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Sample records for 4d phase-contrast magnetic

  1. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  2. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  3. 4D phase contrast flow imaging for in-stent flow visualization and assessment of stent patency in peripheral vascular stents – A phantom study

    Purpose: 4D phase contrast flow imaging is increasingly used to study the hemodynamics in various vascular territories and pathologies. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and validity of MRI based 4D phase contrast flow imaging for the evaluation of in-stent blood flow in 17 commonly used peripheral stents. Materials and methods: 17 different peripheral stents were implanted into a MR compatible flow phantom. In-stent visibility, maximal velocity and flow visualization were assessed and estimates of in-stent patency obtained from 4D phase contrast flow data sets were compared to a conventional 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) as well as 2D PC flow measurements. Results: In all but 3 of the tested stents time-resolved 3D particle traces could be visualized inside the stent lumen. Quality of 4D flow visualization and CE-MRA images depended on stent type and stent orientation relative to the magnetic field. Compared to the visible lumen area determined by 3D CE-MRA, estimates of lumen patency derived from 4D flow measurements were significantly higher and less dependent on stent type. A higher number of stents could be assessed for in-stent patency by 4D phase contrast flow imaging (n = 14) than by 2D phase contrast flow imaging (n = 10). Conclusions: 4D phase contrast flow imaging in peripheral vascular stents is feasible and appears advantageous over conventional 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography and 2D phase contrast flow imaging. It allows for in-stent flow visualization and flow quantification with varying quality depending on stent type

  4. Automatic Segmentation of Intracranial Arteries in 4-Dimensional Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Spaak, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The development of a highly effective phase-contrast magnetic resonance imag- ing (PC-MRI) technique named phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC-VIPR) has improved the ability to image blood flow in the brain. The technique allows for the acquisition of temporally resolved volume images with high spatial resolution. Utilizing these improvements is of importance for diagnostic and research applications. The aim in this project was to investigate and impleme...

  5. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast.

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. PMID:27085170

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance: is phonocardiogram gating reliable in velocity-encoded phase contrast imaging?

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of phonocardiogram (PCG) gated velocity-encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Flow quantification above the aortic valve was performed in 68 patients by acquiring a retrospectively PCG- and a retrospectively ECG-gated velocity-encoded GE-sequence at 1.5 T. Peak velocity (PV), average velocity (AV), forward volume (FV), reverse volume (RV), net forward volume (NFV), as well as the regurgitant fraction (RF) were assessed for both datasets, as well as for the PCG-gated datasets after compensation for the PCG trigger delay. PCG-gated image acquisition was feasible in 64 patients, ECG-gated in all patients. PCG-gated flow quantification overestimated PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037) and underestimated FV (Δ -4.9 ± 15.7 ml; P = 0.015) and NFV (Δ -4.5 ± 16.5 ml; P = 0.033) compared with ECG-gated imaging. After compensation for the PCG trigger delay, differences were only observed for PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037). Wide limits of agreement between PCG- and ECG-gated flow quantification were observed for all variables (PV: -23.9 to 31.4 cm/s; AV: -4.5 to 3.9 cm/s; FV: -35.6 to 25.9 ml; RV: -8.0 to 7.2 ml; NFV: -36.8 to 27.8 ml; RF: -10.4 to 10.2 %). The present study demonstrates that PCG gating in its current form is not reliable enough for flow quantification based on velocity-encoded phase contrast gradient echo (GE) sequences. (orig.)

  7. Segmentation of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to study the dynamic of perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging allows studying quantitatively the perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. However, the anatomy of the subarachnoid space difficult the segmentation of CSF due to the presence of vascular structures and spinal nerves. The aim of this paper is to describe a semiautomatic segmentation method for the study of the perimedullary CSF dynamics. The process is started with a seed point within the region to analyze. The algorithm creates a correlation map, calculates a threshold value and classifies pixels of CSF combining different temporal characteristics of flow behavior as input attributes to a k-means algorithm. One observer carried out ten times the segmentation of the cervical images in 5 healthy subjects; stroke volume and area were calculated. The variability of the obtained measurements was evaluated as an estimation of the reproducibility of the method. For this the coefficient of variation was calculated. The variability of the measurements was less than 5%. The method facilitates the quantification of perimedullary CSF. Stroke volume and the area at C2C3 space and prepontine cistern were measured in 16 healthy subjects.

  8. Use of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery

    The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (PC-MRA) to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery. PC-MRA was performed in 16 volunteers with no ophthalmic abnormalities and measurement of blood flow based on the results was attempted. It was possible to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery using PC-MRA in all 16 volunteers. The mean (±1 standard deviation) velocity was 9.17±2.28 cm/second, peak systolic velocity was 16.69±3.33 cm/second, and end diastolic velocity was 3.69±2.44 cm/second. The resistivity index was 0.79±0.12, the pulsatility index was 1.49±0.41, and flow was 6.25±2.33 ml/minute. It was possible to identify the ophthalmic artery and a portion of the artery in which blood flow could be measured using MR imaging, a preliminary step to blood flow measurement using MR angiography. In addition to the velocity of blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, measurement of the amount of flow was possible with PC-MRA, which is one advantage of this method. (author)

  9. Measurement of flow velocity by magnetic resonance imaging using 2D phase contrast technique. Estimation of oblique flow

    This study analyzed the effects of the obliqueness of flow on the accuracy of measuring flow velocity by means of the 2D phase contrast MR technique. A constant flow phantom consisting of a pump, a polyethylene tube and a flow meter was assembled. A commercial 1.5 Tesla MR imager was used to perform flow velocity measurements. The phase contrast technique was used to estimate the flow velocity of saline through the phantom. The effects of changes in obliqueness of flow to the plane of imaging were studied. The obliqueness had a significant effect that was more pronounced with increasing section thickness. An increase in the obliqueness angle caused underestimation of the average and maximum velocities. The obliqueness was found to be an important parameter affecting the estimation with the 2D phase contrast MR technique. The application of MR to flow velocity measurement was first described by Singer. Various pulse sequences have been proposed to evaluate the flow velocity by MR. The two main classes of techniques are the time-of-flight method and the phase contrast method. The time-of-flight technique derives its contrast from the flow-related enhancement of inflowing blood. The phase contrast method, on the other hand, is based on applying balanced gradient pulses, and derives its contrast by detecting spin phase differences as blood moves across a magnetic field gradient. The phase contrast technique is not only a simple subtraction of phase images on a pixel by pixel basis but a complex difference of phase obtained with a known different flow encoding gradient. Phase images are collected using balanced gradient pulses to produce a phase shift for moving spins. The difference in phase is directly proportional to the flow velocity of the spins within the corresponding voxels. The phase contrast technique is generally better than the time-of-flight technique for quantitative measurement of flow velocity in cardiovascular an cerebrospinal abnormalities. Advantages

  10. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  11. Baseline correction of phase-contrast images in congenital cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Lai Wyman W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential source of error in phase contrast (PC congenital CMR flow measurements is caused by phase offsets due to local non-compensated eddy currents. Phantom correction of these phase offset errors has been shown to result in more accurate measurements of blood flow in adults with structurally normal hearts. We report the effect of phantom correction on PC flow measurements at a clinical congenital CMR program. Results Flow was measured in the ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery, and right and left pulmonary arteries as clinically indicated, and additional values such as Qp/Qs were derived from these measurements. Phantom correction in our study population of 149 patients resulted in clinically significant changes in 13% to 48% of these phase-contrast measurements in patients with known or suspected heart disease. Overall, 640 measurements or calculated values were analyzed, and clinically significant changes were found in 31%. Larger vessels were associated with greater phase offset errors, with 22% of the changes in PC flow measurements attributed to the size of the vessel measured. In patients with structurally normal hearts, the pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio after phantom correction was closer to 1.0 than before phantom correction. There was no significant difference in the effect of phantom correction for patients with tetralogy of Fallot as compared to the group as a whole. Conclusions Phantom correction often resulted in clinically significant changes in PC blood flow measurements in patients with known or suspected congenital heart disease. In laboratories performing clinical CMR with suspected phase offset errors of significance, the routine use of phantom correction for PC flow measurements should be considered.

  12. Real-time phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of haemodynamics: from phantom to patients

    Traber, Julius; Wurche, Lennart; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Utz, Wolfgang; Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Max-Delbrueck-Centrum and Charite -Medical University Berlin and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Working Group on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Jin, Ning [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Assessment of haemodynamics is crucial in many cardiac diseases. Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) can accurately access it. Arrhythmia is a major limitation in conventional segmented PC-MRI (SEG). A real-time PC-MRI sequence (RT) could overcome this. We validated RT by comparing to SEG. A prototype RT using shared velocity encoding was tested against SEG at 1.5 T in a flow phantom and consecutively included patients with (n = 55) or without (n = 59) aortic valve disease. In patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib, n = 15), only RT was applied. Phantom: PC images were acquired in front of and behind an interchangeable aortic-stenosis-like inlay. Mean velocity and flow were quantified. Patients: PC images were acquired in the ascending aorta, pulmonary trunk and superior caval vein. Peak velocity, stroke volume and regurgitant fraction were quantified. Phantom: Mean velocities (11 ± 1 to 207 ± 10 cm/s) and flow correlated closely between SEG and RT (r ≥ 0.99, ICC ≥ 0.98, p < 0.0005). Patients without AVD or with aortic regurgitation: Concordance of SEG and RT was excellent regarding peak velocities, stroke volumes (r ≥ 0.91, ICC ≥ 0.94, p < 0.0005) and regurgitant fractions (r = 0.95, ICC = 0.95, p < 0.0005). RT was feasible in all patients with Afib. The real-time sequence is accurate compared to conventional segmented PC-MRI. Its applicability in Afib was shown. Real-time PC-MRI might become a valuable tool in arrhythmia. (orig.)

  13. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging reveals net retrograde aqueductal flow in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Ringstad, Geir; Emblem, Kyrre Eeg; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to assess the net aqueductal stroke volume (ASV) and CSF aqueductal flow rate derived from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) in patients with probable idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) before and after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery, and to compare observations with intracranial pressure (ICP) scores. METHODS PC-MRI at the level of the sylvian aqueduct was undertaken in patients undergoing assessment for probable iNPH. Aqueductal flow in the craniocaudal direction was defined as positive, or antegrade flow, and net ASV was calculated by subtracting retrograde from antegrade aqueductal flow. Aqueductal flow rate per minute was calculated by multiplying net ASV by heart rate. During the same hospital admission, clinical examination was performed using NPH score and overnight continuous ICP monitoring. Twelve patients were followed prospectively 12 months after shunt placement with clinical assessment and a second PC-MRI. The study also included 2 healthy controls. RESULTS Among 21 patients examined for iNPH, 17 (81%) received a shunt (shunt group), and 4 were treated conservatively (conservative group). Among the patients with shunts, a clinical improvement was observed in 16 (94%) of the 17. Net ASV was negative in 16 (76%) of 21 patients before shunt placement and in 5 (42%) of 12 patients after shunt placement, and increased from a median of -5 μl (range -175 to 27 μl) to a median of 1 μl (range -61 to 30 μl; p = 0.04). Among the 12 patients with PC-MRI after shunt placement, 11 were shunt responders, and in 9 of these 11 either a reduced magnitude of retrograde aqueductal flow, or a complete reversal from retrograde to antegrade flow, occurred. Net ASV was significantly lower in the shunt group than in the conservative group (p = 0.01). The aqueductal flow rate increased from -0.56 ml/min (range -12.78 to 0.58 ml/min) to 0.06 ml/min (range -4.51 to 1.93 ml/min; p = 0.04) after shunt placement. CONCLUSIONS In

  14. Magnetic properties of 4d transition-metal clusters

    We analyze the stability of magnetic states obtained within the tight-binding model solved by molecular dynamics for cubo-octahedral (fcc) and icosahedral clusters of 3d (Ni and Co) and 4d (Pd, Rh, and Ru) transition metals. The magnetic states are stabilized by the Hund close-quote s rule exchange interaction between the d orbitals. Taking realistic parameters deduced from band structure calculations and spectroscopic data, we obtained saturated ferromagnetism for Ni13, Co13, and Pd13 clusters, while Rh13 fcc and Ru13 clusters are partially magnetic, with an antiferromagnetic orientation of the moments on the central atoms in Ru clusters. Our results for 4d transition-metal clusters agree qualitatively with the recent experimental data and with other calculations. Metastable magnetic clusters were identified in several situations. We found a dependence of the equilibrium lattice constant on the magnetization in the considered clusters which may be explained by the character of wave functions in the cluster electronic structure. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  15. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  16. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic Mass in 4D AdS Gravity

    Araneda, Rene; Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    We provide a fully-covariant expression for the diffeomorphic charge in 4D anti-de Sitter gravity, when the Gauss-Bonnet and Pontryagin terms are added to the action. The couplings of these topological invariants are such that the Weyl tensor and its dual appear in the on-shell variation of the action, and such that the action is stationary for asymptotic (anti) self-dual solutions in the Weyl tensor. In analogy with Euclidean electromagnetism, whenever the self-duality condition is global, both the action and the total charge are identically vanishing. Therefore, for such configurations the magnetic mass equals the Ashtekhar-Magnon-Das definition.

  18. Phase contrast image synthesis

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  19. Phase contrast image synthesis

    Glückstad, J.

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  20. Flow velocity and volume measurement of superior and inferior mesenteric artery with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    The flow velocity and volume of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries (SMA, IMA) were measured with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in five healthy volunteers. Each volunteer was first measured in a fasting state, and then one, two, and three hours after a meal. The average SMA flow volume of the volunteers was 230.3±46.8 ml/min (mean±standard error) during the fasting state, and 714.7±207.7 ml/min, 339.2±85.7 ml/min, and 263.8±21.0 ml/min, respectively, at one, two, and three hours postmeal. The increase at one hour postmeal was statistically significant (p<0.05). The corresponding flow measurements in the IMA were 63.1±11.2 ml/min, 67.6±11.2 ml/min, 57.9±8.6 ml/min, and 53.2±6.8 ml/min. These values do not represent a statistically significant flow volume change in the IMA. In all volunteers, the SMA volumetric flow increased the most one hour after the food challenge (72-400% relative to baseline). Diastolic velocity in the SMA increased significantly one hour postmeal, but systolic velocity did not change significantly. The IMA did not demonstrate a significant change in either systolic or diastolic velocity. The difference between the SMA and IMA in the way of reacting against the food challenge is thought to represent the difference between the requirements of small and large intestine for blood supply after the food challenge. These data demonstrate the possibility of this modality for the assessment of conditions such as chronic mesenteric ischemia. (author)

  1. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels) were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume). The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. (author)

  2. Generalized phase contrast:

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the......Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...

