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  1. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT: a comparison of QGS, ECToolbox and 4D-MSPECT

    Objective: The three commercially available gated SPECT software: quantitative gated SPECT (QGS), emory cardiac toolbox (ECToolbox), and four-dimensional model SPECT (4D-MSPECT) were compared in the calculation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), end-diastolic volume (EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV). Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease were examined using gated 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT. QGS, ECToolbox and 4D-MSPECT were used for the estimation of LVEF, EDV, ESV. One hundred and six of the 212 patients underwent left ventriculography within one month of SPECT. Results: Correlation between the methods were excellent for LVEF, EDV and ESV, the correlation coefficients among the 3 software were 0.89-0.91 for LVEF (P< 0.001), and 0.97-0.98 for EDV and ESV (P<0.001). For LVEF and EDV, significant differences were noticed among the 3 methods (P<0.001). The values of 4D-MSPECT [LVEF:(64.2±12.6)%, EDV: (98.1±39.5) ml] were significantly lower than that of ECToolbox [LVEF: (68.3±12.8)%, EDV: (108.2 ± 39.0) ml]; likewise, the values of QGS [LVEF: (59.2 ± 11.4)%, EDV: (88.8 ± 35.5) ml] were lower than that of 4D-MSPECT. For ESV, there was no significant differences among QGS [(39.0 ± 27.0) ml], ECToolbox[(37.9 ± 31.4) ml] and 4D-MSPECT[(38.7 ± 31.3) ml, P=0.92]. Good correlation existed between results of gated SPECT and left ventriculography for LVEF, EDV and ESV, r=0.70-0.80 for LVEF(P<0.001), 0.57-0.61 for EDV(P<0.001) and 0.87-0.89 for ESV (P<0.001). Conclusion: All 3 programs showed good correlation among one another, and between ventriculography. (authors)

  2. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPECT: validation of an elastic surface model approach in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, 4D-MSPECT and QGS

    The segmentation algorithm ESM based on an elastic surface model was validated for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Additionally, it was compared with the commercially available quantification packages 4D-MSPECT and QGS. Cardiac MRI was used as the reference method. SPECT and MRI were performed on 70 consecutive patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease. End-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were derived from SPECT studies by using the segmentation algorithms ESM, 4D-MSPECT and QGS and from cardiac MRI. ESM-derived values for EDV and ESV correlated well with those from cardiac MRI (correlation coefficients R = 0.90 and R = 0.95, respectively), as did the measurements for LVEF (R = 0.86). Both EDV and ESV were slightly overestimated for larger ventricles but not for smaller ventricles; LVEF was slightly overestimated irrespective of ventricle size. The above correlation coefficients are comparable to those for the 4D-MSPECT and QGS segmentation algorithms. However, results obtained with the three segmentation algorithms are not interchangeable. The ESM algorithm can be used to assess EDV, ESV and LVEF from gated perfusion SPECT images. Overall, the performance was similar to that of 4D-MSPECT and QGS when compared with cardiac MRI. Results obtained with the three tested segmentation methods are not interchangeable, so that the same algorithm should be used for follow-up studies and control subjects. (orig.)

  3. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT: validation of an elastic surface model approach in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, 4D-MSPECT and QGS

    Stegger, Lars; Kies, Peter; Schober, Otmar; Schaefers, Michael [University Hospital, Westfaelische Wilhelms-University Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Lipke, Claudia S.A.; Nowak, Bernd; Buell, Udalrich; Schaefer, Wolfgang M. [University Hospital,Aachen University of Technology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2007-06-15

    The segmentation algorithm ESM based on an elastic surface model was validated for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Additionally, it was compared with the commercially available quantification packages 4D-MSPECT and QGS. Cardiac MRI was used as the reference method. SPECT and MRI were performed on 70 consecutive patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease. End-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) volumes and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were derived from SPECT studies by using the segmentation algorithms ESM, 4D-MSPECT and QGS and from cardiac MRI. ESM-derived values for EDV and ESV correlated well with those from cardiac MRI (correlation coefficients R = 0.90 and R = 0.95, respectively), as did the measurements for LVEF (R = 0.86). Both EDV and ESV were slightly overestimated for larger ventricles but not for smaller ventricles; LVEF was slightly overestimated irrespective of ventricle size. The above correlation coefficients are comparable to those for the 4D-MSPECT and QGS segmentation algorithms. However, results obtained with the three segmentation algorithms are not interchangeable. The ESM algorithm can be used to assess EDV, ESV and LVEF from gated perfusion SPECT images. Overall, the performance was similar to that of 4D-MSPECT and QGS when compared with cardiac MRI. Results obtained with the three tested segmentation methods are not interchangeable, so that the same algorithm should be used for follow-up studies and control subjects. (orig.)

  4. Validation of 4D-MSPECT and QGS for quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET: comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    The main aim of this study was to validate the accuracy of 4D-MSPECT in the assessment of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic/end-systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) from gated technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile single-photon emission tomography (99mTc-MIBI SPET), using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) as the reference method. By further comparing 4D-MSPECT and QGS with cMRI, the software-specific characteristics were analysed to elucidate clinical applicability. Fifty-four patients with suspected or proven coronary artery disease (CAD) were examined with gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET (8 gates/cardiac cycle) about 60 min after tracer injection at rest. LV EDV, ESV and LVEF were calculated from gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET using 4D-MSPECT and QGS. On the same day, cMRI (20 gates/cardiac cycle) was performed, with LV EDV, ESV and LVEF calculated using Simpson's rule. Both algorithms worked with all data sets. Correlation between the results of gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET and cMRI was high for EDV [R=0.89 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.92 (QGS)], ESV [R=0.96 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.96 (QGS)] and LVEF [R=0.89 (4D-MSPECT), R=0.90 (QGS)]. In contrast to ESV, EDV was significantly underestimated by 4D-MSPECT and QGS compared to cMRI [130±45 ml (4D-MSPECT), 122±41 ml (QGS), 139±36 ml (cMRI)]. For LVEF, 4D-MSPECT and cMRI revealed no significant differences, whereas QGS yielded significantly lower values than cMRI [57.5%±13.7% (4D-MSPECT), 52.2%±12.4% (QGS), 60.0%±15.8% (cMRI)]. In conclusion, agreement between gated 99mTc-MIBI SPET and cMRI is good across a wide range of clinically relevant LV volume and LVEF values assessed by 4D-MSPECT and QGS. However, algorithm-varying underestimation of LVEF should be accounted for in the clinical context and limits interchangeable use of software. (orig.)

  5. Mitochondria and left ventricular hypertrophy

    Haiyan Zhu; Shiwen Wang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Introduction Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is one of the vicious organ damages of essential hypertension.It contributes a lot to high mortality of essential hypertension due to sudden cardiac death,ventricular arrhythmia and heart failure.Many factors involve in the pathogenesis of hypertension-induced LVH including inherited variants as well as environmental factors.

  6. Systolic left ventricular function according to left ventricular concentricity and dilatation in hypertensive patients

    Bang, Casper; Gerdts, Eva; Aurigemma, Gerard P;

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy [LVH, high left ventricular mass (LVM)] is traditionally classified as concentric or eccentric based on left ventricular relative wall thickness. We evaluated left ventricular systolic function in a new four-group LVH classification based on left ventricular dilatatio...

  7. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm after reimplantation procedure.

    Inoue, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Sakamoto, Yoshimasa; Yoshitake, Michio; Matsumura, Yoko; Kinami, Hiroo; Takagi, Tomomitsu

    2016-04-01

    Postoperative left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is a rare, but potentially lethal, complication because of the high risk of rupture and high mortality of repair. We report a 64-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who underwent the reimplantation valve-sparing aortic root replacement complicated by a postoperative left ventricular pseudoaneurysm that required urgent repair. Careful handling of the aortic root is required to avoid a left ventricular pseudoaneurysm, particularly in patients with connective tissue disorder. PMID:24917204

  8. Left Ventricular Thrombosis in Ulcerative Colitis

    Tarek Saleh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular thrombi usually occur in the setting of an acute myocardial infarction, left ventricular aneurysm, or dilated cardiomyopathy. In the absence of ventricular wall motion abnormalities, they are rare. This report describes a patient with ulcerative colitis in whom two-dimensional echocardiography revealed a left intraventricular mass. Thrombosis in ulcerative colitis is a serious condition and can occur in a very young population. This case also shows that left ventricular thrombi can occur in the active setting of ulcerative colitis.

  9. Giant and thrombosed left ventricular aneurysm

    Jose; Alberto; de; Agustin; Jose; Juan; Gomez; de; Diego; Pedro; Marcos-Alberca; Jose; Luis; Rodrigo; Carlos; Almeria; Patricia; Mahia; Maria; Luaces; Miguel; Angel; Garcia-Fernandez; Carlos; Macaya; Leopoldo; Perez; de; Isla

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular aneurysms are a frequent complication of acute extensive myocardial infarction and are most commonly located at the ventricular apex. A timely diagnosis is vital due to the serious complications that can occur,including heart failure,thromboembolism,or tachyarrhythmias. We report the case of a 78-yearold male with history of previous anterior myocardial infarction and currently under evaluation by chronic heart failure. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a huge thrombosed and calcified anteroapical left ventricular aneurysm. Coronary angiography demonstrated that the left anterior descending artery was chronically occluded,and revealed a big and spherical mass with calcified borders in the left hemithorax. Left ventriculogram confirmed that this spherical mass was a giant calcified left ventricular aneurysm,causing very severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction. The patient underwent cardioverter-defibrillator implantation for primary prevention.

  10. Case series: Congenital left ventricular diverticulum

    Shah Dharita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital left ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by a localized outpouching from the cardiac chamber. The patient is usually asymptomatic. However, complications like embolism, infective endocarditis, arrhythmia and, rarely, rupture can be the initial presentation. Diagnosis can be established by USG, echocardiography, CT angiography, and MRI. We report here two neonates with congenital left ventricular apical diverticulum associated with epigastric hernia.

  11. Left ventricular noncompaction in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Statile, Christopher J; Taylor, Michael D.; Mazur, Wojciech; Cripe, Linda H.; KING, EILEEN; Pratt, Jesse; Benson, D. Woodrow; Hor, Kan N

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes deep trabeculations in the left ventricular (LV) endocardium and a thinned epicardium. LVNC is seen both as a primary cardiomyopathy and as a secondary finding in other syndromes affecting the myocardium such as neuromuscular disorders. The objective of this study is to define the prevalence of LVNC in the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) population and characterize its relationship to global LV function. Methods Cardiac magnetic res...

  12. Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy and left ventricular assist device: a word of caution

    Kornberger, A.; Stock, U. A.; Risteski, P.; Beiras Fernandez, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background In patients with left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC), implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) may be performed as a bridge to transplantation. In this respect, the particular characteristics of the left ventricular myocardium may represent a challenge. Case presentation We report a patient with LVNC who required urgent heart transplantation for inflow cannula obstruction nine months after receiving a LVAD. LVAD parameters, echocardiography and examination of the ...

  13. Respiratory acoustic impedance in left ventricular failure.

    Depeursinge, F B; Feihl, F; Depeursinge, C; Perret, C H

    1989-12-01

    The measurement of respiratory acoustic impedance (Zrs) by forced pseudorandom noise provides a simple means of assessing respiratory mechanics in nonintubated intensive care patients. To characterize the lung mechanical alterations induced by acute vascular congestion of the lung, Zrs was measured in 14 spontaneously breathing patients hospitalized for acute left ventricular failure. The Zrs data in the cardiac patients were compared with those of 48 semirecumbent normal subjects and those of 23 sitting asthmatic patients during allergen-induced bronchospasm. In the patients with acute left ventricular failure, the Zrs abnormalities noted were an excessive frequency dependence of resistance from 10 to 20 Hz and an abnormally low reactance at all frequencies, abnormalities qualitatively similar to those observed in the asthmatic patients but of lesser magnitude. Acute lung vascular congestion modifies the acoustic impedance of the respiratory system. Reflex-induced bronchospasm might be the main mechanism altering respiratory acoustic impedance in acute left ventricular failure. PMID:2582846

  14. Quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction from 16- and rebinned 8-frame gated 99mTc-tetrofosmin SPECT. Comparison of 4D-MSPECT and QGS

    Aim: Using 8-frames/cardiac cycle with gated SPECT underestimates end-diastolic volumes (EDV) and ejection fractions (LVEF), and overestimates end-systolic volumes (ESV). However, using 16-frames/cardiac cycle significantly decreases the signal-to-noise-ratio. We analyzed 16-frames and rebinned 8-frame gated SPECT data using common 4D-MSPECT and QGS algorithms. Patients, methods: 120 patients were examined using gated SPECT on a Siemens Multispect 3 (triple-head gamma camera) 60 minutes after intravenous administration at rest of about 450 MBq (two-day protocol) or about 750 MBq (one-day protocol) 99mTc-tetrofosmin. Reoriented short axis slices (16-frames) were summed framewise (1+2,3+4, etc.) yielding 8-frame data sets. EDV, ESV and LVEF were calculated for both data sets using 4D-MSPECT and QGS. Results: QGS succeeded with 119, 4D-MSPECT with 117 patients. For the remaining 116 patients, higher EDV (+0.8ml/+3.8ml) and LVEF (+1.5%/+2.6%; absolute) and lower ESV (-1.7ml/-0.9ml) (4D-MSPECT/QGS) were found for 16-frame runs. Bland-Altman limits were smaller for QGS than 4D-MSPECT [EDV 32/12ml, ESV 21/10ml, LVEF 17/7% (4D-MSPECT/QGS)]. Conclusion: Both algorithms showed the expected effects. Contour finding using QGS failed with only one data set, whereas contour finding using 4D-MSPECT failed with three data sets. Since the effects observed between the 8- and the 16-frame studies are relatively small and quite predictable, 8-frame studies can be employed in clinical routine with hardly any loss at all, plus contour finding appears less susceptible to error. (orig.)

  15. Left Ventricular Noncompaction: A Distinct Genetic Cardiomyopathy?

    Arbustini, Eloisa; Favalli, Valentina; Narula, Nupoor; Serio, Alessandra; Grasso, Maurizia

    2016-08-30

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) describes a ventricular wall anatomy characterized by prominent left ventricular (LV) trabeculae, a thin compacted layer, and deep intertrabecular recesses. Individual variability is extreme, and trabeculae represent a sort of individual "cardioprinting." By itself, the diagnosis of LVNC does not coincide with that of a "cardiomyopathy" because it can be observed in healthy subjects with normal LV size and function, and it can be acquired and is reversible. Rarely, LVNC is intrinsically part of a cardiomyopathy; the paradigmatic examples are infantile tafazzinopathies. When associated with LV dilation and dysfunction, hypertrophy, or congenital heart disease, the genetic cause may overlap. The prevalence of LVNC in healthy athletes, its possible reversibility, and increasing diagnosis in healthy subjects suggests cautious use of the term LVNC cardiomyopathy, which describes the morphology but not the functional profile of the cardiomyopathy. PMID:27561770

  16. Cerebrovascular complications of left ventricular assist devices

    Backes, Daan; van den Bergh, Walter M; van Duijn, Abram L; Lahpor, Jaap R; van Dijk, Diederik; Slooter, Arjen J C

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) are increasingly being used as a bridge to heart transplantation or destination therapy. It is unclear which antithrombotic regimen should be used to reduce the risk of stroke. We systematically reviewed the literature on all types of antithrombotic regimens a

  17. Left ventricular outflow obstruction and necrotizing enterocolitis

    Allen, H.A.; Haney, P.J.

    1984-02-01

    Two neonates had unusually rapid development of necrotizing enterocolitis within 24 hours of birth. Both patients had decreased systemic perfusion secondary to aortic atresia. Onset of either clinical or radiographic manifestations of necrotizing enterocolitis in the first day of life should alert one to the possible presence of severe left ventricular outflow obstruction.

  18. Left ventricular hypertrophy : virtuous intentions, malign consequences

    Pokharel, S; Sharma, UC; Pinto, YM

    2003-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is currently the focus of intense cardiovascular research, with the resultant rapid evolution of novel concepts relating to its exceedingly complex pathophysiology. In addition to the alterations in signal transduction and disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis, there ar

  19. Left ventricular hypertrophy in patients treated with regular hemodialyses

    Petrović Dejan; Stojimirović Biljana

    2008-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy is the main risk factor for development of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients on hemodialysis. Left ventricular hypertrophy is found in 75% of the patients treated with hemodialysis. Risk factors for left ventricular hypertrophy in patients on hemodialysis include: blood flow through arterial-venous fistula, anemia, hypertension, increased extracellular fluid volume, oxidative stress, microinflammation, hyperhomocysteinemia, secondary hyperpara- th...

  20. Exercise-Induced Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Tachycardia in a Patient with Isolated Left Ventricular Noncompaction

    Mehmet Eren; Erkan İlhan; Ahmet Taha Alper; Tolga Sinan Güvenç

    2011-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction is a hereditary cardiomyopathy in which a variety of supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias could be observed. We report a patient with exercise-induced ventricular tachycardia with left bundle branch block morphology that had characteristics of an idiopathic ventricular tachycardia who was subsequently diagnosed as left ventricular noncompaction. Successful remission of arrhythmia was ensured after the introduction of oral beta-blocker therapy.

  1. Changes of Left Ventricular Geometry Shape and Left Ventricular Regional Function in Patients With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Liang-yu WANG; Ming-xing XIE; Qing-bo LI; Ping CHEN; Zhi-xiong CAI; Zhi-dan ZHU

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To assess the left ventricle regional systolic and diastolic function, left ventricle geometry and left venti-tie sphericity indexes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) by quantitative tissue velocity imaging (QTVI). Methods Thirty normal subjects and 52 DCM patients underwent QTVI and colour Doppler flow imaging study in or-der to measure the left ventricular regional function along left ventricle apical long-axis view and the left ventricle geom-etry. Peak tissue velocities of left venticle regional muscular tissue during systole (Vs), systolic acceleration (a), ear-ly diastole(Ve) and left atrium contraction(Va) along left venticle apical long axis view were measured. The indexes of left ventdcular regional systolic and diastolic function were mearsured at the same time. The left ventricle geometry shape was reflected from the systolic and diastolic sphericity index (Sis and Sid), the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and D wave/A wave (PVd/Pva) of pulmonary veins flowing spectrum reflected the global left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. The Vs, Ve, Va, a, PVd/Pva ratio, LVEF, Sis, Sid and their correlations between normal subjects and patients with DCM were compared and analyzed. Results Vs, Ve, Va, a, PVd/Pva, Sis and Sid in patients with DCM were lower than those in normal persons. There were significant relations between Sis and a (r=0.6142, P<0.05), Ve/Va and Sid (r=0.6271, P<0.05). Conclusions QTVI offer a newer method which has a higher sensitivity and accuracy in evaluating the left venticle regional systolic and diastolic function in DCM patients. There was significant relation between regional cardiac function and left venticle sphericity.

  2. Right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist devices.

    Lampert, Brent C; Teuteberg, Jeffrey J

    2015-09-01

    Most patients with advanced systolic dysfunction who are assessed for a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) also have some degree of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. Hence, RV failure (RVF) remains a common complication of LVAD placement. Severe RVF after LVAD implantation is associated with increased peri-operative mortality and length of stay and can lead to coagulopathy, altered drug metabolism, worsening nutritional status, diuretic resistance, and poor quality of life. However, current medical and surgical treatment options for RVF are limited and often result in significant impairments in quality of life. There has been continuing interest in developing risk models for RVF before LVAD implantation. This report reviews the anatomy and physiology of the RV and how it changes in the setting of LVAD support. We will discuss proposed mechanisms and describe biochemical, echocardiographic, and hemodynamic predictors of RVF in LVAD patients. We will describe management strategies for reducing and managing RVF. Finally, we will discuss the increasingly recognized and difficult to manage entity of chronic RVF after LVAD placement and describe opportunities for future research. PMID:26267741

  3. Left ventricular hypertrophy in patients treated with regular hemodialyses

    Petrović Dejan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy is the main risk factor for development of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients on hemodialysis. Left ventricular hypertrophy is found in 75% of the patients treated with hemodialysis. Risk factors for left ventricular hypertrophy in patients on hemodialysis include: blood flow through arterial-venous fistula, anemia, hypertension, increased extracellular fluid volume, oxidative stress, microinflammation, hyperhomocysteinemia, secondary hyperpara- thyroidism, and disturbed calcium and phosphate homeostasis. Left ventricular pressure overload leads to parallel placement of new sarcomeres and development of concentric hypertrophy of left ventricle. Left ventricular hypertrophy advances in two stages. In the stage of adaptation, left ventricular hypertrophy occurs as a response to increased tension stress of the left ventricular wall and its action is protective. When volume and pressure overload the left ventricle chronically and without control, adaptive hypertrophy becomes maladaptive hypertrophy of the left ventricle, where myocytes are lost, systolic function is deranged and heart insufficiency is developed. Left ventricular mass index-LVMi greater than 131 g/m2 in men and greater than 100 g/m2 in women, and relative wall thickness of the left ventricle above 0.45 indicate concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle. Eccentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle is defined echocardiographically as LVMi above 131 g/m2 in men and greater than 100 g/m2 in women, with RWT ?0.45. Identification of patients with increased risk for development of left ventricular hypertrophy and application of appropriate therapy to attain target values of risk factors lead to regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates and improved quality of life in patients treated with regular hemodialyses.

  4. Echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in Chinese endurance athletes.

    Lo, Y S; Chin, M K

    1990-01-01

    Most echocardiographic data on the athletic heart syndrome originate from the United States and Western Europe. There are no published data on echocardiographically documented left ventricular hypertrophy in Asian athletes. We investigated the echocardiographic changes which take place with endurance training by studying eight Hong Kong national cyclists. This study confirms that left ventricular hypertrophy and increased left ventricular end-diastolic dimensions are common findings in Chines...

  5. Left ventricular noncompaction: Clinical-echocardiographic study

    Nikolić Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC is a disorder in endomyocardial morphogenesis, seen either isolated (in the absence of other cardiac anomalies or in association with congenital heart disease and some neuromuscular diseases. Intrauterine arrest of the compaction of myocardial fibers is postulated to be the reason of LVNC. Recognition of this condition is extremely important due to its high mortality and morbidity that lead to progressive heart failure, ventricular arrhythmias and thromboembolic events. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical presentation of LVNC among consecutive outpatients according to clinical and echocardiographyic findings. Methode. A total of 3,854 consecutive patients examined at the Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases within a period January 2006 - January 2007 were included in the study. All the patients underwent echocardiographic examination using the same equipment (Vivid 7, GE Medical System. Echocardiographic parameters and clinical presentation in patients with echocardiographic criteria for LVNC were analyzed. Results. Analyzing 3,854 consecutive outpatients, using two-dimensional Color Doppler echocardiography from January 2006 to January 2007, 12 patients met the criteria for LVNC. Seven of them were male. The mean age at diagnosis was 45 ± 15 years. Analyzing clinical manifestation of LVNC it was found that seven patients had signs of heart failure, six had arrhythmias with no embolic events. Conclusion. Our results suggest that the real prevalence of LVNC may be higher than expected. New studies have to be done to solve this problem.

  6. CT of left ventricular assist devices.

    Carr, Carrie M; Jacob, Jaisy; Park, Soon J; Karon, Barry L; Williamson, Eric E; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-03-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become an increasingly beneficial option for patients with heart failure, especially in light of the insufficient availability of donor hearts. LVADs have been used effectively in end-stage heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation, as destination therapy for those ineligible for transplantation, or as a bridge to myocardial recovery. Presently, a wide variety of LVADs are being used therapeutically. Four different LVADs have been used at the authors' institution. The records of 42 patients who underwent implantation of 46 total LVADs during a 17-month period were reviewed; in 23 of these patients, computed tomography of the device was performed. Increased use of LVADs necessitates understanding of the normal positioning of a variety of these devices and recognition of potential complications, which include inflow and outflow cannula complications, postoperative hemorrhage, pericardial tamponade, thrombus formation, aortic valve stenosis, aortic valve insufficiency, right-sided heart failure, and infection. PMID:20228327

  7. Left ventricular thrombus associated with arteriovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    Makdisi, George; Hashmi, Zubair A.; Wozniak, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has remarkably progressed over the recent years. It has become an invaluable tool in the care of adults and pediatric patients with severe cardiogenic shock. At the initiation of ECMO support, the left ventricular contractility is profoundly impaired. Inadequate right ventricular drainage and bronchial circulation can lead to left ventricular distension, with potential deleterious consequences, ranging from inadequate myocardial rest, pulmonary edema, or intracardiac clot formation. Therefore, it is of extreme importance to ensure an adequate left ventricular drainage. Here we present a case of LV thrombus developed while the patient is on central venoarterial (VA) ECMO. PMID:26716054

  8. Left ventricular thrombus associated with arteriovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Makdisi, George; Hashmi, Zubair A; Wozniak, Thomas C; Wang, I-Wen

    2015-11-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has remarkably progressed over the recent years. It has become an invaluable tool in the care of adults and pediatric patients with severe cardiogenic shock. At the initiation of ECMO support, the left ventricular contractility is profoundly impaired. Inadequate right ventricular drainage and bronchial circulation can lead to left ventricular distension, with potential deleterious consequences, ranging from inadequate myocardial rest, pulmonary edema, or intracardiac clot formation. Therefore, it is of extreme importance to ensure an adequate left ventricular drainage. Here we present a case of LV thrombus developed while the patient is on central venoarterial (VA) ECMO. PMID:26716054

  9. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes measured by magnetic resonance imaging

    Møgelvang, J; Thomsen, C; Mehlsen, J;

    1986-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were determined in 17 patients with different levels of left ventricular function by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A 1.5 Tesla Magnet was used obtaining ECG triggered single and multiple slices. Calculated cardiac outputs were compared...

  10. Left ventricular thrombus associated with arteriovenous extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    Makdisi, George; Hashmi, Zubair A; Wozniak, Thomas C.; Wang, I-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has remarkably progressed over the recent years. It has become an invaluable tool in the care of adults and pediatric patients with severe cardiogenic shock. At the initiation of ECMO support, the left ventricular contractility is profoundly impaired. Inadequate right ventricular drainage and bronchial circulation can lead to left ventricular distension, with potential deleterious consequences, ranging from inadequate myocardial rest, pulmonary edem...

  11. Arterial baroreflex function and left ventricular hypertrophy

    MIAO Chao-Yu; SU Ding-Feng

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that the arterial baroreflex(ABR)plays a key role in the regulation of heart rate and stabilization of blood pressure.Currently,it appears that ABR dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease states.Since the mid-1990s,a number of studies have been carried out in our laboratory to explore the pathological significance of ABR function in cardiovascular damage.This minireview summarizes our research work on the topic of ABR and left ventricular hypertrophy(LVH).On the basis of discussion concerning the importance of ABR dysfunction in hypertensive LVH and sinoaortic denervation-induced LVH,we advance a new strategy for reversal of LVH,that is,restoration of impaired ABR function.We tested this hypothesis in animal models with ABR deficiency.It was found that improvement of impaird ABR function with long-term treatment of ketanserin or candesartan was accompanied by reversal of LVH.The preliminary results indicate that it is feasible to target ABR for treatment of LVH.

  12. Left Ventricular Dilatation Increases the Risk of Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients With Reduced Systolic Function

    Aleong, Ryan G.; Mulvahill, Matthew J; Halder, Indrani; Carlson, Nichole E; Singh, Madhurmeet; Bloom, Heather L.; Dudley, Samuel C.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Shalaby, Alaa; Weiss, Raul; Gutmann, Rebecca; Sauer, William H.; Narayanan, Kumar; Chugh, Sumeet S.; Saba, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmias; however, LV ejection fraction has a low sensitivity to predict ventricular arrhythmias. LV dilatation and mass may be useful to further risk-stratify for ventricular arrhythmias. Methods and Results Patients from the Genetic Risk of Assessment of Defibrillator Events (GRADE) study (N =930), a study of heart failure subjects with defibrillators, were assessed for appropriate implantable ca...

