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Sample records for 4d phase-contrast magnetic

  1. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  2. 4-D flow magnetic resonance imaging: blood flow quantification compared to 2-D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and Doppler echocardiography

    Gabbour, Maya [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Schnell, Susanne [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Jarvis, Kelly [Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Robinson, Joshua D. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Evanston, IL (United States); Rigsby, Cynthia K. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging 9, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Doppler echocardiography (echo) is the reference standard for blood flow velocity analysis, and two-dimensional (2-D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the reference standard for quantitative blood flow assessment. However, both clinical standard-of-care techniques are limited by 2-D acquisitions and single-direction velocity encoding and may make them inadequate to assess the complex three-dimensional hemodynamics seen in congenital heart disease. Four-dimensional flow MRI (4-D flow) enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex blood flow in the heart and great arteries. The objectives of this study are to compare 4-D flow with 2-D phase-contrast MRI for quantification of aortic and pulmonary flow and to evaluate the advantage of 4-D flow-based volumetric flow analysis compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo for peak velocity assessment in children and young adults. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI of the aortic root, main pulmonary artery (MPA), and right and left pulmonary arteries (RPA, LPA) and 4-D flow with volumetric coverage of the aorta and pulmonary arteries were performed in 50 patients (mean age: 13.1 ± 6.4 years). Four-dimensional flow analyses included calculation of net flow and regurgitant fraction with 4-D flow analysis planes similarly positioned to 2-D planes. In addition, 4-D flow volumetric assessment of aortic root/ascending aorta and MPA peak velocities was performed and compared to 2-D phase-contrast MRI and echo. Excellent correlation and agreement were found between 2-D phase-contrast MRI and 4-D flow for net flow (r = 0.97, P < 0.001) and excellent correlation with good agreement was found for regurgitant fraction (r = 0.88, P < 0.001) in all vessels. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MRI significantly underestimated aortic (P = 0.032) and MPA (P < 0.001) peak velocities compared to echo, while volumetric 4-D flow analysis resulted in higher (aortic: P = 0.001) or similar (MPA: P = 0.98) peak

  3. 4D phase contrast flow imaging for in-stent flow visualization and assessment of stent patency in peripheral vascular stents – A phantom study

    Purpose: 4D phase contrast flow imaging is increasingly used to study the hemodynamics in various vascular territories and pathologies. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and validity of MRI based 4D phase contrast flow imaging for the evaluation of in-stent blood flow in 17 commonly used peripheral stents. Materials and methods: 17 different peripheral stents were implanted into a MR compatible flow phantom. In-stent visibility, maximal velocity and flow visualization were assessed and estimates of in-stent patency obtained from 4D phase contrast flow data sets were compared to a conventional 3D contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) as well as 2D PC flow measurements. Results: In all but 3 of the tested stents time-resolved 3D particle traces could be visualized inside the stent lumen. Quality of 4D flow visualization and CE-MRA images depended on stent type and stent orientation relative to the magnetic field. Compared to the visible lumen area determined by 3D CE-MRA, estimates of lumen patency derived from 4D flow measurements were significantly higher and less dependent on stent type. A higher number of stents could be assessed for in-stent patency by 4D phase contrast flow imaging (n = 14) than by 2D phase contrast flow imaging (n = 10). Conclusions: 4D phase contrast flow imaging in peripheral vascular stents is feasible and appears advantageous over conventional 3D contrast-enhanced MR angiography and 2D phase contrast flow imaging. It allows for in-stent flow visualization and flow quantification with varying quality depending on stent type

  4. Automatic Segmentation of Intracranial Arteries in 4-Dimensional Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Spaak, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The development of a highly effective phase-contrast magnetic resonance imag- ing (PC-MRI) technique named phase-contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction (PC-VIPR) has improved the ability to image blood flow in the brain. The technique allows for the acquisition of temporally resolved volume images with high spatial resolution. Utilizing these improvements is of importance for diagnostic and research applications. The aim in this project was to investigate and impleme...

  5. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast.

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. PMID:27085170

  6. Cardiac magnetic resonance: is phonocardiogram gating reliable in velocity-encoded phase contrast imaging?

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of phonocardiogram (PCG) gated velocity-encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Flow quantification above the aortic valve was performed in 68 patients by acquiring a retrospectively PCG- and a retrospectively ECG-gated velocity-encoded GE-sequence at 1.5 T. Peak velocity (PV), average velocity (AV), forward volume (FV), reverse volume (RV), net forward volume (NFV), as well as the regurgitant fraction (RF) were assessed for both datasets, as well as for the PCG-gated datasets after compensation for the PCG trigger delay. PCG-gated image acquisition was feasible in 64 patients, ECG-gated in all patients. PCG-gated flow quantification overestimated PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037) and underestimated FV (Δ -4.9 ± 15.7 ml; P = 0.015) and NFV (Δ -4.5 ± 16.5 ml; P = 0.033) compared with ECG-gated imaging. After compensation for the PCG trigger delay, differences were only observed for PV (Δ 3.8 ± 14.1 cm/s; P = 0.037). Wide limits of agreement between PCG- and ECG-gated flow quantification were observed for all variables (PV: -23.9 to 31.4 cm/s; AV: -4.5 to 3.9 cm/s; FV: -35.6 to 25.9 ml; RV: -8.0 to 7.2 ml; NFV: -36.8 to 27.8 ml; RF: -10.4 to 10.2 %). The present study demonstrates that PCG gating in its current form is not reliable enough for flow quantification based on velocity-encoded phase contrast gradient echo (GE) sequences. (orig.)

  7. Segmentation of phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging to study the dynamic of perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging allows studying quantitatively the perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. However, the anatomy of the subarachnoid space difficult the segmentation of CSF due to the presence of vascular structures and spinal nerves. The aim of this paper is to describe a semiautomatic segmentation method for the study of the perimedullary CSF dynamics. The process is started with a seed point within the region to analyze. The algorithm creates a correlation map, calculates a threshold value and classifies pixels of CSF combining different temporal characteristics of flow behavior as input attributes to a k-means algorithm. One observer carried out ten times the segmentation of the cervical images in 5 healthy subjects; stroke volume and area were calculated. The variability of the obtained measurements was evaluated as an estimation of the reproducibility of the method. For this the coefficient of variation was calculated. The variability of the measurements was less than 5%. The method facilitates the quantification of perimedullary CSF. Stroke volume and the area at C2C3 space and prepontine cistern were measured in 16 healthy subjects.

  8. Use of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery

    The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) angiography (PC-MRA) to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery. PC-MRA was performed in 16 volunteers with no ophthalmic abnormalities and measurement of blood flow based on the results was attempted. It was possible to measure blood flow in the ophthalmic artery using PC-MRA in all 16 volunteers. The mean (±1 standard deviation) velocity was 9.17±2.28 cm/second, peak systolic velocity was 16.69±3.33 cm/second, and end diastolic velocity was 3.69±2.44 cm/second. The resistivity index was 0.79±0.12, the pulsatility index was 1.49±0.41, and flow was 6.25±2.33 ml/minute. It was possible to identify the ophthalmic artery and a portion of the artery in which blood flow could be measured using MR imaging, a preliminary step to blood flow measurement using MR angiography. In addition to the velocity of blood flow in the ophthalmic artery, measurement of the amount of flow was possible with PC-MRA, which is one advantage of this method. (author)

  9. Measurement of flow velocity by magnetic resonance imaging using 2D phase contrast technique. Estimation of oblique flow

    This study analyzed the effects of the obliqueness of flow on the accuracy of measuring flow velocity by means of the 2D phase contrast MR technique. A constant flow phantom consisting of a pump, a polyethylene tube and a flow meter was assembled. A commercial 1.5 Tesla MR imager was used to perform flow velocity measurements. The phase contrast technique was used to estimate the flow velocity of saline through the phantom. The effects of changes in obliqueness of flow to the plane of imaging were studied. The obliqueness had a significant effect that was more pronounced with increasing section thickness. An increase in the obliqueness angle caused underestimation of the average and maximum velocities. The obliqueness was found to be an important parameter affecting the estimation with the 2D phase contrast MR technique. The application of MR to flow velocity measurement was first described by Singer. Various pulse sequences have been proposed to evaluate the flow velocity by MR. The two main classes of techniques are the time-of-flight method and the phase contrast method. The time-of-flight technique derives its contrast from the flow-related enhancement of inflowing blood. The phase contrast method, on the other hand, is based on applying balanced gradient pulses, and derives its contrast by detecting spin phase differences as blood moves across a magnetic field gradient. The phase contrast technique is not only a simple subtraction of phase images on a pixel by pixel basis but a complex difference of phase obtained with a known different flow encoding gradient. Phase images are collected using balanced gradient pulses to produce a phase shift for moving spins. The difference in phase is directly proportional to the flow velocity of the spins within the corresponding voxels. The phase contrast technique is generally better than the time-of-flight technique for quantitative measurement of flow velocity in cardiovascular an cerebrospinal abnormalities. Advantages

  10. Optimal velocity encoding during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of velocity encoding on measurement of brain blood flow and blood volume of inflow and outflow using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography. A single two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography slice was applied perpendicular to the internal carotid artery and the vertebral artery at C2 level. For each subject, the velocity encoding was set from 30 to 90 cm/s with an interval of 10 cm/s for a total of seven settings. Various velocity encodings greatly affected blood flow volume, maximal blood flow velocity and mean blood flow velocity in the internal carotid artery, but did not significantly affect vertebral arteries and jugular veins. When velocity encoding was 60-80 cm/s, the inflow blood volume was 655 ± 118 mL/min, and the outflow volume was 506 ± 186 mL/min. The ratio of outflow/inflow was steady at 0.78-0.83, and there was no aliasing in any of the images. These findings suggest that velocity encodings of 60-80 cm/s should be selected during measurement of cerebral blood flow volume using phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography.

  11. Baseline correction of phase-contrast images in congenital cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Lai Wyman W

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One potential source of error in phase contrast (PC congenital CMR flow measurements is caused by phase offsets due to local non-compensated eddy currents. Phantom correction of these phase offset errors has been shown to result in more accurate measurements of blood flow in adults with structurally normal hearts. We report the effect of phantom correction on PC flow measurements at a clinical congenital CMR program. Results Flow was measured in the ascending aorta, main pulmonary artery, and right and left pulmonary arteries as clinically indicated, and additional values such as Qp/Qs were derived from these measurements. Phantom correction in our study population of 149 patients resulted in clinically significant changes in 13% to 48% of these phase-contrast measurements in patients with known or suspected heart disease. Overall, 640 measurements or calculated values were analyzed, and clinically significant changes were found in 31%. Larger vessels were associated with greater phase offset errors, with 22% of the changes in PC flow measurements attributed to the size of the vessel measured. In patients with structurally normal hearts, the pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio after phantom correction was closer to 1.0 than before phantom correction. There was no significant difference in the effect of phantom correction for patients with tetralogy of Fallot as compared to the group as a whole. Conclusions Phantom correction often resulted in clinically significant changes in PC blood flow measurements in patients with known or suspected congenital heart disease. In laboratories performing clinical CMR with suspected phase offset errors of significance, the routine use of phantom correction for PC flow measurements should be considered.

  12. Real-time phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging for assessment of haemodynamics: from phantom to patients

    Traber, Julius; Wurche, Lennart; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Utz, Wolfgang; Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Max-Delbrueck-Centrum and Charite -Medical University Berlin and HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Working Group on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Jin, Ning [Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Assessment of haemodynamics is crucial in many cardiac diseases. Phase contrast MRI (PC-MRI) can accurately access it. Arrhythmia is a major limitation in conventional segmented PC-MRI (SEG). A real-time PC-MRI sequence (RT) could overcome this. We validated RT by comparing to SEG. A prototype RT using shared velocity encoding was tested against SEG at 1.5 T in a flow phantom and consecutively included patients with (n = 55) or without (n = 59) aortic valve disease. In patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib, n = 15), only RT was applied. Phantom: PC images were acquired in front of and behind an interchangeable aortic-stenosis-like inlay. Mean velocity and flow were quantified. Patients: PC images were acquired in the ascending aorta, pulmonary trunk and superior caval vein. Peak velocity, stroke volume and regurgitant fraction were quantified. Phantom: Mean velocities (11 ± 1 to 207 ± 10 cm/s) and flow correlated closely between SEG and RT (r ≥ 0.99, ICC ≥ 0.98, p < 0.0005). Patients without AVD or with aortic regurgitation: Concordance of SEG and RT was excellent regarding peak velocities, stroke volumes (r ≥ 0.91, ICC ≥ 0.94, p < 0.0005) and regurgitant fractions (r = 0.95, ICC = 0.95, p < 0.0005). RT was feasible in all patients with Afib. The real-time sequence is accurate compared to conventional segmented PC-MRI. Its applicability in Afib was shown. Real-time PC-MRI might become a valuable tool in arrhythmia. (orig.)

  13. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging reveals net retrograde aqueductal flow in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Ringstad, Geir; Emblem, Kyrre Eeg; Eide, Per Kristian

    2016-06-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to assess the net aqueductal stroke volume (ASV) and CSF aqueductal flow rate derived from phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) in patients with probable idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) before and after ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery, and to compare observations with intracranial pressure (ICP) scores. METHODS PC-MRI at the level of the sylvian aqueduct was undertaken in patients undergoing assessment for probable iNPH. Aqueductal flow in the craniocaudal direction was defined as positive, or antegrade flow, and net ASV was calculated by subtracting retrograde from antegrade aqueductal flow. Aqueductal flow rate per minute was calculated by multiplying net ASV by heart rate. During the same hospital admission, clinical examination was performed using NPH score and overnight continuous ICP monitoring. Twelve patients were followed prospectively 12 months after shunt placement with clinical assessment and a second PC-MRI. The study also included 2 healthy controls. RESULTS Among 21 patients examined for iNPH, 17 (81%) received a shunt (shunt group), and 4 were treated conservatively (conservative group). Among the patients with shunts, a clinical improvement was observed in 16 (94%) of the 17. Net ASV was negative in 16 (76%) of 21 patients before shunt placement and in 5 (42%) of 12 patients after shunt placement, and increased from a median of -5 μl (range -175 to 27 μl) to a median of 1 μl (range -61 to 30 μl; p = 0.04). Among the 12 patients with PC-MRI after shunt placement, 11 were shunt responders, and in 9 of these 11 either a reduced magnitude of retrograde aqueductal flow, or a complete reversal from retrograde to antegrade flow, occurred. Net ASV was significantly lower in the shunt group than in the conservative group (p = 0.01). The aqueductal flow rate increased from -0.56 ml/min (range -12.78 to 0.58 ml/min) to 0.06 ml/min (range -4.51 to 1.93 ml/min; p = 0.04) after shunt placement. CONCLUSIONS In

  14. Magnetic properties of 4d transition-metal clusters

    We analyze the stability of magnetic states obtained within the tight-binding model solved by molecular dynamics for cubo-octahedral (fcc) and icosahedral clusters of 3d (Ni and Co) and 4d (Pd, Rh, and Ru) transition metals. The magnetic states are stabilized by the Hund close-quote s rule exchange interaction between the d orbitals. Taking realistic parameters deduced from band structure calculations and spectroscopic data, we obtained saturated ferromagnetism for Ni13, Co13, and Pd13 clusters, while Rh13 fcc and Ru13 clusters are partially magnetic, with an antiferromagnetic orientation of the moments on the central atoms in Ru clusters. Our results for 4d transition-metal clusters agree qualitatively with the recent experimental data and with other calculations. Metastable magnetic clusters were identified in several situations. We found a dependence of the equilibrium lattice constant on the magnetization in the considered clusters which may be explained by the character of wave functions in the cluster electronic structure. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  15. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  16. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic Mass in 4D AdS Gravity

    Araneda, Rene; Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    We provide a fully-covariant expression for the diffeomorphic charge in 4D anti-de Sitter gravity, when the Gauss-Bonnet and Pontryagin terms are added to the action. The couplings of these topological invariants are such that the Weyl tensor and its dual appear in the on-shell variation of the action, and such that the action is stationary for asymptotic (anti) self-dual solutions in the Weyl tensor. In analogy with Euclidean electromagnetism, whenever the self-duality condition is global, both the action and the total charge are identically vanishing. Therefore, for such configurations the magnetic mass equals the Ashtekhar-Magnon-Das definition.

  18. Phase contrast image synthesis

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  19. Phase contrast image synthesis

    Glückstad, J.

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  20. Suitable image parameters and analytical method for quantitatively measuring cerebral blood flow volume with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    The aim of this study was to determine suitable image parameters and an analytical method for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) as a means of measuring cerebral blood flow volume. This was done by constructing an experimental model and applying the results to a clinical application. The experimental model was constructed from the aorta of a bull and circulating isotonic saline. The image parameters of PC-MRI (repetition time, flip angle, matrix, velocity rate encoding, and the use of square pixels) were studied with percent flow volume (the ratio of actual flow volume to measured flow volume). The most suitable image parameters for accurate blood flow measurement were as follows: repetition time, 50 msec; flip angle, 20 degrees; and a 512 x 256 matrix without square pixels. Furthermore, velocity rate encoding should be set ranging from the maximum flow velocity in the vessel to five times this value. The correction in measuring blood flow was done with the intensity of the region of interest established in the background. With these parameters for PC-MRI, percent flow volume was greater than 90%. Using the image parameters for PC-MRI and the analytical method described above, we evaluated cerebral blood flow volume in 12 patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. The results were compared with conventional xenon computed tomography. The values found with both methods showed good correlation. Thus, we concluded that PC-MRI was a noninvasive method for evaluating cerebral blood flow in patients with occlusive disease of the major cervical arteries. (author)

  1. Flow velocity and volume measurement of superior and inferior mesenteric artery with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    The flow velocity and volume of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries (SMA, IMA) were measured with cine phase contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in five healthy volunteers. Each volunteer was first measured in a fasting state, and then one, two, and three hours after a meal. The average SMA flow volume of the volunteers was 230.3±46.8 ml/min (mean±standard error) during the fasting state, and 714.7±207.7 ml/min, 339.2±85.7 ml/min, and 263.8±21.0 ml/min, respectively, at one, two, and three hours postmeal. The increase at one hour postmeal was statistically significant (p<0.05). The corresponding flow measurements in the IMA were 63.1±11.2 ml/min, 67.6±11.2 ml/min, 57.9±8.6 ml/min, and 53.2±6.8 ml/min. These values do not represent a statistically significant flow volume change in the IMA. In all volunteers, the SMA volumetric flow increased the most one hour after the food challenge (72-400% relative to baseline). Diastolic velocity in the SMA increased significantly one hour postmeal, but systolic velocity did not change significantly. The IMA did not demonstrate a significant change in either systolic or diastolic velocity. The difference between the SMA and IMA in the way of reacting against the food challenge is thought to represent the difference between the requirements of small and large intestine for blood supply after the food challenge. These data demonstrate the possibility of this modality for the assessment of conditions such as chronic mesenteric ischemia. (author)

  2. Generalized phase contrast:

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the......Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...

  3. Generalized Phase Contrast

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  4. Aortic valve stenotic area calculation from phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance: the importance of short echo time

    Cowan Brett R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can potentially quantify aortic valve area (AVA in aortic stenosis (AS using a single-slice phase contrast (PC acquisition at valve level: AVA = aortic flow/aortic velocity-time integral (VTI. However, CMR has been shown to underestimate aortic flow in turbulent high velocity jets, due to intra-voxel dephasing. This study investigated the effect of decreasing intra-voxel dephasing by reducing the echo time (TE on AVA estimates in patients with AS. Method 15 patients with moderate or severe AS, were studied with three different TEs (2.8 ms/2.0 ms/1.5 ms, in the main pulmonary artery (MPA, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT and 0 cm/1 cm/2.5 cm above the aortic valve (AoV. PC estimates of stroke volume (SV were compared with CMR left ventricular SV measurements and PC peak velocity, VTI and AVA were compared with Doppler echocardiography. CMR estimates of AVA obtained by direct planimetry from cine acquisitions were also compared with the echoAVA. Results With a TE of 2.8 ms, the mean PC SV was similar to the ventricular SV at the MPA, LVOT and AoV0 cm (by Bland-Altman analysis bias ± 1.96 SD, 1.3 ± 20.2 mL/-6.8 ± 21.9 mL/6.5 ± 50.7 mL respectively, but was significantly lower at AoV1 and AoV2.5 (-29.3 ± 31.2 mL/-21.1 ± 35.7 mL. PC peak velocity and VTI underestimated Doppler echo estimates by approximately 10% with only moderate agreement. Shortening the TE from 2.8 to 1.5 msec improved the agreement between ventricular SV and PC SV at AoV0 cm (6.5 ± 50.7 mL vs 1.5 ± 37.9 mL respectively but did not satisfactorily improve the PC SV estimate at AoV1 cm and AoV2.5 cm. Agreement of CMR AVA with echoAVA was improved at TE 1.5 ms (0.00 ± 0.39 cm2 versus TE 2.8 (0.11 ± 0.81 cm2. The CMR method which agreed best with echoAVA was direct planimetry (-0.03 cm2 ± 0.24 cm2. Conclusion Agreement of CMR AVA at the aortic valve level with echo AVA improves with a reduced TE of 1.5 ms

  5. Magnetic resonance 4D flow analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari I malformation with and without syringomyelia

    To analyse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics in patients with Chiari type I malformation (CM) with and without syringomyelia using 4D magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast (PC) flow imaging. 4D-PC CSF flow data were acquired in 20 patients with CM (12 patients with presyrinx/syrinx). Characteristic 4D-CSF flow patterns were identified. Quantitative CSF flow parameters were assessed at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal and compared with healthy volunteers and between patients with and without syringomyelia. Compared with healthy volunteers, 17 CM patients showed flow abnormalities at the craniocervical junction in the form of heterogeneous flow (n = 3), anterolateral flow jets (n = 14) and flow vortex formation (n = 5), most prevalent in patients with syringomyelia. Peak flow velocities at the craniocervical junction were significantly increased in patients (-15.5 ± 11.3 vs. -4.7 ± 0.7 cm/s in healthy volunteers, P < 0.001). At the level of C1, maximum systolic flow was found to be significantly later in the cardiac cycle in patients (30.8 ± 10.3 vs. 22.7 ± 4.1%, P < 0.05). 4D-PC flow imaging allowed comprehensive analysis of CSF flow in patients with Chiari I malformation. Alterations of CSF hydrodynamics were most pronounced in patients with syringomyelia. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance 4D flow analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in Chiari I malformation with and without syringomyelia

    Bunck, Alexander C. [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Kroeger, Jan Robert; Juettner, Alena; Heindel, Walter; Schwindt, Wolfram; Niederstadt, Thomas [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); Brentrup, Angela [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Neurosurgery, Muenster (Germany); Fiedler, Barbara [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of General Pediatrics, Muenster (Germany); Crelier, Gerard R. [ETH and University of Zurich, Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Zurich (Switzerland); Martin, Bryn A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Laboratory of Hemodynamics and Cardiovascular Technology, School of Engineering, Interfaculty Institute of Bioengineering, Lausanne (Switzerland); Maintz, David [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Clinical Radiology, Muenster (Germany); University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    To analyse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrodynamics in patients with Chiari type I malformation (CM) with and without syringomyelia using 4D magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast (PC) flow imaging. 4D-PC CSF flow data were acquired in 20 patients with CM (12 patients with presyrinx/syrinx). Characteristic 4D-CSF flow patterns were identified. Quantitative CSF flow parameters were assessed at the craniocervical junction and the cervical spinal canal and compared with healthy volunteers and between patients with and without syringomyelia. Compared with healthy volunteers, 17 CM patients showed flow abnormalities at the craniocervical junction in the form of heterogeneous flow (n = 3), anterolateral flow jets (n = 14) and flow vortex formation (n = 5), most prevalent in patients with syringomyelia. Peak flow velocities at the craniocervical junction were significantly increased in patients (-15.5 {+-} 11.3 vs. -4.7 {+-} 0.7 cm/s in healthy volunteers, P < 0.001). At the level of C1, maximum systolic flow was found to be significantly later in the cardiac cycle in patients (30.8 {+-} 10.3 vs. 22.7 {+-} 4.1%, P < 0.05). 4D-PC flow imaging allowed comprehensive analysis of CSF flow in patients with Chiari I malformation. Alterations of CSF hydrodynamics were most pronounced in patients with syringomyelia. (orig.)

  7. Phase Contrast Imaging

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation with a si......The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...

  8. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, F. R. N. C.; MacDowell, A.; Marchesini, S.; Padmore, H. A.; Parkinson, D. Y.; PIEN., J.; Schirotzek, A.; Yang, C

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard...

  9. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, Filipe

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-R...

  10. Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography: Japanese SKA Cosmic Magnetism Science

    Akahori, Takuya; Ichaki, Kiyotomo; Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Kudoh, Takahiro; Kudoh, Yuki; Machida, Mami; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takizawa, Motokazu

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields play essential roles in various astronomical objects. Radio astronomy has revealed that magnetic fields are ubiquitous in our Universe. However, the real origin and evolution of magnetic fields is poorly proven. In order to advance our knowledge of cosmic magnetism in coming decades, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) should have supreme sensitivity than ever before, which provides numerous observation points in the cosmic space. Furthermore, the SKA should be designed to facilitate wideband polarimetry so as to allow us to examine sightline structures of magnetic fields by means of depolarization and Faraday Tomography. The SKA will be able to drive cosmic magnetism of the interstellar medium, the Milky Way, galaxies, AGN, galaxy clusters, and potentially the cosmic web which may preserve information of the primeval Universe. The Japan SKA Consortium (SKA-JP) Magnetism Science Working Group (SWG) proposes the project "Resolving 4-D Nature of Magnetism with Depolarization and Faraday Tomography"...

  11. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, F R N C; Marchesini, S; Padmore, H A; Parkinson, D Y; Pien, J; Schirotzek, A; Yang, C; 10.1117/12.861946

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. In- terference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher con- trast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  12. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  13. Magnetic mass in 4D AdS gravity

    Araneda, René; Aros, Rodrigo; Miskovic, Olivera; Olea, Rodrigo

    2016-04-01

    We provide a fully covariant expression for the diffeomorphic charge in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter gravity, when the Gauss-Bonnet and Pontryagin terms are added to the action. The couplings of these topological invariants are such that the Weyl tensor and its dual appear in the on-shell variation of the action and such that the action is stationary for asymptotic (anti-)self-dual solutions in the Weyl tensor. In analogy with Euclidean electromagnetism, whenever the self-duality condition is global, both the action and the total charge are identically vanishing. Therefore, for such configurations, the magnetic mass equals the Ashtekhar-Magnon-Das definition.

  14. Cerebral blood flow volume measurements of the carotid artery and ipsilateral branches using two-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography

    Gang Guo; Yonggui Yang; Weiqun Yang

    2011-01-01

    The optimal velocity encoding of phase-contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) in measuring cerebral blood flow volume (BFV) ranges from 60 to 80 cm/s. To verify the accuracy of two-dimensional (2D) PC MRA, the present study localized the region of interest at blood vessels of the neck using PC MRA based on three-dimensional time-of-flight sequences, and the velocity encodingwas set to 80 cm/s. Results of the measurements showed that the error rate was 7.0 ± 6.0%in the estimation of BFV in the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery and the ipsilateralcommon carotid artery. There was no significant difference, and a significant correlation in BFV between internal carotid artery + external carotid artery and ipsilateral common carotid artery. Inaddition, the BFV of the common carotid artery was correlated with that of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. The main error was attributed to the external carotid artery and its branches. Therefore,after selecting the appropriate scanning parameters and protocols, 2D PC MRA is more accuratein the determination of BFV in the carotid arteries.

  15. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    Heverhagen, J.T. E-mail: heverhag@post.med.uni-marburg.de; Hoppe, M.; Klose, K.-J.; Wagner, H.-J

    2002-10-01

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P<0.01; maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.6{+-}0.5 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 81.7{+-}0.6 cm/s). Following Gd-DTPA administration no significant (P>0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3{+-}1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0{+-}3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA.

  16. Does the application of gadolinium-DTPA have an impact on magnetic resonance phase contrast velocity measurements? Results from an in vitro study

    Introduction/objective: To evaluate the potential influence of various concentrations of gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA on magnetic resonance phase contrast (MR PC) velocimetry. Material and methods: Imaging was done with a 1.0 T scanner using a standard Flash 2D sequence and a circular polarized extremity coil. In a validated flow phantom with a defined 75% area stenosis different concentrations of Gd-DTPA, diluted in a 10:1 water-yogurt mixture, MR PC measurements were correlated with a Doppler guide wire as gold standard. Results: MR PC measurements correlated well with the Doppler derived data (r=0.99; P0.05; Student's t-test) flow measurement changes were noted (maximum pre-stenotic velocity: 21.3±1.3 cm/s; maximum intra-stenotic velocity: 84.0±3.6 cm/s). However, delineation of the perfused lumen was enhanced after the application of Gd-DTPA. Discussions and conclusion: The application of Gd-DTPA does not affect MR PC velocimetry. However, the application of contrast media allowed a more accurate vessel segmentation. MR PC measurements can be reliably carried out after application of Gd-DTPA

  17. The Generalised Phase Contrast Method

    Glückstad, Jesper

    An analytic framework and a complete description for the design and optimisation of on-axis centred spatially filtering common path systems are presented. The Generalised Phase Contrast method is derived and introduced as the common denominator for these systems basically extending Zernike......’s original phase contrast scheme into a much wider range of operation and application. It is demonstrated that the Generalised Phase Contrast method can be successfully applied to the interpretation and subsequent optimisation of a number of different, commonly applied spatially filtering architectures...... designs and parameter settings. Finally, a number of original applications facilitated by the parallel light-beam encoding of the Generalised Phase Contrast method are briefly outlined. These include among others, wavefront sensing and generation, advanced usercontrolled optical micro...

  18. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 ± 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P ≥ 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  19. Interdependencies of aortic arch secondary flow patterns, geometry, and age analysed by 4-dimensional phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging at 3 Tesla

    Frydrychowicz, Alex [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Luebeck (Germany); Berger, Alexander; Russe, Maximilian F.; Bock, Jelena [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Munoz del Rio, Alejandro [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Harloff, Andreas [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, Freiburg (Germany); Markl, Michael [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Medical Physics, Freiburg (Germany); Northwestern University, Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-05-15

    It was the aim to analyse the impact of age, aortic arch geometry, and size on secondary flow patterns such as helix and vortex flow derived from flow-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (4D PC-MRI). 62 subjects (age range = 20-80 years) without circumscribed pathologies of the thoracic aorta (ascending aortic (AAo) diameter: 3.2 {+-} 0.6 cm [range 2.2-5.1]) were examined by 4D PC-MRI after IRB-approval and written informed consent. Blood flow visualisation based on streamlines and time-resolved 3D particle traces was performed. Aortic diameter, shape (gothic, crook-shaped, cubic), angle, and age were correlated with existence and extent of secondary flow patterns (helicity, vortices); statistical modelling was performed. Helical flow was the typical pattern in standard crook-shaped aortic arches. With altered shapes and increasing age, helicity was less common. AAo diameter and age had the highest correlation (r = 0.69 and 0.68, respectively) with number of detected vortices. None of the other arch geometric or demographic variables (for all, P {>=} 0.177) improved statistical modelling. Substantially different secondary flow patterns can be observed in the normal thoracic aorta. Age and the AAo diameter were the parameters correlating best with presence and amount of vortices. Findings underline the importance of age- and geometry-matched control groups for haemodynamic studies. (orig.)

  20. A non-invasive clinical application of wave intensity analysis based on ultrahigh temporal resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Biglino Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wave intensity analysis, traditionally derived from pressure and velocity data, can be formulated using velocity and area. Flow-velocity and area can both be derived from high-resolution phase-contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (PC-CMR. In this study, very high temporal resolution PC-CMR data is processed using an integrated and semi-automatic technique to derive wave intensity. Methods Wave intensity was derived in terms of area and velocity changes. These data were directly derived from PC-CMR using a breath-hold spiral sequence accelerated with sensitivity encoding (SENSE. Image processing was integrated in a plug-in for the DICOM viewer OsiriX, including calculations of wave speed and wave intensity. Ascending and descending aortic data from 15 healthy volunteers (30 ± 6 years data were used to test the method for feasibility, and intra- and inter-observer variability. Ascending aortic data were also compared with results from 15 patients with coronary heart disease (61 ± 13 years to assess the clinical usefulness of the method. Results Rapid image acquisition (11 s breath-hold and image processing was feasible in all volunteers. Wave speed was physiological (5.8 ± 1.3 m/s ascending aorta, 5.0 ± 0.7 m/s descending aorta and the wave intensity pattern was consistent with traditionally formulated wave intensity. Wave speed, peak forward compression wave in early systole and peak forward expansion wave in late systole at both locations exhibited overall good intra- and inter-observer variability. Patients with coronary heart disease had higher wave speed (p Conclusion A non-invasive, semi-automated and reproducible method for performing wave intensity analysis is presented. Its application is facilitated by the use of a very high temporal resolution spiral sequence. A formulation of wave intensity based on area change has also been proposed, involving no assumptions about the cross

  1. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Spithoven, E.M.; Meijer, E.; Boertien, W.E.; Gaillard, C.A.J.M.; Jong, P.E. de; Gansevoort, R.T. [University of Groningen, Department of Nephrology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30.001, RB Groningen (Netherlands); Borns, C.; Kappert, P.; Greuter, M.J.W.; Jagt, E. van der [University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vart, P. [University of Groningen, Department of Health Sciences, Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBF{sub MRI}) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBF{sub MRI} measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBF{sub MRI}. After validation, we measured RBF{sub MRI} in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBF{sub MRI} and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBF{sub MRI} measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBF{sub MRI} compared to RBF{sub Hip,} whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBF{sub MRI}. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  2. Feasibility of measuring renal blood flow by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Renal blood flow (RBF) has been shown to predict disease progression in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of phase-contrast RBF by MRI (RBFMRI) in ADPKD patients with a wide range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values. First, we validated RBFMRI measurement using phantoms simulating renal artery hemodynamics. Thereafter, we investigated in a test-set of 21 patients intra- and inter-observer coefficient of variation of RBFMRI. After validation, we measured RBFMRI in a cohort of 91 patients and compared the variability explained by characteristics indicative for disease severity for RBFMRI and RBF measured by continuous hippuran infusion. The correlation in flow measurement using phantoms by phase-contrast MRI was high and fluid collection was high (CCC=0.969). Technical problems that precluded RBFMRI measurement occurred predominantly in patients with a lower eGFR (34% vs. 16%). In subjects with higher eGFRs, variability in RBF explained by disease characteristics was similar for RBFMRI compared to RBFHip, whereas in subjects with lower eGFRs, this was significantly less for RBFMRI. Our study shows that RBF can be measured accurately in ADPKD patients by phase-contrast, but this technique may be less feasible in subjects with a lower eGFR. (orig.)

  3. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 μB depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 μB is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d-transition metals (Tc, Ru, Rh, to

  4. Ab initio investigations of magnetic properties of ultrathin transition-metal films on 4d substrates

    Al-Zubi, Ali

    2010-12-22

    In this thesis, we investigate the magnetic properties of 3d transition-metal monolayers on 4d transition-metal substrates by means of state of the art first-principles quantum theory. In order to reveal the underlying physics of these systems we study trends by performing systematic investigations across the transition-metal series. Case studies are presented for which Rh has been chosen as exemplary 4d substrate. We consider two substrate orientations, a square lattice provided by Rh(001) and a hexagonal lattice provided by Rh(111). We find, all 3d transition-metal (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Ni) monolayers deposited on the Rh substrate are magnetic and exhibit large local moments which follow Hund's rule with a maximum magnetic moment for Mn of about 3.7 {mu}{sub B} depending on the substrate orientation. The largest induced magnetic moment of about 0.46 {mu}{sub B} is found for Rh atoms adjacent to the Co(001)-film. On Rh(001) we predict a ferromagnetic (FM) ground state for V, Co and Ni, while Cr, Mn and Fe monolayers favor a c(2 x 2) antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, a checkerboard arrangement of up and down magnetic moments. The magnetic anisotropy energies of these ultrathin magnetic films are calculated for the FM and the AFM states. With the exception of V and Cr, the easy axis of the magnetization is predicted to be in the film plane. With the exception of Fe, analogous results are obtained for the 3d-metal monolayers on Rh(111). For Fe on Rh(111) a novel magnetic ground state is predicted, a double-row-wise antiferromagnetic state along the [11 anti 2] direction, a sequence of ferromagnetic double-rows of atoms, whose magnetic moments couple antiferromagnetically from double row to double row. The magnetic structure can be understood as superposition of a left- and right-rotating flat spin spiral. In a second set of case studies the properties of an Fe monolayer deposited on varies hexagonally terminated hcp (0001) and fcc (111) surfaces of 4d

  5. Phase-contrast MRI and applications in congenital heart disease

    Goldberg, A., E-mail: adgoldberg@geisinger.edu [Department of Radiology, Geisinger Health System, Danville, PA (United States); Jha, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    A review of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques, with specific application to congenital heart disease, is presented. Theory, pitfalls, advantages, and specific examples of multiple, well-described congenital heart disease presentations are discussed.

  6. Atlas-based analysis of 4D flow CMR: Automated vessel segmentation and flow quantification

    Bustamante, Mariana; Petersson, Sven; Eriksson, Jonatan; Alehagen, Urban; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Carlhäll, Carljohan; Ebbers, Tino

    2015-01-01

    Background Flow volume quantification in the great thoracic vessels is used in the assessment of several cardiovascular diseases. Clinically, it is often based on semi-automatic segmentation of a vessel throughout the cardiac cycle in 2D cine phase-contrast Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR) images. Three-dimensional (3D), time-resolved phase-contrast CMR with three-directional velocity encoding (4D flow CMR) permits assessment of net flow volumes and flow patterns retrospectively at any...

  7. Use of three-dimensional time-resolved phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging with vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction to assess renal blood flow in a renal cell carcinoma patient treated with sunitinib: a case report

    Takayama, Tatsuya; Takehara, Yasuo; Sugiyama, Masataka; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Ishii, Yasuo; Johnson, Kevin E; Wieben, Oliver; Wakayama, Tetsuya; Sakahara, Harumi; Ozono, Seiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Background New imaging modalities to assess the efficacy of drugs that have molecular targets remain under development. Here, we describe for the first time the use of time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to monitor changes in blood supply to a tumor during sunitinib treatment in a patient with localized renal cell carcinoma. Case presentation A 43-year-old Japanese woman with a tumor-bearing but functional single kidney presented at our hospital in July 2...

  8. Quantitative neutron phase contrast tomography

    Conventional neutron radiography and tomography are based on the attenuation contrast induced by the sample. In the last few years, another source of image contrast, the so-called phase contrast, has been introduced. The imaging methods to detect phase changes due to the interaction with the sample improve continuously, and several techniques are established. One method to discover phase shifts is diffraction enhanced imaging using a double-crystal diffractometer. It is described how the refractive index distribution of a sample can be recovered quantitatively in tomographic reconstructions from data achieved by this technique. Using reference samples with a well-known refractive index distribution, high accuracy with deviations of only a few per cent could be found in the reconstructions for all used materials

  9. Normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries measured with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    Correia de Verdier, Maria; Wikstroem, Johan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate normal ranges and test-retest reproducibility of phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI)-measured flow and velocity parameters in intracranial arteries. Highest flow (HF), lowest flow (LF), peak systolic velocity (PSV), and end diastolic velocity (EDV) were measured at two dates in the anterior (ACA), middle (MCA), and posterior (PCA) cerebral arteries of 30 healthy volunteers using two-dimensional PC-MRI at 3 T. Least detectable difference (LDD) was calculated. In the left ACA, HF was (mean (range, LDD)) 126 ml/min (36-312, 59 %), LF 61 ml/min (0-156, 101 %), PSV 64 cm/s (32-141, 67 %), and EDV 35 cm/s (18-55, 42 %); in the right ACA, HF was 154 ml/min (42-246, 49 %), LF 77 ml/min (0-156, 131 %), PSV 75 cm/s (26-161, 82 %), and EDV 39 cm/s (7-59, 67 %). In the left MCA, HF was 235 ml/min (126-372, 35 %), LF 116 ml/min (42-186, 48 %), PSV 90 cm/s (55-183, 39 %), and EDV 46 cm/s (20-66, 28 %); in the right MCA, HF was 238 ml/min (162-342, 44 %), LF 120 ml/min (72-216, 48 %), PSV 88 cm/s (55-141, 35 %), and EDV 45 cm/s (26-67, 23 %). In the left PCA, HF was 108 ml/min (42-168, 54 %), LF 53 ml/min (18-108, 64 %), PSV 50 cm/s (24-77, 63 %), and EDV 28 cm/s (14-40, 45 %); in the right PCA, HF was 98 ml/min (30-162, 49 %), LF 49 ml/min (12-84, 55 %), PSV 47 cm/s (27-88, 59 %), and EDV 27 cm/s (16-41, 45 %). PC-MRI-measured flow and velocity parameters in the main intracranial arteries have large normal ranges. Reproducibility is highest in MCA. (orig.)

  10. Minimally-destructive Partial Phase Contrast Imaging

    Wigley, Paul; Hardman, Kyle; Sooriyabandara, Mahasen; Perumbil, Manju; Close, John; Robins, Nicholas; Kuhn, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a minimally-destructive imaging technique based on a combination of phase contrast and Faraday rotation imaging used to continuously observe a condensate of 85 Rb. We demonstrate that the technique is capable of imaging a small sample of only 10 4 atoms up to 100 times with negligible decreases in atom number and no observable heating. At approximately 1GHz detuning, the SNR remains at approximately 7 for all 100 images, with a 22ms TOF absorption image confirming the survival of the condensate. The splitting of the magnetic sublevels of this species at such fields show non-trivial selection rules. We present experimental data outlining particular allowed transitions in this regime.

  11. Non-collinear magnetic order and spin–orbit coupling effect in 4d transition metal monatomic chains

    Using density functional theory, the structures, stabilities and magnetic properties of 4d transition metals monatomic chains are systematically investigated. We found that the ground states of Y and Pd zigzag chains possess non-collinear magnetisms. Further investigation shows that such novel non-collinear magnetic phases arise from enhanced metallic bond. In addition, for Ru zigzag chain, the ground state of the chain changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic after dimerization, indicating that Peierls distortion could also cause magnetic transition in actual one-dimensional system. Finally, we found that the orbital magnetic moments are very significant in some 4d systems. Specially, strong spin–orbit coupling was observed in two non-collinear magnetic zigzag chains. - Highlights: • The magnetic orders of ground states of Y and Pd zigzag chains are non-collinear states. • The enhanced metallic bond is the physical origin of the non-collinear magnetic chains. • The magnetic order of ground state of Ru chain is antiferromagnetic state. • The magnetic phase transition is caused by dimerization in the Ru zigzag chain. • There exists a strong spin–orbit coupling interaction in non-collinear magnetic systems

  12. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 ± 0.1 vs. 2.88 ± 0.1 (before) and 1.8 ± 0.4 vs 2.83 ± 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 ± 0.43 and 2.81 ± 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 ± 6.6 vs. 140.8 ± 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 ± 25.4 vs. 466.3 ± 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  13. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    Johannes Salamon; Martin Hofmann; Caroline Jung; Michael Gerhard Kaul; Franziska Werner; Kolja Them; Rudolph Reimer; Peter Nielsen; Annika Vom Scheidt; Gerhard Adam; Tobias Knopp; Harald Ittrich

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superp...

  14. Polychromatic phase-contrast computed tomography

    Polychromatic phase-contrast radiography differs from traditional (absorption-only) radiography in that the method requires at least a partially coherent x-ray source and the resulting images contain information about the phase shifts of x-rays in addition to the traditional absorption information. In a typical embodiment, this effect results in a measurable enhancement in image contrast at the edges of objects. In this study, a phase-contrast imaging system was adapted to allow an object to be imaged at multiple projections, and these projections were used to generate phase-contrast computed tomography images. The images obtained with this technique show edge enhancements surrounding the objects within the image

  15. Phase-contrast and holographic computed laminography

    Helfen, L.; Baumbach, T.; Cloetens, P.; Baruchel, J.

    2009-03-01

    In-line phase contrast is combined with laminography to image in three dimensions regions of interest in laterally extended flat specimens of weak absorption contrast. The principle of the method and a theoretical description of the imaging process are outlined. The present instrumental implementation enables reconstructing nondestructively the internal structure at different lateral specimen positions with micron resolution. The feasibility and application potential are demonstrated for both phase-contrast and holographic (i.e., using phase retrieval) laminography by the three-dimensional imaging of fuel-cell diffusion layers.