  3. Generalized Phase Contrast

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  4. Aortic valve stenotic area calculation from phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance: the importance of short echo time

    Cowan Brett R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can potentially quantify aortic valve area (AVA in aortic stenosis (AS using a single-slice phase contrast (PC acquisition at valve level: AVA = aortic flow/aortic velocity-time integral (VTI. However, CMR has been shown to underestimate aortic flow in turbulent high velocity jets, due to intra-voxel dephasing. This study investigated the effect of decreasing intra-voxel dephasing by reducing the echo time (TE on AVA estimates in patients with AS. Method 15 patients with moderate or severe AS, were studied with three different TEs (2.8 ms/2.0 ms/1.5 ms, in the main pulmonary artery (MPA, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT and 0 cm/1 cm/2.5 cm above the aortic valve (AoV. PC estimates of stroke volume (SV were compared with CMR left ventricular SV measurements and PC peak velocity, VTI and AVA were compared with Doppler echocardiography. CMR estimates of AVA obtained by direct planimetry from cine acquisitions were also compared with the echoAVA. Results With a TE of 2.8 ms, the mean PC SV was similar to the ventricular SV at the MPA, LVOT and AoV0 cm (by Bland-Altman analysis bias ± 1.96 SD, 1.3 ± 20.2 mL/-6.8 ± 21.9 mL/6.5 ± 50.7 mL respectively, but was significantly lower at AoV1 and AoV2.5 (-29.3 ± 31.2 mL/-21.1 ± 35.7 mL. PC peak velocity and VTI underestimated Doppler echo estimates by approximately 10% with only moderate agreement. Shortening the TE from 2.8 to 1.5 msec improved the agreement between ventricular SV and PC SV at AoV0 cm (6.5 ± 50.7 mL vs 1.5 ± 37.9 mL respectively but did not satisfactorily improve the PC SV estimate at AoV1 cm and AoV2.5 cm. Agreement of CMR AVA with echoAVA was improved at TE 1.5 ms (0.00 ± 0.39 cm2 versus TE 2.8 (0.11 ± 0.81 cm2. The CMR method which agreed best with echoAVA was direct planimetry (-0.03 cm2 ± 0.24 cm2. Conclusion Agreement of CMR AVA at the aortic valve level with echo AVA improves with a reduced TE of 1.5 ms

  5. Magnetic resonance 4D flow analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari I malformation with and without syringomyelia

    To analyse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics in patients with Chiari type I malformation (CM) with and without syringomyelia using 4D magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast (PC) flow imaging. 4D-PC CSF flow data were acquired in 20 patients with CM (12 patients with presyrinx/syrinx). Characteristic 4D-CSF flow patterns were identified. Quantitative CSF flow parameters were assessed at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal and compared with healthy volunteers and between patients with and without syringomyelia. Compared with healthy volunteers, 17 CM patients showed flow abnormalities at the craniocervical junction in the form of heterogeneous flow (n = 3), anterolateral flow jets (n = 14) and flow vortex formation (n = 5), most prevalent in patients with syringomyelia. Peak flow velocities at the craniocervical junction were significantly increased in patients (-15.5 ± 11.3 vs. -4.7 ± 0.7 cm/s in healthy volunteers, P < 0.001). At the level of C1, maximum systolic flow was found to be significantly later in the cardiac cycle in patients (30.8 ± 10.3 vs. 22.7 ± 4.1%, P < 0.05). 4D-PC flow imaging allowed comprehensive analysis of CSF flow in patients with Chiari I malformation. Alterations of CSF hydrodynamics were most pronounced in patients with syringomyelia. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance 4D flow analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari I malformation with and without syringomyelia

    Bunck, Alexander C. [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Kroeger, Jan Robert; Juettner, Alena; Heindel, Walter; Schwindt, Wolfram; Niederstadt, Thomas [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Brentrup, Angela [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Neurosurgery, Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, Barbara [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of General Pediatrics, Muenster (Germany); Crelier, Gerard R. [ETH and University of Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); Martin, Bryn A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Hemodynamics and Cardiovascular Technology, School of Engineering, Interfaculty Institute of Bioengineering, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maintz, David [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    To analyse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics in patients with Chiari type I malformation (CM) with and without syringomyelia using 4D magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast (PC) flow imaging. 4D-PC CSF flow data were acquired in 20 patients with CM (12 patients with presyrinx/syrinx). Characteristic 4D-CSF flow patterns were identified. Quantitative CSF flow parameters were assessed at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal and compared with healthy volunteers and between patients with and without syringomyelia. Compared with healthy volunteers, 17 CM patients showed flow abnormalities at the craniocervical junction in the form of heterogeneous flow (n = 3), anterolateral flow jets (n = 14) and flow vortex formation (n = 5), most prevalent in patients with syringomyelia. Peak flow velocities at the craniocervical junction were significantly increased in patients (-15.5 {+-} 11.3 vs. -4.7 {+-} 0.7 cm/s in healthy volunteers, P < 0.001). At the level of C1, maximum systolic flow was found to be significantly later in the cardiac cycle in patients (30.8 {+-} 10.3 vs. 22.7 {+-} 4.1%, P < 0.05). 4D-PC flow imaging allowed comprehensive analysis of CSF flow in patients with Chiari I malformation. Alterations of CSF hydrodynamics were most pronounced in patients with syringomyelia. (orig.)

  7. Phase Contrast Imaging

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation with a si......The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...

  8. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, F. R. N. C.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; PIEN., J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard...

  9. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, Filipe

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-R...

  10. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  11. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Padmore, H A; Parkinson, D Y; Pien, J; Schirotzek, A; Yang, C; 10.1117/12.861946

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  12. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  13. Magnetic mass in 4D AdS gravity

    Araneda, René; Aros, Rodrigo; Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    We provide a fully covariant expression for the diffeomorphic charge in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter gravity, when the Gauss-Bonnet and Pontryagin terms are added to the action. The couplings of these topological invariants are such that the Weyl tensor and its dual appear in the on-shell variation of the action and such that the action is stationary for asymptotic (anti-)self-dual solutions in the Weyl tensor. In analogy with Euclidean electromagnetism, whenever the self-duality condition is global, both the action and the total charge are identically vanishing. Therefore, for such configurations, the magnetic mass equals the Ashtekhar-Magnon-Das definition.

  14. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3±1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0±3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA

  15. Cerebral blood flow volume measurements of the carotid artery and ipsilateral branches using two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    The optimal velocity encoding of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) in measuring cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) ranges from 60 to 80 cm/s. To verify the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) PC MRA, the present study localized the region of interest at blood vessels of the neck using PC MRA based on three-dimensional time-of-flight sequences, and the velocity encodingwas set to 80 cm/s. Results of the measurements showed that the error rate was 7.0 ± 6.0%in the estimation of BFV in the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery and the ipsilateralcommon carotid artery. There was no significant difference, and a significant correlation in BFV between internal carotid artery + external carotid artery and ipsilateral common carotid artery. Inaddition, the BFV of the common carotid artery was correlated with that of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The main error was attributed to the external carotid artery and its branches. Therefore,after selecting the appropriate scanning parameters and protocols, 2D PC MRA is more accuratein the determination of BFV in the carotid arteries.

  16. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    Heverhagen, J.T. E-mail: heverhag@post.med.uni-marburg.de; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J

    2002-10-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P<0.01; maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.6{+-}0.5 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 81.7{+-}0.6 cm/s). Following Gd-DTPA administration no significant (P>0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3{+-}1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0{+-}3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA.

  17. The Generalised Phase Contrast Method

    Glückstad, Jesper

    An analytic framework and a complete description for the design and optimisation of on-axis centred spatially filtering common path systems are presented. The Generalised Phase Contrast method is derived and introduced as the common denominator for these systems basically extending Zernike......’s original phase contrast scheme into a much wider range of operation and application. It is demonstrated that the Generalised Phase Contrast method can be successfully applied to the interpretation and subsequent optimisation of a number of different, commonly applied spatially filtering architectures...... designs and parameter settings. Finally, a number of original applications facilitated by the parallel light-beam encoding of the Generalised Phase Contrast method are briefly outlined. These include among others, wavefront sensing and generation, advanced usercontrolled optical micro...

  18. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 ± 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P ≥ 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  19. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Frydrychowicz, Alex [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Harloff, Andreas [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Northwestern University, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-15

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 {+-} 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P {>=} 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  20. A non-invasive clinical application of wave intensity analysis based on ultrahigh temporal resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Biglino Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wave intensity analysis, traditionally derived from pressure and velocity data, can be formulated using velocity and area. Flow-velocity and area can both be derived from high-resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC-CMR. In this study, very high temporal resolution PC-CMR data is processed using an integrated and semi-automatic technique to derive wave intensity. Methods Wave intensity was derived in terms of area and velocity changes. These data were directly derived from PC-CMR using a breath-hold spiral sequence accelerated with sensitivity encoding (SENSE. Image processing was integrated in a plug-in for the DICOM viewer OsiriX, including calculations of wave speed and wave intensity. Ascending and descending aortic data from 15 healthy volunteers (30 ± 6 years data were used to test the method for feasibility, and intra- and inter-observer variability. Ascending aortic data were also compared with results from 15 patients with coronary heart disease (61 ± 13 years to assess the clinical usefulness of the method. Results Rapid image acquisition (11 s breath-hold and image processing was feasible in all volunteers. Wave speed was physiological (5.8 ± 1.3 m/s ascending aorta, 5.0 ± 0.7 m/s descending aorta and the wave intensity pattern was consistent with traditionally formulated wave intensity. Wave speed, peak forward compression wave in early systole and peak forward expansion wave in late systole at both locations exhibited overall good intra- and inter-observer variability. Patients with coronary heart disease had higher wave speed (p Conclusion A non-invasive, semi-automated and reproducible method for performing wave intensity analysis is presented. Its application is facilitated by the use of a very high temporal resolution spiral sequence. A formulation of wave intensity based on area change has also been proposed, involving no assumptions about the cross

  1. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBFMRI) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBFMRI measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBFMRI. After validation, we measured RBFMRI in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBFMRI and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBFMRI measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBFMRI compared to RBFHip, whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBFMRI. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  2. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Spithoven, E.M.; Meijer, E.; Boertien, W.E.; Gaillard, C.A.J.M.; Jong, P.E. de; Gansevoort, R.T. [University of Groningen, Department of Nephrology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, RB Groningen (Netherlands); Borns, C.; Kappert, P.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Jagt, E. van der [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vart, P. [University of Groningen, Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBF{sub MRI}) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBF{sub MRI} measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBF{sub MRI}. After validation, we measured RBF{sub MRI} in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBF{sub MRI} and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBF{sub MRI} measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBF{sub MRI} compared to RBF{sub Hip,} whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBF{sub MRI}. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  3. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 μB depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 μB is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d-transition metals (Tc, Ru, Rh, to

  4. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    Al-Zubi, Ali

    2010-12-22

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 {mu}{sub B} depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 {mu}{sub B} is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d

  5. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  6. Atlas-based analysis of 4D flow CMR: Automated vessel segmentation and flow quantification

    Bustamante, Mariana; Petersson, Sven; Eriksson, Jonatan; Alehagen, Urban; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Carlhäll, Carljohan; Ebbers, Tino

    2015-01-01

    Background Flow volume quantification in the great thoracic vessels is used in the assessment of several cardiovascular diseases. Clinically, it is often based on semi-automatic segmentation of a vessel throughout the cardiac cycle in 2D cine phase-contrast Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) images. Three-dimensional (3D), time-resolved phase-contrast CMR with three-directional velocity encoding (4D flow CMR) permits assessment of net flow volumes and flow patterns retrospectively at any...

  7. Use of three-dimensional time-resolved phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging with vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction to assess renal blood flow in a renal cell carcinoma patient treated with sunitinib: a case report

    Takayama, Tatsuya; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masataka; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Ishii, Yasuo; Johnson, Kevin E; Wieben, Oliver; Wakayama, Tetsuya; Sakahara, Harumi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background New imaging modalities to assess the efficacy of drugs that have molecular targets remain under development. Here, we describe for the first time the use of time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to monitor changes in blood supply to a tumor during sunitinib treatment in a patient with localized renal cell carcinoma. Case presentation A 43-year-old Japanese woman with a tumor-bearing but functional single kidney presented at our hospital in July 2...

  8. Quantitative neutron phase contrast tomography

    Conventional neutron radiography and tomography are based on the attenuation contrast induced by the sample. In the last few years, another source of image contrast, the so-called phase contrast, has been introduced. The imaging methods to detect phase changes due to the interaction with the sample improve continuously, and several techniques are established. One method to discover phase shifts is diffraction enhanced imaging using a double-crystal diffractometer. It is described how the refractive index distribution of a sample can be recovered quantitatively in tomographic reconstructions from data achieved by this technique. Using reference samples with a well-known refractive index distribution, high accuracy with deviations of only a few per cent could be found in the reconstructions for all used materials

  9. Normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries measured with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    Correia de Verdier, Maria; Wikstroem, Johan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI)-measured flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries. Highest flow (HF), lowest flow (LF), peak systolic velocity (PSV), and end diastolic velocity (EDV) were measured at two dates in the anterior (ACA), middle (MCA), and posterior (PCA) cerebral arteries of 30 healthy volunteers using two-dimensional PC-MRI at 3 T. Least detectable difference (LDD) was calculated. In the left ACA, HF was (mean (range, LDD)) 126 ml/min (36-312, 59 %), LF 61 ml/min (0-156, 101 %), PSV 64 cm/s (32-141, 67 %), and EDV 35 cm/s (18-55, 42 %); in the right ACA, HF was 154 ml/min (42-246, 49 %), LF 77 ml/min (0-156, 131 %), PSV 75 cm/s (26-161, 82 %), and EDV 39 cm/s (7-59, 67 %). In the left MCA, HF was 235 ml/min (126-372, 35 %), LF 116 ml/min (42-186, 48 %), PSV 90 cm/s (55-183, 39 %), and EDV 46 cm/s (20-66, 28 %); in the right MCA, HF was 238 ml/min (162-342, 44 %), LF 120 ml/min (72-216, 48 %), PSV 88 cm/s (55-141, 35 %), and EDV 45 cm/s (26-67, 23 %). In the left PCA, HF was 108 ml/min (42-168, 54 %), LF 53 ml/min (18-108, 64 %), PSV 50 cm/s (24-77, 63 %), and EDV 28 cm/s (14-40, 45 %); in the right PCA, HF was 98 ml/min (30-162, 49 %), LF 49 ml/min (12-84, 55 %), PSV 47 cm/s (27-88, 59 %), and EDV 27 cm/s (16-41, 45 %). PC-MRI-measured flow and velocity parameters in the main intracranial arteries have large normal ranges. Reproducibility is highest in MCA. (orig.)