  13. Effect of left ventricular systolic function on left atrial filling

    The effect of left ventricular (LV) systolic function on left atrial (LA) filling was studied using radionuclide angiography (RNA) and echocardiography in 21 normal subjects and in 40 patients with various heart deseases who had no regurgitant or shunt flow. The LV and LA time-activity curves (TAC) and these first-derivative curves were derived from RNA. The peak rate of LA filling during the atrial filling phase was normalized to the LA maximum counts and was defined as the LA peak filling rate (LAf-PFR). In all patients and normal subjects, the LV peak ejection rate (LVs-PER) occurred at a time close to that of LAf-PFR ((132 ± 22 msec (mean ± SD) vs 139 ± 34 msec, NS)). With use of the following equations, the peak rates of the LV emptying or LA filling determined by the RNA were converted from counts/sec to ml/sec by equating the echocardiographically-derived LV end-diastolic volume or LA maximum volume to the LV end-diastolic counts or the LA maximum counts, respectively. LVs-max dV/dt (ml/sec) = (LVs-PER) x (LV end-diastolic volume). LAf-max dV/dt (ml/sec) = (LAf-PFR) x (LA maximum volume). There was a significant positive correlation between the LVs-max dV/dt, an index of LV systolic function, and the LAf-max dV/dt, an index of LA filling function (r = 0.58, p < 0.001) in all patients and normal subjects. This indicates that the LA peak filling rate increases progressively as the LV peak ejection rate. Thus, these results suggest that the LA filling might be affected by the LV systolic function. (author)

  14. Effect of left ventricular systolic function on left atrial filling

    The effect of left ventricular (LV) systolic function on left atrial (LA) filling was studied using radionuclide angiography (RNA) and echocardiography in 17 normal subjects and in 40 patients with various heart disease who had no regurgitant or shunt flow. The LV and LA time-activity curves (TAC) and these first-derivative curves were derived from RNA. The peak rate of LA filling during the atrial filling phase was normalized to the LA maximal counts and was defined as the LA peak filling rate (LAf-PFR). In all patients and normal subjects, the LV peak ejection rate (LVs-PER) occurred at a time close to that of LAf-PFR (131 ± 22 msec (mean ± SD) vs. 140 ± 35 msec, NS). With use of the following equations, the peak rates of the LV emptying or LA filling determined by the RNA were converted from counts/sec to ml/sec by equating the echocardiographically-derived LV end-diastolic volume or LA maximal volume to the LV end-diastolic counts or the LA maximal counts, respectively. LVs-max dV/dt (ml/sec) = LVs-PER x (LV end-diastolic volume). LAf-max dV/dt (ml/sec) = LAf-PFR x (LA maximal volume). There was a significant positive correlation between the LVs-max dV/dt, an index of LV systolic function, and the LAf-max dV/dt, an index of LA filling function (r = 0.57, p < 0.001) in all patients and normal subjects. This indicates that the LA peak filling rate increases progressively as the LV peak ejection rate. Thus, these results suggest that the LA filling might be affected by the LV systolic function. (author)

  15. Comparison of Left Ventricular Electromechanical Mapping and Left Ventricular Angiography: Defining Practical Standards for Analysis of NOGA™ Maps

    Sarmento-Leite, Rogerio; Silva, Guilherme V.; Dohman, Hans F.R.; Rocha, Ricardo Mourilhe; Dohman, Hans J.F.; de Mattos, Nelson Durval S.G.; Carvalho, Luis Antonio; Gottschall, Carlos A.M.; Perin, Emerson C.

    2003-01-01

    We performed this prospective cohort study to correlate the findings of left ventricular angiography (LVA) and NOGA™ left ventricular electromechanical mapping (LVEM) in the evaluation of cardiac wall motion and also to establish standards for wall motion assessment by LVEM. Fifty-five patients (35 men; mean age, 60.4 ± 11.8 years) eligible for elective left cardiac catheterization underwent LVA and LVEM. Wall motion scores, LV ejection fractions (LVEF), and LV volumes derived from LVA versus...

  16. Automatic extraction of left ventricular contours from MRI images

    In the MRI cardiac function analysis, left ventricular volume curves and diagnostic parameters are obtained by extracting the left ventricular cavities as regions of interest (ROI) from the MR cine images. The ROI extractions had to be done by manual operations, so the examination efficiency and data analysis reproducibility were poor in diagnoses on site. In this paper, we outline an automatic extraction method for the left ventricular contours from MR cine images to improve cardiac function diagnosis. With this method, the operator needs to manually indicate only 3 points on the 1st image, and can then get all the contours from the total sequence of images automatically. (author)

  17. A two phase harmonic model for left ventricular function

    Dubi, S; Dubi, Y

    2006-01-01

    A minimal model for mechanical motion of the left ventricle is proposed. The model assumes the left ventricle to be a harmonic oscillator with two distinct phases, simulating the systolic and diastolic phases, at which both the amplitude and the elastic constant of the oscillator are different. Taking into account the pressure within the left ventricle, the model shows qualitative agreement with functional parameters of the left ventricle. The model allows for a natural explanation of heart failure with preserved systolic left ventricular function, also termed diastolic heart failure. Specifically, the rise in left ventricular filling pressures following increased left-ventricular wall stiffness is attributed to a mechanism aimed at preserving heart rate and cardiac output.

  18. Right and left ventricular performance by nuclear stethoscope

    Right and left ventricular performance by Nuclear Stethoscope using Kr-81m and Tc-99m-RBC were performed. And physiological and pharmacological interventions were also investigated for the evaluation of coronary artery diseases (CAD)

  19. Left ventricular muscle mass regression after aortic valve replacement.

    Lee, J. W.; Choi, K. J.; Lee, S G; Choo, S. J.; Kim, J.O.; Kang, D H; Song, J.K.; Song, M. G.

    1999-01-01

    Implanting a valve that will reduce left ventricular mass is critical in aortic stenosis. Regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in 46 aortic valve replacement (AVR) patients receiving a St. Jude Medical (SJM) valve was assessed by serial electrocardiographic and echocardiographic studies during the preoperative, immediate, and late postoperative periods. The patients were divided into three groups according to valve size; 19 mm group (n=9), 21 mm group (n=20), and 23+mm group (n=17). The...

  20. Electrocardiographic Criteria for Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Children

    Rijnbeek, Peter R; van Herpen, Gerard; Kapusta, Livia; ten Harkel, A. Derk Jan; Witsenburg, Maarten; Kors, Jan A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies to determine the sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in children had their imperfections: they were not done on an unselected hospital population, several criteria used in adults were not applied to children, and obsolete limits of normal for the ECG parameters were used. Furthermore, left ventricular mass (LVM) was taken as the reference standard for LVH, with no regard for other clinical evidence. The study population consisted ...

  1. An Updated Concept for Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Risk in Hypertension

    Frohlich, Edward D.

    2009-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) was one of the first three “factors of risk” originally identified by the Framingham Heart Study predisposing the patient to premature morbidity and mortality resulting from coronary heart disease. Among the initial approaches toward specific risk reduction were antihypertensive agents that reduce left ventricular (LV) mass with control of arterial pressure. However, the indication to reduce risk from LVH has not been approved by the federal regulatory agenc...

  2. FINGER LENGTH RATIO (2D:4D) IN LEFT- AND RIGHT-HANDED FEMALES: EVIDENCE SUPPORTING GESCHWIND AND GALABURDA HYPOTHESIS

    I. Pashalieva; Nikolova, P.

    2011-01-01

    The finger length ratio (2D:4D) is a biomarker for the prenatal levels of testosterone. The prenatal effects of testosterone on the brain are considered as a key factor in the etiology of left-handedness. In our previous study we established that handedness-related peculiarities in 2D:4D exist in males. In the present study right hand 2D:4D, left hand 2D:4D, average 2D:4D and the difference between right and left 2D:4D (Dr–l) were compared between left- and right-handed females. The results o...

  3. Silent myocardial ischemia evaluated by ambulatory left ventricular function monitoring

    Imai, Kamon; Yumikura, Sei; Araki, Yasushi; Ando, Tatsuo; Saito, Satoshi; Ozawa, Yukio; Hatano, Michinobu; Kamata, Rikisaburo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-12-01

    To determine whether left ventricular function is less disturbed in asymptomatic ischemia than in symptomatic ischemia, exercise-induced left ventricular function was measured in beat-to-beat using an ambulatory left ventricular function monitoring system. The study subjects were 22 patients with coronary artery disease. Supine and sitting ergometer exercise tests were performed. Of 44 exercise tests, 33 showed significant ST depression on electro-cardiograms. Among these 33, 17 were asymptomatic: 16, symptomatic. The left ventricular functions during exercise of these 33 were analyzed and compared with those of five normal controls. The changes in end-diastolic volume were not so significant either in controls or in the asymptomatic and symptomatic groups, but the changes in end-systolic volume were reversed in the diseased group, particularly in the symptomatic group. The changes in ejection fraction (EF), therefore, were significantly negative in the diseased group, particularly in the symptomatic group. The correlation between exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction and symptoms was evaluated among the 33 patients. Symptoms were present in 35% (6/17) in <10% decrease in EF, 44% (4/9) in 10{approx}15% decrease, and 85% (6/7)in {ge}15% decrease, respectively. Thus, asymptomatic ischemia represents a lesser degree of myocardial ischemia as indicated by mild left ventricular dysfunction, compared with symptomatic ischemia. However, some cases of severe myocardial ischemia did not develop symptoms. We concluded that silent myocardial ischemia is responsible for a lesser degree of myocardial ischemia and decreased pain perception. (author).

  4. Left Ventricular Mass: Correlation with Fatness, Hemodynamics and Renal Morphology

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) is correlated with body composition and central hemodynamics as well as kidney function. Recently, fat-free mass has been considered to be more strongly correlated with LVM in comparison to other descriptors of fatness. We therefore address the question of whether comprehensive descriptors of fatness, central hemodynamics and renal characteristics demonstrate the association with left ventricular mass in healthy non-obese population. 119 healthy non-obese subjects (53 females, 66 males, mean age 50 yrs) were evaluated. Central hemodynamics was measured by Pulse Wave Analysis, left ventricular mass was assessed by echocardiography, fatness was evaluated by anthropometry, bioimpedance, and ultrasound. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) correlated to the same extent with central and peripheral blood pressure but not with descriptors of wave reflection. Fat-free mass as well as intraabdominal fat correlated to a similar extent with LVMI. Kidney morphological characteristics indexed to body surface area were associated inversely and independently with LVMI. Comprehensive assessment of fatness reinforced the concept that intraabdominal fat compartment is strongly correlated with left ventricular mass. Descriptors of wave reflection are not associated with left ventricular mass. The interrelationsh between kidney morphology and LVMI indicates that such associations may be a biologically plausible phenomenon

  5. Left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in hyperthyroidism

    Friedman, M.J.; Okada, R.D.; Ewy, G.A.; Hellman, D.J.

    1982-12-01

    In order to assess the effect of hyperthyroidism on systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle, M-mode echocardiograms and systolic time intervals were obtained in 13 patients while they were clinically hyperthyroid and again when they were euthyroid following radioactive iodine therapy. Echocardiographic tracings of the septum and left ventricular posterior wall were digitized and analyzed to provide the maximum velocity of shortening and maximum velocity of lengthening. These velocities were normalized for left ventricular diastolic dimension. The left ventricular minor axis fractional shortening and the normalized maximum velocity of shortening were both increased during the hyperthyroid state. The normalized maximum velocity of lengthening, a measure of diastolic left ventricular function, was also increased during the hyperthyroid state when compared to the euthyroid state. The preejection period index and the preejection period/left ventricular ejection time ratio were lower when the patients were hyperthyroid than when they were euthyroid. These data confirm the increased inotropic state and demonstrated increased diastolic relaxation velocities of the hyperthyroid left ventricle.

  6. Association of arterial stiffness and electrocardiography-determined left ventricular hypertrophy with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

    Po-Chao Hsu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Increased arterial stiffness is associated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD, but this association may be influenced by left ventricular (LV performance. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH is not only a significant determinant of LV performance, but is also correlated with LVDD. This study is designed to compare LV diastolic function among patients divided by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV and electrocardiography (ECG-determined LVH and to assess whether increased baPWV and ECG-determined LVH are independently associated with LVDD. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 270 patients and classified them into four groups according to the median value of baPWV and with/without ECG-determined LVH. The baPWV was measured using an ABI-form device. ECG-determined LVH was defined by Sokolow-Lyon criterion. LVDD was defined as impaired relaxation, pseudonormal, and restrictive mitral inflow patterns. Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were patients with lower baPWV and without ECG-determined LVH, lower baPWV but with ECG-determined LVH, higher baPWV but without ECG-determined LVH, and higher baPWV and with ECG-determined LVH respectively. RESULTS: Early diastolic mitral velocity (Ea was gradually decreased from group 1 to group 4 (p≦0.027. Patients in group 4 had the highest prevalence of LVDD (all p<0.001. After multivariate analysis, both baPWV and ECG-determined LVH were independent determinants of Ea (β = -0.02, P<0.001; β = -1.77, P<0.001 respectively and LVDD (odds ratio = 1.02, P = 0.011 and odds ratio = 3.53, P = 0.013 respectively. CONCLUSION: Our study showed the group with higher baPWV and ECG-determined LVH had the lowest Ea and highest prevalence of LVDD. In addition, both baPWV and ECG-determined LVH were independently associated with Ea and LVDD. Hence, assessment of arterial stiffness by baPWV and LVH by ECG may be useful in identifying the high risk group of LVDD.

  7. Left ventricular systolic response to exercise in patients with systemic hypertension without left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Christian, T F; Zinsmeister, A R; Miller, T D; Clements, I P; Gibbons, R J

    1990-05-15

    Supine exercise radionuclide angiography was performed in 367 men to assess left ventricular (LV) systolic response to exercise; 58 had systemic hypertension without LV hypertrophy on a resting electrocardiogram and 309 were normotensive. All patients met the following criteria defining a low pretest likelihood of coronary artery disease: age less than 50 years; normal electrocardiographic response to exercise; absence of typical or atypical chest pain; and exercise heart rate greater than 120 beats/min. Patients taking beta-receptor blockers were excluded. There were no significant differences between hypertensive and normotensive groups in peak exercise heart rate, workload or exercise duration. However, hypertensive patients had significantly higher peak exercise systolic blood pressures and peak exercise rate-pressure products. There were no differences between patients with and without hypertension in resting ejection fraction, peak exercise ejection fraction (hypertensive patients 0.71 +/- 0.01, normotensive patients 0.70 +/- 0.05) or change in ejection fraction at peak exercise (hypertensive patients 0.07 +/- 0.01, normotensive patients 0.07 +/- 0.04). Diastolic and systolic ventricular volumes tended to be smaller in the hypertensive patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. The change in systolic volume with exercise was similar in the 2 groups (hypertensive -10 +/- 3 ml/m2, normotensive -10 +/- 1 ml/m2). In the absence of electrocardiographic evidence of LV hypertrophy, systemic hypertension does not influence LV systolic response to exercise. PMID:2140008

  8. Mild carbon monoxide poisoning impairs left ventricular diastolic function

    Özgür Çiftçi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning is associated with direct cardiovascular toxicity. In mild CO poisoning in which cardiovascular life support is not required, the effects of CO on left and right ventricular functions are unknown in patients without cardiac failure. Objectives: Echocardiography was used to determine whether or not mild CO poisoning impairs ventricular function. Twenty otherwise healthy patients with CO poisoning and 20 age- and gender-matched controls were studied. Echocardiographic examinations were performed at the time of admission and 1 week after poisoning. Results: The impairment observed in the left and right ventricular diastolic function at the time of admission was greater than the impairment 1 week after poisoning. Mild CO poisoning did not have a significant effect on systolic function. Carboxyhemoglobin levels were positively correlated with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, whereas the levels were not correlated with right ventricular diastolic function. Conclusions: In CO intoxication, the development of left and right ventricular diastolic dysfunction precedes systolic abnormality. Patients with mild CO poisoning do not manifest cardiovascular symptoms; however, it should be borne in mind that most of these patients have myocardial involvement.

  9. Joint multi-object registration and segmentation of left and right cardiac ventricles in 4D cine MRI

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Kepp, Timo; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac function based on cine MRI requires the segmentation of cardiac structures in the images, but the problem of automatic cardiac segmentation is still open, due to the imaging characteristics of cardiac MR images and the anatomical variability of the heart. In this paper, we present a variational framework for joint segmentation and registration of multiple structures of the heart. To enable the simultaneous segmentation and registration of multiple objects, a shape prior term is introduced into a region competition approach for multi-object level set segmentation. The proposed algorithm is applied for simultaneous segmentation of the myocardium as well as the left and right ventricular blood pool in short axis cine MRI images. Two experiments are performed: first, intra-patient 4D segmentation with a given initial segmentation for one time-point in a 4D sequence, and second, a multi-atlas segmentation strategy is applied to unseen patient data. Evaluation of segmentation accuracy is done by overlap coefficients and surface distances. An evaluation based on clinical 4D cine MRI images of 25 patients shows the benefit of the combined approach compared to sole registration and sole segmentation.

  10. Prediction of all-cause mortality and heart failure admissions from global left ventricular longitudinal strain in patients with acute myocardial infarction and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction

    Ersbøll, Mads; Valeur, Nana; Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig;

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to test the hypothesis that semiautomated calculation of left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS) can identify high-risk subjects among patients with myocardial infarctions (MIs) with left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEFs) >40%.......This study sought to test the hypothesis that semiautomated calculation of left ventricular global longitudinal strain (GLS) can identify high-risk subjects among patients with myocardial infarctions (MIs) with left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEFs) >40%....

  11. The effects of intraventricular gradients on left ventricular ejection dynamics.

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; Craig, W E; McGranahan, G M

    1983-11-01

    The generation of abnormal gradients between the apical cavity and the subaortic valvular region of the left ventricle in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has traditionally been equated to a dynamic obstruction to left ventricular outflow. To examine this concept in more detail, left ventricular ejection dynamics were studied during cardiac catheterization in 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease. Using multisensor catheterization techniques, ascending aortic flow velocity and micromanometer left ventricular and aortic pressures were simultaneously recorded during rest (n = 47). Dynamic left ventricular emptying was also analyzed with frame-by-frame angiography (n = 46). The temporal distribution of left ventricular outflow was independently derived from both flow velocity and angiographic techniques. The HCM patients were subdivided into three groups: I, intraventricular gradients at rest (n = 9); II, intraventricular gradients only with provocation (n = 12); III, no intraventricular gradients despite provocation (n = 9). Expressed as a precentage of the available systolic ejection period (%SEP), the time required for ejection of the total stroke volume was (mean +/- 1 S.D.): Group I, 69 +/- 17% (flow), 64 +/- 6% (angio); Group II, 63 +/- 14% (flow), 65 +/- 6% (angio); Group III, 61 +/- 16% (flow), 62 +/- 4% (angio); control group, 90 +/- 5% (flow) 86 +/- 10% (angio). No significant difference was observed between any of the three HCM subgroups, but, compared with the control group, ejection was completed much earlier in systole independent of the presence or absence of intraventricular gradients. The presence of coexisting mitral regurgitation in 12 of the HCM patients did not alter these results. This study demonstrates that 'outflow obstruction', as traditionally defined by the presence of an abnormal intraventricular pressure gradient and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, does not impede left

  12. Establishment of a chronic left ventricular aneurysm model in rabbit

    Cang-Song XIAO; Chang-Qing GAO; Li-Bing LI; Yao WANG; Tao ZHAO; Wei-Hua YE; Chong-Lei REN; Zhi-Yong LIU; Yang WU

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To establish a cost-effective and reproducible procedure for induction of chronic left ventricular aneurysm (LVA) in rabbits. Methods Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was induced in 35 rabbits via concomitant ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery and the circumflex (Cx) branch at the middle portion. Development of AMI was co n-firmed by ST segment elevation and akinesis of the occluded area. Echocardiography, pathological evaluation, and agar i n-tra-chamber casting were utilized to validate the formation of LVA four weeks after the surgery. Left ventricular end systolic pressure (LVESP) and diastolic pressure (LVEDP) were measured before, immediately after and four weeks after ligation. D i-mensions of the ventricular chamber, thickness of the interventricular septum (IVS) and the left ventricular posterior wall (LVPW) left ventricular end diastolic volume (LVEDV) and systolic volume (LVESV), and ejection fraction (EF) were recorded by echo-cardiography. Results Thirty one (88.6%) rabbits survived myocardial infarction and 26 of them developed aneurysm (83.9%). The mean area of aneurysm was 33.4% ± 2.4% of the left ventricle. LVEF markedly decreased after LVA formation, whereas LVEDV, LVESV and the thickness of IVS as well as the dimension of ventricular chamber from apex to mitral valve annulus significantly increased. LVESP immediately dropped after ligation and recovered to a small extent after LVA formation. LVEDP progressively increased after ligation till LVA formation. Areas in the left ventricle (LV) that underwent fibrosis included the apex, anterior wall and lateral wall but not IVS. Agar intra-chamber cast showed that the bulging of LV wall was prominent in the area of aneurysm. Conclusions Ligation of LAD and Cx at the middle portion could induce develo pment of LVA at a mean area ratio of 33.4%±2.4%which involves the apex, anterior wall and lateral wall of the LV.

  13. Mild carbon monoxide poisoning impairs left ventricular diastolic function

    Özgür Çiftçi; Murat Günday; Mustafa Çaliskan; Hakan Güllü; Rafi Dogan; Aytekin Güven; Haldun Müderrisoglu

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is associated with direct cardiovascular toxicity. In mild CO poisoning in which cardiovascular life support is not required, the effects of CO on left and right ventricular functions are unknown in patients without cardiac failure. Objectives: Echocardiography was used to determine whether or not mild CO poisoning impairs ventricular function. Twenty otherwise healthy patients with CO poisoning and 20 age- and gender-matched controls were studied. Ec...

  14. Assessment of the left ventricular function with the nuclear stethoscope

    The evaluation of the left ventricular function with the Nuclear Stethoscope was performed on 27 patients with heart diseases. The reproducibility of the measurements was good. Repetitions of EF, ER and EDV estimations yielded errors of 2.63%, 1.45% and 0.31%. The comparison with the results of camera ventriculography showed a good agreement of EF, contraction velocity parameters and relaxation velocity parameters, with a cor. coeff. of greater or equal to 0.750. A particularly high correlation was found between the NS EF and NS ER (r = 0.968). It was concluded that the Nuclear Stethoscope provides a reliable evaluation of left ventricular function. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of the left ventricular function with the nuclear stethoscope

    Tarkowska, A.; Adam, W.E.; Bitter, F.

    1980-08-01

    The evaluation of the left ventricular function with the Nuclear Stethoscope was performed on 27 patients with heart diseases. The reproducibility of the measurements was good. Repetitions of EF, ER and EDV estimations yielded errors of 2.63%, 1.45% and 0.31%. The comparison with the results of camera ventriculography showed a good agreement of EF, contraction velocity parameters and relaxation velocity parameters, with a cor. coeff. of greater or equal to 0.750. A particularly high correlation was found between the NS EF and NS ER (r = 0.968). It was concluded that the Nuclear Stethoscope provides a reliable evaluation of left ventricular function.

  16. Left ventricular pseudoaneurysm versus aneurysm a diagnosis dilemma

    Bisoyi, Samarjit; Dash, Anjan K.; Nayak, Debashish; Sahoo, Satyajit; Mohapatra, Raghunath

    2016-01-01

    Free wall rupture of the left ventricle (LV) is a rare but life-threatening complication of acute myocardial infaction. Very rarely such rupture may be contained by the adhering pericardium creating a pseudoaneurysm. This condition warrants for an emergency surgery. Left ventricular aneurysm is the discrete thinning of the ventricular wall (Clinically differentiating the two conditions remains a challenge. We report the case of a patient with LV pseudoaneurysm, initially diagnosed as true aneurysm at our institution. We have attempted to review the existing literature and discussed the characteristic findings of each entity. PMID:26750696

  17. Unusual distribution of noncompaction of left ventricular myocardium.

    Bhardwaj, Ravindra; Abro, Masroor; Gharib, Wissam; Warden, Bradford E; Jain, Abnash; Failinger, Conard F

    2015-01-01

    This case report highlights a rare case of isolated septal noncompaction of the left ventricle, a congenital condition, in a previously asymptomatic adult patient who presented with syncope. Management of left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) includes treatment for heart failure, arrhythmias, and thromboembolic events; but no criteria exist for primary prophylaxis in patients that might be at high risk. To our knowledge this is the first report of isolated septal noncompaction in a previously asymptomatic adult patient. PMID:25665274

  18. Continuous monitoring of left ventricular function by VEST

    Using an ambulatory ventricular function monitor (VEST), left ventricular function (LVF) was examined in one healthy volunteer, 3 with ischemic heart disease, and one with dilated myocardiopathy (DMCP) under various conditions, such as treadmill exercise, standing, and sitting. It was also examined when two DCMP patients with associated left ventricular failure were given a nitrite (ISDM) and cardiotonic agent (E 1020). End-diastolic volume (EDV) decreased in the standing position, and increased in exercise, suggesting the involvement of venous blood pool in the legs. Ejection fraction (EF) decreased in the case of widespread ischemia during exercise. Drug tolerance test revealed decrease in EDV and end-systolic volume (ESV), no change in stroke volume (SV), and slight increase in EF on ISDM; and decrease in EDV and ESV, increase in SV, and marked increase in EF on E 1020. For EF, the VEST data were relatively well correlated with gamma camera data. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Continuous monitoring of left ventricular function by VEST

    Ohtake, Tohru; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kosaka, Noboru and others

    1988-01-01

    Using an ambulatory ventricular function monitor (VEST), left ventricular function (LVF) was examined in one healthy volunteer, 3 with ischemic heart disease, and one with dilated myocardiopathy (DMCP) under various conditions, such as treadmill exercise, standing, and sitting. It was also examined when two DCMP patients with associated left ventricular failure were given a nitrite (ISDM) and cardiotonic agent (E 1020). End-diastolic volume (EDV) decreased in the standing position, and increased in exercise, suggesting the involvement of venous blood pool in the legs. Ejection fraction (EF) decreased in the case of widespread ischemia during exercise. Drug tolerance test revealed decrease in EDV and end-systolic volume (ESV), no change in stroke volume (SV), and slight increase in EF on ISDM; and decrease in EDV and ESV, increase in SV, and marked increase in EF on E 1020. For EF, the VEST data were relatively well correlated with gamma camera data. (Namekawa, K.).

