival and growth. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is essential for both androgen-dependent and castration-resistant growth of PCa cells. During androgen-dependent growth of prostate cells, androgen-AR signaling leads to the accumulation of rRNA. However, the...

  3. Overcoming doxorubicin resistance of cancer cells by Cas9-mediated gene disruption

    Jong Seong Ha; Juyoung Byun; Dae-Ro Ahn

    2016-01-01

    In this study, Cas9 system was employed to down-regulate mdr1 gene for overcoming multidrug resistance of cancer cells. Disruption of the MDR1 gene was achieved by delivery of the Cas9-sgRNA plasmid or the Cas9-sgRNA ribonucleoprotein complex using a conventional gene transfection agent and protein transduction domain (PTD). Doxorubicin showed considerable cytotoxicity to the drug-resistant breast cancer cells pre-treated with the RNA-guided endonuclease (RGEN) systems, whereas virtually non-...

  4. Citrate-release-mediated aluminum resistance is coupled to the inducible expression of mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Paraserianthes falcataria.

    Osawa, Hiroki; Kojima, Katsumi

    2006-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) resistance in some leguminous plants is achieved by enhanced citrate release from roots. Enhancement requires several hours for complete activation and is postulated to involve Al-responsive genes or components. We examined the mechanism of Al-induced citrate release by studying the relationship between citrate release and expression of the mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) gene in three leguminous trees. Root elongation in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit was arrested within 24 h by 30 microM Al, whereas root elongation in Paraserianthes falcataria (L.) Neilson and Acacia mangium Willd. was inhibited mangium maintained enhanced release and accumulation of citrate for at least 28 days in response to Al treatment. Aluminum increased the accumulation of mCS transcripts in P. falcataria roots, but not in L. leucocephala roots, and thus up-regulation decreased following removal of Al. Lanthanum did not alter the expression level of mCS. Aluminum increased mCS activity concomitantly with enhanced mCS gene expression in P. falcataria, whereas it did not affect mCS activity in L. leucocephala. Aluminum content in root apices of P. falcataria was increased by cycloheximide, supporting the idea that de novo synthesis of proteins is a prerequisite for Al resistance. Our findings suggest that Al-inducible expression of mCS coupled with enhanced citrate release mediates Al resistance in P. falcataria. PMID:16452070

  5. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation in the entomopathogenic fungus Lecanicillium lecanii and development of benzimidazole fungicide resistant strains.

    Zhang, Yan-Jun; Zhao, Jin-Jin; Xie, Ming; Peng, De-Liang

    2014-10-01

    Lecanicillium lecanii has been used in the biological control of several insects in agricultural practice. Since the gene manipulation tools for this entomopathogenic fungus have not been sufficiently developed, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) in L. lecanii was investigated in this study, using the wild-type isolate FZ9906 as a progenitor strain and the hygromycin B resistance (hph) gene as a selection marker. Furthermore, a field carbendazim-resistant (mrt) gene from Botrytis cinerea was expressed in L. lecanii FZ9906 via the ATMT system. The results revealed that the frequency of transformation surpassed 25transformants/10(6) conidia, most of the putative transformants contained a single copy of T-DNA, and the T-DNA inserts were stably inherited after five generations. All putative transformants had indistinguishable biological characteristics relative to the wild-type strain, excepting two transformants with altered growth habits or virulence. Moreover, the resistance of the putative transformants to carbendazim (MBC) was improved, and the highest one was 380-fold higher than the wild-type strain. In conclusion, ATMT is an effective and suitable system for L. lecanii transformation, and will be a useful tool for the basic and application research of gene functions and gene modifications of this strain. PMID:25107375

  6. Acquisition of Insect-Resistant Transgenic Maize Harboring a Truncated cry1Ah Gene via Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation

    LI Xiu-ying; LANG Zhi-hong; ZHANG Jie; HE Kang-lai; ZHU Li; HUANG Da-fang

    2014-01-01

    A novel insecticidal gene cry1Ah was cloned from Bacillus thuringiensis isolate BT8 previously for plant genetic engineering improvement. Truncated active Cry1Ah toxin has a toxicity level similar to that of the full-length Cry1Ah toxin. In this study, plant expression vector pMhGM harboring truncated cry1Ah gene was transformed into maize (Zea mays L.) immature embryos by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation at which maize alcohol dehydrogenase matrix attachment regions (madMARs) were incorporated on both sides of the gene expression cassette to improve gene expression. A total of 23 PCR positive events were obtained with a transformation efifciency of 5%around. Bioassay results showed that events 1-4 and 1-5 exhibited enhanced resistance to the Asian corn borer (Ostrinia furnacalis). These two events were further conifrmed by molecular analysis. Southern blot suggested that a single copy of the cry1Ah gene was successfully integrated into the maize genome. Western blot and ELISA showed that the foreign gene cry1Ah was expressed stably at high level in maize and could be inherited stably over generations. The results of a bioassay of T1-T4 transgenic maize plants indicated that the transgenic plants were highly toxic to the Asian corn borer and their resistance could be inherited stably from generation to generation. Thus, events 1-4 and 1-5 are good candidates for the breeding of insect-resistant maize.