  16. Phase-contrast and holographic computed laminography

    In-line phase contrast is combined with laminography to image in three dimensions regions of interest in laterally extended flat specimens of weak absorption contrast. The principle of the method and a theoretical description of the imaging process are outlined. The present instrumental implementation enables reconstructing nondestructively the internal structure at different lateral specimen positions with micron resolution. The feasibility and application potential are demonstrated for both phase-contrast and holographic (i.e., using phase retrieval) laminography by the three-dimensional imaging of fuel-cell diffusion layers

  17. The Electronic and Magnetic Properties of FCC Iron Clusters in FCC 4D Metals

    The electronic and magnetic structures of small FCC iron clusters in FCC Rh, Pd and Ag were calculated using the discrete variational method as a function of cluster size and lattice relaxation. It was found that unrelaxed iron clusters, remain ferromagnetic as the cluster sizes increase, while for relaxed clusters antiferromagnetism develops as the size increases depending on the host metal. For iron in Rh the magnetic structure changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic for clusters as small as 13 Fe atoms, whereas for Fe in Ag antiferromagnetism is exhibited for clusters of 24 Fe atoms. On the hand, for Fe in Pd the transition from ferromagnetism to antiferromagnetism occurs for clusters as large as 42 Fe atoms. The difference in the magnetic trends of these Fe clusters is related to the electronic properties of the underlying metallic matrix. The local d densities of states, the magnetic moments and hyperfine parameters are calculated in the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic regions. In addition, the average local moment in iron-palladium alloys is calculated and compared to experimental results.

  18. The Electronic and Magnetic Properties of FCC Iron Clusters in FCC 4D Metals

    Elzain, M. E., E-mail: elzain@squ.edu.om; Yousif, A. A.; Rawas, A. D. Al; Gismelseed, A. M.; Widatallah, H.; Bouziani, K.; Al-Omari, I. [Sultan Qaboos University, Department of Physics, College of Science (Oman)

    2005-07-15

    The electronic and magnetic structures of small FCC iron clusters in FCC Rh, Pd and Ag were calculated using the discrete variational method as a function of cluster size and lattice relaxation. It was found that unrelaxed iron clusters, remain ferromagnetic as the cluster sizes increase, while for relaxed clusters antiferromagnetism develops as the size increases depending on the host metal. For iron in Rh the magnetic structure changes from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic for clusters as small as 13 Fe atoms, whereas for Fe in Ag antiferromagnetism is exhibited for clusters of 24 Fe atoms. On the hand, for Fe in Pd the transition from ferromagnetism to antiferromagnetism occurs for clusters as large as 42 Fe atoms. The difference in the magnetic trends of these Fe clusters is related to the electronic properties of the underlying metallic matrix. The local d densities of states, the magnetic moments and hyperfine parameters are calculated in the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic regions. In addition, the average local moment in iron-palladium alloys is calculated and compared to experimental results.

  19. Laser projection using generalized phase contrast

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Rodrigo, Peter John;

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate experimental laser projection of a gray-level photographic image with 74% light efficiency using the generalized phase contrast (GPC) method. In contrast with a previously proposed technique [Alonzo et al., New J. Phys. 9, 132 (2007)], a new approach to image construction via GPC...

  20. Magnetism of iron in face-centered cubic 4d metals

    Elzain, M.; Al Rawas, A.; Yousif, A.; Gismelseed, A.; Rais, A.; Al Omari, I.; Widatallah, H. [Physics Department, College of Science, Box 36, Sultan Qaboos University, Al Khod 123 (Oman)

    2004-05-01

    The magnetic moments and hyperfine fields at iron sites embedded in Rh, Pd and Ag face centered cubic structures were calculated using the first principle discrete variational method (DVM) and the full-potential linear-augment plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. In DVM the systems were represented by, clusters of atoms, while in FP-LAPW supercells were used. The objectives of this work are to compare and contrast results from the two different computational methods in addition to comparison to experimental data. Large magnetic moments were obtained for iron in Pd, relatively smaller moments for iron in Ag and smaller moments for iron in Rh. Iron atoms were found to couple ferromagnetically to Pd atoms and antiferromagnetically to Rh. No moment is induced on the Ag atom. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Multiscale differential phase contrast analysis with a unitary detector

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2015-12-30

    A new approach to generate differential phase contrast (DPC) images for the visualization and quantification of local magnetic fields in a wide range of modern nano materials is reported. In contrast to conventional DPC methods our technique utilizes the idea of a unitary detector under bright field conditions, making it immediately usable by a majority of modern transmission electron microscopes. The approach is put on test to characterize the local magnetization of cylindrical nanowires and their 3D ordered arrays, revealing high sensitivity of our method in a combination with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

  2. Phase contrast portal imaging using synchrotron radiation

    Microbeam radiation therapy is an experimental form of radiation treatment with great potential to improve the treatment of many types of cancer. We applied a synchrotron radiation phase contrast technique to portal imaging to improve targeting accuracy for microbeam radiation therapy in experiments using small animals. An X-ray imaging detector was installed 6.0 m downstream from an object to produce a high-contrast edge enhancement effect in propagation-based phase contrast imaging. Images of a mouse head sample were obtained using therapeutic white synchrotron radiation with a mean beam energy of 130 keV. Compared to conventional portal images, remarkably clear images of bones surrounding the cerebrum were acquired in an air environment for positioning brain lesions with respect to the skull structure without confusion with overlapping surface structures

  3. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  4. Quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope

    Liu, Changgeng; Marchesini, Stefano; Kim, Myung K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope (QPCCM) by combining a line-scanning confocal system with digital holography (DH). This combination can merge the merits of these two different imaging modalities. High-contrast intensity images with low coherent noise, and the optical sectioning capability are made available due to the confocality. Phase profiles of the samples become accessible thanks to DH. QPCCM is able to quantitatively measure the phase variations of optical s...

  5. Structural, elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of 4d perovskite CaTcO3: a DFT+U investigation

    Zhang, Wei; Tong, Peiqing

    2012-05-01

    The structural, elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of 4d high Neél temperature perovskite (Pv) CaTcO3 have been studied using density functional theory plus the Hubbard U (DFT+U) method. The degree of correlations of CaTcO3 is determined with a reasonable value of U. The compound is found to be an indirect band gap semiconductor with G-type antiferromagnetic ordering and large superexchange interactions. Large anisotropic compression behavior is found that is much alike the case of Pv CaIrO3 reported by recent high pressure experiment. The b and c axes decrease linearly with pressure whereas the a axis nearly keeps constant and even slightly expands after ˜23 GPa. Finally, we predict the single crystal elastic constants and investigate the polycrystalline elastic properties.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging in fetal anomalies: What does it add to 3D and 4D US?

    Behairy, Noha H. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: noha_behairy@yahoo.com; Talaat, Soha; Saleem, Sahar N. [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); El-Raouf, Maged Abd [Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Kasr El Aini Hospital, Cairo University (Egypt)

    2010-04-15

    Objective: The objective of our study is to evaluate the contribution of adding MRI findings to sonographic data when assessing fetal anomalies and to determine how this addition may affect the management of pregnancy. Study design: We prospectively examined 26 fetuses who had sonographically suspected congenital anomalies over a period of 1 year. 2D/3D and 4D ultrasound, Doppler and magnetic resonant imaging was done for all patients. MRI was done within 1 week following US examination. The maternal age range was 18-39 years. The gestational age range was 15-38 weeks (mean age = 29 weeks). Ultrasound and magnetic resonance findings were compared together. Results: We reported different types of congenital anomalies including eight cases of isolated central nervous system anomalies, four abdominal, five musculoskeletal anomalies, seven cases of renal anomalies and two cases of Meckel Gruber syndrome. MRI and sonography showed concordant findings in 18 cases. MRI changed the diagnosis in five cases and provided additional information in three cases. Ultrasound was superior to magnetic resonance imaging in three cases. Conclusion: Our results showed that fetal MR imaging can be used as a complementary modality to US in diagnosing fetal abnormality in which US findings are inconclusive or equivocal.

  7. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  8. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach

    Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. Materials and Methods A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Results Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. Conclusions 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions. PMID:27249022

  9. Complex trend of magnetic order in Fe clusters on 4d transition-metal surfaces. I. Experimental evidence and Monte Carlo simulations

    Sessi, V.; Otte, F.; Krotzky, S.; Tieg, C.; Wasniowska, M.; Ferriani, P.; Heinze, S.; Honolka, Jan; Kern, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 20 (2014), "205425-1"-"205425-6". ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : iron atoms on 4d metal surfaces * surface magnetism * complex spin order * indirect exchange interactions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  10. Nonlinear phase contrast using a bacteriorhodopsin film

    Iturbe Castillo, Marcelo D.; Sanchez-de-la-Llave, J. D.; Ramos Garcia, Ruben; Tepichin-Rodriguez, Eduardo; Olivos-Perez, L. I.

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel phase contrast system that employs a BR film. Since the filter is optically induced by the Fourier transform of the phase object, no alignment is necessary at the filter plane making it extremely robust. Due to the optical properties of BR films the phase filter can be induced with low light intensity levels. The material response allows operation at video frame rates, processing of high spatial resolution objects, and the use of relatively inexpensive laser sources. Such characteristics and the fact that BR films can be produced at a low cost makes the system simple to implement, relatively inexpensive and extremely robust. The effects of varying the illuminating area beyond the phase object area and filter saturation are also analyzed.

  11. Monitoring stem cells in phase contrast imaging

    Lam, K. P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Collins, D. J.; Richardson, J. B.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the mechanisms behind the proliferation of Mesenchymal Stem cells (MSCs) can offer a greater insight into the behaviour of these cells throughout their life cycles. Traditional methods of determining the rate of MSC differentiation rely on population based studies over an extended time period. However, such methods can be inadequate as they are unable to track cells as they interact; for example, in autologous cell therapies for osteoarthritis, the development of biological assays that could predict in vivo functional activity and biological action are particularly challenging. Here further research is required to determine non-histochemical biomarkers which provide correlations between cell survival and predictive functional outcome. This paper proposes using a (previously developed) advanced texture-based analysis algorithm to facilitate in vitro cells tracking using time-lapsed microscopy. The technique was adopted to monitor stem cells in the context of unlabelled, phase contrast imaging, with the goal of examining the cell to cell interactions in both monoculture and co-culture systems. The results obtained are analysed using established exploratory procedures developed for time series data and compared with the typical fluorescent-based approach of cell labelling. A review of the progress and the lessons learned are also presented.

  12. X-ray phase contrast image simulation

    A deterministic algorithm is proposed to simulate phase contrast (PC) X-ray images for complex three-dimensional (3D) objects. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named VXI (virtual X-ray imaging). The physical model chosen to account for PC technique is based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The algorithm consists mainly of two parts. The first one exploits the VXI ray-tracing approach to compute the object transmission function. The second part simulates the PC image due to the wave front distortion introduced by the sample. In the first part, the use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex 3D objects. Differently from the VXI original version, which makes use of an object description via triangular facets, the new code requires a more 'sophisticated' object representation based on non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBS). As a first step we produce a spatial high resolution image by using a point and monochromatic source and an ideal detector. To simulate the polychromatic case, the intensity image is integrated over the considered X-ray energy spectrum. Then, in order to account for the system spatial resolution properties, the high spatial resolution image (mono or polychromatic) is convolved with the total point spread function of the imaging system under consideration. The results supplied by the proposed algorithm are examined with the help of some relevant examples

  13. Image Fusion Algorithm for Differential Phase Contrast Imaging

    Roessl, E.; Koehler, T.; Van Stevendaal, U.; Hauser, N.; Wang, Z.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary pieces of information: the attenuation,the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, related to the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angle

  14. Phase-contrast radiography with a polychromatic neutron beam

    The phase-contrast imaging is based not only on the absorption contrast like in the conventional radiography but also on the contributions of the phase shifts induced by the propagation of a coherent radiation through the investigated sample. The strong phase changes on the borders between two media can be observed as sharp intensity variations on the radiography image. So the phase-contrast method is an edge-enhancement method which allows to visualize very fine structures where the conventional radiography provides unsatisfactory results. For the aims of the phase-contrast imaging a radiation with a high spatial but not necessarily chromatic coherence is required. In this way phase-contrast radiography experiments with a polychromatic thermal neutron beam possessing a high spatial transversal coherence can be performed. The reported results show that the developed phase-contrast neutron radiography can be used as a standard non-destructive investigation method

  15. Phase contrast imaging diagnostic for Wendelstein 7-X

    Boettger, Lukas-Georg [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic allows non-invasive measurements of density fluctuations in high temperature plasmas. The index of refraction in a plasma depends approximately linearly on its density. Therefore an incoming probing laser beam is shifted in phase by the density fluctuations. This phase shift information can be translated into intensity variations by interference after a phase plate. In general the signal contains only the line-integrated information along the beam path. This limitation can be overcome by the fact that the density fluctuations form filament structures well aligned with the local magnetic field. If the pitch angle of the magnetic field varies significantly along the beam path, optical filtering allows for localization of the density fluctuations. First estimates show that a resolution of about 15 cm in W7-X can be achieved, which will allow for a clear separation of edge and core fluctuations. The process of integration starts with the development of a virtual diagnostic revealing the specific behaviour of the PCI diagnostic at W7-X for standard operation scenarios. In this contribution first results of these investigations are presented.

  16. Phase contrast imaging diagnostic for Wendelstein 7-X

    The Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic allows non-invasive measurements of density fluctuations in high temperature plasmas. The index of refraction in a plasma depends approximately linearly on its density. Therefore an incoming probing laser beam is shifted in phase by the density fluctuations. This phase shift information can be translated into intensity variations by interference after a phase plate. In general the signal contains only the line-integrated information along the beam path. This limitation can be overcome by the fact that the density fluctuations form filament structures well aligned with the local magnetic field. If the pitch angle of the magnetic field varies significantly along the beam path, optical filtering allows for localization of the density fluctuations. First estimates show that a resolution of about 15 cm in W7-X can be achieved, which will allow for a clear separation of edge and core fluctuations. The process of integration starts with the development of a virtual diagnostic revealing the specific behaviour of the PCI diagnostic at W7-X for standard operation scenarios. In this contribution first results of these investigations are presented.

  17. X-ray phase-contrast CT of a pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mouse model.

    Arne Tapfer

    Full Text Available To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (CT for preclinical research, a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC was investigated. One ex-vivo mouse specimen was scanned with different grating-based phase-contrast CT imaging setups covering two different settings: i high-resolution synchrotron radiation (SR imaging and ii dose-reduced imaging using either synchrotron radiation or a conventional x-ray tube source. These experimental settings were chosen to assess the potential of phase-contrast imaging for two different types of application: i high-performance imaging for virtual microscopy applications and ii biomedical imaging with increased soft-tissue contrast for in-vivo applications. For validation and as a reference, histological slicing and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed on the same mouse specimen. For each x-ray imaging setup, attenuation and phase-contrast images were compared visually with regard to contrast in general, and specifically concerning the recognizability of lesions and cancerous tissue. To quantitatively assess contrast, the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR of selected regions of interest (ROI in the attenuation images and the phase images were analyzed and compared. It was found that both for virtual microscopy and for in-vivo applications, there is great potential for phase-contrast imaging: in the SR-based benchmarking data, fine details about tissue composition are accessible in the phase images and the visibility of solid tumor tissue under dose-reduced conditions is markedly superior in the phase images. The present study hence demonstrates improved diagnostic value with phase-contrast CT in a mouse model of a complex endogenous cancer, promoting the use and further development of grating-based phase-contrast CT for biomedical imaging applications.

  18. Advances in 4D Radiation Therapy for Managing Respiration: Part I – 4D Imaging

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Rosu, Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for managing respiration during imaging and planning of radiation therapy are reviewed, concentrating on free-breathing (4D) approaches. First, we focus on detailing the historical development and basic operational principles of currently-available “first generation” 4D imaging modalities: 4D computed tomography, 4D cone beam computed tomography, 4D magnetic resonance imaging, and 4D positron emission tomography. Features and limitations of these first generation systems are descri...

  19. Nanometer size 3d–4d and 3d–5d substitutional clusters: Promising candidates for magnetic storageapplications

    Habeeb Mokkath, Junais

    2013-05-01

    Spin-polarized density-functional calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC) have been performed for FemRhn and FemPtn clusters having N=m+n,N≤19 atoms. The spin magnetic moments, orbital magnetic moments, and the magnetic anisotropy energies have been determined. A significant enhancement of magnetic anisotropy energies is found by the substitutional nanoalloying of Fe with Rh and Pt atoms. We obtained a remarkable non-monotonous dependence of the MAE as a function of Fe content, i.e., upon going from pure Fe to pure Rh and Pt. The substitutional nanoalloying boost the magnetic anisotropy energies by creating significant cluster symmetry lowerings. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy.

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C; Larkin, Kieran G

    2016-08-21

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required. PMID:27436750

  1. Phase contrast image guidance for synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Larkin, Kieran G.

    2016-08-01

    Recent image guidance developments for preclinical synchrotron microbeam radiotherapy represent a necessary step for future clinical translation of the technique. Image quality can be further improved using x-ray phase contrast, which is readily available at synchrotron facilities. We here describe a methodology for phase contrast image guidance at the Imaging and Medical Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron. Differential phase contrast is measured alongside conventional attenuation and used to improve the image quality. Post-processing based on the inverse Riesz transform is employed on the measured data to obtain noticeably sharper images. The procedure is extremely well suited for applications such as image guidance which require both visual assessment and sample alignment based on semi automatic image registration. Moreover, our approach can be combined with all other differential phase contrast imaging techniques, in all cases where a quantitative evaluation of the refractive index is not required.

  2. NiftyFit: a Software Package for Multi-parametric Model-Fitting of 4D Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Melbourne, Andrew; Toussaint, Nicolas; Owen, David; Simpson, Ivor; Anthopoulos, Thanasis; De Vita, Enrico; Atkinson, David; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modal, multi-parametric Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging is becoming an increasingly sophisticated tool for neuroimaging. The relationships between parameters estimated from different individual MR modalities have the potential to transform our understanding of brain function, structure, development and disease. This article describes a new software package for such multi-contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging that provides a unified model-fitting framework. We describe model-fitting functionality for Arterial Spin Labeled MRI, T1 Relaxometry, T2 relaxometry and Diffusion Weighted imaging, providing command line documentation to generate the figures in the manuscript. Software and data (using the nifti file format) used in this article are simultaneously provided for download. We also present some extended applications of the joint model fitting framework applied to diffusion weighted imaging and T2 relaxometry, in order to both improve parameter estimation in these models and generate new parameters that link different MR modalities. NiftyFit is intended as a clear and open-source educational release so that the user may adapt and develop their own functionality as they require. PMID:26972806

  3. Adaptative segmentation for phase-contrast X-Ray imaging

    A set-up for X-Ray Imaging was mounted using a micro source X-ray generator, a Shad-O Box detector and a X-ray Imaging Plate System. We implemented the in-line phase contrast technique in our laboratory. Phase contrast imaging is an emerging X-ray imaging technique capable of improving the conspicuity of fine detail in an image, including some detail which are not visible with conventional techniques. The application of phase contrast imaging techniques to medical diagnostics (e.g. mammography) and the new segmentation adaptative algorithms based in entropy has opened new horizons for X-ray based imaging. The ROI (Region Of Interest) extraction is an important step in de X-ray imaging processing, because it reduces the computational cost. The classical spatial filters used in image segmentation show different results when the dimension of an image changes, this implies modifying the algorithm and it takes longer. The phase contrast technique shows better detail information. In order to avoid different results on images with variable dimensions, we used the non extensive systems concept applied to images through Tsallis entropy that assumes subsets of probabilities for different regions in the X-ray image. The ROI extraction based on Tsallis entropy and phase contrast X-ray images offers high quality region extraction and therefore more accurate diagnoses

  4. X-ray phase-contrast imaging: the quantum perspective

    Time-resolved phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-ray sources is an emerging method to investigate ultrafast dynamical processes in matter. Schemes to generate attosecond x-ray pulses have been proposed, bringing electronic timescales into reach and emphasizing the demand for a quantum description. In this paper, we present a method to describe propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging in nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics. We explain why the standard scattering treatment via Fermi’s golden rule cannot be applied. Instead, the quantum electrodynamical treatment of phase-contrast imaging must be based on a different approach. It turns out that it is essential to select a suitable observable. Here, we choose the quantum-mechanical Poynting operator. We determine the expectation value of our observable and demonstrate that the leading order term describes phase-contrast imaging. It recovers the classical expression of phase-contrast imaging. Thus, it makes the instantaneous electron density of non-stationary electronic states accessible to time-resolved imaging. Interestingly, inelastic (Compton) scattering does automatically not contribute in leading order, explaining the success of the semiclassical description. (paper)

  5. Bi-directional x-ray phase-contrast mammography.

    Kai Scherer

    Full Text Available Phase-contrast x-ray imaging is a promising improvement of conventional absorption-based mammography for early tumor detection. This potential has been demonstrated recently, utilizing structured gratings to obtain differential phase and dark-field scattering images. However, the inherently anisotropic imaging sensitivity of the proposed mono-directional approach yields only insufficient diagnostic information, and has low diagnostic sensitivity to highly oriented structures. To overcome these limitations, we present a two-directional x-ray phase-contrast mammography approach and demonstrate its advantages by applying it to a freshly dissected, cancerous mastectomy breast specimen. We illustrate that the two-directional scanning procedure overcomes the insufficient diagnostic value of a single scan, and reliably detects tumor structures, independently from their orientation within the breast. Our results indicate the indispensable diagnostic necessity and benefit of a multi-directional approach for x-ray phase-contrast mammography.

  6. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  7. Resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging by microsphere digital holography

    Wang, Yunxin; Guo, Sha; Wang, Dayong; Lin, Qiaowen; Rong, Lu; Zhao, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Microsphere has shown the superiority of super-resolution imaging in the traditional 2D intensity microscope. Here a microsphere digital holography approach is presented to realize the resolution enhancement phase-contrast imaging. The system is designed by combining the microsphere with the image-plane digital holography. A microsphere very close to the object can increase the resolution by transforming the object wave from the higher frequency to the lower one. The resolution enhancement amplitude and phase images can be retrieved from a single hologram. The experiments are carried on the 1D and 2D gratings, and the results demonstrate that the observed resolution has been improved, meanwhile, the phase-contrast image is obtained. The proposed method can improve the transverse resolution in all directions based on a single exposure. Furthermore, this system has extended the application of the microsphere from the conventional 2D microscopic imaging to 3D phase-contrast microscopic imaging.

  8. Simultaneous de-noising in phase contrast tomography

    Koehler, Thomas; Roessl, Ewald

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we investigate methods for de-noising of tomographic differential phase contrast and absorption contrast images. We exploit the fact that in grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI), first, several images are acquired simultaneously in exactly the same geometry, and second, these different images can show very different contrast-to-noise-ratios. These features of grating-based DPCI are used to generalize the conventional bilateral filter. Experiments using simulations show a superior de-noising performance of the generalized algorithm compared with the conventional one.

  9. Polychromatic cone-beam phase-contrast tomography

    A method is presented for quantitative phase-contrast tomography using unfiltered radiation from a small polychromatic source. The three-dimensional distribution of complex refractive index in a monomorphous object is reconstructed given a single projection image per view angle. The reconstruction algorithm is achromatic and stable with respect to high-spatial-frequency noise, in contrast to conventional tomography. The density distribution in a test sample was accurately reconstructed from polychromatic phase-contrast data collected with a point-projection x-ray microscope

  10. Wave theory of x-ray phase-contrast radiography

    The consistent wave theory of imaging for weakly absorbing noncrystalline objects is suggested within the method of X-ray phase-contrast radiography with the crystal-analyzer being located in the Bragg geometry. The sensitivity and the spatial resolution of the method were studied, both theoretically and experimentally, as functions of the angular position and the asymmetry coefficient of reflection from the analyzer. The validity ranges of the geometric-optics approximation are discussed. The phase-contrast images of a number of model objects (filaments, capillaries) and also of medical and biological objects are obtained and analyzed

  11. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    Snigireva, I. [ESRF, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  12. Relief- and apodized-phase-contrast imaging of biological specimens

    Pelc, Radek; Hostounský, Z.; Otaki, T.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 38, 4 suppl. (2008), s. 1073-1074. ISSN 1225-6773. [Asia-Pacific Microscopy Conference /9./. 02.11.2008-07.11.2008, Jeju] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * phase contrast * microscopy * apodization Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Mo (4d)-based complex perovskites Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe)

    Musa Saad H E, M., E-mail: musa.1964@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, Qassim University, Buridah 51452 (Saudi Arabia); El-Hagary, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Helwan University, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Institut für Festkörperphysik, TU Wien, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    We report a study of crystallographic parameters of the Mo-based complex perovskites Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe) obtained from analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) data and the electronic and magnetic properties prediction using the magnetic measurements and the full-potential linearized muffin–tin orbitals within the plane-wave approximation (LMTO–PLW). The Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} materials were prepared by the solid state reaction method. XRD analysis reveals that Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} crystalline in a cubic structure (space group Fm-3m) with lattice parameters (a=8.013 Å) for M=Cr and (a=8.061 Å) for M=Fe. XRD results present a matching of 98% with the theoretical results. The densities of states were calculated using the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and LSDA+U methods. LDOS results show a half-metallic-ferrimagnetic ground state for Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6}, which is in majority due to the 4d-t{sub 2g} and 3d-t{sub 2g} characters. The structural, electronic and magnetic calculation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental and previous theoretical results. - Highlights: • Mo-based complex perovskites Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe) have been studied. • XRD analysis revealed Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} crystalline in cubic structures (Fm-3m). • Full-potential linear muffin–tin orbital (LMTO) calculations have been carried out. • The DOSs were calculated using the LSDA and correlated LSDA+U methods. • Ba{sub 2}MMoO{sub 6} (M=Cr and Fe) shows HM–FiM nature due to 3d-t{sub 2g}–4d-t{sub 2g} characters.

  14. Helical differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Fu, Jian; Willner, Marian; Chen, Liyuan; Tan, Renbo; Achterhold, Klaus; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Juergen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    We report on the first experimental results of helical differential phase-contrast computed tomography (helical DPC-CT) with a laboratory X-ray tube source and a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer. The results experimentally verify the feasibility of helical data acquisition and reconstruction in phase-contrast imaging, in analogy to its use in clinical CT systems. This allows fast and continuous volumetric scans for long objects with lengths exceeding the dimension of the detector. Since helical CT revolutionized the field of medical CT several years ago, we anticipate that this method will bring the same significant impact on the future medical and industrial applications of X-ray DPC-CT. PMID:24518822

  15. Nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy for microfluidic and microbiological applications

    Denz, C.; Holtmann, F.; Woerdemann, M.; Oevermann, M.

    2008-08-01

    In live sciences, the observation and analysis of moving living cells, molecular motors or motion of micro- and nano-objects is a current field of research. At the same time, microfluidic innovations are needed for biological and medical applications on a micro- and nano-scale. Conventional microscopy techniques are reaching considerable limits with respect to these issues. A promising approach for this challenge is nonlinear dynamic phase contrast microscopy. It is an alternative full field approach that allows to detect motion as well as phase changes of living unstained micro-objects in real-time, thereby being marker free, without contact and non destructive, i.e. fully biocompatible. The generality of this system allows it to be combined with several other microscope techniques such as conventional bright field or fluorescence microscopy. In this article we will present the dynamic phase contrast technique and its applications in analysis of micro organismic dynamics, micro flow velocimetry and micro-mixing analysis.

  16. Time-resolved rotation projection MR phase contrast angiography

    In view of the advantages of time-resolved phase contrast angiography, the authors have investigated the additional advantage of incrementing projection angle during the cardiac cycle. An electrocardiographically triggered, multisection sequence was modified to produce bipolar gradient-reversal phase-contrast angiograms at 45-msec intervals. The projection angle for each angiogram was incremented by 5 degrees. Asymmetric echo acquisition was used to minimize TE. Velocity-compensated field-of-view select and readout gradients were used. Acceleration-compensated velocity encoding and velocity-compensated phase encoding gradients were investigated. A weak dephasing gradient was used in the projection direction. Images were acquired at 16 angles with four excitations per angle; acquisition time was approximately 8 minutes for each velocity component

  17. Advanced phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer

    McDonald, S.A.; Marone, F.; Hintermüller, C; Mikuljan, G; David, C.; Pfeiffer, F.; Stampanoni, M.

    2009-01-01

    Phase-sensitive X-ray imaging methods can provide substantially increased contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging, and therefore new and otherwise inaccessible information. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) imaging, which uses a grating interferometer and a phase-stepping technique, has been integrated into TOMCAT, a beamline dedicated to tomographic microscopy and coherent radiology experiments at the Swiss Light Source. Developments have been made focusing on the fast acquisitio...

  18. Quantitative differential phase contrast imaging in an LED array microscope

    Tian, L; Waller, L.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Optical Society of America. Illumination-based differential phase contrast (DPC) is a phase imaging method that uses a pair of images with asymmetric illumination patterns. Distinct from coherent techniques, DPC relies on spatially partially coherent light, providing 2× better lateral resolution, better optical sectioning and immunity to speckle noise. In this paper, we derive the 2D weak object transfer function (WOTF) and develop a quantitative phase reconstruction method that is rob...

  19. Quantitative methods in phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    Full text: A new method for extracting quantitative information from phase-contrast x-ray images obtained with microfocus x-ray sources is presented. The proposed technique allows rapid non invasive characterization of the internal structure of thick optically opaque organic samples. The method does not generally involve any sample preparation and does not need any x-ray optical elements (such as monochromators, zone plates, or interferometers)

  20. Phase contrast image segmentation using a Laue analyser crystal

    Dual-energy x-ray imaging is a powerful tool enabling two-component samples to be separated into their constituent objects from two-dimensional images. Phase contrast x-ray imaging can render the boundaries between media of differing refractive indices visible, despite them having similar attenuation properties; this is important for imaging biological soft tissues. We have used a Laue analyser crystal and a monochromatic x-ray source to combine the benefits of both techniques. The Laue analyser creates two distinct phase contrast images that can be simultaneously acquired on a high-resolution detector. These images can be combined to separate the effects of x-ray phase, absorption and scattering and, using the known complex refractive indices of the sample, to quantitatively segment its component materials. We have successfully validated this phase contrast image segmentation (PCIS) using a two-component phantom, containing an iodinated contrast agent, and have also separated the lungs and ribcage in images of a mouse thorax. Simultaneous image acquisition has enabled us to perform functional segmentation of the mouse thorax throughout the respiratory cycle during mechanical ventilation.

  1. Image fusion algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging

    Roessl, Ewald; Koehler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary signals:1, 2 the attenuation, the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, strongly influenced by the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angles. In medical applications, it is of the utmost importance to present to the radiologist all clinically relevant information in as compact a way as possible. Hence, the need arises for a method to combine two or more of the above mentioned signals into one image containing all information relevant for diagnosis. We present an image composition algorithm that fuses the attenuation image and the differential phase contrast image into a composite, final image based on the assumption that the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the sample can be related by a constant scaling factor. The merging is performed in such a way that the composite image is characterized by minimal noise-power at each frequency component.

  2. Phase-contrast imaging using polychromatic hard X-rays

    In conventional radiography, X-rays which pass through an object along different paths are differentially absorbed, and the intensity pattern of the emerging beam records the distribution of absorbing materials within the sample. An alternative approach is phase-contrast radiography, which instead records variations of the phase of the emerging radiation. Such an approach offers improved contrast sensitivity, especially when imaging weakly absorbing samples. Unfortunately, current phase-contrast imaging techniques generally require highly monochromatic plane-wave radiation and sophisticated X-ray optics, so their use is greatly restricted. Here we describe and demonstrate a simplified scheme for phase-contrast imaging based on an X-ray source having high spatial (but essentially no chromatic) coherence. The method is compatible with conventional polychromatic micro-focus X-ray tube sources, is well suited to large areas of irradiation, can operate with a lower absorbed dose than traditional X-ray imaging techniques, and should find broad application in clinical, biological and industrial settings. (Author)

  3. Enhancing 4D PC-MRI in an aortic phantom considering numerical simulations

    Kratzke, Jonas; Schoch, Nicolai; Weis, Christian; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Speidel, Stefanie; Farag, Mina; Beller, Carsten J.; Heuveline, Vincent

    2015-03-01

    To date, cardiovascular surgery enables the treatment of a wide range of aortic pathologies. One of the current challenges in this field is given by the detection of high-risk patients for adverse aortic events, who should be treated electively. Reliable diagnostic parameters, which indicate the urge of treatment, have to be determined. Functional imaging by means of 4D phase contrast-magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) enables the time-resolved measurement of blood flow velocity in 3D. Applied to aortic phantoms, three dimensional blood flow properties and their relation to adverse dynamics can be investigated in vitro. Emerging "in silico" methods of numerical simulation can supplement these measurements in computing additional information on crucial parameters. We propose a framework that complements 4D PC-MRI imaging by means of numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method (FEM). The framework is developed on the basis of a prototypic aortic phantom and validated by 4D PC-MRI measurements of the phantom. Based on physical principles of biomechanics, the derived simulation depicts aortic blood flow properties and characteristics. The framework might help identifying factors that induce aortic pathologies such as aortic dilatation or aortic dissection. Alarming thresholds of parameters such as wall shear stress distribution can be evaluated. The combined techniques of 4D PC-MRI and numerical simulation can be used as complementary tools for risk-stratification of aortic pathology.

  4. 4-D Photoacoustic Tomography

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Wang, Bo; Ji, Lijun; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) offers three-dimensional (3D) structural and functional imaging of living biological tissue with label-free, optical absorption contrast. These attributes lend PAT imaging to a wide variety of applications in clinical medicine and preclinical research. Despite advances in live animal imaging with PAT, there is still a need for 3D imaging at centimeter depths in real-time. We report the development of four dimensional (4D) PAT, which integrates time resolutions with 3D spatial resolution, obtained using spherical arrays of ultrasonic detectors. The 4D PAT technique generates motion pictures of imaged tissue, enabling real time tracking of dynamic physiological and pathological processes at hundred micrometer-millisecond resolutions. The 4D PAT technique is used here to image needle-based drug delivery and pharmacokinetics. We also use this technique to monitor 1) fast hemodynamic changes during inter-ictal epileptic seizures and 2) temperature variations during tumor thermal therapy.

  5. Decompressive craniectomy arrests pulsatile aqueductal CSF flux: An in vivo demonstration using phase-contrast MRI. Case report.

    Scollato, Antonio; Gallina, Pasquale; Bahl, Gautam; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    We give a case study demonstration, using aqueductal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) stroke volume quantification with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, of a large opening in the rigid cranium by a decompressive craniectomy and its subsequent closure by bone flap repositioning resulted in the arrest and subsequent restoration of aqueductal CSF flow. PMID:25958958

  6. Various clinical application of phase contrast X-ray

    Oh, Chilhwan; Park, Sangyong; Ha, Seunghan; Park, Gyuman; Lee, Gunwoo; Lee, Onseok; Je, Jungho

    2008-02-01

    In biomedical application study using phase contrast X-ray, both sample thickness or density and absorption difference are very important factors in aspects of contrast enhancement. We present experimental evidence that synchrotron hard X-ray are suitable for radiological imaging of biological samples down to the cellular level. We investigated the potential of refractive index radiology using un-monochromatized synchrotron hard X-rays for the imaging of cell and tissue in various diseases. Material had been adopted various medical field, such as apoE knockout mouse in cardiologic field, specimen from renal and prostatic carcinoma patient in urology, basal cell epithelioma in dermatology, brain tissue from autosy sample of pakinson's disease, artificially induced artilrtis tissue from rabbits and extracted tooth from patients of crack tooth syndrome. Formalin and paraffin fixed tissue blocks were cut in 3 mm thickness for the X-ray radiographic imaging. From adjacent areas, 4 μm thickness sections were also prepared for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Radiographic images of dissected tissues were obtained using the hard X-rays from the 7B2 beamline of the Pohang Light Source (PLS). The technique used for the study was the phase contrast images were compared with the optical microscopic images of corresponding histological slides. Radiographic images of various diseased tissues showed clear histological details of organelles in normal tissues. Most of cancerous lesions were well differentiated from adjacent normal tissues and detailed histological features of each tumor were clearly identified. Also normal microstructures were identifiable by the phase contrast imaging. Tissue in cancer or other disease showed clearly different findings from those of surrounding normal tissue. For the first time we successfully demonstrated that synchrotron hard X-rays can be used for radiological imaging of relatively thick tissue samples with great histological details.

  7. Phase contrast and DIC illumination for AFM hybrids

    High-resolution optical microscopy is an essential pre-requisite for life science force microscopy, particularly for applications in cell biology and medicine. Identification and validation of cells is typically established with techniques like phase contrast microscopy or differential interference contrast microscopy. The option to select or monitor individual cells online with such light microscopy techniques while performing atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements is therefore extremely beneficial. Here, we report two conceptually different strategies to implement these light microscopy techniques in a fully functional AFM head at the ultimate resolution of the Abbe diffraction limit

  8. Phase-contrast microtomography with polychromatic sealed source

    Conventional X-ray microradiography and microtomography are based on X-ray attenuation inside an object. For light objects (in the terms of X-ray absorption) much better way would be to use phase contrast, rather than attenuation contrast. Recently it has been shown that one can obtain phase by using a polychromatic source provided the focal spot size and detector resolution are small enough to maintain sufficient spatial coherence. The technique opens perspectives for high-resolution micro-CT for the objects with low X-ray attenuation, such as diamonds, biomedical objects, etc

  9. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  10. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Tenhunen, Mikko (Dept. of Physics, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)), e-mail: jani.keyrilainen@hus.fi; Bravin, Alberto (Bio-medical Beamline ID17, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Fernandez, Manuel (High Brilliance Beamline ID2, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)); Virkkunen, Pekka (Dept. of Radiology, HUCH Cancer Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Suortti, Pekka (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland))

    2010-10-15

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  11. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast.

    Keyriläinen, Jani; Bravin, Alberto; Fernández, Manuel; Tenhunen, Mikko; Virkkunen, Pekka; Suortti, Pekka

    2010-10-01

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here. PMID:20799921

  12. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging of breast

    When an X-ray wave traverses an object, its amplitude and phase change, resulting in attenuation, interference, and refraction, and in phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCI) these are converted to intensity changes. The relative change of the X-ray phase per unit path length is even orders of magnitude larger than that of the X-ray amplitude, so that the image contrast based on variation of the X-ray phase is potentially much stronger than the contrast based on X-ray amplitude (absorption contrast). An important medical application of PCI methods is soft-tissue imaging, where the absorption contrast is inherently weak. It is shown by in vitro examples that signs of malignant human breast tumor are enhanced in PCI images. Owing to the strong contrast, the radiation dose can be greatly reduced, so that a high-resolution phase-contrast X-ray tomography of the breast is possible with about 1 mGy mean glandular dose. Scattered radiation carries essential information on the atomic and molecular structure of the object, and particularly small-angle X-ray scattering can be used to trace cancer. The imaging methods developed at the synchrotron radiation facilities will become available in the clinical environment with the ongoing development of compact radiation sources, which produce intense X-ray beams of sufficient coherence. Several developments that are under way are described here

  13. Implementation of neutron phase contrast imaging at FRM-II

    Lorenz, Klaus

    2008-11-12

    At ANTARES, the beam line for neutron imaging at the Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM-II) in Garching, the option to do phase contrast imaging besides conventional absorption based neutron imaging was implemented and successfully used for the non-destructive testing of various types of objects. The used propagation-based technique is based on the interference of neutron waves in the detector plane that were differently strong diffracted by the sample. A comparison with other phase-sensitive neutron imaging techniques highlights assets and drawbacks of the different methods. In preliminary measurements at ANTARES and the spallation source SINQ at PSI in Villigen, the influence of the beam geometry, the neutron spectrum and the detector on the quality of the phase contrast measurements were investigated systematically. It was demonstrated that gamma radiation and epithermal neutrons in the beam contribute severely to background noise in measurements, which motivated the installation of a remotely controlled filter wheel for a quick and precise positioning of different crystal filters in the beam. By the installation of a similar aperture wheel, a quick change between eight different beam geometries was made possible. Besides pinhole and slit apertures, coded apertures based on non redundant arrays were investigated. The possibilities, which arise by the exploitation of the real part of the refractive index in neutron imaging, were demonstrated in experiments with especially designed test samples and in measurements with ordinary, industrial components. (orig.)

  14. A phase contrast interferometer on DIII-D

    A novel imaging diagnostic has recently become operational on the DIII-D tokamak for the study of density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. The phase contrast imaging approach overcomes the limitations of conventional scattering techniques in the spectral range of interest for transport-related phenomena, by allowing detection of long wavelength modes (up to 7.6 cm) with excellent spatial resolution (5 mm) in the radial direction. Additional motivation for the diagnostic is provided by wave-plasma interactions during heating and current drive experiments in the Ion Cyclotron range of frequencies. Density perturbations of 4 x 107 cm-3 with a 1 MHz bandwidth can be resolved. The diagnostic employs a 7.6 cm diameter CO2 laser beam launched vertically across the plasma edge. An image of the plasma is then created on a 16-element detector array: the detector signals are directly proportional to the density fluctuations integrated along each chord. Wavelengths and correlation lengths can be inferred from the spatial mapping. The phase contrast method and its application to DIII-D are described and tests and first plasma data are presented

  15. Validation of 4D-MSPECT and QGS for quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET: comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    The main aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of 4D-MSPECT in the assessment of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic/end-systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) from gated technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile single-photon emission tomography (99mTc-MIBI SPET), using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) as the reference method. By further comparing 4D-MSPECT and QGS with cMRI, the software-specific characteristics were analysed to elucidate clinical applicability. Fifty-four patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease (CAD) were examined with gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET (8 gates/cardiac cycle) about 60 min after tracer injection at rest. LV EDV, ESV and LVEF were calculated from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET using 4D-MSPECT and QGS. On the same day, cMRI (20 gates/cardiac cycle) was performed, with LV EDV, ESV and LVEF calculated using Simpson's rule. Both algorithms worked with all data sets. Correlation between the results of gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET and cMRI was high for EDV [R=0.89 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.92 (QGS)], ESV [R=0.96 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.96 (QGS)] and LVEF [R=0.89 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.90 (QGS)]. In contrast to ESV, EDV was significantly underestimated by 4D-MSPECT and QGS compared to cMRI [130±45 ml (4D-MSPECT), 122±41 ml (QGS), 139±36 ml (cMRI)]. For LVEF, 4D-MSPECT and cMRI revealed no significant differences, whereas QGS yielded significantly lower values than cMRI [57.5%±13.7% (4D-MSPECT), 52.2%±12.4% (QGS), 60.0%±15.8% (cMRI)]. In conclusion, agreement between gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET and cMRI is good across a wide range of clinically relevant LV volume and LVEF values assessed by 4D-MSPECT and QGS. However, algorithm-varying underestimation of LVEF should be accounted for in the clinical context and limits interchangeable use of software. (orig.)

  16. Segmentation of Individual Cells in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Soukup, Jindřich; Lašan, M.; Šroubek, Filip

    London: City University London, 2014 - (Reyes-Aldasoro, C.; Slabaugh, G.), s. 185-190 ISBN 1-901725-51-0. [Medical Image Understanding and Analysis 2014. London (GB), 09.07.2014-11.07.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-29225S Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1205; GAJU(CZ) 134/2013/Z; GA UK(CZ) 914813/2013; OP VaVpI(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/ 01.0024 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : image segmentation * phase contrast microscopy * time-lapse imaging Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/ZOI/soukup-0435026.pdf

  17. Optimization of phase contrast in bimodal amplitude modulation AFM

    Mehrnoosh Damircheli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bimodal force microscopy has expanded the capabilities of atomic force microscopy (AFM by providing high spatial resolution images, compositional contrast and quantitative mapping of material properties without compromising the data acquisition speed. In the first bimodal AFM configuration, an amplitude feedback loop keeps constant the amplitude of the first mode while the observables of the second mode have not feedback restrictions (bimodal AM. Here we study the conditions to enhance the compositional contrast in bimodal AM while imaging heterogeneous materials. The contrast has a maximum by decreasing the amplitude of the second mode. We demonstrate that the roles of the excited modes are asymmetric. The operational range of bimodal AM is maximized when the second mode is free to follow changes in the force. We also study the contrast in trimodal AFM by analyzing the kinetic energy ratios. The phase contrast improves by decreasing the energy of second mode relative to those of the first and third modes.

  18. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  19. Improved Hilbert phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy

    Koeck, Philip J.B.

    2015-07-15

    Hilbert phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode could be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryo sections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal by (Danev et al., 2002) the Hilbert phase plate applies a phase shift of π to approximately half the focal plane (for example the right half excluding the central beam) and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus. After correction for the inbuilt asymmetry of differential phase contrast this image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from the lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length and spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably almost without loss of contrast by using a Hilbert phase plate of half the thickness, leading to a phase shift of π/2, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. - Highlights: • In this paper I present theory and simulations for a Hilbert phase plate that phase shifts the electron wave by π/2 instead of π while images are recorded close to Scherzer defocus instead of Gaussian focus. • I show that the point resolution for this new imaging mode is considerably higher without loss of contrast. • An additional advantage lies in the reduced thickness of the phase plate which leads to reduced inelastic scattering in the phase plate and less noise.

  20. ICT4D

    Coelho, Taiane Ritta

    2014-01-01

    Resumo: Este estudo se situa no campo de ICT4D (Information and Communication Technologies for Development), termo internacionalmente conhecido para discutir o uso das Tecnologias da Informação e Comunicação (TIC) para o desenvolvimento. O que motivou o pesquisador a estudar este tema foi a existência de um paradoxo: TIC são amplamente consideradas, por uns, como invenções que mudam a maneira como milhões de pessoas conduzem suas vidas e, por outros, como alargamento das relações de poder. E ...

