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Sample records for 3d-dynamic mri initial

  1. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    Plathow, Christian; Schoebinger, Max; Meinzer, Heinz Peter [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Herth, Felix; Tuengerthal, Siegfried [Clinic of Thoracic Disease, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans Ulrich [University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved significantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 {+-} 0.5 versus 3.4 L {+-} 0.6, FEV1 0.9 {+-} 0.2 versus 1.4 {+-} 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases)

  2. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved significantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 ± 0.5 versus 3.4 L ± 0.6, FEV1 0.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.4 ± 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases)

  3. 3D Dynamic Echocardiography with a Digitizer

    Oshiro, Osamu; Matani, Ayumu; Chihara, Kunihiro

    1998-05-01

    In this paper,a three-dimensional (3D) dynamic ultrasound (US) imaging system,where a US brightness-mode (B-mode) imagetriggered with an R-wave of electrocardiogram (ECG)was obtained with an ultrasound diagnostic deviceand the location and orientation of the US probewere simultaneously measured with a 3D digitizer, is described.The obtained B-mode imagewas then projected onto a virtual 3D spacewith the proposed interpolation algorithm using a Gaussian operator.Furthermore, a 3D image was presented on a cathode ray tube (CRT)and stored in virtual reality modeling language (VRML).We performed an experimentto reconstruct a 3D heart image in systole using this system.The experimental results indicatethat the system enables the visualization ofthe 3D and internal structure of a heart viewed from any angleand has potential for use in dynamic imaging,intraoperative ultrasonography and tele-medicine.

  4. Scaling in Gravitational Clustering, 2D and 3D Dynamics

    Munshi, D; Melott, A L; Schäffer, R

    1999-01-01

    Perturbation Theory (PT) applied to a cosmological density field with Gaussian initial fluctuations suggests a specific hierarchy for the correlation functions when the variance is small. In particular quantitative predictions have been made for the moments and the shape of the one-point probability distribution function (PDF) of the top-hat smoothed density. In this paper we perform a series of systematic checks of these predictions against N-body computations both in 2D and 3D with a wide range of featureless power spectra. In agreement with previous studies, we found that the reconstructed PDF-s work remarkably well down to very low probabilities, even when the variance approaches unity. Our results for 2D reproduce the features for the 3D dynamics. In particular we found that the PT predictions are more accurate for spectra with less power on small scales. The nonlinear regime has been explored with various tools, PDF-s, moments and Void Probability Function (VPF). These studies have been done with unprec...

  5. Pulmonary hilar lymph nodes in lung cancer: assessment with 3D-dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Purpose: We performed 3D-dynamic MRI on patients with primary lung cancer to identify its usefulness for detecting hilar adenopathy shown at surgery. Methods and materials: 30 consecutive patients with peripheral lung cancer underwent preoperative 3D-dynamic Gd-DTPA-enhanced MRI. Two thoracic radiologists blinded to histopathologic findings reviewed those studies independently for hilar adenopathy visualization. The results were correlated with surgical and histopathologic findings. Interreader agreement for the detection of hilar adenopathy was assessed by means of the κ statistic. Results: Dynamic MRI demonstrated hilar adenopathy, with or without metastasis revealed at surgery, in all of 15 patients. Adenopathy without metastasis was shown in four patients. Dynamic MRI also revealed metastatic adenopathy in 11 of 12 patients with pathologically proven metastasis. There was only one case with lymph node metastasis that did not have adenopathy either on MRI or even at surgery. The diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MRI for adenopathy with or without metastases revealed at surgery were as follows; sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value, 100%; and negative predictive value, 100%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of dynamic MRI for hilar lymph nodes metastasis were as follows; sensitivity, 92%; specificity, 78%; positive predictive value, 73%; and negative predictive value, 93%. Interreader agreement was substantial (κ=0.73) for detection of hilar adenopathy. Conclusion: Hilar adenopathy on 3D-dynamic MRI correlated well with that of surgical finding on patients with primary lung cancer. It may have the potential to make an accurate preoperative evaluation of hilar lymph node metastasis from lung cancer

  6. 3D Dynamic Earthquake Fracture Simulation (Test Case)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Ando, Ryosuke

    2016-04-01

    A 3D dynamic earthquake fracture simulation is being developed for the fault structures which are non-planar to understand heterogeneous stress states in the Marmara Sea. Locating in a seismic gap, a large earthquake is expected in the center of the Sea of Marmara. Concerning the fact that more than 14 million inhabitants of İstanbul, located very closely to the Marmara Sea, the importance of the analysis of the Central Marmara Sea is extremely high. A few 3D dynamic earthquake fracture studies have been already done in the Sea of Marmara for pure right lateral strike-slip stress regimes (Oglesby and Mai, 2012; Aochi and Ulrich, 2015). In this study, a 3D dynamic earthquake fracture model with heterogeneous stress patches from the TPV5, a SCEC code validation case, is adapted. In this test model, the fault and the ground surfaces are gridded by a scalene triangulation technique using GMSH program. For a grid size changing between 0.616 km and 1.050 km the number of elements for the fault surface is 1984 and for the ground surface is 1216. When these results are compared with Kaneko's results for TPV5 from SPECFEM3D, reliable findings could be observed for the first 6.5 seconds (stations on the fault) although a stability problem is encountered after this time threshold. To solve this problem grid sizes are made smaller, so the number of elements increase 7986 for the fault surface and 4867 for the ground surface. On the other hand, computational problems arise in that case, since the computation time is directly proportional to the number of total elements and the required memory also increases with the square of that. Therefore, it is expected that this method can be adapted for less coarse grid cases, regarding the main difficulty coming from the necessity of an effective supercomputer and run time limitations. The main objective of this research is to obtain 3D dynamic earthquake rupture scenarios, concerning not only planar and non-planar faults but also

  7. 3-D DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF TRANSVERSELY ISOTROPIC SATURATED SOILS

    WANG Xiao-gang; HUANG Yi

    2005-01-01

    A study on dynamic response of transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media under a circular non-axisymmetrical harmonic source has been presented by Huang Yi et al.using the technique of Fourier expansion and Hankel transform. However, the method may not always be valid. The work is extended to the general case being in the rectangular coordinate. The purpose is to study the 3-d dynamic response of transversely isotropic saturated soils under a general source distributing in arbitrary rectangular zoon on the medium surface. Based on Biot's theory for fluid-saturated porous media, the 3-d wave motion equations in rectangular coordinate for transversely isotropic saturated poroelastic media were transformed into the two uncoupling governing differential equations of 6-order and 2-order respectively by means of the displacement functions. Then, using the technique of double Fourier transform, the governing differential equations were easily solved. Integral solutions of soil skeleton displacements and pore pressure as well as the total stresses for poroelastic media were obtained. Furthermore, a systematic study on half-space problem in saturated soils was performed. Integral solutions for surface displacements under the general harmonic source distributing on arbitrary surface zone,considering both case of drained surface and undrained surface,were presented.

  8. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Platzek, Ivan; Laniado, Michael [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dresden (Germany); Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany); Schneider, Matthias [Dresden University Hospital, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Gudziol, Volker [Dresden University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Dresden (Germany); Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Hoff, Joerg van den [Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kotzerke, Joerg [Dresden University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG ({sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid system. FDG was administered intravenously prior to the conventional PET scan (267-395 MBq FDG, 348 MBq on average). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumour and of both cerebellar hemispheres were determined for both PET datasets. The numbers of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake were compared between the two PET datasets. No MRI-induced artefacts where observed in the PET images. The tumour was detected by PET/MRI in 17 of the 20 patients, by PET in 16 and by MRI in 14. The PET/MRI examination yielded significantly higher SUV{sub max} than the conventional PET scanner for both the tumour (p < 0.0001) and the cerebellum (p = 0.0009). The number of lymph nodes with increased FDG uptake detected using the PET dataset from the PET/MRI system was significantly higher the number detected by the stand-alone PET system (64 vs. 39, p = 0.001). The current study demonstrated that PET/MRI of the whole head and neck region is feasible with a whole-body PET/MRI system without impairment of PET or MR image quality. (orig.)

  9. PET/MRI in head and neck cancer: initial experience

    Platzek, Ivan; Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Schneider, Matthias; Gudziol, Volker; Langner, Jens; Schramm, Georg; Laniado, Michael; Kotzerke, Jörg; van den Hoff, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI (positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging) with FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) for initial staging of head and neck cancer. Methods The study group comprised 20 patients (16 men, 4 women) aged between 52 and 81 years (median 64 years) with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. The patients underwent a PET scan on a conventional scanner and a subsequent PET/MRI examination on a whole-body hybrid sy...

  10. Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface thermal behavior with 3D dynamic gap element

    Most of the fuel performance codes that are able to simulate a multidimensional analysis are used to calculate the radial temperature distribution and perform a multidimensional mechanical analysis based on a one-dimensional (1D) temperature result. The FRAPCON-FRAPTRAN code system incorporates a 1D thermal module and two-dimensional (2D) mechanical module when FEM option is activated. In this method, the multidimensional gap conductance model is not required because one-dimensional thermal analysis is carried out. On the other hand, a gap conductance model for a multi-dimension should be developed in the code to perform a multidimensional thermal analysis. ALCYONE developed by CEA introduces an equivalent heat convection coefficient that represents the multidimensional gap conductance. However, the code does not employ dynamic gap conductance which is a function of gap thickness and gap characteristics in direct. The BISON code, which has been developed by INL (Idaho National Laboratory), employed a thermo-mechanical contact method that is specifically designed for tightly-coupled implicit solutions that employ Jacobian-free solution methods. Owing to tightly-coupled implicit solutions, the BISON code solves gap conductance and gap thickness simultaneously with given boundary conditions. In this paper, 3D dynamic gap element has been proposed to resolve convergence issue and nonlinear characteristic of multidimensional gap conductance. To evaluate 3D dynamic gap element module, 3D thermomechanical module using FORTRAN77 has been implemented incorporating 3D dynamic gap element. To demonstrate effect of 3D dynamic gap element, thermal behavior of missing pellet surface (MPS) has been simulated by the developed module. LWR fuel performance codes should incorporate thermo-mechanical loop to solve gap conductance problem, iteratively. However, gap conductance in multidimensional model is difficult issue owing to its nonlinearity and convergence characteristics. In

  11. 3D Dynamic Representation for Urban Sprawl Modelling: Example of India’s Delhi-Mumbai corridor

    Gadal, Sébastien; Fournier, Stéphane; Prouteau, Emeric

    2010-01-01

    3D dynamic geo-visualisation models reflect changes in urban land areas and make a new contribution to the spatiotemporal representation of land use processes and the production of geographic knowledge. They facilitate understanding of the process of urbanisation and the resulting transformations of land use. The 3D dynamic visualisation model of the Delhi-Mumbai corridor in India illustrates how it is now possible to integrate the temporal, spatial dynamic and geographic dimensions of a proc...

  12. Hand Gesture Spotting Based on 3D Dynamic Features Using Hidden Markov Models

    Elmezain, Mahmoud; Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Michaelis, Bernd

    In this paper, we propose an automatic system that handles hand gesture spotting and recognition simultaneously in stereo color image sequences without any time delay based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs). Color and 3D depth map are used to segment hand regions. The hand trajectory will determine in further step using Mean-shift algorithm and Kalman filter to generate 3D dynamic features. Furthermore, k-means clustering algorithm is employed for the HMMs codewords. To spot meaningful gestures accurately, a non-gesture model is proposed, which provides confidence limit for the calculated likelihood by other gesture models. The confidence measures are used as an adaptive threshold for spotting meaningful gestures. Experimental results show that the proposed system can successfully recognize isolated gestures with 98.33% and meaningful gestures with 94.35% reliability for numbers (0-9).

  13. 3D dynamic simulation of crack propagation in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Some experimental observations of Shock Wave Lithotripsy(SWL), which include 3D dynamic crack propagation, are simulated with the aim of reproducing fragmentation of kidney stones with SWL. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is the fragmentation of kidney stones by focusing an ultrasonic pressure pulse onto the stones. 3D models with fine discretization are used to accurately capture the high amplitude shear shock waves. For solving the resulting large scale dynamic crack propagation problem, PDS-FEM is used; it provides numerically efficient failure treatments. With a distributed memory parallel code of PDS-FEM, experimentally observed 3D photoelastic images of transient stress waves and crack patterns in cylindrical samples are successfully reproduced. The numerical crack patterns are in good agreement with the experimental ones, quantitatively. The results shows that the high amplitude shear waves induced in solid, by the lithotriptor generated shock wave, play a dominant role in stone fragmentation.

  14. Development of 3D dynamic gap element for simulation of asymmetric fuel behavior

    The accurate modeling of heat transfer across the gap between fuel pellets and the protective cladding is essential to understanding the fuel performance, including cladding stress and behavior under irradiated conditions. To establish a heat transfer model through a gap in the fuel performance code, the gap conductance based on the Ross and Stoute model was employed in most previous works. In this model, the gap conductance that determines the temperature gradient within the gap is a function of gap thickness, which is dependent on mechanical behavior. Recently, many researchers have been developing fuel performance codes based on the finite element method (FE) to calculate the temperature, stress, and strain in 2D or 3D. The gap conductance model for FE can be a challenging issue in terms of convergence and nonlinearity because the elements that are positioned in a gap have a different gap conductance, and the boundary conditions of the gap vary at each iteration step. In this paper, the specified 3D dynamic gap element has been proposed and implemented to simulate asymmetric thermo-mechanical fuel behavior. A thermo-mechanical 3D finite element module incorporating a gap element has been implemented using FORTRAN77. To evaluate the proposed 3D gap element, the missing pellet surface (MPS), which results in an asymmetric heat transfer in the pellet and cladding, was simulated. As a result, the maximum temperature of a pellet for the MPS problem calculated with the specified 3D gap element is much higher than the temperature calculated with a uniform gap conductance model that a multidimensional fuel performance code employs. The results demonstrate that a 3D simulation is essential to evaluate the temperature and stress of the pellet and cladding for an asymmetric geometry simulation. (author)

  15. Small animal simultaneous PET/MRI: initial experiences in a 9.4 T microMRI

    Harsha Maramraju, Sri; Smith, S. David; Junnarkar, Sachin S.; Schulz, Daniela; Stoll, Sean; Ravindranath, Bosky; Purschke, Martin L.; Rescia, Sergio; Southekal, Sudeepti; Pratte, Jean-François; Vaska, Paul; Woody, Craig L.; Schlyer, David J.

    2011-04-01

    We developed a non-magnetic positron-emission tomography (PET) device based on the rat conscious animal PET that operates in a small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, thereby enabling us to carry out simultaneous PET/MRI studies. The PET detector comprises 12 detector blocks, each being a 4 × 8 array of lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals (2.22 × 2.22 × 5 mm3) coupled to a matching non-magnetic avalanche photodiode array. The detector blocks, housed in a plastic case, form a 38 mm inner diameter ring with an 18 mm axial extent. Custom-built MRI coils fit inside the positron-emission tomography (PET) device, operating in transceiver mode. The PET insert is integrated with a Bruker 9.4 T 210 mm clear-bore diameter MRI scanner. We acquired simultaneous PET/MR images of phantoms, of in vivo rat brain, and of cardiac-gated mouse heart using [11C]raclopride and 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose PET radiotracers. There was minor interference between the PET electronics and the MRI during simultaneous operation, and small effects on the signal-to-noise ratio in the MR images in the presence of the PET, but no noticeable visual artifacts. Gradient echo and high-duty-cycle spin echo radio frequency (RF) pulses resulted in a 7% and a 28% loss in PET counts, respectively, due to high PET counts during the RF pulses that had to be gated out. The calibration of the activity concentration of PET data during MR pulsing is reproducible within less than 6%. Our initial results demonstrate the feasibility of performing simultaneous PET and MRI studies in adult rats and mice using the same PET insert in a small-bore 9.4 T MRI.