  10. Minimally-destructive Partial Phase Contrast Imaging

    Wigley, Paul; Hardman, Kyle; Sooriyabandara, Mahasen; Perumbil, Manju; Close, John; Robins, Nicholas; Kuhn, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a minimally-destructive imaging technique based on a combination of phase contrast and Faraday rotation imaging used to continuously observe a condensate of 85 Rb. We demonstrate that the technique is capable of imaging a small sample of only 10 4 atoms up to 100 times with negligible decreases in atom number and no observable heating. At approximately 1GHz detuning, the SNR remains at approximately 7 for all 100 images, with a 22ms TOF absorption image confirming the survival of the condensate. The splitting of the magnetic sublevels of this species at such fields show non-trivial selection rules. We present experimental data outlining particular allowed transitions in this regime.

  11. Non-collinear magnetic order and spin–orbit coupling effect in 4d transition metal monatomic chains

    Using density functional theory, the structures, stabilities and magnetic properties of 4d transition metals monatomic chains are systematically investigated. We found that the ground states of Y and Pd zigzag chains possess non-collinear magnetisms. Further investigation shows that such novel non-collinear magnetic phases arise from enhanced metallic bond. In addition, for Ru zigzag chain, the ground state of the chain changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic after dimerization, indicating that Peierls distortion could also cause magnetic transition in actual one-dimensional system. Finally, we found that the orbital magnetic moments are very significant in some 4d systems. Specially, strong spin–orbit coupling was observed in two non-collinear magnetic zigzag chains. - Highlights: • The magnetic orders of ground states of Y and Pd zigzag chains are non-collinear states. • The enhanced metallic bond is the physical origin of the non-collinear magnetic chains. • The magnetic order of ground state of Ru chain is antiferromagnetic state. • The magnetic phase transition is caused by dimerization in the Ru zigzag chain. • There exists a strong spin–orbit coupling interaction in non-collinear magnetic systems

  12. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 ± 0.1 vs. 2.88 ± 0.1 (before) and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.83 ± 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 ± 0.43 and 2.81 ± 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 ± 6.6 vs. 140.8 ± 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 ± 25.4 vs. 466.3 ± 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  13. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    Johannes Salamon; Martin Hofmann; Caroline Jung; Michael Gerhard Kaul; Franziska Werner; Kolja Them; Rudolph Reimer; Peter Nielsen; Annika Vom Scheidt; Gerhard Adam; Tobias Knopp; Harald Ittrich

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superp...

  14. Polychromatic phase-contrast computed tomography

    Polychromatic phase-contrast radiography differs from traditional (absorption-only) radiography in that the method requires at least a partially coherent x-ray source and the resulting images contain information about the phase shifts of x-rays in addition to the traditional absorption information. In a typical embodiment, this effect results in a measurable enhancement in image contrast at the edges of objects. In this study, a phase-contrast imaging system was adapted to allow an object to be imaged at multiple projections, and these projections were used to generate phase-contrast computed tomography images. The images obtained with this technique show edge enhancements surrounding the objects within the image

  15. Phase-contrast and holographic computed laminography

    In-line phase contrast is combined with laminography to image in three dimensions regions of interest in laterally extended flat specimens of weak absorption contrast. The principle of the method and a theoretical description of the imaging process are outlined. The present instrumental implementation enables reconstructing nondestructively the internal structure at different lateral specimen positions with micron resolution. The feasibility and application potential are demonstrated for both phase-contrast and holographic (i.e., using phase retrieval) laminography by the three-dimensional imaging of fuel-cell diffusion layers

  16. Phase-contrast and holographic computed laminography

    Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T.; Cloetens, P.; Baruchel, J.

    2009-03-01

    In-line phase contrast is combined with laminography to image in three dimensions regions of interest in laterally extended flat specimens of weak absorption contrast. The principle of the method and a theoretical description of the imaging process are outlined. The present instrumental implementation enables reconstructing nondestructively the internal structure at different lateral specimen positions with micron resolution. The feasibility and application potential are demonstrated for both phase-contrast and holographic (i.e., using phase retrieval) laminography by the three-dimensional imaging of fuel-cell diffusion layers.

  17. The Electronic and Magnetic Properties of FCC Iron Clusters in FCC 4D Metals

    The electronic and magnetic structures of small FCC iron clusters in FCC Rh, Pd and Ag were calculated using the discrete variational method as a function of cluster size and lattice relaxation. It was found that unrelaxed iron clusters, remain ferromagnetic as the cluster sizes increase, while for relaxed clusters antiferromagnetism develops as the size increases depending on the host metal. For iron in Rh the magnetic structure changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic for clusters as small as 13 Fe atoms, whereas for Fe in Ag antiferromagnetism is exhibited for clusters of 24 Fe atoms. On the hand, for Fe in Pd the transition from ferromagnetism to antiferromagnetism occurs for clusters as large as 42 Fe atoms. The difference in the magnetic trends of these Fe clusters is related to the electronic properties of the underlying metallic matrix. The local d densities of states, the magnetic moments and hyperfine parameters are calculated in the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic regions. In addition, the average local moment in iron-palladium alloys is calculated and compared to experimental results.

  18. The Electronic and Magnetic Properties of FCC Iron Clusters in FCC 4D Metals

    Elzain, M. E., E-mail: elzain@squ.edu.om; Yousif, A. A.; Rawas, A. D. Al; Gismelseed, A. M.; Widatallah, H.; Bouziani, K.; Al-Omari, I. [Sultan Qaboos University, Department of Physics, College of Science (Oman)

    2005-07-15

    The electronic and magnetic structures of small FCC iron clusters in FCC Rh, Pd and Ag were calculated using the discrete variational method as a function of cluster size and lattice relaxation. It was found that unrelaxed iron clusters, remain ferromagnetic as the cluster sizes increase, while for relaxed clusters antiferromagnetism develops as the size increases depending on the host metal. For iron in Rh the magnetic structure changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic for clusters as small as 13 Fe atoms, whereas for Fe in Ag antiferromagnetism is exhibited for clusters of 24 Fe atoms. On the hand, for Fe in Pd the transition from ferromagnetism to antiferromagnetism occurs for clusters as large as 42 Fe atoms. The difference in the magnetic trends of these Fe clusters is related to the electronic properties of the underlying metallic matrix. The local d densities of states, the magnetic moments and hyperfine parameters are calculated in the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic regions. In addition, the average local moment in iron-palladium alloys is calculated and compared to experimental results.

  19. Laser projection using generalized phase contrast

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Rodrigo, Peter John;

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate experimental laser projection of a gray-level photographic image with 74% light efficiency using the generalized phase contrast (GPC) method. In contrast with a previously proposed technique [Alonzo et al., New J. Phys. 9, 132 (2007)], a new approach to image construction via GPC...

  20. Magnetism of iron in face-centered cubic 4d metals

    Elzain, M.; Al Rawas, A.; Yousif, A.; Gismelseed, A.; Rais, A.; Al Omari, I.; Widatallah, H. [Physics Department, College of Science, Box 36, Sultan Qaboos University, Al Khod 123 (Oman)

    2004-05-01

    The magnetic moments and hyperfine fields at iron sites embedded in Rh, Pd and Ag face centered cubic structures were calculated using the first principle discrete variational method (DVM) and the full-potential linear-augment plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. In DVM the systems were represented by, clusters of atoms, while in FP-LAPW supercells were used. The objectives of this work are to compare and contrast results from the two different computational methods in addition to comparison to experimental data. Large magnetic moments were obtained for iron in Pd, relatively smaller moments for iron in Ag and smaller moments for iron in Rh. Iron atoms were found to couple ferromagnetically to Pd atoms and antiferromagnetically to Rh. No moment is induced on the Ag atom. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Multiscale differential phase contrast analysis with a unitary detector

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2015-12-30

    A new approach to generate differential phase contrast (DPC) images for the visualization and quantification of local magnetic fields in a wide range of modern nano materials is reported. In contrast to conventional DPC methods our technique utilizes the idea of a unitary detector under bright field conditions, making it immediately usable by a majority of modern transmission electron microscopes. The approach is put on test to characterize the local magnetization of cylindrical nanowires and their 3D ordered arrays, revealing high sensitivity of our method in a combination with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

  2. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures

  3. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  4. Quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope

    Liu, Changgeng; Marchesini, Stefano; Kim, Myung K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope (QPCCM) by combining a line-scanning confocal system with digital holography (DH). This combination can merge the merits of these two different imaging modalities. High-contrast intensity images with low coherent noise, and the optical sectioning capability are made available due to the confocality. Phase profiles of the samples become accessible thanks to DH. QPCCM is able to quantitatively measure the phase variations of optical s...

  5. Structural, elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of 4d perovskite CaTcO3: a DFT+U investigation

    Zhang, Wei; Tong, Peiqing

    2012-05-01

    The structural, elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of 4d high Neél temperature perovskite (Pv) CaTcO3 have been studied using density functional theory plus the Hubbard U (DFT+U) method. The degree of correlations of CaTcO3 is determined with a reasonable value of U. The compound is found to be an indirect band gap semiconductor with G-type antiferromagnetic ordering and large superexchange interactions. Large anisotropic compression behavior is found that is much alike the case of Pv CaIrO3 reported by recent high pressure experiment. The b and c axes decrease linearly with pressure whereas the a axis nearly keeps constant and even slightly expands after ˜23 GPa. Finally, we predict the single crystal elastic constants and investigate the polycrystalline elastic properties.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in fetal anomalies: What does it add to 3D and 4D US?

    Behairy, Noha H. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: noha_behairy@yahoo.com; Talaat, Soha; Saleem, Sahar N. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Raouf, Maged Abd [Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: The objective of our study is to evaluate the contribution of adding MRI findings to sonographic data when assessing fetal anomalies and to determine how this addition may affect the management of pregnancy. Study design: We prospectively examined 26 fetuses who had sonographically suspected congenital anomalies over a period of 1 year. 2D/3D and 4D ultrasound, Doppler and magnetic resonant imaging was done for all patients. MRI was done within 1 week following US examination. The maternal age range was 18-39 years. The gestational age range was 15-38 weeks (mean age = 29 weeks). Ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings were compared together. Results: We reported different types of congenital anomalies including eight cases of isolated central nervous system anomalies, four abdominal, five musculoskeletal anomalies, seven cases of renal anomalies and two cases of Meckel Gruber syndrome. MRI and sonography showed concordant findings in 18 cases. MRI changed the diagnosis in five cases and provided additional information in three cases. Ultrasound was superior to magnetic resonance imaging in three cases. Conclusion: Our results showed that fetal MR imaging can be used as a complementary modality to US in diagnosing fetal abnormality in which US findings are inconclusive or equivocal.

  7. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  8. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Results Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. Conclusions 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions. PMID:27249022

  9. Complex trend of magnetic order in Fe clusters on 4d transition-metal surfaces. I. Experimental evidence and Monte Carlo simulations

    Sessi, V.; Otte, F.; Krotzky, S.; Tieg, C.; Wasniowska, M.; Ferriani, P.; Heinze, S.; Honolka, Jan; Kern, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 20 (2014), "205425-1"-"205425-6". ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron atoms on 4d metal surfaces * surface magnetism * complex spin order * indirect exchange interactions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  10. Nonlinear phase contrast using a bacteriorhodopsin film

    Iturbe Castillo, Marcelo D.; Sanchez-de-la-Llave, J. D.; Ramos Garcia, Ruben; Tepichin-Rodriguez, Eduardo; Olivos-Perez, L. I.

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel phase contrast system that employs a BR film. Since the filter is optically induced by the Fourier transform of the phase object, no alignment is necessary at the filter plane making it extremely robust. Due to the optical properties of BR films the phase filter can be induced with low light intensity levels. The material response allows operation at video frame rates, processing of high spatial resolution objects, and the use of relatively inexpensive laser sources. Such characteristics and the fact that BR films can be produced at a low cost makes the system simple to implement, relatively inexpensive and extremely robust. The effects of varying the illuminating area beyond the phase object area and filter saturation are also analyzed.

  11. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  12. X-ray phase contrast image simulation

    A deterministic algorithm is proposed to simulate phase contrast (PC) X-ray images for complex three-dimensional (3D) objects. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named VXI (virtual X-ray imaging). The physical model chosen to account for PC technique is based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The algorithm consists mainly of two parts. The first one exploits the VXI ray-tracing approach to compute the object transmission function. The second part simulates the PC image due to the wave front distortion introduced by the sample. In the first part, the use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex 3D objects. Differently from the VXI original version, which makes use of an object description via triangular facets, the new code requires a more 'sophisticated' object representation based on non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS). As a first step we produce a spatial high resolution image by using a point and monochromatic source and an ideal detector. To simulate the polychromatic case, the intensity image is integrated over the considered X-ray energy spectrum. Then, in order to account for the system spatial resolution properties, the high spatial resolution image (mono or polychromatic) is convolved with the total point spread function of the imaging system under consideration. The results supplied by the proposed algorithm are examined with the help of some relevant examples

  13. Image Fusion Algorithm for Differential Phase Contrast Imaging

    Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; Van Stevendaal, U.; Hauser, N.; Wang, Z.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary pieces of information: the attenuation,the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, related to the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angle

  14. Phase-contrast radiography with a polychromatic neutron beam

    The phase-contrast imaging is based not only on the absorption contrast like in the conventional radiography but also on the contributions of the phase shifts induced by the propagation of a coherent radiation through the investigated sample. The strong phase changes on the borders between two media can be observed as sharp intensity variations on the radiography image. So the phase-contrast method is an edge-enhancement method which allows to visualize very fine structures where the conventional radiography provides unsatisfactory results. For the aims of the phase-contrast imaging a radiation with a high spatial but not necessarily chromatic coherence is required. In this way phase-contrast radiography experiments with a polychromatic thermal neutron beam possessing a high spatial transversal coherence can be performed. The reported results show that the developed phase-contrast neutron radiography can be used as a standard non-destructive investigation method

  15. Phase contrast imaging diagnostic for Wendelstein 7-X

    The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic allows non-invasive measurements of density fluctuations in high temperature plasmas. The index of refraction in a plasma depends approximately linearly on its density. Therefore an incoming probing laser beam is shifted in phase by the density fluctuations. This phase shift information can be translated into intensity variations by interference after a phase plate. In general the signal contains only the line-integrated information along the beam path. This limitation can be overcome by the fact that the density fluctuations form filament structures well aligned with the local magnetic field. If the pitch angle of the magnetic field varies significantly along the beam path, optical filtering allows for localization of the density fluctuations. First estimates show that a resolution of about 15 cm in W7-X can be achieved, which will allow for a clear separation of edge and core fluctuations. The process of integration starts with the development of a virtual diagnostic revealing the specific behaviour of the PCI diagnostic at W7-X for standard operation scenarios. In this contribution first results of these investigations are presented.