  1. 4D flow MRI assessment of extracranial-intracranial bypass: qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the hemodynamics

    Sekine, Tetsuro [University Hospital Zurich/University of Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Takagi, Ryo; Amano, Yasuo; Orita, Erika; Matsumura, Yoshio; Kumita, Shin-ichiro [Nippon Medical School, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Murai, Yasuo [Nippon Medical School, Department of Neurological Surgery, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Our aim was to assess the feasibility of using time-resolved 3D phase-contrast (4D flow) MRI to characterize extracranial-intracranial (EC-IC) bypass. We enrolled 32 patients who underwent EC-IC bypass (15 men, 17 women; mean age 66.4 years). In all, 16 underwent radial artery graft (RAG) bypass and 16 underwent superficial temporal artery (STA) bypass. 4D flow MRI, time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and computed tomography angiography (CTA) were performed. Bypass patency, flow direction, and blood flow volume (BFV) of each artery were determined by 4D flow MRI. Arterial diameters were measured by TOF-MRA and CTA. We compared RAG and STA bypasses by evaluating the flow direction and BFV of each artery. We evaluated the correlation between arterial diameters (measured by CTA or MRA) and the BFV and the detectability of flow direction (measured by 4D flow MRI) of each artery. 4D flow MRI confirmed the patency of each bypass artery. Flow direction of the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery and BFV in the bypass artery differed between RAG and STA groups (p < 0.01). BFV in the bypass slightly correlated with the diameters on CTA (p < 0.05, R{sup 2} = 0.287). Of the 29 arteries in the circle of Willis, nine were not depicted on 4D flow MRI. Cutoff values for arterial diameters on CTA and TOF-MRA for detecting the artery on 4D flow MRI were 2.4 and 1.8 mm, respectively. 4D flow MRI provided unique information for characterizing EC-IC bypasses, although this detectability is limited when addressing small arteries with slow flow. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative measurement of normal and hydrocephalic cerebrospinal fluid flow using phase contrast cine MR imaging

    Measurements of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow using phase contrast cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were performed on a phantom, 12 normal subjects and 20 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The phantom study demonstrated the applicability of phase contrast in quantitative measurement of the slow flow. The CSF flows of the normal subjects showed a consistent pattern with a to-and-fro movement of the flow in the anterior subarachnoid space at the C2/3 level, and they were dependent on the cardiac cycle in all subjects. However, the patients with NPH showed variable patterns of the CSF pulsatile flow and these patterns could be divided into four types according to velocity and amplitude. The amplitudes of each type were as follows: type 0 (n=1), 87.6 mm; type I (n=2), 58.2 mm (mean); type II (n=6), 48.0±5.0 mm (mean±SEM); and type III (n=11), 19.9±1.8 mm (mean±SEM). The decrease of the amplitudes correlated to a worsening of the clinical symptoms. After the shunting operation, the amplitude of to-and-fro movement of the CSF increased again in the patients with NPH who improved clinically. Some of the type III cases were reclassified type II, I and 0 and also one of the type II cases changed type I after the shunting operation. We conclude that the phase contrast cine MR imaging is a practically and clinically applicable technique for the quantitative measurement of the CSF flow. (author)

  3. A novel high temporal resolution phase contrast MRI technique for measuring mitral valve flows

    Voorhees, Abram; Bohmann, Katja; McGorty, Kelly Anne; Wei, Timothy; Chen, Qun

    2005-11-01

    Mitral valve flow imaging is inherently difficult due to valve plane motion and high blood flow velocities, which can range from 200 cm/s to 700 cm/s under regurgitant conditions. As such, insufficient temporal resolution has hampered imaging of mitral valve flows using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A novel phase contrast MRI technique, phase contrast using phase train imaging (PCPTI), has been developed to address the high temporal resolution needs for imaging mitral valve flows. The PCPTI sequence provides the highest temporal resolution to-date (6 ms) for measuring in-plane and through-plane flow patterns, with each velocity component acquired in a separate breathhold. Tested on healthy human volunteers, comparison to a conventional retrogated PC-FLASH cine sequence showed reasonable agreement. Results from a more rigorous validation using digital particle image velocimetry technique will be presented. The technique will be demonstrated in vitro using a physiological flow phantom and a St. Jude Medical Masters Series prosthetic valve.

  4. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  5. New developments in simulating X-ray phase contrast imaging

    A deterministic algorithm simulating phase contrast (PC) x-ray images for complex 3- dimensional (3D) objects is presented. This algorithm has been implemented in a simulation code named VXI (Virtual X-ray Imaging). The physical model chosen to account for PC technique is based on the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The algorithm consists mainly of two parts. The first one exploits the VXI ray-tracing approach to compute the object transmission function. The second part simulates the PC image due to the wave front distortion introduced by the sample. In the first part, the use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex 3D objects. Differently from the VXI original version, which makes use of an object description via triangular facets, the new code requires a more 'sophisticated' object representation based on Non-Uniform Rational B-Splines (NURBS). As a first step we produce a spatial high resolution image by using a point and monochromatic source and an ideal detector. To simulate the polychromatic case, the intensity image is integrated over the considered x-ray energy spectrum. Then, in order to account for the system spatial resolution properties, the high spatial resolution image (mono or polychromatic) is convolved with the total point spread function of the imaging system under consideration. The results supplied by the presented algorithm are examined with the help of some relevant examples. (authors)

  6. SEGMENTACIÓN DE IMÁGENES DE RESONANCIA MAGNÉTICA EN CONTRASTE DE FASE PARA EL ESTUDIO DE LA DINÁMICA DEL LÍQUIDO CEFALORRAQUÍDEO PERIMEDULAR Segmentation of Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Dynamic of Perimedullary Cerebrospinal Fluid

    N FLÓREZ

    Full Text Available La imagen de resonancia magnética en contraste de fase permite estudiar la dinámica del líquido cefalorraquídeo (LCR perimedular de manera cuantitativa. Sin embargo la anatomía propia del espacio subaracnoideo dificulta la segmentación del LCR debido a la presencia de estructuras vasculares y nervios raquídeos. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir un método de segmentación semiautomático para el estudio de la dinámica del LCR perimedular. El proceso se inicializa con un punto semilla dentro de la región a analizar. El algoritmo crea un mapa de correlación, calcula un valor de umbral y clasifica píxeles de LCR combinando diversas características temporales del comportamiento del flujo como atributos de entrada a un algoritmo k-medias. Un observador llevó a cabo diez veces la segmentación en cinco sujetos sanos y se calculó el volumen por ciclo y el área en el espacio perimedular C2C3. Las variaciones de las medidas fueron evaluadas como una estimación de la reproducibilidad del método. Para esto se calculó el coeficiente de variación. La variabilidad de las medidas fue menor del 5%. El método facilita la cuantificación del LCR perimedular. En 16 sujetos sanos se cuantificó el volumen por ciclo de LCR y el área en el espacio C2C3 y cisterna prepontina.Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging allows studying quantitatively the perimedullary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. However, the anatomy of the subarachnoid space difficults the segmentation of CSF due to the presence of vascular structures and spinal nerves. The aim of this paper is to describe a semiautomatic segmentation method for the study of the perimedullary CSF dynamics. The process is started with a seed point within the region to analyze. The algorithm creates a correlation map, calculates a threshold value and classifies pixels of CSF combining different temporal characteristics of flow behavior as input attributes to a k-means algorithm. One

  7. Assessment of fluctuating velocities in disturbed cardiovascular blood flow : in vivo feasibility of generalized phase-contrast MRI

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Escobar Kvitting, John-Peder; Sigfridsson, Andreas; Engvall, Jan; Bolger, Ann F.; Ebbers, Tino

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of generalized phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) for the noninvasive assessment of fluctuating velocities in cardiovascular blood flow. Materials and Methods Multidimensional PC-MRI was used in a generalized manner to map mean flow velocities and intravoxel velocity standard deviation (IVSD) values in one healthy aorta and in three patients with different cardiovascular diseases. The acquired data were used to assess the kinetic energy of b...

  8. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid...... approach in regularizing 3D flow fields is evaluated. METHODS: The proposed algorithm incorporates both a Newtonian fluid physics model and a linear PC-MRI signal model. The model equations are solved numerically using a modified CFD algorithm. The numerical solution corresponds to the optimal solution of...... dynamics (CFD) calculations. CFD provides arbitrarily high resolution, but its accuracy hinges on model assumptions, while velocity fields measured with PC-MRI generally do not satisfy the equations of fluid dynamics, provide limited resolution, and suffer from partial volume effects. The purpose of this...

  9. Understanding phase contrast MR angiography a practical approach with Matlab examples

    Suresh Paul, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Providing many unique MATLAB codes and functions throughout, this book covers the basics of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), leading to an in-depth understanding of the concepts and tools required for analysis and interpretation of Phase Contrast MR Angiography (PC-MRA). The concept of PC-MRA is often difficult, but essential for practicing engineers and scientists working in MR related areas. The concepts are better understood by uniquely combining the physical principles of fluid flow and MR imaging, laid out by modeling the theory and applications using a commonly used software tool MATLAB®. The book starts with a detailed theory of PC-MRA followed by a description of various image processing methods, including detailed MATLAB codes used for their implementation. The flow concepts in the context of MR imaging are explained using MATLAB based simulations.

  10. Apparent linear attenuation coefficients in phase contrast X-ray tomography

    In the inline phase contrast X-ray tomography the reconstructed apparent linear attenuation coefficient values may be greatly larger than sample's linear attenuation coefficients or even be negative. In this work we present a general formula to quantitatively relate the apparent linear attenuation coefficient values in cone-beam phase contrast tomography to sample's linear attenuation coefficients and refractive indices. This formula overcomes the gross inaccuracy of the existing formula in the literature in analyzing high-resolution phase contrast tomography, and it will be useful for correctly interpreting and quantifying the apparent linear attenuation coefficients in cone-beam X-ray phase contrast tomography.

  11. In vivo imaging of rat cortical bone porosity by synchrotron phase contrast micro computed tomography

    Pratt, I. V.; Belev, G.; Zhu, N.; Chapman, L. D.; Cooper, D. M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Cortical bone is a dynamic tissue which undergoes adaptive and pathological changes throughout life. Direct longitudinal tracking of this remodeling process holds great promise for improving our understanding of bone development, maintenance and senescence. The application of in vivo micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has enabled longitudinal tracking of trabecular bone microarchitecture with commercially available scanners generally operating in the 10-20 µm voxel range with absorbed doses reported between 0.5 and 1 Gy. Imaging of cortical bone microarchitecture (porosity) requires higher resolution and thus in vivo imaging of these structures has not been achieved due to excessive radiation dose. In this study we tested the hypothesis that synchrotron propagation phase contrast micro-CT can enable in vivo imaging of cortical porosity in rats at doses comparable to those currently employed for trabecular bone imaging. Synchrotron imaging experiments were conducted at the Canadian Light Source using the bending magnet beamline of the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) facility. Protocol optimization (propagation distance, projection number) was conducted ex vivo on rat (Sprague-Dawley) forelimbs with dose determined by ion chamber and lithium fluoride crystal thermoluminescent dosimeters. Comparative ex vivo imaging was performed using laboratory in vivo scanning systems, identifying a range of doses between 1.2-3.6 Gy for common protocols. A final in vivo synchrotron protocol involving a 2.5 Gy dose was implemented with live rats. The resulting images demonstrated improved delineation of cortical porosity through the improved edge enhancement effect of phase contrast, opening the door to novel experimental studies involving the longitudinal tracking of remodeling.

  12. 脑卒中恢复期患者小腿肌肉功能的速度编码相位对比磁共振观察%Study of lower extremity muscle function in stroke patients by velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging

    姜丽; 窦祖林; 温红梅; 胡昔权; 丘卫红; 兰月; 解东风; 李奎

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of muscle dynamic characteristics for the ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors between stroke patients at the chronic stage and healthy controls so as to provide a new method of assessing thein vivo muscle function in patients with hemiplegia. Methods From May 2008 to May 2009, 26 stroke patients and 21 age-and gender-matched normal controls were recruited. All subjects were positioned on a scanner table and requested to perform the voluntary movement of ankle flexion-extension. The velocity encoded phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (VE-PC MRI )provided the images of tibialis anterior muscle ( TA), medial head of gastrocnemius muscle (MG) and soleus muscle (SOL) during a movement cycle. By measuring the calf muscle contraction velocity, the balance function was assessed by Berg balance scale(BBS). The correlation between scores of BBS and the mean maximum velocity were compared and analyzed. Results The peak velocity of TA( 1-8 phase,8. 900-21. 120 mm/s vs 12.99-34.50 mm/s), MG(12-19phase,13.60-13. 28 mm/s vs 25.85-18.38 mm/s)and SOL(12-16 phase,18. 63-33. 62 mm/s vs 27.68-47.22 mm/s) was lower in the affected side than that in the controls during ankle extension(P <0. 05 ); During ankle dorsiflexion, the co-contraction index of SOL/TA(2-9 phase,0. 81-0. 82 vs 0. 27-0. 44)and the co-contraction index of GM/TA(2-9 phase,0. 73-0. 58 vs 0. 10-0. 11 ) was markedly higher in the affected side than the controls. The patient score of BBS was negatively correlated with the mean velocity of TA ( r = - 0. 69, P = 0. 001 ) and GM ( r = - 0. 47, P =0. 01 ) in the affected side. There was correlation between TA ( r = - 0. 60, P = 0. 001 ) and GM ( r =-0. 49 ,P =0. 01 )in the unaffected side. Conclusion During the movement of active ankle flexionextension, the velocities of TA, SOL and MG are lower in the affected side. The co-contraction index is markedly higher in the affected side during ankle dorsiflexion. This in turn leads to

  13. Biophysical mechanisms of phase contrast in gradient echo MRI

    He, Xiang; Dmitriy A. Yablonskiy

    2009-01-01

    Recently reported contrast in phase images of human and animal brains obtained with gradient-recalled echo MRI holds great promise for the in vivo study of biological tissue structure with substantially improved resolution. Herein we investigate the origins of this contrast and demonstrate that it depends on the tissue “magnetic architecture” at the subcellular and cellular levels. This architecture is mostly determined by the structural arrangements of proteins, lipids, non-heme tissue iron,...

  14. Tumour visualisation in human soft tissue using grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Herzen, Julia; Willner, Marian; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics (E17) and Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The grating-based phase-contrast imaging provides enhanced image structure details, which are partly complementary or even not attainable with standard X-ray absorption imaging. Especially in the case of biological soft tissue when standard x-ray radiography is often limited due to the weak absorption contrast, this method represents a real alternative. Based on X-ray optical transmission gratings this modality has transferred the phase-contrast imaging from the highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources to conventional laboratory-based broadband x-ray tubes. Here, we present a study on human soft tissue specimens containing tumours using the grating-based phase contrast imaging at both highly brilliant synchrotron (ESRF, Grenoble), and at conventional X-ray laboratory radiation sources. Our results demonstrate a superior contrast for different kinds of soft tissue in the phase contrast and verify this imaging modality to be a promising candidate to establish phase-contrast imaging in clinical radiology.

  15. Tumour visualisation in human soft tissue using grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    The grating-based phase-contrast imaging provides enhanced image structure details, which are partly complementary or even not attainable with standard X-ray absorption imaging. Especially in the case of biological soft tissue when standard x-ray radiography is often limited due to the weak absorption contrast, this method represents a real alternative. Based on X-ray optical transmission gratings this modality has transferred the phase-contrast imaging from the highly brilliant synchrotron radiation sources to conventional laboratory-based broadband x-ray tubes. Here, we present a study on human soft tissue specimens containing tumours using the grating-based phase contrast imaging at both highly brilliant synchrotron (ESRF, Grenoble), and at conventional X-ray laboratory radiation sources. Our results demonstrate a superior contrast for different kinds of soft tissue in the phase contrast and verify this imaging modality to be a promising candidate to establish phase-contrast imaging in clinical radiology.

  16. Structure and magnetism of 3d and 4d transition-metal alloys TT' (T = Mn, Fe and T' = Rh, Pd) with CuAu-I type ordered structure

    Yamada, H. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)]. E-mail: hyamada@gipac.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Shimizu, H. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Yamamoto, K. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan); Uebayashi, K. [Faculty of Science, Shinshu University, Asahi 3-1-1, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2006-05-18

    First-principle band calculations of 3d and 4d transition-metal alloys FeRh, FePd, MnRh and MnPd with CuAu-I type ordered structure are carried out by a linear muffin-tin orbital method within an atomic sphere approximation, where a generalized gradient correction for exchange-correlation potential is taken into account. Total energies for paramagnetic, ferromagnetic and three kinds of antiferromagnetic states are estimated as a function of lattice constants a and c. Observed lattice constants and spin structures of these alloys are well described by the present calculations. It is shown that the paramagnetic (non-magnetic) state without local magnetic moments is not stable in CsCl-type structure for these alloys.

  17. In-line phase-contrast and grating-based phase-contrast synchrotron imaging study of brain micrometastasis of breast cancer

    Huang, Sheng; Kou, Binquan; Chi, Yayun; Xi, Yan; Cao, Yixin; Cui, Wenli; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhimin; Guo, Han; Fu, Yanan; Xiao, Tiqiao; Sun, Jianqi; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Jiong

    2015-03-01

    Current bio-medical imaging researches aim to detect brain micrometastasis in early stage for its increasing incidence and high mortality rates. Synchrotron phase-contrast imaging techniques, such as in-line phase-contrast (IPC) and grating-based phase-contrast (GPC) imaging, could provide a high spatial and density imaging study of biological specimens' 3D structures. In this study, we demonstrated the detection efficiencies of these two imaging tools on breast cancer micrometastasis in an ex vivo mouse brain. We found that both IPC and GPC can differentiate abnormal brain structures induced by micrometastasis from the surrounding normal tissues. We also found that GPC was more sensitive in detecting the small metastasis as compared to IPC.

  18. Single-shot x-ray phase contrast imaging with an algorithmic approach using spectral detection

    Das, Mini; Park, Chan-Soo; Fredette, Nathaniel R.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has been investigated during the last two decades for potential benefits in soft tissue imaging. Long imaging time, high radiation dose and general measurement complexity involving motion of x-ray optical components have prevented the clinical translation of these methods. In all existing popular phase contrast imaging methods, multiple measurements per projection angle involving motion of optical components are required to achieve quantitatively accurate estimation of absorption, phase and differential phase. Recently we proposed an algorithmic approach to use spectral detection data in a phase contrast imaging setup to obtain absorption, phase and differential phase in a single-step. Our generic approach has been shown via simulations in all three types of phase contrast imaging: propagation, coded aperture and grating interferometry. While other groups have used spectral detector in phase contrast imaging setups, our proposed method is unique in outlining an approach to use this spectral data to simplify phase contrast imaging. In this abstract we show the first experimental proof of our single-shot phase retrieval using a Medipix3 photon counting detector in an edge illumination aperture (also referred to as coded aperture) phase contrast set up as well as for a free space propagation setup. Our preliminary results validate our new transport equation for edge illumination PCI and our spectral phase retrieval algorithm for both PCI methods being investigated. Comparison with simulations also point to excellent performance of Medipix3 built-in charge sharing correction mechanism.

  19. In-line phase contrast for weakly absorbing materials with a microfocus x-ray source

    Zhang Di; Li Zheng; Huang Zhi-Feng; Yu Ai-Min; Sha Wei

    2006-01-01

    For weakly absorbing materials, image contrast can be enhanced by phase contrast in formation. The effectiveness of the in-line phase contrast technique relies on its ability to record intensity data which contain information on the x-ray's phase shift. Four kinds of approaches to the relationship between intensity distribution and phase shift are reviewed and discussed. A micro-focal x-ray source with high geometrical magnification is used to acquire phase contrast images. A great improvement on image quality is shown and geometrical parameters are modified for comparison between different imaging positions.

  20. Results from the first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast and a rotating gantry

    Bech, Martin; Tapfer, Arne; Velroyen, Astrid; Yaroshenko, Andre; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-07-01

    After successful demonstrations of soft-tissue phase-contrast imaging with grating interferometers at synchrotron radiation sources and at laboratory based x-ray tubes, a first preclinical CT scanner with grating based phase contrast imaging modality has been constructed. The rotating gantry is equipped with a three-grating interferometer, a 50 watt tungsten anode source and a Hamamatsu flat panel detector. The total length of the interferometer is 45 cm, and the bed of the scanner is optimized for mice, with a scanning diameter of 35 mm. From one single scan both phase-contrast and standard attenuation based tomography can be attained, providing an overall gain in image contrast.

  1. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast for biomedical imaging applications

    In this review article we describe the development of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging, with particular emphasis on potential biomedical applications of the technology. We review the basics of image formation in grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with laboratory X-ray sources. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical concepts to extend grating-based multimodal radiography to quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography. (orig.)

  2. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    Sheridan C. Mayo; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Stephen W. Wilkins

    2012-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image ...

  3. Near-field x-ray phase contrast imaging and phase retrieval algorithm

    Zhu Hua-Feng; Xie Hong-Lan; Gao Hong-Yi; Chen Jian-Wen; Li Ru-Xin; Xu Zhi-Zhan

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical analyses of x-ray diffraction phase contrast imaging and near field phase retrieval method are presented.A new variant of the near field intensity distribution is derived with the optimal phase imaging distance and spatial frequency of object taken into account. Numerical examples of phase retrieval using simulated data are also given. On the above basis, the influence of detecting distance and polychroism of radiation on the phase contrast image and the retrieved phase distribution are discussed. The present results should be useful in the practical application of in-line phase contrast imaging.

  4. A feasibility study for compressed sensing combined phase contrast MR angiography reconstruction

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Hong, Cheol-Pyo; Lee, Man-Woo; Han, Bong-Soo

    2012-02-01

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance angiography (PC MRA) is a technique for flow velocity measurement and vessels visualization, simultaneously. The PC MRA takes long scan time because each flow encoding gradients which are composed bipolar gradient type need to reconstruct the angiography image. Moreover, it takes more image acquisition time when we use the PC MRA at the low-tesla MRI system. In this study, we studied and evaluation of feasibility for CS MRI reconstruction combined PC MRA which data acquired by low-tesla MRI system. We used non-linear reconstruction algorithm which named Bregman iteration for CS image reconstruction and validate the usefulness of CS combined PC MRA reconstruction technique. The results of CS reconstructed PC MRA images provide similar level of image quality between fully sampled reconstruction data and sparse sampled reconstruction using CS technique. Although our results used half of sampling ratio and do not used specification hardware device or performance which are improving the temporal resolution of MR image acquisition such as parallel imaging reconstruction using phased array coil or non-cartesian trajectory, we think that CS combined PC MRA technique will be helpful to increase the temporal resolution and at low-tesla MRI system.

  5. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    Hernandez Hoyos, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France); Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia). Grupo Imagine, Grupo de Ingenieria Biomedica; Orlowski, P.; Piatkowska-Janko, E.; Bogorodzki, P. [Warsaw Univ. of Tech. (Poland). ZEJM-BINSK, Inst. of Radioelectronics; Orkisz, M. [CREATIS, CNRS 5515 et INSERM U630 Research Unit, INSA de Lyon, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-03-15

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  6. Vascular centerline extraction in 3D MR angiograms for phase contrast MRI blood flow measurement

    The accuracy of 2D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) depends on the alignment between the vessels and the imaging plane. PC MRA imaging of blood flow is challenging when the flow in several vessels is to be evaluated with one acquisition. For this purpose, semi-automatic determination of the plane most perpendicular to several vessels is proposed based on centerlines extracted from 3D MRA. Arterial centerlines are extracted from 3D MRA based on iterative estimation-prediction, multi-scale analysis of image moments, and a second-order shape model. The optimal plane is determined by minimizing misalignment between its normal vector and the centerlines' tangent vectors. The method was evaluated on a phantom and on 35 patients, by seeking the optimal plane for cerebral blood flow quantification simultaneously in internal carotids and vertebral arteries. In the phantom, difference of orientation and of height between known and calculated planes was 1.2 and 2.5 mm, respectively. In the patients, all but one centerline were correctly extracted and the misalignment of the plane was within 12 per artery. Semi-automatic centerline extraction simplifies and automates determination of the plane orthogonal to one vessel, thereby permitting automatic simultaneous minimization of the misalignment with several vessels in PC MRA. (orig.)

  7. Edge fluctuation measurements by phase contrast imaging on DIII-D

    A novel CO2 laser phase contrast imaging diagnostic has been developed for the DIII-D tokamak, where it is being employed to investigate density fluctuations at the outer edge of the plasma. This system generates 16-point, 1-D images of a 7.6 cm wide region in the radial direction, and is characterized by long wavelength (7.6 cm) and high frequency (100 MHz) capability, as well as excellent sensitivity (rvec n approx-gt 109 cm-3). The effects of vertical line integration have been studied in detail, both analytically and numerically with actual flux surface geometries generated by the EFITD magnetic equilibrium code. It is shown that in the present configuration the measurement is mostly sensitive to radial wave vectors. Experimental results on fluctuation suppression at the L- to H-mode transition and on the L-mode wave number spectrum are discussed briefly. Finally, future plans for extending the measurement to the core of the plasma and for investigating externally launched fast waves are presented

  8. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; M. Feser; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D; Rehak, P; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S

    2008-01-01

    A segmented transmission detector has been developed and installed at sector 2 instruments at the Advanced Photon Source for differential phase-contrast imaging in parallel with absorption and fluorescence measurements.

  9. Quantitative Characterization of Inertial Confinement Fusion Capsules Using Phase Contrast Enhanced X-Ray Imaging

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium capsule. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) capsule. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam capsules were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately reproduced in phase contrast enhanced x-ray images

  10. Correcting Intensity Drift in X-ray Grating-based Phase Contrast Imaging

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has become an attractive technique because it can deliver additional information on weakly absorbing materials. Grating-based phase contrast imaging with conventional x-ray source is a breakthrough in x-ray phase contrast imaging because it provides attenuation, refraction and scattering information simultaneously. Therefore, it has potential to be applied in medical and industrial applications. However, in actual experiments, we found that the photon intensity drift of the x-ray source would influence the final images, especially the refraction images. After analyzing the phase-stepping curve, we proposed a correction method to fix the problem due to the effect of intensity drift. The proposed correction method is successfully applied to grating-based phase-contrast imaging setup having un-stable x-ray source. The experimental results show that our method could solve this problem

  11. Quantitative characterization of inertial confinement fusion capsules using phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging

    Current designs for inertial confinement fusion capsules for the National Ignition Facility consist of a solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layer inside of a copper doped beryllium, Be(Cu), shell. Phase contrast enhanced x-ray imaging is shown to render the D-T layer visible inside the Be(Cu) shell. Phase contrast imaging is experimentally demonstrated for several surrogate capsules and validates computational models. Polyimide and low density divinyl benzene foam shells were imaged at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron. The surrogates demonstrate that phase contrast enhanced imaging provides a method to characterize surfaces when absorption imaging cannot be used. Our computational models demonstrate that a rough surface can be accurately characterized using phase contrast enhanced x-ray images

  12. The energy levels and radiative transition probabilities for electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole transitions among the levels of the ground configuration, [Kr]4d104f4, of W24+

    Large-scale multiconfiguration Hartree–Fock and Dirac–Fock calculations have been performed for the ground configuration, [Kr]4d104f4, energy levels of the W24+ ion. The relativistic corrections were taken into account in the quasirelativistic Breit–Pauli and fully relativistic Breit (taking into account QED effects) approximations. The role of correlation, relativistic, and QED corrections is discussed. Line strengths, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities in the Coulomb and Babushkin gauges are presented for the electric quadrupole (E2) transitions among these levels. The magnetic dipole transitions are also investigated. Dependence of the E2 transition probabilities on the gauge condition of the electromagnetic field potential is studied as well.

  13. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    M. Marschner; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; A. Fehringer; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a g...

  14. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples

    Willner, Marian; Fior, Gabriel; Marschner, Mathias; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Schock, Jonathan; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Peter B Noël; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of ...

  15. A Generalized Bidiagonal-Tikhonov Method Applied To Differential Phase Contrast Tomography

    Schenkels, Nick; Sijbers, Jan; van Aarle, Wim; Vanroose, Wim

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast tomography is an alternative to classic absorption contrast tomography that leads to higher contrast reconstructions in many applications. We review how phase contrast data can be acquired by using a combination of phase and absorption gratings. Using algebraic reconstruction techniques the object can be reconstructed from the measured data. In order to solve the resulting linear system we propose the Generalized Bidiagonal Tikhonov (GBiT) method, an adaptation of the generaliz...

  16. Phase-Contrast Imaging of Nanostructures with Incoherent Femtosecond Laser Driven Soft X-Ray Source

    Application of polychromatic (1.5-15 nm) soft X-ray emission of a spatially large (>0.1 mm) bright femtosecond laser driven plasma source for propagation based phase contrast imaging of nanometer thick foils and biological samples is considered. Diffraction and phase contrast effects increased quality and contrast of the experimental images, registered by LiF crystal X-ray detector with submicron resolution.

  17. Apparent Linear Attenuation Coefficients in Phase Contrast X-Ray Tomography

    Yan, Aimin; Wu, Xizeng

    2011-01-01

    In the inline phase contrast x-ray tomography the reconstructed apparent linear attenuation coefficient values may be greatly larger than sample’s linear attenuation coefficients or even be negative. In this work we present a general formula to quantitatively relate the apparent linear attenuation coefficient values in cone-beam phase contrast tomography to sample’s linear attenuation coefficients and refractive indices. This formula overcomes the gross inaccuracy of the existing formula in t...

  18. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography. (paper)

  19. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  20. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  1. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    Sheridan C. Mayo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies.

  2. Noise properties of grating-based x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Purpose: To investigate the properties of tomographic grating-based phase contrast imaging with respect to its noise power spectrum and the energy dependence of the achievable contrast to noise ratio. Methods: Tomographic simulations of an object with 11 cm diameter constituted of materials of biological interest were conducted at different energies ranging from 25 to 85 keV by using a wave propagation approach. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the x-ray attenuation within the object, it is verified that the simulated measurement deposits the same dose within the object at each energy. Results: The noise in reconstructed phase contrast computed tomography images shows a maximum at low spatial frequencies. The contrast to noise ratio reaches a maximum around 45 keV for the simulated object. The general dependence of the contrast to noise on the energy appears to be independent of the material. Compared with reconstructed absorption contrast images, the reconstructed phase contrast images show sometimes better, sometimes worse, and sometimes similar contrast to noise, depending on the material and the energy. Conclusions: Phase contrast images provide additional information to the conventional absorption contrast images and might thus be useful for medical applications. However, the observed noise power spectrum in reconstructed phase contrast images implies that the usual trade-off between noise and resolution is less efficient for phase contrast imaging compared with absorption contrast imaging. Therefore, high-resolution imaging is a strength of phase contrast imaging, but low-resolution imaging is not. This might hamper the clinical application of the method, in cases where a low spatial resolution is sufficient for diagnosis.

  3. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  4. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    Weber, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.weber@fau.de; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela [Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics (ECAP), Radiation and Detector Physics Group, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  5. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  6. Artifact characterization and reduction in scanning X-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Holzner, Christian; Mohacsi, Istvan; Karvinen, Petri; Diaz, Ana; Pigino, Gaia; David, Christian

    2015-05-18

    Zernike phase contrast microscopy is a well-established method for imaging specimens with low absorption contrast. It has been successfully implemented in full-field microscopy using visible light and X-rays. In microscopy Cowley's reciprocity principle connects scanning and full-field imaging. Even though the reciprocity in Zernike phase contrast has been discussed by several authors over the past thirty years, only recently it was experimentally verified using scanning X-ray microscopy. In this paper, we investigate the image and contrast formation in scanning Zernike phase contrast microscopy with a particular and detailed focus on the origin of imaging artifacts that are typically associated with Zernike phase contrast. We demonstrate experimentally with X-rays the effect of the phase mask design on the contrast and halo artifacts and present an optimized design of the phase mask with respect to photon efficiency and artifact reduction. Similarly, due to the principle of reciprocity the observations and conclusions of this work have direct applicability to Zernike phase contrast in full-field microscopy as well. PMID:26074579

  7. Imaging of metastatic lymph nodes by X-ray phase-contrast micro-tomography.

    Torben Haugaard Jensen

    Full Text Available Invasive cancer causes a change in density in the affected tissue, which can be visualized by x-ray phase-contrast tomography. However, the diagnostic value of this method has so far not been investigated in detail. Therefore, the purpose of this study was, in a blinded manner, to investigate whether malignancy could be revealed by non-invasive x-ray phase-contrast tomography in lymph nodes from breast cancer patients. Seventeen formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded lymph nodes from 10 female patients (age range 37-83 years diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinomas were analyzed by X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Ten lymph nodes had metastatic deposits and 7 were benign. The phase-contrast images were analyzed according to standards for conventional CT images looking for characteristics usually only visible by pathological examinations. Histopathology was used as reference. The result of this study was that the diagnostic sensitivity of the image analysis for detecting malignancy was 100% and the specificity was 87%. The positive predictive value was 91% for detecting malignancy and the negative predictive value was 100%. We conclude that x-ray phase-contrast imaging can accurately detect density variations to obtain information regarding lymph node involvement previously inaccessible with standard absorption x-ray imaging.

  8. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching

  9. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    Brun, E., E-mail: emmanuel.brun@esrf.fr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000, France and Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748 (Germany); Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S. [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Barbone, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Mittone, A.; Coan, P. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Garching 85748, Germany and Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, 81377 Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble 380000 (France)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  10. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy

  11. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Hoshino, Masato, E-mail: hoshino@spring8.or.jp; Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsukube, Takuro [Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital, 1-3-1 Wakinohamakaigandori, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-0073 (Japan); Yagi, Naoto [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2014-10-08

    Quantitative measurements of biological fresh samples based on three-dimensional densitometry using X-ray phase contrast tomography are presented. X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and measured in the fixed state. The influence of the formalin fixation on soft tissue was quantitatively evaluated by comparing the fresh and fixed samples. X-ray phase contrast tomography was also applied to the dynamic measurement of a biological fresh sample. Morphological changes of a ring-shaped fresh pig aorta were measured tomographically under different degrees of stretching.

  12. Instant Cinema 4D starter

    Kaminar, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Get to grips with a new technology, understand what it is and what it can do for you, and then get to work with the most important features and tasks.This book is written in a friendly, practical style with lots of screenshots and help that will ensure you grow in confidence chapter by chapter.This book is recommended for artists that have experience in other 3D software packages, and who want to learn Cinema 4D. That being said, dedicated readers without experience in other 3D software should not be discouraged from reading this book to learn the basics of Cinema 4D as their first 3D package.

  13. Validity of computational hemodynamics in human arteries based on 3D time-of-flight MR angiography and 2D electrocardiogram gated phase contrast images

    Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Chen, Xi; Chen, Rou; Wang, Zhiqiang; Lin, Chen; Kralik, Stephen; Zhao, Ye

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the validity of 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) based on 3-D time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) and 2-D electrocardiogram (ECG) gated phase contrast (PC) images. The mesoscale lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is employed to segment morphological arterial geometry from TOF MRA, to extract velocity profiles from ECG PC images, and to simulate fluid dynamics on a unified GPU accelerated computational platform. Two healthy volunteers are recruited to participate in the study. For each volunteer, a 3-D high resolution TOF MRA image and 10 2-D ECG gated PC images are acquired to provide the morphological geometry and the time-varying flow velocity profiles for necessary inputs of the PSCH. Validation results will be presented through comparisons of LBM vs. 4D Flow Software for flow rates and LBM simulation vs. MRA measurement for blood flow velocity maps. Indiana University Health (IUH) Values Fund.

  14. Non-invasive evaluation of energy loss in the pulmonary arteries using 4D phase contrast MR measurement: a proof of concept

    Lee, Namheon; Taylor, Michael D.; Hor, Kan N; Banerjee, Rupak K.

    2013-01-01

    Background The repair surgery of congenital heart disease (CHD) associated with the right ventricular (RV)-pulmonary artery (PA) pathophysiology often left patients with critical post-operative lesions, leading to regurgitation and obstruction in the PAs. These lesions need longitudinal (with time) assessment for monitoring the RV function, in order for patients to have appropriate treatment before irreversible RV dysfunction occurs. In this research, we computed energy loss in the branch PAs...

  15. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    Kitchen, M. J.; Paganin, D.; Lewis, R. A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.

    2005-08-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  16. Recent advances in synchrotron-based hard x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Ever since the first demonstration of phase contrast imaging (PCI) in the 1930s by Frits Zernike, people have realized the significant advantage of phase contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging in terms of sensitivity to ‘transparent’ features within specimens. Thus, x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) holds great potential in studies of soft biological tissues, typically containing low Z elements such as C, H, O and N. Particularly when synchrotron hard x-rays are employed, the favourable brightness, energy tunability, monochromatic characteristics and penetration depth have dramatically enhanced the quality and variety of XPCI methods, which permit detection of the phase shift associated with 3D geometry of relatively large samples in a non-destructive manner. In this paper, we review recent advances in several synchrotron-based hard x-ray XPCI methods. Challenges and key factors in methodological development are discussed, and biological and medical applications are presented. (paper)

  17. Spherical-Wave Far-Field Interferometer for Hard X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging

    Miao, Houxun; Harmon, Katherine J; Bennett, Eric E; Chedid, Nicholas; Panna, Alireza; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2014-01-01

    Low dose, high contrast x-ray imaging is of general interest in medical diagnostic applications. X-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometers using collimated synchrotron beams demonstrate the highest levels of phase contrast under a given exposure dose. However, common x-ray sources emit divergent cone beams. Here, we developed a spherical-wave inline Mach-Zehnder interferometer for phase contrast imaging over an extended area with a broadband and divergent source. The first tabletop system was tested in imaging experiments of a mammographic accreditation phantom and various biological specimens. The noise level of the phase contrast images at a clinical radiation dose corresponded to a 6 nano radian bending of the x-ray wavefront. Un-resolved structures with conventional radiography and near-field interferometer techniques became visible at a fraction of the radiation dose.

  18. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Kitchen, M. J.; Lewis, R. A.; Morgan, M. J.; Wallace, M. J.; Siew, M. L.; Siu, K. K. W.; Habib, A.; Fouras, A.; Yagi, N.; Uesugi, K.; Hooper, S. B.

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 µm) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 µL were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  19. Analysis of speckle patterns in phase-contrast images of lung tissue

    Kitchen, M.J. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)]. E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@spme.monash.edu.au; Paganin, D. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Lewis, R.A. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Uesugi, K. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2005-08-11

    Propagation-based phase-contrast images of mice lungs have been obtained at the SPring-8 synchrotron research facility. Such images exhibit a speckled intensity pattern that bears a superficial resemblance to alveolar structures. This speckle results from focussing effects as projected air-filled alveoli form aberrated compound refractive lenses. An appropriate phase-retrieval algorithm has been utilized to reconstruct the approximate projected lung tissue thickness from single-phase-contrast mice chest radiographs. The results show projected density variations across the lung, highlighting regions of low density corresponding to air-filled regions. Potentially, this offers a better method than conventional radiography for detecting lung diseases such as fibrosis, emphysema and cancer, though this has yet to be demonstrated. As such, the approach can assist in continuing studies of lung function utilizing propagation-based phase-contrast imaging.

  20. Dynamic measures of regional lung air volume using phase contrast x-ray imaging

    Kitchen, M J; Lewis, R A; Morgan, M J; Siu, K K W; Habib, A [School of Physics, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Wallace, M J; Siew, M L; Hooper, S B [Department of Physiology, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Fouras, A [Division of Biological Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N; Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)], E-mail: Marcus.Kitchen@sci.monash.edu.au

    2008-11-07

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging can provide detailed images of lung morphology with sufficient spatial resolution to observe the terminal airways (alveoli). We demonstrate that quantitative functional and anatomical imaging of lung ventilation can be achieved in vivo using two-dimensional phase contrast x-ray images with high contrast and spatial resolution (<100 {mu}m) in near real time. Changes in lung air volume as small as 25 {mu}L were calculated from the images of term and preterm rabbit pup lungs (n = 28) using a single-image phase retrieval algorithm. Comparisons with plethysmography and computed tomography showed that the technique provided an accurate and robust method of measuring total lung air volumes. Furthermore, regional ventilation was measured by partitioning the phase contrast images, which revealed differences in aeration for different ventilation strategies.

  1. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    Xi, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related in images. This relationship can be described by a natural logarithm equation. Thus, from the one phase-contrast view, depth information can be retrieved from its contrast. Our preliminary biological experiments indicate promise in its application to measurements requiring in vivo and ongoing assessment of lung tumor progression.

  2. Hard x-ray quantitative non-interferometric phase-contrast microscopy

    We report the results of quantitative phase-contrast imaging experiments using synchrotron radiation, in-line imaging geometry and a non-interferometric phase retrieval technique. This quantitative imaging method is fast, simple, robust, does not require sophisticated x-ray optical elements and can potentially provide submicron spatial resolution over a field of view of the order of centimetres. In the present experiment a spatial resolution of approximately 0.8 μm has been achieved in images of a polystyrene sphere using 19.6 keV x-rays. We demonstrate that appropriate processing of phase-contrast images obtained in the in-line geometry can reveal important new information about the internal structure of weakly absorbing organic samples. We believe that this technique will also be useful in phase-contrast tomography. (author)

  3. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements

  4. Phase contrast imaging simulation and measurements using polychromatic sources with small source-object distances

    Golosio, Bruno; Delogu, Pasquale; Zanette, Irene; Carpinelli, Massimo; Masala, Giovanni Luca; Oliva, Piernicola; Stefanini, Arnaldo; Stumbo, Simone

    2008-11-01

    Phase contrast imaging is a technique widely used in synchrotron facilities for nondestructive analysis. Such technique can also be implemented through microfocus x-ray tube systems. Recently, a relatively new type of compact, quasimonochromatic x-ray sources based on Compton backscattering has been proposed for phase contrast imaging applications. In order to plan a phase contrast imaging system setup, to evaluate the system performance and to choose the experimental parameters that optimize the image quality, it is important to have reliable software for phase contrast imaging simulation. Several software tools have been developed and tested against experimental measurements at synchrotron facilities devoted to phase contrast imaging. However, many approximations that are valid in such conditions (e.g., large source-object distance, small transverse size of the object, plane wave approximation, monochromatic beam, and Gaussian-shaped source focal spot) are not generally suitable for x-ray tubes and other compact systems. In this work we describe a general method for the simulation of phase contrast imaging using polychromatic sources based on a spherical wave description of the beam and on a double-Gaussian model of the source focal spot, we discuss the validity of some possible approximations, and we test the simulations against experimental measurements using a microfocus x-ray tube on three types of polymers (nylon, poly-ethylene-terephthalate, and poly-methyl-methacrylate) at varying source-object distance. It will be shown that, as long as all experimental conditions are described accurately in the simulations, the described method yields results that are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Heralded phase-contrast imaging using an orbital angular momentum phase-filter

    Aspden, Reuben S.; Morris, Peter A.; He, Ruiqing; Chen, Qian; Padgett, Miles J.

    2016-05-01

    We utilise the position and orbital angular momentum (OAM) correlations between the signal and idler photons generated in the down-conversion process to obtain ghost images of a phase object. By using an OAM phase filter, which is non-local with respect to the object, the images exhibit isotropic edge-enhancement. This imaging technique is the first demonstration of a full-field, phase-contrast imaging system with non-local edge enhancement, and enables imaging of phase objects using significantly fewer photons than standard phase-contrast imaging techniques.

  6. Array illumination with minimal non-uniformity based on generalized phase contrast

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The generalized phase contrast method (GPC) has been previously shown to be an efficient technique for generating array illumination and is thus highly suitable for such applications as dynamic multiple beam trapping and optical micromanipulation. However, projected arrays usually exhibit intensity...... output spots to improve uniformity. This is combined with matching corrections to the phase shift introduced by the phase contrast filter. Results from numerical experiments show that the array illumination uniformity error improves from over 40% to less than 1% while maintaining the efficiency prior...

  7. Experimental demonstration of Generalized Phase Contrast based Gaussian beam-shaper

    Tauro, Sandeep; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin;

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of Gaussian beam-shaping based on the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) approach. We show that, when using a dynamic spatial light modulator (SLM), this approach can rapidly generate arbitrarily shaped beams. Moreover, we demonstrate that low-cost bin......We report the first experimental demonstration of Gaussian beam-shaping based on the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) approach. We show that, when using a dynamic spatial light modulator (SLM), this approach can rapidly generate arbitrarily shaped beams. Moreover, we demonstrate that low...

  8. X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography; Proof of principle for post-mortem imaging

    Zamir, A; Arthurs, O.; Hagen, C. K.; Diemoz, P. C.; Brochard, T.; Bravin, A.; Sebire, N.; A. Olivo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To demonstrate the feasibility of using X-ray phase contrast tomography to assess internal organs in a post-mortem piglet model, as a possible non-invasive imaging autopsy technique. Methods: Tomographic images of a new-born piglet were obtained using a Free Space Propagation (FSP) X-ray phase contrast imaging setup at a synchrotron (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France). A monochromatic X-ray beam (52 keV) was used in combination with a detector pixel size of...