  16. Initial Incidence of White Matter Hyperintensities on MRI in Astronauts

    Norcross, Jason; Sherman, Paul; McGuire, Steve; Kochunov, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Previous literature has described the increase in white matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden associated with hypobaric exposure in the U-2 and altitude chamber operating personnel. Although astronauts have similar hypobaric exposure pressures to the U2 pilot population, astronauts have far fewer exposures and each exposure would be associated with a much lower level of decompression stress due to rigorous countermeasures to prevent decompression sickness. Therefore, we postulated that the WMH burden in the astronaut population would be less than in U2 pilots. Methods: Twenty-one post-flight de-identified astronaut MRIs (5 mm slice thickness FLAIR sequences) were evaluated for WMH count and volume. The only additional data provided was an age range of the astronauts (43-57) and if they had ever performed an EVA (13 yes, 8 no). Results: WMH count in these 21 astronaut MRI was 21.0 +/- 24.8 (mean+/- SD) and volume was 0.382 +/- 0.602 ml, which was significantly higher than previously published results for the U2 pilots. No significant differences between EVA and no EVA groups existed. Age range of astronaut population is not directly comparable to the U2 population. Discussion: With significantly less frequent (sometimes none) and less stressful hypobaric exposures, yet a much higher incidence of increased WMH, this indicates the possibility of additional mechanisms beyond hypobaric exposure. This increase unlikely to be attributable just to the differences in age between astronauts and U2 pilots. Forward work includes continuing review of post-flight MRI and evaluation of pre to post flight MRI changes if available. Data mining for potential WMH risk factors includes collection of age, sex, spaceflight experience, EVA hours, other hypobaric exposures, hyperoxic exposures, radiation, high performance aircraft experience and past medical history. Finally, neurocognitive and vision/eye results will be evaluated for any evidence of impairment linked to

  17. Mutual information as a measure of image quality for 3D dynamic lung imaging with EIT

    We report on a pilot study of dynamic lung electrical impedance tomography (EIT) at the University of Manchester. Low-noise EIT data at 100 frames per second were obtained from healthy male subjects during controlled breathing, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) subsequently used for spatial validation of the EIT reconstruction. The torso surface in the MR image and electrode positions obtained using MRI fiducial markers informed the construction of a 3D finite element model extruded along the caudal-distal axis of the subject. Small changes in the boundary that occur during respiration were accounted for by incorporating the sensitivity with respect to boundary shape into a robust temporal difference reconstruction algorithm. EIT and MRI images were co-registered using the open source medical imaging software, 3D Slicer. A quantitative comparison of quality of different EIT reconstructions was achieved through calculation of the mutual information with a lung-segmented MR image. EIT reconstructions using a linear shape correction algorithm reduced boundary image artefacts, yielding better contrast of the lungs, and had 10% greater mutual information compared with a standard linear EIT reconstruction. (paper)

  18. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using 23Na-MRI

    23Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of 23Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of 23Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of 23Na-MRI with 1H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. 23Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All 23Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of 23Na-MRI images with 1H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 ± 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 ± 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. 23Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  19. Imaging of tumor viability in lung cancer. Initial results using {sup 23}Na-MRI

    Henzler, T.; Apfaltrer, P.; Haneder, S.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Fink, C. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Konstandin, S.; Schad, L. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Schmid-Bindert, G.; Manegold, C. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Interdisciplinary Thoracic Oncology; Wenz, F. [University Medical Center Mannheim Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-04-15

    {sup 23}Na-MRI has been proposed as a potential imaging biomarker for the assessment of tumor viability and the evaluation of therapy response but has not yet been evaluated in patients with lung cancer. We aimed to assess the feasibility of {sup 23}Na-MRI in patients with lung cancer. Three patients with stage IV adenocarcinoma of the lung were examined on a clinical 3 Tesla MRI system (Magnetom TimTrio, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany). Feasibility of {sup 23}Na-MRI images was proven by comparison and fusion of {sup 23}Na-MRI with {sup 1}H-MR, CT and FDG-PET-CT images. {sup 23}Na signal intensities (SI) of tumor and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of the spinal canal were measured and the SI ratio in tumor and CSF was calculated. One chemonaive patient was examined before and after the initiation of combination therapy (Carboplatin, Gemcitabin, Cetuximab). All {sup 23}Na-MRI examinations were successfully completed and were of diagnostic quality. Fusion of {sup 23}Na-MRI images with {sup 1}H-MRI, CT and FDG-PET-CT was feasible in all patients and showed differences in solid and necrotic tumor areas. The mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF SI ratio were 13.3 {+-} 1.8 x 103 and 0.83 {+-} 0.14, respectively. In necrotic tumors, as suggested by central non-FDG-avid areas, the mean tumor SI and the tumor/CSF ratio were 19.4 x 103 and 1.10, respectively. {sup 23}Na-MRI is feasible in patients with lung cancer and could provide valuable functional molecular information regarding tumor viability, and potentially treatment response. (orig.)

  20. Posture-Dependent Human 3He Lung Imaging in an Open Access MRI System: Initial Results

    Tsai, L L; Li, C -H; Rosen, M S; Patz, S; Walsworth, R L

    2007-01-01

    The human lung and its functions are extremely sensitive to orientation and posture, and debate continues as to the role of gravity and the surrounding anatomy in determining lung function and heterogeneity of perfusion and ventilation. However, study of these effects is difficult. The conventional high-field magnets used for most hyperpolarized 3He MRI of the human lung, and most other common radiological imaging modalities including PET and CT, restrict subjects to lying horizontally, minimizing most gravitational effects. In this paper, we briefly review the motivation for posture-dependent studies of human lung function, and present initial imaging results of human lungs in the supine and vertical body orientations using inhaled hyperpolarized 3He gas and an open-access MRI instrument. The open geometry of this MRI system features a "walk-in" capability that permits subjects to be imaged in vertical and horizontal positions, and potentially allows for complete rotation of the orientation of the imaging su...

  1. 3D-dynamic visualization of complex molecular cell biology processes : 1-year university students' understanding of visualizations of signal transduction

    Jacobsson, Johan Lars Henrik

    2008-01-01

    This study deals with the use of 3D-dynamic visualizations for teaching complex molecular cell biology concepts. The focus is on signal transduction, which is a concept that constitutes an important part of biological systems. 3D-dynamic visualizations (animations) were produced and shown for a total of 24 students attending a course in molecular cell biology at Karlstad University, Sweden. Data were collected by questionnaires and interviews which were structured around the understandability...

  2. Negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection: Outcome of 5-year follow-up in men with negative findings on initial MRI studies

    Highlights: • We assess the negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. • Patients with positive prostate biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. • Patients with negative initial prostate biopsy findings were followed up for 5 years. • The negative predictive value was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. • MRI is a useful tool to rule out significant prostate cancer before biopsy. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the clinical negative predictive value (NPV) of multiparametric MRI (mp-MRI) for prostate cancer in a 5-year follow-up. Materials and methods: One hundred ninety-three men suspected of harboring prostate cancer with negative MRI findings were included. Patients with positive transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. Patients with negative initial TRUS-guided biopsy findings were followed up and only patients with negative findings by digital rectal examination, MRI, and repeat biopsy and no increase in PSA at 5-year follow-up were defined as “clinically negative”. The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was calculated. For quantitative analysis, mean signal intensity on T2-weighted images and the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value on ADC maps of the initial MRI studies were compared between peripheral-zone (PZ) cancer and the normal PZ based on pathologic maps of patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Results: The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. Small cancers, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy masking prostate cancer returned false-negative results. Quantitative analysis showed that there was no significant difference between PZ cancer and the normal PZ. Conclusion: The mp-MRI revealed a high clinical NPV and is a useful tool to rule out clinically significant prostate cancer before biopsy

  3. Negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection: Outcome of 5-year follow-up in men with negative findings on initial MRI studies

    Itatani, R., E-mail: banguliao@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Department of Radiology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Namimoto, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan); Atsuji, S.; Katahira, K.; Morishita, S. [Department of Radiology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Kitani, K.; Hamada, Y. [Department of Urology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Kitaoka, M. [Department of Pathology, Kumamoto Chuo Hospital, 1-5-1, Tainoshima, Kumamoto 862-0965 (Japan); Nakaura, T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa Medical Center, Kameba 854-1, Amakusa, Kumamoto 863-0046 (Japan); Yamashita, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, 1-1-1, Honjo, Kumamoto 860-8556 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We assess the negative predictive value of multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. • Patients with positive prostate biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. • Patients with negative initial prostate biopsy findings were followed up for 5 years. • The negative predictive value was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. • MRI is a useful tool to rule out significant prostate cancer before biopsy. - Abstract: Objective: To assess the clinical negative predictive value (NPV) of multiparametric MRI (mp-MRI) for prostate cancer in a 5-year follow-up. Materials and methods: One hundred ninety-three men suspected of harboring prostate cancer with negative MRI findings were included. Patients with positive transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy findings were defined as false-negative. Patients with negative initial TRUS-guided biopsy findings were followed up and only patients with negative findings by digital rectal examination, MRI, and repeat biopsy and no increase in PSA at 5-year follow-up were defined as “clinically negative”. The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was calculated. For quantitative analysis, mean signal intensity on T2-weighted images and the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value on ADC maps of the initial MRI studies were compared between peripheral-zone (PZ) cancer and the normal PZ based on pathologic maps of patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy. Results: The clinical NPV of mp-MRI was 89.6% for significant prostate cancer. Small cancers, prostatitis, and benign prostatic hypertrophy masking prostate cancer returned false-negative results. Quantitative analysis showed that there was no significant difference between PZ cancer and the normal PZ. Conclusion: The mp-MRI revealed a high clinical NPV and is a useful tool to rule out clinically significant prostate cancer before biopsy.

  4. 3D Dynamic Modeling of the Head-Neck Complex for Fast Eye and Head Orientation Movements Research

    Daniel A. Sierra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D dynamic computer model for the movement of the head-neck complex is presented. It incorporates anatomically correct information about the diverse elements forming the system. The skeleton is considered as a set of interconnected rigid 3D bodies following the Newton-Euler laws of movement. The muscles are modeled using Enderle's linear model, which shows equivalent dynamic characteristics to Loeb's virtual muscle model. The soft tissues, namely, the ligaments, intervertebral disks, and facet joints, are modeled considering their physiological roles and dynamics. In contrast with other head and neck models developed for safety research, the model is aimed to study the neural control of the complex during fast eye and head movements, such as saccades and gaze shifts. In particular, the time-optimal hypothesis and the feedback control ones are discussed.

  5. Diagnosis of breast cancer extent and enhancement patterns using 3D-dynamic MR imaging. Correlation with intraductal component

    The usefulness of 3D-dynamic MR imaging with fat suppression and magnetization transfer contrast for assessing breast cancer extent and tumor profile was evaluated in 74 breasts with 67 malignant and 7 benign lesions. We classified breast cancer by the intraductal component of the main tumor. Five histological types were assigned: type 1 (DS 0) invasive carcinoma without intraductal component, type 2 (DS 1): intraductal component is less than 50% of whole tumor, type 3 (DS 2): intraductal component is nearly equal to 50%, type 4 (DS 3): intraductal component is more than 50%, type 5 (DS 4): pure DSIC or DCIS associated with microinvasive foci. Histologic results and preoperative MR imaging were analyzed regarding tumor size and enhancement pattern for the various tumor types (DS 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4). The three tumors occult to MR imaging were two DCIS and one Paget's disease. The other 64 breast cancers were detected on MR imaging. Tumor size measured with MR imaging correlated closely with histologic measurement in DS 0, 1 and 2, whereas less accuracy was noted in DS 3 and 4. Rapid enhancement was frequently seen in DS 0, 1, 2 and 3. Peripheral enhancement was highly specific for breast cancer. However, peripheral enhancement was not found in all cases of DS 4. Linear and nodular enhancement was frequently seen in DS 3 and 4. MR imaging was useful in predicting the intraductal component. (author)

  6. Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition CT scanner realizing 3D dynamic observation with low-dose scanning

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners have been continuously advancing as essential diagnostic imaging equipment for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases, including the three major disease classes of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Through the development of helical CT scanners and multislice CT scanners, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the Aquilion ONE, a CT scanner with a scanning range of up to 160 mm per rotation that can obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of the brain, heart, and other organs in a single rotation. We have now developed the Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition, a next-generation 320-row multislice CT scanner incorporating the latest technologies that achieves a shorter scanning time and significant reduction in dose compared with conventional products. This product with its low-dose scanning technology will contribute to the practical realization of new diagnosis and treatment modalities employing four-dimensional (4D) data based on 3D dynamic observations through continuous rotations. (author)

  7. Radionuclide Transport and Uptake in Coastal Aquatic Ecosystems: A Comparison of a 3D Dynamic Model and a Compartment Model

    In safety assessments of underground radioactive waste repositories, understanding radionuclide fate in ecosystems is necessary to determine the impacts of potential releases. Here, the reliability of two mechanistic models (the compartmental K-model and the 3D dynamic D-model) in describing the fate of radionuclides released into a Baltic Sea bay is tested. Both are based on ecosystem models that simulate the cycling of organic matter (carbon). Radionuclide transfer is linked to adsorption and flows of carbon in food chains. Accumulation of Th-230, Cs-135, and Ni-59 in biological compartments was comparable between the models and site measurements despite differences in temporal resolution, biological state variables, and partition coefficients. Both models provided confidence limits for their modeled concentration ratios, an improvement over models that only estimate means. The D-model enables estimates at high spatio-temporal resolution. The K-model, being coarser but faster, allows estimates centuries ahead. Future developments could integrate the two models to take advantage of their respective strengths

  8. Usefulness of 3-D dynamic pulmonary xenon-133 SPECT for thoracoscopic lung volume reduction surgery in patients with pulmonary emphysema

    Six patients with pulmonary emphysema scheduled to undergo thoracoscopic lung volume reduction surgery (TLVRS) were evaluated by three-dimensional (3-D) dynamic pulmonary xenon-133 SPECT. Serial 30-second dynamic SPECT data for equilibrium and washout (for 5 min) were acquired using a continuous repetitive rotating acquisition mode with a triple-detector SPECT system. SPECT data were reconstructed to 3-D images with a color, surface-rendering technique, and a 3-D fusion image of the 3-min washout image over the equilibrium image was obtained. Regional ventilation was visually assessed on the fusion 3-D images and quantified by xenon-133 half-washout time (T1/2) and mean transit time (MTT). The 3-D fusion image localized and lateralized the worst diseased sites with xenon-133 retention. Xenon-133 retention, T1/2 and MTT were reduced on these images in five patients with improved pulmonary function tests following TLVRS. However, xenon-133 retention was greater in one with asynchronous diaphragm movement after TLVRS. This modality will assist TLVRS in determining the lung-resection target and in evaluating the treatment effect. (author)

  9. Constraining the Absolute Orientation of Eta Carinae's Binary Orbit: A 3-D Dynamical Model for the Broad [Fe III] Emission

    Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P; Groh, Jose H; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Russell, Christopher M P

    2011-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamical model for the broad [Fe III] emission observed in Eta Carinae using the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). This model is based on full 3-D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's binary colliding winds. Radiative transfer codes are used to generate synthetic spectro-images of [Fe III] emission line structures at various observed orbital phases and STIS slit position angles (PAs). Through a parameter study that varies the orbital inclination i, the PA {\\theta} that the orbital plane projection of the line-of-sight makes with the apastron side of the semi-major axis, and the PA on the sky of the orbital axis, we are able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute 3-D orientation of the binary orbit. To simultaneously reproduce the blue-shifted emission arcs observed at orbital phase 0.976, STIS slit PA = +38 degrees, and the temporal variations in emission seen at negative slit PAs, the binary ...

  10. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during active wrist motion--initial observations.

    Robert D Boutin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-invasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provide the ability to evaluate the complex anatomy of bone and soft tissues of the wrist without the use of ionizing radiation. Dynamic instability of wrist--occurring during joint motion--is a complex condition that has assumed increased importance in musculoskeletal medicine. The objective of this study was to develop an MRI protocol for evaluating the wrist during continuous active motion, to show that dynamic imaging of the wrist is realizable, and to demonstrate that the resulting anatomical images enable the measurement of metrics commonly evaluated for dynamic wrist instability. METHODS: A 3-Tesla "active-MRI" protocol was developed using a bSSFP sequence with 475 ms temporal resolution for continuous imaging of the moving wrist. Fifteen wrists of 10 asymptomatic volunteers were scanned during active supination/pronation, radial/ulnar deviation, "clenched-fist", and volarflexion/dorsiflexion maneuvers. Two physicians evaluated distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ congruity, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU tendon translation, the scapholunate (SL interval, and the SL, radiolunate (RL and capitolunate (CL angles from the resulting images. RESULTS: The mean DRUJ subluxation ratio was 0.04 in supination, 0.10 in neutral, and 0.14 in pronation. The ECU tendon was subluxated or translated out of its groove in 3 wrists in pronation, 9 wrists in neutral, and 11 wrists in supination. The mean SL interval was 1.43 mm for neutral, ulnar deviation, radial deviation positions, and increased to 1.64 mm during the clenched-fist maneuver. Measurement of SL, RL and CL angles in neutral and dorsiflexion was also accomplished. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the initial performance of active-MRI, which may be useful in the investigation of dynamic wrist instability in vivo.