  16. Phase contrast imaging diagnostic for Wendelstein 7-X

    Boettger, Lukas-Georg [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic allows non-invasive measurements of density fluctuations in high temperature plasmas. The index of refraction in a plasma depends approximately linearly on its density. Therefore an incoming probing laser beam is shifted in phase by the density fluctuations. This phase shift information can be translated into intensity variations by interference after a phase plate. In general the signal contains only the line-integrated information along the beam path. This limitation can be overcome by the fact that the density fluctuations form filament structures well aligned with the local magnetic field. If the pitch angle of the magnetic field varies significantly along the beam path, optical filtering allows for localization of the density fluctuations. First estimates show that a resolution of about 15 cm in W7-X can be achieved, which will allow for a clear separation of edge and core fluctuations. The process of integration starts with the development of a virtual diagnostic revealing the specific behaviour of the PCI diagnostic at W7-X for standard operation scenarios. In this contribution first results of these investigations are presented.

  17. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  18. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are descri...

  19. Nanometer size 3d–4d and 3d–5d substitutional clusters: Promising candidates for magnetic storageapplications

    Habeeb Mokkath, Junais

    2013-05-01

    Spin-polarized density-functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have been performed for FemRhn and FemPtn clusters having N=m+n,N≤19 atoms. The spin magnetic moments, orbital magnetic moments, and the magnetic anisotropy energies have been determined. A significant enhancement of magnetic anisotropy energies is found by the substitutional nanoalloying of Fe with Rh and Pt atoms. We obtained a remarkable non-monotonous dependence of the MAE as a function of Fe content, i.e., upon going from pure Fe to pure Rh and Pt. The substitutional nanoalloying boost the magnetic anisotropy energies by creating significant cluster symmetry lowerings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Larkin, Kieran G

    2016-08-21

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required. PMID:27436750

  1. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  2. NiftyFit: a Software Package for Multi-parametric Model-Fitting of 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Melbourne, Andrew; Toussaint, Nicolas; Owen, David; Simpson, Ivor; Anthopoulos, Thanasis; De Vita, Enrico; Atkinson, David; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modal, multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging is becoming an increasingly sophisticated tool for neuroimaging. The relationships between parameters estimated from different individual MR modalities have the potential to transform our understanding of brain function, structure, development and disease. This article describes a new software package for such multi-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging that provides a unified model-fitting framework. We describe model-fitting functionality for Arterial Spin Labeled MRI, T1 Relaxometry, T2 relaxometry and Diffusion Weighted imaging, providing command line documentation to generate the figures in the manuscript. Software and data (using the nifti file format) used in this article are simultaneously provided for download. We also present some extended applications of the joint model fitting framework applied to diffusion weighted imaging and T2 relaxometry, in order to both improve parameter estimation in these models and generate new parameters that link different MR modalities. NiftyFit is intended as a clear and open-source educational release so that the user may adapt and develop their own functionality as they require. PMID:26972806

  3. X-ray phase-contrast imaging: the quantum perspective

    Time-resolved phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-ray sources is an emerging method to investigate ultrafast dynamical processes in matter. Schemes to generate attosecond x-ray pulses have been proposed, bringing electronic timescales into reach and emphasizing the demand for a quantum description. In this paper, we present a method to describe propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. We explain why the standard scattering treatment via Fermi’s golden rule cannot be applied. Instead, the quantum electrodynamical treatment of phase-contrast imaging must be based on a different approach. It turns out that it is essential to select a suitable observable. Here, we choose the quantum-mechanical Poynting operator. We determine the expectation value of our observable and demonstrate that the leading order term describes phase-contrast imaging. It recovers the classical expression of phase-contrast imaging. Thus, it makes the instantaneous electron density of non-stationary electronic states accessible to time-resolved imaging. Interestingly, inelastic (Compton) scattering does automatically not contribute in leading order, explaining the success of the semiclassical description. (paper)

  4. Adaptative segmentation for phase-contrast X-Ray imaging

    A set-up for X-Ray Imaging was mounted using a micro source X-ray generator, a Shad-O Box detector and a X-ray Imaging Plate System. We implemented the in-line phase contrast technique in our laboratory. Phase contrast imaging is an emerging X-ray imaging technique capable of improving the conspicuity of fine detail in an image, including some detail which are not visible with conventional techniques. The application of phase contrast imaging techniques to medical diagnostics (e.g. mammography) and the new segmentation adaptative algorithms based in entropy has opened new horizons for X-ray based imaging. The ROI (Region Of Interest) extraction is an important step in de X-ray imaging processing, because it reduces the computational cost. The classical spatial filters used in image segmentation show different results when the dimension of an image changes, this implies modifying the algorithm and it takes longer. The phase contrast technique shows better detail information. In order to avoid different results on images with variable dimensions, we used the non extensive systems concept applied to images through Tsallis entropy that assumes subsets of probabilities for different regions in the X-ray image. The ROI extraction based on Tsallis entropy and phase contrast X-ray images offers high quality region extraction and therefore more accurate diagnoses

  5. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  6. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  7. Bi-directional x-ray phase-contrast mammography.

    Kai Scherer

    Full Text Available Phase-contrast x-ray imaging is a promising improvement of conventional absorption-based mammography for early tumor detection. This potential has been demonstrated recently, utilizing structured gratings to obtain differential phase and dark-field scattering images. However, the inherently anisotropic imaging sensitivity of the proposed mono-directional approach yields only insufficient diagnostic information, and has low diagnostic sensitivity to highly oriented structures. To overcome these limitations, we present a two-directional x-ray phase-contrast mammography approach and demonstrate its advantages by applying it to a freshly dissected, cancerous mastectomy breast specimen. We illustrate that the two-directional scanning procedure overcomes the insufficient diagnostic value of a single scan, and reliably detects tumor structures, independently from their orientation within the breast. Our results indicate the indispensable diagnostic necessity and benefit of a multi-directional approach for x-ray phase-contrast mammography.

  8. Simultaneous de-noising in phase contrast tomography

    Koehler, Thomas; Roessl, Ewald

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we investigate methods for de-noising of tomographic differential phase contrast and absorption contrast images. We exploit the fact that in grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI), first, several images are acquired simultaneously in exactly the same geometry, and second, these different images can show very different contrast-to-noise-ratios. These features of grating-based DPCI are used to generalize the conventional bilateral filter. Experiments using simulations show a superior de-noising performance of the generalized algorithm compared with the conventional one.

  9. Polychromatic cone-beam phase-contrast tomography

    A method is presented for quantitative phase-contrast tomography using unfiltered radiation from a small polychromatic source. The three-dimensional distribution of complex refractive index in a monomorphous object is reconstructed given a single projection image per view angle. The reconstruction algorithm is achromatic and stable with respect to high-spatial-frequency noise, in contrast to conventional tomography. The density distribution in a test sample was accurately reconstructed from polychromatic phase-contrast data collected with a point-projection x-ray microscope

  10. Wave theory of x-ray phase-contrast radiography

    The consistent wave theory of imaging for weakly absorbing noncrystalline objects is suggested within the method of X-ray phase-contrast radiography with the crystal-analyzer being located in the Bragg geometry. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution of the method were studied, both theoretically and experimentally, as functions of the angular position and the asymmetry coefficient of reflection from the analyzer. The validity ranges of the geometric-optics approximation are discussed. The phase-contrast images of a number of model objects (filaments, capillaries) and also of medical and biological objects are obtained and analyzed

  11. Relief- and apodized-phase-contrast imaging of biological specimens

    Pelc, Radek; Hostounský, Z.; Otaki, T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, 4 suppl. (2008), s. 1073-1074. ISSN 1225-6773. [Asia-Pacific Microscopy Conference /9./. 02.11.2008-07.11.2008, Jeju] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * phase contrast * microscopy * apodization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  12. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  13. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mo (4d)-based complex perovskites Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe)

    Musa Saad H E, M., E-mail: musa.1964@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, Qassim University, Buridah 51452 (Saudi Arabia); El-Hagary, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Institut für Festkörperphysik, TU Wien, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    We report a study of crystallographic parameters of the Mo-based complex perovskites Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe) obtained from analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and the electronic and magnetic properties prediction using the magnetic measurements and the full-potential linearized muffin–tin orbitals within the plane-wave approximation (LMTO–PLW). The Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} materials were prepared by the solid state reaction method. XRD analysis reveals that Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} crystalline in a cubic structure (space group Fm-3m) with lattice parameters (a=8.013 Å) for M=Cr and (a=8.061 Å) for M=Fe. XRD results present a matching of 98% with the theoretical results. The densities of states were calculated using the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA+U methods. LDOS results show a half-metallic-ferrimagnetic ground state for Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6}, which is in majority due to the 4d-t{sub 2g} and 3d-t{sub 2g} characters. The structural, electronic and magnetic calculation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental and previous theoretical results. - Highlights: • Mo-based complex perovskites Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe) have been studied. • XRD analysis revealed Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} crystalline in cubic structures (Fm-3m). • Full-potential linear muffin–tin orbital (LMTO) calculations have been carried out. • The DOSs were calculated using the LSDA and correlated LSDA+U methods. • Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe) shows HM–FiM nature due to 3d-t{sub 2g}–4d-t{sub 2g} characters.

  14. Helical differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Fu, Jian; Willner, Marian; Chen, Liyuan; Tan, Renbo; Achterhold, Klaus; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Juergen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    We report on the first experimental results of helical differential phase-contrast computed tomography (helical DPC-CT) with a laboratory X-ray tube source and a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer. The results experimentally verify the feasibility of helical data acquisition and reconstruction in phase-contrast imaging, in analogy to its use in clinical CT systems. This allows fast and continuous volumetric scans for long objects with lengths exceeding the dimension of the detector. Since helical CT revolutionized the field of medical CT several years ago, we anticipate that this method will bring the same significant impact on the future medical and industrial applications of X-ray DPC-CT. PMID:24518822

  15. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  16. Time-resolved rotation projection MR phase contrast angiography

    In view of the advantages of time-resolved phase contrast angiography, the authors have investigated the additional advantage of incrementing projection angle during the cardiac cycle. An electrocardiographically triggered, multisection sequence was modified to produce bipolar gradient-reversal phase-contrast angiograms at 45-msec intervals. The projection angle for each angiogram was incremented by 5 degrees. Asymmetric echo acquisition was used to minimize TE. Velocity-compensated field-of-view select and readout gradients were used. Acceleration-compensated velocity encoding and velocity-compensated phase encoding gradients were investigated. A weak dephasing gradient was used in the projection direction. Images were acquired at 16 angles with four excitations per angle; acquisition time was approximately 8 minutes for each velocity component

  17. Advanced phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer

    McDonald, S.A.; Marone, F.; Hintermüller, C; Mikuljan, G; David, C.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-01-01

    Phase-sensitive X-ray imaging methods can provide substantially increased contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging, and therefore new and otherwise inaccessible information. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging, which uses a grating interferometer and a phase-stepping technique, has been integrated into TOMCAT, a beamline dedicated to tomographic microscopy and coherent radiology experiments at the Swiss Light Source. Developments have been made focusing on the fast acquisitio...

  18. Quantitative differential phase contrast imaging in an LED array microscope

    Tian, L; Waller, L.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Optical Society of America. Illumination-based differential phase contrast (DPC) is a phase imaging method that uses a pair of images with asymmetric illumination patterns. Distinct from coherent techniques, DPC relies on spatially partially coherent light, providing 2× better lateral resolution, better optical sectioning and immunity to speckle noise. In this paper, we derive the 2D weak object transfer function (WOTF) and develop a quantitative phase reconstruction method that is rob...

  19. Quantitative methods in phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    Full text: A new method for extracting quantitative information from phase-contrast x-ray images obtained with microfocus x-ray sources is presented. The proposed technique allows rapid non invasive characterization of the internal structure of thick optically opaque organic samples. The method does not generally involve any sample preparation and does not need any x-ray optical elements (such as monochromators, zone plates, or interferometers)

  20. Image fusion algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging

    Roessl, Ewald; Koehler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary signals:1, 2 the attenuation, the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, strongly influenced by the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angles. In medical applications, it is of the utmost importance to present to the radiologist all clinically relevant information in as compact a way as possible. Hence, the need arises for a method to combine two or more of the above mentioned signals into one image containing all information relevant for diagnosis. We present an image composition algorithm that fuses the attenuation image and the differential phase contrast image into a composite, final image based on the assumption that the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the sample can be related by a constant scaling factor. The merging is performed in such a way that the composite image is characterized by minimal noise-power at each frequency component.

  1. Phase-contrast imaging using polychromatic hard X-rays

    In conventional radiography, X-rays which pass through an object along different paths are differentially absorbed, and the intensity pattern of the emerging beam records the distribution of absorbing materials within the sample. An alternative approach is phase-contrast radiography, which instead records variations of the phase of the emerging radiation. Such an approach offers improved contrast sensitivity, especially when imaging weakly absorbing samples. Unfortunately, current phase-contrast imaging techniques generally require highly monochromatic plane-wave radiation and sophisticated X-ray optics, so their use is greatly restricted. Here we describe and demonstrate a simplified scheme for phase-contrast imaging based on an X-ray source having high spatial (but essentially no chromatic) coherence. The method is compatible with conventional polychromatic micro-focus X-ray tube sources, is well suited to large areas of irradiation, can operate with a lower absorbed dose than traditional X-ray imaging techniques, and should find broad application in clinical, biological and industrial settings. (Author)

  2. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  3. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  4. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  5. Decompressive craniectomy arrests pulsatile aqueductal CSF flux: An in vivo demonstration using phase-contrast MRI. Case report.