  20. Left ventricular noncompaction: diagnosis by three-dimensional echocardiography.

    Correia, Emanuel; Santos, Luís Ferreira; Rodrigues, Bruno; Gama, Pedro; Ferreira, Pedro; Nunes, Luis; Pipa, João; Cabral, Costa; Dionísio, Odete; Santos, Oliveira

    2009-11-01

    Left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a rare congenital disease caused by an arrest in normal myocardial embryogenesis, leading to persistence of numerous prominent trabeculations that communicate with the left ventricle. It was first described as a congenital condition affecting children, but several cases have been reported of late presentation. The main clinical manifestations are congestive heart failure, arrhythmias (supraventricular or ventricular) and systemic embolism. We present the case of a 51-year-old patient brought to our emergency department after an episode of symptomatic ventricular flutter requiring electrical cardioversion. Two-dimensional echocardiography with color Doppler suggested the diagnosis and the three-dimensional echocardiogram revealed the deep trabeculations typical of LVNC. PMID:20222350

  1. A simple nomogram for determination of echocardiographic left ventricular geometry

    Heesen, WF; Beltman, FW; Smit, AJ; May, JF

    1998-01-01

    Recent data have shown that left ventricular (I.V) geometry provides additional information on the simple dichotomy of presence or absence of LV hypertrophy with regard to cardiovascular risk of hypertensive patients. A "new" class of concentric remodeling was created, identifying a rather large gro

  2. Left ventricular assessment in myocardial infarction - The VALIANT registry

    Hernandez, AF; Velazquez, EJ; Solomon, SD; Kilaru, R; Diaz, R; O'Connor, CM; Ertl, G; Maggioni, AP; Rouleau, JL; van Gilst, W; Pfeffer, MA; Califf, RM

    2005-01-01

    Background: How often echocardiography and cardiac catheterization are used to evaluate left ventricular (LV) function in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and how they are associated with quality of care is unknown. Methods: Patients with MI in the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction (V

  3. Four Genetic Loci Influencing Electrocardiographic Indices of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    Shah, Sonia; Nelson, Christopher P.; Gaunt, Tom R.; van der Harst, Pim; Barnes, Timothy; Braund, Peter S.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Drenos, Fotios; Kivimaki, Mika; Talmud, Philippa J.; Humphries, Steve E.; Whittaker, John; Morris, Richard W.; Whincup, Peter H.; Dominiczak, Anna; Munroe, Patricia B.; Johnson, Toby; Goodall, Alison H.; Cambien, Francois; Diemert, Patrick; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Felix, Janine F.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Burton, Paul R.; Tobin, Martin D.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Navis, Gerjan; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Thompson, John R.; Kumari, Meena; MacFarlane, Peter W.; Day, Ian N. M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    Background-Presence of left ventricular hypertrophy on an ECG (ECG-LVH) is widely assessed clinically and provides prognostic information in some settings. There is evidence for significant heritability of ECG-LVH. We conducted a large-scale gene-centric association analysis of 4 commonly measured i

  4. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy in children

    P.R. Rijnbeek (Peter); G. van Herpen (Gerard); L. Kapusta (Livia); A.D.J. ten Harkel (Arend); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); J.A. Kors (Jan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies to determine the sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in children had their imperfections: they were not done on an unselected hospital population, several criteria used in adults were not applied to children, and obsolete lim

  5. Electrocardiographic criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy in children.

    Rijnbeek, P.R.; Herpen, G van; Kapusta, L.; Harkel, AD Ten; Witsenburg, M.; Kors, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies to determine the sensitivity of the electrocardiogram (ECG) for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in children had their imperfections: they were not done on an unselected hospital population, several criteria used in adults were not applied to children, and obsolete limits of norma

  6. THE PUCA PUMP - A LEFT-VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE

    VERKERKE, B; DEMUINCK, ED; RAKHORST, G; BLANKSMA, PK

    1993-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) that are being used clinically still have specific drawbacks. Therefore, a new concept for mechanical circulatory support was developed, the pulsatile catheter (PUCA) pump. It consists of an extracorporeally placed, pneumatically driven membrane pump that is c

  7. Giant blood cyst tumor in the left ventricular outflow tract

    ZHANG Chong; HU Jian; NI Yi-ming; JIANG Zhi-nong; XU He-yun

    2007-01-01

    @@ Blood cyst is a rare primary cardiac tumor usually affecting the cardiac valves. Associated with severe occlusion-related complications, it is generally removed surgically. With a brief review of the literature, we present a case of pedunculated tumor in the left ventricular outflow tract identified by echocardiography.

  8. Echocardiographic evaluation of left ventricular function in ischemic heart disease

    Mollema, Sjoerd Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    The presence of a decreased left ventricular (LV) function after myocardial infarction has demonstrated to be of considerable clinical importance. In this thesis, the role of 2D echocardiography to evaluate LV function in ischemic heart disease was investigated. In the first part of the thesis, rece

  9. Quantitative assessment of regional left ventricular motion using endocardial landmarks

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); T.E.H. Hooghoudt (Ton); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); J.H.C. Reiber (Johan); G.T. Meester (Geert); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn this study the hypothesis is tested that the motion pattern of small anatomic landmarks, recognizable at the left ventricular endocardial border in the contrast angiocardiogram, reflects the motion of the endocardial wall. To verify this, minute metal markers were inserted in the endo

  10. Synthetic Marijuana Induced Acute Nonischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Moustafa Elsheshtawy; Priatharsini Sriganesh; Vasudev Virparia; Falgun Patel; Ashok Khanna

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic marijuana is an uptrending designer drug currently widely spread in the US. We report a case of acute deterioration of nonischemic left ventricular dysfunction after exposure to synthetic marijuana. This case illustrates the importance of history taking in cardiac patients and identifies a negative cardiovascular effect of synthetic marijuana known as K2, not yet well detected by urine toxicology screening tools.

  11. Role of left ventricular twist mechanics in cardiomyopathies, dance of the helices

    Floris; Kauer; Marcel; Leonard; Geleijnse; Bastiaan; Martijn; van; Dalen

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular twist is an essential part of left ventricular function. Nevertheless, knowledge is limited in "the cardiology community" as it comes to twist mechanics. Fortunately the development of speckle tracking echocardiography, allowing accurate, reproducible and rapid bedside assessment of left ventricular twist, has boosted the interest in this important mechanical aspect of left ventricular deformation. Although the fundamental physiological role of left ventricular twist is undisputable, the clinical relevance of assessment of left ventricular twist in cardiomyopathies still needs to be established. The fact remains; analysis of left ventricular twist mechanics has already provided substantial pathophysiological understanding on a comprehensive variety of cardiomyopathies. It has become clear that increased left ventricular twist in for example hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may be an early sign of subendocardial(microvascular) dysfunction. Furthermore, decreased left ventricular twist may be caused by left ventricular dilatation or an extensive myocardial scar. Finally, the detection of left ventricular rigid body rotation in noncompaction cardiomyopathy may provide an indispensible method to objectively confirm this difficult diagnosis. All this endorses the value of left ventricular twist in the field of cardiomyopathies and may further encourage the implementation of left ventricular twist parameters in the "diagnostic toolbox" for cardiomyopathies.

  12. New strict left bundle branch block criteria reflect left ventricular activation differences

    Emerek, Kasper Janus Grønn; Risum, Niels; Hjortshøj, Søren Pihlkjær;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Pacing lead electrical delays and strict left bundle branch block (LBBB) criteria were assessed against cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) outcome. METHODS: Forty-nine patients with LBBB and QRS duration >130 milliseconds underwent CRT-implantation. Sensed right ventricular to left...

  13. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    Kelbaek, H; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Aldershvile, J; Folke, K; Nielsen, S L

    2011-01-01

    thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p less than 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements...

  14. Left ventricular filling patterns in patients with systemic hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (the LIFE study). Losartan Intervention For Endpoint

    Wachtell, K; Smith, G; Gerdts, E;

    2000-01-01

    Abnormal left ventricular (LV) filling may exist in early stages of hypertension. Whether this finding is related to LV hypertrophy is currently controversial. This study was undertaken to assess relations between abnormal diastolic LV filling and LV geometry in a large series of hypertensive pat...

  15. Association of heart failure hospitalizations with combined electrocardiography and echocardiography criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy

    Gerdts, Eva; Okin, Peter M; Boman, Kurt;

    2012-01-01

    The value of performing echocardiography in hypertensive patients with electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is uncertain.......The value of performing echocardiography in hypertensive patients with electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is uncertain....

  16. Insulin resistance syndrome and left ventricular mass in an elderly population (The Rotterdam Study)

    Rheeder, P; Stolk, RP; Mosterd, A; Pols, HAP; Hofman, A; Grobbee, DE

    1999-01-01

    In a study of elderly men and women, age, body mass index, and systolic blood pressure (and in men, also glucose) were significant predictors of left ventricular mass. Postload insulin was not independently associated with left ventricular mass.

  17. Cardiac MR Elastography: Comparison with left ventricular pressure measurement

    Samani Abbas; Hamm Bernd; Schnorr Jörg; Kaufels Nikola; Laule Michael; Elgeti Thomas; Braun Jürgen; Sack Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of study To compare magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) with ventricular pressure changes in an animal model. Methods Three pigs of different cardiac physiology (weight, 25 to 53 kg; heart rate, 61 to 93 bpm; left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic volume, 35 to 70 ml) were subjected to invasive LV pressure measurement by catheter and noninvasive cardiac MRE. Cardiac MRE was performed in a short-axis view of the heart and applying a 48.3-Hz shear-wave stimulus. Relative changes...

  18. Cardiac arrhythmias and left ventricular hypertrophy in systemic hypertension

    Background: Hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is associated with increased risk of arrhythmias and mortality. Objective was to investigate the prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias and LVH in systemic hypertension. Methods: In all subjects blood pressure was measured, electrocardiography and echocardiography was done. Holter monitoring and exercise test perform in certain cases. There were 500 hypertensive patients, 156 (31.2%) men and 344 (69%) women >30 years of age in the study. Among them 177 (35.4%) were diabetic, 224 (45%) were dyslipidemia, 188 (37.6%) were smokers, and 14 (3%) had homocysteinemia. Mean systolic BP (SBP) was 180 +- 20 mm Hg and diastolic BP (DBP) was 95 +- 12 in male and female patients. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was 119.2 +- 30 2 2gm/m in male while 103 +- 22 gm/m in female patients. Palpitation was seen in 126 (25%) male and 299 (59.8%) female patients. Atrial fibrillation was noted in 108 (21.6%) male and 125 (25%) female patients, 30 (6%) male and 82 (16.4%) female patients had atrial flutter. Ventricular tachycardia was noted in 37 (7.4%) male and 59 (11.8%) female patients. Holter monitoring showed significant premature ventricular contractions (PVC'S) in 109 (21.8%) male and 128 (25.69%) female patients while Holter showed atrial arrhythmias (APC'S) in 89 (17.8%) males and 119 (23.8%) females. Angiography findings diagnosed coronary artery disease in 119 (23.8%) with CAD male and 225 (45%) without CAD while 47 (9.4%) females presented with CAD and 109 (21.8%) without CAD. Conclusion: A significant association has been demonstrated between hypertension and arrhythmias. Diastolic dysfunction of the left ventricle, left atrial size and function, as well as LVH have been suggested as the underlying risk factors for supraventricular, ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death in hypertensives with LVH. (author)

  19. The Effect and Mechanism of Forsinopril on Ventricular Hypertrophy of SHR and Left Ventricular Pressure overloading Rat

    黄恺; 戴闺柱

    2002-01-01

    The effects and mechanism of long-term angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI)Forsinopril on left ventricular hypertrophy of spontaneous hypertension rat (SHR) and left ventricular pressure overloading rat were studied. The left ventricular index (left ventricle weight/body weight) was used to evaluate left ventricular hypertrophy and the in situ hybridization to investigate the TGF-β1 gene expression in left ventricle. The results showed that Forsinopril significantly decreased the left ventricular index of both SHR and left ventricle pressure overloading rat. Forsinopril reduced the integral photic density of TGF-β1 gene statement from 2. 836± 0. 314 to 1.91 ± 0. 217(P<0.01, n=8 ) of SHR rat and from 3. 071±0. 456 to 2. 37640. 379 (P<0.01, n=8) of left ventricular pressure overloading rat respectively. It was concluded that Forsinopril could prevent the occurrence of left ventricular hypertrophy and reduce the TGF-β1 gene expression in left ventricle of both SHR and left ventricular pressure overloading rat significantly.

  20. Left atrial systolic force in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    Chinali, M.; Simone, G. de; Wachtell, K.;

    2008-01-01

    patients (52.3%), who were older and had higher body mass index and heart rate (all P < 0.01) but similar systolic and diastolic blood pressure, in comparison with patients with normal left atrial systolic force. After controlling for confounders, increased left atrial systolic force was associated with......In hypertensive patients without prevalent cardiovascular disease, enhanced left atrial systolic force is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and increased preload. It also predicts cardiovascular events in a population with high prevalence of obesity. Relations between left atrial...

  1. Successful Medical Management of a Left Ventricular Thrombus and Aneurysm Following Failed Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction

    Oyedeji, Adebayo T.; Christopher Lee; Owojori, Olukolade O.; Ajegbomogun, Olabanji J; Adeseye A Akintunde

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with an extensive anterior myocardial infarction complicated by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, left ventricular apical thrombus and an apical left ventricular aneurysm following failed thrombolysis. We obtained serial two-dimensional echocardiograms at short intervals in the acute phase and also during the months of recovery and follow up. The patient was successfully and exclusively medically managed.

  2. Anesthetic experience of patient with isolated left ventricular noncompaction: a case report

    Kim, Doyeon; Kim, Eunhee; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Chung Su; Lee, Sangmin Maria; Lee, Jung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Isolated left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) is a rare primary genetic cardiomyopathy characterized by prominent trabeculation of the left ventricular wall and intertrabecular recesses. Perioperative management of the patient with LVNC might be challenging due to the clinical symptoms of heart failure, systemic thromboembolic events, and fatal left ventricular arrhythmias. We conducted real time intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in a patient with LVNC undergoing general anesth...

  3. Evaluation of left ventricular function by nuclear stethoscope

    The Nuclear Stethoscope (N.S.) is a unique cardiac probe system that provides a precise, rapid, noninvasive method to directly quantify ventricular functions at the bedside or actual beat-to-beat or composite beat basis. The accuracy and validity of N.S. were studied in 42 patients with cardiac diseases in comparison with camera-computer EF. The N.S. EF was well correlated with camera-computer EF (r = 0.82). In this study, clinical application of N.S. was as follows. 1. Beat-to-beat left ventricular volume response for evaluation of arrythmia (atrial fibrillation, premature ventricular conduction, bigemy et al.) 2. exercise study by handgrip and ergometer. EF is an extremely sensitive indicator to discriminate coronary arteries diseases from normal subjects. (author)

  4. Left ventricular border recognition using a dynamic search algorithm

    Initial results obtained with a simple, fully automated algorithm for detection of left ventricular boundaries are presented. The strength of this approach is the use of dynamic programming search techniques, which allow determination of local border points to be influenced by the entire global border location. The relative contributions of mask mode subtraction and the dynamic search technique are evaluated with respect to accurate border definition. These computer-determined ventricular borders are compared with hand-traced borders on subtracted and unsubtracted images. The modular dynamic search algorithm is shown to perform better than previously described algorithms, which generally require operator interaction. It is also shown that for both manual and automated techniques, ventricular borders derived from subtracted images may be significantly different from borders derived from nonsubtracted images

  5. Left ventricular aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia as initial presentation of cardiac sarcoidosis

    Ashraf Jmeian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS is a rare, potentially fatal disease. It has a wide range of clinical presentations that range from asymptomatic electrocardiogram changes to sudden cardiac death. Ventricular aneurysms and ventricular tachycardia are seen late in the disease, and are rarely the presenting manifestation of the disease. Diagnosis of CS is challenging and often missed or delayed. Case Report: We report a 35-year-old patient who presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia and ST-elevation on electrocardiogram. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronaries and left ventricular aneurysm. Subsequent 2D-echocardiography showed an infiltrative disease pattern. Cardiac MRI was done and showed late gadolinium enhancement in the septum, apex and lateral wall. The patient was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis and treated with immune suppression and antiarrhythmic agent. In addition underwent AICD implantation. Conclusion: Our case highlights the importance of suspecting cardiac sarcoidosis in young patients presenting with electrocardiogram changes, and present an atypical presentation of this disease.

  6. Evaluation of left ventricular function by digital subtraction angiography

    Effects of contrast medium doses on left ventriculographic images using intravenous digital subtraction angiography (IVDSA-LVG) were assessed. The validity of IVDSA-LVG in evaluating ejection fraction (FF) and left ventricular regional wall motion was determined by comparison with conventional left ventriculography using direct injection (direct LVG). The advantages of left ventriculography using intraarterial subtraction angiography (IADSA-LVG) performed by injecting small doses of contrast media directly into the left ventricle were stressed. 1. To assess the effects of doses of contrast media on IVDSA-LVG, 10, 20, and 30 ml Urografin-76 were injected into the superior vena cava in 16 patients, and the resulting images were compared in each patient. With only 10 ml contrast medium, left ventricular opacification was fairly good, and regional wall motion was evaluated in many cases, but 30 ml were needed to calculate ventricular volume and EF. 2. To determine the validity of IVDSA-LVG in evaluating EF and regional wall motion, we compared IVDSA-LVG using 30 ml of contrast medium with direct LVG in 18 patients. There was a good correlation between the two methods in determining EF (r = 0.877), and 90 % of the interpretations of regional wall motion were in agreement by the two methods. IVDSA-LVG was useful and accurate in evaluating EF and regional wall motion of the left ventricle. 3. IADSA-LVG was performed for five patients, and good quality images were obtained in many cases, even with relatively small doses (10 ml) of contrast media. These results suggested that this method may be used in cases with impaired LV function, to avoid hemodynamic derangement induced by conventional direct LVG using large doses of contrast medium. (author)

  7. Recurrent orthostatic syncope due to left atrial and left ventricular collapse after a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device implantation.

    Chandra, Avinash; Pradhan, Rajesh; Kim, Francis Y; Frisch, Daniel R; Bogar, Linda J; Bonita, Raphael; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C; Greenspon, Arnold J; Hirose, Hitoshi; Pitcher, Harrison T; Rubin, Sharon; Mather, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have become an established treatment for patients with advanced heart failure as a bridge to transplantation or for permanent support as an alternative to heart transplantation. Continuous-flow LVADs have been shown to improve outcomes, including survival, and reduce device failure compared with pulsatile devices. Although LVADs have been shown to be a good option for patients with end-stage heart failure, unanticipated complications may occur. We describe dynamic left atrial and left ventricular chamber collapse related to postural changes in a patient with a recent continuous-flow LVAD implantation. PMID:23260713

  8. Analysis of left ventricular function in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy

    Assessment of left ventricular function by cardiac pool scintigraphy and that of the regional wall motion by Fourier analysis were done in 43 cases of idiopathic cardiomyopathy and normal cases at rest and exercise stress. The normal group showed a linear increase of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multistage exercise stress, but showed bo abnormality of the regional wall motion. The congestive cardiomyopathy group showed markedly lower LVEF than those of the normal group at rest and a decreasing tendency by exercise stress. Abnormalities of the regional ventricular wall motion were not provoked by exercise stress. The hypertrophic cardiomyopathy group showed higher LVEF at rest than those of the normal group, but showed no more increases after the LVEF reached a certain plateau by increases of exercise. This group showed no abnormality of the regional ventricular wall motion. The hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy group showed higher LVEF at rest than those of the normal group, but decreased LVEF by multistage exercise stress. (Chiba, N.)

  9. Allowable variance set on left ventricular function parameter

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of allowable Variance settings on left ventricular function parameter of the arrhythmia patients during gated myocardial perfusion imaging. Method: 42 patients with evident arrhythmia underwent myocardial perfusion SPECT, 3 different allowable variance with 20%, 60%, 100% would be set before acquisition for every patients,and they will be acquired simultaneously. After reconstruction by Astonish, end-diastole volume(EDV) and end-systolic volume (ESV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) would be computed with Quantitative Gated SPECT(QGS). Using SPSS software EDV, ESV, EF values of analysis of variance. Result: there is no statistical difference between three groups. Conclusion: arrhythmia patients undergo Gated myocardial perfusion imaging, Allowable Variance settings on EDV, ESV, EF value does not have a statistical meaning. (authors)

  10. The effects of stress on left ventricular ejection fraction

    The left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was studied in 17 healthy volunteers with a new ambulatory left ventricular function monitor. Heart rate, EF, and blood pressure measurements were made during rest, a psychiatric stress interview, cold exposure, exercise, and eating. An increase in EF was seen during emotional stress (from 0.45±0.09 to 0.51±0.13, P<0.001). This increase was comparable to that observed during exercise (0.52±0.14) and eating (0.52±0.10, P<0.001). In contrast, cold exposure caused a decrease in EF (0.43±0.13, P<0.05). These observations demonstrate the powerful hemodynamic consequences of common behaviors as well as the utility and feasability of studying such behavioral factors in ambulatory subjects. (orig.)

  11. Should we screen for asymptomatic left ventricular dysfunction inglaucoma patients?

    The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of asymptomatic leftventricular dysfunction in primary open-angle glaucoma patients.Two-dimensional and pulsed Doppler echocardiography of transmitral flow wasperformed on 31 glaucoma patients and 27 controls. No significant differencewas found in early (E) and late (A) transmitral filling velocity, velocitytime integral E wave (VTIE) and A wave (VTIA), left ventricular end-diastolicpressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, left ventricular ejectionfraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS). A significant difference wasfound in ratio E/A (P=0.04) and ratio VTIA/VTIE (P=0.05), although allobtained values were within 95% confidence limit for the corresponding age.Our study tends to indicate the possibility of dysfunction of myocardialrelaxation in glaucoma patients which might be partially attributed tosystematic vascular dysregulation. (author)

  12. Aortic wave dynamics and its influence on left ventricular workload.

    Niema M Pahlevan

    Full Text Available The pumping mechanism of the heart is pulsatile, so the heart generates pulsatile flow that enters into the compliant aorta in the form of pressure and flow waves. We hypothesized that there exists a specific heart rate at which the external left ventricular (LV power is minimized. To test this hypothesis, we used a computational model to explore the effects of heart rate (HR and aortic rigidity on left ventricular (LV power requirement. While both mean and pulsatile parts of the pressure play an important role in LV power requirement elevation, at higher rigidities the effect of pulsatility becomes more dominant. For any given aortic rigidity, there exists an optimum HR that minimizes the LV power requirement at a given cardiac output. The optimum HR shifts to higher values as the aorta becomes more rigid. To conclude, there is an optimum condition for aortic waves that minimizes the LV pulsatile load and consequently the total LV workload.

  13. A case report of left ventricular wall rupture

    Kordovani H; Danesh Pajoh AH

    1994-01-01

    Cardiac rupture, particularly rupture of the left ventricular wall, has a very high mortality rate. In this occasion, even if injured patients being alive when carried to the hospital, many of them will die due to following possible reasons: severe bleeding, cardiac tamponade, wasting time for routine and usual diagnostic procedures or transferring the injured to other hospital equipped for cardiac surgery. The only way to avoid these dangerous hazards is prompt thoracotomy and repair of the ...

  14. Myocardial blood flow and metabolism in left ventricular ischemic dysfunction

    Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis

    1995-01-01

    Due to its inherent truly quantitative capabilities, its noninvasive nature and its nondestructive characteristics, PET has emerged as a unique investigative tool for the assessment and quantification of myocardial blood flow and metabolism in man. The present thesis reviews some of the insights gained with the use of PET into the pathophysiology of regional left ventricular ischemic dysfunction. Chapters 1 and 2 dealt with definitions and specific issues pertinent to the pathophysiologic...

  15. Comprehensive characterisation of hypertensive heart disease left ventricular phenotypes

    Rodrigues, Jonathan C. L.; Amadu, Antonio Matteo; Dastidar, Amardeep Ghosh; Szantho, Gergley V; Lyen, Stephen M.; Godsave, Cattleya; Ratcliffe, Laura E K; Burchell, Amy E; Hart, Emma C.; Hamilton, Mark C K; Nightingale, Angus K; Paton, Julian F. R.; Manghat, Nathan E; Bucciarelli-Ducci, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Myocardial intracellular/extracellular structure and aortic function were assessed among hypertensive left ventricular (LV) phenotypes using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR).METHODS: An observational study from consecutive tertiary hypertension clinic patients referred for CMR (1.5 T) was performed. Four LV phenotypes were defined: (1) normal with normal indexed LV mass (LVM) and LVM to volume ratio (M/V), (2) concentric remodelling with normal LVM but elevated M/V, (3) conc...

  16. Regional assessment of left ventricular torsion by CMR tagging

    Marcus J Tim; Kuijer Joost P; Götte Marco J; Rüssel Iris K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To introduce a standardized method for calculation of left ventricular torsion by CMR tagging and to determine the accuracy of torsion analysis in regions using an analytical model. Methods Torsion between base and apex, base and mid, and mid and apex levels was calculated using CSPAMM tagging and Harmonic Phase tracking. The accuracy of torsion analysis on a regional basis (circumferential segments and transmural layers) was analyzed using an analytical model of a deforming ...

  17. Synthetic Marijuana Induced Acute Nonischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Moustafa Elsheshtawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic marijuana is an uptrending designer drug currently widely spread in the US. We report a case of acute deterioration of nonischemic left ventricular dysfunction after exposure to synthetic marijuana. This case illustrates the importance of history taking in cardiac patients and identifies a negative cardiovascular effect of synthetic marijuana known as K2, not yet well detected by urine toxicology screening tools.

  18. Synthetic Marijuana Induced Acute Nonischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction.

    Elsheshtawy, Moustafa; Sriganesh, Priatharsini; Virparia, Vasudev; Patel, Falgun; Khanna, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic marijuana is an uptrending designer drug currently widely spread in the US. We report a case of acute deterioration of nonischemic left ventricular dysfunction after exposure to synthetic marijuana. This case illustrates the importance of history taking in cardiac patients and identifies a negative cardiovascular effect of synthetic marijuana known as K2, not yet well detected by urine toxicology screening tools. PMID:27119030

  19. Vitamin D levels and left ventricular diastolic function

    Pandit, Anil; Mookadam, Farouk; Boddu, Sailaja; Aryal Pandit, Aashrayata; Tandar, Anwar; Chaliki, Hari; Cha, Stephen; Lee, Howard R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between serum vitamin D level and left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction. Background Vitamin D deficiency has been shown in observational and prospective studies to be associated with cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease, LV hypertrophy and systolic heart failure. Even though diastolic LV dysfunction is an early manifestation of cardiac disease, there is no study that examines whether a deficiency of vitamin D is associated with...

  20. Non-gated computed tomography of left ventricular hypertrophy

    Non-ECG gated computed tomography (CT) of the heart was carried out in 19 cases with cardiovascular diseases; 4 with mitral stenosis, 3 with aortic valve disease, 2 with combined valve disease, 8 with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and one myocardial infarction and one aortic aneurysm. All cardiac diseases were studied by echocardiography and 13 of them further investigated by intracadiac catheterization. The interventricular septum and the apical and posterolateral wall of the left ventricle were segmentally evaluated as to relative wall thickness of myocardium on CT. The wall thickness was directly measured on left ventricular cine angiograms in 13 cases. O-G vector calculated by CT was compatible with the palne of vectorcardiography in evaluating left ventricular hypertorphy. Conclusion were as follows: 1) The degree and site of myocardial hypertrophy were detected by CT with satisfaction. 2) The area of ventricular myocardium increased in aortic valve disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. 3) The direction and magnitude of O-G vector calculated by CT were well correlated to the half area of QRS loop in horizontal plane of vectorcardiography. (author)

  1. Left ventricular dysfunction and blood glycohemoglobin levels in young diabetics

    Left ventricular function including regional wall motion (RWM) was evaluated by 99mTc first-pass and equilibrium gated blood pool ventriculography and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) blood levels determined by a quantitative column technique in 25 young patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus without clinical evidence of heart diesease, and in healthy controls matched for age and sex. Phase analysis revealed abnormal RWM in 19 of 21 diabetic patients. The mean left ventricular global ejection fraction, the mean regional ejection fraction and the mean 1/3 filling fraction were lower and the time to peak ejection, the time to peak filling and the time to peak ejection/cardiac cycle were longer in diabetics than in controls. We found high HbA1c levels in all diabetics. There was no significant difference between patients with and without retinopathy and with and without peripheral neuropathy in terms of left ventricular function and HbA1c levels. (orig.)

  2. Left ventricular diverticulum with marked hypertrophy of the left ventricular apex revealed by thallium-201 myocardial emission CT

    A case of left ventricular apical diverticulum with marked hypertrophy of the left ventricular apical wall revealed by thallium-201 myocardial emission CT is reported. A 23-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of chest oppression. She was known to have had a heart murmur soon after birth, but she grew uneventfully, partaking in normal exercise. At the age of 21, she began to feel chest oppression during exercise. As the attacks became frequent, she was admitted to our hospital. Physical examination revealed an ejection systolic murmur in the second left intercostal space. Electrocardiography showed ST depression and T inversion in leads III, a VF and V4-6. M-mode echocardiography was normal. Two-dimensional echocardiography showed a small diverticulum at the apex of the left ventricle, which was also recognized by left ventriculography. It was about 8 x 12 mm in size. Thallium-201 myocardial emission CT disclosed marked uptake in the apex of the left ventricle, suggesting apical hypertrophy. Stress thallium-201 myocardial emission CT was negative. Coronary angiography was normal. The cause of chest oppression in this patient is uncertain, but the small diverticulum and hypertrophy of the cardiac apex may play a role in its pathogenesis. (author)

  3. Non-invasive measurement of stroke volume and left ventricular ejection fraction. Radionuclide cardiography compared with left ventricular cardioangiography

    Kelbaek, H.; Svendsen, J.H.; Aldershvile, J.; Folke, K.; Nielsen, S.L.