  11. FEM modeling for 3D dynamic analysis of deep-ocean mining pipeline and its experimental verification

    2007-01-01

    3D dynamic analysis models of 1000 m deep-ocean mining pipeline, including steel lift pipe, pump, buffer and flexible hose, were established by finite element method (FEM). The coupling effect of steel lift pipe and flexible hose, and main external loads of pipeline were considered in the models, such as gravity, buoyancy, hydrodynamic forces, internal and external fluid pressures, concentrated suspension buoyancy on the flexible hose, torsional moment and axial force induced by pump working.Some relevant FEM models and solution techniques were developed, according to various 3D transient behaviors of integrated deep-ocean mining pipeline, including towing motions of track-keeping operation and launch process of pipeline. Meanwhile, an experimental verification system in towing water tank that had similar characteristics of designed mining pipeline was developed to verify the accuracy of the FEM models and dynamic simulation. The experiment results show that the experimental records and simulation results of stress of pipe are coincided. Based on the further simulations of 1 000 m deep-ocean mining pipeline, the simulation results show that, to form configuration of a saddle shape, the total concentrated suspension buoyancy of flexible hose should be 95%-105% of the gravity of flexible hose in water, the first suspension point occupies 1/3 of the total buoyancy, and the second suspension point occupies 2/3 of the total buoyancy. When towing velocity of mining system is less than 0.5 m/s, the towing track of buffer is coincided with the setting route of ship on the whole and the configuration of flexible hose is also kept well.

  12. Efficiency of Non-Contrast-Enhanced Liver Imaging Sequences Added to Initial Rectal MRI in Rectal Cancer Patients.

    Gene-hyuk Kwon

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the value of addition of liver imaging to initial rectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for detection of liver metastasis and evaluate imaging predictors of a high risk of liver metastasis on rectal MRI.We enrolled 144 patients who from October 2010 to May 2013 underwent rectal MRI with T2-weighted imaging (T2WI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI (b values = 50, 500, and 900 s/mm2 of the liver and abdominopelvic computed tomography (APCT for the initial staging of rectal cancer. Two reviewers scored the possibility of liver metastasis on different sets of liver images (T2WI, DWI, and combined T2WI and DWI and APCT and reached a conclusion by consensus for different analytic results. Imaging features from rectal MRI were also analyzed. The diagnostic performances of CT and an additional liver scan to detect liver metastasis were compared. Multivariate logistic regression to determine independent predictors of liver metastasis among rectal MRI features and tumor markers was performed. This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived.All sets of liver images were more effective than APCT for detecting liver metastasis, and DWI was the most effective. Perivascular stranding and anal sphincter invasion were statistically significant for liver metastasis (p = 0.0077 and p = 0.0471, while extramural vascular invasion based on MRI (mrEMVI was marginally significant (p = 0.0534.The addition of non-contrast-enhanced liver imaging, particularly DWI, to initial rectal MRI in rectal cancer patients could facilitate detection of liver metastasis without APCT. Perivascular stranding, anal sphincter invasion, and mrEMVI detected on rectal MRI were important imaging predictors of liver metastasis.

  13. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  14. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  15. Preparation and initial characterization of biodegradable particles containing gadolinium-DTPA contrast agent for enhanced MRI

    Doiron, Amber L.; Chu, Kevin; Ali, Adeel; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Accurate imaging of atherosclerosis is a growing necessity for timely treatment of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a promising technique for plaque imaging. The goal of this study was to create polymeric particles of a small size with high loading of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid gadolinium (III) (Gd-DTPA) and demonstrate their usefulness for MRI. A water-in-oil-in-oil double emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used to encapsulate the MRI agent in a poly(lactide-c...

  16. MRI for the initial evaluation of acute wrist, knee, and ankle trauma

    J.J. Nikken (Jeroen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we study the application of MRI in acute trauma of wrist, knee, and ankle, evaluating its potentials, its effects, and its costs. Our aim was to use MRI in all patients with acute trauma of wrist, knee, and ankle, without increasing the overall costs to society, potentiall

  17. MRI detection of brain metastases at initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    We prospectively investigated 40 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) for signs of brain metastasis by neurological examination and MRI of the brain, to determine the significance of MRI for staging. MRI could not be completed in one patient, who was excluded from the study. The MRI studies of the remaining patients showed no abnormalities in 12, cerebral infarcts in 2 and brain metastases in 11 patients, of whom 3 no relevant symptoms. Nonenhancing white matter lesions were found in 14 patients. In 3 of the 4 patients with an abnormal neurological examination at diagnosis, nonenhancing white matter lesions later developed into contrast enhancing lesions compatible with breain metastases; in 2, this occurred during the course of the chemotherapy. MRI did not change the clinical staging in patients with asymptomatic brain metastases. (orig.)

  18. [18F]FDG-PET (PET) vs. CT/MRI in the initial staging of Hodgkin's disease in children

    Full text: The aim of the study is to examine the value of PET in comparison to MRI/CT for initial staging of Hodgkin's disease in children. In consensus conferences, we compared the results of CT/MRI with the PET data for 27 possibly involved regions in 179 newly diagnosed patients. An upstaging by PET occurred in 14 %, a downstaging in 5 % of cases. From a total of 1120 positive regions in CT/MRI, 98 findings were missed in PET (8.7%). In the lungs, from 31 positive CT-findings 11 didn't show abnormality in PET; in diaphragmatic recesses 13 of 26 positive findings in CT were PET-negative. PET was positive in 1212 regions, 190 of them didn't show according findings in CT/MRI (15.7%). The rate of discrepant negative findings in CT/MRI was highest in the skeleton (13/23 PET-positive cases) and inguinal lymph nodes (11/18 regions). Our results indicate that PET has a similar impact on staging of HD in children than it has been shown in adults. PET modified staging in 19 % of patients

  19. An MRI system for imaging neonates in the NICU: initial feasibility study

    Transporting premature infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a radiology department for MRI has medical risks and logistical challenges. To develop a small 1.5-T MRI system for neonatal imaging that can be easily installed in the NICU and to evaluate its performance using a sheep model of human prematurity. A 1.5-T MRI system designed for orthopedic use was adapted for neonatal imaging. The system was used for MRI examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen in 12 premature lambs during the first hours of life. Spin-echo, fast spin-echo and gradient-echo MR images were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists. All animals remained physiologically stable throughout the imaging sessions. Animals were imaged at two or three time points. Seven brain MRI examinations were performed in seven different animals, 23 chest examinations in 12 animals and 19 abdominal examinations in 11 animals. At each anatomical location, high-quality images demonstrating good spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast were routinely obtained within 30 min using standard clinical protocols. Our preliminary experience demonstrates the feasibility and potential of the neonatal MRI system to provide state-of-the-art MRI capabilities within the NICU. Advantages include overall reduced cost and site demands, lower acoustic noise, improved ease of access and reduced medical risk to the neonate. (orig.)

  20. An MRI system for imaging neonates in the NICU: initial feasibility study

    Tkach, Jean A.; Loew, Wolfgang; Pratt, Ron G.; Daniels, Barret R.; Giaquinto, Randy O.; Winter, Patrick M.; Li, Yu; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Hillman, Noah H.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Merhar, Stephanie L.; Ikegami, Machiko; Whitsett, Jeffrey A. [Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Transporting premature infants from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to a radiology department for MRI has medical risks and logistical challenges. To develop a small 1.5-T MRI system for neonatal imaging that can be easily installed in the NICU and to evaluate its performance using a sheep model of human prematurity. A 1.5-T MRI system designed for orthopedic use was adapted for neonatal imaging. The system was used for MRI examinations of the brain, chest and abdomen in 12 premature lambs during the first hours of life. Spin-echo, fast spin-echo and gradient-echo MR images were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists. All animals remained physiologically stable throughout the imaging sessions. Animals were imaged at two or three time points. Seven brain MRI examinations were performed in seven different animals, 23 chest examinations in 12 animals and 19 abdominal examinations in 11 animals. At each anatomical location, high-quality images demonstrating good spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and tissue contrast were routinely obtained within 30 min using standard clinical protocols. Our preliminary experience demonstrates the feasibility and potential of the neonatal MRI system to provide state-of-the-art MRI capabilities within the NICU. Advantages include overall reduced cost and site demands, lower acoustic noise, improved ease of access and reduced medical risk to the neonate. (orig.)

  1. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  2. 3D dynamic simulations of spontaneous rupture propagation governed by different constitutive laws with rake rotation allowed

    M. Cocco

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present a 3D Finite Difference numerical method to model the dynamic spontaneous propagation of an earthquake rupture on planar faults in an elastic half-space. We implement the Traction-at-Split-Nodes fault boundary condition for a system of faults, either vertical or oblique, using different constitutive laws. We can adopt both a slip-weakening law to prescribe the traction evolution within the breakdown zone or rate- and state-dependent friction laws, which involve the choice of an evolution relation for the state variable. Our numerical procedure allows the use of oblique and heterogeneous distribution of initial stress and allows the rake rotation. This implies that the two components of slip velocity and total dynamic traction are coupled together to satisfy, in norm, the adopted constitutive law. The simulations presented in this study show that the rupture acceleration to super-shear crack speeds occurs along the direction of the imposed initial stress; the rupture front velocity along the perpendicular direction is slower than that along the pre-stress direction. Depending on the position on the fault plane the orientation of instantaneous total dynamic traction can change with time with respect to the imposed initial stress direction. These temporal rake rotations depend on the amplitude of initial stress and on its distribution on the fault plane. They also depend on the curvature and direction of the rupture front with respect to the imposed initial stress direction: this explains why rake rotations are mostly located near the rupture front and within the cohesive zone.

  3. Initial clinical experience of MRI microscopy coil to triangular fibrocartilage complex

    This paper presents the efficacy of high-resolution MRI using a microscopy coil at 1.5 T for diagnosing triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury, compared with arthroscopy and arthrography. All subjects were imaged in the prone position with the arm over the head. The wrist was kept in the pronation position and a microscopy coil was placed on the center of ulnar head. All MR images were obtained at 1.5 T. Two-dimensional gradient-echo (GRE), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fast spin echo (FSE) images of the wrist were acquired using a microscopy coil (47 mm in diameter). Eight patients with injured TFCC were studied with both arthrography and MRI, and three patients were studied with both arthroscopy and MRI. The structures of TFCC were classified into 6 regions (radius attachment, disc proper, triangular ligament, lunate-triquetral attachment, volar side radio-ulnar ligament, and dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament), and were evaluated by one orthopedics surgeon and two radiologists. It was possible to distinguish each structure of the TFCC using high-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil. The injuries were pointed out at radius attachment in 3 patients, disc proper in 4, triangular ligament in 4, dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament in 3, volar side radioulnar ligament in 7, and lunate-triquetral attachment in 7 on MRI. Using arthroscopy, injuries at lunate-triquetral attachment in 1, dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament, and triangular ligament in 3 were not observed possibly because of dorsal approach. Another TFCC injuries on MRI in 3 patients were consistent with those with arthroscopy. High-resolution MRI with a microscopy coil allowed to describe most of TFCC injuries, and to evaluate triangular ligament, lunate-triquetral attachment and dorsal side radio-ulnar ligament, which could not be observed by arthroscopy and arthrography. (author)

  4. Brain MRI findings in patients with initial cerebral thrombosis and the relationship between incidental findings, aging and dementia

    To estimate the relationship between aging, dementia and changes observed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seen in elderly patients with cerebral thrombosis, MRI findings in 103 patients with an initial stroke event (thrombosis group) were compared with those of 37 patients with hypertension/diabetes (high risk group) and 78 patients without those disorders (low risk group). In addition to the causative lesions in the thrombosis group, periventricular hyperintensities (PVH), spotty lesions (SL), silent infarctions (SI), ventricular dilatation (VD), and cortical atrophy (CA) were analyzed in these groups. Infarctions located in the internal capsule/corona radiata were the most frequent causative lesion. Compared to the low risk group, a high incidence of patchy/diffuse PVH, SI, and severe CA was seen in both the thrombosis group and the high risk group. Widespread PVH and multiple SL increased with age in the thrombosis group, while severe CA was seen in each group. SI and VD tended to increase after age 60, though they were not significant. Dementia, diagnosed in 40 out of 78 patients, increased with age. Multivariate analysis revealed the degree of the effects of MRI findings on dementia to be marked in PVH, brain atrophy, causative lesions, and SL, in that order. These results indicated that diffuse PVH and brain atrophy, developing with age, promoted dementia in the elderly with vascular lesions. Moreover, they suggested that a variety of silent brain lesions recognized on MRI other than infarction can affect symptoms in the elderly. (author)

  5. A head-mounted display system for augmented reality: Initial evaluation for interventional MRI

    Purpose: To discuss the technical details of a head mounted display with an augmented reality (AR) system and to describe a first pre-clinical evaluation in interventional MRI. Method: The AR system consists of a video-see-through head mounted display (HMD), mounted with a mini video camera for tracking and a stereo pair of mini cameras that capture live images of the scene. The live video view of the phantom/patient is augmented with graphical representations of anatomical structures from MRI image data and is displayed on the HMD. The application of the AR system with interventional MRI was tested using a MRI data set of the head and a head phantom. Results: The HMD enables the user to move around and observe the scene dynamically from various viewpoints. Within a short time the natural hand-eye coordination can easily be adapted to the slightly different view. The 3D perception is based on stereo and kinetic depth cues. A circular target with a diameter of 0.5 square centimeter was hit in 19 of 20 attempts. In a first evaluation the MRI image data augmented reality scene of a head phantom allowed good planning and precise simulation of a puncture. Conclusion: The HMD in combination with AR provides a direct, intuitive guidance for interventional MR procedures. (orig.)

  6. Initial experience of oculodynamic MRI using ultrafast T2-weighted imaging

    We designed cine MRI protocol using sequential static half-Fourier single-shot rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) images with the subjects staring at the series of targets in front of their eyes. This technique was applied to three healthy volunteers and four patients with ocular motility disorders, including blow-out fracture, globe restriction due to a large posterior staphyloma, neurogenic strabismus (convergence disorder), and intraocular adhesion. In the volunteers, smooth movements of their visual foci and extraocular muscles were observed. In the patients, the ocular movement disturbances were demonstrated. Oculodynamic MRI provides functional information in cases of diplopia. (author)

  7. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Joseph, Gabby B.; Hou, Stephanie W.; Nardo, Lorenzo; Heilmeier, Ursula; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, Michael C.; McCulloch, Charles E. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at baseline and WOMAC{sub pain} = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  8. MRI findings associated with development of incident knee pain over 48 months: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    The purpose of this nested case-control study was to identify baseline, incident, and progressive MRI findings visible on standard MRI clinical sequences that were associated with development of incident knee pain in subjects at risk for OA over a period of 48 months. We analyzed 60 case knees developing incident pain (WOMACpain = 0 at baseline and WOMACpain ≥ 5 at 48 months) and 60 control knees (WOMACpain = 0 at baseline and WOMACpain = 0 at 48 months) from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. 3 T knee MRIs were analyzed using a modified WORMS score (cartilage, meniscus, bone marrow) at baseline and after 48 months. Baseline and longitudinal findings were grouped into logistic regression models and compared using likelihood-ratio tests. For each model that was significant, a stepwise elimination was used to isolate significant MRI findings. One baseline MRI finding and three findings that changed from baseline to 48 months were associated with the development of pain: at baseline, the severity of a cartilage lesion in the medial tibia was associated with incident pain - (odds ratio (OR) for incident pain = 3.05; P = 0.030). Longitudinally, an incident effusion (OR = 9.78; P = 0.005), a progressive cartilage lesion of the patella (OR = 4.59; P = 0.009), and an incident medial meniscus tear (OR = 4.91; P = 0.028) were associated with the development of pain. Our results demonstrate that baseline abnormalities of the medial tibia cartilage as well as an incident joint effusion, progressive patella cartilage defects, and an incident medial meniscus tear over 48 months may be associated with incident knee pain. Clinically, this study helps identify MRI findings that are associated with the development of knee pain. (orig.)

  9. High temporal resolution parametric MRI monitoring of the initial ischemia/reperfusion phase in experimental acute kidney injury.

    Andreas Pohlmann

    Full Text Available Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury, a consequence of kidney hypoperfusion or temporary interruption of blood flow is a common cause of acute kidney injury (AKI. There is an unmet need to better understand the mechanisms operative during the initial phase of ischemic AKI. Non-invasive in vivo parametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI may elucidate spatio-temporal pathophysiological changes in the kidney by monitoring the MR relaxation parameters T2* and T2, which are known to be sensitive to blood oxygenation. The aim of our study was to establish the technical feasibility of fast continuous T2*/T2 mapping throughout renal I/R. MRI was combined with a remotely controlled I/R model and a segmentation model based semi-automated quantitative analysis. This technique enabled the detailed assessment of in vivo changes in all kidney regions during ischemia and early reperfusion. Significant changes in T2* and T2 were observed shortly after induction of renal ischemia and during the initial reperfusion phase. Our study demonstrated for the first time that continuous and high temporal resolution parametric MRI is feasible for in-vivo monitoring and characterization of I/R induced AKI in rats. This technique may help in the identification of the timeline of key events responsible for development of renal damage in hypoperfusion-induced AKI.