  9. Soft-tissue phase-contrast tomography with an x-ray tube source

    We report the first experimental soft-tissue phase-contrast tomography results using a conventional x-ray tube source, with a millimeter-sized focal spot. The setup is based on a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer operated at a mean energy of 28 keV. We present three-dimensional ex vivo images of a chicken heart sample, fixated in formalin. The results clearly demonstrate the advantageous contrast attainable through phase-contrast imaging over conventional attenuation-based approaches.

  10. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown

  11. Combining Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering into a versatile beam shaping approach

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2010-01-01

    We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical ...... manipulation, high-speed sorting and other parallel spatial light applications [1].......We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical...

  12. Combining generalized phase contrast with matched filtering into a versatile beam shaping system

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical ...... manipulation, high-speed sorting and other parallel spatial light applications.......We adapt concepts from matched filtering to propose a method for generating reconfigurable multiple beams. Combined with the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) technique, the proposed method coined mGPC can yield dynamically reconfigurable optical beam arrays with high light efficiency for optical...

  13. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    Suzuki, Yoshio, E-mail: yoshio@spring8.or.jp; Takeuchi, Akihisa [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI/SPring-8), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2016-01-28

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  14. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a λ/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with π phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  15. Simulation study of phase retrieval for hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging

    YU; Bin; PENG; Xiang; TIAN; Jindong; NIU; Hanben; DIAO; Luh

    2005-01-01

    Two algorithms for the phase retrieval of hard X-ray in-line phase contrast imaging are presented. One is referred to as Iterative Angular Spectrum Algorithm (IASA) and the other is a hybrid algorithm that combines IASA with TIE (transport of intensity equation). The calculations of the algorithms are based on free space propagation of the angular spectrum. The new approaches are demonstrated with numerical simulations. Comparisons with other phase retrieval algorithms are also performed. It is shown that the phase retrieval method combining the IASA and TIE is a promising technique for the application of hard X-ray phase contrast imaging.

  16. Thickness Measurements from Single X-ray Phase-contrast Speckle Projection

    Xi, Yan; Tang, Rongbiao; Ma, Jingchen; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We propose a one-shot thickness measurement method for sponge-like structures using a propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging (P-PCI) method. In P-PCI, the air-material interface refracts the incident X-ray. Refracted many times along their paths by such a structure, incident X-rays propagate randomly within a small divergent angle range, resulting in a speckle pattern in the captured image. We found structure thickness and contrast of a phase-contrast projection are directly related i...

  17. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    Rigsby, Cynthia K.; Hilpipre, Nicholas; Boylan, Emma E.; Popescu, Andrada R.; Deng, Jie [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States); McNeal, Gary R. [Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Customer Solutions Group, Cardiovascular MR R and D, Chicago, IL (United States); Zhang, Gang [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago Research Center, Biostatistics Research Core, Chicago, IL (United States); Choi, Grace [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pediatrics, Chicago, IL (United States); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  18. Analysis of an automated background correction method for cardiovascular MR phase contrast imaging in children and young adults

    Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for evaluating vessel blood flow. Inherent errors in acquisition, such as phase offset, eddy currents and gradient field effects, can cause significant inaccuracies in flow parameters. These errors can be rectified with the use of background correction software. To evaluate the performance of an automated phase contrast MRI background phase correction method in children and young adults undergoing cardiac MR imaging. We conducted a retrospective review of patients undergoing routine clinical cardiac MRI including phase contrast MRI for flow quantification in the aorta (Ao) and main pulmonary artery (MPA). When phase contrast MRI of the right and left pulmonary arteries was also performed, these data were included. We excluded patients with known shunts and metallic implants causing visible MRI artifact and those with more than mild to moderate aortic or pulmonary stenosis. Phase contrast MRI of the Ao, mid MPA, proximal right pulmonary artery (RPA) and left pulmonary artery (LPA) using 2-D gradient echo Fast Low Angle SHot (FLASH) imaging was acquired during normal respiration with retrospective cardiac gating. Standard phase image reconstruction and the automatic spatially dependent background-phase-corrected reconstruction were performed on each phase contrast MRI dataset. Non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected net flow, forward flow, regurgitant volume, regurgitant fraction, and vessel cardiac output were recorded for each vessel. We compared standard non-background-corrected and background-phase-corrected mean flow values for the Ao and MPA. The ratio of pulmonary to systemic blood flow (Qp:Qs) was calculated for the standard non-background and background-phase-corrected data and these values were compared to each other and for proximity to 1. In a subset of patients who also underwent phase contrast MRI of the MPA, RPA, and LPA a comparison was made between standard non

  19. HII galaxies in 4D

    Telles, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    HII galaxies are clumpy and their gas kinematics can be mapped to show the global turbulent motions and the effect of massive star evolution. The distribution of their physical conditions is homogeneous and oxygen abundance is uniform. The presence of nebular HeII 4868 line seems to be higher in a low abundance galaxy, implying a harder ionization power probably due to stars in low metallicity. Innovative methods of data cube analysis, namely PCA tomography (nicknamed 4D), seem promising in revealing additional information not detected with the standard methods. I review some of our own recent work on the 3D spectroscopy of HII galaxies.

  20. Use of Caval Subtraction 2D Phase-Contrast MR Imaging to Measure Total Liver and Hepatic Arterial Blood Flow: Preclinical Validation and Initial Clinical Translation.

    Chouhan, Manil D; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Bainbridge, Alan; Walker-Samuel, Simon; Davies, Nathan; Halligan, Steve; Lythgoe, Mark F; Taylor, Stuart A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To validate caval subtraction two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measurements of total liver blood flow (TLBF) and hepatic arterial fraction in an animal model and evaluate consistency and reproducibility in humans. Materials and Methods Approval from the institutional ethical committee for animal care and research ethics was obtained. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 2D phase-contrast MR imaging of the portal vein (PV) and infrahepatic and suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC). TLBF and hepatic arterial flow were estimated by subtracting infrahepatic from suprahepatic IVC flow and PV flow from estimated TLBF, respectively. Direct PV transit-time ultrasonography (US) and fluorescent microsphere measurements of hepatic arterial fraction were the standards of reference. Thereafter, consistency of caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging-derived TLBF and hepatic arterial flow was assessed in 13 volunteers (mean age, 28.3 years ± 1.4) against directly measured phase-contrast MR imaging PV and proper hepatic arterial inflow; reproducibility was measured after 7 days. Bland-Altman analysis of agreement and coefficient of variation comparisons were undertaken. Results There was good agreement between PV flow measured with phase-contrast MR imaging and that measured with transit-time US (mean difference, -3.5 mL/min/100 g; 95% limits of agreement [LOA], ±61.3 mL/min/100 g). Hepatic arterial fraction obtained with caval subtraction agreed well with those with fluorescent microspheres (mean difference, 4.2%; 95% LOA, ±20.5%). Good consistency was demonstrated between TLBF in humans measured with caval subtraction and direct inflow phase-contrast MR imaging (mean difference, -1.3 mL/min/100 g; 95% LOA, ±23.1 mL/min/100 g). TLBF reproducibility at 7 days was similar between the two methods (95% LOA, ±31.6 mL/min/100 g vs ±29.6 mL/min/100 g). Conclusion Caval subtraction phase-contrast MR imaging is a simple and clinically

  1. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases

  2. Contrast-to-noise in X-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    Engel, K.J.; Geller, D.; Koehler, T.; Martens, G.; Schusser, S.; Vogtmeier, G.; Roessl, E.

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative theory for the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) is proposed and compared to that of images derived from classical absorption contrast imaging (ACI). Most prominently, the CNR for DPCI contains the reciprocal of thespatial wavelength to be ima

  3. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part II: Optimisation of imaging conditions

    Yang, Hao, E-mail: hao.yang@materials.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Pennycook, Timothy J.; Nellist, Peter D. [University of Oxford, Department of Materials. Parks Rd, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    In Part I of this series of two papers, we demonstrated the formation of a high efficiency phase-contrast image at atomic resolution using a pixelated detector in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) with ptychography. In this paper we explore the technique more quantitatively using theory and simulations. Compared to other STEM phase contrast modes including annular bright field (ABF) and differential phase contrast (DPC), we show that the ptychographic phase reconstruction method using pixelated detectors offers the highest contrast transfer efficiency and superior low dose performance. Applying the ptychographic reconstruction method to DPC segmented detectors also improves the detector contrast transfer and results in less noisy images than DPC images formed using difference signals. We also find that using a minimum array of 16×16 pixels is sufficient to provide the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for imaging beam sensitive weak phase objects. Finally, the convergence angle can be adjusted to enhance the contrast transfer based on the spatial frequencies of the specimen under study. - Highlights: • High efficiency phase contrast transfer function (PCTF) can be achieved using pixelated detectors followed by a ptychographic reconstruction. • Ptychographic reconstruction offers the highest PCTF across the entire spatial frequency range compared to DPC and ABF. • Image simulations show that a ptychographic reconstruction using pixelated detectors offers a superior low dose performance for imaging weak phase objects. • Optimisation of imaging conditions using pixelated detectors are discussed by considering the contrast transfer function for various cases.

  4. Generalized Phase contrast and matched filtering for speckle‐free patterned illumination

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson;

    2013-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) and matched‐filtering GPC use tandem diffractive phase elements on Fourier‐conjugate planes of a 4f optical processor to efficiently reshape incident light into a pattern that resembles the input phase modulation pattern. The synthesized patterns are inherently...

  5. Differential diagnosis of arachnoid cyst from subarachnoid space enlargement by phase-contrast cine MRI

    于群; 孔祥泉; 刘定西

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To reveal the relationship of brain motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow by phase-contrast cine MRI, and to evaluate this technique in differentiating between arachnoid cysts and subarachnoid space enlargement. Methods Using a phase-contrast cine MRI pulse sequence, we measured brain motion and CSF flow during the cardiac cycle in 10 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with MRI-suspected arachnoid cyst or subarachnoid space enlargement. CSF stroke volume curve was illustrated according to flow quantification, and time-signal intensity curve was traced. The two curves were compared. Results This study showed that brain motion was due to the volume difference between arterial and venous blood flow during a cardiac cycle, and thus drives CSF pulsation. Arachnoid cysts and subarachnoid space enlargement carried different curve patterns, demonstrating that phase-contrast MRI and flow quantification can be a useful and reliable technique for non-invasive evaluation of brain motion and CSF flow. Conclusion Arachnoid cysts can be successfully differentiated using phase-contrast cine MRI from subarachnoid space enlargement.

  6. Phase-Contrast Hounsfield Units of Fixated and Non-Fixated Soft-Tissue Samples.

    Marian Willner

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results.

  7. Phase-contrast Hounsfield units of fixated and non-fixated soft-tissue samples

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a novel technology that achieves high soft-tissue contrast. Although its clinical impact is still under investigation, the technique may potentially improve clinical diagnostics. In conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography, radiological diagnostics are quantified by Hounsfield units. Corresponding Hounsfield units for phase-contrast imaging have been recently introduced, enabling a setup-independent comparison and standardized interpretation of imaging results. Thus far, the experimental values of few tissue types have been reported; these values have been determined from fixated tissue samples. This study presents phase-contrast Hounsfield units for various types of non-fixated human soft tissues. A large variety of tissue specimens ranging from adipose, muscle and connective tissues to liver, kidney and pancreas tissues were imaged by a grating interferometer with a rotating-anode X-ray tube and a photon-counting detector. In addition, we investigated the effects of formalin fixation on the quantitative phase-contrast imaging results

  8. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown

  9. Phase-contrast X-ray imaging with synchrotron radiation for materials science applications

    Stevenson, A.W. E-mail: andrew.stevenson@csiro.au; Gureyev, T.E.; Paganin, D.; Wilkins, S.W.; Weitkamp, T.; Snigirev, A.; Rau, C.; Snigireva, I.; Youn, H.S.; Dolbnya, I.P.; Yun, W.; Lai, B.; Garrett, R.F.; Cookson, D.J.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M

    2003-01-01

    Since Roentgen's discovery of X-rays just over a century ago the vast majority of radiographs have been collected and interpreted on the basis of absorption contrast and geometrical (ray) optics. Recently the possibility of obtaining new and complementary information in X-ray images by utilizing phase-contrast effects has received considerable attention, both in the laboratory context and at synchrotron sources (where much of this activity is a consequence of the highly coherent X-ray beams which can be produced). Phase-contrast X-ray imaging is capable of providing improved information from weakly absorbing features in a sample, together with improved edge definition. Four different experimental arrangements for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray regime, for the purpose of non-destructive characterization of materials, will be described. Two of these, demonstrated at ESRF in France and AR in Japan, are based on parallel-beam geometry; the other two, demonstrated at PLS in Korea and APS in USA, are based on spherical-beam geometry. In each case quite different X-ray optical arrangements were used. Some image simulations will be employed to demonstrate salient features of hard X-ray phase-contrast imaging and examples of results from each of the experiments will be shown.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging at CPHS

    Since the launching of the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project of Tsinghua University in 2009, works have begun on the design and engineering of an imaging/radiography instrument for the neutron source provided by CPHS. The instrument will perform basic tasks such as transmission imaging and computerized tomography. Additionally, we include in the design the utilization of coded-aperture and grating-based phase contrast methodology, as well as the options of prompt gamma-ray analysis and neutron-energy selective imaging. Previously, we had implemented the hardware and data-analysis software for grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging. Here, we investigate Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations of neutron refraction phenomena and then model the grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging system according to the classic-optics-based method. The simulated experimental results of the retrieving phase shift gradient information by five-step phase-stepping approach indicate the feasibility of grating-based neutron phase contrast imaging as an option for the cold neutron imaging instrument at the CPHS.

  11. Justification of routine WB FDG PET with dual phase contrast CT in head and neck cancers

    The aim of the study is to demonstrate the justification of routine WB FDG positron emission tomograph (PET) with dual phase contrast CT and to know the significant contribution of them to evaluate in all stage of the primary head and neck cancers (HNC)

  12. Grating-based phase-contrast imaging of tumor angiogenesis in lung metastases.

    Huimin Lin

    Full Text Available To assess the feasibility of the grating-based phase-contrast imaging (GPI technique for studying tumor angiogenesis in nude BALB/c mice, without contrast agents.We established lung metastatic models of human gastric cancer by injecting the moderately differentiated SGC-7901 gastric cancer cell line into the tail vein of nude mice. Samples were embedded in a 10% formalin suspension and dried before imaging. Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast images were obtained at the BL13W beamline of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF and compared with histological sections.Without contrast agents, grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging still differentiated angiogenesis within metastatic tumors with high spatial resolution. Vessels, down to tens of microns, showed gray values that were distinctive from those of the surrounding tumors, which made them easily identifiable. The vessels depicted in the imaging study were similar to those identified on histopathology, both in size and shape.Our preliminary study demonstrates that grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging has the potential to depict angiogenesis in lung metastases.

  13. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  14. In-line phase-contrast imaging for strong absorbing objects

    DeCaro, Liberato; Cedola, Alessia; Giannini, Cinzia; Bukreeva, Inna; Lagomarsino, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is one of the most important emerging x-ray imaging techniques. In this work we analyse, from a theoretical point of view, the in-line phase-contrast image formation under general assumptions. The approach is based on wave-optical theory (Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals) and on the formalism of the mutual coherence function for the evolution of the coherence wavefield properties. Our theoretical model can be applied to phase-contrast imaging realized both by using highly coherent synchrotron radiation and micro-focus x-ray laboratory sources. Thus, the model is suitable for widespread applications, ranging from material science to medical imaging of human body parts. However, it cannot be applied to polychromatic sources, although the validity of the model does not require particularly demanding characteristics of monochromaticity. In addition, for moderate phase gradients, a useful analytical formula of the phase-contrast visibility is derived, based on the a priori knowledge of source size and distance, pixel detector size, defocus distance, material/tissue dielectric susceptibility and characteristic scales of transversal and longitudinal non-uniformities of the material/tissue dielectric susceptibility. Comparisons both with experimental results published by other authors and with simulations based on a Fourier optics approach have been reported, to confirm the validity of the proposed analytical formula.

  15. In-line phase-contrast imaging for strong absorbing objects

    Phase-contrast imaging is one of the most important emerging x-ray imaging techniques. In this work we analyse, from a theoretical point of view, the in-line phase-contrast image formation under general assumptions. The approach is based on wave-optical theory (Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals) and on the formalism of the mutual coherence function for the evolution of the coherence wavefield properties. Our theoretical model can be applied to phase-contrast imaging realized both by using highly coherent synchrotron radiation and micro-focus x-ray laboratory sources. Thus, the model is suitable for widespread applications, ranging from material science to medical imaging of human body parts. However, it cannot be applied to polychromatic sources, although the validity of the model does not require particularly demanding characteristics of monochromaticity. In addition, for moderate phase gradients, a useful analytical formula of the phase-contrast visibility is derived, based on the a priori knowledge of source size and distance, pixel detector size, defocus distance, material/tissue dielectric susceptibility and characteristic scales of transversal and longitudinal non-uniformities of the material/tissue dielectric susceptibility. Comparisons both with experimental results published by other authors and with simulations based on a Fourier optics approach have been reported, to confirm the validity of the proposed analytical formula.

  16. Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography of non-formalin fixed biological objects

    Using a monolithic X-ray interferometer having the view size of 25 mmx25 mm, phase-contrast X-ray CT (PCCT) was performed for non-formalin fixed livers of two normal rats and a rabbit transplanted with VX-2 cancer. PCCT images of liver and cancer lesions resembled well those obtained by formalin fixed samples

  17. Complete staining of human spermatozoa and immature germ cells combined with phase contrast microscopy

    Michael, A Y; Drejer, J O; Bagger, P V;

    1987-01-01

    A method combining Janus green B and Thymol blue stains the anterior part of the head, the nuclear membrane, middle piece, and tail of spermatozoa light green and the nucleus deep purple. The method provides excellent stained preparations for the evaluation of sperm morphology by phase contrast...... microscopy. It produces significantly less abnormal spermatozoa compared with the Papanicolaou stain....

  18. Noise robustness of a combined phase retrieval and reconstruction method for phase-contrast tomography

    Kongskov, Rasmus Dalgas; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer; Poulsen, Henning Friis;

    2016-01-01

    Classical reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography consist of two stages: phase retrieval and tomographic reconstruction. A novel algebraic method combining the two was suggested by Kostenko et al. [Opt. Express 21, 12185 (2013) [CrossRef], and preliminary results demonstrated improve...

  19. Evaluation of a new reconstruction algorithm for x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Seifert, Maria; Hauke, Christian; Horn, Florian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging might open up entirely new opportunities in medical imaging. However, transferring the interferometer technique from laboratory setups to conventional imaging systems the necessary rigidity of the system is difficult to achieve. Therefore, vibrations or distortions of the system lead to inaccuracies within the phase-stepping procedure. Given insufficient stability of the phase-step positions, up to now, artifacts in phase-contrast images occur, which lower the image quality. This is a problem with regard to the intended use of phase-contrast imaging in clinical routine as for example tiny structures of the human anatomy cannot be observed. In this contribution we evaluate an algorithm proposed by Vargas et.al.1 and applied to X-ray imaging by Pelzer et.al. that enables us to reconstruct a differential phase-contrast image without the knowledge of the specific phase-step positions. This method was tested in comparison to the standard reconstruction by Fourier analysis. The quality of phase-contrast images remains stable, even if the phase-step positions are completely unknown and not uniformly distributed. To also achieve attenuation and dark-field images the proposed algorithm has been combined with a further algorithm of Vargas et al.3 Using this algorithm, the phase-step positions can be reconstructed. With the help of the proper phase-step positions it is possible to get information about the phase, the amplitude and the offset of the measured data. We evaluated this algorithm concerning the measurement of thick objects which show a high absorbency.

  20. Analysis of X-ray phase contrast imaging in atomizing sprays

    Recent studies of spray-related flow fields using synchrotron-based X-ray phase contrast imaging have produced results that are sometimes straightforward to interpret in terms of the fluid structure, but in other cases the images do not reflect generally accepted physics of fluid motion. It has been unclear why some images have the appearance of a normal fluid stream while others depart significantly from expectation. The detailed numerical modeling presented here is meant to explain the images and resolve common questions about the technique. The simulations show that collimated X-ray beams will always contain signatures from every possible encounter, from the input plane to the exit plane, and these signatures generate overlapping phase contrast patterns that can prove at times impossible to interpret. Clouds of moderate- to large-size drops produce a complex, mottled X-ray phase contrast image indicating the presence of the cloud; but it is an image that cannot be interpreted further. Small drops generate something akin to one gray pixel image each, and their size is close to the resolution limit of the instrument, so the diffraction pattern is broadened by the instrument response into something more like a small diffuse blob. Dense clouds of small drops produce a composite image that is a fairly uniform gray mass indicating the presence of a drop cloud that cannot be interpreted further. Moreover, it is not possible to image intact liquid structures behind clouds of drops. Whenever a significant number of drops are present, therefore, X-ray phase contrast images are dominated by unavoidable artifacts of the technique. Sprays, by definition, consist of droplet clouds and this means that internal features in the spray formation region cannot be investigated using X-ray phase contrast imaging. (orig.)

  1. X-ray microscopy in Ziarnik phase contrast mode at 4 keV photon energy with 60 nm resolution

    We report on x-ray microscopy of advanced microelectronic devices imaged in Zernike-type phase contrast mode at 4 keV photon energy. Fresnel zone plates were used as high resolution x-ray objectives providing 60 nm spatial resolution. Integrated circuit copper interconnect structures were imaged in positive as well as negative phase contrast. In both cases the phase contrast in the x-ray images is about five times higher than the pure absorption contrast

  2. Performance analysis of the attenuation-partition based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for in-line phase-contrast imaging

    YAN Aimin; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2010-01-01

    The phase retrieval is an important task in x-ray phase contrast imaging. The robustness of phase retrieval is especially important for potential medical imaging applications such as phase contrast mammography. Recently the authors developed an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, the attenuation-partition based algorithm, for the phase retrieval in inline phase-contrast imaging [1]. Applied to experimental images, the algorithm was proven to be fast and robust. However, a quantitative analys...

  3. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly optimiza......We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly...... optimization of the input aperture parameters according to desired output characteristics. For wavefront sensing, the achieved aperture control opens a new degree of freedom for improving the accuracy of quantitative phase imaging. Diffractive GPC input modulation also fits well with grating-based optical...

  4. Improved algorithm for processing grating-based phase contrast interferometry image sets

    Grating-based X-ray and neutron interferometry tomography using phase-stepping methods generates large data sets. An improved algorithm is presented for solving for the parameters to calculate transmissions, differential phase contrast, and dark-field images. The method takes advantage of the vectorization inherent in high-level languages such as Mathematica and MATLAB and can solve a 16 × 1k × 1k data set in less than a second. In addition, the algorithm can function with partial data sets. This is demonstrated with processing of a 16-step grating data set with partial use of the original data chosen without any restriction. Also, we have calculated the reduced chi-square for the fit and notice the effect of grating support structural elements upon the differential phase contrast image and have explored expanded basis set representations to mitigate the impact

  5. Sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects by plasmonic lens structure

    Yao, Na; Wang, Changtao; Tao, Xing; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Luo, Xiangang

    2013-04-01

    We propose a specially designed plasmonic lens structure to succeed in realizing sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects. The nano-objects are embedded inside the insulator layer of the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) plasmonic structure and have a small refractive index difference with respect to the transparent insulator layer. The excited surface plasmons in the MIM structure help to greatly enhance scattered light from the nano-objects and effectively suppress the transmitted illumination light. A spatial resolution of about 64 nm and a minimum distinguishable refractive index difference down to 0.05 are numerically demonstrated. For sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of irregular three-dimensional (3D) nanowires and nanocylinders, the optimized MIM structure shows much better performance in comparison with that of a superlens.

  6. Sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects by plasmonic lens structure

    We propose a specially designed plasmonic lens structure to succeed in realizing sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of transparent nano-objects. The nano-objects are embedded inside the insulator layer of the metal–insulator–metal (MIM) plasmonic structure and have a small refractive index difference with respect to the transparent insulator layer. The excited surface plasmons in the MIM structure help to greatly enhance scattered light from the nano-objects and effectively suppress the transmitted illumination light. A spatial resolution of about 64 nm and a minimum distinguishable refractive index difference down to 0.05 are numerically demonstrated. For sub-diffraction phase-contrast imaging of irregular three-dimensional (3D) nanowires and nanocylinders, the optimized MIM structure shows much better performance in comparison with that of a superlens. (paper)

  7. Cone-beam differential phase-contrast laminography with x-ray tube source

    Fu, J.; Biernath, T.; Willner, M.; Amberger, M.; Meiser, J.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Herzen, J.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an x-ray cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed laminography (DPC-CL) method for tomographic reconstruction of thin and lamellar objects. We describe the specific scan geometry of DPC-CL, which consists of a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer and a lab-based x-ray tube source, and derive a filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The experimental results of a flat sphere phantom and a piece of ham demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The existing DPC-CL methods are based on synchrotron sources and the parallel-beam geometry. In contrast, our approach adopts a more accessible x-ray tube source and a cone-beam geometry. Therefore it significantly widens the application range of phase-contrast laminography, particularly in practical laboratory settings, beyond applications at large-scale synchrotron facilities.

  8. Design of a novel phase contrast X-ray imaging system for mammography

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique which may lead to significant advancements in medical imaging. One of the impediments to the clinical implementation of the technique is the general requirement to have an X-ray source of high coherence. The radiation physics group at UCL is currently developing an X-ray phase contrast imaging technique which works with laboratory X-ray sources. The design of this system requires rigorous simulation of the imaging system and the interaction of X-rays with healthy and unhealthy breast tissue. We present in this paper the results of such simulations showing the expected gain in contrast arising from the proposed system and the system's initial design.

  9. Characterization of NIF cryogenic beryllium capsules using x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    Montgomery, D. S. (David S.); Nobile, A. (Arthur), Jr.; Walsh, Peter J.,

    2004-01-01

    Beryllium capsules filled with cryogenic deuterium and tritium fuel layers may provide many advantages for obtaining ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). However, characterizing the uniformity and thickness of the frozen fuel layer in such a target is challenging since traditional x-ray radiography techniques, which rely on absorption for'image contrast, cannot provide sufficient contrast to image the fuel layer in these low-Z materials. We propose using x-ray phase contrast imaging, which relies on gradients in the refractive index and wave interference, to characterize fuel layer uniformity. We present numerical modeling results of x-ray phase contrast imaging demonstrating the feasibility of this method for target characterization, discuss the necessary x-ray source characteristics, and present concepts for using this technique in the context of dynamic high density plasma experiments.

  10. Generation of a Desired Wavefront with a Plurality of Phase Contrast Filters

    2004-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing an intensity pattern based on generalized phase contrast imaging. The phase filter contains a plurality of phase shifting regions that is matched to the layout of a light source array, each of the regions being positioned at...... the zero-order diffraction region of a respective element of the array. Further, the shape of each phase shifting region may match the shape of the zero-order diffraction region of the respective element. Thus, the energy of the electromagnetic fields of the system may be distributed over a large area...... compared to the area of a zero-order diffraction region of a single plane electromagnetic field of a known phase contrast imaging system....

  11. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    Maretzke, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent X-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only ...

  12. X-ray phase-contrast imaging of dynamics of complex fluids

    Complex fluids often exhibit unusual and/or unexpected behaviours in response to external stresses because of their complicated structures and compositions. It is not easy to understand dynamic behaviours of complex fluids based on using conventional imaging methods such as optical or electron microscopy. Recently, x-ray phase-contrast imaging, as one of the most powerful methods, has been introduced for elucidating the dynamic nature of complex fluids, enabling directly looking into the insides of complex fluids thanks to the strong penetration capability and small refractivity of hard x-rays. In this paper, we review representative x-ray imaging studies on dynamics of various complex fluid systems from droplets, bubbles, granular materials and foams to colloids. It is demonstrated that x-ray phase-contrast imaging would help us better identify and utilize the properties of complex fluids. (paper)

  13. Development of microperiodic mirrors for hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Differential phase-contrast imaging with hard x rays can have important applications in medicine, material sciences, and energy research. Phase-contrast methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, are particularly attractive because they allow the use of conventional x-ray tubes. To enable shearing interferometry with x rays up to 100 keV, we propose using grazing-incidence microperiodic mirrors. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors, based on the difference in grazing-incidence reflectivity between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Using this method, we produced prototype mirrors with 5-100 μm periods and 90 mm active length. Experimental tests with x rays up to 60 keV indicate good microperiodic mirror reflectivity and high-contrast fringe patterns, encouraging further development of the proposed imaging concept.

  14. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Krenkel, Martin; Töpperwien, Mareike; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  15. On the origin of speckle in x-ray phase contrast images of lung tissue

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging of small animal lungs reveals a speckled intensity pattern not seen in other tissues, making the lungs highly visible in comparison to other organs. Although bearing a superficial resemblance to alveoli, the cause of this speckle has not been established. With a view to determining the mechanism for the formation of speckle, this paper details the results of propagation-based phase contrast experiments performed on mice lungs, together with packed glass microspheres used to emulate lung tissue. These experimental studies are compared to numerical simulations, based on wave propagation techniques. We find that speckle arises from focusing effects, with multiple alveoli acting as aberrated compound refractive lenses. Both experiments and modelling suggest that this speckle-formation phenomenon may lead to better screening methods for human lungs than conventional radiography

  16. On the origin of speckle in x-ray phase contrast images of lung tissue

    Kitchen, M J [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Paganin, D [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Lewis, R A [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia); Yagi, N [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Uesugi, K [SPring-8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mudie, S T [Centre for X-ray Physics and Imaging, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2004-09-21

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging of small animal lungs reveals a speckled intensity pattern not seen in other tissues, making the lungs highly visible in comparison to other organs. Although bearing a superficial resemblance to alveoli, the cause of this speckle has not been established. With a view to determining the mechanism for the formation of speckle, this paper details the results of propagation-based phase contrast experiments performed on mice lungs, together with packed glass microspheres used to emulate lung tissue. These experimental studies are compared to numerical simulations, based on wave propagation techniques. We find that speckle arises from focusing effects, with multiple alveoli acting as aberrated compound refractive lenses. Both experiments and modelling suggest that this speckle-formation phenomenon may lead to better screening methods for human lungs than conventional radiography.

  17. Enhancing Tabletop X-Ray Phase Contrast Imaging with Nano-Fabrication

    Miao, Houxun; Gomella, Andrew A.; Harmon, Katherine J.; Bennett, Eric E.; Chedid, Nicholas; Znati, Sami; Panna, Alireza; Foster, Barbara A.; Bhandarkar, Priya; Wen, Han

    2015-08-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising approach for improving soft-tissue contrast and lowering radiation dose in biomedical applications. While current tabletop imaging systems adapt to common x-ray tubes and large-area detectors by employing absorptive elements such as absorption gratings or monolithic crystals to filter the beam, we developed nanometric phase gratings which enable tabletop x-ray far-field interferometry with only phase-shifting elements, leading to a substantial enhancement in the performance of phase contrast imaging. In a general sense the method transfers the demands on the spatial coherence of the x-ray source and the detector resolution to the feature size of x-ray phase masks. We demonstrate its capabilities in hard x-ray imaging experiments at a fraction of clinical dose levels and present comparisons with the existing Talbot-Lau interferometer and with conventional digital radiography.

  18. Optical imaging of transient acoustic fields using a phase contrast method

    Clement, G T

    2014-01-01

    A coherent phase-contrast optical system has been designed and tested for tomographic imaging of pressure fields from experimental transient acoustic signals. The system is similar to the pulsed, central-order schlieren method, but uses a Fourier filtering technique that images the actual acoustic pressure field, where the former technique reconstructs only the absolute value of the field. Simulations of the system are performed using a single-cycle sine-wave acoustic pulse. Experimental images resulting from a broad-band Gaussian pulse input to an underwater piezoceramic transducer array are presented. Relative pressure field s are reconstructed in space over a series of times after the source excitation. Theory and limitations of the phase contrast system are discussed.

  19. Cine phase contrast angiography of normal and diseased peripheral arteries. Preliminary results

    Cine phase contrast angiography (PCA) is a modified MR phase contrast sequence that acquires up to 22 coronal phase images per mean cardiac cycle. The ability of the sequence to visualise local haemodynamics was investigated in 7 normal volunteers and 9 patients with flow disturbances of the peripheral arteries using a 1.5 T imager. Functional flow information provided by coronal cine PCA was correlated with quantitative data obtained by MR flow measurements and vessel morphology confirmed by conventional angiograms. Due to the yet suboptimal image quality, an aortic dissection and 1 of 4 aneurysms could not be depicted morphologically. The temporal pattern of arterial perfusion in cine PCA corresponded with flow velocity versus time data provided by quantitative MR flow measurements. Accuracy and time resolution of cine PCA was thus sufficient to provide functional information on the severity of occlusive vascular disease. (orig.)

  20. An iterative method for robust in-line phase contrast imaging

    Carroll, Aidan J.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Tran, Giang N.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2016-04-01

    We present an iterative near-field in-line phase contrast method that allows quantitative determination of the thickness of an object given the refractive index of the sample material. The iterative method allows for quantitative phase contrast imaging in regimes where the contrast transfer function (CTF) and transport of intensity equation (TIE) cannot be applied. Further, the nature of the iterative scheme offers more flexibility and potentially allows more high-resolution image reconstructions when compared to TIE method and less artefacts when compared to the CTF method. While, not addressed here, extension of our approach in future work to broadband illumination will also be straightforward as the wavelength dependence of the refractive index of an object can be readily incorporated into the iterative approach.

  1. Visibility in differential phase-contrast imaging with partial coherence source

    Liu Xin; Guo Jin-Chuan; Peng Xiang; Niu Han-Ben

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives theoretical analysis of visibility of fringes, which is influenced by distances, temporal and spatial coherence of source, in hard x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with microfocus x-ray source. According to the character of longitudinal periodicity of the interferogram, the setup is insensitive to mechanical drift and vibrations. The effect of temporal coherence of x-ray source is investigated and its related bandwidth is derived. Based on the theory of partially coherent light, it shows that the requirement for the spatial coherence of x-ray source is not strict and can be met by the general microfocus x-ray tube for x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging.

  2. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    Martin Krenkel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  3. X-Ray Grating Interferometry for Phase-Contrast Imaging and Optics Metrology Applications

    David, Christian; Rutishauser, Simon; Thüring, Thomas; Donath, Tilman; Stampanoni, Marco

    2010-04-01

    We report on a hard x-ray interferometry technique based on diffraction gratings fabricated using microlithography techniques. Compared to other x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods, the grating interferometer only has very moderate requirements in terms of coherence. This makes it possible to use the method with standard x-ray tubes, which opens up a huge range of applications e.g. in medical imaging.

  4. Theoretical analysis of x-ray CT phase-contrast imaging

    Feng, Sheng; Liu, Song; Zhang, Xuelong

    2008-12-01

    Recently phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention. An obvious advantage of using X-rays for imaging the internal structure of relatively thick samples lies in its high degree of penetration of solid objects. However, often leads to poor image contrast for soft tissue. Phase contrast imaging can be very useful in such situation, as the phase of the transmitted beam may often be more sensitive indicator of density of sample than convention contrast. On the other hand, Computed Tomography is the best technology in the aspect of X-rays detection. Using the technology, the detected object can be imaged to three-dimensional image, so as to observe the inner structure of object, and be convenient to the disease examination. If the phase contrast imaging can be used to the technology of Computed Tomography, the high resolution image can be gained. The technology will become the development orientation of medical image. The aim of this article was to apply the theory of X-rays phase contrast imaging to the traditional X-CT technique. For this purpose, the formula deduced from the imaging theory with parallel monochromatic X-rays illuminating the object based on the Fresnel-Kircohhof theory had been completed and a formula similar to that of the traditional X-CT reconstruction had been gained, which was Radon transform formula. At last, X-rays reconstruction simulation had been carried out according to the formula, and proved that the method could be used in clinical medical imaging. The method discussed in this paper had a very bright prospect for application.

  5. Noise and Analyzer-Crystal Angular Position Analysis for Analyzer-Based Phase-Contrast Imaging

    Majidi, Keivan; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-01-01

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast X-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the...

  6. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    Hongchang Wang; Sebastien Berujon; Julia Herzen; Robert Atwood; David Laundy; Alexander Hipp; Kawal Sawhney

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric informa...

  7. High-sensitivity phase-contrast tomography of rat brain in phosphate buffered saline

    Pfeiffer, F.; David, C.; Bunk, O.; Poitry-Yamate, C.; Grütter, R; B. Müller; Weitkamp, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report advances and complementary results concerning a recently developed method for high-sensitivity grating-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography. In particular we demonstrate how the soft tissue sensitivity of the technique can be used to obtain in-vitro tomographic images of rat brain specimens. Contrary to our previous experiments with fixated specimen (chemically modified or formalin fixed), the present results on the rat's brain are closer to the in-vivo situation. The findings are ...

  8. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    Yan Xi; Xiaojie Lin; Falei Yuan; Guo-Yuan Yang; Jun Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displa...

  9. X-ray phase-contrast tomography for high-spatial-resolution zebrafish muscle imaging

    William Vågberg; Daniel H. Larsson; Mei Li; Anders Arner; Hertz, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of muscular structure with cellular or subcellular detail in whole-body animal models is of key importance for understanding muscular disease and assessing interventions. Classical histological methods for high-resolution imaging methods require excision, fixation and staining. Here we show that the three-dimensional muscular structure of unstained whole zebrafish can be imaged with sub-5 μm detail with X-ray phase-contrast tomography. Our method relies on a laboratory propagation-bas...

  10. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system toge...

  11. Experimental demonstration of Generalized Phase Contrast based Gaussian beam-shaper

    Tauro, Sandeep; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    We report the first experimental demonstration of Gaussian beam-shaping based on the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) approach. We show that, when using a dynamic spatial light modulator (SLM), this approach can rapidly generate arbitrarily shaped beams. Moreover, we demonstrate that low-cost binary-phase optics fabricated using photolithography and chemical etching techniques can replace the SLM in static and high power beam shaping applications. The design parameters for the binary-phase el...

  12. Diffractive generalized phase contrast for adaptive phase imaging and optical security

    Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the properties of Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) when the input phase modulation is implemented using diffractive gratings. In GPC applications for patterned illumination, the use of a dynamic diffractive optical element for encoding the GPC input phase allows for onthe- fly optimization of the input aperture parameters according to desired output characteristics. For wavefront sensing, the achieved aperture control opens a new degree of freedom for improving the accuracy of quan...

  13. Generalized Phase contrast and matched filtering for speckle‐free patterned illumination

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Aabo, Thomas; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) and matched‐filtering GPC use tandem diffractive phase elements on Fourier‐conjugate planes of a 4f optical processor to efficiently reshape incident light into a pattern that resembles the input phase modulation pattern. The synthesized patterns are inherently speckle‐free and the use of phase modulating elements minimizes absorption losses to maximize light efficiency as light is simply redistributed from the dark regions to the intense regions of the output...

  14. Phase contrast enhancement of x-ray mammography: a design study

    This paper explores the application to mammography of phase contrast produced by variations in x-ray refractive index. As a spatially coherent x-ray beam propagates through an x-ray transparent medium, the phase of the incident wavefront becomes modified in a manner related to the electron density of the medium. The resulting phase gradient across the wavefront is equivalent to a small change in direction of the propagation of the wave. For a general object, the change in propagation direction will vary from point to point depending on the structures within the object. The net effect can be recorded in a radiographic image using an appropriate geometry to produce the visual appearance of edge enhancement at interfaces between materials with differing x-ray refractive indices. Normally these materials will also have differences in attenuation coefficient, so the overall effect is to increase the visibility of interfaces between materials. It is proposed that mammographic images can be subtly enhanced by the use of phase contrast information to overcome some of the known limitations of the imaging process whilst leaving the gross radiological appearance of the images substantially unchanged. The design trade-offs required to utilize phase contrast information were investigated using a conventional mammographic x-ray generator and film-screen system. The Leeds TORMAM mammographic image quality test object was then used to demonstrate a considerable improvement in image quality for the phase contrast enhanced images over those produced in the conventional geometry with no increase in radiation dose to the patient. The results are discussed in terms of their possible practical application. (author)

  15. Solution of the inverse problem of images reconstruction by the X-ray phase contrast method

    In the approximation of geometrical optics of the wave theory of X-ray diffraction an inverse problem of reconstruction of an internal structure of objects on the base of data of X-ray phase contrast method with the crystal-analyzer, located in Bragg geometry is analytically solved. It is shown, that the approximation of geometrical optics is fair, if the characteristic sizes of object exceed radius of the first Fresnel zone and the extinction length

  16. Fast Measurement of Intracardiac Pressure Differences With 2D Breath-Hold Phase-Contrast MRI

    Thompson, Richard B; Mcveigh, Elliot R.

    2003-01-01

    Intracardiovascular blood pressure differences can be derived from velocity images acquired with phase-contrast (PC) MRI by evaluating the Navier-Stokes equations. Pressure differences within a slice of interest can be calculated using only the in-plane velocity components from that slice. This rapid exam is proposed as an alternative to the lengthy 3D velocity imaging exams. Despite their good spatial coverage, the 3D exams are prone to artifacts and errors from respiratory motion and insuff...

  17. Efficient formation of extended line intensity patterns using matched-filtering generalized phase contrast

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Aabo, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the efficient generation of line patterns using matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC). So far, the main emphasis of mGPC light addressing has been on the creation of rapidly reconfigurable focused spots. This has recently been extended to encoding extended line patter...... for structured light applications and advanced microscopy. © (2013) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only....

  18. A quantitative, non-interferometric X-ray phase contrast imaging technique.

    Munro, P. R.; Rigon, L.; Ignatyev, K; Lopez, F. C.; Dreossi, D.; Speller, R. D.; A. Olivo

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative, non-interferometric, X-ray differential phase contrast imaging technique based on the edge illumination principle. We derive a novel phase retrieval algorithm which requires only two images to be acquired and verify the technique experimentally using synchrotron radiation. The technique is useful for planar imaging but is expected to be important for quantitative phase tomography also. The properties and limitations of the technique are studied in detail.

  19. Contrast-to-noise in X-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    Engel, K.J.; Geller, D; Koehler, T.; Martens, G.; Schusser, S.; Vogtmeier, G.; Roessl, E

    2011-01-01

    A quantitative theory for the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in differential phase contrast imaging (DPCI) is proposed and compared to that of images derived from classical absorption contrast imaging (ACI). Most prominently, the CNR for DPCI contains the reciprocal of thespatial wavelength to be imaged, the fringe visibility, and a tunable factor dependent on the system geometry. DPCI is thus potentiallybeneficial especially for the imaging of small object structures. We demonstrate CNR calcu...

  20. Quantitative X-ray phase-contrast microtomography from a compact laser-driven betatron source

    Wenz, J; S. Schleede; Khrennikov, K.; Bech, M.; Thibault, P.; Heigoldt, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Karsch, S.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imagi...

  1. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    Hagen, C. K.; Munro, P. R. T.; M. Endrizzi; Diemoz, P. C.; A. Olivo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomogr...

  2. Quantitative phase reconstruction for orthogonal-scanning differential phase-contrast optical coherence tomography

    Heise, Bettina; 10.1364/OL.34.001306

    2011-01-01

    We present differential phase-contrast optical coherence tomography (DPC-OCT) with two transversally separated probing beams to sense phase gradients in various directions by employing a rotatable Wollaston prism. In combination with a two-dimensional mathe- matical reconstruction algorithm based on a regularized shape from shading (SfS) method accurate quantitative phase maps can be determined from a set of two orthogonal en-face DPC-OCT images, as exemplified on various technical samples.

  3. In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging Using Partially Coherent Hard X-Ray

    喻虹; 朱频频; 韩申生; 罗震林; 高琛

    2003-01-01

    An experimental study of in-line hard x-ray phase-contrast imaging had been performed, using the polychromatic output of an x-ray tube. The results are in good agreement with partially coherent theory of hard x-ray phasecontrast imaging. The new technique provides the advantage to obtain the radiographs of large samples in an acceptable exposure time, which is very important to clinical applications.

  4. Laser light-field fusion for wide-field lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using an on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wav...

  5. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    Zhang, Dongming; Yan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xinyi [Fudan University, Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, State Key Laboratory of Surface Physics and Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chenglin [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers' College, Yancheng (China); Dang, Ruishan [The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiao, Tiqiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Peiping [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  6. Synchrotron radiation phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of acupuncture points

    Three-dimensional (3D) topographic structures of acupuncture points were investigated by using synchrotron radiation in-line X-ray phase contrast computerized tomography. Two acupuncture points, named Zhongji (RN3) and Zusanli (ST36), were studied. We found an accumulation of microvessels at each acupuncture point region. Images of the tissues surrounding the acupuncture points do not show such kinds of structure. This is the first time that 3D images have revealed the specific structures of acupuncture points. (orig.)