    The stroke volume (SV) was determined by first passage radionuclide cardiography and the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by multigated radionuclide cardiography in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease. The results were evaluated against those obtained by the invasive dye dilution or thermodilution and left ventricular cardioangiographic techniques. In a paired comparison the mean difference between the invasive and radionuclide SV was -1 ml (SED 3.1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (p < 0.01). Radionuclide LVEF values also correlated well with cardioangiographic measurements, r = 0.93 (p < 0.001). LVEF determined by multigated radionuclide cardiography was, however, significantly lower than when measured by cardioangiography, the mean difference being 6% (p < 0.001). These findings suggest that radionuclide determinations of SV and LVEF are reliable. The discrepancy between the non-invasive and invasive LVEF values raises the question, whether LVEF is overestimated by cardioangiography or underestimated by radionuclide cardiography.

  4. Inverted Left Atrial Appendage: A Cause of Left Ventricular Inflow Obstruction

    A Molaei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available When a new left atrial mass is discovered by means of echocardiography, the differential diagnosis is usually between thrombus, vegetation, and tumor. In the past decade, however, the physicians were able to document another cause. Our aim is to introduce a case of postoperative inverted left atrial appendage which caused left ventricular inflow obstruction requiring reoperation. We report a 4- year old boy who had inverted left atrial appendage after atrial septal defect repair. He showed signs and symptoms of pulmonary edema postoperatively. We assessed him by echocardiography and discovered a mass in his left atrium necessitating re-operation. The surgeon found and restored inverted left atrial appendage intra-operatively. Because inverted left atrial appendage can cause severe and occasionally life threatening complications, we believe intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography is highly essential to diagnose this pathology and to avoid restorative reoperation.

  5. Prognostic significance of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic hypertension (the LIFE Study)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Palmieri, Vittorio; Gerdts, Eva;

    2010-01-01

    Patients with hypertension and left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy commonly have impaired diastolic filling. However, it remains unknown whether changes in LV diastolic filling variables are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this study, 778 patients with hypertension with...... account. In conclusion, antihypertensive treatment in patients with hypertension with electrocardiographic LV hypertrophy resulted in significant improvement in transmitral flow patterns; this was not associated with reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, normal in-treatment LV filling...

  6. Left ventricular mass formulae and prevalence rates of echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in Nigerians with essential hypertension

    Ajayi Ebenezer Adekunle; Ajayi Iyiade Adeseye; Oyedeji Tolulope Adebayo; Adeoti Adekunle Olatayo; Omotoye Olusola Joseph; Adebayo Rasaaq Ayodele

    2013-01-01

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as a marker of cardiac damage in hypertension has important prognostic implications. With high prevalence of hypertension in Nigeria and the untoward effect of LVH, it is essential that the prevalence of LVH be determined. Aims: To determine prevalence of LVH and its severity in clinical practice among hypertensive patients referred for echocardiographic assessment in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Devereux and Troy formulae were used to calcula...

  7. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Major Risk Factor in Patients with Hypertension: Update and Practical Clinical Applications

    Richard E. Katholi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy is a maladaptive response to chronic pressure overload and an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation, diastolic heart failure, systolic heart failure, and sudden death in patients with hypertension. Since not all patients with hypertension develop left ventricular hypertrophy, there are clinical findings that should be kept in mind that may alert the physician to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy so a more definitive evaluation can be performed using an echocardiogram or cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Controlling arterial pressure, sodium restriction, and weight loss independently facilitate the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. Choice of antihypertensive agents may be important when treating a patient with hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers followed by calcium channel antagonists most rapidly facilitate the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy. With the regression of left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic function and coronary flow reserve usually improve, and cardiovascular risk decreases.

  8. Radionuclide left ventricular absolute volume determination by ejection fraction measurement data and a left posterior oblique blood pool image

    Kinoshita, Shinichiro (Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan))

    1989-09-01

    A new method for the calculation of left ventricular volumes called the 'semi-geometric' method, was reported by Nichols et al in 1984. This method, however, still had certain limitations for practical use. This paper describes a modified semi-geometric method in which the left ventricular volume was obtained from conventional left ventricular ejection fraction measurement data collected from the modified left anterior oblique position with a caudal tilt of 10 degrees or more and a left posterior oblique blood pool image. The left ventricular end-diastolic volumes obtained by this method were compared with those calculated by combining the thermodilution cardiac output and the left ventricular ejection fraction. The correlation coefficient was r=0.93 (n=20). In the phantom experiment, the true volumes and those obtained by this method showed an excellent correlation (r=0.99). This method is considered accurate and practical. (author).

  9. Dynamic three-dimensional tagged imaging of left ventricular contraction

    This paper reports on a method, cardiac tagging with MR imaging, used to assess ventricular deformation during the cardiac cycle. Twenty human volunteers were examined. Six short-axis images of the left ventricle placed to encompass the entire left ventricle were acquired with six radially distributed linear tags generated at the R wave of the electrocardiogram. A series of six images in the long axis of left ventricle with six equidistant tags extending from apex to base parallel to the short axis of the ventricle were also obtained to determine the amount of apex-to-base translation. An inhouse computer program was used to determine automatically the epicardial, endocardial, and tag contours. A three-dimensional wire frame construct was then generated to serve as the data base for a dynamic three-dimensional display of the contracting ventricle as well as to measure the main components of strain

  10. Ultrasonic evaluation of the relationship between left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular geometry and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension

    Jing Dong; Pingyang Zhang; Xuehong Feng; Chong Wang; Pei Wang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or left ventricular geometry (LVG) and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension (EH). Methods: Seventy-six patients and 30 normal subjects were first examined by echocardiography. Brachial artery dilatation induced by reactive hyperemia (DIRH) or nitroglycerin (DING) was detected using high-resolution ultrasonography. Results: DIRH was lower in patients with hypertension than in the controls, and the decrease in DIRH was greater in the patients with LVH than that in patients without LVH (4.36±2.54% vs 8.56+1.87 %; P 0.05). While there was no significant difference in DIRH between the patients with normal left ventricular geometry or cardiac remodeling, the patients showing either eccentric or concentric left ventricular hypertrophy had lower DIRH than the patients with normal left ventricular geometry or cardiac remodeling. The DIRH was the lowest in patients with concentric hypertrophy. Although bivariate analysis showed that the left ventricular mass index (LVMI) correlated well with the brachial artery dilatation induced by reactive hyperemia, diastolic blood pressure and mean blood pressure (r=-0.61, P < 0.0001; r=0.27, P < 0.05; r=0.31, P < 0.05, respectively), a multivariate stepwise regression demonstrated that LVMI correlated only with the brachial artery dilatation induced by reactive hyperemia. Conclusion: Left ventricular hypertrophy was related to endothelial dysfunction in essential hypertension. The endothelial dysfunction might be basic and important in the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  11. LEFT VENTRICULAR ROTATION, TWIST AND UNTWIST: PHYSIOLOGICAL ROLE AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    E. N. Pavlyukova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The helical ventricular myocardial band of Torrent-Guasp is a new concept, which provides strong grounds for reconciliation of some important aspects in cardiovascular medicine. Oblique fiber orientation provides left ventricular rotation, which in addition to radial thickening and longitudinal shortening, is predicted as an essential component of the effective left ventricular pumping. Left ventricular rotation can be measured in clinical practice noninvasively using echocardiography and this provides new opportunities for the assessment of different aspects of left ventricular mechanical function.

  12. Radionuclide determination of right and left ventricular stroke volumes

    Wei Feng Shen; Roubin, G.S.; Choong, C.Y.P.; Harris, P.J.; Flether, P.J.; Kelly, D.T.; Uren, R.F.; Hutton, B.F.

    1985-03-01

    The relationship between radionuclide and thermodilution measurement of stroke volumes (SV) was investigated in 30 patients without valvular regurgitation or intracardiac shunt (group A) at rest and during exercise. Both attenuated radionuclide right ventricular (RV) and left ventricular (LV) SV measurements correlated well with the SV determined by the thermodilution method (r = 0.87 and r = 0.93, all P < 0.001). The reliability of the radionuclide method to estimate SV was evaluated prospectively in two additional groups of patients. In 11 patients without valvular regurgitation or intracardiac shunt (group B) the radionuclide RVSV and LVSV closely approximated to thermodilution SV at rest and during exercise. In 15 patients with aortic regurgitation (group C) the radionuclide stroke volume ratio correlated well with the angiographic regurgitant fraction. Thus, both RVSV and LVSV and the severity of aortic regurgitation can be reliably measured with gated radionuclide ventriculography.

  13. Left ventricular structure and remodeling in patients with COPD

    Pelà G

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Giovanna Pelà,1 Mauro Li Calzi,1 Silvana Pinelli,1 Roberta Andreoli,1 Nicola Sverzellati,2 Giuseppina Bertorelli,1 Matteo Goldoni,1 Alfredo Chetta11Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, University Medical School, University Hospital Parma, Parma, ItalyBackground: Data on cardiac alterations such as left ventricular (LV hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and lower stroke volume in patients with COPD are discordant. In this study, we investigated whether early structural and functional cardiac changes occur in patients with COPD devoid of manifest cardiovascular disease, and we assessed their associations with clinical and functional features.Methods: Forty-nine patients with COPD belonging to all Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD classes were enrolled and compared with 36 controls. All subjects underwent clinical history assessment, lung function testing, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and conventional and Doppler tissue echocardiography. Patients were also subjected to computed tomography to quantify emphysema score.Results: Patients with COPD had lower LV cavity associated with a marked increase in relative wall thickness (RWT, suggesting concentric remodeling without significant changes in LV mass. RWT was significantly associated with ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second to the forced vital capacity and emphysema score and was the only cardiac parameter that – after multivariate analysis – significantly correlated with COPD conditions in all individuals. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that RWT (with a cutoff point of 0.42 predicted the severity of COPD with 83% specificity and 56% sensitivity (area under the curve =0.69, 95% confidence interval =0.59–0.81. Patients with COPD showed right ventricular to be functional but no structural changes.Conclusion: Patients with COPD without evident cardiovascular disease

  14. Myocardial perfusion in relation with low left ventricular ejection fraction

    Full text: Aim: Assessment of myocardial perfusion in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Material and Methods: 27 patients were included in the study. All patients underwent radionuclide ventriculography with Tc99m human serum albuminum and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) with Tc99m SESTAMIBI according to standard two days protocol. All examinations were performed on the SPECT E.CAM Siemens. Results: All patients have been divided into two groups according to the LVEF. 1st group consisted of 16 patients with LVEF from 30% to 50% and the second one - 11 patients with LVEF lower than 30%. MPS revealed 68 segments of reversible perfusion defects and 9 segments of fixed defects (ischemic and post myocardial infarction respectively) in the 1st group. The second group of patients had 41 segments of reversible perfusion defects and 7 segments of fixed ones. The quantity of segments with perfusion defects per one patient in both groups were relatively equivalent: 4,36 and 4,66 respectively. However the analysis shows that perfusion defects of anterior wall of left ventricle were found in 10 of 11 patients (90%) in the 2nd group and in 7 of 16 patients (44%) in the first one. Conclusion: Perfusion abnormalities in the area of anterior wall significantly decrease left ventricular ejection fraction and patients with such kind of localization of perfusion defects have bad prognosis for survival and should be the candidates for myocardial revascularisation in the first turn

  15. Determinants of left ventricular mass in obesity; a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Clarke Kieran

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is linked to increased left ventricular mass, an independent predictor of mortality. As a result of this, understanding the determinants of left ventricular mass in the setting of obesity has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Using cardiovascular magnetic resonance our goal was to elucidate the main predictors of left ventricular mass in severely obese subjects free of additional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods 38 obese (BMI 37.8 ± 6.9 kg/m2 and 16 normal weight controls subjects, (BMI 21.7 ± 1.8 kg/m2, all without cardiovascular risk factors, underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess left ventricular mass, left ventricular volumes and visceral fat mass. Left ventricular mass was then compared to serum and anthropometric markers of obesity linked to left ventricular mass, i.e. height, age, blood pressure, total fat mass, visceral fat mass, lean mass, serum leptin and fasting insulin level. Results As expected, obesity was associated with significantly increased left ventricular mass (126 ± 27 vs 90 ± 20 g; p 2 = 0.77. Conclusion The left ventricular hypertrophic response to obesity in the absence of additional cardiovascular risk factors is mainly attributable to increases in lean body mass, LV stroke volume and visceral fat mass. In view of the well documented link between obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy and mortality, these findings have potentially important prognostic and therapeutic implications for primary and secondary prevention.

  16. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 ± 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 ± 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p < 0.0001), normal patients and patients after inferior wall infarction (p < 0.0001) and normal patients and patients with coronary artery disease (p < 0.0001). The TPFR was 180 ± 37.5 msec after anterior - and 158 ± 50.7 msec after inferior wall infarction and 156 ± 45.2 msec in the patients with CAD without previous infarction. The left ventricular diastolic function (PFR and/or TPFR) was abnormal in 88% after anterior- and in 82% after inferior wall infarction and in 69% in coronary patients without previous myocardial infarction. In comparison with this the ejection fraction was reduced in 66% in anterior- and in 61% inferior wall infarction at rest. These results indicate that the diastolic function at rest appears to be more informative for evaluation of a left ventricular dysfunction than the systolic function at rest. (orig.)

  17. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Brugger, P.T.

    1986-08-01

    In 302 patients with confirmed coronary disease we determined the left ventricular diastolic function with the Nuclear Stethoscope by the aid of the Peak Filling Rate (PFR) and the Time to Peak Filling Rate (TPFR). Moreover we investigated the ejection fraction (EF). 201 patients had already suffered a myocardial infarction, of these 99 an anterior wall and 102 an inferior wall infarction. The remaining 101 patients had a CAD without a history of myocardial infarction. The PFR was 2.19 +- 0.65 EDV/sec in the 99 patients after anterior wall infarction and 2.62 +- 0.85 EDV/sec in the 102 patients after inferior wall infarction and 2.79 +- 0.85 EDV/sec in 101 patients with coronary artery disease without a history of myocardial infarction. For the PFR there could be found a statistically significant difference between normal patients and patients after anterior wall infarction (p < 0.0001), normal patients and patients after inferior wall infarction (p < 0.0001) and normal patients and patients with coronary artery disease (p < 0.0001). The TPFR was 180 +- 37.5 msec after anterior - and 158 +- 50.7 msec after inferior wall infarction and 156 +- 45.2 msec in the patients with CAD without previous infarction. The left ventricular diastolic function (PFR and/or TPFR) was abnormal in 88% after anterior- and in 82% after inferior wall infarction and in 69% in coronary patients without previous myocardial infarction. In comparison with this the ejection fraction was reduced in 66% in anterior- and in 61% inferior wall infarction at rest. These results indicate that the diastolic function at rest appears to be more informative for evaluation of a left ventricular dysfunction than the systolic function at rest.

  18. New nuclear medicine method of calculating left ventricular stroke volume

    Gieschke, R.; Luig, H.; Reuter, R.; Figulla, H.R.

    1983-12-01

    A new non-invasive nuclear medicine procedure for determining the left ventricular stroke volume is described. The procedure exhibits the following features: 1. individual calibration of scintigraphic counts in activity by first-pass evaluation; 2. no need for a delta-shaped bolus injection; and 3. determination of different stroke volumes, e.g. during different grades of exercise, by only one injection and by only one blood sample. 36 results obtained at rest and during exercise are compared with corresponding results of the thermodilution method (r = 0.86).

  19. Modelling fibre orientation of the left ventricular human heart wall

    Siem, Knut Vidar Løvøy

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to obtain and represent the orientation of the muscle fibres in the left ventricular wall of the human heart. The orientation of these fibres vary continuously through the wall. This report features an introduction to the human heart and medical imaging techniques. Attention is gradually drawn to concepts in computer science, and how they can help us get a “clearer picture” of the internals of, perhaps, the most important organ in the human body. A highly detail...

  20. [Pathophysiology of left ventricular hypertrophy in arterial hypertension].

    Vallotton, M B; Braconi-Quintaje, S; Lang, U

    1997-02-11

    The role of left ventricular hypertrophy as an independent risk factor for subsequent cardio-vascular events is well established, therefore the authors, in this brief review, describe the endocrine function of the heart and the role played by various factors, including hormones, in the development of cardiac remodeling during the course of hypertension. They then outline the present state of our knowledge concerning transmembrane signaling in the cardiomyocyte in response to an activation of specific receptors for vasoactive hormones of the renin-angiotensin II-aldosterone system. PMID:9139339

  1. Laronidase Replacement Therapy and Left Ventricular Function in Mucopolysaccharidosis I

    Harada, Haruhito; Niiyama, Hiroshi; Katoh, Atsushi; Ikeda, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the effects of long-term laronidase replacement therapy (LRT) on the left ventricular (LV) function of a 52-year-old adult woman with mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I). The urinary uronic acid concentration significantly decreased by 78.7% (from 75 to 16 mg/g creatinine) after LRT; thereafter, estimated LV weight as assessed by two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography significantly decreased by 33.3% (from 189 to 126 g). Although systolic LV function of the ejection fraction as assesse...

  2. Coronary flow and left ventricular function during environmental stress.

    Erickson, H. H.; Adams, J. D.; Stone, H. L.; Sandler, H.

    1972-01-01

    A canine model was used to study the effects of different environmental stresses on the heart and coronary circulation. The heart was surgically instrumented to measure coronary blood flow, left ventricular pressure, and other cardiovascular variables. Coronary flow was recorded by telemetry. Physiologic data were processed and analyzed by analog and digital computers. By these methods the physiologic response to altitude hypoxia, carbon monoxide, hypercapnia, acceleration, exercise, and the interaction of altitude hypoxia and carbon monoxide were described. The effects of some of these stresses on the heart and coronary circulation are discussed.

  3. Patient-reported outcomes in left ventricular assist device therapy

    Brouwers, Corline; Denollet, Johan; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Caliskan, Kadir; Kealy, Jennifer; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2011-01-01

    Technological advancements of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) have created today's potential for extending the lives of patients with end-stage heart failure. Few studies have examined the effect of LVAD therapy on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), such as health status, quality of life, and...... anxiety/depression, despite poor PROs predicting mortality and rehospitalization in patients with heart failure. In this systematic review, we provide an overview of available evidence on the impact of LVAD therapy on PROs and discuss recommendations for clinical research and practice....

  4. Effects of sedation on echocardiographic variables of left atrial and left ventricular function in healthy cats.

    Ward, Jessica L; Schober, Karsten E; Fuentes, Virginia Luis; Bonagura, John D

    2012-10-01

    Although sedation is frequently used to facilitate patient compliance in feline echocardiography, the effects of sedative drugs on echocardiographic variables have been poorly documented. This study investigated the effects of two sedation protocols on echocardiographic indices in healthy cats, with special emphasis on the assessment of left atrial size and function, as well as left ventricular diastolic performance. Seven cats underwent echocardiography (transthoracic two-dimensional, spectral Doppler, color flow Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging) before and after sedation with both acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM), or acepromazine (0.1 mg/kg IM), butorphanol (0.25 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (1.5 mg/kg IV). Heart rate increased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol/ketamine (mean±SD of increase, 40±26 beats/min) and non-invasive systolic blood pressure decreased significantly following acepromazine/butorphanol (mean±SD of decrease, 12±19 mmHg). The majority of echocardiographic variables were not significantly different after sedation compared with baseline values. Both sedation protocols resulted in mildly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and mildly increased left ventricular end-diastolic wall thickness. This study therefore failed to demonstrate clinically meaningful effects of these sedation protocols on echocardiographic measurements, suggesting that sedation with acepromazine, butorphanol and/or ketamine can be used to facilitate echocardiography in healthy cats. PMID:22577049

  5. Deterioration of left ventricular function following atrio-ventricular node ablation and right ventricular apical pacing in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation

    Szili-Torok, Tamas; Kimman, Geert-Jan; Poldermans, Don; Jordaens, Luc; Roelandt, Jos; Theuns, Dominic

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: Transcatheter radiofrequency ablation of the atrio-ventricular (AV) node followed by ventricular pacing has been shown to improve symptoms and quality of life of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). It is assumed that function improves, but this has been less well demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of AV node ablation and ventricular pacing on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with permanent AF. METHODS AND RESULTS: ...

  6. Left ventricular volumes determined with equilibrium rdionuclide angiography

    Del Vecchio, G.; Santomauro, M.; Alfano, B.; Pace, L.; Fazio, S.; D' Amico, P.; Salvatore, M.; De Divitiis, O.

    1988-01-01

    Several methods have been proposed to measure left ventricular volumes by Radionuclide Angiography. An automated method for edge detection and volume determination is presented. This procedures is based on an original algorithm which can take in account factors related to system resolution, background level and the presence of other radioactive sources (i.e. right ventricle, left atrium) within the image. Phantom studies were performed to assess either the effect of the object slope and the influence of the distance from the collimator on the edge detection algorithm. The results showed that the method was independent from such factors, and a very good correlation (r = .99) was found between measured and actual volumes. Furthermore, a preliminary group of patient studies was analyzed using the new algorithm, which showed to be reliable in determining cardiac volumes as compared to thermodilution data (r = .883).

  7. Usefulness of verapamil for congestive heart failure associated with abnormal left ventricular diastolic filling and normal left ventricular systolic performance

    Normal left ventricular systolic performance with impaired left ventricular diastolic filling may be present in a substantial number of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To evaluate the effect of oral verapamil in this subset, 20 men (mean age 68 +/- 5 years) with CHF, intact left ventricular function (ejection fraction greater than 45%) and abnormal diastolic filling (peak filling rate less than 2.5 end-diastolic volumes per second [edv/s]) were studied in a placebo-controlled, double-blind 5-week crossover trial. All patients underwent echocardiography to rule out significant valvular disease, and thallium-201 stress scintigraphy to exclude major active ischemia. Compared to baseline values, verapamil significantly improved exercise capacity by 33% (13.9 +/- 4.3 vs 10.7 +/- 3.4 minutes at baseline) and peak filling rate by 30% (2.29 +/- 0.54 vs 1.85 +/- 0.45 edv/s at baseline) (all p less than 0.05). Placebo values were 12.3 +/- 4.0 minutes and 2.16 +/- 0.48 edv/s, respectively (difference not significant for both). Improvement from baseline in an objective clinico-radiographic heart failure score (scale 0 to 13) was significantly greater with verapamil compared to placebo (median improvement in score: 3 vs 1, p less than 0.01). Mean ejection fraction and systolic blood pressure were unchanged from baseline; diastolic blood pressure and heart rate decreased to a small degree. Verapamil may have therapeutic efficacy in patients with CHF, preserved systolic function and impaired diastolic filling

  8. Observations of super early left ventricular remodeling experimental myocardial infarction

    Purpose: Ventricular remodeling is defined as the changes in the shape and size of the entire left ventricle after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Many investigators have shown that left ventricular remodeling is related to clinical outcomes, including mortality, that represent the natural history, of the heart failure syndrome. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that it is possible to observe super early left ventricular remodeling by 99mTc-MIBI myocardial imaging in the dog model of acute experimental myocardial infarction. Methods: Experimental subjects: Twenty-three healthy mongrel dogs (14-25 kg) of either sex were studied under general anesthesia (sodium pentobarbital, 30 mg/kg). The left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery was dissected and ligated between the first and second diagonal branches. Seven dogs died of ventricular fibrillation after the LAD coronary artery ligation. The 16 remaining dogs were divided into two groups: Group A (GA) received 99mTc-MIBI myocardial imaging (n=8): Group B (GB) received 99mTc-MIBI myocardial imaging combined with echocardiography (n=8). 99mTc-MIBI myocardial perfusion imaging :Static 99mTc-MIBI myocardial imaging was taken with ADAC Vertex Dual-head SPECT. 99mTc-MIBI kit was manufactured in Syncor, China. Each dog served as its own control, and was scanned by 99mTc-MIBI myocardial imaging and chocardiography at 48-72 hours before ligation. The mean time of the first acquisition was 21.87 ± 11.03 (14-48) minutes post-operatively in GA, 57.63±22.83 (30-99) minutes for 99mTc-MIBI imaging in GB, 26.00±15.07 (12-50) minutes for echocardiography in GB. Acquisition techniques for Gated SPECT: ECG synchronized data collection: R wave trigger, 8 Frames/Cardiac cycle. Images were gathered by rotating the detectors 180 degrees at 6 degrees per frame. Each frame took 40 seconds. The dog position was supine. The images were acquired and recorded for 6 hours following the LAD coronary artery ligation. After 6 hours

  9. Changes of left ventricular function at exercise after lung resection

    To determine the effect of lung resection on left ventricular function, 29 surgical patients were examined by using a nuclear stethoscope as a non-invasive means for measuring ventricular function at exercise. Pre- and post-operative parameters were obtained at rest and exercise. At rest, postoperative stroke volume (SV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), ejection fraction (EF), and ejection rate (ER) were significantly decreased; heart rate (HR) was significantly increased; and both filling rate (FR) and cardiac output (CO) remained unchanged. At maximum exercise, postoperative EDV, SV, ER and FR were significantly decreased; and there was no significant difference in either HR or EF, resulting in a significantly decreased CO. A ratio of CO and FR at maximum exercise to at rest was significantly decreased after surgery, as compared with that before surgery. According to the number of lobe resection, similar findings for all parameters, except for EF, were observed in the group of two lobe or more resection (n=13); and only two parameters, ER and FR, had the same tendency as those mentioned above in the group of a single lobe resection (n=16). The age group of 60 years or less (n=14) had similar findings for all parameters. In the group of 65 years or more (n=10), resting HR after surgery was not different from that before surgery; and postoperative CO was significantly decreased at rest, but not different from preoperative value at maximum exercise. In conclusion, left ventricular function associated with lung resection is reflected by decreased EDV and SV resulting from reduced pre-load. These changes may be corrected at rest, but not corrected at maximum exercise, resulting in decreased CO. More noticeable decrease in EDV and SV seems to be associated with larger lung resection. In older patients, HR is not corrected well, resulting in a decrease in CO at rest. (N.K.)

  10. Echocardiographic partition values and prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive Nigerians

    Oladapo Olulola O; Adebayo Adedeji K; Aje Akinyemi; Ojji Dike B; Ogah Okechukwu S; Adebiyi Adewole A; Falase Ayodele O

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is a well known independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. It has been shown that combination of left ventricular mass (LVM) and relative wall thickness (RWT) can be used to identify different forms of left ventricular (LV) geometry. Prospective studies have shown that LV geometric patterns have prognostic implications, with the worst prognosis associated with concentric hypertrophy. The methods for the normalization or indexation...

  11. 24 Hour ST Segment Analysis in Transient Left Ventricular Apical Ballooning

    Frank Bode; Christof Burgdorf; Heribert Schunkert; Volkhard Kurowski

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The etiologic basis of transient left ventricular apical ballooning, a novel cardiac syndrome, is not clear. Among the proposed pathomechanisms is coronary vasospasm. Long-term ST segment analysis may detect vasospastic episodes but has not been reported. METHODS: 30 consecutive patients with transient left ventricular apical ballooning, left ventricular dysfunction and normal or near-normal coronary arteries were investigated. A 24-hour Holter ECG was obtained after emergency admi...