  10. 3D {sup 23}Na MRI of human skeletal muscle at 7 Tesla: initial experience

    Chang, Gregory; Wang, Ligong; Regatte, Ravinder R. [Center for Biomedical Imaging/Hospital for Joint Diseases, Department of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [Ottawa General Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate healthy skeletal muscle pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI and muscle proton T{sub 2} mapping, and to evaluate diabetic muscle pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI. The calves of seven healthy subjects underwent imaging pre- and post-exercise via 7 T {sup 23}Na MRI (3D fast low angle shot, TR/TE = 80 ms/0.160 ms, 4 mm x 4 mm x 4 mm) and 1 week later by {sup 1}H MRI (multiple spin-echo sequence, TR/TE = 3,000 ms/15-90 ms). Four type 2 diabetics also participated in the {sup 23}Na MRI protocol. Pre- and post-exercise sodium signal intensity (SI) and proton T{sub 2} relaxation values were measured/calculated for soleus (S), gastrocnemius (G), and a control, tibialis anterior (TA). Two-tailed t tests were performed. In S/G in healthy subjects post-exercise, sodium SI increased 8-13% (p < 0.03), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 22 min), and {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values increased 12-17% (p < 0.03), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 12-15 min). In TA, no significant changes in sodium SI or {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values were seen (-2.4 to 1%, p > 0.17). In S/G in diabetics, sodium SI increased 10-11% (p < 0.04), then decreased (t{sub 1/2} = 27-37 min) without significant change in the TA SI (-3.6%, p = 0.066). It is feasible to evaluate skeletal muscle via 3D {sup 23}Na MRI at 7 T. Post-exercise muscle {sup 1}H T{sub 2} values return to baseline more rapidly than sodium SI. Diabetics may demonstrate delayed muscle sodium SI recovery compared with healthy subjects. (orig.)

  11. 3D Dynamic Rupture Simulation Across a Complex Fault System: the Mw7.0, 2010, Haiti Earthquake

    Douilly, R.; Aochi, H.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes ruptures sometimes take place on a secondary fault and surprisingly do not activate an adjacent major one. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is a classic case where rupture occurred on a blind thrust while the adjacent San Andreas Fault was not triggered during the process. Similar to Loma Prieta, the Mw7.0, January 12 2010, Haiti earthquake also ruptured a secondary blind thrust, the Léogâne fault, adjacent to the main plate boundary, the Enriquillo Plantain Garden Fault, which did not rupture during this event. Aftershock relocalizations delineate the Léogâne rupture with two north dipping segments with slightly different dip, where the easternmost segment had mostly dip-slip motion and the westernmost one had mostly strike-slip motion. In addition, an offshore south dipping structure inferred from the aftershocks to the west of the rupture zone coincides with the offshore Trois Baies reverse fault, a region of increase in Coulomb stress increase. In this study, we investigate the rupture dynamics of the Haiti earthquake in a complex fault system of multiple segments identified by the aftershock relocations. We suppose a background stress regime that is consistent with the type of motion of each fault and with the regional tectonic regime. We initiate a nucleation on the east segment of the Léogâne fault by defining a circular region with a 2 km radius where shear stress is slightly greater than the yield stress. By varying friction on faults and background stress, we find a range of plausible scenarios. In the absence of near-field seismic records of the event, we score the different models against the static deformation field derived from GPS and InSAR at the surface. All the plausible simulations show that the rupture propagates from the eastern to the western segment along the Léogâne fault, but not on the Enriquillo fault nor on the Trois Baies fault. The best-fit simulation shows a significant increase of shear stresses on the Trois Baies

  12. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis - initial results

    This paper is a feasibility study of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lung perfusion in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) using contrast-enhanced 3D MRI. Correlation assessment of perfusion changes with structural abnormalities. Eleven CF patients (9 f, 2 m; median age 16 years) were examined at 1.5 T. Morphology: HASTE coronal, transversal (TR/TE/α/ST: 600 ms/28 ms/180 /6 mm), breath-hold 18 s. Perfusion: Time-resolved 3D GRE pulse sequence (FLASH, TE/TR/α: 0.8/1.9 ms/40 ), parallel imaging (GRAPPA, PAT 2). Twenty-five data sets were acquired after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight of gadodiamide, 3-5 ml/s. A total of 198 lung segments were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus and scored for morphological and perfusion changes. Statistical analysis was performed by Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results showed that perfusion defects were observed in all patients and present in 80% of upper, and 39% of lower lobes. Normal lung parenchyma showed homogeneous perfusion (86%, P<0.0001). Severe morphological changes led to perfusion defects (97%, P<0.0001). Segments with moderate morphological changes showed normal (53%) or impaired perfusion (47%). In conclusion, pulmonary perfusion is easy to judge in segments with normal parenchyma or severe changes. In moderately damaged segments, MRI of lung perfusion may help to better assess actual functional impairment. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRI of lung perfusion has the potential for early vascular functional assessment and therapy control in CF patients. (orig.)

  13. MRI of Arterial Flow Reserve in Patients with Intermittent Claudication: Feasibility and Initial Experience

    Versluis, Bas; Dremmen, Marjolein H. G.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Schurink, Geert-Willem; LEINER, TIM; Backes, Walter H

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this work was to develop a MRI method to determine arterial flow reserve in patients with intermittent claudication and to investigate whether this method can discriminate between patients and healthy control subjects. Methods Ten consecutive patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. All subjects underwent vector cardiography triggered quantitative 2D cine MR phase-contrast imaging to obtain flow waveforms of the popliteal art...

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for fetal oxygenation during maternal hypoxia: initial results

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of fMRI to measure changes in fetal tissue oxygenation during acute maternal hypoxia in fetal lambs. Material and Methods: Two ewes carrying singleton fetuses (gestational age 125 and 131 days) underwent MR imaging under inhalation anesthesia. BOLD imaging of the fetal brain, liver and myocardium was performed during acute maternal hypoxia (oxygen replaced by N2O). Maternal oxygen saturation and heart rate were monitored by a pulse-oxymeter attached to the maternal tongue. Results: Changes of fetal tissue oxygenation during maternal hypoxia were clearly visible with BOLD MRI. Signal intensity decreases were more distinct in liver and heart (∝40%) from control than in the fetal brain (∝10%). Conclusions: fMRI is a promising diagnostic tool to determine fetal tissue oxygenation and may open new opportunities in monitoring fetal well being in high risk pregnancies complicated by uteroplacentar insufficiency. Different signal changes in liver/heart and brain may reflect a centralization of the fetal blood flow. (orig.)

  15. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    Choi, Hye Young [Department of Radiology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; Yun, Bo La [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung [Department of Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon [Department of Pathology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Woo Kyung [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Sook [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions.

  16. MRI-Guided Intervention for Breast Lesions Using the Freehand Technique in a 3.0-T Closed-Bore MRI Scanner: Feasibility and Initial Results

    To report the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided intervention for diagnosing suspicious breast lesions detectable by MRI only, using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner. Five women with 5 consecutive MRI-only breast lesions underwent MRI-guided intervention: 3 underwent MRI-guided needle localization and 2, MRI-guided vacuum-assisted biopsy. The interventions were performed in a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI system using a dedicated phased-array breast coil with the patients in the prone position; the freehand technique was used. Technical success and histopathologic outcome were analyzed. MRI showed that four lesions were masses (mean size, 11.5 mm; range, 7-18 mm); and 1, a nonmass-like enhancement (maximum diameter, 21 mm). The locations of the lesions with respect to the breast with index cancer were as follows: different quadrant, same breast - 3 cases; same quadrant, same breast - 1 case; and contralateral breast - 1 case. Histopathologic evaluation of the lesions treated with needle localization disclosed perilobular hemangioma, fibrocystic change, and fibroadenomatous change. The lesions treated with vacuum-assisted biopsy demonstrated a radial scar and atypical apocrine hyperplasia. Follow-up MRI after 2-7 months (mean, 4.6 months) confirmed complete lesion removal in all cases. MRI-guided intervention for breast lesions using the freehand technique with a 3.0-T closed-bore MRI scanner is feasible and accurate for diagnosing MRI-only lesions

  17. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    Andersen, Kjel [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: kjel_andersen@web.de; Hennersdorf, Marcus [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: hennersdorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Cohnen, Mathias [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: cohnen@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Blondin, Dirk [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Moedder, Ulrich [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: moedder@uni-duesseldorf.de; Poll, Ludger W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: poll@gmx.de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  18. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  19. 7-T MRI in Cerebrovascular Diseases: Challenges to Overcome and Initial Results.

    Harteveld, Anita A; van der Kolk, Anja G; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Luijten, Peter R; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the investigation of cerebrovascular diseases. Compared with computed tomography (CT) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), its advantages in diagnosing cerebrovascular pathology include its superior tissue contrast, its ability to visualize blood vessels without the use of a contrast agent, and its use of magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses instead of ionizing radiation. In recent years, ultrahigh field MRI at 7 tesla (7 T) has shown promise in the diagnosis of many cerebrovascular diseases. The increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR; 2.3x and 4.7x increase compared with 3 and 1.5 T, respectively) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) at this higher field strength can be exploited to obtain a higher spatial resolution and higher lesion conspicuousness, enabling assessment of smaller brain structures and lesions. Cerebrovascular diseases can be assessed at different tissue levels; for instance, changes of the arteries feeding the brain can be visualized to determine the cause of ischemic stroke, regional changes in brain perfusion can be mapped to predict outcome after revascularization, and tissue damage, including old and recent ischemic infarcts, can be evaluated as a marker of ischemic burden. For the purpose of this review, we will discriminate 3 levels of assessment of cerebrovascular diseases using MRI: Pipes, Perfusion, and Parenchyma (3 Ps). The term Pipes refers to the brain-feeding arteries from the heart and aortic arch, upwards to the carotid arteries, vertebral arteries, circle of Willis, and smaller intracranial arterial branches. Perfusion is the amount of blood arriving at the brain tissue level, and includes the vascular reserve and perfusion territories. Parenchyma refers to the acute and chronic burden of brain tissue damage, which includes larger infarcts, smaller microinfarcts, and small vessel disease manifestations such as white matter lesions, lacunar infarcts, and microbleeds

  20. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    Streitparth, Florian; Walter, Thula; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Freyhardt, Patrick; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M. [Charite, Humboldt-University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Hartwig, Tony; Putzier, Michael; Strube, Patrick [Charite, Humboldt-University, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Bretschneider, Tina [University of Magdeburg, Department of Radiology, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  1. MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression in open MRI: an initial clinical investigation

    To assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of real-time MR guidance and thermometry of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD). Twenty-four discs in 22 patients with chronic low-back and radicular pain were treated by PLDD using open 1.0-T magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). A fluoroscopic proton-density-weighted turbo spin-echo (PDw TSE) sequence was used to position the laser fibre. Non-spoiled gradient-echo (GRE) sequences were employed for real-time thermal monitoring based on proton resonance frequency (PRF). Radicular pain was assessed over 6 months with a numerical rating scale (NRS). PLDD was technically successful in all cases, with adequate image quality for laser positioning. The PRF-based real-time temperature monitoring was found to be feasible in practice. After 6 months, 21 % reported complete remission of radicular pain, 63 % at least great pain relief and 74 % at least mild relief. We found a significant decrease in the NRS score between the pre-intervention and the 6-month follow-up assessment (P < 0.001). No major complications occurred; the single adverse event recorded, moderate motor impairment, resolved. Real-time MR guidance and PRF-based thermometry of PLDD in the lumbar spine under open 1.0-T MRI appears feasible, safe and effective and may pave the way to more precise operating procedures. (orig.)

  2. Noninvasive measurement of liver iron concentration at MRI in children with acute leukemia: initial results

    Vag, Tibor; Krumbein, Ines; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Lopatta, Eric; Stenzel, Martin; Kaiser, Werner A.; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Jena (Germany); Kentouche, Karim; Beck, James [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Pediatrics, Jena (Germany); Renz, Diane M. [Charite University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Campus Virchow Clinic, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Routine assessment of body iron load in patients with acute leukemia is usually done by serum ferritin (SF) assay; however, its sensitivity is impaired by different conditions including inflammation and malignancy. To estimate, using MRI, the extent of liver iron overload in children with acute leukemia and receiving blood transfusions, and to examine the association between the degree of hepatic iron overload and clinical parameters including SF and the transfusion iron load (TIL). A total of 25 MRI measurements of the liver were performed in 15 children with acute leukemia (mean age 9.75 years) using gradient-echo sequences. Signal intensity ratios between the liver and the vertebral muscle (L/M ratio) were calculated and compared with SF-levels. TIL was estimated from the cumulative blood volume received, assuming an amount of 200 mg iron per transfused red blood cell unit. Statistical analysis revealed good correlation between the L/M SI ratio and TIL (r = -0.67, P = 0.002, 95% confidence interval CI = -0.83 to -0.34) in patients with acute leukemia as well as between L/M SI ratio and SF (r = -0.76, P = 0.0003, 95% CI = -0.89 to -0.52). SF may reliably reflect liver iron stores as a routine marker in patients suffering from acute leukemia. (orig.)

  3. MRI-based motion correction of thoracic PET: initial comparison of acquisition protocols and correction strategies suitable for simultaneous PET/MRI systems

    Dikaios, Nikolaos; Fryer, Tim D. [University of Cambridge, Wolfson Brain Imaging Centre, Department of Clinical Neurosciences, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Imaging Science Laboratories, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Graves, Martin J. [University of Cambridge, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquired on equipment capable of simultaneous MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) could potentially provide the gold standard method for motion correction of PET. To assess the latter, in this study we compared fast 2D and 3D MRI of the torso and used deformation parameters from real MRI data to correct simulated PET data for respiratory motion. PET sinogram data were simulated using SimSET from a 4D pseudo-PET image series created by segmenting MR images acquired over a respiratory cycle. Motion-corrected PET images were produced using post-reconstruction registration (PRR) and motion-compensated image reconstruction (MCIR). MRI-based motion correction improved PET image quality at the lung-liver and lung-spleen boundaries and in the heart but little improvement was obtained where MRI contrast was low. The root mean square error in SUV units per voxel compared to a motion-free image was reduced from 0.0271 (no motion correction) to 0.0264 (PRR) and 0.0250 (MCIR). Motion correction using MRI can improve thoracic PET images but there are limitations due to the quality of fast MRI. (orig.)

  4. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva: initial presentation with a preosseous lesion of the scalp and its MRI appearance.

    Lin, Fu-Yu; Lin, Chien-Hung; Shu, Ginger; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang

    2016-07-01

    This case subject is a 1-year-old girl presenting with recurrent diffuse soft-tissue swelling of the scalp and periorbital region. Her family denied any known history of trauma. There was no obvious discoloration or local heat at the lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed diffuse soft tissue swelling of the scalp manifesting as high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and low signal intensity on T1-weighted images with diffuse enhancement after gadolinium-contrast administration. Biopsy yielded inconclusive pathological results. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) was not suspected until malformation of the patient's toes was noticed. The scalp lesion underwent spontaneous regression, and subsequent radiographs of the chest and cervical spine revealed heterotopic ossifications of the neck and thorax. Early diagnosis of FOP is vital because trauma, unnecessary biopsy and intramuscular injection are known to cause acceleration of heterotopic ossifications. Previous studies reported diffuse soft tissue swelling at the posterior neck, thoracic wall or paraspinal region as preosseous lesions of FOP (Shiva Kumar et al. Neurology. 2010;74(6):e20, Merchant et al. Pediatr Radiol. 2006;36(10):1108-11, Hagiwara et al. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003;181(4):1145-7). To our knowledge, diffuse soft tissue swelling of the scalp as a preosseous lesion of FOP and associated MRI findings have not yet been reported. We believe that awareness of preosseous lesions presenting as diffuse soft tissue swelling, in addition to shortening and valgus deformity of the great toes, is an important diagnostic clue for establishing FOP. PMID:27003387

  5. MRI of arterial flow reserve in patients with intermittent claudication: feasibility and initial experience.

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this work was to develop a MRI method to determine arterial flow reserve in patients with intermittent claudication and to investigate whether this method can discriminate between patients and healthy control subjects. METHODS: Ten consecutive patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. All subjects underwent vector cardiography triggered quantitative 2D cine MR phase-contrast imaging to obtain flow waveforms of the popliteal artery at rest and during reactive hyperemia. Resting flow, maximum hyperemic flow and absolute flow reserve were determined and compared between the two groups by two independent MRI readers. Also, interreader reproducibility of flow measures was reported. RESULTS: Resting flow was lower in patients compared to controls (4.9±1.6 and 11.1±3.2 mL/s in patients and controls, respectively (p<0.01. Maximum hyperemic flow was 7.3±2.9 and 16.4±3.2 mL/s (p<0.01 and the absolute flow reserve was 2.4±1.6 and 5.3±1.3 mL/s (p<0.01, respectively in patients and controls. The interreader coefficient of variation was below 10% for all measures in both patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Quantitative 2D MR cine phase-contrast imaging is a promising method to determine flow reserve measures in patients with peripheral arterial disease and can be helpful to discriminate patients with intermittent claudication from healthy controls.