  7. STAT3-dependent TXNDC17 expression mediates Taxol resistance through inducing autophagy in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Zhang, Zhongde; Wang, Aihua; Li, Hui; Zhi, Hui; Lu, Feng

    2016-06-10

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is one of the taxane class of anticancer drugs as a first-line chemotherapeutic agent against many cancers including colorectal cancer, breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, ovarian cancer and so on. It is verified to induce cytotoxicity in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Numerous novel formulations of Taxol have been remanufactured for better therapeutic effect. Though Taxol works as a common anticancer drug for a long time in clinical practice, drug resistance is a major limitation of its long-term administration. In-depth research on drug resistance is still in progress and researchers have made some achievements, however, the mechanism or key molecule related to Taxol resistance in colorectal cancer still remains to be explored. In the present study, we observed that the high expression of TXNDC17 (thioredoxin domain containing 17) was associated with Taxol resistance in colorectal cancer cells. And TXNDC17 mediated Taxol resistance was related with increased basal autophagy level. Taxol exposure induced high levels of phospho-STAT3 (Tyr 705) and TXNDC17; and increase of basal autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. TXNDC17 overexpression cells obtained Taxol resistance and a high level of autophagy, and it is not surprising that stable downregulation of TXNDC17 accordingly reversed these phenomena. Interestingly, STAT3 could similarly work as TXNDC17 in spite of slighter effect compared to TXNDC17. And it has been proved that phospho-STAT3 (Tyr 705) possesses transcriptional regulation activity through forming dimmers. Many research revealed that transcription factor STAT3 affected more than 1000 gene products, and TXNDC17 is predicted to be a target gene of STAT3 at UCSC database. For the first time, we found STAT3 could bind promoter region of TXNDC17 (-623bp to -58bp relative to the transcription start site (TSS)) for regulating its expression. These results suggest the possibility that TXNDC17 could play an important role

  8. Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4E (eIF4E) and angiogenesis: prognostic markers for breast cancer

    The overexpression of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), a key regulator of protein synthesis, is involved in the malignant progression of human breast cancer. This study investigates the relationship between eIF4E and angiogenesis, as well as their prognostic impact in patients with human breast cancer. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine protein expression of eIF4E, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and CD105 in a set of 122 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary breast cancer tissues. Expression of eIF4E in positive cells was characterized by cytoplasmic staining. Evaluation of VEGF and IL-8 in the same tissue established the angiogenic profiles, while CD105 was used as an indicator of microvessel density (MVD). A significant relationship was found between the level of eIF4E expression and histological grade (P = 0.016). VEGF, IL-8, and MVD were closely related to tumor grade (P = 0.003, P = 0.022, and P < 0.001, respectively) and clinical stage (P = 0.007, P = 0.048, and P < 0.001, respectively). Expression of eIF4E was also significantly correlated with VEGF (P = 0.007), IL-8 (P = 0.007), and MVD (P = 0.006). Patients overexpressing eIF4E had significantly worse overall (P = 0.01) and disease-free survival (P = 0.006). When eIF4E, histological grade, tumor stage, ER, PR, Her-2 status and the levels of VEGF, IL-8, MVD were included in a multivariate Cox regression analysis, eIF4E emerged as an independent prognostic factor for breast cancer (P = 0.001), along with stage (P = 0.005), node status (P = 0.046), and MVD (P = 0.004). These results suggest that higher eIF4E expression correlates with both angiogenesis and vascular invasion of cancer cells, and could therefore serve as a useful histological predictor for less favorable outcome in breast cancer patients, as well as represent a potential therapeutic target

  9. RAS signaling promotes resistance to JAK inhibitors by suppressing BAD-mediated apoptosis

    Winter, Peter S.; Sarosiek, Kristopher A.; Lin, Kevin H.; Meggendorfer, Manja; Schnittger, Susanne; Letai, Anthony; Wood, Kris C.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently have an activating mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). Thus, targeting the pathway mediated by JAK and its downstream substrate, signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT), may yield clinical benefit for patients with MPNs containing the JAK2V617F mutation. Although JAK inhibitor therapy reduces splenomegaly and improves systemic symptoms in patients, this treatment does not appreciably reduce the number of neoplasti...

  10. DEK Is a Poly(ADP-Ribose) Acceptor in Apoptosis and Mediates Resistance to Genotoxic Stress

    Kappes, Ferdinand; Fahrer, Jörg; Khodadoust, Michael A.; Tabbert, Anja; Strasser, Christine; Mor-Vaknin, Nirit; Moreno-Villanueva, María; Bürkle, Alexander; Markovitz, David M; May, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    DEK is a nuclear phosphoprotein implicated in oncogenesis and autoimmunity and a major component of metazoan chromatin. The intracellular cues that control the binding of DEK to DNA and its pleiotropic functions in DNA- and RNA-dependent processes have remained mainly elusive so far. Our recent finding that the phosphorylation status of DEK is altered during death receptor-mediated apoptosis suggested a potential involvement of DEK in stress signaling. In this study, we show that in cells com...