  12. Echocardiographic Partition Values and Prevalence of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Jamaicans

    Chiranjivi Potu; Edwin Tulloch-Reid; Dainia Baugh; Olusegun A Ismail; Ernest C. Madu

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) detected by either electrocardiography or echo- cardiography has been shown to be an extremely strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with essential hypertension and in members of the general population. Alternative to LVH, left ventricular geometrical patterns offer incremental prognostic value beyond that provided by the other cardiovascular risk factors including left ventricular mass (LVM). Combination of LVM and relative wall thickness ...

  13. Left-Ventricular Structure in the Southall And Brent REvisited (SABRE) Study: Explaining Ethnic Differences

    Park, Chloe M.; March, Katherine; Ghosh, Arjun K.; Jones, Siana; Coady, Emma; Tuson, Claire; Francis, Darrel; Mayet, Jamil; Tillin, Therese; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiometabolic risk is elevated in South Asians and African Caribbeans compared with Europeans, yet whether this is associated with ethnic differences in left-ventricular structure is unclear. Conventional M-mode or 2-dimensional echocardiography may be misleading, because they calculate left-ventricular mass and remodeling using geometric assumptions. Left-ventricular structure was compared in a triethnic population-based cohort using conventional and 3-dimensional echocardiography on 895 i...

  14. How reliable is the electrocardiogram in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertension?

    Vijan, S. G.; Manning, G; Millar-Craig, M W

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the sensitivity and specificity of the electrocardiogram in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy in 75 hypertensive patients. Each patient underwent a 12 lead electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. Left ventricular mass index, using echocardiogram, was calculated according to the Penn convention and left ventricular hypertrophy was assessed by standard electrocardiographic criteria. The electrocardiogram was found to be very specific but insensitive in the detection of le...

  15. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Major Risk Factor in Patients with Hypertension: Update and Practical Clinical Applications

    Katholi, Richard E.; Couri, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy is a maladaptive response to chronic pressure overload and an important risk factor for atrial fibrillation, diastolic heart failure, systolic heart failure, and sudden death in patients with hypertension. Since not all patients with hypertension develop left ventricular hypertrophy, there are clinical findings that should be kept in mind that may alert the physician to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy so a more definitive evaluation can be performed u...

  16. Hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy in liquidators of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    Echocardiography was used for the study of prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in 839 liquidators of consequences of the Chernobyl accident. Prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (left ventricular myocardial mass 134 g/m2) was 10.3, 13.4 and 22.5 % in liquidators with normal blood pressure, borderline hypertension and hypertension, respectively. Liquidators with normal blood pressure had significantly greater left ventricular myocardial mass than normotensive men from general population while liquidators and non liquidators with hypertension had equal values of this parameter

  17. Clinical application of automatic extraction of left ventricular contours. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes by contrast-enhanced breath-hold ultrafast cine MR imaging

    To assess the validity of automatic extraction of left ventricular inner contours based on contrast-enhanced ultrafast cine-MR images, phantom (n=15) and clinical (n=60) studies were performed. In phantom study, left ventricular volumes obtained by biplane modified Simpson's method based on automatic extraction of left ventricular inner contour was significantly correlated to phantom's volumes(r=0.991). Contrast-enhanced breath-hold ultrafast cine MR imaging was shown to provide accurate cardiac images with high success rate (89% in horizontal long axis section and 88% in vertical long axis section) in clinical study. However, the extraction of left ventricular inner contour depends on operator's manual tracing and the time required for data analysis is longer. The automatic extraction time of left ventricular inner contour was 4 second/frame, on the other hand conventional manual tracing time was 60-90 second/frame. Comparison with left ventricular volumes showed a high correlation between contrast-enhanced ultrafast cine MR imaging (monoplane area-length's and biplane modified Simpson's methods based on automatic extraction of left ventricle) and digital subtraction left ventriculography (biplane area-length's method). (author)

  18. Comparison of Arrhythmias among Different Left Ventricular Geometric Patterns in Essential Hypertension

    2001-01-01

    The differences of arrhythmias among distinct left ventricular geometric patterns in the patients with essential hypertension were studied. 179 patients with essential hypertension received 24 h dynamic ECG recording, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, echocardiography examination, etc. According to the examinations, left ventricular geometric patterns and arrhythmias were identified. The comparison of morbidity of arrhythmias between the left ventricular remodeling group and the normal geometric pattern group was performed. The multiple stepwise regression analysis was carried out to identify the independent determinants of arrhythmias. After these predictors were controlled or adjusted, the severity of arrhythmias among different left ventricular geometric patterns was compared. It was found that the morbidity of atrial arrhythmia, ventricular arrhythmia and complex ventricular arrhythmias in the left ventricular remodeling group was significantly higher than in the normal geometric pattern group respectively. There were many independent factors influencing on arrhythmias in essential hypertension. Of all these factors, some indices of left ventricular anatomic structure, grade of hypertension, left atrial inner dimension, E/A, diastolic blood pressure load value at night and day average heart rate and so on were very important. After the above-mentioned factors were adjusted, the differences of the orders of arrhythmias between partial geometric patterns were reserved, which resulted from the differences of the geometric patterns. Many factors contributed to arrhythmias of essential hypertension, such as grade of hypertension, LVMI, LA, PWT and so on. The severity of arrhythmias was different in different left ventricular geometric patterns.

  19. New scintigraphic method for determining left ventricular volumes

    Nichols, K.; Adatepe, M.H.; Isaacs, G.H.; Powell, O.M.; Pittman, D.E.; Gay, T.C.; Begg, F.R.

    1984-10-01

    A new scintigraphic count-based method for measuring absolute left ventricular volumes is presented. It is a fast and simple technique that allows geometrical assumptions to be avoided and is free of radiation attenuation corrections. This method requires the acquisition of an image of the left ventricle in the right anterior oblique projection and the collection of gated blood pool images in the left anterior oblique projection. To assess the accuracy of the method scintigraphic stroke volumes were compared with those derived from thermodilution measurements during cardiac catheterization in 20 subjects, and to assess its precision the technique was applied to phantom data of known radionuclide volumes. Excellent correlations were found between the scintigraphic and both the thermodilution and phantom data. The reproducibility of results was investigated by repeating data acquisition and analysis for 15 subjects on two different days, and the interobserver variability of the method was studied by having two computer operators calculate volumes for the same patient data for 20 randomly selected studies.

  20. Passive and active ventricular elastances of the left ventricle

    Ng Eddie YK

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Description of the heart as a pump has been dominated by models based on elastance and compliance. Here, we are presenting a somewhat new concept of time-varying passive and active elastance. The mathematical basis of time-varying elastance of the ventricle is presented. We have defined elastance in terms of the relationship between ventricular pressure and volume, as: dP = EdV + VdE, where E includes passive (Ep and active (Ea elastance. By incorporating this concept in left ventricular (LV models to simulate filling and systolic phases, we have obtained the time-varying expression for Ea and the LV-volume dependent expression for Ep. Methods and Results Using the patient's catheterization-ventriculogram data, the values of passive and active elastance are computed. Ea is expressed as: ; Epis represented as: . Ea is deemed to represent a measure of LV contractility. Hence, Peak dP/dt and ejection fraction (EF are computed from the monitored data and used as the traditional measures of LV contractility. When our computed peak active elastance (Ea,max is compared against these traditional indices by linear regression, a high degree of correlation is obtained. As regards Ep, it constitutes a volume-dependent stiffness property of the LV, and is deemed to represent resistance-to-filling. Conclusions Passive and active ventricular elastance formulae can be evaluated from a single-beat P-V data by means of a simple-to-apply LV model. The active elastance (Ea can be used to characterize the ventricle's contractile state, while passive elastance (Ep can represent a measure of resistance-to-filling.

  1. Phase quadrature shift between left and right ventricles during a ventricular tachycardia attack

    Philippe, L.; Itti, R.; Cosnay, P.; Fauchier, J.P.

    1984-08-01

    Equilibrium gated nuclear angiography was performed on a patient during an attack of ventricular tachycardia and then after conversion to sinus rhythm. Global and regional wall motion was assessed by means of isocontours. Fourier phase analysis and factor analysis. Ventricular phase histograms showed a 100/sup 0/ difference between ventricles: left ventricular filling time occurred during right ventricular contraction. The earliest phase was located in the septum and the sequence of activation showed a large delay of left ventricular activation. After conversion to sinus rhythm, a right bundle branch block was observed, being almost the inverse of the latter situation.

  2. Phase quadrature shift between left and right ventricles during a ventricular tachycardia attack

    Equilibrium gated nuclear angiography was performed on a patient during an attack of ventricular tachycardia and then after conversion to sinus rhythm. Global and regional wall motion was assessed by means of isocontours. Fourier phase analysis and factor analysis. Ventricular phase histograms showed a 1000 difference between ventricles: left ventricular filling time occurred during right ventricular contraction. The earliest phase was located in the septum and the sequence of activation showed a large delay of left ventricular activation. After conversion to sinus rhythm, a right bundle branch block was observed, being almost the inverse of the latter situation. (orig.)

  3. Measurement of right and left ventricular ejection fraction in dogs

    Brynjolf, I.; Qvist, J.; Mygind, T.; Jordening, H.; Dorph, S.; Munck, O.

    1983-08-01

    Three techniques for measurement of right (RVEF) and two techniques for left (LVEF) ventricular ejection fraction were evaluated in five dogs. RVEF was measured with a first-pass radionuclide technique using erythrocytes labelled in vitro with Technetium-99m methylene disphosphonate (MDP) and compared with RVEF measured with a thermodilution technique. Thermodilution-determined RVEF was compared with RVEF values measured with cine angiocardiography. LVEF was measured with a radionuclide ECG-gated equilibrium technique and compared with cine angiocardiography. Measurements were performed before and during a continuous infusion of dopamine. There was an excellent correlation between RVEF measured with the first-pass and the thermodilution technique. LVEF measured with the ECG-gated equilibrium technique correlated well with cine angiocardiography.

  4. A case report of left ventricular wall rupture

    Kordovani H

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac rupture, particularly rupture of the left ventricular wall, has a very high mortality rate. In this occasion, even if injured patients being alive when carried to the hospital, many of them will die due to following possible reasons: severe bleeding, cardiac tamponade, wasting time for routine and usual diagnostic procedures or transferring the injured to other hospital equipped for cardiac surgery. The only way to avoid these dangerous hazards is prompt thoracotomy and repair of the wound, which must be done in any surgical ward available. We report a case of cardiact rupture due to penetrating injury caused by a slender sharp object, passing through the heart anteroposteriorly. The patient was successfully rescued. This report indicates that in hospital, where no facility for cardiac surgery is available, this kind of emergency surgery for cardiac rupture is very indicative and may save the life of injured patient.

  5. Image quality influences the assessment of left ventricular function

    Grossgasteiger, Manuel; Hien, Maximilian D; Graser, Bastian;

    2014-01-01

    divided by the total endocardial border. These ratings were used to generate groups of poor (0%-40%), fair (41%-70%), and good (71%-100%) image quality. The ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic volume, and end-systolic volume were analyzed by the Simpson method of disks (biplane and monoplane), eyeball......, with the Teichholz EF found to be most accurate with poor (r = 0.928) in contrast to good (r = 0.699) image quality. Conclusions: With good image quality, the Simpson biplane method is the most accurate 2-dimensional method for assessing the left ventricular EF. Short-axis view methods, especially the...... method, Teichholz method, and speckle-tracking method. Furthermore, the fractional area change was determined. Each correlation with real-time 3DE was evaluated. Results: Correlations of the EF and volumes, respectively, as determined by long-axis view methods increased with improving image quality: the...

  6. Assessment of left ventricular function by noninvasive methods.

    Luisada, A A; Singhal, A; Portaluppi, F

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of evaluating left ventricular function by noninvasive methods is discussed in detail. The methods that are considered are electrocardiograph, phonocardiography, apex cardiography, sphygmography, impedance cardiography, electrokymography, and echocardiography. Following a brief section of 'definitions', each method is described in detail including technical problems, difficulties, and results. The systolic time intervals and the stress tests are briefly discussed. Based on modern experimental studies, the stress test should include both an electro- and a phonocardiogram. In the latter, one would measure the amplitude of the first heart sound as an index of contractility. The conclusion is that combined methods give the best results. They are electrocardiography, phonocardiography, impedance cardiography, and echocardiography. An alternative, dictated by technical problems, is to use at first phonocardiography and impedance plus electrocardiography; then echocardiography plus electrocardiography; and then, if indicated, a stress test might complete the study; the latter should include both an electrocardiogram and a phonocardiogram. PMID:4003144

  7. Imaging Diagnosis for Left Ventricular Thrombosis in Idiopathic Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    He, Yu-Quan; Zhao, Ya-Nan; Zhu, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Meng-Chao; Liu, Lin; Zeng, Hong; Yang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome (IHES) is a rare disease that is frequently associated with cardiac thrombosis and endocardial wall thickness. This case report describes 2 patients who had IHES associated with left ventricular (LV) thrombi. The patients’ symptoms are atypical. Peripheral blood and bone marrow tests showed markedly elevated eosinophils. Electrocardiography showed ischemic changes in both patients. Negative computed tomography (CT) angiography excluded coronary artery stenosis. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), conventional multislice spiral CT, gemstone spectral CT, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were used to identify the LV intraluminal thrombus and endocardial thickening, and the diagnostic values of each imaging method were analyzed and compared. These patients were clinically diagnosed as “IHES, LV thrombosis, NYHA heart function classification I.” Both patients received oral prednisone and warfarin therapy. At 5 month follow-up, TTE rechecks showed that the size of the LV thrombotic lesion was reduced in the first case but substantially increased in the second case. PMID:25275526

  8. Current Trends in Implantable Left Ventricular Assist Devices

    Jens Garbade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of appropriate donor organs and the expanding pool of patients waiting for heart transplantation have led to growing interest in alternative strategies, particularly in mechanical circulatory support. Improved results and the increased applicability and durability with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs have enhanced this treatment option available for end-stage heart failure patients. Moreover, outcome with newer pumps have evolved to destination therapy for such patients. Currently, results using nonpulsatile continuous flow pumps document the evolution in outcomes following destination therapy achieved subsequent to the landmark Randomized Evaluation of Mechanical Assistance for the Treatment of Congestive Heart Failure Trial (REMATCH, as well as the outcome of pulsatile designed second-generation LVADs. This review describes the currently available types of LVADs, their clinical use and outcomes, and focuses on the patient selection process.

  9. Left ventricular diastolic filling in patients with systemic hypertension

    To study the prevalence and significance of left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction in mild to moderate systemic hypertension (HT), cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99 m were obtained in 10 normal subjects and 27 patients with HT. The patients with HT did not show any evidence of coronary heart disease, renal insufficiency, cerebrovascular accident or diabetes mellitus. They were divided into 3 groups; (1) HT-1 (n=10): without evidence of echocardiographic (UCG) and electrocardiographic (ECG) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), (2) HT-2 (n=8): with evidence of ECG-LVH without UCG-LVH, (3) HT-3 (n=9): with evidence of UCG-LVH. UCG-LVH was defined when posterior or interventricular septal tall thickness exceeded 13 mm at end-diastole. From UCG findings LV mass was calculated and from UCG findings and auscultating brachial systolic pressure LV peak-systolic wall stress (WS) was obtained. Cardiac blood pool imagings were performed at modified LAO at rest and during exercise stress. Indices of LV systolic function (rest ejection fraction, mean ejection rate during the first third of ejection and exercise ejection fraction response) were essentially similar in normal subjects and all HT groups. In contrast, LV diastolic filling rate during the first third of diastole (1/3 FR mean) decreased significantly in any group of HT, and it was prominent in HT-3. In patients with HT, 1/3 FR mean did not correlate with blood pressure, LV peak-systolic WS, LV systolic functions and LV end-diastolic volume. But it correlated inversely with LV mass (r=-0.84). These results suggest that impairment of early diastolic LV filling can be detected before systolic cardiac impairment and LVH develop, and it is, at least in part, relate to the LV mass. (author)

  10. Accuracy of advanced versus strictly conventional 12-lead ECG for detection and screening of coronary artery disease, left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction

    Warren Stafford G; Delgado Reynolds; Bauch Terry; Hayat Matthew J; Bungo Michael W; Rahman M; Vrtovec Bojan; Starc Vito; DePalma Jude L; Greco E; Feiveson Alan H; Kulecz Walter B; Schlegel Todd T; Núñez-Medina Tulio; Medina Rubén

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Resting conventional 12-lead ECG has low sensitivity for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and low positive predictive value (PPV) for prediction of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). We hypothesized that a ~5-min resting 12-lead advanced ECG test ("A-ECG") that combined results from both the advanced and conventional ECG could more accurately screen for these conditions than strictly conventional ECG. Methods Resu...

  11. Left ventricular mass in male adolescent athletes and non-athletes

    Erling David Kaunang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Systematic exercise leads to increased left ventricular mass, which may be misleading in a differential diagnosis of heart disease in athletes (physiologic hypertrophy versus pathologic hypertrophy. The cause of left ventricular hypertrophy is an important risk factor in the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases. Objective To compare left ventricular mass and left ventricular hypertrophy in male adolescent athletes and non-athletes. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, analytic study, from September to December 2012 in male adolescents aged 15-18 years. The case group included athletes from the Bina Taruna Football Club Manado, while the control group included non-athlete adolescents. All subjects underwent history-taking, physical examinations and further supporting examinations. Left ventricular mass was measured by cardiovascular echocardio-graphy (Esaote Mylab 4.0 and calculated based on a formula. Left ventricular hypertrophy was defined as left ventricular mass of > 134 g/m2 body surface area. Results Subjects’ mean left ventricular masses were 359.69 (SD 188.4; 95%CI 283.58 to 435.81 grams in the athlete group and 173.04 (SD 50.69; 95%CI 152.56 to 103.51 grams in the non-athlete group, a statistically significant difference (P=0.0001. Ventricular hypertrophy was found 76.9% compared to 11.5% in the non-athlete group (P=0.0001. Conclusion Left ventricular mass in athletes is bigger than in non-athletes. In addition, left ventricular hypertrophy is more common in male adolescent athletes than in non-athletes. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:305-8.].

  12. Gated spect (GASPECT) for analysis of global and regional left ventricular function

    Eilles, C.

    1988-04-01

    GASPECT enables a quantitative analysis of global and regional left ventricular function. Comparisons with the procedures of thermodilution and cineangiography showed excellent correlations in the measurement of absolute left ventricular volumes. The extent of regional contraction abnormalities in patients with myocardial infarction can be quantified by GASPECT and newly developed method for regional wall motion analysis.

  13. Determinants of Left Ventricular Mass and Hypertrophy in Hemodialysis Patients Assessed by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Patel, Rajan K.; Oliver, Scott; Patrick B. Mark; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Traynor, James P.; Dargie, Henry J; Jardine, Alan G

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death in hemodialysis (HD) patients and one of the three forms of uremic cardiomyopathy. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a volume-independent technique to assess cardiac structure. We used CMR to assess the determinants of left ventricular mass (LVM) and LVH in HD patients.

  14. Second statement of the working group on electrocardiographic diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy

    Bacharova, Ljuba; Estes, E Harvey; Bang, Lia E;

    2011-01-01

    The Working Group on Electrocardiographic Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, appointed by the Editor of the Journal of Electrocardiology, presents the alternative conceptual model for the ECG diagnosis of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). It is stressed that ECG is a record of electrical...

  15. Endothelial dysfunction is associated with left ventricular mass (assessed using MRI) in an adult population (MESA)

    Yeboah, J; Crouse, JR; Bluemke, DA; Lima, JAC; Polak, JF; Burke, GL; Herrington, DM

    2010-01-01

    Brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is a measure of endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability. Endothelial nitric oxide controls vascular tone and is likely to modify the ventricular muscle coupling mechanism. The association between left ventricular mass and FMD is not well understood. We assessed the association between left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and FMD in participants of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). MESA is a population-based study of 6814 adults free of clin...

  16. Normal left ventricular wall motion measured with two-dimensional myocardial tagging

    Qi, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Henriksen, O

    1993-01-01

    Using a myocardial tagging technique, normal left ventricular wall motion was studied in 3 true short axis views and a double oblique 4-chamber view in 14 and 11 volunteers, respectively. Three orthogonal directions of left ventricular motion were observed throughout the systole; a concentric...... contraction towards the center of the left ventricle, a motion of the base of the heart towards the apex, and a rotation of the left ventricle around its long axis. The direction of left ventricular rotation changed from early systole to late systole. The base and middle levels of the left ventricle rotated...... that MR imaging with myocardial tagging is a method that can be used to study normal left ventricular wall motion, and that is promising for future use in patient groups....

  17. A systematic review: effect of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition on left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction in patients with a myocardial infarction and in patients with left ventricular dysfunction

    Abdulla, Jawdat; Barlera, Simona; Latini, Roberto;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: To summarize and quantify results of echocardiographic studies examining the effect of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on left ventricular remodelling in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (L...

  18. Left ventricular structure and remodeling in patients with COPD

    Pelà, Giovanna; Li Calzi, Mauro; Pinelli, Silvana; Andreoli, Roberta; Sverzellati, Nicola; Bertorelli, Giuseppina; Goldoni, Matteo; Chetta, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Background Data on cardiac alterations such as left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and lower stroke volume in patients with COPD are discordant. In this study, we investigated whether early structural and functional cardiac changes occur in patients with COPD devoid of manifest cardiovascular disease, and we assessed their associations with clinical and functional features. Methods Forty-nine patients with COPD belonging to all Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) classes were enrolled and compared with 36 controls. All subjects underwent clinical history assessment, lung function testing, blood pressure measurement, electrocardiography, and conventional and Doppler tissue echocardiography. Patients were also subjected to computed tomography to quantify emphysema score. Results Patients with COPD had lower LV cavity associated with a marked increase in relative wall thickness (RWT), suggesting concentric remodeling without significant changes in LV mass. RWT was significantly associated with ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second to the forced vital capacity and emphysema score and was the only cardiac parameter that – after multivariate analysis – significantly correlated with COPD conditions in all individuals. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that RWT (with a cutoff point of 0.42) predicted the severity of COPD with 83% specificity and 56% sensitivity (area under the curve =0.69, 95% confidence interval =0.59–0.81). Patients with COPD showed right ventricular to be functional but no structural changes. Conclusion Patients with COPD without evident cardiovascular disease exhibit significant changes in LV geometry, resulting in concentric remodeling. In all individuals, RWT was significantly and independently related to COPD. However, its prognostic role should be determined in future studies. PMID:27257378

  19. Comparison of permanent left ventricular and biventricular pacing in patients with heart failure and chronic atrial fibrillation: prospective haemodynamic study

    Garrigue, S; Bordachar, P.; Reuter, S.; Jaïs, P.; Kobeissi, A; Gaggini, G; Haïssaguerre, M; Clementy, J

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare clinical and haemodynamic variables between left ventricular and biventricular pacing in patients with severe heart failure; and to analyse haemodynamic changes during daily life and maximum exercise during chronic left ventricular and biventricular pacing.

  20. Cardiac Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Asymptomatic Hemodialysis Patients

    Reneta Yovcheva Koycheva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiac biomarkers are often elevated in dialysis patients showing the presence of left ventricular dysfunction. The aim of the study is to establish the plasma levels of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs TnT, precursor of B-natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs CRP and their relation to the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH in patients undergoing hemodialysis without signs of acute coronary syndrome or heart failure. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Were studied 48 patients - 26 men and 22 women. Pre and postdialysis levels of hs cTnT, NT-proBNP and hs CRP were measured at week interim procedure. Patients were divided in two groups according to the presence of echocardiographic evidence of LVH - gr A - 40 patients (with LVH, and gr B - 8 patients (without LVH. RESULTS: In the whole group of patients was found elevated predialysis levels of all three biomarkers with significant increase (p < 0.05 after dialysis with low-flux dialyzers. Predialysis values of NT-proBNP show moderate positive correlation with hs cTnT (r = 0.47 and weaker with hs CRP (r = 0.163. Such dependence is observed in postdialysis values of these biomarkers. There is a strong positive correlation between the pre and postdialysis levels: for hs cTnT (r = 0.966, for NT-proBNP (r = 0.918 and for hs CRP (r = 0.859. It was found a significant difference in the mean values of hs cTnT in gr. A and gr. B (0.07 ± 0.01 versus 0.03 ± 0.01 ng /mL, p < 0.05 and NT-proBNP (15,605.8 ± 2,072.5 versus 2,745.5 ± 533.55 pg /mL, p < 0.05. Not find a significant difference in hs CRP in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate the relationship of the studied cardiac biomarkers with LVH in asymptomatic patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment.

  1. Left Ventricular Free Wall Rupture in Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Amir, Offer; Smith, Ronald; Nishikawa, Akaira; Gregoric, Igor D.; Smart, Frank W.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a case of subacute left ventricular free wall rupture during acute myocardial infarction in a 68-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by echocardiography. The patient was supported by an intra-aortic balloon pump until the ruptured wall could be successfully repaired by suturing and gluing a pericardial patch over the defect and bypassing the left anterior descending coronary artery with a vein graft. This case demonstrates that left ventricular free wall rupture is not alway...

  2. Ventricular Recovery and Pump Explantation in Patients Supported by Left Ventricular Assist Devices: A Systematic Review.

    Phan, Kevin; Huo, Ya Ruth; Zhao, Dong Fang; Yan, Tristan D; Tchantchaleishvili, Vakhtang

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported that a portion of patients who exhibit cardiac recovery during left ventricular assist device (LVAD) support can have their device explanted with reasonable long-term survival. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the survival and cardiac function in patients with explanted LVADs from the current literature. Electronic search was performed to identify all studies in English literature assessing LVAD explantation. All identified articles were systematically assessed using the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Selected studies were subjected to quantitative assessment. From 5 electronic databases, 11 studies (213 patients) were included. Pooled mean perioperative mortality rate of those explanted was 9.2% (95% CI, 5.0-14.5%; I = 0). Pooled mean late mortality rate was 15% (95% CI, 9.0-22.1%; I = 31%). The pooled 1, 5, and 10 year survival postexplant was 91, 76, and 65.7%, respectively. Pooled postweaning freedom from heart failure (HF) recurrence reached 81.3%. Subset analysis demonstrated that patients explanted from a continuous-flow LVAD versus pulsatile LVAD had a lower rate of HF recurrence (6.6 vs. 28.3%, p = 0.03) and LVAD reimplantation (7.5 vs. 37%, p = 0.001). Before LVAD explantation, overall mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 49%. Weighted pooled early and late postexplantation mean LVEF was 47.3 and 41.2%, respectively. Late postexplantation LVEF was significantly higher in the continuous-flow versus pulsatile LVAD subgroup (41.5 vs. 24%, p = 0.001). This review shows encouraging safety and 10 year survival outcomes after explantation of LVADs in carefully selected patients, with rates better than expected after a heart transplant. Recovery of the native heart is the most desirable clinical outcome in patients supported with LVADs and should be actively sought. PMID:26735559

  3. Quantification of left-ventricular regional dyssynergy by radionuclide angiography

    To determine whether variables obtained from Fourier analysis of gated equilibrium radionuclide angiographic (RNA) images can detect and quantify changes in left-ventricular (LV) regional wall motion induced by transient ischemia, 11 chronically instrumented dogs were simultaneously studied with hemodynamic measurements and RNA during control, left circumflex (LCx) coronary artery occlusion, and postocclusion conditions. The dogs were preinstrumented with aortic and LV catheters, electromagnetic aortic and LCx coronary artery flow probes, high-fidelity LV micromanometers, LCx coronary artery occluders, and 4-mm ultrasonic transverse LV diameter and 2-mm regional LV segment crystal pairs. Radionuclide LV regional phase and amplitude variables were calculated for each condition. The absolute changes in LCx region RNA mean, median, and standard deviation of mean phase correlated with the percent changes in LCx segment crystal fractional shortening (r = -0.71, -0.64, and -0.51, respectively; all p less than or equal to 0.01). Similarly, the absolute changes and percent changes in LCx region RNA mean amplitude per pixel correlated with the percent changes in LCx segment crystal fractional shortening (r = 0.89 and 0.94, respectively; both p less than 0.001). When these LCx region RNA phase variables were subgrouped according to mild or severe depression or augmentation in LCx segment crystal fractional shortening, progressive differences were observed between the average values for these subgroups (p less than 0.05 to p less than 0.001). These data, therefore, suggest that these regional RNA phase variables may be able to detect and quantify alterations in LV contraction patterns due to transient ischemia

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction of a left ventricular shape from time and viewpoint varying X-ray cineangiocardiograms. Development of a system for clinical use

    This paper describes a system for the accurate three-dimensional reconstruction of a left ventricular shape from x-ray cineangiocardiograms with different viewpoints as well as times. We perform direct B-spline fitting to a 4D closed surface model, called ''BF4D method'', using an iterative method consisting of two stages, so as to deal with fragmented contours such as extracted from x-ray cineangiocardiograms. However, it is necessary for making clinical use that we can set parameters easily to reconstruct the 3D model. Therefore we develop a system considering user interface. The system consists of three subsystems; The first subsystem is a contour detector of a left ventricle, the second one is for setting parameters for 3D reconstruction, and the third one is fitting to the model. We also show the results using real left ventricular angiographic image sequences. (author)

  5. Telemetric left ventricular monitoring using wireless telemetry in the rabbit model

    Zavala Diana L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure is a critical condition that affects many people and often results from left ventricular dysfunction. Numerous studies investigating this condition have been performed using various model systems. To do so, investigators must be able to accurately measure myocardial performance in order to determine the degree of left ventricular function. In this model development study, we employ a wireless telemetry system purchased from Data Sciences International to continuously assess left ventricular function in the rabbit model. Findings We surgically implanted pressure-sensitive catheters fitted to wireless radio-transmitters into the left ventricle of Dutch-belted rabbits. Following recovery of the animals, we continuously recorded indices of cardiac contractility and ventricular relaxation at baseline for a given time period. The telemetry system allowed us to continuously record baseline left ventricular parameters for the entire recording period. During this time, the animals were unrestrained and fully conscious. The values we recorded are similar to those obtained using other reported methods. Conclusions The wireless telemetry system can continuously measure left ventricular pressure, cardiac contractility, and cardiac relaxation in the rabbit model. These results, which were obtained just as baseline levels, substantiate the need for further validation in this model system of left ventricular assessment.