  6. GEM/POPs: a global 3-D dynamic model for semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants – Part 2: Global transports and budgets of PCBs

    L. A. Barrie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Global transports and budgets of three PCBs were investigated with a 3-D dynamic model for semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants – GEM/POPs. Dominant pathways were identified for PCB transports in the atmosphere with a peak transport flux below 8 km and 14 km for gaseous and particulate PCB28, 4 km and 6 km for gaseous and particulate PCB180. The inter-continental transports of PCBs in the Northern Hemisphere (NH are dominated in the zonal direction with their route changes seasonally regulated by the variation of westerly jet. The transport pathways from Europe and North Atlantic to the Arctic contributed the most PCBs over there. Inter-hemispheric transports of PCBs originated from the regions of Europe, Asia and North America in three different flow-paths, accompanying with easterly jet, Asian monsoon winds and trade winds. PCBs from the Southern Hemisphere (SH could export into the NH. According to the PCB emissions of year 2000, Europe, North America and Asia are the three largest sources of the three PCBs, contributing to the global background concentrations in the atmosphere and soil and water. Globally, PCB28 in soil and water has become a comparable source to the anthropogenic emissions while heavier PCBs such as PCB153 and 180 are still transporting into soil and water. It is found that lighter PCBs have more long range transport potentials than their heavier counter-parts in the atmosphere.

  7. Imaging of brain metastases of bronchial carcinomas with 7 T MRI. Initial results

    Moenninghoff, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Maderwald, S.; Theysohn, J.M.; Kraff, O.; Ladd, S.C.; Wanke, I. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Erwin L. Hahn Inst. fuer Magnetresonanztomographie; Schuett, P.; Gauler, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Innere Medizin, Konservative Onkologie; Ladd, M.E. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Erwin L. Hahn Inst. fuer Magnetresonanztomographie

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: To compare the depiction of brain metastases of bronchial carcinomas on susceptibility-weighted and contrast-enhanced images with 7 T and at 1.5 T MRI. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with brain metastases of bronchial carcinomas underwent 7 T and 1.5 T MRI. Minimum intensity projections (MinIP) of a 1.5 T SWI sequence (voxel size = 0.9 x 0.9 x 2.0 mm{sup 3}) were compared to 7 T SWI MinIPs (voxel size = 0.4 x 0.4 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}). A T 1-w 3D MPRAGE at 1.5 T (voxel size = 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} after double-dose (DD) gadoterate meglumine, Gd-DOTA) was compared to a 7 T MPRAGE sequence (voxel size = 0.7 x 0.7 x x 0.7 mm{sup 3}, single dose (SD) Gd-DOTA) in all patients, and to DD Gd-DOTA in 6 patients after a 10 minute delay. The number of intracranial microhemorrhages in SWI MinIPs and the number of contrast-enhancing metastases in MPRAGE images were compared in each patient grouped into three size ranges ({<=} 2 mm, > 2 mm and < 6 mm, {>=} 6 mm) by two radiologists in consensus. Results: In all 12 patients the 7 T SWI with spatially higher resolution allowed the identification of 87 versus 67 cerebral microhemorrhages at 1.5 T. 7 T T 1-w images after SD Gd-DOTA depicted 198 brain metastases versus 238 at 1.5 T after DD Gd-DOTA. After doubling the contrast dose in six patients, 4 additional brain metastases were identified at 7 T. Conclusion: Our preliminary results indicate that despite the higher spatial resolution the detection of brain metastases on 7 T MPRAGE images is almost equal to 1.5 T MPRAGE images. The 7 T SWI sequence with spatially higher resolution allowed the detection of 20 % more microhemorrhages in brain metastases compared to the 1.5 T SWI sequence. (orig.)

  8. A comparison of non-contrast and contrast-enhanced MRI in the initial stage of Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

    A prognostic indicator of outcome for Legg-Calve-Perthes disease (LCP) is needed to guide treatment decisions during the initial stage of the disease (stage 1), before deformity occurs. Radiographic prognosticators are applicable only after fragmentation (stage II). We investigated pre- and postcontrast MRI in depicting stage I femoral head involvement. Thirty children with stage I LCP underwent non-contrast coronal T1 fast spin-echo (FSE) and corresponding postcontrast fat-suppressed T1-weighted fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences to quantify the extent of femoral head involvement. Three pediatric radiologists and one pediatric orthopedic surgeon independently measured central head involvement. Interobserver reliability of percent head involvement using non-contrasted MR images had intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.72. Postcontrast MRI improved interobserver reliability (ICC 0.82). Qualitatively, the area of involvement was more clearly visible on contrast-enhanced MRI. A comparison of results obtained by each observer using the two MRI techniques showed no correlation. ICC ranged from -0.08 to 0.03 for each observer. Generally, greater head involvement was depicted by contrast compared with non-contrast MRI (Pearson r = -0.37, P = 0.04). Pre- and postcontrast MRI assess two different components of stage I LCP. However, contrast-enhanced MRI more clearly depicts the area of involvement. (orig.)

  9. MRI-controlled interstitial ultrasound brain therapy: An initial in-vivo study

    N'Djin, W. Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Lipsman, Nir; Bronskill, Michael; Schwartz, Michael; Kucharczyk, Walter; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-11-01

    The recent emergence at the clinical level of minimally-invasive focal therapy such as laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) has demonstrated promise in the management of brain metastasis [1], although control over the spatial pattern of heating is limited. Delivery of HIFU from minimally-invasive applicators enables high spatial control of the heat deposition in biological tissues, large treatment volumes and high treatment rate in well chosen conditions [2,3]. In this study, the feasibility of MRI-guided interstitial ultrasound therapy in brain was studies in-vivo in a porcine model. A prototype system originally developed for transurethral ultrasound therapy [4,5,6] was used in this study. Two burr holes of 12 mm in diameter were created in the animal's skull to allow the insertion of the therapeutic ultrasound applicator (probe) into the brain at two locations (right and left frontal lobe). A 4-element linear ultrasound transducer (f = 8 MHz) was mounted at the tip of a 25-cm linear probe (6 mm in diameter). The target boundary was traced to cover in 2D a surface compatible with the treatment of a 2 cm brain tumor. Acoustic power of each element and rotation rate of the device were adjusted in real-time based on MR-thermometry feedback control to optimize heat deposition at the target boundary [2,4,5]. Two MRT-controlled ultrasound brain treatments per animal have been performed using a maximal surface acoustic power of 10W.cm-2. In all cases, it was possible to increase accurately the temperature of the brain tissues in the targeted region over the 55°C threshold necessary for the creation of irreversible thermal lesion. Tissue changes were visible on T1w contrast-enhanced images immediately after treatment. These changes were also evident on T2w FSE images taken 2 hours after the 1st treatment and correlated well with the temperature image. On average, the targeted volume was 4.7 ± 2.3 cm3 and the 55°C treated volume was 6.7 ± 4.4 cm3. The volumetric

  10. Highly accelerated cardiac MRI using iterative SENSE reconstruction: initial clinical experience.

    Allen, Bradley D; Carr, Maria; Botelho, Marcos P F; Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Markl, Michael; Zenge, Michael O; Schmidt, Michaela; Nadar, Mariappan S; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the qualitative and quantitative performance of an accelerated cardiovascular MRI (CMR) protocol that features iterative SENSE reconstruction and spatio-temporal L1-regularization (IS SENSE). Twenty consecutively recruited patients and 9 healthy volunteers were included. 2D steady state free precession cine images including 3-chamber, 4-chamber, and short axis slices were acquired using standard parallel imaging (GRAPPA, acceleration factor = 2), spatio-temporal undersampled TSENSE (acceleration factor = 4), and IS SENSE techniques (acceleration factor = 4). Acquisition times, quantitative cardiac functional parameters, wall motion abnormalities (WMA), and qualitative performance (scale: 1-poor to 5-excellent for overall image quality, noise, and artifact) were compared. Breath-hold times for IS SENSE (3.0 ± 0.6 s) and TSENSE (3.3 ± 0.6) were both reduced relative to GRAPPA (8.4 ± 1.7 s, p cardiac function was present between the three techniques (p = 0.89 for ejection fraction). GRAPPA and IS SENSE had similar image quality (4.7 ± 0.4 vs. 4.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.09) while, both techniques were superior to TSENSE (quality: 4.1 ± 0.7, p  0.60, p < 0.001), while agreement with TSENSE was poor (κ < 0.40, p < 0.001). IS SENSE is a viable clinical CMR acceleration approach to reduce acquisition times while maintaining satisfactory qualitative and quantitative performance. PMID:26894256

  11. MRI of the cervical spine with 3D gradient echo sequence at 3 T: initial experience

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare three-dimensional (3D) high resolution T2*-weighted gradient echo (3D FFE) magnetic resonance (MR) sequence with conventional 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) MR sequence for imaging of the cervical spine, especially to assess the detectability of the internal anatomy of the cervical spinal cord, i.e. to distinguish the grey and white matter. Methods: Fifteen volunteers were examined at 3.0T MR unit. Signal-to-noise (SNR), contrast-to-noise (CNR) and image homogeneity were evaluated. In the visual analysis, the visibility of anatomical structures of the cervical spine and artifacts were assessed. The nonparametric method of paired sample t-test was adopted to evaluate the differences between the sequences. Results: The 3D FFE sequence provided better results for CNR, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) versus white matter, grey matter, disk and bone. Moreover, it yielded good results for the CNR grey matter versus white matter. The butterfly-shaped “H” is clearly displayed in the 3D FFE sequence. The statistical analysis revealed the statistically significant difference between the 2D TSE and 3D FFE sequences for the contrast of CSF versus spinal cord (both grey matter and white matter). Conclusion: The 3D FFE sequence in MR imaging of the cervical spinal cord is superior in delineation of spinal cord anatomical structures compared to 2D TSE sequence. -- Highlights: •We investigate the potential of 3D FFE sequence to distinguish the grey-white of the cervical spinal cord at 3T MRI system. •We optimized The 3D FFE sequence was optimized to increase the grey-white contrast. •Utilizing medium TE for T2W and the shortest TR for reduction of susceptibility related artifacts and motion artefacts. •This technique may increase the confidence in the diagnosis of disease with the improved delineation of cord anatomy

  12. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  13. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  14. Predictive value of semi-quantitative MRI-based scoring systems for future knee replacement: data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Eng, John; Demehri, Shadpour [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zikria, Bashir [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate, in a confirmatory fashion, whether baseline and change from baseline to 24-month follow-up in cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions and meniscal damage are predictors of knee replacement (KR) in subjects with a high risk of osteoarthritis (OA), independent of the level of physical activity, symptom severity and radiographic abnormalities. Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative's (OAI) baseline and 24-month follow-up knee MRIs of 115 patients (age range: 45-78 years; 48 % female; BMI: 20.9-48.7) were analyzed. Cartilage, bone marrow and menisci were semi-quantitatively scored according to the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) and Boston-Leeds Osteoarthritis Knee Score (BLOKS) systems in all compartments. Baseline and 24-month interval changes in structural tissue damage assessed by BLOKS and WORMS were used as predictors of KR independent of clinical and radiographic parameters using Cox hazard analysis. Adjustments were performed for age, gender, BMI and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly: PASE), Western Ontario and McMaster Questionnaire (WOMAC) total score and radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score. BLOKS and WORMS baseline cartilage scores were predictors of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. One score increase in the average baseline BLOKS full-thickness cartilage defect score was associated with a [hazard ratio (95 % CI)] 13.55 (3.61-50.89) times greater risk of KR independent of the PASE, WOMAC and KL score. Net reclassification improvements (NRIs) of the additional evaluation of 24-month follow-up MRI scores and assessment of changes were not significant for prediction of KR (NRI range: - 7.23 - 24.8 %). The BLOKS cartilage score for full-thickness cartilage defects had the highest hazard for KR. Follow-up MRI changes in structural tissue damage, detected by BLOKS and WORMS cartilage, bone marrow or meniscus scores (up to 24 months) had no significant predictive value in addition

  15. Initial experience of using high field strength intraoperative MRI for neurosurgical procedures.

    Raheja, Amol; Tandon, Vivek; Suri, Ashish; Sarat Chandra, P; Kale, Shashank S; Garg, Ajay; Pandey, Ravindra M; Kalaivani, Mani; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-08-01

    We report our initial experience to optimize neurosurgical procedures using high field strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) in 300 consecutive patients as high field strength IOMRI rapidly becomes the standard of care for neurosurgical procedures. Three sequential groups (groups A, B, C; n=100 each) were compared with respect to time management, complications and technical difficulties to assess improvement in these parameters with experience. We observed a reduction in the number of technical difficulties (paccounting for brain shift) helps in intraoperative planning to reduce complications. IOMRI is an asset to neurosurgeons, helping to augment the EOR, especially in glioma and pituitary surgery, with no significant increase in morbidity to the patient. PMID:26077939

  16. 3-D Dynamic Simulation System of Nuclear Power Plants%核电站三维动态仿真系统

    阎光伟; 王瑞华

    2012-01-01

    为提高核电站仿真培训系统的真实感,设计了基于虚拟现实技术的核电站三维动态仿真系统。系统采用三维建模技术构建核电站的主要厂房和设备,通过三维场景交互技术实现对核电站虚拟场景的自主和固定路径漫游,采用三维动画技术对设备拆装、冷却系统和堆芯工作原理进行模拟。提出了基于参数关联的时序动画生成方法,用以实现设备的虚拟拆装;利用纹理法实现了冷却系统中的水流效果;提出了模型叠加法,用以表现反应堆内部的反应速率。利用该系统,受培训人员能够在核电站虚拟场景中直观了解核电站的构造和工作原理,从而增强了培训的效果。%To improve the sense of reality for the nuclear power station simulation training system,a 3-D dynamic simulation system based on virtual reality technology is designed.The main powerhouses and equipments of nuclear power plants are modeled by means of 3-D modeling technology.Roaming in nuclear power station virtual scene is realized by 3-D interaction technology.Equipments dismounting,cooling system and working principles of the reactor core are simulated using 3-D animation technology.A sequence animation generating method based on parameter-correlation is proposed to realize virtual equipments dismounting.The effectiveness of running water in the cooling system is simulated by means of the texture method.A model-superposition method is proposed to simulate the reaction rate within the reactor.Through this system,trainees can grasp the structure and working principles of the nuclear power station in a visual mode,thus improving the training effects.

  17. A method for conducting functional MRI studies in alert nonhuman primates: initial results with opioid agonists in male cynomolgus monkeys

    Kaufman, Marc J.; Janes, Amy C.; Frederick, Blaise deB.; Brimson-Théberge, Melanie; Tong, Yunjie; McWilliams, Samuel B.; Bear, Ashley; Gillis, Timothy E.; Schrode, Katrina M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has emerged as a powerful technique for assessing neural effects of psychoactive drugs and other stimuli. Several experimental approaches have been developed to use fMRI in anesthetized and awake animal subjects, each of which has its advantages and complexities. We sought to assess whether one particular method to scan alert post-anesthetized animals can be used to assess fMRI effects of opioid agonists. To date, the use of fMRI as a method to com...

  18. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRS of the early stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with a normal initial MRI

    Seo, Yeong-Seon; Jung, Da-Eun [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Suwon, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho-Sung [Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Suwon, Kyungki-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), conventional MRI findings have been reported. However, in the early clinical stages, imaging studies can appear normal. Moreover, with no history of infant measles infection, the diagnosis of SSPE can only be arrived at after extensive investigation that must eliminate a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We report here on {sup 18} F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings in a 14-year-old girl with a normal initial MRI who had not contracted measles. Although {sup 18} F-FDG PET and MRS are not specific or diagnostic for SSPE, these techniques can demonstrate substantial metabolic impairments when MRI findings show no obvious abnormalities, as is often the case in the early stages of this disease. (orig.)

  19. 18F-FDG PET and MRS of the early stages of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a child with a normal initial MRI

    In subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), conventional MRI findings have been reported. However, in the early clinical stages, imaging studies can appear normal. Moreover, with no history of infant measles infection, the diagnosis of SSPE can only be arrived at after extensive investigation that must eliminate a number of neurodegenerative diseases. We report here on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) findings in a 14-year-old girl with a normal initial MRI who had not contracted measles. Although 18 F-FDG PET and MRS are not specific or diagnostic for SSPE, these techniques can demonstrate substantial metabolic impairments when MRI findings show no obvious abnormalities, as is often the case in the early stages of this disease. (orig.)