  7. Phase contrast image simulations for electron holography of magnetic and electric fields

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, Giulio

    The research on flux line lattices and pancake vortices in superconducting materials, carried out within a long and fruitful collaboration with Akira Tonomura and his group at the Hitachi Advanced Research Laboratory, led us to develop a mathematical framework, based on the reciprocal representat...

  8. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  9. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  10. A uniqueness result for propagation-based phase contrast imaging from a single measurement

    Maretzke, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Phase contrast imaging seeks to reconstruct the complex refractive index of an unknown sample from scattering intensities, measured for example under illumination with coherent x-rays. By incorporating refraction, this method yields improved contrast compared to purely absorption-based radiography but involves a phase retrieval problem which, in general, allows for ambiguous reconstructions. In this paper, we show uniqueness of propagation-based phase contrast imaging for compactly supported objects in the near-field regime, based on a description by the projection- and paraxial approximations. In this setting, propagation is governed by the Fresnel propagator and the unscattered part of the illumination function provides a known reference wave at the detector which facilitates phase reconstruction. The uniqueness theorem is derived using the theory of entire functions. Unlike previous results based on exact solution formulae, it is valid for arbitrary complex objects and requires intensity measurements only at a single detector distance and illumination wavelength. We also deduce a uniqueness criterion for phase contrast tomography, which may be applied to resolve the three-dimensional structure of micro- and nano-scale samples. Moreover, our results may have some significance to electronic imaging methods due to the equivalence of paraxial wave propagation and Schrödinger’s equation.

  11. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research

    Yan Xi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  12. Simulation of grating-based X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast tomography proved to achieve better contrast in soft tissue than conventional X-ray absorption. The real part of the refractive index of the tissue results in a slight deflection of the X-rays. These tiny angles of approximately 20 nrad can be detected by a combination of a phase and absorption gratings. With an absorption grating near the anode of a conventional X-ray tube the method is applicable as part of a medical device. Hence X-ray phase contrast can be used in the detection of soft tissue pathologies e.g. breast tumor in mammography. The application in the clinics demands the lowest dose for the patient though the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). To accomplish this, we simulated the imaging varying the height and pitch of the gratings for a given power and spectrum of the X-ray tube. Source, detector and grating distances were under the constraint of the dimensions of a putative computer tomograph. Optimal combinations where found for maximal CNR. The results will be important for the design and implementation of the X-ray phase contrast method in commercial CT devices.

  13. Bone histomorphometric quantification by X-ray phase contrast and transmission 3D SR microcomputed tomography

    Full text: Conventional histomorphometry is an important method for quantitative evaluation of bone microstructure. X-ray computed tomography is a noninvasive technique, which can be used to evaluate histomorphometric indices. In this technique, the output 3D images are used to quantify the whole sample, differently from the conventional one, in which the quantification is performed in 2D slices and extrapolated for 3D case. Looking for better resolutions and visualization of soft tissues, X-ray phase contrast imaging technique was developed. The objective of this work was to perform histomorphometric quantification of human cancellous bone using 3D synchrotron X ray computed microtomography, using two distinct techniques: transmission and phase contrast, in order to compare the results and evaluate the viability of applying the same methodology of quantification for both technique. All experiments were performed at the ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Trieste (Italy). MicroCT data sets were collected using the CT set-up on the SYRMEP (Synchrotron Radiation for Medical Physics) beamline. Results showed that there is a better correlation between histomorphometric parameters of both techniques when morphological filters had been used. However, using these filters, some important information given by phase contrast are lost and they shall be explored by new techniques of quantification

  14. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping.

    Marschner, M; Willner, M; Potdevin, G; Fehringer, A; Noël, P B; Pfeiffer, F; Herzen, J

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal. PMID:27052368

  15. Preliminary results from a first preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    Conventional absorption-based X-ray imaging of biomedical samples provides only weak soft-tissue contrast. This limitation can be addressed by phase-contrast imaging, which exploits the phase shift that X-rays undergo when passing through an object. The phase shift, apparent in a minimal angular refraction of the X-ray, can be measured by grating-based interferometric methods at laboratory X-ray sources. Using this technique, improved soft-tissue contrast can be achieved and great potential for medical imaging is anticipated. As a first step towards clinical implementation, we have developed a grating-based compact preclinical phase-contrast CT scanner with rotating gantry, from which we present the first results of soft tissue samples. In particular, the effect of the rotational movement of the gantry on the interferometric image acquisition is characterized and the consequent challenges for image preprocessing and image formation are presented. First scans of biological samples clearly show the improved soft-tissue contrast and hence prove the feasibility of phase-contrast X-ray tomography with a compact rotating gantry system.

  16. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy

    Sannomiya, Takumi, E-mail: sannomiya.t.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Kanagawa (Japan); Junesch, Juliane [ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Hosokawa, Fumio [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nagayama, Kuniaki [National Institute of Physiological Science, Aichi (Japan); Sokendai, Kanagawa (Japan); Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko [Terabase Inc., Aichi (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows “disposal” of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape. - Highlights: • A new method to fabricate carbon based phase plates for TEM is introduced. • Phase modulating objects on carbon film can be produced in parallel by colloidal lithography. • Disk type phase plates as well as pore type phase plates are produced through carbon etching and stencil methods. • Each phase modulating objects can be disposable because numbers of pores (disks) exist on a single phase plate membrane. • Both pore and disk type phase plates verify approximately pi/2 phase shift for phase contrast TEM imaging.

  17. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging using polychromatic laboratory sources

    Research highlights: → Efficient use of polychromatic laboratory sources for X-ray phase contrast imaging. → The inter-grating distance is not limited by the polychromaticity of the X-ray source. → Sensitivity for phase measurements can be further improved. → Potential optimizations of the imaging system from an application perspective. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to have an improved contrast over conventional absorption imaging for those weakly absorbing objects. However, most of the hard X-ray phase-sensitive imaging has so far been impractical with laboratory available X-ray sources. Grating-based phase imaging approach has the prominent advantage that polychromatic laboratory X-ray generators can be efficiently used in a Talbot-Lau configuration. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate here the efficient use of polychromatic X-ray laboratory sources for differential phase contrast imaging. The presented results explain why in recently reported experiments, polychromatic X-ray tubes could be efficiently used in a Talbot-Lau interferometer. Furthermore, the results indicate that the fractional Talbot distance is not limited by the polychromaticity of the X-ray source. Since the sensitivity of phase measurements is proportional to the fractional Talbot distance, the image quality for phase measurements can be further improved. Finally, the potential optimizations of the imaging system are discussed from an application perspective, taking into consideration both available X-ray flux and compactness of the system.

  18. Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging using polychromatic laboratory sources

    Wang Zhili [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Gao Kun [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhu Peiping; Yuan Qingxi; Huang Wanxia; Zhang Kai; Hong Youli [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ge Xin [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Wu Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Efficient use of polychromatic laboratory sources for X-ray phase contrast imaging. {yields} The inter-grating distance is not limited by the polychromaticity of the X-ray source. {yields} Sensitivity for phase measurements can be further improved. {yields} Potential optimizations of the imaging system from an application perspective. - Abstract: X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to have an improved contrast over conventional absorption imaging for those weakly absorbing objects. However, most of the hard X-ray phase-sensitive imaging has so far been impractical with laboratory available X-ray sources. Grating-based phase imaging approach has the prominent advantage that polychromatic laboratory X-ray generators can be efficiently used in a Talbot-Lau configuration. Through numerical simulations, we demonstrate here the efficient use of polychromatic X-ray laboratory sources for differential phase contrast imaging. The presented results explain why in recently reported experiments, polychromatic X-ray tubes could be efficiently used in a Talbot-Lau interferometer. Furthermore, the results indicate that the fractional Talbot distance is not limited by the polychromaticity of the X-ray source. Since the sensitivity of phase measurements is proportional to the fractional Talbot distance, the image quality for phase measurements can be further improved. Finally, the potential optimizations of the imaging system are discussed from an application perspective, taking into consideration both available X-ray flux and compactness of the system.

  19. Reverse projection retrieval in edge illumination x-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    Hagen, Charlotte K.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) can provide three-dimensional distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index (n=1-δ +\\text{i}β ) of the sample. Phase retrieval, i.e. the separation of attenuation and refraction data from projections that contain a combination of both, is a key step in the image reconstruction process. In EI-based x-ray phase contrast CT, this is conventionally performed on the basis of two projections acquired in opposite illumination configurations (i.e. with different positions of the pre-sample mask) at each CT angle. Displacing the pre-sample mask at each projection makes the scan susceptible to motor-induced misalignment and prevents a continuous sample rotation. We present an alternative method for the retrieval of attenuation and refraction data that does not require repositioning the pre-sample mask. The method is based on the reverse projection relation published by Zhu et al (2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 13576–81) for grating interferometry-based x-ray phase contrast CT. We use this relation to derive a simplified acquisition strategy that allows acquiring data with a continuous sample rotation, which can reduce scan time when combined with a fast read-out detector. Besides discussing the theory and the necessary alignment of the experimental setup, we present tomograms obtained with reverse projection retrieval and demonstrate their agreement with those obtained with the conventional EI retrieval.

  20. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  1. The application of phase contrast X-ray techniques for imaging Li-ion battery electrodes

    In order to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cells and batteries across a range of applications, an understanding of the mechanisms by which they age and degrade at the microstructural level is required. Here, the most widely commercialized Li-ion batteries based on porous graphite based electrodes which de/intercalate Li+ ions during charge/discharge are studied by two phase contrast enhanced X-ray imaging modes, namely in-line phase contrast and Zernike phase contrast at the micro (synchrotron) and nano (laboratory X-ray microscope) level, respectively. The rate of charge cycling is directly dependent on the nature of the electrode microstructure, which are typically complex multi-scale 3D geometries with significant microstructural heterogeneities. We have been able to characterise the porosity and the tortuosity by micro-CT as well as the morphology of 5 individual graphite particles by nano-tomography finding that while their volume varied significantly their sphericity was surprisingly similar. The volume specific surface areas of the individual grains measured by nano-CT are significantly larger than the total volume specific surface area of the electrode from the micro-CT imaging, which can be attributed to the greater particle surface area visible at higher resolution

  2. The application of phase contrast X-ray techniques for imaging Li-ion battery electrodes

    Eastwood, D. S.; Bradley, R. S.; Tariq, F.; Cooper, S. J.; Taiwo, O. O.; Gelb, J.; Merkle, A.; Brett, D. J. L.; Brandon, N. P.; Withers, P. J.; Lee, P. D.; Shearing, P. R.

    2014-04-01

    In order to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cells and batteries across a range of applications, an understanding of the mechanisms by which they age and degrade at the microstructural level is required. Here, the most widely commercialized Li-ion batteries based on porous graphite based electrodes which de/intercalate Li+ ions during charge/discharge are studied by two phase contrast enhanced X-ray imaging modes, namely in-line phase contrast and Zernike phase contrast at the micro (synchrotron) and nano (laboratory X-ray microscope) level, respectively. The rate of charge cycling is directly dependent on the nature of the electrode microstructure, which are typically complex multi-scale 3D geometries with significant microstructural heterogeneities. We have been able to characterise the porosity and the tortuosity by micro-CT as well as the morphology of 5 individual graphite particles by nano-tomography finding that while their volume varied significantly their sphericity was surprisingly similar. The volume specific surface areas of the individual grains measured by nano-CT are significantly larger than the total volume specific surface area of the electrode from the micro-CT imaging, which can be attributed to the greater particle surface area visible at higher resolution.

  3. The application of phase contrast X-ray techniques for imaging Li-ion battery electrodes

    Eastwood, D.S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Bradley, R.S. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tariq, F.; Cooper, S.J. [Dept. Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Taiwo, O.O. [Dept. Chemical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Gelb, J.; Merkle, A. [Carl Zeiss X-ray Microscopy Inc., Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Brett, D.J.L. [Dept. Chemical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Brandon, N.P. [Dept. Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Withers, P.J.; Lee, P.D. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Research Complex at Harwell, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Shearing, P.R., E-mail: p.shearing@ucl.ac.uk [Dept. Chemical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    In order to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cells and batteries across a range of applications, an understanding of the mechanisms by which they age and degrade at the microstructural level is required. Here, the most widely commercialized Li-ion batteries based on porous graphite based electrodes which de/intercalate Li{sup +} ions during charge/discharge are studied by two phase contrast enhanced X-ray imaging modes, namely in-line phase contrast and Zernike phase contrast at the micro (synchrotron) and nano (laboratory X-ray microscope) level, respectively. The rate of charge cycling is directly dependent on the nature of the electrode microstructure, which are typically complex multi-scale 3D geometries with significant microstructural heterogeneities. We have been able to characterise the porosity and the tortuosity by micro-CT as well as the morphology of 5 individual graphite particles by nano-tomography finding that while their volume varied significantly their sphericity was surprisingly similar. The volume specific surface areas of the individual grains measured by nano-CT are significantly larger than the total volume specific surface area of the electrode from the micro-CT imaging, which can be attributed to the greater particle surface area visible at higher resolution.

  4. Simulation of grating-based X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Achterhold, Klaus; Herzen, Julia; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department of Physics (E17) and Institute of Medical Engineering (IMETUM), Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast tomography proved to achieve better contrast in soft tissue than conventional X-ray absorption. The real part of the refractive index of the tissue results in a slight deflection of the X-rays. These tiny angles of approximately 20 nrad can be detected by a combination of a phase and absorption gratings. With an absorption grating near the anode of a conventional X-ray tube the method is applicable as part of a medical device. Hence X-ray phase contrast can be used in the detection of soft tissue pathologies e.g. breast tumor in mammography. The application in the clinics demands the lowest dose for the patient though the best contrast to noise ratio (CNR). To accomplish this, we simulated the imaging varying the height and pitch of the gratings for a given power and spectrum of the X-ray tube. Source, detector and grating distances were under the constraint of the dimensions of a putative computer tomograph. Optimal combinations where found for maximal CNR. The results will be important for the design and implementation of the X-ray phase contrast method in commercial CT devices.

  5. Quantitative grating-based X-ray phase contrast tomography at 82 keV

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has increasingly aroused interest as the method has been successfully adapted to work with laboratory X-ray sources. The high potential to improve the soft-tissue contrast compared to standard absorption-based tomography and the quantitativeness of the technique have been demonstrated at energies below 35 keV. However, a broad spectrum of applications in industrial testing and medical imaging needs the operation at higher X-ray energies. Technical advances in the grating manufacturing process make it possible to continuously push the existing energy limitations. In this work we report on the results of a first quantitative phase contrast tomography analysis of a high-energy phantom at 82 keV. The phantom consists of well-defined solid materials covering a wide range of densities and atomic numbers and was scanned with high-resolution at a synchrotron radiation source. The absorption and phase contrast images are analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the material-specific mass absorption coefficients and refractive index decrements are determined and compared to theoretical values.

  6. Performance analysis of quantitative phase retrieval method in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy

    Heng, Chen; Kun, Gao; Da-Jiang, Wang; Li, Song; Zhi-Li, Wang

    2016-02-01

    Since the invention of Zernike phase contrast method in 1930, it has been widely used in optical microscopy and more recently in X-ray microscopy. Considering the image contrast is a mixture of absorption and phase information, we recently have proposed and demonstrated a method for quantitative phase retrieval in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy. In this contribution, we analyze the performance of this method at different photon energies. Intensity images of PMMA samples are simulated at 2.5 keV and 6.2 keV, respectively, and phase retrieval is performed using the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed phase retrieval method is applicable over a wide energy range. For weakly absorbing features, the optimal photon energy is 2.5 keV, from the point of view of image contrast and accuracy of phase retrieval. On the other hand, in the case of strong absorption objects, a higher photon energy is preferred to reduce the error of phase retrieval. These results can be used as guidelines to perform quantitative phase retrieval in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy with the proposed method. Supported by the State Key Project for Fundamental Research (2012CB825801), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11475170, 11205157 and 11179004) and Anhui Provincial Natural Science Foundation (1508085MA20).

  7. A dual detector approach for X-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    Phase sensitive X-ray imaging methods can provide substantially improved contrast over conventional absorption-based techniques, and therefore new and inaccessible information. Here we propose a dual detector approach for X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, which allows a quantitative retrieval of the object's phase information by a single exposure. The analysis performed in our research shows that compared with the phase-stepping method, the dual detector approach is advantageous in fast imaging speed, reduced radiation dose and alignment errors, and avoiding any problems resulting from motion artifacts and X-ray exposure reproducibility. The approach has a direct extension to single exposure two-dimensional differential phase contrast imaging, as well as the possibility to perform three-dimensional reconstruction of the refractive index and its gradient field. We believe that this approach can find its potential in clinical applications, where imaging speed and radiation dose are critical issues. - Highlights: ► Dual detector approach for single-shot X-ray differential phase contrast imaging. ► Quantitative retrieval of the object's phase information by a single exposure. ► Advantageous in fast imaging speed and reduced radiation dose

  8. Regularized Newton Methods for X-ray Phase Contrast and General Imaging Problems

    Maretzke, Simon; Krenkel, Martin; Salditt, Tim; Hohage, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Like many other advanced imaging methods, x-ray phase contrast imaging and tomography require mathematical inversion of the observed data to obtain real-space information. While an accurate forward model describing the generally nonlinear image formation from a given object to the observations is often available, explicit inversion formulas are typically not known. Moreover, the measured data might be insufficient for stable image reconstruction, in which case it has to be complemented by suitable a priori information. In this work, regularized Newton methods are presented as a general framework for the solution of such ill-posed nonlinear imaging problems. For a proof of principle, the approach is applied to x-ray phase contrast imaging in the near-field propagation regime. Simultaneous recovery of the phase- and amplitude from a single near-field diffraction pattern is demonstrated for the first time. The presented methods further permit all-at-once phase contrast tomography, i.e. simultaneous phase retriev...

  9. Establishing a framework to implement 4D XCAT Phantom for 4D radiotherapy research

    Raj K Panta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: An integrated computer program has been developed to generate, review, analyse, process, and export the 4D XCAT images. A framework has been established to implement the 4D XCAT phantom for 4D RT research.

  10. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 μm pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS

  11. Establishing a framework to implement 4D XCAT Phantom for 4D radiotherapy research

    Panta, Raj K.; Paul Segars; Fang-Fang Yin; Jing Cai

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To establish a framework to implement the 4D integrated extended cardiac torso (XCAT) digital phantom for 4D radiotherapy (RT) research. Materials and Methods: A computer program was developed to facilitate the characterization and implementation of the 4D XCAT phantom. The program can (1) generate 4D XCAT images with customized parameter files; (2) review 4D XCAT images; (3) generate composite images from 4D XCAT images; (4) track motion of selected region-of-interested (ROI); (5) c...

  12. Slit-scanning differential phase-contrast mammography: first experimental results

    Roessl, Ewald; Daerr, Heiner; Koehler, Thomas; Martens, Gerhard; van Stevendaal, Udo

    2014-03-01

    The demands for a large field-of-view (FOV) and the stringent requirements for a stable acquisition geometry rank among the major obstacles for the translation of grating-based, differential phase-contrast techniques from the laboratory to clinical applications. While for state-of-the-art Full-Field-Digital Mammography (FFDM) FOVs of 24 cm x 30 cm are common practice, the specifications for mechanical stability are naturally derived from the detector pixel size which ranges between 50 and 100 μm. However, in grating-based, phasecontrast imaging, the relative placement of the gratings in the interferometer must be guaranteed to within micro-meter precision. In this work we report on first experimental results on a phase-contrast x-ray imaging system based on the Philips MicroDose L30 mammography unit. With the proposed approach we achieve a FOV of about 65 mm x 175 mm by the use of the slit-scanning technique. The demand for mechanical stability on a micrometer scale was relaxed by the specific interferometer design, i.e., a rigid, actuator-free mount of the phase-grating G1 with respect to the analyzer-grating G2 onto a common steel frame. The image acquisition and formation processes are described and first phase-contrast images of a test object are presented. A brief discussion of the shortcomings of the current approach is given, including the level of remaining image artifacts and the relatively inefficient usage of the total available x-ray source output.

  13. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    Müller, Mark, E-mail: mark-mueller@ph.tum.de; Yaroshenko, Andre; Velroyen, Astrid; Tapfer, Arne [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bech, Martin [Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, Barngatan 2:1, 221 85 Lund (Sweden); Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander [Bruker microCT, Kartuizersweg 3B, B-2550 Kontich (Belgium); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institut für diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, 81675 München (Germany); Institute for Advanced Study, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed.

  14. Quantitative analysis of image contrast in phase contrast STEM for low dose imaging

    This work quantitatively evaluates the contrast in phase contrast images of thin vermiculite crystals recorded by TEM and aberration-corrected bright-field STEM. Specimen movement induced by electron irradiation remains a major problem limiting the phase contrast in TEM images of radiation-sensitive specimens. While spot scanning improves the contrast, it does not eliminate the problem. One possibility is to utilise aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with an Angstrom-sized probe to illuminate the sample, and thus further reduce irradiation-induced specimen movement. Vermiculite is relatively radiation insensitive in TEM to electron fluences below 100,000 e-/A2 and this is likely to be similar for STEM although different damage mechanisms could occur. We compare the performance of a TEM with a thermally assisted field emission electron gun (FEG) and charge coupled device (CCD) image capture to the performance of STEMs with spherical aberration correction, cold field emission electron sources and photomultiplier tube image capture at a range of electron fluences and similar illumination areas. We show that the absolute contrast of the phase contrast images obtained by aberration-corrected STEM is better than that obtained by TEM. Although the STEM contrast is higher, the efficiency of collection of electrons in bright field STEM is still much less than that in bright field TEM (where for thin samples virtually all the electrons contribute to the image), and the SNR of equivalent STEM images is three times lower. This is better than expected, probably due to the absence of a frequency dependent modulation transfer function in the STEM detection system. With optimisation of the STEM bright field collection angles, the efficiency may approach that of bright field TEM, and if reductions in beam-induced specimen movement are found, STEM could surpass the overall performance of TEM.

  15. Contrast-to-noise ratio optimization for a prototype phase-contrast computed tomography scanner

    In the field of biomedical X-ray imaging, novel techniques, such as phase-contrast and dark-field imaging, have the potential to enhance the contrast and provide complementary structural information about a specimen. In this paper, a first prototype of a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner based on a Talbot-Lau interferometer is characterized. We present a study of the contrast-to-noise ratios for attenuation and phase-contrast images acquired with the prototype scanner. The shown results are based on a series of projection images and tomographic data sets of a plastic phantom in phase and attenuation-contrast recorded with varying acquisition settings. Subsequently, the signal and noise distribution of different regions in the phantom were determined. We present a novel method for estimation of contrast-to-noise ratios for projection images based on the cylindrical geometry of the phantom. Analytical functions, representing the expected signal in phase and attenuation-contrast for a circular object, are fitted to individual line profiles of the projection data. The free parameter of the fit function is used to estimate the contrast and the goodness of the fit is determined to assess the noise in the respective signal. The results depict the dependence of the contrast-to-noise ratios on the applied source voltages, the number of steps of the phase stepping routine, and the exposure times for an individual step. Moreover, the influence of the number of projection angles on the image quality of CT slices is investigated. Finally, the implications for future imaging purposes with the scanner are discussed

  16. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging

    Lauzier, Pascal Thériault; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot–Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from i...

  17. Halo suppression in full-field x-ray Zernike phase contrast microscopy.

    Vartiainen, Ismo; Mokso, Rajmund; Stampanoni, Marco; David, Christian

    2014-03-15

    Visible light Zernike phase contrast (ZPC) microscopy is a well established method for imaging weakly absorbing samples. The method is also used with hard x-ray photon energies for structural evaluation of material science and biological applications. However, the method suffers from artifacts that are inherent for the Zernike image formation. In this Letter, we investigate their origin and experimentally show how to suppress them in x-ray full-field ZPC microscopy based on diffractive x-ray optics. PMID:24690848

  18. Diffraction enhance x-ray imaging for quantitative phase contrast studies

    Agrawal, A. K.; Singh, B.; Kashyap, Y. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2016-05-01

    Conventional X-ray imaging based on absorption contrast permits limited visibility of feature having small density and thickness variations. For imaging of weakly absorbing material or materials possessing similar densities, a novel phase contrast imaging techniques called diffraction enhanced imaging has been designed and developed at imaging beamline Indus-2 RRCAT Indore. The technique provides improved visibility of the interfaces and show high contrast in the image forsmall density or thickness gradients in the bulk. This paper presents basic principle, instrumentation and analysis methods for this technique. Initial results of quantitative phase retrieval carried out on various samples have also been presented.

  19. Phase-only spatial light modulation by the reverse phase contrast method

    Glückstad, J.; Mogensen, P.C.; Eriksen, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach to phase-only spatial light modulation is proposed in which a given amplitude pattern can be converted into a spatially identical binary phase pattern. A spatial filtering approach is applied to transform spatial amplitude modulation into spatial phase modulation using the Reverse ...... Phase Contrast (RPC) method. The analytical method for achieving this is outlined and experimental results are shown for the generation of a binary phase-only distribution using an amplitude spatial light modulator and a phase-only spatial filter....

  20. Statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm for X-ray phase-contrast CT

    Dieter Hahn; Pierre Thibault; Andreas Fehringer; Martin Bech; Thomas Koehler; Franz Pfeiffer; Peter B Noël

    2015-01-01

    Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is a promising imaging tool on the horizon for pre-clinical and clinical applications. Until now PCCT has been plagued by strong artifacts when dense materials like bones are present. In this paper, we present a new statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm which overcomes this limitation. It makes use of the fact that an X-ray interferometer provides a conventional absorption as well as a dark-field signal in addition to the phase-...

  1. Measurements of edge fluctuations by phase contrast imaging on DIII-D

    A novel imaging diagnostic for the investigation of edge plasma density fluctuations was recently installed on the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic, which is based on the Zernike phase contrast method, was developed in response to the need for spatially resolved, long wavelength fluctuation measurements. Unique features of this system include: Large bandwidth (100 MHz), high sensitivity (ne ≅ 109 cm-3), and absolute calibration capability. Initial results are presented on the fluctuation suppression at the L- to H-mode transition and on the bursts of turbulent activity which occur during ELMs

  2. Extracting optical scattering properties on the basis of phase contrast images for diagnosing stomach cancer

    We combine morphological granulometry with Mie theory in order to analyze phase contrast images of biomedical tissue for cancer diagnosis. This method correlates microscopic phase distributions of the tissue image and macroscopic optical scattering properties of the tissue. Our results show that the particle size density distribution can be used to quantitatively identify morphological changes of cancerous stomach tissues. Our method can distinguish normal tissue from cancerous tissues, using the significant differences in scattering coefficient, reduced scattering coefficient and phase function. Therefore, this method can provide not only quantitative information for the diagnosis of cancer, but also accurate optical scattering parameters for photothermal therapy for cancer. (paper)

  3. Quantitative In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging with Multienergy X Rays

    We present a new method for quantitative nondestructive characterization of objects by x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Spatial distributions of the projected values of the complex refractive index in the sample are reconstructed by processing near-field images collected at a fixed sample-to-detector distance using a polychromatic incident beam and an energy-sensitive area detector, such as a CCD used in the photon-counting spectroscopy mode. The method has the potential advantages of decreased radiation dose and increased accuracy compared to conventional techniques of x-ray imaging

  4. Quantitative In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging with Multienergy X Rays

    Gureyev, T. E.; Mayo, S.; Wilkins, S. W.; Paganin, D.; Stevenson, A. W.

    2001-06-01

    We present a new method for quantitative nondestructive characterization of objects by x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Spatial distributions of the projected values of the complex refractive index in the sample are reconstructed by processing near-field images collected at a fixed sample-to-detector distance using a polychromatic incident beam and an energy-sensitive area detector, such as a CCD used in the photon-counting spectroscopy mode. The method has the potential advantages of decreased radiation dose and increased accuracy compared to conventional techniques of x-ray imaging.

  5. Micro Soft Tissues Visualization Based on X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2011-01-01

    The current imaging methods have a limited ability to visualize microstructures of biological soft tissues. Small lesions cannot be detected at the early stage of the disease. Phase contrast imaging (PCI) is a novel non-invasive imaging technique that can provide high contrast images of soft tissues by the use of X-ray phase shift. It is a new choice in terms of non-invasively revealing soft tissue details. In this study, the lung and hepatic fibrosis models of mice and rats were used to inve...

  6. X-ray phase-contrast tomography based on synchrotron radiation sources

    The experiments were carried out at the ANKA synchrotron radiation facility, Institute for Synchrotron Radiation (ISS), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany, in collaboration with the Entomology Unit (IAEA Laboratories), the Atominstitut (Vienna) and the ANKA synchrotron facility Tomo-Topo beamline team. The purpose was to perform X-ray phase-contrast tomography of malaria transmitting mosquitoes (genus Anopheles) selected from irradiated and control groups as well as radiographic imaging of living and chemically fixed Tsetse flies (Glossina pallidipes). The X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique allows radiographic-like imaging of samples characterized by very weak or no absorption contrast. This technique is of special interest for radiography of soft tissue, small animals, and insects where the available material is not sufficient to produce satisfactory absorption contrast. Another advantage of the technique over the X-ray absorption radiography is minimization of the radiation dose to the sample. The technique enables the investigation of living animals or the performance of tomographic imaging with longer exposition time with minimum radiation damage to the otherwise sensitive and delicate samples. Images of the malaria transmitting mosquitoes can provide information about morphological differences between the irradiated and control groups of specimens. It is of prime importance for a successful application of the sterile insect technique (SIT) that the irradiated (sterile) group of male mosquitoes is healthy and can compete with the local population of males during mating. In the case of Tsetse flies there is also an interest in in vivo investigation of the mating process as well as in learning more about the morphology of specific organs, such as salivary glands and reproductive organs. The experiments confirmed a possibility to perform imaging of the morphological details for live species of mosquito and flies as well as to study in vivo processes by using

  7. New generation quantitative x-ray microscopy encompassing phase-contrast

    Full text: We briefly outline a new approach to X-ray ultramicroscopy using projection imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared to earlier approaches, the new approach offers spatial resolution of ≤0.1 micron and includes novel features such as: i) phase contrast to give additional sample information over a wide energy range, rapid phase/amplitude extraction algorithms to enable new real-time modes of microscopic imaging widespread applications are envisaged to fields such as materials science, biomedical research, and microelectronics device inspection. Some illustrative examples are presented. The quantitative methods described here are also very relevant to X-ray projection microscopy using synchrotron sources

  8. Quantitative Evaluation Methods of In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Techniques

    LI Zheng; LI Cheng-Quan; YU Ai-Min

    2007-01-01

    By revealing the relationship between edge visibility and imaging parameters in in-line phase contrast imaging (PCI), we propose a method to quantitatively measure the contribution of absorption and phase shift from acquired images. We also prove that edge visibility will grow with the increasing source-object distance and object-detector distance. The result is validated by relative phase factor and by experiments conducted on a microfocus x-ray source. This method provides a new approach to evaluate in-line PCI images and is helpful for deciding imaging parameters.

  9. Processing of projections containing phase contrast in laboratory micro-computerized tomography imaging

    Zápražný, Zdenko; Korytár, Dušan; Mikulík, Petr; Áč, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Free-space-propagation-based imaging belongs to several techniques for achieving phase contrast in the hard X-ray range. The basic precondition is to use an X-ray beam with a high degree of coherence. Although the best sources of coherent X-rays are synchrotrons, spatially coherent X-rays emitted from a sufficiently small spot of laboratory microfocus or sub-microfocus sources allow the transfer of some of the modern imaging techniques from synchrotrons to laboratories. Spatially coherent X-r...

  10. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Hernandez, Victor H. [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Moser, Tobias [InnerEarLab, Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Bernstein Focus for Neurotechnology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-Ray Physics, University of Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Center for Nanoscopy and Molecular Physiology of the Brain, Göttingen (Germany)

    2013-08-19

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  11. A tilted grating interferometer for full vector field differential x-ray phase contrast tomography

    S. Rutishauser; Donath, T.; David, C.; Pfeiffer, F.; Marone, F.; Modregger, P.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a setup for differential x-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography, that measures the full 2D phase-gradient information. The setup uses a simple one-dimensional x-ray grating interferometer, in which the grating structures of the interferometer are oriented at a tilt angle with respect to the sample rotation axis. In such a configuration, the differential phase images from opposing tomography projections can be combined to yield both components of the gradient vector. We show ...

  12. Cine phase-contrast MR to assess portal blood flow in a 10-year-old girl with abdominal aortic coarctation: a case report

    We report the case of a 10-year-old girl with repaired abdominal aortic coarctation in whom chronic mesenteric ischemia was clinically suspected. Cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) was used to determine the difference between fasting and postprandial portal blood flow. Fasting flow rates in the portal vein were normal. After a meal, blood flow in the portal vein increased 226 % over the fasting state, showing normal augmentation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of this technique to a pediatric setting. (orig.)

  13. 4-D OCT in Developmental Cardiology

    Jenkins, Michael W.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    Although strong evidence exists to suggest that altered cardiac function can lead to CHDs, few studies have investigated the influential role of cardiac function and biophysical forces on the development of the cardiovascular system due to a lack of proper in vivo imaging tools. 4-D imaging is needed to decipher the complex spatial and temporal patterns of biomechanical forces acting upon the heart. Numerous solutions over the past several years have demonstrated 4-D OCT imaging of the developing cardiovascular system. This chapter will focus on these solutions and explain their context in the evolution of 4-D OCT imaging. The first sections describe the relevant techniques (prospective gating, direct 4-D imaging, retrospective gating), while later sections focus on 4-D Doppler imaging and measurements of force implementing 4-D OCT Doppler. Finally, the techniques are summarized, and some possible future directions are discussed.

  14. CINEMA 4D The Artist's Project Sourcebook

    McQuilkin, Kent

    2011-01-01

    Cinema 4D is a fully integrated 3D modeling, animation, and rendering package used extensively in the film, television, science, architecture, engineering and other industries. Generally ranked as the 3rd most widely-used 3Dapplication Cinema 4D is widely praised for its stability, speed and ease of use. Recent film and broadcast productions that have used Cinema 4D include Open Season, Monster House, Superman Returns, Polar Express, Monday Night Football. This third edition of Cinema 4D is updated to address the latest release of the application as well as its critically acclaimed MoGr

  15. Quantitative and dynamic measurements of biological fresh samples with X-ray phase contrast tomography

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Tsukube, Takuro; Yagi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography using a Talbot grating interferometer was applied to biological fresh samples which were not fixed by any fixatives. To achieve a high-throughput measurement for the fresh samples the X-ray phase contrast tomography measurement procedure was improved. The three-dimensional structure of a fresh mouse fetus was clearly depicted as a mass density map using X-ray phase contrast tomography. The mouse fetus measured in the fresh state was then fixed by formalin and m...

  16. Performance Evaluation of a Differential Phase-contrast Cone-beam (DPC-CBCT) System for Soft Tissue Imaging

    YU, Yang; Ning, Ruola; Cai, Weixing

    2011-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast (DPC) technique is promising as the next breakthrough in the field of X-ray CT imaging. Utilizing the long ignored X-ray phase information, Differential phase-contrast (DPC) technique has the potential of providing us with projection images with higher contrast in a CT scan without increasing the X-ray dose. While traditional absorption-based X-ray imaging is not very efficient at differentiating soft tissues, differential phase-contrast (DPC) is promising as a new...

  17. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Wu, Zhao; Gao, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Dajiang; Wang, Shenghao; Chen, Heng; Bao, Yuan; Shao, Qigang; Wang, Zhili, E-mail: wangnsrl@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Zhang, Kai [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, China and Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations.

  18. Preliminary research on dual-energy X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Han, Hua-Jie; Wang, Sheng-Hao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of the human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption, while X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method aims to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretical ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for a future precise and low-dose area density calculation method for low-Z materials. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program (2012CB825800), Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (11321503) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179004, 10979055, 11205189, 11205157)

  19. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  20. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    High-energy x-rays, >10 keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in inertial confinement fusion and high-energy density physics. These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density Hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200 TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17 keV produced from 2 ps, 100 J laser interactions with a 12 μm molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1 mm thick polystyrene target using 2 ns, 250 J, 532 nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to one-dimensional hydro calculations.

  1. First evidence of phase-contrast imaging with laboratory sources and active pixel sensors

    The aim of the present work is to achieve a first step towards combining the advantages of an innovative X-ray imaging technique-phase-contrast imaging (XPCi)-with those of a new class of sensors, i.e. CMOS-based active pixel sensors (APSs). The advantages of XPCi are well known and include increased image quality and detection of details invisible to conventional techniques, with potential application fields encompassing the medical, biological, industrial and security areas. Vanilla, one of the APSs developed by the MI-3 collaboration (see (http://mi3.shef.ac.uk)), was thoroughly characterised and an appropriate scintillator was selected to provide X-ray sensitivity. During this process, a set of phase-contrast images of different biological samples was acquired by means of the well-established free-space propagation XPCi technique. The obtained results are very encouraging and are in optimum agreement with the predictions of a simulation recently developed by some of the authors thus further supporting its reliability. This paper presents these preliminary results in detail and discusses in brief both the background to this work and its future developments

  2. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  3. Systolically gated 3D phase contrast MRA of mesenteric arteries in suspected mesenteric ischemia

    Wasser, M.N.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Roos, A. de [Leiden Univ. Hospital (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the value of MRA for detecting stenoses in the celiac (CA) and superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries in patients suspected of having chronic mesenteric ischemia, using an optimized systolically gated 3D phase contrast technique. In an initial study in 24 patients who underwent conventional angiography of the abdominal vessels for different clinical indications, a 3D phase contrast MRA technique (3D-PCA) was evaluated and optimized to image the CAs and SMAs. Subsequently, a prospective study was performed to assess the value of systolically gated 3D-PCA in evaluation of the mesenteric arteries in 10 patients with signs and symptoms of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography and surgical findings were used as the reference standard. In the initial study, systolic gating appeared to be essential in imaging the SMA on 3D-PCA. In 10 patients suspected of mesenteric ischemia, systolically gated 3D-PCA identified significant proximal disease in the two mesenteric vessels in 4 patients. These patients underwent successful reconstruction of their stenotic vessels. Cardiac-gated MRA may become a useful tool in selection of patients suspected of having mesenteric ischemia who may benefit from surgery. 16 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Microtomography from a Compact Laser Driven Betatron Source

    Wenz, J; Khrennikov, K; Bech, M; Thibault, P; Heigoldt, M; Pfeiffer, F; Karsch, S

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called Betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present the first phase-contrast micro-tomogram revealing quantitative electron density values of a biological sample using betatron X-rays, and a comprehensive source characterization. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential fo...

  5. Teachable, high-content analytics for live-cell, phase contrast movies.

    Alworth, Samuel V; Watanabe, Hirotada; Lee, James S J

    2010-09-01

    CL-Quant is a new solution platform for broad, high-content, live-cell image analysis. Powered by novel machine learning technologies and teach-by-example interfaces, CL-Quant provides a platform for the rapid development and application of scalable, high-performance, and fully automated analytics for a broad range of live-cell microscopy imaging applications, including label-free phase contrast imaging. The authors used CL-Quant to teach off-the-shelf universal analytics, called standard recipes, for cell proliferation, wound healing, cell counting, and cell motility assays using phase contrast movies collected on the BioStation CT and BioStation IM platforms. Similar to application modules, standard recipes are intended to work robustly across a wide range of imaging conditions without requiring customization by the end user. The authors validated the performance of the standard recipes by comparing their performance with truth created manually, or by custom analytics optimized for each individual movie (and therefore yielding the best possible result for the image), and validated by independent review. The validation data show that the standard recipes' performance is comparable with the validated truth with low variation. The data validate that the CL-Quant standard recipes can provide robust results without customization for live-cell assays in broad cell types and laboratory settings. PMID:20639505

  6. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    Workman, Jonathan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gautier, Donald C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  7. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  8. Laser light-field fusion for wide-field lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud

    2016-01-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. Nanoscopy is often synonymous with high equipment costs and limited FOV. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast nanoscopy, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using an on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images with resolving power below the pixel pitch of the sensor array as well as the wavelength of the probing light source, beyond the diffraction limit. Experimental results demonstrate, for the first time, a lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 500 nm nanoparticles without any specialized or intricate sample preparation or the use of synthetic aperture- or lateral shift-based t...

  9. Complex dark-field contrast in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Yang, Yi; Tang, Xiangyang

    2015-03-01

    Without assuming that the sub-pixel microstructures of an object to be imaged distribute in space randomly, we investigate the influence of the object's microstructures on grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging. Our theoretical analysis and 3D computer simulation study based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff theory show that the existing dark-field contrast can be generalized into a complex dark-field contrast in a way such that its imaginary part quantifies the effect of the object's sub-pixel microstructures on the phase of intensity oscillations. A method based on the phase-attenuation duality that holds for soft tissues to be imaged at high x-ray energies is proposed to retrieve the imaginary part of the complex dark-field contrast for imaging. In comparison to the existing dark-field contrast, the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast exhibits significantly stronger selectivity on the shape of the object's sub-pixel microstructures. Thus the x-ray imaging corresponding to the imaginary part of complex dark-field contrast can provide additional and complementary information to that corresponding to the attenuation contrast, phase contrast and the existing dark-field contrast.

  10. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters

  11. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    Kohn, V. G.; Argunova, T. S.; Je, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters.

  12. Cell morphology classification in phase contrast microscopy image reducing halo artifact

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Since the morphology of tumor cells is a good indicator of their invasiveness, we used time-lapse phase-contrast microscopy to examine the morphology of tumor cells. This technique enables long-term observation of the activity of live cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. However, it does have certain drawbacks in terms of imaging. Therefore, we first corrected for non-uniform illumination artifacts and then we use intensity distribution information to detect cell boundary. In phase contrast microscopy image, cell is normally appeared as dark region surrounded by bright halo ring. Due to halo artifact is minimal around the cell body and has non-symmetric diffusion pattern, we calculate cross sectional plane which intersects center of each cell and orthogonal to first principal axis. Then, we extract dark cell region by analyzing intensity profile curve considering local bright peak as halo area. Finally, we examined cell morphology to classify tumor cells as malignant and benign.

  13. High-Resolution Phase-Contrast Imaging of Submicron Particles in Unstained Lung Tissue

    Schittny, J. C.; Barré, S. F.; Mokso, R.; Haberthür, D.; Semmler-Behnke, M.; Kreyling, W. G.; Tsuda, A.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-09-01

    To access the risks and chances of deposition of submicron particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung, a precise three-dimensional (3D)-localization of the sites of deposition is essential—especially because local peaks of deposition are expected in the acinar tree and in individual alveoli. In this study we developed the workflow for such an investigation. We administered 200-nm gold particles to young adult rats by intratracheal instillation. After fixation and paraffin embedding, their lungs were imaged unstained using synchrotron radiation x-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) at the beamline TOMCAT (Swiss Light Source, Villigen, Switzerland) at sample detector distances of 2.5 mm (absorption contrast) and of 52.5 mm (phase contrast). A segmentation based on a global threshold of grey levels was successfully done on absorption-contrast images for the gold and on the phase-contrast images for the tissue. The smallest spots containing gold possessed a size of 1-2 voxels of 370-nm side length. We conclude that a combination of phase and absorption contrast SRXTM imaging is necessary to obtain the correct segmentation of both tissue and gold particles. This method will be used for the 3D localization of deposited particles in the gas-exchange area of the lung.

  14. High sensitivity phase retrieval method in grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Purpose: Grating-based x-ray phase contrast imaging is considered as one of the most promising techniques for future medical imaging. Many different methods have been developed to retrieve phase signal, among which the phase stepping (PS) method is widely used. However, further practical implementations are hindered, due to its complex scanning mode and high radiation dose. In contrast, the reverse projection (RP) method is a novel fast and low dose extraction approach. In this contribution, the authors present a quantitative analysis of the noise properties of the refraction signals retrieved by the two methods and compare their sensitivities. Methods: Using the error propagation formula, the authors analyze theoretically the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the refraction images retrieved by the two methods. Then, the sensitivities of the two extraction methods are compared under an identical exposure dose. Numerical experiments are performed to validate the theoretical results and provide some quantitative insight. Results: The SNRs of the two methods are both dependent on the system parameters, but in different ways. Comparison between their sensitivities reveals that for the refraction signal, the RP method possesses a higher sensitivity, especially in the case of high visibility and/or at the edge of the object. Conclusions: Compared with the PS method, the RP method has a superior sensitivity and provides refraction images with a higher SNR. Therefore, one can obtain highly sensitive refraction images in grating-based phase contrast imaging. This is very important for future preclinical and clinical implementations

  15. Performance Analysis of Quantitative Phase Retrieval Method in Zernike Phase Contrast X-ray Microscopy

    Chen, Heng; Wang, Dajiang; Song, Li; Wang, Zhili

    2016-01-01

    Since the invention of Zernike phase contrast method in 1930, it has been widely used in optical microscopy and more recently in X-ray microscopy. Considering the image contrast is a mixture of absorption and phase information, we recently have proposed and demonstrated a method for quantitative phase retrieval in Zernike phase contrast X-ray microscopy. In this contribution, we analyzed the performance of this method at different photon energies. Intensity images of PMMA samples are simulated at 2.5 keV and 6.2 keV, respectively, and phase retrieval is performed using the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed phase retrieval method is applicable over a wide energy range. For weakly absorbing features, the optimal photon energy is 2.5 keV, from the point of view of image contrast and accuracy of phase retrieval. On the other hand, in the case of strong absorption objects, a higher photon energy is preferred to reduce the error of phase retrieval. Those results can be used as guidelines t...