  6. Diabetes, gender, and left ventricular structure in African-Americans: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study

    Liebson Philip R

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular risk associated with diabetes may be partially attributed to left ventricular structural abnormalities. However, the relations between left ventricular structure and diabetes have not been extensively studied in African-Americans. Methods We studied 514 male and 965 female African-Americans 51 to 70 years old, in whom echocardiographic left ventricular mass measurements were collected for the ARIC Study. In these, we investigated the independent association of diabetes with left ventricular structural abnormalities. Results Diabetes, hypertension and obesity prevalences were 22%, 57% and 45%, respectively. Unindexed left ventricular mass was higher with diabetes in both men (238.3 ± 79.4 g vs. 213.7 ± 58.6 g; p Conclusion In African-Americans, diabetes is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and, with different patterns of left ventricular structural abnormalities between genders. Attenuation seen in adjusted associations suggests that the higher frequency of structural abnormalities seen in diabetes may be due to factors other than hyperglycemia.

  7. Diastolic left ventricular function in patients with mild and moderate hypertension - liquidators of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station accident

    Diastolic left ventricular function was studied by doppler-echocardiography in 25 healthy persons (control group) and 50 patients with mild and moderate hypertension including 28 liquidators of the Chernobyl accident consequences. Patients with hypertension including liquidators had such manifestations of diastolic left ventricular dysfunction. These manifestations were more pronounced in liquidators who also had greater left ventricular myocardial mass

  8. Detection of left ventricular thrombi by echotomography and computed tomography

    Left ventricular (LV) thrombi are rarely recognized during life, though they are not infrequent at the post-mortem examination of patients succumbed to valvular disease, acute myocardial infarction, and cardiomyopathy. We presented five cases in which LV thrombi were detected by cross-sectional echocardiography (CSE) and confirmed by computed tomography. The main purpose of this study was to compare the echocardiographic findings of the LV thrombi with the manifestations of the LV thrombi on the computed tomograms, with a hope to augment the clinical utility of CSE in the detection of LV thrombi. CSE was recorded from the apical and four-chamber views in addition to the conventional approach. A computed tomographic whole-body scanner which utilized a continuously rotating gantry and pulsed anode with X-ray radiation collimated to form a thin fan-shaped beam was used. A complete section scan was performed in 3 seconds. Sustained enhancement was obtained with a rapid intravenous infusion of 30% meglumine iothalanate. Most of the LV thrombi showed an abnormal echo with irregular borders and/or a mobile mass echo at the apex by CSE. Computed tomographic findings suggestive of LV thrombi appeared as a defect, which was apparently different in quality from the surrounding myocardium or valvular apparatus. These findings were quite consistent with those of CSE with respect to the number and the location of the LV thrombi. (author)

  9. Left ventricular hemodynamics in patients with sick sinus syndrome

    The left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions in 31 patients with sick sinus syndrome (types I and II) were analyzed using LV time activity curves obtained by a 99mTc-RBC cardiac pool scintigraphy-forward and backward multiple gated study (FBMG) and compared with those in controls. On A-V sequential pacing (rate, 70 bpm; A-V delay, 150 msec), LV-peak ejection rate (PER) and peak filling rate (PFR) were significantly decreased compared to those in normal controls. As pacing rate was increased, PFR decreased significantly in patients in whom PER was decreased. The etiology of disturbed LV systolic and diastolic functions in patients with sick sinus syndrome remains unknown. No patient had significant organic coronary artery disease or other cardiac disorder. On the other hand, the frequency of vasospastic angina was higher in this group than in the controls. We suspect that sick sinus syndrome and vasospastic angina probably share a common pathophysiology. In patients with sick sinus syndrome, LV systolic and diastolic functions are impaired at rest and during A-V sequential pacing. (author)

  10. Effect of positive pleural pressure on left ventricular performance

    A sudden increase in pleural pressure such as coughing or a valsalva maneuver causes a transient increase in left ventricular stroke volume but the mechanism is not known. To help understand this phenomenon we studied 7 normal volunteers during spontaneous breathing and when breathing under positive pleural pressure. The positive pressure was developed by expiring against a 24cm H/sub 2/O threshold load. Radionuclide ventriculopgraphy using a double gating technique as performed. Image data were acquired during the cardiac cycles occurring during positive pleural pressure by means of a pressure transducer coupled to an EKG gate. They were compared to data acquired by EKG gating alone under quiet respiration as control. Results are shown for end diastolic (EDC), end systolic (ESC) and stroke counts (SC) and are expressed as % change from control for each parameter. The authors conclude that a transient increase in positive pleural pressure comparable to that reached during forceful coughing increases stroke volume and cardiac output through a combination of increased end diastolic volume with a lesser increase in end systolic volume. This effect was seen in the absence of any change in cardiac rhythm or rate

  11. Medical Image of the week: left ventricular non-compaction

    Khoubyari R

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A 38-year-old woman with history of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension presented to emergency department with worsening exertional dyspnea and orthopnea for the past 2-3 months. She also reported a 14 pound weight gain within the 2 weeks prior to presentation. She denied any prior history of cardiac or pulmonary disease. Also, there was no family history of heart disease. She denies any recent sick contacts, smoking, alcohol drinking, or substance abuse. Physical exam revealed jugular venous pressure of 10 cm H2O and significant bilateral lower extremity pitting edema. Chest x-ray showed an enlarged cardiac silhouette. Brain naturetic peptide (BNP was 2,917 pg/mL. A subsequent echocardiogram revealed a left ventricular (LV ejection fraction of 23% with severe global LV hypokinesia with moderate mitral regurgitation. Thyroid panel as well as iron panel were within normal range. Other laboratories were unremarkable. For the new onset systolic heart failure, a coronary angiography was ...

  12. QT dispersion in elderly athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Galetta, F; Franzoni, F; Santoro, G; Prattichizzo, F; Femia, F R; Pastine, F; Pentimone, F

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the QT dispersion in elderly endurance athletes with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Sixteen athletes (males, mean age 67.6 +/- 4.5 years) with mild to moderate LV hypertrophy, were compared with 16 age-matched hypertensive patients with similar degree of LV hypertrophy and 16 age-matched healthy sedentary controls. All the participants underwent echocardiogram and 12-lead electrocardiogram. QT dispersion was defined as the difference between maximum and minimum QT intervals in the different leads. QT dispersion was corrected (QTc) for heart rate according to Bazett's formula. The results showed in athletes and hypertensive patients comparable LV mass (258.2 +/- 14.2 vs. 262.4 +/- 16.8 g, ns), which was significantly higher than that of controls (p < 0.001). Trained subjects had QT dispersion (38.6 +/- 10.2 ms) and QTc dispersion (39.4 +/- 11.3 ms) significantly lower than hypertensive patients (QT dispersion: 68.4 +/- 11.4 ms; QTc dispersion: 72.2 +/- 8.4, p < 0.001) and comparable with controls (QT dispersion: 44.3 +/- 8.4 ms; QTc dispersion: 46.2 +/- 6.2 ms, ns). In conclusion, in elderly athletes training-induced myocardial hypertrophy was characterized by a QT dispersion significantly lower than hypertensive myocardial hypertrophy. This could provide a simple and inexpensive screening method for differentiating physiologic from pathologic myocardial hypertrophy in elderly subjects. PMID:12784163

  13. PERIOPERATIVE PERIOD FOLLOWING HEART TRANSPLANTATION WITH SEVERE LEFT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY

    V. N. Poptsov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use donor hearts with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH is controversial. This category of heart recipients has increasing risk of early graft failure. We proposed that heart transplantation (HT with LVH ≥1.5 cm may be successful if performed in selective category patients from alternate transplant list. This study included 10 pati- ents (2 female and 8 male at the age 26–62 (44 ± 3, who needed urgent HT. This study showed that recipients with LVH ≥1.5 cm demanded more high and long inotropic support with adrenalin and dopamine, more fre- quent use of levosimendan infusion (in 40% of cases and intraaortic balloon conterpulsation (in 50% of cases. However we didn’t observed any difference in survival rate (90.0% vs 89.0% and ICU time (4.8 ± 0.6 days vs 4.1 ± 0.4 days between HT recipients with and without LVH. Our study showed that HT from donor with LVH ≥1.5 cm may be performed in patients, demanding urgent HT, with acceptable early posttransplant results. 

  14. Exercise body surface mapping in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    To evaluate exercise-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with electrocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), including ST·T changes, body surface maps (QRST area maps) were recorded using 87 lead points before and after exercise. The patterns of the subtraction QRST area maps (S-maps) were compared with the findings of stress thallium (Tl) scans in 31 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and in five with essential hypertension. All 18 patients whose S-maps revealed changes less than -40 μVS or only an increase over the anterior chest region showed no positive findings on the stress Tl scans. However, there were clearly positive findings on stress Tl scans in eight (89%) of nine patients whose S-maps revealed changes greater than -40 μVS over a wide precordial region or in six (67%) of nine patients whose S-maps revealed increases over the anterior chest region and had accompanying changes greater than -40 μVS somewhere over the precordial region. These results suggested that exercise QRST area maps could differentiate exercise-induced myocardial ischemia from LVH with ST·T changes. (author)

  15. Regional left ventricular diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    To estimate regional left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling patterns in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a computer-assisted method by applying 'sector analysis' to ECG forward and reverse gated radionuclide ventriculography was developed. Fourteen patients with HCM (four with localized septal hypertrophy, seven with apical hypertrophy and three with septal and apical hypertrophy according to echocardiography) were observed at rest. After establishing serial 20 msec imaged frames, the LV region of interest was subdivided into eight sectors radiating from the geometric center. A time-activity curve was generated for each sector and was fitted by third-order harmonics of the Fourier series. From each fitted curve, the regional peak filling rate (rPFR) and the time to rPFR (rTPFR) in the forward gating method and regional atrial contribution to filling (rAC/FV) in the reverse gating method were calculated. The coefficient of variance of rTPFR was used as an index of LV diastolic asynchrony. In HCM, a prominent delay of rTPFR was observed in the hypertrophied regions. The coefficient of variance of rTPFR correlated inversely with global LVPFR (r=-0.62, p<0.05), indicating that diastolic asynchrony is one of the determinants of the LV early filling rate. Regional AC/FV was augmented in the hypertrophied regions, indicating the important role of atrial systolic LV filling for slowed early filling. Thus, this new method provides valuable information concerning regional diastolic LV wall mechanics in HCM. (author)

  16. A STUDY OF LEFT VENTRICULAR DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION IN HYPERTENSION

    Ravi Keerthy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRTODUCTION: Hypertension is one of the major non communica b le disease among the adult population . Hypertension is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and developing countries . Hypertension is the leading cause of ischemic heart disease , heart failure and stroke . (1 In spite of having target organ damage , hypertens ion remains asymptomatic in majority of population . Diastolic dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy are the early evidence of hypertensive heart disease , both of which may remain silent . (2 Heart failure is a common and often lethal complication of chronic hypertension . Based on extensive research , it has become possible to focus on individual factors that cause or contribute to the syndrome of chronic heart failure . OBJECTIVE: Main objective of the study of to find out the incidence of left ventricu lar diastolic dysfunction . METERIALS AND METHODS: All hypertensive patient with systolic blood pressure of more than 140 and or diastolic blood pressure of more than 90 are included in the study . Data was collected from history , clinical examination , ECG , Echo . Coronary angiogram was done in few patients to rule out ischemic heart disease . LV dime n sions were obtained by M - mode echo from apical and parasternal windows . Diastolic dysfunction was measured by Doppler echo . RESULTS: 85patients were considered fo r the study . 62 patients had diastolic dysfunction , 40 patients had LVH . Of the 62 patients , 28 had isolated diastolic dysfunction and 34 patients had both systolic and diastolic dysfunction . Ejection fraction was ranging from 50 - 77% . Early peak velocity r anged from40cms/secto 120cms/sec with a mean of 71 . 21+/ - 16 . 81cms/sec in patients with diastolicdys function , l ate atrial velocity ranged from 50cms/sec to 150cms/sec with a mean of102 . 66cmd/sec+/ - 19 . 13cms/sec . E/A ratio ranged from 0 . 41 to 1 . 8 with a mean of 0 . 69+/ - 0 . 14 . CONCLUSION: Since

  17. Right ventricular functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction: relation with left ventricular function and interventricular septum motion. GISSI-3 echo substudy

    Popescu, B A; Antonini-Canterin, F; Temporelli, P L; Giannuzzi, P; Bosimini, E; Gentile, F.; Maggioni, A. P.; Tavazzi, L; Piazza, R.; L. Ascione; Stoian, I; Cervesato, E; Popescu, A C; Nicolosi, G L

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the pattern of right ventricular (RV) functional recovery and its relation with left ventricular (LV) function and interventricular septal (IVS) motion in low risk patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

  18. Cardiac MRI in a Patient with Coincident Left Ventricular Non-Compaction and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Zahra Alizadeh-Sani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy is a rare congenital cardiomyopathy that affects both children and adults. Since the clinical manifestations are not sufficient to establish diagnosis, echocardiography is the diagnostic tool that makes it possible to document ventricular non-compaction and establish prognostic factors. We report a 47-year-old woman with a history of dilated cardiomyopathy with unknown etiology. Echocardiography showed mild left ventricular enlargement with severe systolic dysfunction (EF = 20-25%. According to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings non-compaction left ventricle with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was considered, and right ventricular septal biopsy was recommended. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy showed moderate hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes with foci of myocytolysis and moderate interstitial fibrosis. No evidence of infiltrative deposition was seen.

  19. Evaluation of Left Ventricular Dyssynchrony after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting in Patients with Ischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    MA Babaee Beigi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ischemic left ventricular (LV dysfunction is one of the major causes of LV dyssynchrony. This is indicative of poor prognosis in patients with LV dysfunction and correction of ischemia by Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG may resynchronize LV contraction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CABG on LV dyssynchrony, systolic and diastolic function.Patients: The present study comprised 31 patients with ischemic LV dysfunction with Ejection Fraction (EF:25- 50%. Echocardiography with Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI was performed to assess LV dyssynchrony (calculated by basal LV segment,to evaluate diastolic function by measurement of peak early diastolic mitral annular velocity (Em ,systolic function by measurement of peak early systolic mitral annular velocity (Sm and Ejection Fraction (EF by Simpson method.Results: Mean LV dyssychrony before CABG was 30±16 ms that decreased to 22±14 ms after operation (P=0.04.There was also improved diastolic and systolic function after CABG ( Em 0.04m/s versus 0.05 m/s , P=0.01 and Sm 0.06 m/s versus 0.08 m/s P=0.01.The mean ejection fraction rose from 40±8.6% to 42±8.2% (P=0.01.Conclusion: CABG is associated with improvement of LV dyssynchrony, systolic and diastolic function in patients with ischemic LV dysfunction.

  20. Effect of Neurohormonal Blockade Drug Therapy on Outcomes and Left Ventricular Function and Structure After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    Grupper, Avishay; Zhao, Yanjun M; Sajgalik, Pavol; Joyce, Lyle D; Park, Soon J; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Burnett, John C; Edwards, Brooks S; Daly, Richard C; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Schirger, John A

    2016-06-01

    Neurohormonal blockade drug therapy (NHBDT) is the cornerstone therapy in heart failure (HF) management for promoting reverse cardiac remodeling and improving outcomes. It's utility in left ventricular assist device (LVAD) supported patients remains undefined. Sixty-four patients who received continuous flow LVAD at our institution were retrospectively reviewed and divided into 2 groups: no-NHBDT group (n = 33) received LVAD support only and NHBDT group (n = 31) received concurrent NHBDT based on the clinical judgment of the attending physicians. Cardiac remodeling (echocardiographic parameters and biomarkers) and clinical outcome (functional status, HF-related hospital readmissions, and mortality) data were collected. A statistically significant increase in ejection fraction, decrease in LV end-diastolic diameter index and LV mass index, and a sustained reduction in N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) were observed in the NHBDT group at 6 months after LVAD implant (p improvement in New York Heart Association functional classification and 6-minute-walk distance throughout the study. The combined end point of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization was significantly reduced in patients receiving NHBDT (p = 0.013) associated primarily with a 12.1% absolute reduction in HF-related hospitalizations (p = 0.046). In conclusion, NHBDT in LVAD-supported patients is associated with a significant reversal in adverse cardiac remodeling and a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared with LVAD support alone. PMID:27079215

  1. Left atrial appendage dysfunction in a patient with premature ventricular contractions - a risk factor for stroke?

    Patel, Sandeep M; Ackerman, Michael J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old female with ventricular dysfunction and frequent ventricular arrhythmia presented with a cardioembolic stroke. Prior electrophysiology study and ablation was performed for ventricular tachycardia (VT). For remaining ventricular ectopy, the patient was maintained on carvedilol and mexiletine. After one year on this regimen, she presented with an acute stroke. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed no evidence of an intracardiac or ventricular thrombus but demonstrated markedly decreased left atrial appendage (LAA) flow velocity worsened during frequent premature ventricular contractions (PVC). In the absence of atrial fibrillation (AF), the LAA dysfunction was considered secondary to the frequent PVCs and was thought to be the underlying cause for the stroke. We present this case to highlight a potential under recognized association between LAA dysfunction and ventricular arrhythmia, similar to that observed with atrioventricular dyssynchronous pacing. PMID:24086095

  2. Nuclear medical determination of left ventricular diastolic function in coronary heart disease

    Brugger, P.; Laesser, W.K.; Kullich, W.; Stoiberer, I.; Klein, G.

    1985-06-01

    In 64 patients with coronary heart disease, the left ventricular diastolic function was determined by means of a new nuclear medical method (nuclear stethoscope). The investigations revealed an abnormal diastolic filling in 85.9% of the cases on the basis of the parameters peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate as manifestation of a disturbed ventricular function.

  3. Nuclear medical determination of left ventricular diastolic function in coronary heart disease

    In 64 patients with coronary heart disease, the left ventricular diastolic function was determined by means of a new nuclear medical method (nuclear stethoscope). The investigations revealed an abnormal diastolic filling in 85.9% of the cases on the basis of the parameters peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate as manifestation of a disturbed ventricular function

  4. Left ventricular dysfunction in patients with suspected pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Francisca Gavilanes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the role of right heart catheterization in the diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. METHODS: We evaluated clinical, functional, and hemodynamic data from all patients who underwent right heart catheterization because of diagnostic suspicion of PAH-in the absence of severe left ventricular dysfunction (LVD, significant changes in pulmonary function tests, and ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy findings consistent with chronic pulmonary thromboembolism-between 2008 and 2013 at our facility. RESULTS: During the study period, 384 patients underwent diagnostic cardiac catheterization at our facility. Pulmonary hypertension (PH was confirmed in 302 patients (78.6%. The mean age of those patients was 48.7 years. The patients without PH showed better hemodynamic profiles and lower levels of B-type natriuretic peptide. Nevertheless, 13.8% of the patients without PH were categorized as New York Heart Association functional class III or IV. Of the 218 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 40 (18.3% and 178 (81.7% were diagnosed with PH associated with LVD (PH-LVD and with PAH, respectively. The patients in the HP-LVD group were significantly older than were those in the PAH group (p < 0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: The proportional difference between the PAH and PH-LVD groups was quite significant, considering the absence of echocardiographic signs suggestive of severe LVD during the pre-catheterization investigation. Our results highlight the fundamental role of cardiac catheterization in the diagnosis of PAH, especially in older patients, in whom the prevalence of LVD that has gone undiagnosed by non-invasive tests is particularly relevant.

  5. Echocardiographic assessment of fetal left ventricular function in hypertensive disorder of pregnancy

    Objective: To investigate fetal left ventricular function in hypertensive disorder of pregnancy (HDP). Methods: Fetuses of hypertensive (84) and normotensive (147) mothers were enrolled in this study. The fetal left ventricular ejection fractions, E/A ratios of mitral valves, left atrial shortening fractions and Tei indexes of the two groups were measured on fetal echocardiography. Results: The left ventricular ejection fractions (P=0.040), E/A ratios of the mitral valves (P=0.042) and the left atrial shortening fractions (P=0.036) in fetuses of HDP were significantly smaller than those of the normal group whereas the Tei indexes (P=0.030) were significantly larger than those of the normal group. Conclusion: The hypertensive disorder of pregnancy may cause decreased systolic, diastolic and global function of the fetal left ventricle. (authors)

  6. Left Anterolateral Thoracotomy for Simultaneous Correction of Ventricular Septal Defect and Coarctation of the Aorta

    Chu, Shu-Hsun; Chou, Nai-Kuan; Chou, Tsai-Fwu; Wang, Shoei-Shen

    1994-01-01

    Three patients with ventricular septal defect and coarctation of the aorta were treated successfully by simultaneous correction of both anomalies through a single incision via a left transsternal anterolateral thoracotomy. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1994; 21:158-60)

  7. Sudden death in patients with myocardial infarction and left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, or both

    Solomon, Scott D; Zelenkofske, Steve; McMurray, John J V; Finn, Peter V; Velazquez, Eric; Ertl, George; Harsanyi, Adam; Rouleau, Jean L; Maggioni, Aldo; Køber, Lars Valeur; White, Harvey; Van de Werf, Frans; Pieper, Karen; Califf, Robert M; Pfeffer, Marc A

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of sudden death from cardiac causes is increased among survivors of acute myocardial infarction with reduced left ventricular systolic function. We assessed the risk and time course of sudden death in high-risk patients after myocardial infarction. METHODS: We studied 14......,609 patients with left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, or both after myocardial infarction to assess the incidence and timing of sudden unexpected death or cardiac arrest with resuscitation in relation to the left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Of 14,609 patients, 1067 (7 percent) had an event...... associated with a 21 percent adjusted increase in the risk of sudden death or cardiac arrest with resuscitation in the first 30 days. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of sudden death is highest in the first 30 days after myocardial infarction among patients with left ventricular dysfunction, heart failure, or both...

  8. Longitudinal strain bull's eye plot patterns in patients with cardiomyopathy and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Liu, Dan; Hu, Kai; Nordbeck, Peter; Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Weidemann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Despite substantial advances in the imaging techniques and pathophysiological understanding over the last decades, identification of the underlying causes of left ventricular hypertrophy by means of echocardiographic examination remains a challenge in current clinical practice. The longitudinal strain bull's eye plot derived from 2D speckle tracking imaging offers an intuitive visual overview of the global and regional left ventricular myocardial function in a single diagram. The bull's eye mapping is clinically feasible and the plot patterns could provide clues to the etiology of cardiomyopathies. The present review summarizes the longitudinal strain, bull's eye plot features in patients with various cardiomyopathies and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and the bull's eye plot features might serve as one of the cardiac workup steps on evaluating patients with left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:27165726

  9. Independent effects of both right and left ventricular function on plasma brain natriuretic peptide

    Vogelsang, Thomas Wiis; Jensen, Ruben J; Monrad, Astrid L; Russ, Kaspar; Olesen, Uffe H; Hesse, Birger; Kjaer, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is increased in heart failure; however, the relative contribution of the right and left ventricles is largely unknown. AIM: To investigate if right ventricular function has an independent influence on plasma BNP concentration. METHODS: Right (RVEF), left......, which is a strong prognostic marker in heart failure, independently depends on both left and right ventricular systolic function. This might, at least in part, explain why BNP holds stronger prognostic value than LVEF alone....... ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVI) were determined in 105 consecutive patients by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography (FP-RNV) and multiple ECG-gated equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography (ERNV), respectively. BNP was analyzed by immunoassay...

  10. Erythropoietin Therapy and Left Ventricular Mass Index in CKD and ESRD Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    Parfrey, Patrick S.; Lauve, Maria; Latremouille-Viau, Dominick; Lefebvre, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The purpose was to evaluate changes in the left ventricular mass index (LVMi) among anemic chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients treated with recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO).

  11. Heart Failure With Normal Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction : What is the Evidence?

    Kindermann, Michael; Reil, Jan-Christian; Pieske, Burkert; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Boehm, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure with a normal ejection fraction (HFNEF) is a common clinical problem with many unsolved questions regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy. Although the term diastolic heart failure has been abandoned, diastolic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction together with combined systolic

  12. Impact of fasting glucose on electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in an elderly general population

    Diederichsen, Søren Z; Pareek, Manan; Nielsen, Mette L;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate relationships between fasting plasma glucose (FPG), other cardiovascular risk markers and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) as detected by electrocardiography. METHODS: Subjects were selected randomly from groups defined by FPG. Traditional risk markers were assessed. LVH...

  13. Echocardiographic Partition Values and Prevalence of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Hypertensive Jamaicans

    Chiranjivi Potu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH detected by either electrocardiography or echo- cardiography has been shown to be an extremely strong predictor of morbidity and mortality in patients with essential hypertension and in members of the general population. Alternative to LVH, left ventricular geometrical patterns offer incremental prognostic value beyond that provided by the other cardiovascular risk factors including left ventricular mass (LVM. Combination of LVM and relative wall thickness (RWT can be used to identify different left ventricular geometrical patterns. Various indexation methods normalised for LVM have been shown to offer prognostic significance. There was no prior study on the prevalence of LVH and geometric patterns in hypertensive patients in Jamaica using multiple partition values. Our study was designed to estimate the prevalence of LVH and geometrical patterns in a hypertensive Caribbean population in Jamaica using 10 different published cut-off values.

  14. Clustered metabolic abnormalities blunt regression of hypertensive left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    de Simone, G; Okin, P M; Gerdts, E;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Clusters of metabolic abnormalities resembling phenotypes of metabolic syndrome predicted outcome in the LIFE study, independently of single risk markers, including obesity, diabetes and baseline ECG left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We examined whether clusters of two or...