    Scollato, Antonio; Gallina, Pasquale; Bahl, Gautam; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    We give a case study demonstration, using aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume quantification with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, of a large opening in the rigid cranium by a decompressive craniectomy and its subsequent closure by bone flap repositioning resulted in the arrest and subsequent restoration of aqueductal CSF flow. PMID:25958958

  6. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  7. Phase-contrast microtomography with polychromatic sealed source

    Conventional X-ray microradiography and microtomography are based on X-ray attenuation inside an object. For light objects (in the terms of X-ray absorption) much better way would be to use phase contrast, rather than attenuation contrast. Recently it has been shown that one can obtain phase by using a polychromatic source provided the focal spot size and detector resolution are small enough to maintain sufficient spatial coherence. The technique opens perspectives for high-resolution micro-CT for the objects with low X-ray attenuation, such as diamonds, biomedical objects, etc

  8. Phase contrast and DIC illumination for AFM hybrids

    High-resolution optical microscopy is an essential pre-requisite for life science force microscopy, particularly for applications in cell biology and medicine. Identification and validation of cells is typically established with techniques like phase contrast microscopy or differential interference contrast microscopy. The option to select or monitor individual cells online with such light microscopy techniques while performing atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements is therefore extremely beneficial. Here, we report two conceptually different strategies to implement these light microscopy techniques in a fully functional AFM head at the ultimate resolution of the Abbe diffraction limit

  9. A phase contrast interferometer on DIII-D

    A novel imaging diagnostic has recently become operational on the DIII-D tokamak for the study of density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. The phase contrast imaging approach overcomes the limitations of conventional scattering techniques in the spectral range of interest for transport-related phenomena, by allowing detection of long wavelength modes (up to 7.6 cm) with excellent spatial resolution (5 mm) in the radial direction. Additional motivation for the diagnostic is provided by wave-plasma interactions during heating and current drive experiments in the Ion Cyclotron range of frequencies. Density perturbations of 4 x 107 cm-3 with a 1 MHz bandwidth can be resolved. The diagnostic employs a 7.6 cm diameter CO2 laser beam launched vertically across the plasma edge. An image of the plasma is then created on a 16-element detector array: the detector signals are directly proportional to the density fluctuations integrated along each chord. Wavelengths and correlation lengths can be inferred from the spatial mapping. The phase contrast method and its application to DIII-D are described and tests and first plasma data are presented

  10. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Tenhunen, Mikko (Dept. of Physics, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)), e-mail: jani.keyrilainen@hus.fi; Bravin, Alberto (Bio-medical Beamline ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Fernandez, Manuel (High Brilliance Beamline ID2, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Virkkunen, Pekka (Dept. of Radiology, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Suortti, Pekka (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2010-10-15

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  11. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  12. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  13. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  14. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  15. Validation of 4D-MSPECT and QGS for quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET: comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    The main aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of 4D-MSPECT in the assessment of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic/end-systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) from gated technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile single-photon emission tomography (99mTc-MIBI SPET), using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) as the reference method. By further comparing 4D-MSPECT and QGS with cMRI, the software-specific characteristics were analysed to elucidate clinical applicability. Fifty-four patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease (CAD) were examined with gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET (8 gates/cardiac cycle) about 60 min after tracer injection at rest. LV EDV, ESV and LVEF were calculated from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET using 4D-MSPECT and QGS. On the same day, cMRI (20 gates/cardiac cycle) was performed, with LV EDV, ESV and LVEF calculated using Simpson's rule. Both algorithms worked with all data sets. Correlation between the results of gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET and cMRI was high for EDV [R=0.89 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.92 (QGS)], ESV [R=0.96 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.96 (QGS)] and LVEF [R=0.89 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.90 (QGS)]. In contrast to ESV, EDV was significantly underestimated by 4D-MSPECT and QGS compared to cMRI [130±45 ml (4D-MSPECT), 122±41 ml (QGS), 139±36 ml (cMRI)]. For LVEF, 4D-MSPECT and cMRI revealed no significant differences, whereas QGS yielded significantly lower values than cMRI [57.5%±13.7% (4D-MSPECT), 52.2%±12.4% (QGS), 60.0%±15.8% (cMRI)]. In conclusion, agreement between gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET and cMRI is good across a wide range of clinically relevant LV volume and LVEF values assessed by 4D-MSPECT and QGS. However, algorithm-varying underestimation of LVEF should be accounted for in the clinical context and limits interchangeable use of software. (orig.)

  16. Segmentation of Individual Cells in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Soukup, Jindřich; Lašan, M.; Šroubek, Filip

    London: City University London, 2014 - (Reyes-Aldasoro, C.; Slabaugh, G.), s. 185-190 ISBN 1-901725-51-0. [Medical Image Understanding and Analysis 2014. London (GB), 09.07.2014-11.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1205; GAJU(CZ) 134/2013/Z; GA UK(CZ) 914813/2013; OP VaVpI(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/ 01.0024 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : image segmentation * phase contrast microscopy * time-lapse imaging Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/soukup-0435026.pdf

  17. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM. Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  18. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  19. Improved Hilbert phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy

    Koeck, Philip J.B.

    2015-07-15

    Hilbert phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode could be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryo sections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal by (Danev et al., 2002) the Hilbert phase plate applies a phase shift of π to approximately half the focal plane (for example the right half excluding the central beam) and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus. After correction for the inbuilt asymmetry of differential phase contrast this image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from the lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length and spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably almost without loss of contrast by using a Hilbert phase plate of half the thickness, leading to a phase shift of π/2, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. - Highlights: • In this paper I present theory and simulations for a Hilbert phase plate that phase shifts the electron wave by π/2 instead of π while images are recorded close to Scherzer defocus instead of Gaussian focus. • I show that the point resolution for this new imaging mode is considerably higher without loss of contrast. • An additional advantage lies in the reduced thickness of the phase plate which leads to reduced inelastic scattering in the phase plate and less noise.

  20. ICT4D

    Coelho, Taiane Ritta

    2014-01-01

    Resumo: Este estudo se situa no campo de ICT4D (Information and Communication Technologies for Development), termo internacionalmente conhecido para discutir o uso das Tecnologias da Informação e Comunicação (TIC) para o desenvolvimento. O que motivou o pesquisador a estudar este tema foi a existência de um paradoxo: TIC são amplamente consideradas, por uns, como invenções que mudam a maneira como milhões de pessoas conduzem suas vidas e, por outros, como alargamento das relações de poder. E ...

  1. 4D flow MRI assessment of extracranial-intracranial bypass: qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hemodynamics

    Sekine, Tetsuro [University Hospital Zurich/University of Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Takagi, Ryo; Amano, Yasuo; Orita, Erika; Matsumura, Yoshio; Kumita, Shin-ichiro [Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murai, Yasuo [Nippon Medical School, Department of Neurological Surgery, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility of using time-resolved 3D phase-contrast (4D flow) MRI to characterize extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass. We enrolled 32 patients who underwent EC-IC bypass (15 men, 17 women; mean age 66.4 years). In all, 16 underwent radial artery graft (RAG) bypass and 16 underwent superficial temporal artery (STA) bypass. 4D flow MRI, time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and computed tomography angiography (CTA) were performed. Bypass patency, flow direction, and blood flow volume (BFV) of each artery were determined by 4D flow MRI. Arterial diameters were measured by TOF-MRA and CTA. We compared RAG and STA bypasses by evaluating the flow direction and BFV of each artery. We evaluated the correlation between arterial diameters (measured by CTA or MRA) and the BFV and the detectability of flow direction (measured by 4D flow MRI) of each artery. 4D flow MRI confirmed the patency of each bypass artery. Flow direction of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery and BFV in the bypass artery differed between RAG and STA groups (p < 0.01). BFV in the bypass slightly correlated with the diameters on CTA (p < 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.287). Of the 29 arteries in the circle of Willis, nine were not depicted on 4D flow MRI. Cutoff values for arterial diameters on CTA and TOF-MRA for detecting the artery on 4D flow MRI were 2.4 and 1.8 mm, respectively. 4D flow MRI provided unique information for characterizing EC-IC bypasses, although this detectability is limited when addressing small arteries with slow flow. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative measurement of normal and hydrocephalic cerebrospinal fluid flow using phase contrast cine MR imaging

    Measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow using phase contrast cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed on a phantom, 12 normal subjects and 20 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The phantom study demonstrated the applicability of phase contrast in quantitative measurement of the slow flow. The CSF flows of the normal subjects showed a consistent pattern with a to-and-fro movement of the flow in the anterior subarachnoid space at the C2/3 level, and they were dependent on the cardiac cycle in all subjects. However, the patients with NPH showed variable patterns of the CSF pulsatile flow and these patterns could be divided into four types according to velocity and amplitude. The amplitudes of each type were as follows: type 0 (n=1), 87.6 mm; type I (n=2), 58.2 mm (mean); type II (n=6), 48.0±5.0 mm (mean±SEM); and type III (n=11), 19.9±1.8 mm (mean±SEM). The decrease of the amplitudes correlated to a worsening of the clinical symptoms. After the shunting operation, the amplitude of to-and-fro movement of the CSF increased again in the patients with NPH who improved clinically. Some of the type III cases were reclassified type II, I and 0 and also one of the type II cases changed type I after the shunting operation. We conclude that the phase contrast cine MR imaging is a practically and clinically applicable technique for the quantitative measurement of the CSF flow. (author)

  3. A novel high temporal resolution phase contrast MRI technique for measuring mitral valve flows

    Voorhees, Abram; Bohmann, Katja; McGorty, Kelly Anne; Wei, Timothy; Chen, Qun

    2005-11-01

    Mitral valve flow imaging is inherently difficult due to valve plane motion and high blood flow velocities, which can range from 200 cm/s to 700 cm/s under regurgitant conditions. As such, insufficient temporal resolution has hampered imaging of mitral valve flows using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A novel phase contrast MRI technique, phase contrast using phase train imaging (PCPTI), has been developed to address the high temporal resolution needs for imaging mitral valve flows. The PCPTI sequence provides the highest temporal resolution to-date (6 ms) for measuring in-plane and through-plane flow patterns, with each velocity component acquired in a separate breathhold. Tested on healthy human volunteers, comparison to a conventional retrogated PC-FLASH cine sequence showed reasonable agreement. Results from a more rigorous validation using digital particle image velocimetry technique will be presented. The technique will be demonstrated in vitro using a physiological flow phantom and a St. Jude Medical Masters Series prosthetic valve.

  4. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  5. New developments in simulating X-ray phase contrast imaging

    A deterministic algorithm simulating phase contrast (PC) x-ray images for complex 3- dimensional (3D) objects is presented. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named VXI (Virtual X-ray Imaging). The physical model chosen to account for PC technique is based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The algorithm consists mainly of two parts. The first one exploits the VXI ray-tracing approach to compute the object transmission function. The second part simulates the PC image due to the wave front distortion introduced by the sample. In the first part, the use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex 3D objects. Differently from the VXI original version, which makes use of an object description via triangular facets, the new code requires a more 'sophisticated' object representation based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS). As a first step we produce a spatial high resolution image by using a point and monochromatic source and an ideal detector. To simulate the polychromatic case, the intensity image is integrated over the considered x-ray energy spectrum. Then, in order to account for the system spatial resolution properties, the high spatial resolution image (mono or polychromatic) is convolved with the total point spread function of the imaging system under consideration. The results supplied by the presented algorithm are examined with the help of some relevant examples. (authors)

  6. SEGMENTACIÓN DE IMÁGENES DE RESONANCIA MAGNÉTICA EN CONTRASTE DE FASE PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LA DINÁMICA DEL LÍQUIDO CEFALORRAQUÍDEO PERIMEDULAR Segmentation of Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Dynamic of Perimedullary Cerebrospinal Fluid

    N FLÓREZ

    Full Text Available La imagen de resonancia magnética en contraste de fase permite estudiar la dinámica del líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR perimedular de manera cuantitativa. Sin embargo la anatomía propia del espacio subaracnoideo dificulta la segmentación del LCR debido a la presencia de estructuras vasculares y nervios raquídeos. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir un método de segmentación semiautomático para el estudio de la dinámica del LCR perimedular. El proceso se inicializa con un punto semilla dentro de la región a analizar. El algoritmo crea un mapa de correlación, calcula un valor de umbral y clasifica píxeles de LCR combinando diversas características temporales del comportamiento del flujo como atributos de entrada a un algoritmo k-medias. Un observador llevó a cabo diez veces la segmentación en cinco sujetos sanos y se calculó el volumen por ciclo y el área en el espacio perimedular C2C3. Las variaciones de las medidas fueron evaluadas como una estimación de la reproducibilidad del método. Para esto se calculó el coeficiente de variación. La variabilidad de las medidas fue menor del 5%. El método facilita la cuantificación del LCR perimedular. En 16 sujetos sanos se cuantificó el volumen por ciclo de LCR y el área en el espacio C2C3 y cisterna prepontina.Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging allows studying quantitatively the perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. However, the anatomy of the subarachnoid space difficults the segmentation of CSF due to the presence of vascular structures and spinal nerves. The aim of this paper is to describe a semiautomatic segmentation method for the study of the perimedullary CSF dynamics. The process is started with a seed point within the region to analyze. The algorithm creates a correlation map, calculates a threshold value and classifies pixels of CSF combining different temporal characteristics of flow behavior as input attributes to a k-means algorithm. One

  7. Assessment of fluctuating velocities in disturbed cardiovascular blood flow : in vivo feasibility of generalized phase-contrast MRI

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Engvall, Jan; Bolger, Ann F.; Ebbers, Tino

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of generalized phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) for the noninvasive assessment of fluctuating velocities in cardiovascular blood flow. Materials and Methods Multidimensional PC-MRI was used in a generalized manner to map mean flow velocities and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) values in one healthy aorta and in three patients with different cardiovascular diseases. The acquired data were used to assess the kinetic energy of b...

  8. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid...... approach in regularizing 3D flow fields is evaluated. METHODS: The proposed algorithm incorporates both a Newtonian fluid physics model and a linear PC-MRI signal model. The model equations are solved numerically using a modified CFD algorithm. The numerical solution corresponds to the optimal solution of...... dynamics (CFD) calculations. CFD provides arbitrarily high resolution, but its accuracy hinges on model assumptions, while velocity fields measured with PC-MRI generally do not satisfy the equations of fluid dynamics, provide limited resolution, and suffer from partial volume effects. The purpose of this...

  9. Understanding phase contrast MR angiography a practical approach with Matlab examples

    Suresh Paul, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Providing many unique MATLAB codes and functions throughout, this book covers the basics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), leading to an in-depth understanding of the concepts and tools required for analysis and interpretation of Phase Contrast MR Angiography (PC-MRA). The concept of PC-MRA is often difficult, but essential for practicing engineers and scientists working in MR related areas. The concepts are better understood by uniquely combining the physical principles of fluid flow and MR imaging, laid out by modeling the theory and applications using a commonly used software tool MATLAB®. The book starts with a detailed theory of PC-MRA followed by a description of various image processing methods, including detailed MATLAB codes used for their implementation. The flow concepts in the context of MR imaging are explained using MATLAB based simulations.

  10. Apparent linear attenuation coefficients in phase contrast X-ray tomography

    In the inline phase contrast X-ray tomography the reconstructed apparent linear attenuation coefficient values may be greatly larger than sample's linear attenuation coefficients or even be negative. In this work we present a general formula to quantitatively relate the apparent linear attenuation coefficient values in cone-beam phase contrast tomography to sample's linear attenuation coefficients and refractive indices. This formula overcomes the gross inaccuracy of the existing formula in the literature in analyzing high-resolution phase contrast tomography, and it will be useful for correctly interpreting and quantifying the apparent linear attenuation coefficients in cone-beam X-ray phase contrast tomography.

  11. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography

    Pratt, I. V.; Belev, G.; Zhu, N.; Chapman, L. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling.