  16. Quantitative 3D refractive index decrement reconstruction using single-distance phase-contrast tomography data

    X-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging is an attractive phase-sensitive imaging technique that has found applications in many research fields. Here, we report the investigations of a method which can quantitatively reconstruct in 3D the refractive index decrement of a quasi-homogeneous object using single-distance phase-contrast tomography data. The method extends the Born-type approximation phase-retrieval algorithm, which is based on the phase-attenuation duality (ε = δ/β, with constant ε) and suitable for homogeneous objects, to tomography and we study its application to quasi-homogeneous objects. The noise performance and the phase-attenuation duality influences of the method are also investigated. In simulation, the method allows us to quantitatively reconstruct the 3D refractive index decrement for quasi-homogeneous and weakly absorbing samples and it performs well in the practical noise situation. Furthermore, it shows a substantial contrast increase and successfully distinguishes different materials in a quasi-homogeneous and weakly absorbing sample from experimental data, even with inappropriate ε value. (paper)

  17. Quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC

    V. G. Kohn

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of quantitative hard x-ray phase contrast imaging of micropipes in SiC are discussed. The micropipe is assumed as a hollow cylinder with an elliptical cross section. The major and minor diameters can be restored using the least square fitting procedure by comparing the experimental data, i.e. the profile across the micropipe axis, with those calculated based on phase contrast theory. It is shown that one projection image gives an information which does not allow a complete determination of the elliptical cross section, if an orientation of micropipe is not known. Another problem is a weak accuracy in estimating the diameters, partly because of using pink synchrotron radiation, which is necessary because a monochromatic beam intensity is not sufficient to reveal the weak contrast from a very small object. The general problems of accuracy in estimating the two diameters using the least square procedure are discussed. Two experimental examples are considered to demonstrate small as well as modest accuracies in estimating the diameters.

  18. Quantitative imaging of electron density and effective atomic number using phase contrast CT

    Compared to single energy CT, which only provides information for x-ray linear attenuation coefficients, dual-energy CT is able to obtain both the electron density and effective atomic number for different materials in a quantitative way. In this study, as an alternative to dual-energy CT, a novel quantitative imaging method based on phase contrast CT is presented. Rather than requiring two projection data sets with different x-ray energy spectra, diffraction-grating-based phase contrast CT is capable of reconstructing images of both linear attenuation and refractive index decrement from the same projection data using a single x-ray energy spectra. From the two images, quantitative information of both the electron density and effective atomic number can be extracted. Two physical phantoms were constructed and used to validate the presented method. Experimental results demonstrate that (1) electron density can be accurately determined from refractive index decrement through a linear relationship, and (2) the effective atomic number can be explicitly derived from the ratio of the linear attenuation to refractive index decrement using a power function plus a constant. The presented method will provide insight into the technique of material separation and find its use in medical and industrial applications.

  19. Preliminary Research on Dual-Energy X-Ray Phase-Contrast Imaging

    Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Peiping

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption. While X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method is aiming to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretic ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for future precise and lo...

  20. Development of optics for x-ray phase-contrast imaging of high energy density plasmas

    Phase-contrast or refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography can be useful for the diagnostic of low-Z high energy density plasmas, such as imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellets, due to its sensitivity to density gradients. To separate and quantify the absorption and refraction contributions to x-ray images, methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, can be used. To enable applying such methods with the energetic x rays needed for ICF radiography, we investigate a new type of optics consisting of grazing incidence microperiodic mirrors. Using such mirrors, efficient phase-contrast imaging systems could be built for energies up to ∼100 keV. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors based on the difference in the total reflection between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Prototype mirrors fabricated with this method show promising characteristics in laboratory tests.

  1. Non-invasive pulmonary blood flow analysis and blood pressure mapping derived from 4D flow MRI

    Delles, Michael; Rengier, Fabian; Azad, Yoo-Jin; Bodenstedt, Sebastian; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley, Sebastian; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2015-03-01

    In diagnostics and therapy control of cardiovascular diseases, detailed knowledge about the patient-specific behavior of blood flow and pressure can be essential. The only method capable of measuring complete time-resolved three-dimensional vector fields of the blood flow velocities is velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), often denoted as 4D flow MRI. Furthermore, relative pressure maps can be computed from this data source, as presented by different groups in recent years. Hence, analysis of blood flow and pressure using 4D flow MRI can be a valuable technique in management of cardiovascular diseases. In order to perform these tasks, all necessary steps in the corresponding process chain can be carried out in our in-house developed software framework MEDIFRAME. In this article, we apply MEDIFRAME for a study of hemodynamics in the pulmonary arteries of five healthy volunteers. The study included measuring vector fields of blood flow velocities by phase-contrast MRI and subsequently computing relative blood pressure maps. We visualized blood flow by streamline depictions and computed characteristic values for the left and the right pulmonary artery (LPA and RPA). In all volunteers, we observed a lower amount of blood flow in the LPA compared to the RPA. Furthermore, we visualized blood pressure maps using volume rendering and generated graphs of pressure differences between the LPA, the RPA and the main pulmonary artery. In most volunteers, blood pressure was increased near to the bifurcation and in the proximal LPA, leading to higher average pressure values in the LPA compared to the RPA.

  2. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device

    Michael, C. A., E-mail: clive.michael@gmail.com [Plasma Research Lab, Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 2601 (Australia); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Vyacheslavov, L. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sanin, A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO{sub 2} laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1.

  3. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device.

    Michael, C A; Tanaka, K; Vyacheslavov, L; Sanin, A; Kawahata, K

    2015-09-01

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1. PMID:26429439

  4. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1

  5. Phase-Contrast MRI and CFD Modeling of Apparent 3He Gas Flow in Rat Pulmonary Airways

    Phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized 3He is potentially useful for developing and testing patient-specific models of pulmonary airflow. One challenge, however, is that PC-MRI provides apparent values of local 3He velocity that not only depend on actual airflow but also on gas diffusion. This not only blurs laminar flow patterns in narrow airways but also introduces anomalous airflow structure that reflects gas-wall interactions. Here, both effects are predicted in a live rat using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and for the first time, simulated patterns of apparent 3He gas velocity are compared with in-vivo PC-MRI. Results show (1) that correlations (R2) between measured and simulated airflow patterns increase from 0.23 to 0.79 simply by accounting for apparent 3He transport, and that (2) remaining differences are mainly due to uncertain airway segmentation and partial volume effects stemming from relatively coarse MRI resolution. Higher-fidelity testing of pulmonary airflow predictions should therefore be possible with future imaging improvements.

  6. Phase-Contrast MRI and CFD Modeling of Apparent 3He Gas Flow in Rat Pulmonary Airways

    Minard, Kevin R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2012-08-01

    Phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with hyperpolarized 3He is potentially useful for developing and testing patient-specific models of pulmonary airflow. One challenge, however, is that PC-MRI provides apparent values of local 3He velocity that not only depend on actual airflow but also on gas diffusion. This not only blurs laminar flow patterns in narrow airways but also introduces anomalous airflow structure that reflects gas-wall interactions. Here, both effects are predicted in a live rat using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and for the first time, simulated patterns of apparent 3He gas velocity are compared with in-vivo PC-MRI. Results show (1) that correlations (R2) between measured and simulated airflow patterns increase from 0.23 to 0.79 simply by accounting for apparent 3He transport, and that (2) remaining differences are mainly due to uncertain airway segmentation and partial volume effects stemming from relatively coarse MRI resolution. Higher-fidelity testing of pulmonary airflow predictions should therefore be possible with future imaging improvements.

  7. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT: validation of an elastic surface model approach in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, 4D-MSPECT and QGS

    Stegger, Lars; Kies, Peter; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital, Westfaelische Wilhelms-University Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Lipke, Claudia S.A.; Nowak, Bernd; Buell, Udalrich; Schaefer, Wolfgang M. [University Hospital,Aachen University of Technology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    The segmentation algorithm ESM based on an elastic surface model was validated for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Additionally, it was compared with the commercially available quantification packages 4D-MSPECT and QGS. Cardiac MRI was used as the reference method. SPECT and MRI were performed on 70 consecutive patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease. End-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were derived from SPECT studies by using the segmentation algorithms ESM, 4D-MSPECT and QGS and from cardiac MRI. ESM-derived values for EDV and ESV correlated well with those from cardiac MRI (correlation coefficients R = 0.90 and R = 0.95, respectively), as did the measurements for LVEF (R = 0.86). Both EDV and ESV were slightly overestimated for larger ventricles but not for smaller ventricles; LVEF was slightly overestimated irrespective of ventricle size. The above correlation coefficients are comparable to those for the 4D-MSPECT and QGS segmentation algorithms. However, results obtained with the three segmentation algorithms are not interchangeable. The ESM algorithm can be used to assess EDV, ESV and LVEF from gated perfusion SPECT images. Overall, the performance was similar to that of 4D-MSPECT and QGS when compared with cardiac MRI. Results obtained with the three tested segmentation methods are not interchangeable, so that the same algorithm should be used for follow-up studies and control subjects. (orig.)

  8. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPECT: validation of an elastic surface model approach in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, 4D-MSPECT and QGS

    The segmentation algorithm ESM based on an elastic surface model was validated for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Additionally, it was compared with the commercially available quantification packages 4D-MSPECT and QGS. Cardiac MRI was used as the reference method. SPECT and MRI were performed on 70 consecutive patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease. End-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were derived from SPECT studies by using the segmentation algorithms ESM, 4D-MSPECT and QGS and from cardiac MRI. ESM-derived values for EDV and ESV correlated well with those from cardiac MRI (correlation coefficients R = 0.90 and R = 0.95, respectively), as did the measurements for LVEF (R = 0.86). Both EDV and ESV were slightly overestimated for larger ventricles but not for smaller ventricles; LVEF was slightly overestimated irrespective of ventricle size. The above correlation coefficients are comparable to those for the 4D-MSPECT and QGS segmentation algorithms. However, results obtained with the three segmentation algorithms are not interchangeable. The ESM algorithm can be used to assess EDV, ESV and LVEF from gated perfusion SPECT images. Overall, the performance was similar to that of 4D-MSPECT and QGS when compared with cardiac MRI. Results obtained with the three tested segmentation methods are not interchangeable, so that the same algorithm should be used for follow-up studies and control subjects. (orig.)

  9. In Vitro Validation of an Artefact Suppression Algorithm in X-Ray Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Hirano, Shin-ichi; Gupta, Rajiv; Ando, Masami

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast tomography can significantly increase the contrast-resolution of conventional attenuation-contrast imaging, especially for soft-tissue structures that have very similar attenuation. Just as in attenuation-based tomography, phase contrast tomography requires a linear dependence of aggregate beam direction on the incremental direction alteration caused by individual voxels along the path of the X-ray beam. Dense objects such as calcifications in biological specimens violate...

  10. Matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast using binary phase for dynamic spot- and line patterns in biophotonics and structured lighting

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    This work discusses the use of matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) as an efficient and cost-effective beam shaper for applications such as in biophotonics, optical micromanipulation, microscopy and two-photon polymerization. The theoretical foundation of mGPC is described as a combination of Generalized Phase Contrast and phase-only correlation. Such an analysis makes it convenient to optimize an mGPC system for different setup conditions. Results showing binary-only phase gen...

  11. Numerical design of in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary

    Sun, Weiyuan; Liu, Zhiguo [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Peng, Song [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Ma, Yongzhong [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Beijing, Beijing 100013 (China); Ding, Xunliang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-05-11

    A new device using an ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics was numerically designed to realize in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging by using conventional laboratory X-ray source with a large spot. Numerical simulation results validated the effectiveness of the proposed device and approach. The ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics had potential applications in the in-line phase contrast imaging with polychromatic X-rays.

  12. Feasibility testing of a pre-clinical coded aperture phase contrast imaging configuration using a simple fast Monte Carlo simulator

    Kavanagh, A.; Olivo, A.; Speller, R; Vojnovic, B

    2013-01-01

    A simple method of simulating possible coded aperture phase contrast X-ray imaging apparatus is presented. The method is based on ray tracing, with the rays treated ballistically within a voxelized sample and with the phase-shift-induced angular deviations and absorptions applied at a plane in the middle of the sample. For the particular case of a coded aperture phase contrast configuration suitable for small animal pre-clinical imaging we present results obtained using a high resolution voxe...

  13. Numerical design of in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging based on ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary

    A new device using an ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics was numerically designed to realize in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging by using conventional laboratory X-ray source with a large spot. Numerical simulation results validated the effectiveness of the proposed device and approach. The ellipsoidal single-bounce monocapillary X-ray optics had potential applications in the in-line phase contrast imaging with polychromatic X-rays

  14. Improving visibility of X-ray phase-contrast imaging with Wiener filtering.

    Gong, Shaorun; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the degrading effects of the physical parameters on the in-line X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCi), a simulation tool based on the Fresnel/Kirchhoff diffraction integral was firstly developed with comprehensively considering effects of the source-to-sample (S-S) and sample-to-detector (S-D) distances, the practical characteristics of a polychromatic and finite size source, the point spread function (PSF) of the fluorescent screen and the spatial resolution of the detector on the theoretical phase-contrast pattern. By a comparison between the simulative profile and the experimental one under the commonly-used parameters, an acceptable consistency has been demonstrated in despite of the deviation between the theoretically-predicted contrast (0.188) and the original experimental one (0.12). From the simulations, it is apparently observed that the fine interference pattern has been severely degraded by the finite spatial resolution, and will inevitably be further deteriorated by the system noise in practice. Since the image quality of the X-ray phase-contrast imaging is strongly dependent on the physical parameters of the system, a model-based deblurring procedure to upgrade the image visibility is preferably desired. As a simple restoration way, a Wiener filter was then introduced to offer an optimal tradeoff between the contrast preservation and the noise suppression. Finally, to minimize the deviation resulting from the finite spatial resolution, one-dimensional interpolation was performed by positioning the set square at a tiny angle to the vertical direction. The result after the Wiener-filtering-based deblurring has shown a considerably improved profile visibility: the processed experimental contrast (0.156) increased by 30% as compared to the original one (0.12) in company with the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by 0.9dB. With the trend of the post-filtered experimental contrast to the theoretical one, it could be motivated that

  15. Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchrotron Microtomography for Virtual Dissection of the Head of Rhodnius prolixus

    Sena, G.; Almeida, A. P.; Braz, D.; Nogueira, L. P.; Colaço, M. V.; Soares, J.; Cardoso, S. C.; Garcia, E. S.; Azambuja, P.; Gonzalez, M. S.; Mohammadi, S.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2014-04-01

    Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchroton Microtomography is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work complete series of virtual thin sections through the heads of selected Rhodnius prolixus were obtained. The sections of the head were important to compare the difference in use the spatial resolution of 2 μm or 4.5 μm and to see anatomical details that couldn't be seen with other technique. Three different groups of Rhodnius prolixus were used. One group was fed with defibrinated rabbit blood and after 10 days was sacrificed, other group was sacrificed 4 days after feeding and the last group remained unfed. The results show some differences for each kind of groups and for the different resolutions.

  16. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  17. Optimized three-dimensional phase-contrast MR angiography with reduced acquisition time

    This paper presents modified acquisition schemes for phase-contrast MR angiography that reduce by 33% the measurement time for three-dimensional data sets sensitive to flow in all directions. The new sequence scheme combines one flow-compensated and three flow-encoded acquisitions. Misregistration artifacts due to patient motion are eliminated through interleaved measurement. Taking the complex difference of each flow-encoded data set from the flow-form, the three flow-sensitive data sets are added to obtain the final angiogram. A more complex pulse sequence scheme was also evaluated with the first data set flow encoded in all directions, and the flow phase inverted for a single direction in each of the other three data sets. Optimization was performed on a standard 1.5-T Magnetom imager with 10 normal subjects and selected patients

  18. Asymmetric masks for laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging with edge illumination

    Endrizzi, Marco; Astolfo, Alberto; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Millard, Thomas P.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    We report on an asymmetric mask concept that enables X-ray phase-contrast imaging without requiring any movement in the system during data acquisition. The method is compatible with laboratory equipment, namely a commercial detector and a rotating anode tube. The only motion required is that of the object under investigation which is scanned through the imaging system. Two proof-of-principle optical elements were designed, fabricated and experimentally tested. Quantitative measurements on samples of known shape and composition were compared to theory with good agreement. The method is capable of measuring the attenuation, refraction and (ultra-small-angle) X-ray scattering, does not have coherence requirements and naturally adapts to all those situations in which the X-ray image is obtained by scanning a sample through the imaging system.

  19. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  20. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency

  1. Generalized Phase Contrast with matched filtering using LCoS pico-projectors

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report a beam shaping system for generating high intensity programmable optical spots using mGPC: matched filtering combined with Generalized Phase Contrast applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation......, optical lattices and other beam shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices were used as binary phase-only spatial light modulators by setting the appropriate polarization of the illumination....... They were subsequently placed into the object and Fourier plane of a 4f-setup based on the mGPC configuration. Having a dynamic spatial phase filter, instead of a fabricated one, allows the beam shaper to adapt to different input phase patterns suited for different requirements. Despite imperfections...

  2. Fourier transform based iterative method for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    Biological soft tissues encountered in clinical and pre-clinical imaging mainly consist of light element atoms, and their composition is nearly uniform with little density variation. Thus, x-ray attenuation imaging suffers from low image contrast resolution. By contrast, x-ray phase shift of soft tissues is about a thousand times greater than x-ray absorption over the diagnostic energy range, thereby a significantly higher sensitivity can be achieved in terms of phase shift. In this paper, we propose a novel Fourier transform based iterative method to perform x-ray tomographic imaging of the refractive index directly from differential phase shift data. This approach offers distinct advantages in cases of incomplete and noisy data than analytic reconstruction, and especially suitable for phase-contrast interior tomography by incorporating prior knowledge in a region of interest (ROI). Biological experiments demonstrate the merits of the proposed approach.

  3. Phase contrast enhanced high resolution X-ray imaging and tomography of soft tissue

    A tabletop system for digital high resolution and high sensitivity X-ray micro-radiography has been developed for small-animal and soft-tissue imaging. The system is based on a micro-focus X-ray tube and the semiconductor hybrid position sensitive Medipix2 pixel detector. Transmission radiography imaging, conventionally based only on absorption, is enhanced by exploiting phase-shift effects induced in the X-ray beam traversing the sample. Phase contrast imaging is realized by object edge enhancement. DAQ is done by a novel fully integrated USB-based readout with online image generation. Improved signal reconstruction techniques make use of advanced statistical data analysis, enhanced beam hardening correction and direct thickness calibration of individual pixels. 2D and 3D micro-tomography images of several biological samples demonstrate the applicability of the system for biological and medical purposes including in-vivo and time dependent physiological studies in the life sciences

  4. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    Vo, Nghia T.; Atwood, Robert C.; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2012-11-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  5. Note: Gratings on low absorbing substrates for x-ray phase contrast imaging

    Koch, F. J., E-mail: frieder.koch@kit.edu; Schröter, T. J.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Meiser, J.; Faisal, A.; Khalil, M. I.; Mohr, J. [Institute of Microstructure Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Birnbacher, L.; Viermetz, M.; Pfeiffer, F. [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department and Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Walter, M.; Schulz, J. [Microworks GmbH, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging is on the verge of being applied in clinical settings. To achieve this goal, compact setups with high sensitivity and dose efficiency are necessary. Both can be increased by eliminating unwanted absorption in the beam path, which is mainly due to the grating substrates. Fabrication of gratings via deep X-ray lithography can address this issue by replacing the commonly used silicon substrate with materials with lower X-ray absorption that fulfill certain boundary conditions. Gratings were produced on both graphite and polymer substrates without compromising on structure quality. These gratings were tested in a three-grating setup with a source operated at 40 kVp and lead to an increase in the detector photon count rate of almost a factor of 4 compared to a set of gratings on silicon substrates. As the visibility was hardly affected, this corresponds to a significant increase in sensitivity and therefore dose efficiency.

  6. Noise analysis of grating-based x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    The sensitivity of x-ray radiographic images, meaning the minimal detectable change in the thickness or in the index of refraction of a sample, is directly related to the uncertainty of the measurement method. In the following work, we report on the recent development of quantitative descriptions for the stochastic error of grating-based differential phase contrast imaging (DPCi). Our model includes the noise transfer characteristics of the x-ray detector and the jitter of the phase steps. We find that the noise in DPCi depends strongly on the phase stepping visibility and the sample properties. The results are supported by experimental evidence acquired with our new instrument with a field of view of 50x70 mm2. Our conclusions provide general guidelines to optimize grating interferometers for specific applications and problems.

  7. Phase contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography for virtual dissection of the head of Rhodnius prolixus

    Phase Contrast X-Ray Synchroton Microtomography is a non-destructive technique that allows the microanatomical investigations of Rhodnius prolixus, one of the most important insect vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work complete series of virtual thin sections through the heads of selected Rhodnius prolixus were obtained. The sections of the head were important to compare the difference in use the spatial resolution of 2 μm or 4.5 μm and to see anatomical details that couldn't be seen with other technique. Three different groups of Rhodnius prolixus were used. One group was fed with defibrinated rabbit blood and after 10 days was sacrificed, other group was sacrificed 4 days after feeding and the last group remained unfed. The results show some differences for each kind of groups and for the different resolutions

  8. Phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography for in vivo breast imaging: a two-step method

    We present a two-step reconstruction method that can qualitatively and quantitatively improve the reconstruction of tissue refractive index (RI) distribution by phase-contrast diffuse optical tomography (PCDOT). In this two-step method, we first recover the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering coefficients by conventional diffuse optical tomography to obtain the geometrical information of lesions, allowing the incorporation of geometrical information as a priori in the PCDOT reconstruction using a locally refined mesh. The method is validated by a series of phantom experiments and evaluated using in vivo data from 42 human subjects. The results demonstrate clear contrast of RI between the lesion and the surroundings, making the image interpretation straightforward. The sensitivity and specificity from these 42 cases are both 81% when RI is used as an imaging parameter for distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions.

  9. Theory of single-shot phase contrast imaging in spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a theoretical framework for single-shot phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates. Our model allows for the simple calculation of the quantum backaction resulting from the measurement, and the amount of information that is read out. We find that there is an optimum time $ G\\tau \\sim 1/N $ for the light-matter interaction ($G $ is the ac Stark shift frequency, $ N $ is the number of particles in the BEC), where the maximum amount of information can be read out from the BEC. A universal information-disturbance tradeoff law $ \\epsilon_F \\epsilon_G \\propto 1/N^2 $ is found where $ \\epsilon_F $ is the amount of backaction and $ \\epsilon_G $ is the estimation error. The PCI measurement can also be found to be a direct probe of the quantum fluctuations of the BEC, via the noise of the PCI signal.

  10. Comparison of two x-ray phase-contrast imaging methods with a microfocus source.

    Zhou, T; Lundström, U; Thüring, T; Rutishauser, S; Larsson, D H; Stampanoni, M; David, C; Hertz, H M; Burvall, A

    2013-12-16

    We present a comparison for high-resolution imaging with a laboratory source between grating-based (GBI) and propagation-based (PBI) x-ray phase-contrast imaging. The comparison is done through simulations and experiments using a liquid-metal-jet x-ray microfocus source. Radiation doses required for detection in projection images are simulated as a function of the diameter of a cylindrical sample. Using monochromatic radiation, simulations show a lower dose requirement for PBI for small object features and a lower dose for GBI for larger object features. Using polychromatic radiation, such as that from a laboratory microfocus source, experiments and simulations show a lower dose requirement for PBI for a large range of feature sizes. Tested on a biological sample, GBI shows higher noise levels than PBI, but its advantage of quantitative refractive index reconstruction for multi-material samples becomes apparent. PMID:24514597

  11. Design of a novel phase contrast x-ray imaging system for mammography

    It is hoped that x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) will provide a generational improvement in the effectiveness of mammography. XPCi is sensitive to the refraction which x-rays undergo as a result of the variation in x-ray propagation speeds within an object. XPCi is, however, seldom used in clinical applications owing mainly to a lack of suitable systems. The radiation physics group at UCL has previously designed and built an XPCi system sensitive to phase gradients in one dimension for application in security inspection. We present here the design methodology and final design of a prototype XPCi system sensitive to phase gradients in two directions for use in mammography. The technique makes efficient use of the flux available from a laboratory x-ray source, thus making it suitable for clinical use.

  12. The phase contrast method as an imaging diagnostic for plasma density fluctuations

    An imaging diagnostic for the observation of plasma density fluctuations is presented. It is based on the phase contrast method, and is used on the TCA tokamak to investigate fluctuations associated with plasma turbulence and driven waves in radio frequency heating experiment. The diagnostic uses a 23 cm wide CO2 laser beam transmitted through the plasma, and produces an image of the plasma where the small phase shifts due to refractive perturbations are revealed as corresponding intensity variations. A wide range of fluctuation wavelengths between 0.2 and about 20 cm is accessible to observation, with a sensitivity better than 10-5 radiants for a 1 MHz bandwidth. (author) 11 figs., 12 refs

  13. In-line holography and phase-contrast microtomography with high energy x-rays

    Holography with high energy x-rays is now feasible due to the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron sources. Simple in-line holographic techniques can be used to generate edge-enhanced images which for many samples can be interpreted without direct phase retrieval. The coherence properties of such sources and their exploitation for phase-contrast microimaging are demonstrated. The technique can easily be combined with computed microtomography (CMT) data collection and reconstruction strategies for three-dimensional imaging. A dramatically improved image contrast, as compared with absorption CMT, was obtained when imaging a wet human coronary artery specimen. In the tomograms, previously invisible detail could be visualized with absorbed doses below the level where radiation damage impedes the imaging. The results indicate the considerable potential of the in-line holographic CMT method in three-dimensional biomedical microscopy. (author)

  14. X-ray phase-contrast CT imaging of the acupoints based on synchrotron radiation

    In this paper, the morphology of the acupuncture point (abbreviated as acupoint hereafter) or tissue where there were no acupoints in the fractional rabbit hind limb was studied by in-line phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) methods based on synchrotron radiation. The density of micro-vessels was calculated for tissues with acupoints or without acupoints. Differences between acupoints area and non-acupoint areas determined by the density of the micro-vessels propose a strong evidence of the existence of acupoints. Our results showed that there were two significantly higher densities of the micro-vessels, where two acupoints were located, respectively. In addition, there were large numbers of involutedly microvascular structure in the acupoint areas. Nevertheless, in non-acupoints area, the microvascular structure was relatively simple and flat

  15. Measurement of depth-resolved thermal deformation distribution using phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography.

    Zhang, Yun; Dong, Bo; Bai, Yulei; Ye, Shuangli; Lei, Zhenkun; Zhou, Yanzhou

    2015-10-19

    An updated B-scan method is proposed for measuring the evolution of thermal deformation fields in polymers. In order to measure the distributions of out-of-plane deformation and normal strain field, phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography (PC-SOCT) was performed with the depth range and resolution of 4.3 mm and 10.7 μm, respectively, as thermal loads were applied to three different multilayer samples. The relation between temperature and material refractive index was predetermined before the measurement. After accounting for the refractive index, the thermal deformation fields in the polymer were obtained. The measured thermal expansion coefficient of silicone sealant was approximately equal to its reference value. This method allows correctly assessing the mechanical properties in semitransparent polymers. PMID:26480464

  16. Grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography of thick samples

    We analyze how the position dependence of the measured signal in phase-contrast imaging using a grating interferometer influences tomographic imaging of samples that are thick in relation to the setup dimensions. The investigations show that there are fundamental differences in image formation depending on the position of the sample relative to the gratings. We discuss tomographic imaging in parallel and fan-beam geometry, with a highlight on tomographic parallel-beam reconstructions for sample positions upstream and downstream of the central beam-splitter grating. Alterations to the standard reconstruction algorithms that result from the position dependence of the measured signal are analyzed analytically and discussed in exemplary computer simulations. We find that the reconstruction results are determined by the position of the axis of rotation relative to the gratings. We conclude that artifact-free reconstructions are feasible for all sample positions within the interferometer, although with different requirements on the angular range and the reconstruction algorithms, respectively.

  17. Image reconstruction exploiting object sparsity in boundary-enhanced X-ray phase-contrast tomography.

    Sidky, Emil Y; Anastasio, Mark A; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2010-05-10

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) seeks to reconstruct information regarding the complex-valued refractive index distribution of an object. In many applications, a boundary-enhanced image is sought that reveals the locations of discontinuities in the real-valued component of the refractive index distribution. We investigate two iterative algorithms for few-view image reconstruction in boundary-enhanced PCT that exploit the fact that a boundary-enhanced PCT image, or its gradient, is often sparse. In order to exploit object sparseness, the reconstruction algorithms seek to minimize the l(1)-norm or TV-norm of the image, subject to data consistency constraints. We demonstrate that the algorithms can reconstruct accurate boundary-enhanced images from highly incomplete few-view projection data. PMID:20588896

  18. Programmable aperture microscopy: A computational method for multi-modal phase contrast and light field imaging

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Minliang; Chen, Qian

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and cost-effective programmable aperture microscope to realize multi-modal computational imaging by integrating a programmable liquid crystal display (LCD) into a conventional wide-field microscope. The LCD selectively modulates the light distribution at the rear aperture of the microscope objective, allowing numerous imaging modalities, such as bright field, dark field, differential phase contrast, quantitative phase imaging, multi-perspective imaging, and full resolution light field imaging to be achieved and switched rapidly in the same setup, without requiring specialized hardwares and any moving parts. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging unstained cheek cells, profiling microlens array, and changing perspective views of thick biological specimens. The post-exposure refocusing of a butterfly mouthpart and RFP-labeled dicot stem cross-section is also presented to demonstrate the full resolution light field imaging capability of our system for both translucent and fluorescent specimens.

  19. Long-term quantitative phase-contrast imaging of living cells by digital holographic microscopy

    Liu, S.; Pan, F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, F.; Rong, L.; Shang, P.; Xiao, W.

    2011-04-01

    The dynamic analysis of biological living samples is one of the particular interests in life sciences. An improved digital holographic microscope for long-term quantitative phase-contrast imaging of living cells is presented in this paper. The optical configuration is optimized in the form of a free-space-fiber hybrid system which promotes the flexibility of imaging in complex or semi-enclosed experimental environment. Aberrations compensation is implemented taking into account the additional phase aberration induced by liquid culture medium in long-term observation. The proposed approach is applied to investigate living samples of MC3T3-E1 and MLO-Y4 cells. The experimental results demonstrate its availability in the analysis of cellular changes.

  20. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging and tomography of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    We have analyzed the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans with the help of phase-contrast x-ray tomography. This work combines techniques from x-ray imaging studies of single biological cells by in-line holography with three-dimensional reconstruction and furthermore extends these studies to the multicellular level. To preserve the sub-cellular ultrastructure of the nematodes, we used the near-native sample preparation of high-pressure freezing as commonly used in the field of electron microscopy. For the presented samples, a standard, non-magnifying parallel-beam setting, as well as a magnifying, divergent-beam setting using nanofocusing optics is evaluated based on their tomographic reconstruction potential. In this paper, we address difficulties in sample preparation and issues of image processing. By experimental refinement and through optimized reconstruction procedures, we were able to perform x-ray imaging studies on a living specimen. (paper)

  1. Improved peripheral MRA using multi-velocity-encoding phase contrast-enhanced MRA techniques

    Phase contrast MR angiography (PC-MRA) depends on phase shifts caused by blood flow. Generally, PC sequences employ one VENC (velocity-encoding) value for each encoded spatial direction to optimize the signal in major vessels during peak systolic flow. We compared a mono-(30) with a multi-(20/30/45) VENC-PC-MRA technique in 10 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. In all patients, the multi-VENC-PC sequence enhanced the vascular signal in vessels with very different flow velocities in one measurement. Large fields-of-view can be measured in a relatively short examination time to obtain an overview of the peripheral arterial system of the patient when contrast-enhanced MRA is not possible

  2. Inverse geometry for grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    Phase-contrast imaging using conventional polychromatic x-ray sources and grating interferometers has been developed and demonstrated for x-ray energies up to 60 keV. Here, we conduct an analysis of possible grating configurations for this technique and present further geometrical arrangements not considered so far. An inverse interferometer geometry is investigated that offers significant advantages for grating fabrication and for the application of the method in computed tomography (CT) scanners. We derive and measure the interferometer's angular sensitivity for both the inverse and the conventional configuration as a function of the sample position. Thereby, we show that both arrangements are equally sensitive and that the highest sensitivity is obtained, when the investigated object is close to the interferometer's phase grating. We also discuss the question whether the sample should be placed in front of or behind the phase grating. For CT applications, we propose an inverse geometry with the sample position behind the phase grating.

  3. A robust phase unwrapping method for phase-contrast X-ray CT using genetic algorithm

    In hard X-ray regions, X-ray phase information allows image formation with higher contrast for such a biological soft tissue, which cannot be sufficiently delineated by conventional absorption-based imaging. To generate projections from raw fringe pattern images in the process of the CT image reconstruction procedures, frequently 2p-phase jump must be corrected, i.e., the phase unwrapping. However, it is difficult to obtain the satisfactory corrections for noisy fringe pattern images. In this research, regarding the phase unwrapping as a combinatorial optimization, we propose a robust phase-unwrapping algorithm for phase-contrast X-ray CT by using genetic algorithm. We confirm the effectiveness for actual data obtained at SPring-8, and point out left problems. (author)

  4. Algorithm for phase contrast X-ray tomography based on nonlinear phase retrieval

    NI Wen-lei; ZHOU Tie

    2008-01-01

    A new algorithm for phase contrast X-ray tomography under holographic measurement was proposed in this paper. The main idea of the algorithm was to solve the nonlinear phase retrieval problem using the Newton iterative method. The linear equations for the Newton directions were proved to be ill-posed and the regularized solu- tions were obtained by the conjugate gradient method. Some numerical experiments with computer simulated data were presented. The efficiency, feasibility and the numerical stability of the algorithm were illustrated by the numerical experiments. Compared with the results produced by the linearized phase retrieval algorithm, we can see that the new algorithm is not limited to be only efficient for the data measured in the near-field of the Fresnel region and thus it has a broader validity range.

  5. Typical Microstructures of Chinese Medicines with X-Ray Microscopy in Phase Contrast

    WEI Xun; XIAO Ti-Qiao; LIU Li-Xiang; DU Guo-Hao; CHEN Min; LUO Yu-Yu; XU Hong-Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ Due to the low absorption contrast of plant tissues, traditional x-ray radiography has not been included in the microscopic techniques used in the identification of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs). With the development of x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) in recent years, weakly absorbing materials could also be imaged by xrays. Here we investigate microstructures of TCMs utilizing XPCI based on a nano-focus x-ray tube. The results demonstrated that XPCI is capable of revealing the microstructures of TCMs used as judging criteria in the identification of TCMs. The major advantages of the new method are nondestructivity, no special demand for sample preparation and suitability for thick samples.

  6. X-ray phase-contrast CT imaging of the acupoints based on synchrotron radiation

    Chenglin, Liu, E-mail: lclyctc@163.com [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers’ College, Yancheng 224051 (China); Xiaohua, Wang; Hua, Xu [Physics Department of Yancheng Teachers’ College, Yancheng 224051 (China); Fang, Liu; Ruishan, Dang [Anatomy Department of Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Dongming, Zhang; Xinyi, Zhang [Synchrotron Radiation Research Center of Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Honglan, Xie; Tiqiao, Xiao [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility of Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, CAS, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, the morphology of the acupuncture point (abbreviated as acupoint hereafter) or tissue where there were no acupoints in the fractional rabbit hind limb was studied by in-line phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) methods based on synchrotron radiation. The density of micro-vessels was calculated for tissues with acupoints or without acupoints. Differences between acupoints area and non-acupoint areas determined by the density of the micro-vessels propose a strong evidence of the existence of acupoints. Our results showed that there were two significantly higher densities of the micro-vessels, where two acupoints were located, respectively. In addition, there were large numbers of involutedly microvascular structure in the acupoint areas. Nevertheless, in non-acupoints area, the microvascular structure was relatively simple and flat.

  7. Ecdysis period of Rhodnius prolixus head investigated using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography.

    Sena, G; Nogueira, L P; Braz, D; Almeida, A P; Gonzalez, M S; Azambuja, P; Colaço, M V; Barroso, R C

    2016-06-01

    Microtomography using synchrotron sources is a useful tool in biological imaging research since the phase coherence of synchrotron beams can be exploited to obtain images with high contrast resolution. This work is part of a series of works using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography in the study of Rhodnius prolixus head, the insect vector of Chagas' disease, responsible for about 12,000 deaths per year. The control of insect vector is the most efficient method to prevent this disease and studies have shown that the use of triflumuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, disrupted chitin synthesis during larval development and it's an alternative method against insect pests. The aim of this work was to investigate the biological effects of treatments with triflumuron in the ecdysis period (the moulting of the R. prolixus cuticle) using the new imaging beamline IMX at LNLS (Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory). Nymphs of R. prolixus were taken from the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Physiology of Insects, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Brazil. Doses of 0.05mg of triflumuron were applied directly to the abdomen on half of the insects immediately after feeding. The insects were sacrificed 25days after feeding (intermoulting period) and fixed with glutaraldehyde. The results obtained using phase contrast synchrotron microtomography in R. prolixus showed amazing images of the effects of triflumuron on insects in the ecdysis period, and the formation of the new cuticle on those which were not treated with triflumuron. Both formation and malformation of this insect's cuticle have never been seen before with this technique. PMID:27184550

  8. Design and characterization of a phase contrast X-ray CT system

    Zambelli, Joseph N.

    Phase contrast x-ray imaging has recently attracted wide research interest, as it offers the possibility to exploit different contrast mechanisms than conventional absorption imaging, with the potential for higher quality images or more available information as a result. This work details design and construction of au experimental grating-interferometer-based differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) imaging system, presents measurements of performance, and compares this new imaging technique with conventional absorption imaging. Details of the fabrication of the specialized x-ray phase and absorption gratings are also provided. This system is unique in that makes use of a conventional rotating-anode x-ray tube, unlike previous designs which were based upon stationary anode x-ray tubes or synchrotron sources. The imaging system described here enables simultaneous reconstruction of electron density, effective atomic number, attenuation coefficient, and small-angle scatter density with data acquired from a single scan. It is theoretically shown and experimentally verified that DPC-CT imaging allows imaging of electron density at high spatial resolution with a much less severe dose penalty compared with conventional absorption imaging. Improved object visibility using electron density imaging is demonstrated with CNR measurements in physical phantoms and comparisons of reconstructions of breast tissue samples. The ability to directly image both electron density and effective atomic number provides a truly quantitative imaging technique and accuracy of the technique is shown using phantoms and potential applications are demonstrated using breast tissue samples. A new reconstruction algorithm which allows a doubling of the diameter of the scanning field of view, a potential enabling technology for eventual clinical use, is also demonstrated.

  9. Analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging system using a micro focus x-ray source

    Zhou, Wei [BME Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Majidi, Keivan; Brankov, Jovan G., E-mail: brankov@iit.edu [ECE Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Here we describe a new in-laboratory analyzer based phase contrast-imaging (ABI) instrument using a conventional X-ray tube source (CXS) aimed at bio-medical imaging applications. Phase contrast-imaging allows visualization of soft tissue details usually obscured in conventional X-ray imaging. The ABI system design and major features are described in detail. The key advantage of the presented system, over the few existing CXS ABI systems, is that it does not require high precision components, i.e., CXS, X-ray detector, and electro-mechanical components. To overcome a main problem introduced by these components, identified as temperature stability, the system components are kept at a constant temperature inside of three enclosures, thus minimizing the electrical and mechanical thermal drifts. This is achieved by using thermoelectric (Peltier) cooling/heating modules that are easy to control precisely. For CXS we utilized a microfocus X-ray source with tungsten (W) anode material. In addition the proposed system eliminates tungsten's multiple spectral lines by selecting monochromator crystal size appropriately therefore eliminating need for the costly mismatched, two-crystal monochromator. The system imaging was fine-tuned for tungsten Kα{sub 1} line with the energy of 59.3 keV since it has been shown to be of great clinical significance by a number of researchers at synchrotron facilities. In this way a laboratory system that can be used for evaluating and quantifying tissue properties, initially explored at synchrotron facilities, would be of great interest to a larger research community. To demonstrate the imaging capability of our instrument we use a chicken thigh tissue sample.

  10. Phase contrast imaging reveals low lung volumes and surface areas in the developing marsupial.

    Shannon J Simpson

    Full Text Available Marsupials are born with immature lungs when compared to eutherian mammals and rely, to various extents, on cutaneous gas exchange in order to meet metabolic requirements. Indeed, the fat-tailed dunnart is born with lungs in the canalicular stage of development and relies almost entirely on the skin for gas exchange at birth; consequently undergoing the majority of lung development in air. Plane radiographs and computed tomography data sets were acquired using phase contrast imaging with a synchrotron radiation source for two marsupial species, the fat-tailed dunnart and the larger tammar wallaby, during the first weeks of postnatal life. Phase contrast imaging revealed that only two lung sacs contain air after the first hour of life in the fat-tailed dunnart. While the lung of the tammar wallaby was comparatively more developed, both species demonstrated massive increases in air sac number and architectural complexity during the postnatal period. In addition, both the tammar wallaby and fat-tailed dunnart had lower lung volumes and parenchymal surface areas than were expected from morphometrically determined allometric equations relating these variables to body mass during the neonatal period. However, lung volume is predicted to scale with mass as expected after the neonatal marsupial reaches a body mass of ∼1 g and no longer relies on the skin for gas exchange. Decreased lung volume in the marsupial neonate further supports the maxim that cutaneous gas exchange occurs in the marsupial neonate because the respiratory apparatus is not yet capable of meeting the gas exchange requirements of the newborn.

  11. Characterization of Mechanical Properties of Tissue Scaffolds by Phase Contrast Imaging and Finite Element Modeling.

    Bawolin, Nahshon K; Dolovich, Allan T; Chen, Daniel X B; Zhang, Chris W J

    2015-08-01

    In tissue engineering, the cell and scaffold approach has shown promise as a treatment to regenerate diseased and/or damaged tissue. In this treatment, an artificial construct (scaffold) is seeded with cells, which organize and proliferate into new tissue. The scaffold itself biodegrades with time, leaving behind only newly formed tissue. The degradation qualities of the scaffold are critical during the treatment period, since the change in the mechanical properties of the scaffold with time can influence cell behavior. To observe in time the scaffold's mechanical properties, a straightforward method is to deform the scaffold and then characterize scaffold deflection accordingly. However, experimentally observing the scaffold deflection is challenging. This paper presents a novel study on characterization of mechanical properties of scaffolds by phase contrast imaging and finite element modeling, which specifically includes scaffold fabrication, scaffold imaging, image analysis, and finite elements (FEs) modeling of the scaffold mechanical properties. The innovation of the work rests on the use of in-line phase contrast X-ray imaging at 20 KeV to characterize tissue scaffold deformation caused by ultrasound radiation forces and the use of the Fourier transform to identify movement. Once deformation has been determined experimentally, it is then compared with the predictions given by the forward solution of a finite element model. A consideration of the number of separate loading conditions necessary to uniquely identify the material properties of transversely isotropic and fully orthotropic scaffolds is also presented, along with the use of an FE as a form of regularization. PMID:25902011

  12. On "New Massive" 4D Gravity

    Bergshoeff, Eric A; Rosseel, Jan; Townsend, Paul K

    2012-01-01

    We construct a four-dimensional (4D) gauge theory that propagates, unitarily, the five polarization modes of a massive spin-2 particle. These modes are described by a "dual" graviton gauge potential and the Lagrangian is 4th-order in derivatives. As the construction mimics that of 3D "new massive gravity", we call this 4D model (linearized) "new massive dual gravity". We analyse its massless limit, and discuss similarities to the Eddington-Schroedinger model.