  15. Rapid estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction in acute myocardial infarction by echocardiographic wall motion analysis

    Berning, J; Rokkedal Nielsen, J; Launbjerg, J;

    1992-01-01

    Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide ventriculog......Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular ejection fraction (ECHO-LVEF) in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were obtained by a new approach, using visual analysis of left ventricular wall motion in a nine-segment model. The method was validated in 41 patients using radionuclide...... risk groups following AMI. Thus, the results showed that simple, readily available wall motion-derived estimates of LVEF were as closely associated with LVEF measured by standard reference methods as were previously published, more cumbersome, planimetric echocardiographic methods. Reporting on global...

  16. Left ventricular dysfunction in normotensive Type 1 diabetic patients: the impact of autonomic neuropathy

    Taskiran, M; Rasmussen, Verner; Rasmussen, Bo Valdemar; Fritz-Hansen, T; Larsson, H. B. W.; Jensen, G. B.; Hilsted, J

    Aims The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for increased cardiovascular mortality in diabetic autonomic neuropathy (AN) are largely unknown. The aim was to determine the relative role of AN in the pathogenesis of cardiac diastolic dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy in Type 1...... diabetes. Methods Ten Type 1 diabetic patients with AN, defined by cardiovascular tests (AN+) and 10 age- and sex-matched patients without neuropathy (AN-) as well as 10 healthy subjects (C) participated in the study. Left ventricular diastolic function was assessed by Doppler echocardiography, whilst...... showed a significantly greater left ventricular mass index in AN+ compared with C [103 +/- 4 g/m(2) (AN+) vs. 98 +/- 7 (AN-) and 92 +/- 4 g/m(2) (C), P < 0.05]. Conclusion Autonomic neuropathy is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction in Type 1 diabetic patients...

  17. Effects of trimetazidine therapy on left ventricular function after percutaneous coronary intervention

    许晓晗

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of trimetazidine therapy on left ventricular(LV)function after percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI).Methods A total of 106 patients with unstable angina pectoris undergoing successful

  18. Temporary epicardial left ventricular and biventricular pacing improves cardiac output after cardiopulmonary bypass

    García-Bengochea Jose B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate, with different pacing modes, acute changes in left ventricular systolic function, obtained by continuous cardiac output thermodilution in various subsets of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Increments of mean arterial pressure and cardiac output were considered the end point. Methods Fifty cases electively submitted to cardiac surgery were analyzed. Isolated valve surgery 62%, coronary revascularization 30% and 8% mixed disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction was preserved in 50%,36% had moderate depression,(EF 36%-50% whereas 14% had severe depression (EF  Results Right atrium-right ventricular pacing, decreased significantly mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (2.3% in the overall population and in the subgroups studied. Right atrium-left ventricle, increased mean arterial pressure and cardiac output in 79% of patients and yielded cardiac output increments of 7.5% (0.40 l/m in the low ejection fraction subgroup and 7.3% (0.43 l/m in the left bundle branch block subset. In atrial fibrillation patients, left ventricular and biventricular pacing produced a significant increase in cardiac output 8.5% (0.39 l/min and 11.6% (0.53 l/min respectively. The dP/dt max increased significantly with both modes (p = 0.021,p = 0.028. Conclusion Right atrial-right ventricular pacing generated adverse hemodynamic effects. Right atrium-left ventricular pacing produced significant CO improvement particularly in cases with depressed ventricular function and left bundle branch block. The greatest increments were observed with left ventricular or biventricular pacing in atrial fibrillation with depressed ejection fraction.

  19. Metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes

    Shenouda, Sylvia K.; Varner, Kurt J.; Carvalho, Felix; Lucchesi, Pamela A.

    2009-01-01

    Repeated administration of MDMA (ecstasy) produces eccentric left ventricular (LV) dilation and diastolic dysfunction. While the mechanism(s) underlying this toxicity are unknown; oxidative stress plays an important role. MDMA is metabolized into redox cycling metabolites that produce superoxide. In this study, we demonstrated that metabolites of MDMA induce oxidative stress and contractile dysfunction in adult rat left ventricular myocytes. Metabolites of MDMA used in this study included: al...

  20. Natriuretic peptide vs. clinical information for diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in primary care

    Wachter Rolf; Pouwels Claudia; Kleta Sibylle; Wetzel Dirk; Kochen Michael M; Lüers Claus; Scherer Martin; Koschack Janka; Herrmann-Lingen Christoph; Pieske Burkert; Binder Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Screening of primary care patients at risk for left ventricular systolic dysfunction by a simple blood-test might reduce referral rates for echocardiography. Whether or not natriuretic peptide testing is a useful and cost-effective diagnostic instrument in primary care settings, however, is still a matter of debate. Methods N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, clinical information, and echocardiographic data of left ventricular systolic function wer...

  1. Dynamics of left ventricular ejection in obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Murgo, J P; Alter, B R; Dorethy, J F; Altobelli, S A; McGranahan, G M

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the dynamics of left ventricular ejection in patients with obstructive and nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 30 patients with HCM and 29 patients with no evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied during cardiac catheterization. Using a single multisensor catheter, electromagnetically derived ascending aortic flow velocity and high fidelity left ventricular and aortic pressures were recorded during rest (n = 47) and provocative man...

  2. Allopurinol Benefits Left Ventricular Mass and Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Kao, Michelle P.; Ang, Donald S.; Gandy, Stephen J.; Nadir, M. Adnan; Houston, J. Graeme; Lang, Chim C; Struthers, Allan D

    2011-01-01

    Allopurinol ameliorates endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness among patients without chronic kidney disease (CKD), but it is unknown if it has similar effects among patients with CKD. Furthermore, because arterial stiffness increases left ventricular afterload, any allopurinol-induced improvement in arterial compliance might also regress left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in patients with stage 3 CKD a...

  3. Haemochromatosis genotype and iron overload: association with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy

    Ellervik, C; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Appleyard, M;

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that there is an association between haemochromatosis genotype C282Y/C282Y and/or iron overload and risk of hypertension and/or left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).......We hypothesized that there is an association between haemochromatosis genotype C282Y/C282Y and/or iron overload and risk of hypertension and/or left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH)....

  4. Effect of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention on Left Ventricular Diastolic Function in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease

    Salehi, Nahid; Saidi, Mohammadreza; Rai, Alireza; Najafi, Farid; Javeedannejad, Seedmokhtar; Babanejad, Mehran; Tadbiri, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is considerable disagreement over the effects of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on left ventricular diastolic function that has necessitated the investigation of diastolic indices. The present study was conducted to evaluate left ventricular diastolic function and its indices, three months after performing the PCI procedure in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: In a quasi-experimental clinical trial study (before and after), 51 patients with CAD ...

  5. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and reduction in left ventricular mass after aortic valve replacement

    Kandler, Kristian; Møller, Christian H; Hassager, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival.......The presence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) after aortic valve replacement may influence patient survival. We examined the relationship between PPM and changes in left ventricular mass index at 3 months follow-up and also overall survival....

  6. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated SPECT and cardiac MRI in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the assessment of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic/end-systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the reference method. Furthermore, software-specific characteristics of Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS), Emory Cardiac Toolbox (ECTB) and 4D-MSPECT were analysed. Thirty-six patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent gated 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile SPECT and cardiac MRI were included. LV EDV, ESV and LVEF values of gated SPECT were calculated using QGS, ECTB and 4D-MSPECT. The correlation between the results of gated SPECT and cardiac MRI was excellent for EDV [R = 0.872 (QGS), R = 0.879 (ECTB), R = 0.869 (4D-MSPECT)], ESV [R = 0.908 (QGS), R = 0.897 (ECTB), R = 0.880 (4D-MSPECT)] and LVEF [R = 0.794 (QGS), R = 0.763 (ECTB), R = 0.710 (4D-MSPECT)]. EDV and ESV assessed by QGS did not differ significantly from those assessed by cardiac MRI (all p = NS), whereas EDV and ESV were overestimated by ECTB and 4D-MSPECT compared with cardiac MRI (all p < 0.05). LVEF was overestimated by QGS, ECTB and 4D-MSPECT compared with cardiac MRI (all p < 0.05). The correlation between gated SPECT and cardiac MRI is excellent for LV volume and LVEF values calculated by QGS, ECTB and 4D-MSPECT in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. However, algorithm-varying over- or underestimation of LV volumes and LVEF should be accounted for in the clinical context. (orig.)

  7. Abnormal response of left ventricular systolic function to submaximal exercise in post-partial left ventriculotomy patients

    A.H. Herdy

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with heart failure who have undergone partial left ventriculotomy improve resting left ventricular systolic function, but have limited functional capacity. We studied systolic and diastolic left ventricular function at rest and during submaximal exercise in patients with previous partial left ventriculotomy and in patients with heart failure who had not been operated, matched for maximal and submaximal exercise capacity. Nine patients with heart failure previously submitted to partial left ventriculotomy were compared with 9 patients with heart failure who had not been operated. All patients performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test with measurement of peak oxygen uptake and anaerobic threshold. Radionuclide left ventriculography was performed to analyze ejection fraction and peak filling rate at rest and during exercise at the intensity corresponding to the anaerobic threshold. Groups presented similar exercise capacity evaluated by peak oxygen uptake and at anaerobic threshold. Maximal heart rate was lower in the partial ventriculotomy group compared to the heart failure group (119 ± 20 vs 149 ± 21 bpm; P 0.05 vs change in partial ventriculotomy group. The abnormal responses demonstrated here may contribute to the limited exercise capacity of patients with partial left ventriculotomy despite the improvement in resting left ventricular systolic function.

  8. Mapping and Surgical Ablation of Focal Epicardial Left Ventricular Tachycardia

    Arif Elvan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technical challenge in a 17-year-old patient with incessant epicardial focal ventricular arrhythmia and diminished LV function. Failure of ablation at the earliest activated endocardial site during ectopy suggested an epicardial origin, which was supported by specific electrocardiographic criteria. Epicardial ablation was not possible due to the localization of the origin of the ventricular tachycardia adjacent to the phrenic nerve. Minimal invasive surgical multielectrode high-density epicardial mapping was performed to localize the arrhythmia focus. Epicardial surgical RF ablation resulted in the termination of ventricular ectopy. After 2 years, the patient is still free from arrhythmias.

  9. Close association of arterial plaques with left ventricular hypertrophy and ejection fraction in hemodialysis patients

    Mowlaie Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In renal failure patients, cardiovascular complications are a major clinical problem. Objectives: This study aimed to test, the possible association of left ventricular hypertrophy and ejection fraction with plaques of carotid and femoral artery hemodialysis. Patients and Methods: Sixty-one patients, who were on regular hemodialysis were selected. For all patients echocardiography and B-mode Ultrsonographic assessment of carotid-femoral arteries for plaque occurrence were conducted. Results: In this study there was a positive correlation between left ventricular hypertrophy with the duration of hemodialysis treatment (p<0.05. Significant positive association between left ventricular hypertrophy and plaque score and also a significant positive association between left ventricular hypertrophy with presence of chest pain was found (p<0.05. Association of diabetes mellitus with the presence of chest pain was positive. Positive correlation between hypertension with plaque score was demonstrated too (p<0.05. Also an inverse association of plaque score with left ventricular ejection fraction was detected too (p<0.05. Furthermore, the correlation of plaque score with the presence of diabetes mellitus was positive. Conclusion: The present investigations, documents parallel cardiac and vascular adaptation in hemodialysis patients and shows the potential contribution of structural and functional large artery alteration to the pathogenesis of left ventricular hypertrophy which needs more attention in patients on hemodialysis.

  10. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    Novitzky, D.; Cooper, D.; Boniaszczuk, J.; Isaacs, S.; Fraser, R.C.; Commerford, P.J.; Uys, C.J.; Rose, A.G.; Smith, J.A.; Barnard, C.N.

    1985-02-01

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts.

  11. Significance of left ventricular volume measurement after heart transplantation using radionuclide techniques

    Multigated equilibrium blood pool scanning using Technetium 99m labeled red blood cells was used to measure left ventricular volumes in three heterotopic and one orthotopic heart transplant recipient(s). Simultaneously, an endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the degree of acute rejection was assessed by a histological scoring system. The scores were correlated to changes in ejection fraction and heart rate. Technetium 99m scanning data were pooled according to the endomyocardial biopsy score: no rejection; mild rejection; moderate rejection, and severe rejection. In each group, the median of the left ventricular volume parameters was calculated and correlated with the endomyocardial biopsy score, using a non-parametric one-way analysis of variance. A decrease in stroke volume correlated best with the endomyocardial biopsy score during acute rejection. A decrease in end-diastolic left ventricular volumes did not correlate as well. Changes in the end-systolic left ventricular volumes were not statistically significant, but using a simple correlation between end-systolic left ventricular volumes and endomyocardial biopsy the correlation reached significance. Changes in left ventricular volumes measured by Technetium 99m scanning may be useful to confirm the presence or absence of acute rejection in patients with heart grafts

  12. Left ventricular assist device inflow cannula thrombus: characterization with two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography.

    Missov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Thrombotic complications are inherent to current generation nonpulsatile left ventricular assist devices. The clinical expression of device thrombosis ranges from catastrophic failure to protracted and indolent. We report the case of a 79-year-old patient who received a left ventricular assist device as destination therapy and presented only with vague clinical symptoms. He was found to have a large thrombus in close proximity with the inflow cannula at the left ventricular apex, raising the question of mechanical obstruction. We describe the step-by-step contrast-enhanced two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic examination which allowed to obtain diagnostic acoustic tomograms of the inflow cannula and obviated the need for any additional imaging modalities. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the most common imaging modality used in the clinical follow-up of left ventricular assist device recipients. A frequent clinical indication for TTE is to exclude left ventricular apical thrombus near the inflow cannula. Imaging of the inflow cannula at the left ventricular apex in the traditional apical 4 chamber, apical 2 chamber, and parasternal long axis views is challenging by TTE mainly because of poor acoustic windows, image artifacts, large body habitus, and operator experience. PMID:24172272

  13. EFFECT OF AROTINOLOL ON LEFT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH IDIOPATHIC DILATED CARDIOMYOPATHY

    Chao-mei Fan; Xiu-qing Du; Na-qiang Lu; Hong Yang; Yi-shi Li; Li Xu; Ke-fei DOU; Jing-lin Zhao; Xian-qi Yuan; Yan-fen Zhao; Rong-fang Shi

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of long-term treatment with arotinolol in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM).Methods Sixty-three patients with IDCM were evaluated at baseline and after 12-month therapy with arotinolol.The conventional therapy for congestive heart failure was continued throughout the study with arotinolol as the only β-blocker. Left ventricular function was assessed with the New York Heart Association functional class and two-dimensional echocardiography.Results After 12-month arotinolol treatment, there was a significant improvement in left ventricular systolic function. Left ventricular end-systolic dimension significantly decreased from 59. 52 ± 8. 83 mm to 50. 89 ± 8.17 mm (P <0.001). Left ventricular ejection fraction significantly increased from 27.39% ±7.94% to 41.13% ±9.45% (P <0.001). Left ventricular mass index decreased from 150. 47 ± 42. 42 g/m2 to 141.58 ± 34.36 g/m2 ( P<0.01). No adverse events leading to premature discontinuation of study drug occurred.Conclusion In this preliminary study, 12-month arotinolol treatment has a favorable effect on left ventricular function in patients with IDCM, and it is safe and well tolerated.

  14. Effect of Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction on Left Atrial Mechanics in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Lynne K. Williams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial (LA volumes are known to be increased in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM and are a predictor of adverse outcome. In addition, LA function is impaired and is presumed to be due to left ventricular (LV diastolic dysfunction as a result of hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. In the current study, we assess the incremental effect of outflow tract obstruction (and concomitant mitral regurgitation on LA function as assessed by LA strain. Patients with HCM (50 obstructive, 50 nonobstructive were compared to 50 normal controls. A subset of obstructive patients who had undergone septal myectomy was also studied. Utilising feature-tracking software applied to cardiovascular magnetic resonance images, LA volumes and functional parameters were calculated. LA volumes were significantly elevated and LA ejection fraction and strain were significantly reduced in patients with HCM compared with controls and were significantly more affected in patients with obstruction. LA volumes and function were significantly improved after septal myectomy. LVOT obstruction and mitral regurgitation appear to further impair LA mechanics. Septal myectomy results in a significant reduction in LA volumes, paralleled by an improvement in function.

  15. Reference values for quantitative left ventricular and left atrial measurements in cardiac computed tomography

    To assess reference values for left ventricular (LV) and left atrial (LA) dimensions, global LV function, and LV-myocardial mass for cardiac CT. We examined 120 subjects undergoing a coronary angiography using 64-slice and dual-source CT. All individuals had a low cardiovascular risk, normal ECG, negative biomarkers, and a normal cardiac CT examination. All subjects had a negative medical history of cardiovascular disease both on admission and at clinical 6-month follow-up. The following measurements were obtained: septal wall thickness (SWT), posterior wall thickness (PWT), LV inner diameter (LVID), LA anterior posterior diameter (LADsys), end-systolic volume (ESV), and end-diastolic volume (EDV), LV-myocardial mass (LVMM). We found significant gender-related differences for all LV dimensions (SWTsys, SWTdia,PWTsys,PWTdia,LVIDsys,LVIDdia). LADsys showed no significant difference between males and females. Significant differences were found for global LV functional parameters including ESV, EDV, and SV, whereas no significant differences were found for the EF. LV-myocardial mass parameters showed significant gender-related differences. No significant correlation was found between any of these parameters and age. All data were transferred to percentile ranks. This study provides gender-related reference values and percentiles for LV and LA quantitative measurements for cardiac CT and should assist in interpreting results. (orig.)

  16. Left ventricular hypertrophy in children, adolescents and young adults with sickle cell anemia

    Gustavo Baptista de Almeida Faro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to estimate the frequency of left ventricular hypertrophy and to identify variables associated with this condition in under 25-year-old patients with sickle cell anemia.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed of children, adolescents and young adults with sickle cell anemia submitted to a transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. The mass of the left ventricle was determined by the formula of Devereux et al. with correction for height, and the percentile curves of gender and age were applied. Individuals with rheumatic and congenital heart disease were excluded. The patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of left ventricular hypertrophy and compared according to clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory variables.RESULTS: A total of 37.6% of the patients had left ventricular hypertrophy in this sample. There was no difference between the groups of patients with and without hypertrophy according to pathological history or clinical characteristics, except possibly for the use of hydroxyurea, more often used in the group without left ventricular hypertrophy. Patients with left ventricular hypertrophy presented larger left atria and lower hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, reticulocyte index and a higher albumin:creatinine ratio in urine.CONCLUSION: Left ventricular hypertrophy was observed in more than one-third of the young patients with sickle cell anemia with this finding being inversely correlated to the hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, and reticulocyte index and directly associated to a higher albumin/creatinine ratio. It is possible that hydroxyurea had had a protective effect on the development of left ventricular hypertrophy.

  17. Left-ventricular structure in the Southall And Brent REvisited (SABRE) study: explaining ethnic differences.

    Park, Chloe M; March, Katherine; Ghosh, Arjun K; Jones, Siana; Coady, Emma; Tuson, Claire; Francis, Darrel; Mayet, Jamil; Tillin, Therese; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D

    2013-05-01

    Cardiometabolic risk is elevated in South Asians and African Caribbeans compared with Europeans, yet whether this is associated with ethnic differences in left-ventricular structure is unclear. Conventional M-mode or 2-dimensional echocardiography may be misleading, because they calculate left-ventricular mass and remodeling using geometric assumptions. Left-ventricular structure was compared in a triethnic population-based cohort using conventional and 3-dimensional echocardiography on 895 individuals (aged 55-85 years; 427 European, 325 South Asian, 143 African Caribbean). Left-ventricular mass was indexed, and left-ventricle remodeling index and relative wall thickness were calculated. Anthropometry, blood pressure, and fasting bloods were measured. Three-dimensional left-ventricular mass index did not differ between Europeans (mean ± SE, 29.8 ± 0.3 g/m(2.7)) and African Caribbeans (29.9 ± 0.5 g/m(2.7); P=0.9), but it was significantly lower in South Asians (28.1 ± 0.4 g/m(2.7); Pleft-ventricle mass index was significantly higher in African Caribbeans (46.4 ± 0.9 g/m(2.7)) than in Europeans (41.9 ± 0.5 g/m(2.7); PLeft-ventricle remodeling index was the highest in African Caribbeans and the lowest in South Asians. Relative wall thickness was also higher in African Caribbeans, but no different in South Asians, compared with Europeans. Differences in left-ventricle remodeling index were attenuated by adjustment for cardiometabolic factors between African Caribbeans and Europeans only. In conclusion, left-ventricular mass is lower in South Asians and equivalent in African Caribbeans compared with Europeans, even when cardiometabolic risk factors are accounted for. Left-ventricular remodeling rather than hypertrophy may explain the increased risk of heart failure in people of African Caribbean origin. PMID:23478098

  18. [Correlation between QT interval, ventricular arrhythmias and left ventricular function in chronic alcoholics].

    Pomini, G; Gribaldo, R; Bellavere, F; Lupia, M; Sale, F; Rugna, A; Costa, L; Molfese, G

    1986-04-01

    Prolonged QT interval and arrhythmias have been reported to occur in chronic alcoholics. To investigate the role of chronic alcohol consumption in the onset of arrhythmias and the development of the preclinical left ventricular dysfunction, in a group of 12 asymptomatic chronic alcoholics with no clinical evidence of heart disease, with histologically proven hepatic damage, after a week of abstinence from alcohol, the following investigations were performed: measurements of the corrected QT interval (QTc), 24-hours Holter monitoring, systolic time intervals, M-mode echocardiograms. The results were compared to those of 10 normal subjects. Our data suggested no difference in QTc interval between chronic alcoholics and normal persons. The distribution of arrhythmias was not statistically different in the two groups, particularly frequent and complicated arrhythmias occurred in only one subject in each group. Preejection period corrected for heart rate (PEPI) was significantly longer in alcoholics (132 +/- 16 vs 119 +/- 11, p less than 0.05). All echocardiographic parameters examined were not significantly different in the two groups. On the basis of our results, our impression is that the arrhythmogenic role of alcohol, not under acute ingestion, is relatively unimportant and further studies are needed to become a definitive conclusion about subclinical alcoholic cardiomyopathy. PMID:3743931

  19. Alteration of canine left ventricular diastolic function by intravenous anesthetics in vivo. Ketamine and propofol.

    Pagel, P S; Schmeling, W T; Kampine, J P; Warltier, D C

    1992-03-01

    Diastolic function has been shown to influence overall cardiac performance significantly, but the effect of intravenous anesthetics on diastolic function has not been previously characterized in vivo. The effects of ketamine and propofol on two indices of left ventricular diastolic function were examined in chronically instrumented dogs. Because autonomic nervous system function may significantly influence the systemic hemodynamic actions produced by intravenous anesthetics in vivo, experiments were performed in the presence of pharmacologic blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Two groups comprising a total of 14 experiments were performed using 7 dogs instrumented for measurement of aortic and left ventricular pressure, the maximum rate of increase of left ventricular pressure (dP/dt), subendocardial segment length, and cardiac output. Systemic hemodynamics and diastolic function were recorded and evaluated in the conscious state and after a 20-min equilibration at 25-, 50-, and 100-mg.kg-1.h-1 infusion doses of ketamine or propofol. Ventricular relaxation was described using the time constant of isovolumetric relaxation (tau) assuming a nonzero asymptote of ventricular pressure decay. Regional chamber stiffness, an index of passive ventricular filling, was described using an exponential equation relating segment length to ventricular pressure between minimum ventricular pressure and the onset of atrial systole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1539854

  20. Applications of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of left ventricular dysfunction

    Beacock, David John

    2002-07-01

    This thesis has described the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the investigation of left ventricular dimensions and systolic function. This has been performed in conditions of left ventricular dysfunction, in congestive cardiac failure and following anterior myocardial infarction. The reproducibility of measurements of left ventricular dimensions using MRI has been presented. Such measurements were shown to be reproducible between different MRI studies of normal volunteers and patients with congestive heart failure. Furthermore, measurements from different MRI studies obtained from two commercially different systems were reproducible for the same subject groups. Ventricular dimensions and systolic function was evaluated in adult normal volunteers of different ages. Although left ventricular volumes and mass remained unchanged, detailed studies of the systolic images revealed significant differences between the two age groups. Differences in left ventricular cavity volumes and mass between patients with congestive heart failure and age-matched normal volunteers were also investigated. Left ventricular volumes and myocardial mass were assessed in a group of patients following anterior myocardial infarction. End-systolic volume was significantly increased compared to age-matched volunteers, but no changes in end-diastolic volume or myocardial mass was observed. Serial re-evaluation of these patients revealed no other changes over the subsequent six months. All these patients were treated with optimal medical therapy (thrombolysis, aspirin, beta-blockade and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition). Thus, the use of this therapy may attenuate the process of left ventricular remodelling. Regional wall thickness was measured in the post-infarct patients. Wall thickening was significantly reduced both in the infarcted regions and in myocardium remote to the infarction. In contrast to previous echocardiographic studies, no 'hypercontractility' was

  1. Ethical challenges with the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy

    Rady Mohamed Y

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The left ventricular assist device was originally designed to be surgically implanted as a bridge to transplantation for patients with chronic end-stage heart failure. On the basis of the REMATCH trial, the US Food and Drug Administration and the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services approved permanent implantation of the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy in Medicare beneficiaries who are not candidates for heart transplantation. The use of the left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy raises certain ethical challenges. Left ventricular assist devices can prolong the survival of average recipients compared with optimal medical management of chronic end-stage heart failure. However, the overall quality of life can be adversely affected in some recipients because of serious infections, neurologic complications, and device malfunction. Left ventricular assist devices alter end-of-life trajectories. The caregivers of recipients may experience significant burden (e.g., poor physical health, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder from destination therapy with left ventricular assist devices. There are also social and financial ramifications for recipients and their families. We advocate early utilization of a palliative care approach and outline prerequisite conditions so that consenting for the use of a left ventricular assist device as a destination therapy is a well informed process. These conditions include: (1 direct participation of a multidisciplinary care team, including palliative care specialists, (2 a concise plan of care for anticipated device-related complications, (3 careful surveillance and counseling for caregiver burden, (4 advance-care planning for anticipated end-of-life trajectories and timing of device deactivation, and (5 a plan to address the long-term financial burden on patients, families, and caregivers. Short-term mechanical circulatory devices (e

  2. Evaluation of diastolic function of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using left ventricular volume-time curve

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of using left ventricular volume-time curve in the evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function, and to analyze characteristics of left ventricular volume-time curve changes in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Methods: Seventeen cases of HCM and 12 healthy volunteers received cardiac MRI (CMRI) examination, and left ventricular (LV) 2-chamber long and short axis cine imaging were performed, LV volume-time curves were reconstructed and platform time, different diastolic volume recovery (DVR) time and their corresponding filling velocity were calculated from LV volume-time curve off-line. The DVR time and their corresponding filling velocity were analyzed by using multiple linear regression analysis. Results: Compared with the group of healthy volunteers,ventricular septal HCM group had delayed left ventricular 50%, 70% DVR time [(8.9 ± 1.3) versus (7.7 ± 0.8) phase, F=6.787, P=0.016; (11.3 ±1.6) versus (9.7±1.8) phase, F=4.927, P=0.036] and shortened plateau time [(1.8 ± 1.7) versus (4.1 ± 1.4) phase, t=6.787, P<0.01]. Ventricular septal HCM group had reduced 30%, 50% DVR filling rates [(0.22 ± 0.11) versus (0.40 ± 0.15) ml/ms, F=12.916, P<0.01; (0.20 ± 0.09) versus (0.30 ± 0.10) ml/ms, F=7.121, P=0.014] compared with those in the group of healthy volunteers. But 70%, 80%, 90% DVR filling rates showed no statistically significant different in the two groups. In HCM patients,myocardial fibrosis caused 50%, 70%, 80% DVR time delay [(9.6 ± 1.0) versus (7.9 ± 1.5) phase, F=5.000, P=0.045; (12.3 ± 1.4) versus (9.6 ± 1.8) phase, F=8.039, P=0.015; (13.1 ±1.4) versus (10.9±1.9) phase, F=5.060, P=0.044], but no significant difference of DVR filling rate was found between the two groups. Conclusions: Left ventricular volume curve analysis techniques can be used for detailed evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function. The left ventricular diastolic dysfunction of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs mainly in

  3. Effects of mechanical left ventricular unloading by Impella on left ventricular dynamics in high-risk and primary percutaneous coronary intervention patients

    M. Remmelink; K.D. Sjauw; J.P.S. Henriques; R.J. de Winter; M.M. Vis; K.T. Koch; W.J. Paulus; B.A.J.M. de Mol; J.G.P. Tijssen; J.J. Piek; J.,Jr Baan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied online left ventricular (LV) dynamic effects of mechanical LV unloading directly after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). BACKGROUND: Limited clinical information is available on the direct LV dynamic consequences of LV unloading in patients undergoing high-risk PCI and

  4. Effect of Salvia Miltiorrhiza on Left Ventricular Hypertrophy and Cardiac Aldosterone in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    韩少杰; 郑智; 任大宏

    2002-01-01

    Summary: Chronic treatment with Salvia Miltiorrhiza preventing left ventricular hypertrophy(LVH) and its possible mechanism-inhibiting the action of cardiac aldosterone in spontaneouslyhypertensive rats (SHR) were investigated. Normotensive Wistar-kyoto (WKY) rats and SHRswere used. Part of SHRs was treated with Salvia Miltiorrhiza for 12 weeks. Systolic blood pres-sure (SBP) and left ventricular mass index were measured. Sections of heart tissue were stainedwith HE method and VanGieson method. Collagen volume fraction was determined in the left ven-tricle by automatically quantitative morphometry. Cardiac aldosterone concentration was measuredby radioimmunoassay. The results indicated that compared with WKY rats, SHRs exhibited high-er SBP, left ventricular collagen volume fraction, and aldosterone concentration (all P<0. 05).After the treatment with Salvia Miltiorrhiza, SBP, left ventricular collagen volume fraction, andaldosterone concentration in SHR were decreased as compared with control group (P<0. 05) ex-cept SBP. It was concluded that chronic treatment with Salvia Miltiorrhiza could prevent left ven-tricular hypertrophy in SHR, significantly inhibit collagen compositions in left ventricle. Themechanism was probably related with the inhibition of the cardiac aldosterone action.