  20. Initial experience with intravenous pentobarbital sedation for children undergoing MRI at a tertiary care pediatric hospital: the learning curve

    Objective. Our purpose is to describe the initial experience with intravenous pentobarbital sedation in children undergoing MRI at a tertiary pediatric hospital to identify errors associated with inexperience. Subjects and methods. The study included the first 100 children sedated with intravenous pentobarbital prior to magnetic resonance examination at a tertiary pediatric hospital. The protocol included a maximum dose of 6 mg/kg administered in three divided doses with the total dose not to exceed 200 mg. Flow sheets documenting vital signs, administered drug doses, and adverse reactions were maintained contemporaneous to sedation. Results. Sedation was successful in 92 children. Of the eight children who failed sedation, three were at least 12 years old and three weighed more than 50 kg. χ2 tests identified significantly greater failure rates in children older than 11 years or weight greater than 50 kg. Two children had prolonged sedation after the maximum suggested dose was exceeded. Conclusions. The success rate was good, but could have been improved by restricting the use of pentobarbital to children less than 12 years of age and weighing less than 50 kg. Radiologists inexperienced with intravenous sedation should strictly observe the maximum suggested dose of pentobarbital to prevent prolonged sedation. (orig.)

  1. Simultaneous PET/MR body imaging in rats. Initial experiences with an integrated PET/MRI scanner

    We recently developed an integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (iPET/MRI) scanner for small animals, which had relatively large field-of-view (FOV) covering up to the size of a rat body. The purpose of this study was to report results of simultaneous PET/MRI of a rat body using this scanner with some radiotracers. C-11-methionine (MET), F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), or F-18-sodium fluoride (NaF) was injected as a radiotracer for PET portion in addition to gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine penta-acetic acid, a hepatobiliary contrast agent, for MRI portion. Simultaneous PET/MRI was performed in normal rats. PET, MRI, and co-registered fusion images were evaluated regarding image quality and feasibility for rat imaging studies. MET uptake was clearly shown in the liver and pancreas, which was confirmed with magnetic resonance (MR) and fused PET/MR images. PET/MR images depicted intense FDG uptake in the brain, Harderian glands, and myocardium. NaF uptake was observed in all bones and joints within FOV, except in ribs, which was well recognized with the help of MR and fused PET/MR images. This study demonstrated that simultaneous PET/MRI with an integrated dual-modality molecular imaging scanner was a feasible technique for imaging studies targeting on a rat body. However, further developments including attenuation correction methods are required to use this technique routinely in rat imaging studies. (author)

  2. Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma in a child: whole-body MRI in the initial and follow-up evaluations

    Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma (SPTCL) is classified as an unusual subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma that preferentially infiltrates the subcutaneous tissue without overt lymph node involvement. SPTCL is particularly rare in children, and there have been only a few case reports describing the US and CT findings of SPTCL. To our knowledge, the use of whole-body (WB) MRI as the initial and follow-up diagnostic method to assess the extent of disease and relapse of SPTCL has not been reported in children. In our case report involving one child, WB MRI was useful as both the initial and follow-up diagnostic method to assess the extent of disease and to monitor the patient's response to therapy for SPTCL. (orig.)

  3. An initial experimental study-the value of gadolinium-enhanced MRI and delay enhanced MRI in detecting articular cartilage degeneration of the rabbit knee

    Objective: To explore the appearance and value of early and delaye Gadolinium- enhanced MRI in detecting aricular cartilage generation of rabbit knee. Methods: Twenty adult New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into five groups (A, B, C, D, E). Intra-articular injection of Papain was performed to establish animal models of different stages of cartilage degeneration in the right knees of A, B, C, D groups, and MR scan was conducted 24 hours,one week one month and three months after the last Papain injection. The knees were scanned bilaterally with T1WI and 3D-FS-SPGR in sagittal plane. The signal intensity ratio between articular cartilage and surrounding soft tissue was measured at plain scan and 0, 2, 4 hours after intravenous injection of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA). The articular cartilage was pathologically examined (HE and alcican blue stain). Results: In 3D-FS-SPGR sequence, it showed significant difference in the SIR between processing side of four groups (F=7.961, P1WI sequence in detecting the change of cartilage signal intensity. (2)SIR on early and delayed Gadolinium-enhanced MRI has the ability in evaluating the early stage change of cartilage degeneration. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of kinetic entropy of breast masses initially found on MRI using whole-lesion curve distribution data: Comparison with the standard kinetic analysis

    Shimauchi, Akiko [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Tohoku University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Abe, Hiroyuki; Schacht, David V.; Yulei, Jian; Pineda, Federico D.; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Ganesh, Rajiv; Newstead, Gillian M. [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-08-15

    To quantify kinetic heterogeneity of breast masses that were initially detected with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, using whole-lesion kinetic distribution data obtained from computer-aided evaluation (CAE), and to compare that with standard kinetic curve analysis. Clinical MR images from 2006 to 2011 with breast masses initially detected with MRI were evaluated with CAE. The relative frequencies of six kinetic patterns (medium-persistent, medium-plateau, medium-washout, rapid-persistent, rapid-plateau, rapid-washout) within the entire lesion were used to calculate kinetic entropy (KE), a quantitative measure of enhancement pattern heterogeneity. Initial uptake (IU) and signal enhancement ratio (SER) were obtained from the most-suspicious kinetic curve. Mann-Whitney U test and ROC analysis were conducted for differentiation of malignant and benign masses. Forty benign and 37 malignant masses comprised the case set. IU and SER were not significantly different between malignant and benign masses, whereas KE was significantly greater for malignant than benign masses (p = 0.748, p = 0.083, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Areas under ROC curve for IU, SER, and KE were 0.479, 0.615, and 0.662, respectively. Quantification of kinetic heterogeneity of whole-lesion time-curve data with KE has the potential to improve differentiation of malignant from benign breast masses on breast MRI. (orig.)

  5. Evaluation of kinetic entropy of breast masses initially found on MRI using whole-lesion curve distribution data: Comparison with the standard kinetic analysis

    To quantify kinetic heterogeneity of breast masses that were initially detected with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, using whole-lesion kinetic distribution data obtained from computer-aided evaluation (CAE), and to compare that with standard kinetic curve analysis. Clinical MR images from 2006 to 2011 with breast masses initially detected with MRI were evaluated with CAE. The relative frequencies of six kinetic patterns (medium-persistent, medium-plateau, medium-washout, rapid-persistent, rapid-plateau, rapid-washout) within the entire lesion were used to calculate kinetic entropy (KE), a quantitative measure of enhancement pattern heterogeneity. Initial uptake (IU) and signal enhancement ratio (SER) were obtained from the most-suspicious kinetic curve. Mann-Whitney U test and ROC analysis were conducted for differentiation of malignant and benign masses. Forty benign and 37 malignant masses comprised the case set. IU and SER were not significantly different between malignant and benign masses, whereas KE was significantly greater for malignant than benign masses (p = 0.748, p = 0.083, and p < 0.0001, respectively). Areas under ROC curve for IU, SER, and KE were 0.479, 0.615, and 0.662, respectively. Quantification of kinetic heterogeneity of whole-lesion time-curve data with KE has the potential to improve differentiation of malignant from benign breast masses on breast MRI. (orig.)

  6. Performance of gadofosveset-enhanced MRI for staging rectal cancer nodes: can the initial promising results be reproduced?

    Heijnen, Luc A.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Maas, Monique; Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Cappendijk, Vincent C. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, ' s Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Oliveira, Pedro [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Porto (Portugal); Lammering, Guido [Maastro Clinic, Radiation Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Riedl, Robert G. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    A previous study showed promising results for gadofosveset-trisodium as a lymph node magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in rectal cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively confirm the diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer in a second patient cohort. Seventy-one rectal cancer patients were prospectively included, of whom 13 (group I) underwent a primary staging gadofosveset MRI (1.5-T) followed by surgery (± preoperative 5 x 5 Gy) and 58 (group II) underwent both primary staging and restaging gadofosveset MRI after a long course of chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery. Nodal status was scored as (y)cN0 or (y)cN+ by two independent readers (R1, R2) with different experience levels. Results were correlated with histology on a node-by-node basis. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) were 94 %, 79 % and 0.89 for the more experienced R1 and 50 %, 83 % and 0.74 for the non-experienced R2. R2's performance improved considerably after a learning curve, to an AUC of 0.83. Misinterpretations mainly occurred in nodes located in the superior mesorectum, nodes located in between vessels and nodes containing micrometastases. This prospective study confirms the good diagnostic performance of gadofosveset MRI for nodal (re)staging in rectal cancer. (orig.)

  7. Impact of diffusion-weighted MRI-measured initial cerebral infarction volume on clinical outcome in acute stroke patients with middle cerebral artery occlusion treated by thrombolysis

    Sanak, Daniel; Bartkova, Andrea; Herzig, Roman; Skoloudik, David; Vlachova, Ivanka; Kanovsky, Petr [University Hospital, Stroke Center, Department of Neurology, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Nosal' , Vladimir; Kurca, Egon [University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Martin (Slovakia); Horak, David; Bucil, Jiri; Burval, Stanislav; Koecher, Martin [University Hospital, Stroke Center, Department of Radiology, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Zelenak, Kamil; Cisarikova, Viera [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Martin (Slovakia); Zapletalova, Jana [Palacky University Medical School, Department of Biometry and Statistics, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2006-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help identify acute stroke patients with a higher potential benefit from thrombolytic therapy. The aim of our study was to assess the correlation between initial cerebral infarct (CI) volume (quantified on diffusion-weighted MRI) and the resulting clinical outcome in acute stroke patients with middle cerebral artery (MCA) (M{sub 1-2} segment) occlusion detected on MRI angiography treated by intravenous/intraarterial thrombolysis. Initial infarct volume (V{sub DWI-I}) was retrospectively compared with neurological deficit evaluated using the NIH stroke scale on admission and 24 h later, and with the 90-day clinical outcome assessed using the modified Rankin scale in a series of 25 consecutive CI patients. The relationship between infarct volume and neurological deficit severity was assessed and, following the establishment of the maximum V{sub DWI-I} still associated with a good clinical outcome, the patients were divided into two groups (V{sub DWI-I} {<=}70 ml and >70 ml). V{sub DWI-I} ranged from 0.7 to 321 ml. The 24-h clinical outcome improved significantly (P=0.0001) in 87% of patients with a V{sub DWI-I} {<=}70 ml (group 1) and deteriorated significantly (P=0.0018) in all patients with a V{sub DWI-I} >70 ml (group 2). The 90-day mortality was 0% in group 1 and 71.5% in group 2. The 90-day clinical outcome was significantly better in group 1 than in group 2 (P=0.026). Clinical outcome could be predicted from initial infarct volume quantified by MRI-DWI in acute CI patients with MCA occlusion treated by intravenous/intraarterial thrombolysis. Patients with a V{sub DWI-I} {<=}70 ml had a significantly better outcome. (orig.)

  8. Predicting response before initiation of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer using new methods for the analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE MRI) data

    DeGrandchamp, Joseph B.; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Arlinghaus, Lori R.; Abramson, V. G.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Julio

    2016-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI have shown promise as biomarkers for tumor response to therapy. However, standard methods of analyzing DCE MRI data (Tofts model) require high temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and the Arterial Input Function (AIF). Such models produce reliable biomarkers of response only when a therapy has a large effect on the parameters. We recently reported a method that solves the limitations, the Linear Reference Region Model (LRRM). Similar to other reference region models, the LRRM needs no AIF. Additionally, the LRRM is more accurate and precise than standard methods at low SNR and slow temporal resolution, suggesting LRRM-derived biomarkers could be better predictors. Here, the LRRM, Non-linear Reference Region Model (NRRM), Linear Tofts model (LTM), and Non-linear Tofts Model (NLTM) were used to estimate the RKtrans between muscle and tumor (or the Ktrans for Tofts) and the tumor kep,TOI for 39 breast cancer patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). These parameters and the receptor statuses of each patient were used to construct cross-validated predictive models to classify patients as complete pathological responders (pCR) or non-complete pathological responders (non-pCR) to NAC. Model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC). The AUC for receptor status alone was 0.62, while the best performance using predictors from the LRRM, NRRM, LTM, and NLTM were AUCs of 0.79, 0.55, 0.60, and 0.59 respectively. This suggests that the LRRM can be used to predict response to NAC in breast cancer.

  9. Comparison of pharmacokinetic MRI and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose PET in the diagnosis of breast cancer: initial experience

    It was the aim of this methodology-oriented clinical pilot study to compare the potential of dynamic MRI and 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for the detection and characterization of breast cancer. Fourteen women with suspicious breast lesions were examined. The MRI data were acquired with a turbo fast low-angle shot sequence and analyzed using a pharmacokinetic model. Emission data were detected in the sensitive 3D modus, iteratively reconstructed, and superimposed onto corresponding transmission images. In the 14 patients, 13 breast masses with a suspicious contrast enhancement and FDG uptake were detected. For these lesions, no statistically significant correlation between evaluated MR and PET parameters was found. Of the 9 histologically confirmed carcinomas, 8 were correctly characterized with MRI and PET. Two inflammatory lesions were concordantly classified as cancer. Moreover, dynamic MRI yielded another false-positive finding. In 6 patients, PET detected occult lymph node and/or distant metastases. Although both functional imaging techniques provide independent tissue information, the results concerning the diagnosis of primary breast lesions were almost identical. An advantage of PET, however, is its ability to localize lymph node involvement and distant metastases as an integral part of the examination. (orig.)

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI of bone marrow oedema, soft tissue oedema and synovitis in paediatric patients: feasibility and initial experience

    Neubauer Henning

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MRI has become the mainstay of diagnostic imaging in paediatric rheumatology for lesion detection, differential diagnosis and therapy surveillance. MR imaging of synovitis, in particular, is indispensable for early diagnosis and follow-up in arthritis patients. We used diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI as a new imaging modality in comparison to standard MRI sequences to study bone marrow oedema, soft-tissue oedema and synovitis in paediatric patients. Methods A total of 52 patients (mean age 11 ± 5 years with bone marrow oedema (n = 31, soft-tissue oedema (n = 20 and synovitis (n = 15 were examined with transversal diffusion-weighted single-shot echoplanar imaging in addition to standard MR sequences (T2W TIRM, T1W pre- and post-contrast. Diffusion-weighted images were used for lesion detection and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, unit × 10-3 mm2/s values were measured with ROI technique on ADC maps. Results In 50 of 52 patients, DWI delineated the lesion of interest corresponding to pathological signal increase on standard sequences. Mean ADC was 1.60 ± 0.14 (range 1.38 - 1.99 in osseous lesions, 1.72 ± 0.31 (range 1.43 - 2.56 in soft tissue oedema and 2.82 ± 0.24 (range 2.47 - 3.18 for joint effusion (ANOVA p  Conclusions Diffusion-weighted MRI reliably visualises osseous and soft tissue oedema, as compared to standard sequences. DWI of synovitis is feasible in large joints and presents a novel approach to contrast-free imaging of synovitis. Whole-body DWI for chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis should be evaluated in future studies.

  11. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    James, J; Place, V; Panda, A [Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Edmonson, H [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Felmlee, J [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Pooley, R [Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  12. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Assessment of Hyperemic Fractional Microvascular Blood Plasma Volume in Peripheral Arterial Disease: Initial Findings

    Bas Versluis; Marjolein H G Dremmen; Nelemans, Patty J; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Geert-Willem Schurink; Tim Leiner; Walter H Backes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METH...

  13. SU-D-18C-06: Initial Experience with Implementing MRI Safety Guidelines for Patients with Pacemakers - Medical Physicist Perspective

    Purpose: Several institutions have developed MRI guidelines for patients with MR-unsafe or MR-conditional pacemakers. Here we highlight the role of a medical physicist in implementing these guidelines for non-pacemaker dependent patients. Guidelines: Implementing these guidelines requires involvement from several medical specialties and a strong collaboration with the site MRI supervisor to develop a structured workflow. A medical physicist is required to be present during the scan to supervise the MR scanning and to maintain a safety checklist that ensures: 1) uninterrupted patient communication with the technologist, 2) continuous patient physiologic monitoring (e.g. blood pressure and electrocardiography) by a trained nurse, 3) redundant patient vitals monitoring (e.g. pulse oximetry) due to the possibility of in vivo electrocardiography reading fluctuations during image acquisition. A radiologist is strongly recommended to be available to review the images before patients are discharged from the scanner. Pacemaker MRI should be restricted to 1.5T field strength. The MRI sequences should be optimized by the physicist with regards to: a) SAR: limited to <1.5 W/Kg for MR-unsafe pacemakers in normal operating mode, b) RF exposure time: <30 min, c) Coils: use T/R coils but not restricted to such, d) Artifacts: further optimization of sequences whenever image quality is compromised due to the pacemaker. In particular, cardiac, breast and left-shoulder MRIs are most susceptible to these artifacts. Possible strategies to lower the SAR include: a) BW reduction, 2) echo-train-length reduction, 3) increase TR, 4) decrease number of averages, 5) decrease flip angle, 6) reduce slices and/or a combination of all the options. Conclusion: A medical physicist in collaboration with the MR supervisor plays an important role in the supervision/implementation of safe MR scanning of pacemaker patients. Developing and establishing a workflow has enabled our institution to scan over

  14. A dimensionless dynamic contrast enhanced MRI parameter for intra-prostatic tumour target volume delineation: initial comparison with histology

    Hrinivich, W. Thomas; Gibson, Eli; Gaed, Mena; Gomez, Jose A.; Moussa, Madeleine; McKenzie, Charles A.; Bauman, Glenn S.; Ward, Aaron D.; Fenster, Aaron; Wong, Eugene

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: T2 weighted and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) show promise in isolating prostate tumours. Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has also been employed as a component in multi-parametric tumour detection schemes. Model-based parameters such as Ktrans are conventionally used to characterize DCE images and require arterial contrast agent (CR) concentration. A robust parameter map that does not depend on arterial input may be more useful for target volume delineation. We present a dimensionless parameter (Wio) that characterizes CR wash-in and washout rates without requiring arterial CR concentration. Wio is compared to Ktrans in terms of ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate, as demonstrated via comparison with histology. Methods: Three subjects underwent DCE-MRI using gadolinium contrast and 7 s imaging temporal resolution. A pathologist identified cancer on whole-mount histology specimens, and slides were deformably registered to MR images. The ability of Wio maps to discriminate cancer was determined through receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis. Results: There is a trend that Wio shows greater area under the ROC curve (AUC) than Ktrans with median AUC values of 0.74 and 0.69 respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant based on a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p = 0.13). Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that Wio shows potential as a tool for Ktrans QA, showing similar ability to discriminate cancer in the prostate as Ktrans without requiring arterial CR concentration.