  13. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    Sarapata, A., E-mail: adrian.sarapata@tum.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 and Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Pfeiffer, F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  14. Polychromatic phase contrast imaging as a basic step towards a widespread application of the technique

    Phase contrast imaging (PCI) is probably the most exciting amongst emerging X-ray imaging techniques, as it has the potential to remove some of the main limitations of conventional radiology. As a consequence, significant effort is currently directed towards developing the technique for the first clinical implementations. In recent years, PCI has been widely experimented, but its use has been mainly restricted to synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities. Source-related limitations are in fact the most relevant in this context, and the fact that most phase techniques require monochromatic radiation makes these limitations even more severe. Amongst the different techniques, free-space propagation is the most suited to a polychromatic implementation. A detailed simulation, based on Fresnel/Kirchoff diffraction integrals, was devised to describe this imaging modality. This simulation accounts for source dimensions, beam spectrum and divergence and detector point spread function, and can thus be applied to any X-ray imaging system. In particular, by accepting these parameters as input, along with ones describing the sample, the model can be used to optimize the geometry of the set-up, i.e. to assess the source-to-sample and sample-to-detector distances that maximize feature detection. The simulation was validated experimentally by acquiring a range of images of different samples with a laboratory X-ray source. Good agreement was found between simulated and experimental data in all cases. In order to maximize the generality of the results, all acquisitions were carried out using a polychromatic source and an energy-resolving detector. This effectively allowed the recording of a range of monochromatic and polychromatic images in a single acquisition, as an assortment of the former can be created by integrating different parts of the acquired spectra. The most notable result obtained in this study is that in most practical cases polychromatic PCI can provide the same image

  15. Comparison of blood velocity measurements between ultrasound Doppler and accelerated phase-contrast MR angiography in small arteries with disturbed flow

    Jiang Jingfeng; Johnson, Kevin; Wieben, Oliver; Zagzebski, James [Medical Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States); Strother, Charles; Consigny, Dan [Radiology Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States); Baker, Sara, E-mail: jjiang2@wisc.edu [School of Ultrasound, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, WI (United States)

    2011-03-21

    Ultrasound Doppler (UD) velocity measurements are commonly used to quantify blood flow velocities in vivo. The aim of our work was to investigate the accuracy of in vivo spectral Doppler measurements of velocity waveforms. Waveforms were derived from spectral Doppler signals and corrected for intrinsic spectral broadening errors by applying a previously published algorithm. The method was tested in a canine aneurysm model by determining velocities in small arteries (3-4 mm diameter) near the aneurysm where there was moderately disturbed flow. Doppler results were compared to velocity measurements in the same arteries acquired with a rapid volumetric phase contrast MR angiography technique named phase contrast vastly undersampled isotropic projection reconstruction magnetic resonance angiography (PC-VIPR MRA). After correcting for intrinsic spectral broadening, there was a high degree of correlation between velocities obtained by the real-time UD and the accelerated PC-MRA technique. The peak systolic velocity yielded a linear correlation coefficient of r = 0.83, end diastolic velocity resulted in r = 0.81, and temporally averaged mean velocity resulted in r = 0.76. The overall velocity waveforms obtained by the two techniques were also highly correlated (r = 0.89 {+-} 0.06). There were, however, only weak correlations for the pulsatility index (PI: 0.25) and resistive index (RI: 0.14) derived from the two techniques. Results demonstrate that to avoid overestimations of peak systolic velocities, the results for UD must be carefully corrected to compensate for errors caused by intrinsic spectral broadening.

  16. Schlieren, Phase-Contrast, and Spectroscopy Diagnostics for the LBNL HIF Plasma Channel Experiment

    Ponce, D. M.; Niemann, C.; Fessenden, T. J.; Leemans, W.; Vandersloot, K.; Dahlbacka, G.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.; Tauschwitz, A.

    1999-11-01

    The LBNL Plasma Channel experiment has demonstrated stable 42-cm Z-pinch discharge plasma channels with peak currents in excess of 50 kA for a 7 torr nitrogen, 30 kV discharge. These channels offer the possibility of transporting heavy-ion beams for inertial fusion. We postulate that the stability of these channels resides in the existance of a neutral-gas density depresion created by a pre-pulse discharge before the main capacitor bank discharge is created. Here, we present the results and experimental diagnostics setup used for the study of the pre-pulse and main bank channels. Observation of both the plasma and neutral gas dynamics is achieved. Schlieren, Zernike's phase-contrast, and spectroscopic techniques are used. Preliminary Schlieren results show a gas shockwave moving radially at a rate of ≈ 10^6 mm/sec as a result of the fast and localized deposited energy during the evolution of the pre-pulse channel. This data will be used to validate simulation codes (BUCKY and CYCLOPS).

  17. DESIGN OF A MICROFABRICATED, TWO-ELECTRODE PHASE-CONTRAST ELEMENTSUITABLE FOR ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

    Cambie, Rossana; Downing, Kenneth H.; Typke, Dieter; Glaeser,Robert M.; Jin, Jian

    2006-09-20

    A miniature electrostatic element has been designed to selectively apply a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plane of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. The design involves a cylindrically shaped, biased-voltage electrode, which is surrounded by a concentric grounded electrode. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that the fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size is greater than 5:1. Unlike the planar, three-electrode einzel lens originally proposed by Boersch for the same purpose, this new design does not require insulating layers to separate the biased and grounded electrodes, and it can thus be produced by a very simple microfabrication process. Scanning electron microscope images confirm that mechanically robust devices with feature sizes of {approx}1 {micro}m can be easily fabricated. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a 90-degree phase shift between the scattered and unscattered electrons, as expected.

  18. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from image artifacts and increased inaccuracy in the reconstructed image values. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small region of interest (ROI) within a large object can be accurately and stably reconstructed using fully truncated projection datasets provided that a priori information on electron density is known for a small region inside the ROI. The method reconstructs an image iteratively to satisfy a group of physical conditions by using a projection onto convex set (POCS) approach. In this work, this POCS algorithm is validated using both numerical simulations and physical phantom experimental data. In both cases, the root mean square error is reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the truncated analytic reconstructions. Truncation artifacts observed in the latter reconstructions are eliminated using the POCS algorithm.

  19. Computer Modeling of the C-MOD Phase Contrast Imaging System

    Shugart, A. J.; Hallock, G. A.; Rowan, W.; Mazurenko, A.; Nelson-Melby, E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Porkolab, M.

    2000-10-01

    Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) is used on Alcator C-Mod to measure electron density fluctuations related to plasma turbulence, quasi-coherent modes, Ion-Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF) and Ion-Bernstein waves (IBW). A simplified model of a PCI system has been developed using a computer code written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL). This code is implemented as a series of modules that form a small IDL library which models components of the optical setup. Using this library of routines one can account for the diffraction of light in both the near and far fields as well as focusing effects due to lenses and mirrors and the effects of the PCI phase plate. One can also determine the amplitude and phase of a cross section of the laser at any point in the optical system. We used this code to model PCI measurements of ICRF waves in C-Mod. The results of this analysis show the sensitivity and resolution of the system.

  20. Information and backaction due to phase contrast imaging measurements of cold atomic gases: beyond Gaussian states

    Ilo-Okeke, Ebubechukwu O

    2016-01-01

    We further examine a theory of phase contrast imaging (PCI) of cold atomic gases, first introduced by us in Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 112}, 233602 (2014). We model the PCI measurement by directly calculating the entangled state between the light and the atoms due to the ac Stark shift, which induces a conditional phase shift on the light depending upon the atomic state. By interfering the light that passes through the BEC with the original light, one can obtain information of the atomic state at a single shot level. We derive an exact expression for a measurement operator that embodies the information obtained from PCI, as well as the back-action on the atomic state. By the use of exact expressions for the measurement process, we go beyond the continuous variables approximation such that the non-Gaussian regime can be accessed for both the measured state and the post-measurement state. Features such as the photon probability density, signal, signal variance, Fisher information, error of the measurement, and the b...

  1. High-throughput 3D tracking of bacteria on a standard phase contrast microscope

    Taute, K. M.; Gude, S.; Tans, S. J.; Shimizu, T. S.

    2015-11-01

    Bacteria employ diverse motility patterns in traversing complex three-dimensional (3D) natural habitats. 2D microscopy misses crucial features of 3D behaviour, but the applicability of existing 3D tracking techniques is constrained by their performance or ease of use. Here we present a simple, broadly applicable, high-throughput 3D bacterial tracking method for use in standard phase contrast microscopy. Bacteria are localized at micron-scale resolution over a range of 350 × 300 × 200 μm by maximizing image cross-correlations between their observed diffraction patterns and a reference library. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique to a range of bacterial species and exploit its high throughput to expose hidden contributions of bacterial individuality to population-level variability in motile behaviour. The simplicity of this powerful new tool for bacterial motility research renders 3D tracking accessible to a wider community and paves the way for investigations of bacterial motility in complex 3D environments.

  2. Hierarchical Mergence Approach to Cell Detection in Phase Contrast Microscopy Images

    Lei Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase contrast microscope is one of the most universally used instruments to observe long-term cell movements in different solutions. Most of classic segmentation methods consider a homogeneous patch as an object, while the recorded cell images have rich details and a lot of small inhomogeneous patches, as well as some artifacts, which can impede the applications. To tackle these challenges, this paper presents a hierarchical mergence approach (HMA to extract homogeneous patches out and heuristically add them up. Initially, the maximum region of interest (ROI, in which only cell events exist, is drawn by using gradient information as a mask. Then, different levels of blurring based on kernel or grayscale morphological operations are applied to the whole image to produce reference images. Next, each of unconnected regions in the mask is applied with Otsu method independently according to different reference images. Consequently, the segmentation result is generated by the combination of usable patches in all informative layers. The proposed approach is more than simply a fusion of the basic segmentation methods, but a well-organized strategy that integrates these basic methods. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms previous methods within our datasets.

  3. Feasibility of using energy-resolving detectors in differential phase-contrast imaging

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2016-03-01

    In a common clinical setting, conventional absorption-based imaging provides relatively good contrast between bonelike and soft-tissue materials. The reliability of material differentiation, however, is hampered when materials with similar absorption properties are scanned. This problem can be addressed by utilizing a spectral imaging technique whereby multiple X-ray measurements are taken at different beam conditions. In this work, we discuss the possibility of using a spectral imaging approach in a grating-based, differential-phase contrast-imaging (DPCI) modality. Two approaches, dual exposure with a conventional flat-panel detector (FPD) and a single exposure with a photon-counting energy-resolving detector (PCD), were reviewed. The feasibility of a single-exposure DPCI and a two-bin PCD setup was assessed quantitatively by a least-squares minimization algorithm applied to an X-ray diffraction pattern. It was shown that a two-peak-shaped X-ray spectrum can allow PCDs to be placed unambiguously at single Talbot distances making it possible to simultaneously detect photons in each energy bin with comparable efficiencies. The results of this work can help build a bridge between two rapidly developing imaging modalities, X-ray spectral imaging and X-ray DPCI.

  4. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    Hagen, C. K., E-mail: charlotte.hagen.10@ucl.ac.uk; Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Malet Place, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Munro, P. R. T. [Optical + Biomedical Engineering Laboratory, School of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australia and Centre for Microscopy, Characterisation, and Analysis, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  5. Assessing cerebrospinal fluid flow connectivity using 3D gradient echo phase contrast velocity encoded MRI

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using three-directional velocity encoded 3D gradient echo (GE) phase contrast (PC) imaging to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow connectivity in the human brain. Five healthy volunteers were scanned using low velocity sensitivity (Venc = 0.04–0.05 m s−1). Flow–time curves were compared to standard 2D PC scans. The 3D data were used to reconstruct in vivo CSF flow volumes based on time-averaged phase-difference information, and the patency of the CSF flow pathways was assessed using nearest-neighbour connectivity. A pulsatile flow phantom was used to gauge the measurement accuracy of the CSF flow volumes at low flow velocities. Flow connectivity from the lateral ventricles down to the cisterna magna was successfully demonstrated in all volunteers. The phantom tests showed a good distinction between the flow cavities and the background noise. 3D PC imaging results in CSF flow waveforms with similar pulsatility but underestimated peak velocities compared to 2D PC data. 3D time-resolved velocity encoded GE imaging has successfully been applied to assess CSF flow connectivity in normal subjects

  6. Generalized phase contrast-enhanced diffractive coupling to light-driven microtools

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2015-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated on-demand dynamic coupling to optically manipulated microtools coined as wave-guided optical waveguides using diffractive techniques on a "point and shoot" approach. These microtools are extended microstructures fabricated using two-photon photopolymerization and function as free-floating optically trapped waveguides. Dynamic coupling of focused light via these structures being moved in three-dimensional space is done holographically. However, calculating the necessary holograms is not straightforward when using counter-propagating trapping geometry. The generation of the coupling spots is done in real time following the position of each microtool with the aid of an object tracking routine. This approach allows continuous coupling of light through the microtools which can be useful in a variety of biophotonics applications. To complement the targeted-light delivery capability of the microtools, the applied spatial light modulator has been illuminated with a properly matched input beam cross section based on the generalized phase contrast method. Our results show a significant gain in the output at the tip of each microtool as measured from the fluorescence signal of the trapping medium. The ability to switch from on-demand to continuous addressing with efficient illumination leverages our microtools for potential applications in stimulation and near-field-based biophotonics on cellular scales.

  7. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  8. Coded apertures allow high-energy x-ray phase contrast imaging with laboratory sources

    Ignatyev, K.; Munro, P. R. T.; Chana, D.; Speller, R. D.; Olivo, A.

    2011-07-01

    This work analyzes the performance of the coded-aperture based x-ray phase contrast imaging approach, showing that it can be used at high x-ray energies with acceptable exposure times. Due to limitations in the used source, we show images acquired at tube voltages of up to 100 kVp, however, no intrinsic reason indicates that the method could not be extended to even higher energies. In particular, we show quantitative agreement between the contrast extracted from the experimental x-ray images and the theoretical one, determined by the behavior of the material's refractive index as a function of energy. This proves that all energies in the used spectrum contribute to the image formation, and also that there are no additional factors affecting image contrast as the x-ray energy is increased. We also discuss the method flexibility by displaying and analyzing the first set of images obtained while varying the relative displacement between coded-aperture sets, which leads to image variations to some extent similar to those observed when changing the crystal angle in analyzer-based imaging. Finally, we discuss the method's possible advantages in terms of simplification of the set-up, scalability, reduced exposure times, and complete achromaticity. We believe this would helpful in applications requiring the imaging of highly absorbing samples, e.g., material science and security inspection, and, in the way of example, we demonstrate a possible application in the latter.

  9. A consideration of the signal-to-noise ratio in phase contrast mammography

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2010-04-01

    Recently, with developments in medicine, digital systems such as computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detector (FPD) systems are being employed for mammography instead of analog systems such as the screen-film system. Phase-contrast mammography (PCM) is a commercially available digital system that uses images with a magnification of 1.75x. To study the effect of the air gap in PCM, we measured the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and calculated the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in PCM, and compared it to that in conventional mammography (CM). Then, to extend the SNR to the spatial frequency domain, we calculated the noise equivalent quanta (NEQ) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) used by the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum of the pixel value (NPSΔPV), gradient of the digital characteristic curve, and number of X-ray photons. The obtained results indicated that the SFR of the PCM was as low as that of the CM with a grid. When the exposure dose was constant, the SNR of the PCM was the highest in all systems. Moreover, the NEQ and DQE for the PCM were higher than those for the CM (G-) in the spatial frequency domain over 2.5 cycles/mm. These results showed that the number of scattered X-rays was reduced sufficiently by the air gap in the PCM and the NEQ and DQE for PCM were influenced by the presampled MTF in the high-spatial-frequency domain.

  10. X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging of Calcified Tissue and Biomaterial Structure in Bioreactor Engineered Tissues

    Appel, Alyssa A. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States); Larson, Jeffery C. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States); Garson, III, Alfred B. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Guan, Huifeng [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Fisher, John P. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Anastasio, Mark A. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Brey, Eric M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital, IL (United States)

    2014-11-04

    Tissues engineered in bioreactor systems have been used clinically to replace damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these systems are under continued development for many tissue engineering applications. The ability to quantitatively assess material structure and tissue formation is critical for evaluating bioreactor efficacy and for preimplantation assessment of tissue quality. These techniques allow for the nondestructive and longitudinal monitoring of large engineered tissues within the bioreactor systems and will be essential for the translation of these strategies to viable clinical therapies. X-ray Phase Contrast (XPC) imaging techniques have shown tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide image contrast based on multiple X-ray properties, including absorption, refraction, and scatter. In this research, mesenchymal stem cell-seeded alginate hydrogels were prepared and cultured under osteogenic conditions in a perfusion bioreactor. The constructs were imaged at various time points using XPC microcomputed tomography (µCT). Imaging was performed with systems using both synchrotron- and tube-based X-ray sources. XPC µCT allowed for simultaneous three-dimensional (3D) quantification of hydrogel size and mineralization, as well as spatial information on hydrogel structure and mineralization. Samples were processed for histological evaluation and XPC showed similar features to histology and quantitative analysis consistent with the histomorphometry. Furthermore, these results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on XPC for noninvasive 3D imaging engineered tissues grown in bioreactors.

  11. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples

  12. Sensitive Phase Gratings for X-ray Phase Contrast -- a Simulation-based Comparison

    Preusche, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Medical differential phase contrast x-ray imaging (DPCI) promises improved soft-tissue contrast at lower x-ray dose. The dose strongly depends on both the angular sensitivity and on the visibility of a grating-based Talbot-Lau interferometer. Using a conventional x-ray tube, a high sensitivity and a high visibility are somewhat contradicting goals: To increase sensitivity, the grating period has to be reduced and/or the grating distance increased. Technically, this means using a higher Talbot order (3rd or 5th one instead of first one). This however reduces the visibility somewhat, because only a smaller part of the tube spectrum will get used. This work proposes to relax this problem by changing the phase grating geometry. This allows to double sensitivity (i.e., double the Talbot order) without reducing the visibility. One proposed grating geometry is an older binary one (75% of a period $\\pi$-shifting), but applied in a novel way. The second proposed geometry is a novel one, requiring three height levels f...

  13. Stability estimates for linearized near-field phase retrieval in X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Maretzke, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase contrast enables nanoscale imaging of biological tissue by probing not only the attenuation, but also the real part of the refractive index of the sample. Since only intensities of diffracted waves can be measured, the main mathematical challenge consists in a phase-retrieval problem in the near-field regime. We treat an often used linearized version of this problem known as contract transfer function model. Surprisingly, this inverse problem turns out to be well-posed assuming only a compact support of the imaged object. Moreover, we establish bounds on the Lipschitz stability constant. In general this constant grows exponentially with the Fresnel number of the imaging setup. However, both for homogeneous objects, characterized by a fixed ratio of the induced refractive phase shifts and attenuation, and in the case of measurements at two distances, a much more favorable algebraic dependence on the Fresnel number can be shown. In some cases we establish order optimality of our es...

  14. Differential phase contrast setup for a non coherent beamline at HASYLAB using hard X-ray grating interferometer

    Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix; Haibel, Astrid; Schreyer, Andreas [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany); Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Gruenzweig, Christian [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pfeiffer, Franz [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); EPF Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a common technique to visualize soft tissue with much higher contrast than the conventional absorption-contrast imaging. Differential phase contrast (DPC), developed at PSI, Switzerland, makes use of a hard x-ray grating interferometer and allows for phase-contrast imaging with high brilliance synchrotron sources as well as with conventional x-ray tubes. It is recently reported also to provide dark field information that is very sensitive to micro structures like porosity within the materials. Here we present the plans to adopt the DPC technique to the HARWI-II materials science beamline, operated by GKSS Research Centre, in cooperation with DESY, Hamburg. This will offer an amount of new applications especially in the field of materials science like for example characterizing new light weight materials like magnesium and studying its corrosion as implant material.

  15. Differential phase contrast setup for a non coherent beamline at HASYLAB using hard X-ray grating interferometer

    Phase-contrast imaging is a common technique to visualize soft tissue with much higher contrast than the conventional absorption-contrast imaging. Differential phase contrast (DPC), developed at PSI, Switzerland, makes use of a hard x-ray grating interferometer and allows for phase-contrast imaging with high brilliance synchrotron sources as well as with conventional x-ray tubes. It is recently reported also to provide dark field information that is very sensitive to micro structures like porosity within the materials. Here we present the plans to adopt the DPC technique to the HARWI-II materials science beamline, operated by GKSS Research Centre, in cooperation with DESY, Hamburg. This will offer an amount of new applications especially in the field of materials science like for example characterizing new light weight materials like magnesium and studying its corrosion as implant material.

  16. Simultaneous maximum-likelihood reconstruction for x-ray grating based phase-contrast tomography avoiding intermediate phase retrieval

    Ritter, André; Durst, Jürgen; Gödel, Karl; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Weber, Thomas; Wucherer, Lukas; Anton, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Phase-wrapping artifacts, statistical image noise and the need for a minimum amount of phase steps per projection limit the practicability of x-ray grating based phase-contrast tomography, when using filtered back projection reconstruction. For conventional x-ray computed tomography, the use of statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms has successfully reduced artifacts and statistical issues. In this work, an iterative reconstruction method for grating based phase-contrast tomography is presented. The method avoids the intermediate retrieval of absorption, differential phase and dark field projections. It directly reconstructs tomographic cross sections from phase stepping projections by the use of a forward projecting imaging model and an appropriate likelihood function. The likelihood function is then maximized with an iterative algorithm. The presented method is tested with tomographic data obtained through a wave field simulation of grating based phase-contrast tomography. The reconstruction result...

  17. Quantitative studies on inner interfaces in conical metal joints using hard x-ray inline phase contrast radiography

    Quantitative investigation of micrometer and submicrometer gaps between joining metal surfaces is applied to conical plug-socket connections in dental titanium implants. Microgaps of widths well beyond the resolving power of industrial x-ray systems are imaged by synchrotron phase contrast radiography. Furthermore, by using an analytical model for the relatively simple sample geometry and applying it to numerical forward simulations of the optical Fresnel propagation, we show that quantitative measurements of the microgap width down to 0.1 μm are possible. Image data recorded at the BAMline (BESSY-II light source, Germany) are presented, with the resolving power of the imaging system being 4 μm in absorption mode and ∼14 μm in phase contrast mode (z2=0.74 m). Thus, phase contrast radiography, combined with numerical forward simulations, is capable of measuring the widths of gaps that are two orders of magnitude thinner than the conventional detection limit.

  18. Imaging Liver Lesions Using Grating-Based Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography with Bi-Lateral Filter Post-Processing

    Herzen, Julia; Marian S Willner; Fingerle, Alexander A.; Peter B Noël; Köhler, Thomas; Drecoll, Enken; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging shows improved soft-tissue contrast compared to standard absorption-based X-ray imaging. Especially the grating-based method seems to be one promising candidate for clinical implementation due to its extendibility to standard laboratory X-ray sources. Therefore the purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with a novel bi-lateral denoising method for imaging of focal liver lesions in an ex...

  19. Investigation of the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    Weber, Thomas; Bayer, Florian; Haas, Wilhelm; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Wucherer, Lukas; Braun, Jan Matthias; Durst, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising modality increasing the soft tissue contrast in medical imaging. In this work, the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based physe-contrast imaging is investigated. Methods: We used a Talbot-Lau interferometer for our investigations of two C57BL/6 mice. Both underwent projection imaging and computed tomography. Results: The results show that the three images obtained by X-ray phase-contrast imaging show complementary ana...

  20. Glancing angle Talbot-Lau grating interferometers for phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Talbot-Lau interferometer is demonstrated using micro-periodic gratings inclined at a glancing angle along the light propagation direction. Due to the increase in the effective thickness of the absorption gratings, the device enables differential phase contrast imaging at high x-ray energy, with improved fringe visibility (contrast). For instance, at 28° glancing angle, we obtain up to ˜35% overall interferometer contrast with a spectrum having ˜43 keV mean energy, suitable for medical applications. In addition, glancing angle interferometers could provide high contrast at energies above 100 keV, enabling industrial and security applications of phase contrast imaging.

  1. Novel X-ray phase-contrast tomography method for quantitative studies of heat induced structural changes in meat

    Miklos, Rikke; Nielsen, Mikkel Schou; Einarsdottir, Hildur;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of X-ray phase-contrast tomography combined with 3D image segmentation to investigate the heat induced structural changes in meat. The measurements were performed at the Swiss synchrotron radiation light source using a grating interferometric...... separated into a water phase and a gel phase formed by the sarcoplasmic proteins in the exudate. The results show that X-ray phase contrast tomography offers unique possibilities in studies both the meat structure and the different meat component such as water, fat, connective tissue and myofibrils in a...

  2. Quantitative evaluation of single-shot inline phase contrast imaging using an inverse compton x-ray source

    Inverse compton scattering (ICS) x-ray sources are of current interest in biomedical imaging. We present an experimental demonstration of inline phase contrast imaging using a single picosecond pulse of the ICS source located at the BNL Accelerator Test Facility. The phase contrast effect is clearly observed. Its qualities are shown to be in agreement with the predictions of theoretical models through comparison of experimental and simulated images of a set of plastic wires of differing composition and size. Finally, we display an application of the technique to a biological sample, confirming the possibility of time-resolved imaging on the picosecond scale.

  3. Milestones and basic principles of grating-based x-ray and neutron phase-contrast imaging

    This is a review of the most important milestones in the last ten years of development in the field of grating-based x-ray and neutron imaging. It provides a description of the basic imaging principles of grating-based phase-contrast and dark-field radiography and present some exemplary multimodal radiography results obtained with x-rays and neutrons. Furthermore, it reviews the theory of grating-based quantitative transmission, phase-contrast, and dark-field scattering computed tomography.

  4. Representing Participation in ICT4D Projects

    Singh, J. P.; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    How do the discourses of participation inform deployment of information and communication technologies for development (ICT4D)? Discourses here mean narratives that assign roles to actors, and specify causes and outcomes for events. Based on the theory and practice of international development we...... identify two dimensions to participation and ICT4D: whether participation 1) is hierarchical/top-down or agent-driven/bottom-up, and 2) involves conflict or cooperation. Based on these dimensions we articulate four ideal types of discourse that permeate ICT and development efforts: stakeholder......-based discourses that emphasize consensus, networked efforts among actors collaborating in network arrangements, mobilization discourses that account for contestation over meanings of participation, and oppositional discourses from ׳grassroots׳ actors that also include conflict. We conclude that ICT4D efforts...

  5. 4D MR imaging using robust internal respiratory signal

    Hui, CheukKai; Wen, Zhifei; Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, R. H. N.; van den Berg, C. A. T.; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Beddar, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using internal respiratory (IR) surrogates to sort four-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance (MR) images. The 4D MR images were constructed by acquiring fast 2D cine MR images sequentially, with each slice scanned for more than one breathing cycle. The 4D volume was then sorted retrospectively using the IR signal. In this study, we propose to use multiple low-frequency components in the Fourier space as well as the anterior body boundary as potential IR surrogates. From these potential IR surrogates, we used a clustering algorithm to identify those that best represented the respiratory pattern to derive the IR signal. A study with healthy volunteers was performed to assess the feasibility of the proposed IR signal. We compared this proposed IR signal with the respiratory signal obtained using respiratory bellows. Overall, 99% of the IR signals matched the bellows signals. The average difference between the end inspiration times in the IR signal and bellows signal was 0.18 s in this cohort of matching signals. For the acquired images corresponding to the other 1% of non-matching signal pairs, the respiratory motion shown in the images was coherent with the respiratory phases determined by the IR signal, but not the bellows signal. This suggested that the IR signal determined by the proposed method could potentially correct the faulty bellows signal. The sorted 4D images showed minimal mismatched artefacts and potential clinical applicability. The proposed IR signal therefore provides a feasible alternative to effectively sort MR images in 4D.

  6. Cinema 4D R13 Cookbook

    Szabo, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This book contains short recipes designed to effectively teach tools in the minimum amount of time. Each recipe hits on a topic that can be combined or incorporated with other recipes to give you the building blocks you need to start making great designs with Cinema 4D. Rather than demonstrating how to make a few specific and extensive projects, the recipes create a solid base of knowledge to help the reader understand the tools available to foster their own creativity. This book is for anyone who wants to quickly get up to speed with Cinema 4D to create 3D projects that run laps around simple

  7. 4D, N = 1 Supersymmetry Genomics (I)

    Gates, S J; MacGregor, B; Parker, J; Polo-Sherk, R; Rodgers, V G J; Wassink, L

    2009-01-01

    Presented in this paper the nature of the supersymmetrical representation theory behind 4D, N = 1 theories, as described by component fields, is investigated using the tools of Adinkras and Garden Algebras. A survey of familiar matter multiplets using these techniques reveals they are described by two fundamental valise Adinkras that are given the names of the cis-Valise (c-V) and the trans-Valise (t-V). A conjecture is made that all off-shell 4D, N = 1 component descriptions of supermultiplets are associated with two integers - the numbers of c-V and t-V Adinkras that occur in the representation.

  8. X-ray phase contrast imaging of the breast: Analysis of tissue simulating materials

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Phase contrast imaging, particularly of the breast, is being actively investigated. The purpose of this work is to investigate the x-ray phase contrast properties of breast tissues and commonly used breast tissue substitutes or phantom materials with an aim of determining the phantom materials best representative of breast tissues. Methods: Elemental compositions of breast tissues including adipose, fibroglandular, and skin were used to determine the refractive index, n= 1 -{delta}+i {beta}. The real part of the refractive index, specifically the refractive index decrement ({delta}), over the energy range of 5-50 keV were determined using XOP software (version 2.3, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, France). Calcium oxalate and calcium hydroxyapatite were considered to represent the material compositions of microcalcifications in vivo. Nineteen tissue substitutes were considered as possible candidates to represent adipose tissue, fibroglandular tissue and skin, and four phantom materials were considered as possible candidates to represent microcalcifications. For each material, either the molecular formula, if available, or the elemental composition based on weight fraction, was used to determine {delta}. At each x-ray photon energy, the absolute percent difference in {delta} between the breast tissue and the substitute material was determined, from which three candidates were selected. From these candidate tissue substitutes, the material that minimized the absolute percent difference in linear attenuation coefficient {mu}, and hence {beta}, was considered to be best representative of that breast tissue. Results: Over the energy range of 5-50 keV, while the {delta} of CB3 and fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of that of fibroglandular tissue, the {mu} of fibroglandular tissue-equivalent material better approximated the fibroglandular tissue. While the {delta} of BR10 and adipose tissue-equivalent material were within 1% of

  9. Noise and analyzer-crystal angular position analysis for analyzer-based phase-contrast imaging

    The analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging (ABI) method is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. Like many of the modern imaging techniques, ABI is a computed imaging method (meaning that images are calculated from raw data). ABI can simultaneously generate a number of planar parametric images containing information about absorption, refraction, and scattering properties of an object. These images are estimated from raw data acquired by measuring (sampling) the angular intensity profile of the x-ray beam passed through the object at different angular positions of the analyzer crystal. The noise in the estimated ABI parametric images depends upon imaging conditions like the source intensity (flux), measurements angular positions, object properties, and the estimation method. In this paper, we use the Cramér–Rao lower bound (CRLB) to quantify the noise properties in parametric images and to investigate the effect of source intensity, different analyzer-crystal angular positions and object properties on this bound, assuming a fixed radiation dose delivered to an object. The CRLB is the minimum bound for the variance of an unbiased estimator and defines the best noise performance that one can obtain regardless of which estimation method is used to estimate ABI parametric images. The main result of this paper is that the variance (hence the noise) in parametric images is directly proportional to the source intensity and only a limited number of analyzer-crystal angular measurements (eleven for uniform and three for optimal non-uniform) are required to get the best parametric images. The following angular measurements only spread the total dose to the measurements without improving or worsening CRLB, but the added measurements may improve parametric images by reducing estimation bias. Next, using CRLB we evaluate the multiple-image radiography, diffraction enhanced imaging and scatter diffraction enhanced imaging estimation techniques

  10. Experimental and theoretical contributions to X-ray phase-contrast techniques for medical imaging

    Several X-ray phase-contrast techniques have recently been developed. Unlike conventional X-ray methods, which measure the absorption properties of the tissues, these techniques derive contrast also from the modulation of the phase produced by the sample. Since the phase shift can be significant even for small details characterized by weak or absent absorption, the achievable image contrast can be greatly increased, notably for the soft biological tissues. These methods are therefore very promising for applications in the medical domain. The aim of this work is to contribute to a deeper understanding of these techniques, in particular propagation-based imaging (PBI), analyzer-based imaging (ABI) and grating interferometry (GIFM), and to study their potential and the best practical implementation for medical imaging applications. An important part of this work is dedicated to the use of mathematical algorithms for the extraction, from the acquired images, of quantitative sample information (the absorption, refraction and scattering sample properties). In particular, five among the most known algorithms based on the geometrical optics approximation have been theoretically analysed and experimentally compared, in planar and tomographic modalities, by using geometrical phantoms and human bone-cartilage and breast samples. A semi-quantitative method for the acquisition and reconstruction of tomographic images in the ABI and GIFM techniques has also been proposed. The validity conditions are analyzed in detail and the method, enabling a considerable simplification of the imaging procedure, has been experimentally checked on phantoms and human samples. Finally, a theoretical and experimental comparison of the PBI, ABI and GIFM techniques is presented. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these techniques are discussed. The results obtained from this analysis can be very useful for determining the most adapted technique for a given application. (author)

  11. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio

    Gromann, Lukas B.; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  12. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 μm resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 μm period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at ∼25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a ∼2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  13. Talbot phase-contrast x-ray imaging for the small joints of the hand

    Stutman, Dan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Beck, Thomas J [Quantum Medical Metrics, 1450 South Rolling Road, Baltimore, MD 21227 (United States); Carrino, John A [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Bingham, Clifton O, E-mail: stutman@pha.jhu.edu [Divisions of Rheumatology and Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    A high-resolution radiographic method for soft tissues in the small joints of the hand would aid in the study and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), which often attacks these joints. Of particular interest would be imaging with <100 {mu}m resolution the joint cartilage, whose integrity is a main indicator of disease. Differential phase-contrast (DPC) or refraction-based x-ray imaging with Talbot grating interferometers could provide such a method, since it enhances soft tissue contrast and can be implemented with conventional x-ray tubes. A numerical joint phantom was first developed to assess the angular sensitivity and spectrum needed for a hand DPC system. The model predicts that, due to quite similar refraction indexes for joint soft tissues, the refraction effects are very small, requiring high angular resolution. To compare our model to experiment we built a high-resolution bench-top interferometer using 10 {mu}m period gratings, a W anode tube and a CCD-based detector. Imaging experiments on animal cartilage and on a human finger support the model predictions. For instance, the estimated difference between the index of refraction of cartilage and water is of only several percent at {approx}25 keV mean energy, comparable to that between the linear attenuation coefficients. The potential advantage of DPC imaging thus comes mainly from the edge enhancement at the soft tissue interfaces. Experiments using a cadaveric human finger are also qualitatively consistent with the joint model, showing that refraction contrast is dominated by tendon embedded in muscle, with the cartilage layer difficult to observe in our conditions. Nevertheless, the model predicts that a DPC radiographic system for the small hand joints of the hand could be feasible using a low energy quasi-monochromatic source, such as a K-edge filtered Rh or Mo tube, in conjunction with a {approx}2 m long 'symmetric' interferometer operated in a high Talbot order.

  14. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast breast images

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In x-ray breast imaging, the anatomical noise background of the breast has a significant impact on the detection of lesions and other features of interest. This anatomical noise is typically characterized by a parameter, β, which describes a power law dependence of anatomical noise on spatial frequency (the shape of the anatomical noise power spectrum). Large values of β have been shown to reduce human detection performance, and in conventional mammography typical values of β are around 3.2. Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) and the associated dark field imaging methods have received considerable attention as possible supplements to absorption imaging for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the impact of these additional contrast mechanisms on lesion detection is not yet well understood. In order to better understand the utility of these new methods, we measured the β indices for absorption, DPC, and dark field images in 15 cadaver breast specimens using a benchtop DPC imaging system. We found that the measured β value for absorption was consistent with the literature for mammographic acquisitions (β = 3.61±0.49), but that both DPC and dark field images had much lower values of β (β = 2.54±0.75 for DPC and β = 1.44±0.49 for dark field). In addition, visual inspection showed greatly reduced anatomical background in both DPC and dark field images. These promising results suggest that DPC and dark field imaging may help provide improved lesion detection in breast imaging, particularly for those patients with dense breasts, in whom anatomical noise is a major limiting factor in identifying malignancies.

  15. Triggering of leukocytes by phase contrast in imaging cytometry with scanning fluorescence microscope (SFM)

    Bocsi, József; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Marecka, Monika; Malkusch, Wolf; Tárnok, Attila

    2009-02-01

    Slide-based cytometry (SBC) leads to breakthrough in cytometry of cells in tissues, culture and suspension. Carl Zeiss Imaging Solutions' new automated SFM combines imaging with cytometry. A critical step in image analysis is selection of appropriate triggering signal to detect all objects. Without correct target cell definition analysis is hampered. DNA-staining is among the most common triggering signals. However, the majority of DNA-dyes yield massive spillover into other fluorescence channels limiting their application. By microscopy objects of >5μm diameter can be easily detected by phase-contrast signal (PCS) without any staining. Aim was to establish PCS - triggering for cell identification. Axio Imager.Z1 motorized SFM was used (high-resolution digital camera, AxioCam MRm; AxioVision software: automatic multi-channel scanning, analysis). Leukocytes were stained with FITC (CD4, CD8) and APC (CD3) labelled antibodies in combinations using whole blood method. Samples were scanned in three channels (PCS/FITC/APC). Exposition-times for PCS were set as low as possible; the detection efficiency was verified by fluorescence. CD45-stained leukocytes were counted and compared to the number of PCS detected events. Leukocyte subtyping was compared with other cytometers. In focus the PCS of cells showed ring-form that was not optimal for cell definition. Out of focus PCS allows more effective qualitative and quantitative cell analyses. PCS was an accurate triggering signal for leukocytes enabling cell counting and discrimination of leukocytes from platelets. Leukocyte subpopulation frequencies were comparable to those obtained by other cytometers. In conclusion PCS is a suitable trigger-signal not interfering with fluorescence detection.

  16. Phase contrast mammography with synchrotron radiation: physical aspects of the clinical trial

    Longo, R.; Abrami, A.; Arfelli, F.; Bregant, P.; Chenda, V.; Cova, M. A.; Dreossi, D.; de Guarrini, F.; Menk, R. H.; Quai, E.; Quaia, E.; Rokvic, T.; Tonutti, M.; Tromba, G.; Zanconati, F.; Castelli, E.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: The first clinical facility for synchrotron radiation (SR) mammography is now operative at the SYRMEP beamline of ELETTRA, the SR facility in Trieste, Italy. The mammographic facility and the preliminary results of the clinical trial are presented in this contribution. Method and Materials: The distance between the SR source and the patient is about 30 m; the main features of the X-ray beam are: monochromaticity at ~0.2% bandwith in the energy range 8-35 keV, photon flux of about 10 8 ph/(mm2 s) and dimensions of 21 cm x 3.5 mm at the compressed breast. An innovative dosimetric system allows the on-line dose control during the examination. The images are acquired by scanning the patient, in prone position, in front of the stationary laminar beam; the average scanning time is about 10 s. The detector is a screen film system; it is at ~2 m from the breast in order to fulfil the so-called Phase Contrast (PhC) requirements. The breast thickness and glandularity defines the optimal beam energy for each examination. The patients are enrolled by radiologists, after routine examinations, on the basis of BI-RADS classification, according the research program approved by the local Ethical Committee. Results: This communication concerns the first 9 patients underwent the SR PhC mammography; the images match the quality obtained in previous in vitro studies. With reference to conventional mammography the diagnostic quality of the radiological images is better, without increasing the delivered dose to the patient.

  17. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  18. Ascending colonic variceal bleeding: utility of phase-contrast MR portography in diagnosis and follow-up after treatment with TIPS and variceal embolization

    The authors describe the discovery of ascending colonic variceal veins via celiomesenteric diagnostic angiography following a bout of melena in a 44-year-old woman. Magnetic resonance imaging, including phase-contrast MR venography, allowed visualization of the portal and systemic veins immediately after the initial angiograms. The hemorrhagic episode did not resolve until after transjugular intrahepatic shunt insertion and selective variceal embolization through the shunt. At 1 week-, 3 months-, and 6 months post treatment, follow-up MR venography no longer revealed the presence of colonic varices. Colonoscopy at 6 months was normal and the patient did not have any further episodes of bleeding until a liver transplantation was performed after 9 months. (orig.)

  19. Constrained reconstructions for 4D intervention guidance

    Kuntz, J.; Flach, B.; Kueres, R.; Semmler, W.; Kachelrieß, M.; Bartling, S.

    2013-05-01

    Image-guided interventions are an increasingly important part of clinical minimally invasive procedures. However, up to now they cannot be performed under 4D (3D + time) guidance due to the exceedingly high x-ray dose. In this work we investigate the applicability of compressed sensing reconstructions for highly undersampled CT datasets combined with the incorporation of prior images in order to yield low dose 4D intervention guidance. We present a new reconstruction scheme prior image dynamic interventional CT (PrIDICT) that accounts for specific image features in intervention guidance and compare it to PICCS and ASD-POCS. The optimal parameters for the dose per projection and the numbers of projections per reconstruction are determined in phantom simulations and measurements. In vivo experiments in six pigs are performed in a cone-beam CT; measured doses are compared to current gold-standard intervention guidance represented by a clinical fluoroscopy system. Phantom studies show maximum image quality for identical overall doses in the range of 14 to 21 projections per reconstruction. In vivo studies reveal that interventional materials can be followed in 4D visualization and that PrIDICT, compared to PICCS and ASD-POCS, shows superior reconstruction results and fewer artifacts in the periphery with dose in the order of biplane fluoroscopy. These results suggest that 4D intervention guidance can be realized with today’s flat detector and gantry systems using the herein presented reconstruction scheme.

  20. USE OF IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE AND PHASE-CONTRAST MICROSCOPY FOR DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF 'GIARDIA' CYSTS IN WATER SAMPLES

    A method was developed in which indirect immunofluorescence and phase-contrast microscopy are used for rapid detection and identification of Giardia cysts in raw and finished water supplies. When anti-Giardia cyst antiserum and fluorescein conjugate were applied to known Giardia ...

  1. Matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast using binary phase for dynamic spot- and line patterns in biophotonics and structured lighting

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas; Palima, Darwin;

    2013-01-01

    This work discusses the use of matched filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) as an efficient and cost-effective beam shaper for applications such as in biophotonics, optical micromanipulation, microscopy and two-photon polymerization. The theoretical foundation of mGPC is described as a...

  2. In-line phase-contrast imaging with a laser-based hard x-ray source

    We demonstrate the feasibility of phase-contrast imaging with an ultrafast laser-based hard x-ray source. Hard x rays are generated during the interaction of a high-intensity femtosecond laser pulse (10 TW, 60 fs, 10 Hz) focused onto solid target in a very small spot (3 μm diam). Such a novel x-ray source has a number of advantages over other sources previously used for phase-contrast imaging: It is very compact and much cheaper than a synchrotron, it has higher power and better x-ray spectrum control than a microfocal x-ray tube, and it has much higher repetition rate than an x-pinch source. The Kα line at 17 keV produced using a solid Mo target, and the in-line imaging geometry have been utilized in this study. Phase-contrast images of test objects and biological samples have been realized. The characteristics of the images are the significant enhancement of interfaces due to an x-ray phase shift that reveal details that were hardly observable, or even undetectable, in absorption images and suppression of optically dense structures well defined in the absorption images. Our study indicates that the absorption and the phase-contrast images obtained with an ultrafast laser-based x-ray source provide complementary information about the imaged objects, thus enriching our arsenal of research tools for laboratory or clinic-based biomedical imaging

  3. Matched-filtering generalized phase contrast using LCoS pico-projectors for beam-forming

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    We report on a new beam-forming system for generating high intensity programmable optical spikes using so-called matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low-cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation...

  4. Direct signal-to-noise comparison of radiographic attenuation- and differential phase-contrast X-ray images

    For radiographic applications of X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging, like e.g. mammography, we present the Relative Contrast Gain (RCG) as a novel measure of the relative information content of attenuation- and differential phase-contrast (dpc) radiographs recorded with a grating-based Talbot interferometer. It is a fast and simple method to quantify the gain in soft-tissue contrast of the differential phase-contrast signal compared to the standard attenuation based radiograph. The RCG can also be used as a figure of merit to assess the quality of different experimental setups in terms of providing good feature visibility in soft-tissue samples in the presence of noise. A comparison of a differential signal to a non-differential signal is achieved by analysis of the calculated gradient of the attenuation signal. The Relative Contrast Gain analysis is applied on experimental absorption and phase-contrast projections obtained for human breast samples. The results show a good gain in feature contrast in the dpc signal compared to the attenuation signal as expected from theory.

  5. Study of phase contrast imaging for carbon fiber, polystyrene and lung tissue using monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray sources

    Phase contrast imaging is a new method of radiography in which the information of change in phase of the X-rays as it passes through the object gets reflected in the intensity. This leads to a better sensitivity and contrast than the conventional absorption radiography. In this paper we discuss the simulation studies of phase contrast imaging using monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray point source for simple two- and three-dimensional objects like circular and spherical objects (made up of carbon-fiber, polystyrene and lung tissue). The advantages of refraction contrast images are discussed in terms of contrast and resolution, and a comparison is made with absorption images. The result obtained shows considerable improvement in contrast with phase contrast imaging as compared to conventional absorption radiography. These results also guide us in proper selection of source to object distance, object to detector distance, etc. These results are proposed to be used in our experiment on phase contrast imaging with microfocus X-rays. The technique is going to be very useful in improving the resolution in the X-ray imaging for the composites, and in detection of cracks at micron level resolution. Moreover, if the doses can be controlled by proper selection of the detector or the source, it can have clinical application in the mammography

  6. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies.