  5. Quantitative analysis of left ventricular strain using cardiac computed tomography

    Buss, Sebastian J., E-mail: sebastian.buss@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schulz, Felix; Mereles, Derliz [Department of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hosch, Waldemar [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Galuschky, Christian; Schummers, Georg; Stapf, Daniel [TomTec Imaging Systems GmbH, Munich (Germany); Hofmann, Nina; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Hardt, Stefan E. [Department of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Katus, Hugo A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios [Department of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Objectives: To investigate whether cardiac computed tomography (CCT) can determine left ventricular (LV) radial, circumferential and longitudinal myocardial deformation in comparison to two-dimensional echocardiography in patients with congestive heart failure. Background: Echocardiography allows for accurate assessment of strain with high temporal resolution. A reduced strain is associated with a poor prognosis in cardiomyopathies. However, strain imaging is limited in patients with poor echogenic windows, so that, in selected cases, tomographic imaging techniques may be preferable for the evaluation of myocardial deformation. Methods: Consecutive patients (n = 27) with congestive heart failure who underwent a clinically indicated ECG-gated contrast-enhanced 64-slice dual-source CCT for the evaluation of the cardiac veins prior to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) were included. All patients underwent additional echocardiography. LV radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain and strain rates were analyzed in identical midventricular short axis, 4-, 2- and 3-chamber views for both modalities using the same prototype software algorithm (feature tracking). Time for analysis was assessed for both modalities. Results: Close correlations were observed for both techniques regarding global strain (r = 0.93, r = 0.87 and r = 0.84 for radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain, respectively, p < 0.001 for all). Similar trends were observed for regional radial, longitudinal and circumferential strain (r = 0.88, r = 0.84 and r = 0.94, respectively, p < 0.001 for all). The number of non-diagnostic myocardial segments was significantly higher with echocardiography than with CCT (9.6% versus 1.9%, p < 0.001). In addition, the required time for complete quantitative strain analysis was significantly shorter for CCT compared to echocardiography (877 ± 119 s per patient versus 1105 ± 258 s per patient, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Quantitative assessment of LV strain

  6. Left ventricular diastolic filling in elder patients with systemic hypertension

    To study the significance of left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling in elderly patients with hypertension (HT), cardiac blood pool imagings with Tc-99m were obtained at rest in 17 normal subjects and 28 patients with systemic HT. HT patients did not show any evidence of coronary heart disease, renal insufficiency or other diseases. They showed normal LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and normal LV wall motion. They were divided into 4 groups: normal young (<60 years old, n=10), normal old (≥65 years old, n=7), HT young (<60 years old, N=15), and HT old (≥65 years old, n=13). From the LV volume curve and its first differentiation curve, LVEF, mean first third ejection rate (ERm) and peak ejection rate (PER) were obtained as LV systolic function indices; and LV diastolic filling rate during the first third of diastole (FRm) and peak filling rate (PFR) were obtained as LV diastolic function indices. All indices of LV systolic function were similar in all groups. In contrast, LV diastolic indices (FRm and PFR) of older groups were significantly lower than those of young HT and normal groups. LV diastolic indices in HT groups decreased significantly compared with normal groups of the same age. FRm could distinguish HT patients from normal subjects of the same age more accurately than PFR. In normal subjects, FRm correlated with age (r=-0.490) and ERm (r=-0.489). In addition to age ERm, FRm correlated with LV wall thickness measured by M-mode ecocardiography (r=-0.566) in HT patients. In the HT old group, the correlations between FRm and LV wall thickness and between FRm and ERm were more significant than those in the HT young group. The impairment of early diastolic filling of LV was more prominent in older HT patients than younger HT patients. LV diastolic abnormality was influenced more highly by the degree of LV hypertrophy in older HT patients than younger HT patients. These diastolic abnormalities may cause systolic dysfunction in older HT patients. (J.P.N.)

  7. The Prognostic Value of Left Atrial Peak Reservoir Strain in Acute Myocardial Infarction Is Dependent on Left Ventricular Longitudinal Function and Left Atrial Size

    Ersbøll, Mads; Andersen, Mads J; Valeur, Nana; Mogensen, Ulrik Madvig; Waziri, Homa; Møller, Jacob Eifer; Hassager, Christian; Søgaard, Peter; Køber, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Peak atrial longitudinal strain (PALS) during the reservoir phase has been proposed as a measure of left atrium function in a range of cardiac conditions, with the potential for added pathophysiological insight and prognostic value. However, no studies have assessed the interrelation of PALS and...... left ventricular longitudinal strain (global longitudinal strain) in large-scale populations in regard to prognosis....

  8. An examination of left ventricular peak filling rate and ventricular relaxation rate by simultaneous acquisition of radionuclide ventriculography and left ventricular pressure

    We investigated whether peak filling rate (PFR) obtained from ECG gated radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) reflects left ventricular (LV) relaxation rate or not. Five patients with angina pectoris, 5 patients with old myocardial infarction and 6 controls were studied by simultaneous acquisition of RNV and LV pressure. RNV was performed in modified left anterior oblique position before and during angiotensin II (A II) infusion to elevate their blood pressure about 25 mmHg (A-1) and 50 mmHg (A-2). The data were acquired in a list mode and LV volume curves were reconstructed by forward and backward gating from the R wave of ECG. Actual PFR and corrected PFR by stroke volume (/SV), by end diastolic volume (/EDV), by instantaneous volume (/IV) were calculated from LV volume curve and its first differential curve. LV pressure was simultaneously measured by the catheter-tip micromanometer, and the time constant (T) of assumed exponential decline in LV pressure was calculated as index of LV relaxation rate. Although there was no correlation between actual PFR and T, corrected PFR (/EDV) and PFR (/IV) correlated with T. PFR (/EDV) decreased and T increased during A-1 and A-2. Decrease of PFR (/EDV) corresponded with increase of T. Thus, corrected PFR (/EDV) obtained from RNV reflects the rate of LV relaxation, and was considered to be an useful index to evaluate LV diastolic function. (author)

  9. Comparison of methods for determining absolute left ventricular volumes from radionuclide ventriculography

    Warren, S.E.; McKay, R.G.; Aroesty, J.M.; Heller, G.V.; Kolodny, G.M.; Royal, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several radionuclide techniques have been used in routine clinical nuclear medicine practice as a means of quantitating left ventricular chamber volumes in man. Despite wide use and availability of the different techniques, however, there has not been a thorough comparison of radionuclide and contrast angiographic measurements performed in the same patients in close temporal proximity. Accordingly, in order to validate traditional methods of ventricular volume measurement, we have performed contrast ventriculography followed immediately (upon return of baseline hemodynamics) by gated radionuclide ventriculography in 34 patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Absolute left ventricular end-diastolic volumes were determined from single-plane, right anterior oblique, end-diastolic contrast silhouettes using a standard area-length method. Radionuclide ventriculographic volumes were determined by three methods: planimetry (32 patients), counts-based (19 patients), and thermodilution stroke volume/radionuclide ejection fraction (32 patients). With planimetry, an area-length method was used in which the modified left anterior oblique left ventricular image was assumed to be a prolate ellipsoid whose volume can be determined by measuring surface area and the ventricular long axis. With the counts-based technique, a blood sample was drawn at the midpoint of the radionuclide ventriculogram acquisition and counted with a gamma camera with appropriate attenuation factor correction. With the thermodilution stroke volume/radionuclide ejection fraction technique, the left ventricular stroke volume was determined by dividing thermodilution cardiac output by the heart rate.

  10. Mechanisms of decreased left ventricular preload during continuous positive pressure ventilation in ARDS

    Dhainaut, J.F.; Devaux, J.Y.; Monsallier, J.F.; Brunet, F.; Villemant, D.; Huyghebaert, M.F.

    1986-07-01

    Continuous positive pressure ventilation is associated with a reduction in left ventricular preload and cardiac output, but the mechanisms responsible are controversial. The decrease in left ventricular preload may result exclusively from a decreased systemic venous return due to increased pleural pressure, or from an additional effect such as decreased left ventricular compliance. To determine the mechanisms responsible, we studied the changes in cardiac output induced by continuous positive pressure ventilation in eight patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome. We measured cardiac output by thermodilution, and biventricular ejection fraction by equilibrium gated blood pool scintigraphy. Biventricular end-diastolic volumes were then calculated by dividing stroke volume by ejection fraction. As positive end-expiratory pressure increased from 0 to 20 cm H/sub 2/O, stroke volume and biventricular end-diastolic volumes fell about 25 percent, and biventricular ejection fraction remained unchanged. At 20 cm H/sub 2/O positive end-expiratory pressure, volume expansion for normalizing cardiac output restored biventricular end-diastolic volumes without markedly changing biventricular end-diastolic transmural pressures. The primary cause of the reduction in left ventricular preload with continuous positive pressure ventilation appears to be a fall in venous return and hence in right ventricular stroke volume, without evidence of change in left ventricular diastolic compliance.

  11. Lung perfusion and ventilation during implantation of left ventricular assist device as a strategy to avoid postoperative pulmonary complications and right ventricular failure

    Macedo, Francisco Igor B.; Anthony L. PANOS; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; Salerno, Tomas A.; Pham, Si M.

    2013-01-01

    Right ventricular failure is a major contributor to increased morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation. Cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with increased pulmonary ischaemia and pulmonary vascular resistance. Continuous pulmonary perfusion and ventilation represents an emerging strategy for pulmonary protection during cardiac surgery. We hypothesize that this technique may have a pivotal role in reducing postoperative right ventricular dysfu...

  12. Beat-to-beat left ventricular performance in atrial fibrillation: radionuclide assessment with the computerized nuclear probe

    There is wide beat-to-beat variability in cycle length and left ventricular performance in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, left ventricular ejection fraction and relative left ventricular volumes were evaluated on a beat-to-beat basis with the computerized nuclear probe, an instrument with sufficiently high sensitivity to allow continuous evaluation of the radionuclide time-activity curve. Of 18 patients with atrial fibrillation, 5 had mitral stenosis, 6 had mitral regurgitation, and 7 had coronary artery disease. Fifty consecutive beats were analyzed in each patient. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction ranged from 17 to 51%. There was substantial beat-to-beat variation in cycle length and left ventricular ejection fraction in all patients, including those with marked left ventricular dysfunction. In 14 patients who also underwent multiple gated cardiac blood pool imaging, there was an excellent correlation between mean ejection fraction derived from the nuclear probe and gated ejection fraction obtained by gamma camera imaging (r . 0.90). Based on beat-to-beat analysis, left ventricular function was dependent on relative end-diastolic volume and multiple preceding cycle lengths, but not preceding end-systolic volumes. This study demonstrates that a single value for left ventricular ejection fraction does not adequately characterize left ventricular function in patients with atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, both the mean beat-to-beat and the gated ejection fraction may underestimate left ventricular performance at rest in such patients

  13. Association of Left Atrial Volume With Mortality Among ESRD Patients With Left Ventricular Hypertrophy Referred for Kidney Transplantation

    Patel, Rajan K.; Jardine, Alan G.M.; Patrick B. Mark; Cunningham, Anthony F.; Steedman, Tracey; Powell, Joanna R.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Stevens, Kathryn K; Dargie, Henry J; Jardine, Alan G

    2010-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is common in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and an independent risk factor for premature cardiovascular death. Left atrial volume (LAV), measured using echocardiography, predicts death in patients with ESRD. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is a volume-independent method of accurately assessing cardiac structure and function in patients with ESRD. Study Design Single-center prospective observational study to assess the...

  14. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    Ana Baptista

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. Objective: To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. Methods: The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m2 for women or ≥ 116 g/m2 for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. Results: A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m2 (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m2] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%. Nine (19.1% showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5, a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. Conclusion: In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5.

  15. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m2 for women or ≥ 116 g/m2 for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m2 (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m2] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%). Nine (19.1%) showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5), a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5)

  16. Screening for Fabry Disease in Left Ventricular Hypertrophy: Documentation of a Novel Mutation

    Baptista, Ana, E-mail: baptista-ana@hotmail.com; Magalhães, Pedro; Leão, Sílvia; Carvalho, Sofia; Mateus, Pedro; Moreira, Ilídio [Centro Hospitalar de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Unidade de Vila Real (Portugal)

    2015-08-15

    Fabry disease is a lysosomal storage disease caused by enzyme α-galactosidase A deficiency as a result of mutations in the GLA gene. Cardiac involvement is characterized by progressive left ventricular hypertrophy. To estimate the prevalence of Fabry disease in a population with left ventricular hypertrophy. The patients were assessed for the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy defined as a left ventricular mass index ≥ 96 g/m{sup 2} for women or ≥ 116 g/m{sup 2} for men. Severe aortic stenosis and arterial hypertension with mild left ventricular hypertrophy were exclusion criteria. All patients included were assessed for enzyme α-galactosidase A activity using dry spot testing. Genetic study was performed whenever the enzyme activity was decreased. A total of 47 patients with a mean left ventricular mass index of 141.1 g/m{sup 2} (± 28.5; 99.2 to 228.5 g/m{sup 2}] were included. Most of the patients were females (51.1%). Nine (19.1%) showed decreased α-galactosidase A activity, but only one positive genetic test − [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5), a mutation not previously described in the literature. This clinical investigation was able to establish the association between the mutation and the clinical presentation. In a population of patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, we documented a Fabry disease prevalence of 2.1%. This novel case was defined in the sequence of a mutation of unknown meaning in the GLA gene with further pathogenicity study. Thus, this study permitted the definition of a novel causal mutation for Fabry disease - [GLA] c.785G>T; p.W262L (exon 5)

  17. Numerical simulation of the influence of a left ventricular assist device on the cardiovascular system

    Verkerke, GJ; Geertsema, AA; Mihaylov, D; Blanksma, PK; Rakhorst, G

    2000-01-01

    The PUCA (pulsatile catheter) pump is a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) capable of unloading the left ventricle (LV) and improving coronary flow by providing a counterpulsation effect. If consists of an extracorporeal located membrane pump, coupled to a transarterial catheter that enters the b

  18. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT versus cardiac MRI

    It is stated that cardiac MRI imaging can provide accurate estimation of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for assessment of LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and EF, using cardiac MRI as the reference methods/(methodology). Gated myocardial perfusion SPECT images were analyzed with two different quantification software, quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) and 4D-MSPECT. Thirty-four consecutive patients were studied. Myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac MRI had excellent intra/interobserver reproducibility. Correlation between the results of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac MRI were high for EDV and EF. However, ESV and EDV were significantly underestimated by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT compared to cardiac MRI. Moreover, gated myocardial perfusion SPECT overestimated EF for small heart. One reason for the difference in volumes and EF is the delineation of the endocardial border. Cardiac MRI has higher spatial resolution. We should understand the differences of volumes and EF as determined by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac MRI. (author)

  19. Effect of Hemodialysis on Left and Right Ventricular Volume and Function

    With the improvement of hemodialysis, the course of thc discase in patient with endstage renal disease has been clearly improved. Nevertheless, among several shortcomings to our present mode of renal replacement therapy, cardiovascular complications have been the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Several factors such as anemia, arteriovenous shunting of blood, intermittent extracorporeal circulation and hypertension may be contributing. But little is known about the quantitative cardiac hemodynamic characteristics occurred during hemodialysis. The purpose of this study is to observe the sequential hemodynamic changes before, during and after the hemodialysis and to investigate: reliable parameters in the detection of ventricular dysfunction. In the present study, equilibrium radionuclide cardiac angiography was performed and left and right ventricular volume indices, ejection phase indices of both ventricular, performance were measured in the 16 stable patients with chronic renal failure treated with maintenance hemodialysis sequentially i.e. before, during (carly and late phase) and after the hemodialysis. The results obtained were as follows; 1) The indices of the left ventricular function were not changed during the hemodialysis but increased after the hemodialysis. 2) The indices of the right ventricular function(EF, SVI) were significantly decreased in the early phase (15, 30 minutes after starting extracorporeal circulation) but recovered after the hemodialysis, 3) The ratio of right ventricular to left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly decreased in the early phase and the lung volume indices were significantly increased at the same phase. As a conclusion, hemodialysis improves left ventricular function maybe du to increased contractility, and effects on the right ventricular function maybe due to the increased lung volume in the early phase of hemodialysis.

  20. Comparison of the accuracy of electron-beam computed tomography and conventional cineangiography in left ventricular volume measurement

    Purpose: To compare the relative accuracy of left ventricular volume measured by electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) and conventional cineangiography. Materials and methods: Fourteen human left ventricular casts underwent electron-beam computed tomography scanning and conventional biplane cineangiography. The true left ventricular volume was measured by displacement of water. EBCT left ventricular volume was calculated with modified Simpson's method, the cineangiographic left ventricular volume was calculated with biplane area-length method. Results: The actual left ventricular cast volume was 55.57 +- 28.91 ml, EBCT left ventricular volume was 66.50 +- 33.04 ml for long-axis view, and 60.36 +- 29.90 ml for short-axis view, ventricular volume from biplane cineangiography was 82.09 +- 40.40 ml. Left ventricular volume from biplane cineangiography was significantly larger than those from EBCT and the actual volume (P0.98). Conclusion: EBCT is more accurate for left ventricular volume measurement and should become the gold standard

  1. Normal left ventricular wall motion measured with two-dimensional myocardial tagging

    Using a myocardial tagging technique, normal left ventricular wall motion was studied in 3 true short axis views and a double oblique 4-chamber view in 14 and 11 volunteers, respectively. Three orthogonal directions of left ventricular motion were observed throughout the systole; a concentric contraction towards the center of the left ventricle, a motion of the base of the heart towards the apex, and a rotation of the left ventricle around its long axis. The direction of left ventricular rotation changed from early systole to late systole. The base and middle levels of the left ventricle rotated counterclockwise (CCW) at early systole and clockwise (CW) at late systole, whereas the apex of the heart rotated CW at early systole and CCW at late systole. The different directions of the rotation of base and apex resulted in a myocardial twisting that changed direction from early to late systole. We conclude that MR imaging with myocardial tagging is a method that can be used to study normal left ventricular wall motion, and that is promising for future use in patient groups. (orig.)

  2. Evaluation of left ventricular function with breath-hold MR imaging

    Objective: To investigate the value of breath-hold cine MR imaging in the evaluation of left ventricular function. Methods: Eighteen healthy volunteers and 36 patients with cardiac diseases were studied with breath-hold cine MR imaging, then left ventricular volumes and masses were measured, and the measurements were compared with those of conventional cine MR imaging and echocardiography. Results: (1) The measurements of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction (EF) with breath-hold cine MR imaging technique were closely correlated with those obtained by conventional cine MR imaging and echocardiography. There was no statistically significant difference among the measurements of the three methods (P > 0.05). The correlation coefficients were 0.52-0.96. (2) The correlation coefficient of left ventricular mass (EDM and ESM) among three methods were lower than those of left ventricular volume, and there was statistically significant difference in ESM between MRI and echocardiography (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Breath-hold cine MR imaging is an useful method for evaluating the left ventricular function because of non-ghosting artifacts and short imaging time

  3. Echocardiographic assessment of the different left ventricular geometric patterns in hypertensive patients

    Delma Maria Cunha

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identiy left ventricular geometric patterns in hypertensive patients on echocardiography, and to correlate those patterns with casual blood pressure measurements and with the parameters obtained on a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. METHODS: We studied sixty hypertensive patients, grouped according to the Joint National Committee stages of hypertension.. Using the single- and two-dimensional Doppler Echocardiography, we analyzed the left ventricular mass and the geometric patterns through the correlation of left ventricular mass index and relative wall thickness. On ambulatory blood pressure monitoring we assessed the means and pressure loads in the different geometric patterns detected on echocardiography RESULTS: We identified three left ventricular geometric patterns: 1 concentric hypertrophy, in 25% of the patients; 2 concentric remodeling, in 25%; and 3 normal geometry, in 50%. Casual systolic blood pressure was higher in the group with concentric hypertrophy than in the other groups (p=0.001. Mean systolic pressure in the 24h, daytime and nighttime periods was also higher in patients with concentric hypertrophy, as compared to the other groups (p=0.003, p=0.004 and p=0.007. Daytime systolic load and nighttime diastolic load were higher in patients with concentric hypertrophy ( p=0.004 and p=0.01, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Left ventricular geometric patterns show significant correlation with casual systolic blood pressure, and with means and pressure loads on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

  4. Dipyridamole-thallium tests are predictive of severe cardiac arrhythmias in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy

    In a population of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and a high prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) undergoing chronic hemodialysis, the authors investigated the association between the results of dipyridamole-thallium tests (DTTs) and the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. They observed a positive significant association between positive DTTs and the occurrence of severe forms of ventricular arrhythmias. A significant association was also observed between the presence of severe LVH and the occurrence of severe ventricular arrhythmias. However, no association was found between the presence of LVH and the positivity of the DTT. As most of their patients with positive DTTs had unimpaired coronary circulations, they conclude that positive DTTs, although falsely indicative of impaired myocardial blood supply, does have an important clinical relevance, indicating increased risk of morbidity (and, possibly, mortality) due to ventricular arrhythmias in a population of CRF patients submitted to chronic renal function replacement program

  5. Factors influencing left ventricular hypertrophy in children and adolescents with or without family history of premature myocardial infarction

    Seyyed Mohsen Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Result : The results showed that among the studied variables, gender, age, body mass index, and blood pressure were associated with the left ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Considering the results and previous studies in this field, it was observed that left ventricular hypertrophy exists at early ages, which is very dangerous and can lead to heart diseases at early ages. Factors such as being overweight, having high blood pressure, and being male cause left ventricular hypertrophy and lead to undiagnosable heart diseases.

  6. Prolonged left ventricular dysfunction occurs in patients with coronary artery disease after both dobutamine and exercise induced myocardial ischaemia

    BARNES, E; Baker, C; Dutka, D.; Rimoldi, O; Rinaldi, C.; Nihoyannopoulos, P; Camici, P; Hall, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether pharmacological stress leads to prolonged but reversible left ventricular dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease, similar to that seen after exercise.
DESIGN—A randomised crossover study of recovery time of systolic and diastolic left ventricular function after exercise and dobutamine induced ischaemia.
SUBJECTS—10 patients with stable angina, angiographically proven coronary artery disease, and normal left ventricular function.
INTERVENTIONS—Tread...

  7. Effects of Perindopril on Left Ventricular Remodeling and Osteopontin Expression in Rats With Myocardial Infarction

    2007-01-01

    To observe the effects of perindopril on left ventricular remodeling and myocardial osteopontin expression in rats with myocardial infarction. Methods In this study male adult SD rats were randomly divided into 3groups: sham-operation group, MI-saline group and MI-perindopril group. Left anterior descending artery was ligated to generate myocardial infarction. Perindopril (2 mg/kg body weight/day) was administered from the next day of MI.Four weeks later, left ventricular diameter (LVEDD and LVESD) and left ventricular ejection fraction was estimated with echocardiography, LVSP, LVEDP and ± dp/dtmax was detected with hemodynamic measurement, cardiomyocyte diameter and interstitial fibrosis infiltration were evaluated with histological methods, and myocardium osteopontin protein expression level was detected with western blot. Results ①Compared with the sham-operation group, all rats with MI developed significant systolic and diastolic dysfunction, as was indicated by decreased LVEF, LVSP and ± dp/dtmax, as well as increased LVEDP. ②Rats with MI showed significantly dilated left ventricles and higher ventricular weight / body weight ratio, significantly increased cardiomyocyte diameter and marked interstitial fibrosis in the non-infarction area. ③Perindopril treatment partly prevented cardiac dysfunction and left ventricular remodeling as indicated by the parameters mentioned above. ④No osteopontin protein was detected in myocardium of sham-operation rats. In rats with MI, high level osteopontin protein expression was significantly inhibited by perindopril treatment. Conclusions In rats with MI, perindopril treatment significantly prevented left ventricular remodeling and myocardium osteopontin protein expression.

  8. Successful management of a postinfarction left ventricular rupture using a sutureless technique with concomitant myocardial revascularization.

    Kalangos, A; Panos, A; Chatelain, P; Vala, D; Fromage, P; Faidutti, B

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of left ventricular (LV) rupture that occurred on the second day after inferolateral myocardial infarction (MI). An aggressive diagnostic approach with rapid coronary angiography prior to surgical repair provides a benefit characterized postoperatively by complete recovery of myocardial contractility in the akinetic infarcted area. We believe that coronary artery disease associated with subacute ventricular rupture may, in fact, be better investigated and simultaneously treated under a protocol of early surgical repair. PMID:9591179

  9. Impaired left ventricular diastolic filling in patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy: a pulsed Doppler echocardiographic study.

    Kinoshita, O; Hongo, M; Yamada, H.; Misawa, T.; Kono, J.; Okubo, S.; Ikeda, S

    1989-01-01

    To assess left ventricular diastolic filling in patients with amyloid heart disease 12 patients with familial amyloid polyneuropathy and 15 normal subjects were studied by pulsed Doppler echocardiography. None of the patients had clinical evidence of overt heart disease or restrictive cardiomyopathy and only two of them showed ventricular wall thickening. The peak flow velocity of rapid diastolic filling and the acceleration rate of early diastolic inflow were significantly lower in patients ...

  10. Left ventricular metastasis from a primary lung carcinoma

    CHE Guo-wei; LIU Lun-xu; ZHANG Er-yong; ZHOU Qing-hua

    2007-01-01

    @@ The most common tumors associated with cardiac metastases are lung carcinoma and melanoma.1 Although the cardiac involvement of lung cancer is common(lung cancer usually directly invades into the pericardium and/or left/right atrium),the primary lung cancer accompanied with metastasis to the left ventricle is extremely rare.