  15. In vivo imaging of transplanted hepatocytes with a 1.5-T clinical MRI system - initial experience in mice

    The feasibility of in vitro mature mouse hepatocyte labeling with a novel iron oxide particle was assessed and the ability of 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track labeled mouse hepatocytes in syngenic recipient livers following intraportal cell transplantation was tested. Mouse hepatocytes were incubated with anionic iron oxide nanoparticles at various iron concentrations. Cell viability was assessed and iron oxide particle uptake quantified. Labeled hepatocytes were intraportally injected into 20 mice, while unlabeled hepatocytes were injected into two mice. Liver T2 values, spleen-to-muscle relative signal intensity (RIspleen/muscle), and liver-to-muscle relative signal intensity (RIliver/muscle) on gradient-echo T2-weighted imaging after injection of either labeled or unlabeled hepatocytes were compared with an ANOVA test followed by Fisher's a posteriori PLSD test. Livers, spleens and lungs were collected for histological analysis. Iron oxide particle uptake was saturable with a maximum iron content of 20 pg per cell and without viability alteration after 3 days of culture. Following labeled-cell transplantation, recipient livers showed well-defined nodular foci of low signal intensity on MRI - consistent with clusters of labeled hepatocytes on pathological analysis - combined with a significant decrease in both liver T2 values and liver-to-muscle RIliver/muscle (P = 0.01) with minimal T2 values demonstrated 8 days after transplantation. Conventional MRI can demonstrate the presence of transplanted iron-labeled mature hepatocytes in mouse liver. (orig.)

  16. Rod ejection accident 3D-dynamic analysis in Trillo NPP with RELAP5/PARCS V2.7 coupled codes

    The Rod Ejection Accident (REA) belongs to the Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) category of accidents, and it is part of the licensing basis accident analyses required for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The REA consist of a rod ejection due to the failure of its driving mechanism. The evolution is driven by a continuous reactivity insertion. In previous works, we have analyzed this transient in Trillo NPP at different power levels at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and at the end of cycle (EOC) using the coupled code RELAP5-MOD3.3/PARCSv2.7. In this work, we present the results of the REA analysis at 30% of the rated power at BOC. In the thermalhydraulic model used, each fuel assemblies has been modelled as an independent channel, for that, the RELAP5 source code has been modified and recompiled to accept this large number of channels. The neutronic nodal discretization consists of 177 x 32 active nodes, considering 28 different fuel elements with 867 neutronic compositions. The cross-sections sets are obtained from CASMO4-SIMULATE3 using the SIMTAB methodology developed in UPV. The transient departs from an initially critical core, being the withdrawal speed of the control rod a typical bounding value. These analyses will allow knowing more accurately the PWR real plant phenomenology in the RIA most limiting conditions, in this way the conclusions will be realistic. The aim is to improve the understanding of these accidents using advanced methods. (authors)

  17. Rod ejection accident 3D-dynamic analysis in Almaraz NPP with RELAP5/PARCS V2.7 coupled codes

    The Rod Ejection Accident (REA) belongs to the Reactivity Initiated Accidents (RIA) category of accidents, and it is part of the licensing basis accident analyses required for pressurized water reactors (PWR). The REA consist of a rod ejection due to the failure of its driving mechanism. The evolution is driven by a continuous reactivity insertion. In previous works, we have analyzed this transient in Almaraz NPP at different power levels at the beginning of cycle (BOC) and at the end of cycle (EOC) using the coupled code RELAP5-MOD3.3/PARCS v2.7. In this work, we present the results of the REA analysis at hot zero power at BOC with all control rods inserted. In the thermal-hydraulic model used, each fuel assemblies has been modelled as an independent channel, for that, the RELAP5 source code has been modified and recompiled to accept this large number of channels. The neutronic nodal discretization consists of 157 x 24 active nodes, considering 13 different fuel elements with 291 neutronic compositions. The cross-sections sets are obtained from CASMO4-SIMULATE3 using the SIMTAB methodology developed in UPV. The transient departs from an initially critical core, being the withdrawal speed of the control rod a typical bounding value. These analyses will allow knowing more accurately the PWR real plant phenomenology in the RIA most limiting conditions, in this way the conclusions will be realistic. The aim is to improve the understanding of these accidents using advanced methods. (authors)

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  19. Altered baseline brain activity with 72 h of simulated microgravity--initial evidence from resting-state fMRI.

    Liao, Yang; Zhang, Jinsong; Huang, Zhiping; Xi, Yibin; Zhang, Qianru; Zhu, Tianli; Liu, Xufeng

    2012-01-01

    To provide the basis and reference to further insights into the neural activity of the human brain in a microgravity environment, we discuss the amplitude changes of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations using a simulated microgravity model. Twelve male participants between 24 and 31 years old received resting-state fMRI scans in both a normal condition and after 72 hours in a -6° head down tilt (HDT). A paired sample t-test was used to test the amplitude differences of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations between these two conditions. With 72 hours in a -6° HDT, the participants showed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the left thalamus compared with the normal condition (a combined threshold of Pmicrogravity environment. PMID:23285086

  20. Tumor perfusion assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI correlates to the grading of renal cell carcinoma: Initial results

    In this study, we investigated whether assessment of the tumor perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) enables to estimate the morphologic grading of renal cell carcinomas. A total of 21 patients with suspected renal cell cancer were examined using a Gadobutrol-enhanced, dynamic saturation-recovery, turbo-fast, low-angle shot sequence. Tumor perfusion and the tissue-blood ratio within the entire tumor and the most highly vascularized part of the tumor were calculated according to the model of Miles. Immediately after examination, patients underwent surgery, and the results from imaging were compared with the morphological analysis of the histologic grading. Fourteen patients had G2 tumors, and seven patients had G3 tumors. Significantly higher perfusion values (p < 0.05) were obtained in G3 tumors than in G2 tumors when the entire tumor area was considered (1.59 ± 0.44 (ml/g/min) vs. 1.08 ± 0.38 (ml/g/min)) or its most highly vascularized part (2.14 ± 0.89 (ml/g/min) vs. 1.40 ± 0.49 (ml/g/min)). By contrast, the tissue-blood ratios did not differ significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, unlike tissue-blood ratio, surrogate parameters of the tumor perfusion determined by DCE MRI seem to allow an estimation of the grading of renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with high case numbers and including patients with G1 tumors are required to evaluate the full potential and clinical impact.

  1. Tumor perfusion assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI correlates to the grading of renal cell carcinoma: Initial results

    Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.d [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Schifferdecker, Isabel [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Zwick, Stefan [Division of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Macher-Goeppinger, Stephan [Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Laue, Hendrik [MeVis Research, Center for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Haferkamp, Axel [Department of Urology, Heidelberg University (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany); Kiessling, Fabian [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Hallscheidt, Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    In this study, we investigated whether assessment of the tumor perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) enables to estimate the morphologic grading of renal cell carcinomas. A total of 21 patients with suspected renal cell cancer were examined using a Gadobutrol-enhanced, dynamic saturation-recovery, turbo-fast, low-angle shot sequence. Tumor perfusion and the tissue-blood ratio within the entire tumor and the most highly vascularized part of the tumor were calculated according to the model of Miles. Immediately after examination, patients underwent surgery, and the results from imaging were compared with the morphological analysis of the histologic grading. Fourteen patients had G2 tumors, and seven patients had G3 tumors. Significantly higher perfusion values (p < 0.05) were obtained in G3 tumors than in G2 tumors when the entire tumor area was considered (1.59 {+-} 0.44 (ml/g/min) vs. 1.08 {+-} 0.38 (ml/g/min)) or its most highly vascularized part (2.14 {+-} 0.89 (ml/g/min) vs. 1.40 {+-} 0.49 (ml/g/min)). By contrast, the tissue-blood ratios did not differ significantly between the two groups. In conclusion, unlike tissue-blood ratio, surrogate parameters of the tumor perfusion determined by DCE MRI seem to allow an estimation of the grading of renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with high case numbers and including patients with G1 tumors are required to evaluate the full potential and clinical impact.

  2. Fetal MRI

    Ultrasonography is the method of choice for prenatal malformation screening, but it does not always provide sufficient information for correct diagnosis or adequate abnormality evaluation. Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to complete sonographic findings. It was initially used for evaluation of cerebral abnormalities but is increasingly being applied to other fetal areas. In vivo investigation of fetal brain maturation has been enhanced by MRI. An adequate analysis of fetal chest and abdomen can be achieved with fast T2-, T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The advantages include the great field of view and the excellent soft tissue contrast. This allows correct diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and evaluation of the consequences on pulmonary growth. Other pulmonary malformations, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration and brochogenic cysts, can also be easily identified. Renal position can be quickly determined using DWI sequences and renal agenesia can be easily diagnosed with only one sequence. Prenatal MRI is virtually as effective as postnatal examination, dispenses with transport of a potentially very ill newborn, and provides logistic advantages. Therefore, prenatal MRI is useful for adequate postnatal treatment of newborns with malformations. (orig.)

  3. Altered baseline brain activity with 72 h of simulated microgravity--initial evidence from resting-state fMRI.

    Yang Liao

    Full Text Available To provide the basis and reference to further insights into the neural activity of the human brain in a microgravity environment, we discuss the amplitude changes of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations using a simulated microgravity model. Twelve male participants between 24 and 31 years old received resting-state fMRI scans in both a normal condition and after 72 hours in a -6° head down tilt (HDT. A paired sample t-test was used to test the amplitude differences of low-frequency brain activity fluctuations between these two conditions. With 72 hours in a -6° HDT, the participants showed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations in the left thalamus compared with the normal condition (a combined threshold of P<0.005 and a minimum cluster size of 351 mm(3 (13 voxels, which corresponded with the corrected threshold of P<0.05 determined by AlphaSim. Our findings indicate that a gravity change-induced redistribution of body fluid may disrupt the function of the left thalamus in the resting state, which may contribute to reduced motor control abilities and multiple executive functions in astronauts in a microgravity environment.

  4. Initial PET Performance Evaluation of a Preclinical Insert for PET/MRI with Digital SiPM Technology

    Schug, David; Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter Michael; Salomon, Andre; Hallen, Patrick; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    Hyperion-IID is a positron emission tomography (PET) insert which allows simultaneous operation in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. To read out the scintillation light of the employed LYSO crystal arrays with a pitch of 1 mm pitch and 12 mm in height, digital silicon photomultipliers (DPC 3200-22, Philips Digital Photon Counting) (DPC) are used. The basic PET performance in terms of energy resolution, coincidence resolution time (CRT) and sensitivity as a function of operating parameters, such as the operating temperature, the applied overvoltage, activity and configuration parameters of the DPCs, were evaluated on system level. The measured energy resolution did not show a large dependency on the selected parameters and is in the range of 12.4-12.9% for low activities and degrades to ~13.6% at activities of ~100 MBq. The CRT strongly depends on the selected trigger scheme (trig) of the DPCs. We measured approximately 260 ps, 440 ps, 540 ps and 1300 ps for trig 1-4, respectively. The trues...

  5. 3D Dynamic Analysis of the Wrist.

    Sandow, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    With advances in imaging and computing technology the greater capacity to diagnose, plan and deliver care to patients with hand and wrist disorder is being realised. Work in our laboratory, has been able to identify certain specific rules that control wrist motion, and is a step on the pathway to creating a unified theory of carpal mechanics which will incorporate a kinetic biomechanical model. This will allow more precise anatomically based as well as quantitative diagnoses, but also an ability to test a proposed intervention in a "what if" scenario. PMID:26387995

  6. Rendering of 3D Dynamic Virtual Environments

    Catanese, Salvatore; Fiumara, Giacomo; Pagano, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a framework for the rendering of dynamic 3D virtual environments which can be integrated in the development of videogames. It includes methods to manage sounds and particle effects, paged static geometries, the support of a physics engine and various input systems. It has been designed with a modular structure to allow future expansions. We exploited some open-source state-of-the-art components such as OGRE, PhysX, ParticleUniverse, etc.; all of them have been properly integrated to obtain peculiar physical and environmental effects. The stand-alone version of the application is fully compatible with Direct3D and OpenGL APIs and adopts OpenAL APIs to manage audio cards. Concluding, we devised a showcase demo which reproduces a dynamic 3D environment, including some particular effects: the alternation of day and night infuencing the lighting of the scene, the rendering of terrain, water and vegetation, the reproduction of sounds and atmospheric agents.

  7. Initial PET performance evaluation of a preclinical insert for PET/MRI with digital SiPM technology

    Schug, David; Lerche, Christoph; Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter Michael; Salomon, Andre; Hallen, Patrick; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2016-04-01

    Hyperion-IID is a positron emission tomography (PET) insert which allows simultaneous operation in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. To read out the scintillation light of the employed lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal arrays with a pitch of 1 mm and 12 mm in height, digital silicon photomultipliers (DPC 3200-22, Philips Digital Photon Counting) (DPC) are used. The basic PET performance in terms of energy resolution, coincidence resolution time (CRT) and sensitivity as a function of the operating parameters, such as the operating temperature, the applied overvoltage, activity and configuration parameters of the DPCs, has been evaluated at system level. The measured energy resolution did not show a large dependency on the selected parameters and is in the range of 12.4%-12.9% for low activity, degrading to  ˜13.6% at an activity of  ˜100 MBq. The CRT strongly depends on the selected trigger scheme (trig) of the DPCs, and we measured approximately 260 ps, 440 ps, 550 ps and 1300 ps for trig 1-4, respectively. The trues sensitivity for a NEMA NU 4 mouse-sized scatter phantom with a 70 mm long tube of activity was dependent on the operating parameters and was determined to be 0.4%-1.4% at low activity. The random fraction stayed below 5% at activity up to 100 MBq and the scatter fraction was evaluated as  ˜6% for an energy window of 411 keV-561 keV and  ˜16% for 250 keV-625 keV. Furthermore, we performed imaging experiments using a mouse-sized hot-rod phantom and a large rabbit-sized phantom. In 2D slices of the reconstructed mouse-sized hot-rod phantom (∅ = 28 mm), the rods were distinguishable from each other down to a rod size of 0.8 mm. There was no benefit from the better CRT of trig 1 over trig 3, where in the larger rabbit-sized phantom (∅ = 114 mm) we were able to show a clear improvement in image quality using the time-of-flight information. The findings will allow system architects—aiming at a similar

  8. Differentiation between active and chronic Crohn's disease using MRI small-bowel motility examinations — Initial experience

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of locally active Crohn's disease on systemic small-bowel motility in patients with chronic Crohn's disease compared to healthy individuals. Material and methods: Fifteen healthy individuals (11 men, four women; mean age 37 years) and 20 patients with histopathologically proven active (n = 15; 10 women, 5 men; mean age 45 years) or chronic (n = 5; four women, one man; mean age 48 years) Crohn's disease were included in this institutional review board-approved, retrospective study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 1.5 T) was performed after standardized preparation. Two-dimensional (2D) cine sequences for motility acquisition were performed in apnoea (27 s). Motility assessment was performed using dedicated software in three randomly chosen areas of the small-bowel outside known Crohn's disease-affected hotspots. The main quantitative characteristics (frequency, amplitude, occlusion rate) were compared using Student's t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Three randomly chosen segments were analysed in each participant. Patients with active Crohn's disease had significantly (p < 0.05) reduced contraction frequencies (active Crohn's disease: 2.86/min; chronic: 4.14/min; healthy: 4.53/min) and luminal occlusion rates (active: 0.43; chronic: 0.70; healthy: 0.73) compared to healthy individuals and patients with chronic Crohn's disease. Contraction amplitudes were significantly reduced during active Crohn's disease (6.71 mm) compared to healthy participants (10.14 mm), but this only reached borderline significance in comparison to chronic Crohn's disease (8.87 mm). Mean bowel lumen diameter was significantly (p = 0.04) higher in patients with active Crohn's disease (16.91 mm) compared to healthy participants (14.79 mm) but not in comparison to patients with chronic Crohn's disease (13.68). Conclusion: The findings of the present study suggest that local inflammatory activity of small-bowel segments in patients with