  12. 脑卒中恢复期患者小腿肌肉功能的速度编码相位对比磁共振观察%Study of lower extremity muscle function in stroke patients by velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    姜丽; 窦祖林; 温红梅; 胡昔权; 丘卫红; 兰月; 解东风; 李奎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of muscle dynamic characteristics for the ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors between stroke patients at the chronic stage and healthy controls so as to provide a new method of assessing thein vivo muscle function in patients with hemiplegia. Methods From May 2008 to May 2009, 26 stroke patients and 21 age-and gender-matched normal controls were recruited. All subjects were positioned on a scanner table and requested to perform the voluntary movement of ankle flexion-extension. The velocity encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (VE-PC MRI )provided the images of tibialis anterior muscle ( TA), medial head of gastrocnemius muscle (MG) and soleus muscle (SOL) during a movement cycle. By measuring the calf muscle contraction velocity, the balance function was assessed by Berg balance scale(BBS). The correlation between scores of BBS and the mean maximum velocity were compared and analyzed. Results The peak velocity of TA( 1-8 phase,8. 900-21. 120 mm/s vs 12.99-34.50 mm/s), MG(12-19phase,13.60-13. 28 mm/s vs 25.85-18.38 mm/s)and SOL(12-16 phase,18. 63-33. 62 mm/s vs 27.68-47.22 mm/s) was lower in the affected side than that in the controls during ankle extension(P <0. 05 ); During ankle dorsiflexion, the co-contraction index of SOL/TA(2-9 phase,0. 81-0. 82 vs 0. 27-0. 44)and the co-contraction index of GM/TA(2-9 phase,0. 73-0. 58 vs 0. 10-0. 11 ) was markedly higher in the affected side than the controls. The patient score of BBS was negatively correlated with the mean velocity of TA ( r = - 0. 69, P = 0. 001 ) and GM ( r = - 0. 47, P =0. 01 ) in the affected side. There was correlation between TA ( r = - 0. 60, P = 0. 001 ) and GM ( r =-0. 49 ,P =0. 01 )in the unaffected side. Conclusion During the movement of active ankle flexionextension, the velocities of TA, SOL and MG are lower in the affected side. The co-contraction index is markedly higher in the affected side during ankle dorsiflexion. This in turn leads to

  13. Biophysical mechanisms of phase contrast in gradient echo MRI

    He, Xiang; Dmitriy A. Yablonskiy

    2009-01-01

    Recently reported contrast in phase images of human and animal brains obtained with gradient-recalled echo MRI holds great promise for the in vivo study of biological tissue structure with substantially improved resolution. Herein we investigate the origins of this contrast and demonstrate that it depends on the tissue “magnetic architecture” at the subcellular and cellular levels. This architecture is mostly determined by the structural arrangements of proteins, lipids, non-heme tissue iron,...

  14. Tumour visualisation in human soft tissue using grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    The grating-based phase-contrast imaging provides enhanced image structure details, which are partly complementary or even not attainable with standard X-ray absorption imaging. Especially in the case of biological soft tissue when standard x-ray radiography is often limited due to the weak absorption contrast, this method represents a real alternative. Based on X-ray optical transmission gratings this modality has transferred the phase-contrast imaging from the highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources to conventional laboratory-based broadband x-ray tubes. Here, we present a study on human soft tissue specimens containing tumours using the grating-based phase contrast imaging at both highly brilliant synchrotron (ESRF, Grenoble), and at conventional X-ray laboratory radiation sources. Our results demonstrate a superior contrast for different kinds of soft tissue in the phase contrast and verify this imaging modality to be a promising candidate to establish phase-contrast imaging in clinical radiology.

  15. Tumour visualisation in human soft tissue using grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics (E17) and Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The grating-based phase-contrast imaging provides enhanced image structure details, which are partly complementary or even not attainable with standard X-ray absorption imaging. Especially in the case of biological soft tissue when standard x-ray radiography is often limited due to the weak absorption contrast, this method represents a real alternative. Based on X-ray optical transmission gratings this modality has transferred the phase-contrast imaging from the highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources to conventional laboratory-based broadband x-ray tubes. Here, we present a study on human soft tissue specimens containing tumours using the grating-based phase contrast imaging at both highly brilliant synchrotron (ESRF, Grenoble), and at conventional X-ray laboratory radiation sources. Our results demonstrate a superior contrast for different kinds of soft tissue in the phase contrast and verify this imaging modality to be a promising candidate to establish phase-contrast imaging in clinical radiology.

  16. Structure and magnetism of 3d and 4d transition-metal alloys TT' (T = Mn, Fe and T' = Rh, Pd) with CuAu-I type ordered structure

    Yamada, H. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)]. E-mail: hyamada@gipac.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Shimizu, H. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Uebayashi, K. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2006-05-18

    First-principle band calculations of 3d and 4d transition-metal alloys FeRh, FePd, MnRh and MnPd with CuAu-I type ordered structure are carried out by a linear muffin-tin orbital method within an atomic sphere approximation, where a generalized gradient correction for exchange-correlation potential is taken into account. Total energies for paramagnetic, ferromagnetic and three kinds of antiferromagnetic states are estimated as a function of lattice constants a and c. Observed lattice constants and spin structures of these alloys are well described by the present calculations. It is shown that the paramagnetic (non-magnetic) state without local magnetic moments is not stable in CsCl-type structure for these alloys.

  17. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC.

  18. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  19. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    Sheridan C. Mayo; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Stephen W. Wilkins

    2012-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image ...

  20. Near-field x-ray phase contrast imaging and phase retrieval algorithm

    Zhu Hua-Feng; Xie Hong-Lan; Gao Hong-Yi; Chen Jian-Wen; Li Ru-Xin; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical analyses of x-ray diffraction phase contrast imaging and near field phase retrieval method are presented.A new variant of the near field intensity distribution is derived with the optimal phase imaging distance and spatial frequency of object taken into account. Numerical examples of phase retrieval using simulated data are also given. On the above basis, the influence of detecting distance and polychroism of radiation on the phase contrast image and the retrieved phase distribution are discussed. The present results should be useful in the practical application of in-line phase contrast imaging.

  1. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  2. In-line phase contrast for weakly absorbing materials with a microfocus x-ray source

    Zhang Di; Li Zheng; Huang Zhi-Feng; Yu Ai-Min; Sha Wei

    2006-01-01

    For weakly absorbing materials, image contrast can be enhanced by phase contrast in formation. The effectiveness of the in-line phase contrast technique relies on its ability to record intensity data which contain information on the x-ray's phase shift. Four kinds of approaches to the relationship between intensity distribution and phase shift are reviewed and discussed. A micro-focal x-ray source with high geometrical magnification is used to acquire phase contrast images. A great improvement on image quality is shown and geometrical parameters are modified for comparison between different imaging positions.

  3. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography. (orig.)

  4. Edge fluctuation measurements by phase contrast imaging on DIII-D

    A novel CO2 laser phase contrast imaging diagnostic has been developed for the DIII-D tokamak, where it is being employed to investigate density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. This system generates 16-point, 1-D images of a 7.6 cm wide region in the radial direction, and is characterized by long wavelength (7.6 cm) and high frequency (100 MHz) capability, as well as excellent sensitivity (rvec n approx-gt 109 cm-3). The effects of vertical line integration have been studied in detail, both analytically and numerically with actual flux surface geometries generated by the EFITD magnetic equilibrium code. It is shown that in the present configuration the measurement is mostly sensitive to radial wave vectors. Experimental results on fluctuation suppression at the L- to H-mode transition and on the L-mode wave number spectrum are discussed briefly. Finally, future plans for extending the measurement to the core of the plasma and for investigating externally launched fast waves are presented

  5. A feasibility study for compressed sensing combined phase contrast MR angiography reconstruction

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Cheol-Pyo; Lee, Man-Woo; Han, Bong-Soo

    2012-02-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) is a technique for flow velocity measurement and vessels visualization, simultaneously. The PC MRA takes long scan time because each flow encoding gradients which are composed bipolar gradient type need to reconstruct the angiography image. Moreover, it takes more image acquisition time when we use the PC MRA at the low-tesla MRI system. In this study, we studied and evaluation of feasibility for CS MRI reconstruction combined PC MRA which data acquired by low-tesla MRI system. We used non-linear reconstruction algorithm which named Bregman iteration for CS image reconstruction and validate the usefulness of CS combined PC MRA reconstruction technique. The results of CS reconstructed PC MRA images provide similar level of image quality between fully sampled reconstruction data and sparse sampled reconstruction using CS technique. Although our results used half of sampling ratio and do not used specification hardware device or performance which are improving the temporal resolution of MR image acquisition such as parallel imaging reconstruction using phased array coil or non-cartesian trajectory, we think that CS combined PC MRA technique will be helpful to increase the temporal resolution and at low-tesla MRI system.

  6. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    Hernandez Hoyos, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia). Grupo Imagine, Grupo de Ingenieria Biomedica; Orlowski, P.; Piatkowska-Janko, E.; Bogorodzki, P. [Warsaw Univ. of Tech. (Poland). ZEJM-BINSK, Inst. of Radioelectronics; Orkisz, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-03-15

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  7. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  8. Quantitative characterization of inertial confinement fusion capsules using phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium, Be(Cu), shell. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) shell. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam shells were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately characterized using phase contrast enhanced x-ray images

  9. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; M. Feser; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D; Rehak, P; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S

    2008-01-01

    A segmented transmission detector has been developed and installed at sector 2 instruments at the Advanced Photon Source for differential phase-contrast imaging in parallel with absorption and fluorescence measurements.

  10. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images

  11. Correcting Intensity Drift in X-ray Grating-based Phase Contrast Imaging

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has become an attractive technique because it can deliver additional information on weakly absorbing materials. Grating-based phase contrast imaging with conventional x-ray source is a breakthrough in x-ray phase contrast imaging because it provides attenuation, refraction and scattering information simultaneously. Therefore, it has potential to be applied in medical and industrial applications. However, in actual experiments, we found that the photon intensity drift of the x-ray source would influence the final images, especially the refraction images. After analyzing the phase-stepping curve, we proposed a correction method to fix the problem due to the effect of intensity drift. The proposed correction method is successfully applied to grating-based phase-contrast imaging setup having un-stable x-ray source. The experimental results show that our method could solve this problem

  12. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    M. Marschner; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; A. Fehringer; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a g...

  13. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Peter B Noël; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of ...

  14. A Generalized Bidiagonal-Tikhonov Method Applied To Differential Phase Contrast Tomography

    Schenkels, Nick; Sijbers, Jan; van Aarle, Wim; Vanroose, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast tomography is an alternative to classic absorption contrast tomography that leads to higher contrast reconstructions in many applications. We review how phase contrast data can be acquired by using a combination of phase and absorption gratings. Using algebraic reconstruction techniques the object can be reconstructed from the measured data. In order to solve the resulting linear system we propose the Generalized Bidiagonal Tikhonov (GBiT) method, an adaptation of the generaliz...

  15. Phase-Contrast Imaging of Nanostructures with Incoherent Femtosecond Laser Driven Soft X-Ray Source

    Application of polychromatic (1.5-15 nm) soft X-ray emission of a spatially large (>0.1 mm) bright femtosecond laser driven plasma source for propagation based phase contrast imaging of nanometer thick foils and biological samples is considered. Diffraction and phase contrast effects increased quality and contrast of the experimental images, registered by LiF crystal X-ray detector with submicron resolution.

  16. Apparent Linear Attenuation Coefficients in Phase Contrast X-Ray Tomography

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng

    2011-01-01

    In the inline phase contrast x-ray tomography the reconstructed apparent linear attenuation coefficient values may be greatly larger than sample’s linear attenuation coefficients or even be negative. In this work we present a general formula to quantitatively relate the apparent linear attenuation coefficient values in cone-beam phase contrast tomography to sample’s linear attenuation coefficients and refractive indices. This formula overcomes the gross inaccuracy of the existing formula in t...

  17. The energy levels and radiative transition probabilities for electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions among the levels of the ground configuration, [Kr]4d104f4, of W24+

    Large-scale multiconfiguration Hartree–Fock and Dirac–Fock calculations have been performed for the ground configuration, [Kr]4d104f4, energy levels of the W24+ ion. The relativistic corrections were taken into account in the quasirelativistic Breit–Pauli and fully relativistic Breit (taking into account QED effects) approximations. The role of correlation, relativistic, and QED corrections is discussed. Line strengths, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities in the Coulomb and Babushkin gauges are presented for the electric quadrupole (E2) transitions among these levels. The magnetic dipole transitions are also investigated. Dependence of the E2 transition probabilities on the gauge condition of the electromagnetic field potential is studied as well.

  18. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    Sheridan C. Mayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies.

  19. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography. (paper)

  20. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  1. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  2. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  3. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    Weber, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.weber@fau.de; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), Radiation and Detector Physics Group, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  4. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  5. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching

  6. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    Brun, E., E-mail: emmanuel.brun@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000, France and Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Barbone, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  7. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy

  8. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  9. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well. PMID:26074579

  10. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography.

    Torben Haugaard Jensen

    Full Text Available Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations to obtain information regarding lymph node involvement previously inaccessible with standard absorption x-ray imaging.

  11. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Hoshino, Masato, E-mail: hoshino@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsukube, Takuro [Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital, 1-3-1 Wakinohamakaigandori, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-0073 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-08

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching.

  12. Instant Cinema 4D starter

    Kaminar, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks.This book is written in a friendly, practical style with lots of screenshots and help that will ensure you grow in confidence chapter by chapter.This book is recommended for artists that have experience in other 3D software packages, and who want to learn Cinema 4D. That being said, dedicated readers without experience in other 3D software should not be discouraged from reading this book to learn the basics of Cinema 4D as their first 3D package.

  13. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  14. Non-invasive evaluation of energy loss in the pulmonary arteries using 4D phase contrast MR measurement: a proof of concept

    Lee, Namheon; Taylor, Michael D.; Hor, Kan N; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The repair surgery of congenital heart disease (CHD) associated with the right ventricular (RV)-pulmonary artery (PA) pathophysiology often left patients with critical post-operative lesions, leading to regurgitation and obstruction in the PAs. These lesions need longitudinal (with time) assessment for monitoring the RV function, in order for patients to have appropriate treatment before irreversible RV dysfunction occurs. In this research, we computed energy loss in the branch PAs...

  15. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented. (paper)

  16. Spherical-Wave Far-Field Interferometer for Hard X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    Miao, Houxun; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Panna, Alireza; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    Low dose, high contrast x-ray imaging is of general interest in medical diagnostic applications. X-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometers using collimated synchrotron beams demonstrate the highest levels of phase contrast under a given exposure dose. However, common x-ray sources emit divergent cone beams. Here, we developed a spherical-wave inline Mach-Zehnder interferometer for phase contrast imaging over an extended area with a broadband and divergent source. The first tabletop system was tested in imaging experiments of a mammographic accreditation phantom and various biological specimens. The noise level of the phase contrast images at a clinical radiation dose corresponded to a 6 nano radian bending of the x-ray wavefront. Un-resolved structures with conventional radiography and near-field interferometer techniques became visible at a fraction of the radiation dose.