  7. Estimation of age based on tooth cementum annulations: A comparative study using light, polarized, and phase contrast microscopy

    Kaur, Prabhpreet; Astekar, Madhusudan; Singh, Jappreet; Arora, Karandeep Singh; Bhalla, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    Context: The identification of living or deceased persons using unique traits and characteristics of the teeth and jaws is a cornerstone of forensic science. Teeth have been used to estimate age both in the young and old, as well as in the living and dead. Gradual structural changes in teeth throughout life are the basis for age estimation. Tooth cementum annulation (TCA) is a microscopic method for the determination of an individual's age based on the analysis of incremental lines of cementum. Aim: To compare ages estimated using incremental lines of cementum as visualized by bright field microscopy, polarized microscopy, and phase contrast microscopy with the actual age of subject and to determine accuracy and feasibility of the method used. Materials and Methods: Cementum annulations of 60 permanent teeth were analyzed after longitudinal ground sections were made in the mesiodistal plane. The incremental lines were counted manually using a light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy. Ages were estimated and then compared with the actual age of individual. Statistical Analysis: Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's t-test, the Pearson product-moment corre (PPMCC) and regression analysis were performed. Results: PPMCC value r = 0.347, 0.542 and 0.989 were obtained using light, polarized and phase contrast microscopy methods respectively. Conclusion: It was concluded that incremental lines of cementum were most clearly visible under a phase contrast microscope, followed by a polarized microscope, and then a light microscope when used for age estimation. PMID:26816462

  8. On the possibilities of x-ray phase contrast microimaging by coherent high-energy synchrotron radiation

    Coherent properties of the x-ray beam delivered at the ESRF allow the observation of very weak perturbations of the wave front, resulting in the phase contrast. A straightforward experimental setup for phase contrast imaging is proposed and used to record holographic images from organic samples of 10--100 μm at energy 10--50 keV with the contrast up to 50%--100%. The theory of phase contrast imaging is considered and some theoretical estimations are made to reveal the performance of the proposed technique in terms of resolution, sensitivity, geometrical requirements, and energy range applicability. It is found that for carbon-based fibers a detectable size with 2% contrast is 0.1 μm for 10 keV and -1 μm for 100 keV. It is demonstrated that the fine interference structure of the image is very sensitive to the shape, density variation, and internal structure of the sample. Some prospects for the practical use and future development of the new coherent techniques such as phase contrast microscopy, microtomography, holography, and interferometry at high energies are also discussed. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  9. Quantitative imaging of the microbubble concentrations by using an in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype: a preliminary phantom study

    Wu, Di; Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Li, Yuhua; Yang, Kai; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a high-energy in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis system to quantitatively imaging microbubbles in a tissue simulating phantom under a limited radiation dose. The imaging system used in the investigation was a bench top in-line phase contrast tomosynthesis prototype operated under 120 kVp tube voltage and 0.5 mA tube current. A prime beam filter made of 2.3 mm Cu, 0.8 mm Pb and 1.0 mm Al was employed to obtain as large as possible portion of x-ray photon energy higher than 60 keV. The tissue simulating phantom was built by three acrylic slabs and a wax slab to mimic a 40 mm thick compressed breast. There were two tiny-sized structures with average 1 mm depth engraved on the two different layers. The microbubble suspensions with different concentrations were injected into those tiny structures. The inline phase contrast angular projections acquired were used to reconstruct the in-plane slices of the tiny structures on different layers. The CNRs vs microbubble concentrations were investigated. As the result, the microbubble suspensions were clearly visible, showing higher CNR when compared with the areas with no microbubble. Furthermore, a monotonously increasing relation between CNRs and microbubble concentrations was observed after calculating the area CNR of the phase contrast tomosynthesis slices.

  10. Characterization of an x-ray phase contrast imaging system based on the miniature synchrotron MIRRORCLE-6X

    Purpose: The implementation of in-line x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) for soft-tissue patient imaging is hampered by the lack of a bright and spatially coherent x-ray source that fits into the hospital environment. This article provides a quantitative characterization of the phase-contrast enhancement of a PCI system based on the miniature synchrotron technology MIRRORCLE-6X. Methods: The phase-contrast effect was measured using an edge response of a plexiglass plate as a function of the incident angle of radiation. We have developed a comprehensive x-ray propagation model based on the system's components, properties, and geometry in order to interpret the measurement data. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the system's spectral properties and resolution. Results: The measured ratio of the detected phase-contrast to the absorption contrast is currently in the range 100% to 200%. Experiments show that with the current implementation of the MIRRORCLE-6X, a target smaller than 30-40 μm does not lead to a larger phase-contrast. The reason for this is that the fraction of x-rays produced by the material (carbon filament and glue) that is used for mounting the target in the electron beam is more than 25% of the total amount of x-rays produced. This increases the apparent source size. The measured phase-contrast is at maximum two times larger than the absorption contrast with the current set-up. Conclusions: Calculations based on our model of the present imaging system predict that the phase-contrast can be up to an order of magnitude larger than the absorption contrast in case the materials used for mounting the target in the electron beam do not (or hardly) produce x-rays. The methods described in this paper provide vital feedback for guiding future modifications to the design of the x-ray target of MIRRORCLE-type system and configuration of the in-line PCI systems in general.

  11. A grating-based single-shot x-ray phase contrast and diffraction method for in vivo imaging

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop a single-shot version of the grating-based phase contrast x-ray imaging method and demonstrate its capability of in vivo animal imaging. Here, the authors describe the principle and experimental results. They show the source of artifacts in the phase contrast signal and optimal designs that minimize them. They also discuss its current limitations and ways to overcome them. Methods: A single lead grid was inserted midway between an x-ray tube and an x-ray camera in the planar radiography setting. The grid acted as a transmission grating and cast periodic dark fringes on the camera. The camera had sufficient spatial resolution to resolve the fringes. Refraction and diffraction in the imaged object manifested as position shifts and amplitude attenuation of the fringes, respectively. In order to quantify these changes precisely without imposing a fixed geometric relationship between the camera pixel array and the fringes, a spatial harmonic method in the Fourier domain was developed. The level of the differential phase (refraction) contrast as a function of hardware specifications and device geometry was derived and used to guide the optimal placement of the grid and object. Both ex vivo and in vivo images of rodent extremities were collected to demonstrate the capability of the method. The exposure time using a 50 W tube was 28 s. Results: Differential phase contrast images of glass beads acquired at various grid and object positions confirmed theoretical predictions of how phase contrast and extraneous artifacts vary with the device geometry. In anesthetized rats, a single exposure yielded artifact-free images of absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction. Differential phase contrast was strongest at bone-soft tissue interfaces, while diffraction was strongest in bone. Conclusions: The spatial harmonic method allowed us to obtain absorption, differential phase contrast, and diffraction images, all from a

  12. Non-destructive characterisation of polymers and Al-alloys by polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography

    X-ray computed tomography (XCT) has become a very important tool for the non-destructive characterisation of materials. Continuous improvements in the quality and performance of X-ray tubes and detectors have led to cone-beam XCT systems that can now achieve spatial resolutions down to 1 μm and even below. Since not only the amplitude but also the phase of an X-ray beam is altered while passing through an object, phase contrast effects can occur even for polychromatic sources when the spatial coherence due to a small focal spot size is high enough. This can lead to significant improvements over conventional attenuation-based X-ray computed tomography. Phase contrast can increase by edge enhancement the visibility of small structures and of features which are only slightly different in attenuation. We report on the possibilities of polychromatic cone-beam phase contrast tomography for non-destructive characterisation of materials. A carbon fibre-reinforced polymer and the Al-alloys AlMg5Si7 and AlSi18 were investigated with high resolution cone-beam X-ray computed tomography with a polychromatic tube source. Under certain conditions strong phase contrast resulting in an upward and downward overshooting of the grey values across edges was observed. The phase effects are much stronger for the polymer than for the Al-alloys. The influence on the phase contrast of the parameters, including source-detector distance, focal spot size and tube acceleration voltage is presented. Maximum phase contrast was observed for a maximum distance between the source and the detector, for a low voltage and a minimum focal spot size at the X-ray source. The detectability of the different phases is improved by the edge enhancement and the resulting improvement of sharpness. Thus, a better segmentation of the carbon fibres in the fibre-reinforced polymer and of the Mg2Si-phase in the AlMg5Si7-alloy is achieved. Primary and eutectic Si cannot be detected by attenuation-based X-ray computed

  13. Investigation of the effect of tube voltage and imaging geometry on phase contrast imaging for a micro-CT system

    Based upon a bench-top micro-CT system, propagation-based phase-contrast imaging has been investigated using insects and a thin plastic sheet. The system mainly includes a micro-focus source with focal spot size of 13-20 μm and a cooled X-ray CCD detector with pixel size of 24 μm. The edge-enhancement effect can be found clearly in the acquired images. With a 0.5 mm thickness plastic edge phantom, the effects of X-ray tube voltage and imaging geometry on the phase-contrast imaging were investigated, and quantitative index, edge-enhancement index (EEI), were also calculated. In our study, an interesting phenomenon was observed that the phase-contrast effect becomes more pronounced as the tube voltage increases from 20 kVp to 90 kVp. Further investigation indicates that smaller focal spot size resulting from the reduction of tube current at higher tube voltage, has caused the unexpected phenomenon. Inferred from our results, phase-contrast effect is insensitive to the tube voltage in the range of 20-90 kVp (widely used in medical diagnosis); however, it is sensitive to the focal spot size. In addition, for the investigation of the effect of imaging geometry, an optimal geometric magnification range of 2.5-4.5 is suggested to get a good phase-contrast imaging for a micro-CT system with source-to-detector distance of 720 mm.

  14. Imaging liver lesions using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography with bi-lateral filter post-processing.

    Julia Herzen

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast imaging shows improved soft-tissue contrast compared to standard absorption-based X-ray imaging. Especially the grating-based method seems to be one promising candidate for clinical implementation due to its extendibility to standard laboratory X-ray sources. Therefore the purpose of our study was to evaluate the potential of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with a novel bi-lateral denoising method for imaging of focal liver lesions in an ex vivo feasibility study. Our study shows that grating-based phase-contrast CT (PCCT significantly increases the soft-tissue contrast in the ex vivo liver specimens. Combining the information of both signals--absorption and phase-contrast--the bi-lateral filtering leads to an improvement of lesion detectability and higher contrast-to-noise ratios. The normal and the pathological tissue can be clearly delineated and even internal structures of the pathological tissue can be visualized, being invisible in the absorption-based CT alone. Histopathology confirmed the presence of the corresponding findings in the analyzed tissue. The results give strong evidence for a sufficiently high contrast for different liver lesions using non-contrast-enhanced PCCT. Thus, ex vivo imaging of liver lesions is possible with a polychromatic X-ray source and at a spatial resolution of ∼100 µm. The post-processing with the novel bi-lateral denoising method improves the image quality by combining the information from the absorption and the phase-contrast images.

  15. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT

  16. Practical aspects of Boersch phase contrast electron microscopy of biological specimens

    Walter, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany); Muzik, Heiko; Vieker, Henning; Turchanin, Andrey; Beyer, Andre; Goelzhaeuser, Armin [University of Bielefeld, Physics of Supramolecular Systems and Surfaces, Universitaetsstr. 25, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Schmitz, Sam; Holik, Peter [Caesar Research Center, Ludwig-Erhard-Allee 2, D-53175 Bonn (Germany); Kuehlbrandt, Werner [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany); Rhinow, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.rhinow@biophys.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute of Biophysics, Department of Structural Biology, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, D-60439 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Implementation of physical phase plates into transmission electron microscopes to achieve in-focus contrast for ice-embedded biological specimens poses several technological challenges. During the last decade several phase plates designs have been introduced and tested for electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), including thin film (Zernike) phase plates and electrostatic devices. Boersch phase plates (BPPs) are electrostatic einzel lenses shifting the phase of the unscattered beam by an arbitrary angle. Adjusting the phase shift to 90 Degree-Sign achieves the maximum contrast transfer for phase objects such as biomolecules. Recently, we reported the implementation of a BPP into a dedicated phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) and demonstrated its use to generate in-focus contrast of frozen-hydrated specimens. However, a number of obstacles need to be overcome before BPPs can be used routinely, mostly related to the phase plate devices themselves. CryoEM with a physical phase plate is affected by electrostatic charging, obliteration of low spatial frequencies, and mechanical drift. Furthermore, BPPs introduce single sideband contrast (SSB), due to the obstruction of Friedel mates in the diffraction pattern. In this study we address the technical obstacles in detail and show how they may be overcome. We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to identify contaminants responsible for electrostatic charging, which occurs with most phase plates. We demonstrate that obstruction of low-resolution features is significantly reduced by lowering the acceleration voltage of the microscope. Finally, we present computational approaches to correct BPP images for SSB contrast and to compensate for mechanical drift of the BPP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Various obstacles need to be overcome before Boersch phase plates can be used routinely. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technical problems include

  17. Limited-angle tomography for analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging

    Majidi, Keivan; Wernick, Miles N.; Li, Jun; Muehleman, Carol; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2014-07-01

    Multiple-image radiography (MIR) is an analyzer-based phase-contrast x-ray imaging method, which is emerging as a potential alternative to conventional radiography. MIR simultaneously generates three planar parametric images containing information about scattering, refraction and attenuation properties of the object. The MIR planar images are linear tomographic projections of the corresponding object properties, which allows reconstruction of volumetric images using computed tomography (CT) methods. However, when acquiring a full range of linear projections around the tissue of interest is not feasible or the scanning time is limited, limited-angle tomography techniques can be used to reconstruct these volumetric images near the central plane, which is the plane that contains the pivot point of the tomographic movement. In this work, we use computer simulations to explore the applicability of limited-angle tomography to MIR. We also investigate the accuracy of reconstructions as a function of number of tomographic angles for a fixed total radiation exposure. We use this function to find an optimal range of angles over which data should be acquired for limited-angle tomography MIR (LAT-MIR). Next, we apply the LAT-MIR technique to experimentally acquired MIR projections obtained in a cadaveric human thumb study. We compare the reconstructed slices near the central plane to the same slices reconstructed by CT-MIR using the full angular view around the object. Finally, we perform a task-based evaluation of LAT-MIR performance for different numbers of angular views, and use template matching to detect cartilage in the refraction image near the central plane. We use the signal-to-noise ratio of this test as the detectability metric to investigate an optimum range of tomographic angles for detecting soft tissues in LAT-MIR. Both results show that there is an optimum range of angular view for data acquisition where LAT-MIR yields the best performance, comparable to CT

  18. Practical aspects of Boersch phase contrast electron microscopy of biological specimens

    Implementation of physical phase plates into transmission electron microscopes to achieve in-focus contrast for ice-embedded biological specimens poses several technological challenges. During the last decade several phase plates designs have been introduced and tested for electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), including thin film (Zernike) phase plates and electrostatic devices. Boersch phase plates (BPPs) are electrostatic einzel lenses shifting the phase of the unscattered beam by an arbitrary angle. Adjusting the phase shift to 90° achieves the maximum contrast transfer for phase objects such as biomolecules. Recently, we reported the implementation of a BPP into a dedicated phase contrast aberration-corrected electron microscope (PACEM) and demonstrated its use to generate in-focus contrast of frozen–hydrated specimens. However, a number of obstacles need to be overcome before BPPs can be used routinely, mostly related to the phase plate devices themselves. CryoEM with a physical phase plate is affected by electrostatic charging, obliteration of low spatial frequencies, and mechanical drift. Furthermore, BPPs introduce single sideband contrast (SSB), due to the obstruction of Friedel mates in the diffraction pattern. In this study we address the technical obstacles in detail and show how they may be overcome. We use X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to identify contaminants responsible for electrostatic charging, which occurs with most phase plates. We demonstrate that obstruction of low-resolution features is significantly reduced by lowering the acceleration voltage of the microscope. Finally, we present computational approaches to correct BPP images for SSB contrast and to compensate for mechanical drift of the BPP. -- Highlights: ► Various obstacles need to be overcome before Boersch phase plates can be used routinely. ► Technical problems include electrostatic charging, mechanical drift, and image artefacts.

  19. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  20. 4D, N=1 Supergravity Genomics

    Chappell, Isaac; Linch, William D; Parker, James; Randall, Stephen; Ridgway, Alexander; Stiffler, Kory

    2012-01-01

    The off-shell representation theory of 4D, $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supermultiplets can be categorized in terms of distinct irreducible graphical representations called adinkras. Recent evidence has emerged pointing to the existence of three such fundamental adinkras associated with distinct equivalence classes of a Coxeter group. A partial description of these adinkras is given in terms of two types, termed cis-and trans-adinkras (the latter being a degenerate doublet) in analogy to enantiomers in chemistry. Through a new and simple procedure that uses adinkras, we find the irreducible off-shell adinkra representations of 4D, $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supergravity, in the old-minimal, non-minimal, and conformal formulations. We categorize these representations in terms of their supersymmetry `enantiomer' numbers: the number of cis-($n_c$) and trans-($n_t$) adinkras in the representation.

  1. 4D, N=1 Supergravity Genomics

    Chappell, Isaac; Gates, Jr., S. James; Linch III, William D; Parker, James; Randall, Stephen; Ridgway, Alexander; Stiffler, Kory

    2012-01-01

    The off-shell representation theory of 4D, $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supermultiplets can be categorized in terms of distinct irreducible graphical representations called adinkras as part of a larger effort we call supersymmetry `genomics.' Recent evidence has emerged pointing to the existence of three such fundamental adinkras associated with distinct equivalence classes of a Coxeter group. A partial description of these adinkras is given in terms of two types, termed cis-and trans-adinkras (the latter...

  2. 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography

    An overview of the theory of 4D image reconstruction for emission tomography is given along with a review of the current state of the art, covering both positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). By viewing 4D image reconstruction as a matter of either linear or non-linear parameter estimation for a set of spatiotemporal functions chosen to approximately represent the radiotracer distribution, the areas of so-called ‘fully 4D’ image reconstruction and ‘direct kinetic parameter estimation’ are unified within a common framework. Many choices of linear and non-linear parameterization of these functions are considered (including the important case where the parameters have direct biological meaning), along with a review of the algorithms which are able to estimate these often non-linear parameters from emission tomography data. The other crucial components to image reconstruction (the objective function, the system model and the raw data format) are also covered, but in less detail due to the relatively straightforward extension from their corresponding components in conventional 3D image reconstruction. The key unifying concept is that maximum likelihood or maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of either linear or non-linear model parameters can be achieved in image space after carrying out a conventional expectation maximization (EM) update of the dynamic image series, using a Kullback-Leibler distance metric (comparing the modeled image values with the EM image values), to optimize the desired parameters. For MAP, an image-space penalty for regularization purposes is required. The benefits of 4D and direct reconstruction reported in the literature are reviewed, and furthermore demonstrated with simple simulation examples. It is clear that the future of reconstructing dynamic or functional emission tomography images, which often exhibit high levels of spatially correlated noise, should ideally exploit these 4D

  3. 4D Lung Reconstruction with Phase Optimization

    Lyksborg, Mark; Paulsen, Rasmus; Brink, Carsten;

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates and demonstrates a 4D lung CT reconstruction/registration method which results in a complete volumetric model of the lung that deforms according to a respiratory motion field. The motion field is estimated iteratively between all available slice samples and a reference...... than using an optimization which does not correct for phase errors. Knowing how the lung and any tumors located within the lung deforms is relevant in planning the treatment of lung cancer....

  4. Real-time phase-contrast flow MRI of haemodynamic changes in the ascending aorta and superior vena cava during Mueller manoeuvre

    Aim: To evaluate the potential of real-time phase-contrast flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 40 ms resolution for the simultaneous determination of blood flow in the ascending aorta (AA) and superior vena cava (SVC) in response to reduced intrathoracic pressure (Mueller manoeuvre). Materials and methods: Through-plane flow was assessed in 20 healthy young subjects using real-time phase-contrast MRI based on highly undersampled radial fast low-angle shot (FLASH) with image reconstruction by regularized non-linear inversion. Haemodynamic alterations (three repetitions per subject = 60 events) were evaluated during normal breathing (10 s), inhalation with nearly closed epiglottis (10 s), and recovery (20 s). Results: Relative to normal breathing and despite interindividual differences, reduced intrathoracic pressure by at least 30 mmHg significantly decreased the initial peak mean velocity (averaged across the lumen) in the AA by −24 ± 9% and increased the velocity in the SVC by +28 ± 25% (p < 0.0001, n = 23 successful events). Respective changes in flow volume per heartbeat were −25 ± 9% in the AA and +49 ± 44% in the SVC (p < 0.0001, n = 23). Flow parameters returned to baseline during sustained pressure reduction, while the heart rate was elevated by 10% (p < 0.0001) after the start (n = 24) and end (n = 17) of the manoeuvre. Conclusions: Real-time flow MRI during low intrathoracic pressure non-invasively revealed quantitative haemodynamic adjustments in both the AA and SVC. - Highlights: • Direct monitoring of rapid haemodynamic adjustments can be achieved using real-time phase contrast MRI. • This technique allows for the simultaneous measurement of blood flow in multiple vessels. • It may improve our understanding of the cardiovascular consequences of sleep apnoea

  5. BPS black holes in gauged N = 4, D = 4 supergravity

    We find solutions of the bosonic sector of gauged N = 4, D = 4 SU(2) x SU(2) supergravity, which represent dilaton black holes with toroidal or spherical event horizons. The axion is consistently truncated, and the gauge group is broken to U(1) x U(1). The spherical black holes carry two electric and two magnetic abelian charges, whereas the toroidal holes have vanishing magnetic charges. The space-time metrics are warped products, and the manifolds turn out to be globally hyperbolic, in contrast to standard gauged supergravity ground states. It is shown that in the toroidal case, there are solutions preserving one quarter or one half of the supersymmetries, while for spherical topologies all supersymmetries are broken. In general, the toroidal BPS states represent naked singularities, but there is also a supersymmetric black hole with vanishing Hawking temperature. The ((1)/(2)) supersymmetric case arises for vanishing charges and mass, and represents the known domain wall solution of the Freedman-Schwarz model. It provides the background in which the black holes live. Finally, we use Chamseddine's and Volkov's Kaluza-Klein interpretation of gauged N = 4, D = 4 SU(2) x SU(2) supergravity to lift our solutions to ten and eleven dimensions and to consider them as solutions to the leading order equations of motion of the string/M-theory effective action

  6. A LabVIEW based user-friendly X-ray phase-contrast imaging system software platform

    Wang, Shenghao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Marcelli, Augusto; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this manuscript, we introduce an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly system software platform dedicated for the newly built grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China. Unified management and control upon 21 motorized positioning stages, an ultra-precision piezoelectric translation stage and an X-ray tube are achieved with this platform, the software also covers automatic image acquisition with a flat panel detector for phase-stepping scanning. Moreover, data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features could be realized on it. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions into an organism, this software platform greatly facilitate activity of the users during experimen...

  7. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science. PMID:27003308

  8. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Marian Willner

    Full Text Available X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science.

  9. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science. PMID:27003308

  10. Limitations imposed by specimen phase gradients on the design of grating based x-ray phase contrast imaging systems

    X-ray phase contrast imaging is a very promising technique that may lead to significant advancements in a variety of fields, perhaps most notably, medical imaging. The radiation physics group at University College London is currently developing an x-ray phase contrast imaging technique that works with laboratory x-ray sources. This system essentially measures the degree to which photons are refracted by regions of an imaged object. The amount of refraction that may be expected to be encountered in practice impacts strongly upon the design of the imaging system. In this paper, we derive an approximate expression between the properties of archetypal imaged objects encountered in practice and the resulting distribution of refracted photons. This is used to derive constraints governing the design of the system.

  11. Reconstruction method for grating-based x-ray phase-contrast images without knowledge of the grating positions

    To retrieve the phase information of x-rays using a Talbot-Lau interferometer, the knowledge of the grating positions is mandatory. Transferring the interferometer technique from the laboratory to a conventional x-ray imaging system, this requirement is no longer guaranteed. This is due to distortions and vibrations which are coupled into the interferometer. Therefore, we applied a principal-component analysis to Talbot-Lau x-ray phase-contrast data. In experiments we compared this alternative approach for image reconstruction to the conventional procedure. As a result, a superior robustness of the principal-component analysis against imperfect phase-stepping data was found. Furthermore, using the proposed method, the reconstruction of x-ray phase-contrast images from randomly distributed phase-step positions is possible

  12. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    Yue Weisheng [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang Guilin [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: glzhang@sinap.ac.cn; Liu Ping; Sun Jianqi [Key Laboratory of Systems Biomedicine, Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Hwu Yeukuang [Institute of Physics, Acamemia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei (China); Je, Jung Ho [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Tan Mingguang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Li Yan [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: liyan@sinap.ac.cn

    2007-09-15

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM{sub 2.5}, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM{sub 2.5} samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM{sub 2.5} samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  13. Aerosol-induced lung injuries observed by synchrotron radiation X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique

    Yue, Weisheng; Zhang, Guilin; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Hwu, Yeukuang; Je, Jung Ho; Tan, Mingguang; Li, Yan

    2007-09-01

    Adverse health effects are associated with the inhalation of a variety of atmospheric particles. To study the lung injuries caused by aerosol PM2.5, synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique was used. Nude mice were inoculated with PM2.5 samples collected from suburban area (JD), industrial area (BS) and traffic tunnel (DPQ) of Shanghai. From X-ray phase-contrast images of lung tissues, apart from blood vessels and structures of alveoli, even hemorrhage spots of several microns caused by the inflammation were clearly observed. The studies showed that the PM2.5 samples collected from the traffic tunnel (DPQ) produced higher level of lung injury, followed by the aerosol samples collected from industrial area (BS) and suburban area (JD). Our studies also helped us to understand the process of lung injuries caused by aerosol particles.

  14. Development of Scanning-Imaging X-Ray Microscope for Quantitative Three-Dimensional Phase Contrast Microimaging

    A novel x-ray microscope system has been developed for the purpose of quantitative and sensitive three-dimensional (3D) phase-contrast x-ray microimaging. The optical system is a hybrid that consists of a scanning microscope optics with a one-dimensional (1D) focusing (line-focusing) device and an imaging microscope optics with a 1D objective. These two optics are orthogonally arranged regarding their common optical axis. Each is used for forming each dimension of two-dimensional (2D) image. The same data acquisition process as that of the scanning microscope system enables quantitative and sensitive x-ray imaging such as phase contrast and absorption contrast. Because a 2D image is measured with only 1D translation scan, much shorter measurement time than that of conventional scanning optics has been realized. By combining a computed tomography (CT) technique, some 3D CT application examples are demonstrated

  15. Propagation based differential phase contrast imaging and tomography of murine tissue with a laser plasma x-ray source

    An ultrafast, laser-driven x-ray source with a liquid mercury target has been used for phase contrast imaging of an excised murine liver and for computed tomography of an electronic component. The x-ray spectrum emitted at 5 kHz repetition rate is found to be similar to that of a 2.5 W, 30 kV microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten anode. The images of the excised liver show the venous network with approximately 20 μm spatial resolution. Phase contrast features in the tomographic images of the electronic component, transferred to the orthogonal cross sections upon reconstruction, show the internal components of the device with high contrast. Adequate signal-to-noise ratios in the images were achieved with exposure times between 1 and 3 min

  16. Use of immunofluorescence and phase-contrast microscopy for detection and identification of Giardia cysts in water samples.

    Sauch, J F

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed in which indirect immunofluorescence and phase-contrast microscopy are used for rapid detection and identification of Giardia cysts in raw and finished water supplies. When anti-Giardia cyst antiserum and fluorescein conjugate were applied to known Giardia cysts on membrane filters, the cysts fluoresced bright green when they were illuminated by UV light. This procedure permitted individual cysts to be quickly located even in samples heavily contaminated with other micr...

  17. Laboratory implementation of edge illumination X-ray phase-contrast imaging with energy-resolved detectors

    Diemoz, P. C.; M. Endrizzi; Vittoria, F. A.; Hagen, C. K.; Kallon, G.; Basta, D; Marenzana, M.; Delogu, P.; Vincenzi, A.; De Ruvo, L.; Spandre, G.; Brez, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Olivo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Edge illumination (EI) X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) has potential for applications in different fields of research, including materials science, non-destructive industrial testing, small-animal imaging, and medical imaging. One of its main advantages is the compatibility with laboratory equipment, in particular with conventional non-microfocal sources, which makes its exploitation in normal research laboratories possible. In this work, we demonstrate that the signal in laboratory imple...

  18. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combi...

  19. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    Allner, S; Koehler, T; Fehringer, A; Birnbacher, L; Willner, M; Pfeiffer, F; Noël, P B

    2016-05-21

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields. PMID:27100408

  20. Imaging of Poly(α-hydroxy-ester) Scaffolds with X-ray Phase-Contrast Microcomputed Tomography

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Somo, Sami; Zhong, Zhong; Spicer, Patrick P.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Garson, Alfred B.; Zysk, Adam M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Anastasio, Mark A.; Eric M Brey

    2012-01-01

    Porous scaffolds based on poly(α-hydroxy-esters) are under investigation in many tissue engineering applications. A biological response to these materials is driven, in part, by their three-dimensional (3D) structure. The ability to evaluate quantitatively the material structure in tissue-engineering applications is important for the continued development of these polymer-based approaches. X-ray imaging techniques based on phase contrast (PC) have shown a tremendous promise for a number of bi...

  1. Cone-beam x-ray phase contrast tomography of biological samples; Optimization of contrast, resolution and field of view

    Bartels, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional information of entire objects can be obtained by the remarkable technique of computed tomography (CT). In combination with phase sensitive X-ray imaging high contrast for soft tissue structures can be achieved as opposed to CT based on classical radiography. In this work biological samples ranging from micrometer sized single cells over multi-cellular nerve tissue to entire millimeter sized organs are investigated by use of cone-beam propagationbased X-ray phase contrast. Op...

  2. Phase contrast medical imaging with compact X-ray sources at the Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics (MAP)

    Coan, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany)], E-mail: paola.coan@esrf.fr; Gruener, F. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Garching (Germany); Glaser, C.; Schneider, T. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Institut of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Bravin, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Reiser, M. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Institut of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Munich (Germany); Habs, D. [Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munich, Garching (Germany)

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, the excellence cluster 'Munich-Centre for Advance Photonics' (MAP) is presented. One of the aims of the project is the development of innovative X-ray-based diagnostics imaging techniques to be implemented at an ultra-compact high-energy and high-brilliance X-ray source. The basis of the project and the developments towards the clinical application of phase contrast imaging applied to mammography and cartilage studies will be presented and discussed.

  3. Phase-contrast computed tomography for quantification of structural changes in lungs of asthma mouse models of different severity

    Dullin, Christian, E-mail: christian.dullin@med.uni-goettingen.de [University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Larsson, Emanuel [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza (Trieste) 34149 (Italy); University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Tromba, Giuliana [Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza (Trieste) 34149 (Italy); Markus, Andrea M. [University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Alves, Frauke [University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); University Medical Center Goettingen, Robert Koch Strasse 40, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany); Max Planck Institut for Experimental Medicine, Hermann-Rein-Strasse 3, Goettingen, Lower Saxony 37075 (Germany)

    2015-06-17

    Synchrotron inline phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with single-distance phase retrieval enables quantification of morphological alterations in lungs of mice with mild and severe experimental allergic airways disease in comparison with healthy controls. Lung imaging in mouse disease models is crucial for the assessment of the severity of airway disease but remains challenging due to the small size and the high porosity of the organ. Synchrotron inline free-propagation phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) with its intrinsic high soft-tissue contrast provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to analyse the mouse lung structure in great detail. Here, this technique has been applied in combination with single-distance phase retrieval to quantify alterations of the lung structure in experimental asthma mouse models of different severity. In order to mimic an in vivo situation as close as possible, the lungs were inflated with air at a constant physiological pressure. Entire mice were embedded in agarose gel and imaged using inline free-propagation phase-contrast CT at the SYRMEP beamline (Synchrotron Light Source, ‘Elettra’, Trieste, Italy). The quantification of the obtained phase-contrast CT data sets revealed an increasing lung soft-tissue content in mice correlating with the degree of the severity of experimental allergic airways disease. In this way, it was possible to successfully discriminate between healthy controls and mice with either mild or severe allergic airway disease. It is believed that this approach may have the potential to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies that target airway remodelling processes in asthma.

  4. Increasing the field of view of x-ray phase contrast imaging using stitched gratings on low absorbent carriers

    Meiser, J.; Amberger, M.; Willner, M.; Kunka, D.; Meyer, P.; Koch, F.; Hipp, A.; Walter, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Mohr, J.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging has become a promising biomedical imaging technique for enhancing soft-tissue contrast. In addition to an absorption contrast image it provides two more types of image, a phase contrast and a small-angle scattering contrast image recorded at the same time. In biomedical imaging their combination allows for the conventional investigation of e.g. bone fractures on the one hand and for soft-tissue investigation like cancer detection on the other hand. Among the different methods of X-ray phase contrast imaging the grating based approach, the Talbot-Lau interferometry, has the highest potential for commercial use in biomedical imaging at the moment, because commercially available X-ray sources can be used in a compact setup. In Talbot-Lau interferometers, core elements are phase and absorption gratings with challenging specifications because of their high aspect ratios (structure height over width). For the long grating lamellas structural heights of more than 100 μm together with structural width in the micron range are requested. We are developing a fabrication process based on deep x-ray lithography and electroforming (LIGA) to fabricate these challenging structures. In case of LIGA gratings the structural area is currently limited to several centimeters by several centimeters which limit the field of view in grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging. In order to increase the grating area significantly we are developing a stitching method for gratings using a 625 μm thick silicon wafer as a carrier substrate. In this work we compare the silicon carrier with an alternative one, polyimide, for patient dose reduction and for the use at lower energies in terms of transmission and image reconstruction problems.

  5. Application of X-ray phase-contrast tomography in quantative studies of heat induced structural changes in meat

    Miklos, R.; Nielsen, M. S.; Einarsdottir, Hildur;

    2013-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography is increasingly used in the studies of food structure. This paper describes the perspectives of use of phase contrast computed tomography in studies of heat induced structural changes in meat. From the data it was possible to obtain reconstructed images of the sample...... structure for visualization and qualitative studies of the sample structure. Further data segmentation allowed structural changes to be quantified....

  6. Simulation study of spatial resolution in phase-contrast X-ray imaging with Takagi-Taupin equation

    Koyama, I

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate attainable spatial resolution of phase-contrast X-ray imaging using an LLL X-ray interferometer with a thin crystal wafer, a computer simulation study with Takagi-Taupin equation was performed. Modulation transfer function of the wafer for X-ray phase was evaluated. For a polyester film whose thickness is 0.1 mm, it was concluded that the spatial resolution can be improved up to 3 mu m by thinning the wafer, under our experimental condition.

  7. Phase-contrast computed tomography for quantification of structural changes in lungs of asthma mouse models of different severity

    Synchrotron inline phase-contrast computed tomography in combination with single-distance phase retrieval enables quantification of morphological alterations in lungs of mice with mild and severe experimental allergic airways disease in comparison with healthy controls. Lung imaging in mouse disease models is crucial for the assessment of the severity of airway disease but remains challenging due to the small size and the high porosity of the organ. Synchrotron inline free-propagation phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) with its intrinsic high soft-tissue contrast provides the necessary sensitivity and spatial resolution to analyse the mouse lung structure in great detail. Here, this technique has been applied in combination with single-distance phase retrieval to quantify alterations of the lung structure in experimental asthma mouse models of different severity. In order to mimic an in vivo situation as close as possible, the lungs were inflated with air at a constant physiological pressure. Entire mice were embedded in agarose gel and imaged using inline free-propagation phase-contrast CT at the SYRMEP beamline (Synchrotron Light Source, ‘Elettra’, Trieste, Italy). The quantification of the obtained phase-contrast CT data sets revealed an increasing lung soft-tissue content in mice correlating with the degree of the severity of experimental allergic airways disease. In this way, it was possible to successfully discriminate between healthy controls and mice with either mild or severe allergic airway disease. It is believed that this approach may have the potential to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutic strategies that target airway remodelling processes in asthma

  8. Ideal-observer detectability in photon-counting differential phase-contrast imaging using a linear-systems approach

    Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats; Stayman, J. Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Åslund, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a cascaded-systems framework based on the noise-power spectrum (NPS), modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) for quantitative evaluation of differential phase-contrast imaging (Talbot interferometry) in relation to conventional absorption contrast under equal-dose, equal-geometry, and, to some extent, equal-photon-economy constraints. The focus is a geometry for photon-counting mammography.

  9. Quantitative measurement of total cerebral blood flow using 2D phase-contrast MRI and doppler ultrasound

    To compare of quantitative measurement of the total cerebral blood flow using two-dimensional phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound. In 16 volunteers (mean age, 26 years; mean body weight, 66 kg) without abnormal medical histories, two-dimensional phase-contrast MR imaging was performed at the level of the C2-3 inter vertebral disc for flow measurement of the internal carotid arteries and the vertebral arteries. Volume flow measurements using Doppler ultrasound were also performed at the internal carotid arteries 2cm above the carotid bifurcation, and at the vertebral arteries at the level of the upper pole of the thyroid gland. Flows in the four vessels measured by the two methods were compared using Wilcoxon's correlation analysis and the median score. Total cerebral blood flows were calculated by summing these four vessel flows, and mean values for the 16 volunteers were calculated. Cerebral blood flows measured by 2-D phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasounds were 233 and 239 ml/min in the right internal carotid artery, 250 and 248 ml/min in the left internal carotid artery, 62 and 56 ml/min in the right vertebral artery, and 83 and 68 ml/min in the left vertebral artery. Correlation coefficients of the blood flows determined by the two methods were 0.48, 0.54, 0.49, and 0.62 in each vessel, while total cerebral blood flows were 628±68 (range, 517 to 779) ml/min and 612±79 (range, 482 to 804)ml/min, respectively. Total cerebral blood flow was easily measured using 2-D phase-contrast MR imaging and Doppler ultrasound, and the two noninvasive methods can therefore be used clinically for the measurement of total cerebral blood flow

  10. Instability of Solution of Phase Retrieval in Direct Diffraction Phase-Contrast Imaging with Partially Coherent X-Ray Source

    GUO Hua; HAN Shen-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The theoretical model of direct diffraction phase-contrast imaging with partially coherent x-ray source is expressedby an operator of multiple integral. It is presented that the integral operator is linear. The problem of its phaseretrieval is described by solving an operator equation of multiple integral. It is demonstrated that the solution ofthe phase retrieval is unstable. The numerical simulation is performed and the result validates that the solutionof the phase retrieval is unstable.

  11. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    Allner, S.; Koehler, T.; Fehringer, A.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  12. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested

  13. Single shot x-ray phase contrast imaging using a direct conversion microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity

    Kagias, M.; Cartier, S.; Wang, Z.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dinapoli, R.; Mozzanica, A.; Schmitt, B.; Stampanoni, M.

    2016-06-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging enables the measurement of the electron density of a sample with high sensitivity compared to the conventional absorption contrast. This is advantageous for the study of dose-sensitive samples, in particular, for biological and medical investigations. Recent developments relaxed the requirement for the beam coherence, such that conventional X-ray sources can be used for phase contrast imaging and thus clinical applications become possible. One of the prominent phase contrast imaging methods, Talbot-Lau grating interferometry, is limited by the manufacturing, alignment, and photon absorption of the analyzer grating, which is placed in the beam path in front of the detector. We propose an alternative improved method based on direct conversion charge integrating detectors, which enables a grating interferometer to be operated without an analyzer grating. Algorithms are introduced, which resolve interference fringes with a periodicity of 4.7 μm recorded with a 25 μm pitch Si microstrip detector (GOTTHARD). The feasibility of the proposed approach is demonstrated by an experiment at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source on a polyethylene sample.

  14. A user-friendly LabVIEW software platform for grating based X-ray phase-contrast imaging.

    Wang, Shenghao; Han, Huajie; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Wu, Zhao; Wu, Ziyu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide greatly improved contrast over conventional absorption-based imaging for weakly absorbing samples, such as biological soft tissues and fibre composites. In this study, we introduced an easy and fast way to develop a user-friendly software platform dedicated to the new grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging setup at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of the University of Science and Technology of China. The control of 21 motorized stages, of a piezoelectric stage and of an X-ray tube are achieved with this software, it also covers image acquisition with a flat panel detector for automatic phase stepping scan. Moreover, a data post-processing module for signals retrieval and other custom features are in principle available. With a seamless integration of all the necessary functions in one software package, this platform greatly facilitate users' activities during experimental runs with this grating based X-ray phase contrast imaging setup. PMID:25882730

  15. A new method for information retrieval in two-dimensional grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be an extremely powerful phase-sensitive imaging technique. By using two-dimensional (2D) gratings, the observable contrast is extended to two refraction directions. Recently, we have developed a novel reverse-projection (RP) method, which is capable of retrieving the object information efficiently with one-dimensional (1D) grating-based phase contrast imaging. In this contribution, we present its extension to the 2D grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging, named the two-dimensional reverse-projection (2D-RP) method, for information retrieval. The method takes into account the nonlinear contributions of two refraction directions and allows the retrieval of the absorption, the horizontal and the vertical refraction images. The obtained information can be used for the reconstruction of the three-dimensional phase gradient field, and for an improved phase map retrieval and reconstruction. Numerical experiments are carried out, and the results confirm the validity of the 2D-RP method

  16. Efficient phase contrast imaging in STEM using a pixelated detector. Part 1: Experimental demonstration at atomic resolution

    Pennycook, Timothy J., E-mail: tpennycook@gmail.com [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Lupini, Andrew R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Yang, Hao [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Murfitt, Matthew F. [Nion Co., 1102 8th St., Kirkland, WA 98033 (United States); Jones, Lewys [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D. [EPSRC SuperSTEM Facility, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    We demonstrate a method to achieve high efficiency phase contrast imaging in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with a pixelated detector. The pixelated detector is used to record the Ronchigram as a function of probe position which is then analyzed with ptychography. Ptychography has previously been used to provide super-resolution beyond the diffraction limit of the optics, alongside numerically correcting for spherical aberration. Here we rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations, but use the pixelated detector data set to utilize the largest possible volume of Fourier space to create high efficiency phase contrast images. The use of ptychography to diagnose the effects of chromatic aberration is also demonstrated. Finally, the four dimensional dataset is used to compare different bright field detector configurations from the same scan for a sample of bilayer graphene. Our method of high efficiency ptychography produces the clearest images, while annular bright field produces almost no contrast for an in-focus aberration-corrected probe. - Highlights: • Ptychographic high efficiency phase contrast imaging is demonstrated in STEM. • We rely on a hardware aberration corrector to eliminate aberrations. • High efficiency is achieved by collecting all the relevant interference. • Use of a pixelated detector allows comparison of bright field modes post acquisition. • Ptychography provides the clearest images among the STEM bright field modes tested.

  17. Investigation of the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based phase-contrast imaging

    Weber, Thomas; Haas, Wilhelm; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Wucherer, Lukas; Braun, Jan Matthias; Durst, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging is a promising modality increasing the soft tissue contrast in medical imaging. In this work, the signature of lung tissue in X-ray grating-based physe-contrast imaging is investigated. Methods: We used a Talbot-Lau interferometer for our investigations of two C57BL/6 mice. Both underwent projection imaging and computed tomography. Results: The results show that the three images obtained by X-ray phase-contrast imaging show complementary anatomical structures. Especially the dark field image allows a more-exact determination of the position of the lung in the chest cavity. Conclusion: Due to its sensitivity to granular structures, the dark field image may be used for the diagnosis of lung diseases in earlier stages or without a CT scan. Furthermore, X-ray phase-contrast imaging may also have great potential in the application of animal laboratory sciences to reduce the number of required animals used in long-term translational, toxicity, and regenerative med...

  18. A new method for information retrieval in two-dimensional grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging

    Wang Zhi-Li; Gao Kun; Chen Jian; Ge Xin; Zhu Pei-Ping; Tian Yang-Chao; Wu Zi-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging has been demonstrated to be an extremely powerful phase-sensitive imaging technique.By using two-dimensional (2D) gratings,the observable contrast is extended to two refraction directions.Recently,we have developed a novel reverse-projection (RP) method,which is capable of retrieving the object information efficiently with one-dimensional (1D) grating-based phase contrast imaging.In this contribution,we present its extension to the 2D grating-based X-ray phase contrast imaging,named the two-dimensional reverseprojection (2D-RP) method,for information retrieval.The method takes into account the nonlinear contributions of two refraction directions and allows the retrieval of the absorption,the horizontal and the vertical refraction images.The obtained information can be used for the reconstruction of the three-dimensional phase gradient field,and for an improved phase map retrieval and reconstruction.Numerical experiments are carried out,and the results confirm the validity of the 2D-RP method.

  19. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G, E-mail: rainer.raupach@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, H IM CT R and D PA, Siemensstrasse 1, D-91301 Forchheim (Germany)

    2011-04-07

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  20. Cinema 4D R14 cookbook

    Russell, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This book is written in a Cookbook style with short recipes designed to effectively teach tools in the minimum amount of time. Each recipe hits on a topic that can be combined or incorporated with other recipes to give you the building blocks you need to start making great designs with Cinema 4D. Rather than demonstrating how to make a few specific and extensive projects, the recipes create a solid base of knowledge to help the reader understand the tools available to foster their own creativity.This book is for professional artists working in architecture, design, production, or games and wan