  17. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    Kitchen, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  18. Hard x-ray quantitative non-interferometric phase-contrast microscopy

    We report the results of quantitative phase-contrast imaging experiments using synchrotron radiation, in-line imaging geometry and a non-interferometric phase retrieval technique. This quantitative imaging method is fast, simple, robust, does not require sophisticated x-ray optical elements and can potentially provide submicron spatial resolution over a field of view of the order of centimetres. In the present experiment a spatial resolution of approximately 0.8 μm has been achieved in images of a polystyrene sphere using 19.6 keV x-rays. We demonstrate that appropriate processing of phase-contrast images obtained in the in-line geometry can reveal important new information about the internal structure of weakly absorbing organic samples. We believe that this technique will also be useful in phase-contrast tomography. (author)

  19. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  20. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 µm) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  1. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    Kitchen, M.J. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)]. E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@spme.monash.edu.au; Paganin, D. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lewis, R.A. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Uesugi, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2005-08-11

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  2. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  3. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements

  4. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    Golosio, Bruno; Delogu, Pasquale; Zanette, Irene; Carpinelli, Massimo; Masala, Giovanni Luca; Oliva, Piernicola; Stefanini, Arnaldo; Stumbo, Simone

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Simulation study of phase retrieval for hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging

    YU; Bin; PENG; Xiang; TIAN; Jindong; NIU; Hanben; DIAO; Luh

    2005-01-01

    Two algorithms for the phase retrieval of hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging are presented. One is referred to as Iterative Angular Spectrum Algorithm (IASA) and the other is a hybrid algorithm that combines IASA with TIE (transport of intensity equation). The calculations of the algorithms are based on free space propagation of the angular spectrum. The new approaches are demonstrated with numerical simulations. Comparisons with other phase retrieval algorithms are also performed. It is shown that the phase retrieval method combining the IASA and TIE is a promising technique for the application of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging.

  6. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    Xi, Yan; Tang, Rongbiao; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related i...

  7. X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography; Proof of principle for post-mortem imaging

    Zamir, A; Arthurs, O.; Hagen, C. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Brochard, T.; Bravin, A.; Sebire, N.; A. Olivo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate the feasibility of using X-ray phase contrast tomography to assess internal organs in a post-mortem piglet model, as a possible non-invasive imaging autopsy technique. Methods: Tomographic images of a new-born piglet were obtained using a Free Space Propagation (FSP) X-ray phase contrast imaging setup at a synchrotron (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France). A monochromatic X-ray beam (52 keV) was used in combination with a detector pixel size of...

  8. Soft-tissue phase-contrast tomography with an x-ray tube source

    We report the first experimental soft-tissue phase-contrast tomography results using a conventional x-ray tube source, with a millimeter-sized focal spot. The setup is based on a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer operated at a mean energy of 28 keV. We present three-dimensional ex vivo images of a chicken heart sample, fixated in formalin. The results clearly demonstrate the advantageous contrast attainable through phase-contrast imaging over conventional attenuation-based approaches.

  9. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown

  10. Combining Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering into a versatile beam shaping approach

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2010-01-01

    We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical ...... manipulation, high-speed sorting and other parallel spatial light applications [1].......We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical...

  11. Combining generalized phase contrast with matched filtering into a versatile beam shaping system

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical ...... manipulation, high-speed sorting and other parallel spatial light applications.......We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical...

  12. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    Suzuki, Yoshio, E-mail: yoshio@spring8.or.jp; Takeuchi, Akihisa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  13. Heralded phase-contrast imaging using an orbital angular momentum phase-filter

    Aspden, Reuben S.; Morris, Peter A.; He, Ruiqing; Chen, Qian; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-05-01

    We utilise the position and orbital angular momentum (OAM) correlations between the signal and idler photons generated in the down-conversion process to obtain ghost images of a phase object. By using an OAM phase filter, which is non-local with respect to the object, the images exhibit isotropic edge-enhancement. This imaging technique is the first demonstration of a full-field, phase-contrast imaging system with non-local edge enhancement, and enables imaging of phase objects using significantly fewer photons than standard phase-contrast imaging techniques.

  14. Array illumination with minimal non-uniformity based on generalized phase contrast

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The generalized phase contrast method (GPC) has been previously shown to be an efficient technique for generating array illumination and is thus highly suitable for such applications as dynamic multiple beam trapping and optical micromanipulation. However, projected arrays usually exhibit intensity...... output spots to improve uniformity. This is combined with matching corrections to the phase shift introduced by the phase contrast filter. Results from numerical experiments show that the array illumination uniformity error improves from over 40% to less than 1% while maintaining the efficiency prior...

  15. Experimental demonstration of Generalized Phase Contrast based Gaussian beam-shaper

    Tauro, Sandeep; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin;

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of Gaussian beam-shaping based on the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) approach. We show that, when using a dynamic spatial light modulator (SLM), this approach can rapidly generate arbitrarily shaped beams. Moreover, we demonstrate that low-cost bin......We report the first experimental demonstration of Gaussian beam-shaping based on the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) approach. We show that, when using a dynamic spatial light modulator (SLM), this approach can rapidly generate arbitrarily shaped beams. Moreover, we demonstrate that low...

  16. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  17. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  18. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Hilpipre, Nicholas; Boylan, Emma E.; Popescu, Andrada R.; Deng, Jie [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); McNeal, Gary R. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Customer Solutions Group, Cardiovascular MR R and D, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Gang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago Research Center, Biostatistics Research Core, Chicago, IL (United States); Choi, Grace [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  19. HII galaxies in 4D

    Telles, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    HII galaxies are clumpy and their gas kinematics can be mapped to show the global turbulent motions and the effect of massive star evolution. The distribution of their physical conditions is homogeneous and oxygen abundance is uniform. The presence of nebular HeII 4868 line seems to be higher in a low abundance galaxy, implying a harder ionization power probably due to stars in low metallicity. Innovative methods of data cube analysis, namely PCA tomography (nicknamed 4D), seem promising in revealing additional information not detected with the standard methods. I review some of our own recent work on the 3D spectroscopy of HII galaxies.

  20. Use of Caval Subtraction 2D Phase-Contrast MR Imaging to Measure Total Liver and Hepatic Arterial Blood Flow: Preclinical Validation and Initial Clinical Translation.

    Chouhan, Manil D; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Bainbridge, Alan; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Davies, Nathan; Halligan, Steve; Lythgoe, Mark F; Taylor, Stuart A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To validate caval subtraction two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements of total liver blood flow (TLBF) and hepatic arterial fraction in an animal model and evaluate consistency and reproducibility in humans. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethical committee for animal care and research ethics was obtained. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2D phase-contrast MR imaging of the portal vein (PV) and infrahepatic and suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC). TLBF and hepatic arterial flow were estimated by subtracting infrahepatic from suprahepatic IVC flow and PV flow from estimated TLBF, respectively. Direct PV transit-time ultrasonography (US) and fluorescent microsphere measurements of hepatic arterial fraction were the standards of reference. Thereafter, consistency of caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging-derived TLBF and hepatic arterial flow was assessed in 13 volunteers (mean age, 28.3 years ± 1.4) against directly measured phase-contrast MR imaging PV and proper hepatic arterial inflow; reproducibility was measured after 7 days. Bland-Altman analysis of agreement and coefficient of variation comparisons were undertaken. Results There was good agreement between PV flow measured with phase-contrast MR imaging and that measured with transit-time US (mean difference, -3.5 mL/min/100 g; 95% limits of agreement [LOA], ±61.3 mL/min/100 g). Hepatic arterial fraction obtained with caval subtraction agreed well with those with fluorescent microspheres (mean difference, 4.2%; 95% LOA, ±20.5%). Good consistency was demonstrated between TLBF in humans measured with caval subtraction and direct inflow phase-contrast MR imaging (mean difference, -1.3 mL/min/100 g; 95% LOA, ±23.1 mL/min/100 g). TLBF reproducibility at 7 days was similar between the two methods (95% LOA, ±31.6 mL/min/100 g vs ±29.6 mL/min/100 g). Conclusion Caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging is a simple and clinically

  1. Grating-based phase-contrast imaging of tumor angiogenesis in lung metastases.

    Huimin Lin

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents.We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF and compared with histological sections.Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape.Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases.

  2. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples.

    Marian Willner

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  3. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results

  4. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown

  5. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    Stevenson, A.W. E-mail: andrew.stevenson@csiro.au; Gureyev, T.E.; Paganin, D.; Wilkins, S.W.; Weitkamp, T.; Snigirev, A.; Rau, C.; Snigireva, I.; Youn, H.S.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Garrett, R.F.; Cookson, D.J.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M

    2003-01-01

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown.

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging at CPHS

    Since the launching of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project of Tsinghua University in 2009, works have begun on the design and engineering of an imaging/radiography instrument for the neutron source provided by CPHS. The instrument will perform basic tasks such as transmission imaging and computerized tomography. Additionally, we include in the design the utilization of coded-aperture and grating-based phase contrast methodology, as well as the options of prompt gamma-ray analysis and neutron-energy selective imaging. Previously, we had implemented the hardware and data-analysis software for grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging. Here, we investigate Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations of neutron refraction phenomena and then model the grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging system according to the classic-optics-based method. The simulated experimental results of the retrieving phase shift gradient information by five-step phase-stepping approach indicate the feasibility of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging as an option for the cold neutron imaging instrument at the CPHS.

  7. Justification of routine WB FDG PET with dual phase contrast CT in head and neck cancers

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the justification of routine WB FDG positron emission tomograph (PET) with dual phase contrast CT and to know the significant contribution of them to evaluate in all stage of the primary head and neck cancers (HNC)

  8. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases

  9. Contrast-to-noise in X-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    Engel, K.J.; Geller, D.; Koehler, T.; Martens, G.; Schusser, S.; Vogtmeier, G.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative theory for the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) is proposed and compared to that of images derived from classical absorption contrast imaging (ACI). Most prominently, the CNR for DPCI contains the reciprocal of thespatial wavelength to be ima

  10. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    Yang, Hao, E-mail: hao.yang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Pennycook, Timothy J.; Nellist, Peter D. [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases.

  11. Generalized Phase contrast and matched filtering for speckle‐free patterned illumination

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson;

    2013-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) and matched‐filtering GPC use tandem diffractive phase elements on Fourier‐conjugate planes of a 4f optical processor to efficiently reshape incident light into a pattern that resembles the input phase modulation pattern. The synthesized patterns are inherently...

  12. Differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst from subarachnoid space enlargement by phase-contrast cine MRI

    于群; 孔祥泉; 刘定西

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To reveal the relationship of brain motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow by phase-contrast cine MRI, and to evaluate this technique in differentiating between arachnoid cysts and subarachnoid space enlargement. Methods Using a phase-contrast cine MRI pulse sequence, we measured brain motion and CSF flow during the cardiac cycle in 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with MRI-suspected arachnoid cyst or subarachnoid space enlargement. CSF stroke volume curve was illustrated according to flow quantification, and time-signal intensity curve was traced. The two curves were compared. Results This study showed that brain motion was due to the volume difference between arterial and venous blood flow during a cardiac cycle, and thus drives CSF pulsation. Arachnoid cysts and subarachnoid space enlargement carried different curve patterns, demonstrating that phase-contrast MRI and flow quantification can be a useful and reliable technique for non-invasive evaluation of brain motion and CSF flow. Conclusion Arachnoid cysts can be successfully differentiated using phase-contrast cine MRI from subarachnoid space enlargement.

  13. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  14. Complete staining of human spermatozoa and immature germ cells combined with phase contrast microscopy

    Michael, A Y; Drejer, J O; Bagger, P V;

    1987-01-01

    A method combining Janus green B and Thymol blue stains the anterior part of the head, the nuclear membrane, middle piece, and tail of spermatozoa light green and the nucleus deep purple. The method provides excellent stained preparations for the evaluation of sperm morphology by phase contrast...... microscopy. It produces significantly less abnormal spermatozoa compared with the Papanicolaou stain....

  15. Noise robustness of a combined phase retrieval and reconstruction method for phase-contrast tomography

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Poulsen, Henning Friis;

    2016-01-01

    Classical reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography consist of two stages: phase retrieval and tomographic reconstruction. A novel algebraic method combining the two was suggested by Kostenko et al. [Opt. Express 21, 12185 (2013) [CrossRef], and preliminary results demonstrated improve...

  16. In-line phase-contrast imaging for strong absorbing objects

    DeCaro, Liberato; Cedola, Alessia; Giannini, Cinzia; Bukreeva, Inna; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is one of the most important emerging x-ray imaging techniques. In this work we analyse, from a theoretical point of view, the in-line phase-contrast image formation under general assumptions. The approach is based on wave-optical theory (Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals) and on the formalism of the mutual coherence function for the evolution of the coherence wavefield properties. Our theoretical model can be applied to phase-contrast imaging realized both by using highly coherent synchrotron radiation and micro-focus x-ray laboratory sources. Thus, the model is suitable for widespread applications, ranging from material science to medical imaging of human body parts. However, it cannot be applied to polychromatic sources, although the validity of the model does not require particularly demanding characteristics of monochromaticity. In addition, for moderate phase gradients, a useful analytical formula of the phase-contrast visibility is derived, based on the a priori knowledge of source size and distance, pixel detector size, defocus distance, material/tissue dielectric susceptibility and characteristic scales of transversal and longitudinal non-uniformities of the material/tissue dielectric susceptibility. Comparisons both with experimental results published by other authors and with simulations based on a Fourier optics approach have been reported, to confirm the validity of the proposed analytical formula.

  17. In-line phase-contrast imaging for strong absorbing objects

    Phase-contrast imaging is one of the most important emerging x-ray imaging techniques. In this work we analyse, from a theoretical point of view, the in-line phase-contrast image formation under general assumptions. The approach is based on wave-optical theory (Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals) and on the formalism of the mutual coherence function for the evolution of the coherence wavefield properties. Our theoretical model can be applied to phase-contrast imaging realized both by using highly coherent synchrotron radiation and micro-focus x-ray laboratory sources. Thus, the model is suitable for widespread applications, ranging from material science to medical imaging of human body parts. However, it cannot be applied to polychromatic sources, although the validity of the model does not require particularly demanding characteristics of monochromaticity. In addition, for moderate phase gradients, a useful analytical formula of the phase-contrast visibility is derived, based on the a priori knowledge of source size and distance, pixel detector size, defocus distance, material/tissue dielectric susceptibility and characteristic scales of transversal and longitudinal non-uniformities of the material/tissue dielectric susceptibility. Comparisons both with experimental results published by other authors and with simulations based on a Fourier optics approach have been reported, to confirm the validity of the proposed analytical formula.

  18. Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography of non-formalin fixed biological objects

    Using a monolithic X-ray interferometer having the view size of 25 mmx25 mm, phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) was performed for non-formalin fixed livers of two normal rats and a rabbit transplanted with VX-2 cancer. PCCT images of liver and cancer lesions resembled well those obtained by formalin fixed samples

  19. Analysis of X-ray phase contrast imaging in atomizing sprays

    Recent studies of spray-related flow fields using synchrotron-based X-ray phase contrast imaging have produced results that are sometimes straightforward to interpret in terms of the fluid structure, but in other cases the images do not reflect generally accepted physics of fluid motion. It has been unclear why some images have the appearance of a normal fluid stream while others depart significantly from expectation. The detailed numerical modeling presented here is meant to explain the images and resolve common questions about the technique. The simulations show that collimated X-ray beams will always contain signatures from every possible encounter, from the input plane to the exit plane, and these signatures generate overlapping phase contrast patterns that can prove at times impossible to interpret. Clouds of moderate- to large-size drops produce a complex, mottled X-ray phase contrast image indicating the presence of the cloud; but it is an image that cannot be interpreted further. Small drops generate something akin to one gray pixel image each, and their size is close to the resolution limit of the instrument, so the diffraction pattern is broadened by the instrument response into something more like a small diffuse blob. Dense clouds of small drops produce a composite image that is a fairly uniform gray mass indicating the presence of a drop cloud that cannot be interpreted further. Moreover, it is not possible to image intact liquid structures behind clouds of drops. Whenever a significant number of drops are present, therefore, X-ray phase contrast images are dominated by unavoidable artifacts of the technique. Sprays, by definition, consist of droplet clouds and this means that internal features in the spray formation region cannot be investigated using X-ray phase contrast imaging. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  1. X-ray microscopy in Ziarnik phase contrast mode at 4 keV photon energy with 60 nm resolution

    We report on x-ray microscopy of advanced microelectronic devices imaged in Zernike-type phase contrast mode at 4 keV photon energy. Fresnel zone plates were used as high resolution x-ray objectives providing 60 nm spatial resolution. Integrated circuit copper interconnect structures were imaged in positive as well as negative phase contrast. In both cases the phase contrast in the x-ray images is about five times higher than the pure absorption contrast

  2. Performance analysis of the attenuation-partition based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for in-line phase-contrast imaging

    YAN Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The phase retrieval is an important task in x-ray phase contrast imaging. The robustness of phase retrieval is especially important for potential medical imaging applications such as phase contrast mammography. Recently the authors developed an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the attenuation-partition based algorithm, for the phase retrieval in inline phase-contrast imaging [1]. Applied to experimental images, the algorithm was proven to be fast and robust. However, a quantitative analys...

  3. Visibility in differential phase-contrast imaging with partial coherence source

    Liu Xin; Guo Jin-Chuan; Peng Xiang; Niu Han-Ben

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives theoretical analysis of visibility of fringes, which is influenced by distances, temporal and spatial coherence of source, in hard x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with microfocus x-ray source. According to the character of longitudinal periodicity of the interferogram, the setup is insensitive to mechanical drift and vibrations. The effect of temporal coherence of x-ray source is investigated and its related bandwidth is derived. Based on the theory of partially coherent light, it shows that the requirement for the spatial coherence of x-ray source is not strict and can be met by the general microfocus x-ray tube for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

  4. Optical imaging of transient acoustic fields using a phase contrast method

    Clement, G T

    2014-01-01

    A coherent phase-contrast optical system has been designed and tested for tomographic imaging of pressure fields from experimental transient acoustic signals. The system is similar to the pulsed, central-order schlieren method, but uses a Fourier filtering technique that images the actual acoustic pressure field, where the former technique reconstructs only the absolute value of the field. Simulations of the system are performed using a single-cycle sine-wave acoustic pulse. Experimental images resulting from a broad-band Gaussian pulse input to an underwater piezoceramic transducer array are presented. Relative pressure field s are reconstructed in space over a series of times after the source excitation. Theory and limitations of the phase contrast system are discussed.

  5. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    Maretzke, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent X-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only ...

  6. X-ray phase-contrast imaging of dynamics of complex fluids

    Complex fluids often exhibit unusual and/or unexpected behaviours in response to external stresses because of their complicated structures and compositions. It is not easy to understand dynamic behaviours of complex fluids based on using conventional imaging methods such as optical or electron microscopy. Recently, x-ray phase-contrast imaging, as one of the most powerful methods, has been introduced for elucidating the dynamic nature of complex fluids, enabling directly looking into the insides of complex fluids thanks to the strong penetration capability and small refractivity of hard x-rays. In this paper, we review representative x-ray imaging studies on dynamics of various complex fluid systems from droplets, bubbles, granular materials and foams to colloids. It is demonstrated that x-ray phase-contrast imaging would help us better identify and utilize the properties of complex fluids. (paper)

  7. Development of microperiodic mirrors for hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Differential phase-contrast imaging with hard x rays can have important applications in medicine, material sciences, and energy research. Phase-contrast methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, are particularly attractive because they allow the use of conventional x-ray tubes. To enable shearing interferometry with x rays up to 100 keV, we propose using grazing-incidence microperiodic mirrors. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors, based on the difference in grazing-incidence reflectivity between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Using this method, we produced prototype mirrors with 5-100 μm periods and 90 mm active length. Experimental tests with x rays up to 60 keV indicate good microperiodic mirror reflectivity and high-contrast fringe patterns, encouraging further development of the proposed imaging concept.

  8. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly optimiza......We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly...... optimization of the input aperture parameters according to desired output characteristics. For wavefront sensing, the achieved aperture control opens a new degree of freedom for improving the accuracy of quantitative phase imaging. Diffractive GPC input modulation also fits well with grating-based optical...

  9. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact

  10. Sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects by plasmonic lens structure

    Yao, Na; Wang, Changtao; Tao, Xing; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2013-04-01

    We propose a specially designed plasmonic lens structure to succeed in realizing sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects. The nano-objects are embedded inside the insulator layer of the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic structure and have a small refractive index difference with respect to the transparent insulator layer. The excited surface plasmons in the MIM structure help to greatly enhance scattered light from the nano-objects and effectively suppress the transmitted illumination light. A spatial resolution of about 64 nm and a minimum distinguishable refractive index difference down to 0.05 are numerically demonstrated. For sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of irregular three-dimensional (3D) nanowires and nanocylinders, the optimized MIM structure shows much better performance in comparison with that of a superlens.

  11. Sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects by plasmonic lens structure

    We propose a specially designed plasmonic lens structure to succeed in realizing sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects. The nano-objects are embedded inside the insulator layer of the metal–insulator–metal (MIM) plasmonic structure and have a small refractive index difference with respect to the transparent insulator layer. The excited surface plasmons in the MIM structure help to greatly enhance scattered light from the nano-objects and effectively suppress the transmitted illumination light. A spatial resolution of about 64 nm and a minimum distinguishable refractive index difference down to 0.05 are numerically demonstrated. For sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of irregular three-dimensional (3D) nanowires and nanocylinders, the optimized MIM structure shows much better performance in comparison with that of a superlens. (paper)

  12. Cone-beam differential phase-contrast laminography with x-ray tube source

    Fu, J.; Biernath, T.; Willner, M.; Amberger, M.; Meiser, J.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Herzen, J.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an x-ray cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed laminography (DPC-CL) method for tomographic reconstruction of thin and lamellar objects. We describe the specific scan geometry of DPC-CL, which consists of a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer and a lab-based x-ray tube source, and derive a filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The experimental results of a flat sphere phantom and a piece of ham demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The existing DPC-CL methods are based on synchrotron sources and the parallel-beam geometry. In contrast, our approach adopts a more accessible x-ray tube source and a cone-beam geometry. Therefore it significantly widens the application range of phase-contrast laminography, particularly in practical laboratory settings, beyond applications at large-scale synchrotron facilities.

  13. Design of a novel phase contrast X-ray imaging system for mammography

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an X-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an X-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory X-ray sources. The design of this system requires rigorous simulation of the imaging system and the interaction of X-rays with healthy and unhealthy breast tissue. We present in this paper the results of such simulations showing the expected gain in contrast arising from the proposed system and the system's initial design.

  14. Characterization of NIF cryogenic beryllium capsules using x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Montgomery, D. S. (David S.); Nobile, A. (Arthur), Jr.; Walsh, Peter J.,

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium capsules filled with cryogenic deuterium and tritium fuel layers may provide many advantages for obtaining ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). However, characterizing the uniformity and thickness of the frozen fuel layer in such a target is challenging since traditional x-ray radiography techniques, which rely on absorption for'image contrast, cannot provide sufficient contrast to image the fuel layer in these low-Z materials. We propose using x-ray phase contrast imaging, which relies on gradients in the refractive index and wave interference, to characterize fuel layer uniformity. We present numerical modeling results of x-ray phase contrast imaging demonstrating the feasibility of this method for target characterization, discuss the necessary x-ray source characteristics, and present concepts for using this technique in the context of dynamic high density plasma experiments.

  15. Generation of a Desired Wavefront with a Plurality of Phase Contrast Filters

    2004-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing an intensity pattern based on generalized phase contrast imaging. The phase filter contains a plurality of phase shifting regions that is matched to the layout of a light source array, each of the regions being positioned at...... the zero-order diffraction region of a respective element of the array. Further, the shape of each phase shifting region may match the shape of the zero-order diffraction region of the respective element. Thus, the energy of the electromagnetic fields of the system may be distributed over a large area...... compared to the area of a zero-order diffraction region of a single plane electromagnetic field of a known phase contrast imaging system....

  16. Cine phase contrast angiography of normal and diseased peripheral arteries. Preliminary results

    Cine phase contrast angiography (PCA) is a modified MR phase contrast sequence that acquires up to 22 coronal phase images per mean cardiac cycle. The ability of the sequence to visualise local haemodynamics was investigated in 7 normal volunteers and 9 patients with flow disturbances of the peripheral arteries using a 1.5 T imager. Functional flow information provided by coronal cine PCA was correlated with quantitative data obtained by MR flow measurements and vessel morphology confirmed by conventional angiograms. Due to the yet suboptimal image quality, an aortic dissection and 1 of 4 aneurysms could not be depicted morphologically. The temporal pattern of arterial perfusion in cine PCA corresponded with flow velocity versus time data provided by quantitative MR flow measurements. Accuracy and time resolution of cine PCA was thus sufficient to provide functional information on the severity of occlusive vascular disease. (orig.)

  17. An iterative method for robust in-line phase contrast imaging

    Carroll, Aidan J.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Tran, Giang N.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2016-04-01

    We present an iterative near-field in-line phase contrast method that allows quantitative determination of the thickness of an object given the refractive index of the sample material. The iterative method allows for quantitative phase contrast imaging in regimes where the contrast transfer function (CTF) and transport of intensity equation (TIE) cannot be applied. Further, the nature of the iterative scheme offers more flexibility and potentially allows more high-resolution image reconstructions when compared to TIE method and less artefacts when compared to the CTF method. While, not addressed here, extension of our approach in future work to broadband illumination will also be straightforward as the wavelength dependence of the refractive index of an object can be readily incorporated into the iterative approach.

  18. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-08-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  19. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Martin Krenkel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  20. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Krenkel, Martin; Töpperwien, Mareike; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  1. On the origin of speckle in x-ray phase contrast images of lung tissue

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging of small animal lungs reveals a speckled intensity pattern not seen in other tissues, making the lungs highly visible in comparison to other organs. Although bearing a superficial resemblance to alveoli, the cause of this speckle has not been established. With a view to determining the mechanism for the formation of speckle, this paper details the results of propagation-based phase contrast experiments performed on mice lungs, together with packed glass microspheres used to emulate lung tissue. These experimental studies are compared to numerical simulations, based on wave propagation techniques. We find that speckle arises from focusing effects, with multiple alveoli acting as aberrated compound refractive lenses. Both experiments and modelling suggest that this speckle-formation phenomenon may lead to better screening methods for human lungs than conventional radiography

  2. On the origin of speckle in x-ray phase contrast images of lung tissue

    Kitchen, M J [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Paganin, D [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Lewis, R A [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mudie, S T [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2004-09-21

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging of small animal lungs reveals a speckled intensity pattern not seen in other tissues, making the lungs highly visible in comparison to other organs. Although bearing a superficial resemblance to alveoli, the cause of this speckle has not been established. With a view to determining the mechanism for the formation of speckle, this paper details the results of propagation-based phase contrast experiments performed on mice lungs, together with packed glass microspheres used to emulate lung tissue. These experimental studies are compared to numerical simulations, based on wave propagation techniques. We find that speckle arises from focusing effects, with multiple alveoli acting as aberrated compound refractive lenses. Both experiments and modelling suggest that this speckle-formation phenomenon may lead to better screening methods for human lungs than conventional radiography.

  3. In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging Using Partially Coherent Hard X-Ray

    喻虹; 朱频频; 韩申生; 罗震林; 高琛

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of in-line hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging had been performed, using the polychromatic output of an x-ray tube. The results are in good agreement with partially coherent theory of hard x-ray phasecontrast imaging. The new technique provides the advantage to obtain the radiographs of large samples in an acceptable exposure time, which is very important to clinical applications.

  4. Noise and Analyzer-Crystal Angular Position Analysis for Analyzer-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the...

  5. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    Hongchang Wang; Sebastien Berujon; Julia Herzen; Robert Atwood; David Laundy; Alexander Hipp; Kawal Sawhney

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric informa...

  6. High-sensitivity phase-contrast tomography of rat brain in phosphate buffered saline

    Pfeiffer, F.; David, C.; Bunk, O.; Poitry-Yamate, C.; Grütter, R; B. Müller; Weitkamp, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report advances and complementary results concerning a recently developed method for high-sensitivity grating-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography. In particular we demonstrate how the soft tissue sensitivity of the technique can be used to obtain in-vitro tomographic images of rat brain specimens. Contrary to our previous experiments with fixated specimen (chemically modified or formalin fixed), the present results on the rat's brain are closer to the in-vivo situation. The findings are ...

  7. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    Yan Xi; Xiaojie Lin; Falei Yuan; Guo-Yuan Yang; Jun Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displa...

  8. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    William Vågberg; Daniel H. Larsson; Mei Li; Anders Arner; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-bas...

  9. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system toge...

  10. Experimental demonstration of Generalized Phase Contrast based Gaussian beam-shaper

    Tauro, Sandeep; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of Gaussian beam-shaping based on the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) approach. We show that, when using a dynamic spatial light modulator (SLM), this approach can rapidly generate arbitrarily shaped beams. Moreover, we demonstrate that low-cost binary-phase optics fabricated using photolithography and chemical etching techniques can replace the SLM in static and high power beam shaping applications. The design parameters for the binary-phase el...