  9. Chest MRI

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  10. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    Laberge, Marc A.; Baum, Thomas; Virayavanich, Warapat; Nardo, Lorenzo; Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Research, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nevitt, M.C.; Lynch, J.; McCulloch, C.E. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2012-06-15

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI < 25 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 37), and obese (BMI {>=} 30 kg/m{sup 2}, n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  11. Obesity increases the prevalence and severity of focal knee abnormalities diagnosed using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects - data from the osteoarthritis initiative

    To study the effect of BMI on the prevalence, severity, and 36-month progression of early degenerative changes in the knee by using 3T MRI in middle-aged subjects without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). We examined baseline and 36-month follow-up MR studies from 137 middle-aged individuals (45-55 years old) with risk factors for knee OA but no radiographic OA from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. Subjects were grouped into three categories: normal BMI (BMI 2, n = 38), overweight (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m2, n = 37), and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2, n = 62). Using 3T MRI, cartilage, meniscus, and bone marrow abnormalities were graded using the OA Whole-organ MR Imaging Score (WORMS). The statistical analysis was corrected as necessary for differences in age, sex, and OA risk factors other than BMI. The overall prevalence of lesions was 64% for meniscus and 79% for cartilage (including low grade lesions). At baseline, the prevalence and severity of knee lesions was positively associated with BMI, with a nearly fourfold increase in meniscal tears and more than twofold increase in high-grade cartilage defects in obese individuals relative to normal-weight subjects. Over the 36-month follow-up period, the number of new or worsening cartilage lesions of any grade was significantly higher in obese subjects (p = 0.039), while there was no significant difference in meniscal lesion progression. Obesity was associated with both higher prevalence and severity of early degenerative changes in the knee in middle-aged individuals without radiographic OA and with significantly increased cartilage lesion progression (of any grade) over 36 months. (orig.)

  12. MRI and low back pain

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  13. Diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease. The initial DWI findings within 6 hours after onset

    We performed this study to evaluate the accuracy of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in detecting focal ischemia, and to predict the role of DWI in the management of patients with ischemia in the superacute phase. Ninety-nine patients with clinically diagnosed acute occlusive cerebrovascular disease were studied with DWI within 6 hours after onset of symptoms. In 88 of 99 patients, early ischemic lesions were identified on initial DWI as hyperintensity areas. The initial DWI findings were classified into 4 types according to the location and extent of the hyperintensity area. The patients with type 1 (no hyperintensity area) were clinically diagnosed as TIA or complete stroke within 2 hours after the onset. Twenty-eight patients out of the patients with type 2 (hyperintensity area in the perforator's territory) were diagnosed with lacunar infarction, and the remaining 13 patients were diagnosed as victims of stroke caused by main trunk occlusion. Except for 2 patients with TIA, the patients with type 3 (scattered hyperintensity areas in the cortex) had main trunk occlusion and showed a more extended ischemic area on SPECT than hyperintensity area on DWI. All the patients with type 4 (extended hyperintensity area) had main trunk occlusion and showed severe hypoperfusion in the affected area on SPECT, and the area of hypoperfusion was well matched with the hyperintensity area on DWI. Comparing DWI findings with rCBF on SPECT, a significant difference was noted in rCBF between hyperintensity and non-hyperintensity area. We considered that emergence of hyperintensity on DWI was related to both the time of duration and the degree of hypoperfusion, and the reduced perfusion area where DWI showed no hyperintensity was thought to be the ''ischemic penumbra''. Our study indicated DWI had high diagnostic accuracy in superacute occlusive cerebrovascular disease and could furnish useful information to reveal the pathologic condition. In addition, DWI is expected to be

  14. Whole-body MRI for initial staging of paediatric lymphoma: prospective comparison to an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard

    Littooij, Annemieke S. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Singapore (Singapore); Kwee, Thomas C.; Vermoolen, Malou A.; Keizer, Bart de; Beek, Frederik J.A.; Hobbelink, Monique G.; Nievelstein, Rutger A.J. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barber, Ignasi; Enriquez, Goya [Hospital Materno-Infantil Vall d' Hebron, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Giannina Gaslini Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Zsiros, Jozsef [University of Amsterdam, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Emma Children' s Hospital, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Soh, Shui Yen [KK Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Haematology and Oncology service, Department of Paediatric Subspecialities, Singapore (Singapore); Bierings, Marc B. [University Medical Centre Utrecht/Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Paediatric Haematology-Oncology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    To compare whole-body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (whole-body MRI-DWI), with FDG-PET/CT for staging newly diagnosed paediatric lymphoma. A total of 36 children with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent both whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT. Whole-body MRI-DWI was successfully performed in 33 patients (mean age 13.9 years). Whole-body MRI-DWI was independently evaluated by two blinded observers. After consensus reading, an unblinded expert panel evaluated the discrepant findings between whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT and used bone marrow biopsy, other imaging data and clinical information to derive an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard. Interobserver agreement of whole-body MRI-DWI was good [all nodal sites together (κ = 0.79); all extranodal sites together (κ = 0.69)]. There was very good agreement between the consensus whole-body MRI-DWI- and FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard for nodal (κ = 0.91) and extranodal (κ = 0.94) staging. The sensitivity and specificity of consensus whole-body MRI-DWI were 93 % and 98 % for nodal staging and 89 % and 100 % for extranodal staging, respectively. Following removal of MRI reader errors, the disease stage according to whole-body MRI-DWI agreed with the reference standard in 28 of 33 patients. Our results indicate that whole-body MRI-DWI is feasible for staging paediatric lymphoma and could potentially serve as a good radiation-free alternative to FDG-PET/CT. (orig.)

  15. Whole-body MRI for initial staging of paediatric lymphoma: prospective comparison to an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard

    To compare whole-body MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (whole-body MRI-DWI), with FDG-PET/CT for staging newly diagnosed paediatric lymphoma. A total of 36 children with newly diagnosed lymphoma prospectively underwent both whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT. Whole-body MRI-DWI was successfully performed in 33 patients (mean age 13.9 years). Whole-body MRI-DWI was independently evaluated by two blinded observers. After consensus reading, an unblinded expert panel evaluated the discrepant findings between whole-body MRI-DWI and FDG-PET/CT and used bone marrow biopsy, other imaging data and clinical information to derive an FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard. Interobserver agreement of whole-body MRI-DWI was good [all nodal sites together (κ = 0.79); all extranodal sites together (κ = 0.69)]. There was very good agreement between the consensus whole-body MRI-DWI- and FDG-PET/CT-based reference standard for nodal (κ = 0.91) and extranodal (κ = 0.94) staging. The sensitivity and specificity of consensus whole-body MRI-DWI were 93 % and 98 % for nodal staging and 89 % and 100 % for extranodal staging, respectively. Following removal of MRI reader errors, the disease stage according to whole-body MRI-DWI agreed with the reference standard in 28 of 33 patients. Our results indicate that whole-body MRI-DWI is feasible for staging paediatric lymphoma and could potentially serve as a good radiation-free alternative to FDG-PET/CT. (orig.)

  16. Comparison of PET/CT and PET/MRI hybrid systems using a 68Ga-labelled PSMA ligand for the diagnosis of recurrent prostate cancer: initial experience

    68Ga-labelled HBED-CC-PSMA is a highly promising tracer for imaging recurrent prostate cancer (PCa). The intention of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of PET/MRI with this tracer. Twenty patients underwent PET/CT 1 h after injection of the 68Ga-PSMA ligand followed by PET/MRI 3 h after injection. Data from the two investigations were first analysed separately and then compared with respect to tumour detection rate and radiotracer uptake in various tissues. To evaluate the quantification accuracy of the PET/MRI system, differences in SUVs between PET/CT and corresponding PET/MRI were compared with differences in SUVs between PET/CT 1 h and 3 h after injection in another patient cohort. This cohort was investigated using the same PET/CT system. With PET/MRI, different diagnostic sequences, higher contrast of lesions and higher resolution of MRI enabled a subjectively easier evaluation of the images. In addition, four unclear findings on PET/CT could be clarified as characteristic of PCa metastases by PET/MRI. However, in PET images of the PET/MRI, a reduced signal was observed at the level of the kidneys (in 11 patients) and around the urinary bladder (in 15 patients). This led to reduced SUVs in six lesions. SUVmean values provided by the PET/MRI system were different in muscles, blood pool, liver and spleen. PCa was detected more easily and more accurately with Ga-PSMA PET/MRI than with PET/CT and with lower radiation exposure. Consequently, this new technique could clarify unclear findings on PET/CT. However, scatter correction was challenging when the specific 68Ga-PSMA ligand was used. Moreover, direct comparison of SUVs from PET/CT and PET/MR needs to be conducted carefully. (orig.)

  17. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI: feasibility, agreement and initial experience

    Both [18F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens mMR system 20 min after injection of 200 MBq FET. The MRI protocol included standard structural MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging for BV measurements. Maximal relative tumour FET uptake (TBRmax) and BV (rBVmax), and Dice coefficients were calculated to assess the quantitative and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes determined by FET PET, BV MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI. FET volume and TBRmax were higher in BV-positive than in BV-negative scans, and both VOLBV and rBVmax were higher in FET-positive than in FET-negative scans. TBRmax and rBVmax were positively correlated (R2 = 0.59, p < 0.001). FET and BV positivity were in agreement in only 26 of the 32 patients and in 42 of 63 lesions, and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes as assessed by the Dice coefficients was generally poor with median Dice coefficients exceeding 0.1 in less than half the patients positive on at least one modality for any pair of modalities. In 56 % of the patients susceptibility artefacts in DSC BV maps overlapped the tumour on MRI. The study demonstrated that although tumour volumes determined by BV MRI and FET PET were quantitatively correlated, their spatial congruence in a mixed population of treated glioma patients was generally poor, and the modalities did not provide the same information in this population of patients. Combined imaging of brain tumour metabolism and perfusion using

  18. Simultaneous evaluation of brain tumour metabolism, structure and blood volume using [{sup 18}F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET/MRI: feasibility, agreement and initial experience

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Hansen, Adam E.; Law, Ian [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Vibeke A. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans S. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Blegdamsvej, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsson, Henrik B.W. [Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Functional Imaging Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology Nuclear Medicine and PET, Glostrup (Denmark)

    2016-01-15

    Both [{sup 18}F]-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) PET and blood volume (BV) MRI supplement routine T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI in gliomas, but whether the two modalities provide identical or complementary information is unresolved. The aims of the study were to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous structural MRI, BV MRI and FET PET of gliomas using an integrated PET/MRI scanner and to assess the spatial and quantitative agreement in tumour imaging between BV MRI and FET PET. A total of 32 glioma patients underwent a 20-min static simultaneous PET/MRI acquisition on a Siemens mMR system 20 min after injection of 200 MBq FET. The MRI protocol included standard structural MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging for BV measurements. Maximal relative tumour FET uptake (TBR{sub max}) and BV (rBV{sub max}), and Dice coefficients were calculated to assess the quantitative and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes determined by FET PET, BV MRI and contrast-enhanced MRI. FET volume and TBR{sub max} were higher in BV-positive than in BV-negative scans, and both VOL{sub BV} and rBV{sub max} were higher in FET-positive than in FET-negative scans. TBR{sub max} and rBV{sub max} were positively correlated (R{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). FET and BV positivity were in agreement in only 26 of the 32 patients and in 42 of 63 lesions, and spatial congruence in the tumour volumes as assessed by the Dice coefficients was generally poor with median Dice coefficients exceeding 0.1 in less than half the patients positive on at least one modality for any pair of modalities. In 56 % of the patients susceptibility artefacts in DSC BV maps overlapped the tumour on MRI. The study demonstrated that although tumour volumes determined by BV MRI and FET PET were quantitatively correlated, their spatial congruence in a mixed population of treated glioma patients was generally poor, and the modalities did not provide the same information in this population of patients. Combined

  19. 3 Tesla proton MRI for the diagnosis of pneumonia/lung infiltrates in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Initial results in comparison to HRCT

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3 Tesla proton MRI for the assessment of pneumonia/lung infiltrates in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Material and methods: In a prospective study, 3 Tesla MRI was performed in 19 febrile neutropenic patients (5 women, 14 men; mean age 61 years ± 14.2; range 23–77 years). All patients underwent high-resolution CT less than 24 h prior to MRI. The MRI protocol (Magnetom Tim Trio, Siemens) included a T2-weighted HASTE sequence (TE/TR: 49 ms/∞, slice thickness 6 mm) and a high-resolution 3D VIBE sequence with an ultra-short TE < 1 ms (TE/TR 0.8/2.9 ms, slice thickness 2 mm). The VIBE sequence was examined before and after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoterate meglumine (Dotarem, Guerbet). The presence of pulmonary abnormalities, their location within the lung, and lesion type (nodules, consolidations, glass opacity areas) were analyzed by one reader and compared to the findings of HRCT, which was evaluated by a second independent radiologist who served as the reference standard. The findings were compared per lobe in each patient and rated as true positive (TP) findings if all three characteristics (presence, location, and lesion type) listed above were concordant to HRCT. Results: Pulmonary abnormalities were characterized by 3 Tesla MRI with a sensitivity of 82.3% and a specificity of 78.6%, resulting in an overall accuracy of 88% (NPV/PPV 66.7%/89.5%). In 51 lobes (19 of 19 patients), pulmonary abnormalities visualized by MR were judged to be concordant in their location and in the lesion type identified by both readers. In 22 lobes (11 of 19 patients), no abnormalities were present on either MR or HRCT (true negative). In 6 lobes (5 of 19 patients), ground glass opacity areas were detected on MRI but were not visible on HRCT (false positives). In 11 lobes (7 of 19 patients), MRI failed to detect ground glass opacity areas identified by HRCT. However, since the abnormalities were

  20. 3 Tesla proton MRI for the diagnosis of pneumonia/lung infiltrates in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukemia: Initial results in comparison to HRCT

    Attenberger, U.I., E-mail: ulrike.attenberger@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Morelli, J.N. [Scott and White Hospital, Texas A and M Health Sciences Center, Temple (United States); Henzler, T. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Buchheidt, D. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany); Department of Radiology, AKH Celle, Celle (Germany); Schoenberg, S.O.; Reichert, M. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3 Tesla proton MRI for the assessment of pneumonia/lung infiltrates in neutropenic patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Material and methods: In a prospective study, 3 Tesla MRI was performed in 19 febrile neutropenic patients (5 women, 14 men; mean age 61 years ± 14.2; range 23–77 years). All patients underwent high-resolution CT less than 24 h prior to MRI. The MRI protocol (Magnetom Tim Trio, Siemens) included a T2-weighted HASTE sequence (TE/TR: 49 ms/∞, slice thickness 6 mm) and a high-resolution 3D VIBE sequence with an ultra-short TE < 1 ms (TE/TR 0.8/2.9 ms, slice thickness 2 mm). The VIBE sequence was examined before and after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoterate meglumine (Dotarem, Guerbet). The presence of pulmonary abnormalities, their location within the lung, and lesion type (nodules, consolidations, glass opacity areas) were analyzed by one reader and compared to the findings of HRCT, which was evaluated by a second independent radiologist who served as the reference standard. The findings were compared per lobe in each patient and rated as true positive (TP) findings if all three characteristics (presence, location, and lesion type) listed above were concordant to HRCT. Results: Pulmonary abnormalities were characterized by 3 Tesla MRI with a sensitivity of 82.3% and a specificity of 78.6%, resulting in an overall accuracy of 88% (NPV/PPV 66.7%/89.5%). In 51 lobes (19 of 19 patients), pulmonary abnormalities visualized by MR were judged to be concordant in their location and in the lesion type identified by both readers. In 22 lobes (11 of 19 patients), no abnormalities were present on either MR or HRCT (true negative). In 6 lobes (5 of 19 patients), ground glass opacity areas were detected on MRI but were not visible on HRCT (false positives). In 11 lobes (7 of 19 patients), MRI failed to detect ground glass opacity areas identified by HRCT. However, since the abnormalities were

  1. Quantification of left ventricular function and mass in heart transplant recipients using dual-source CT and MRI: initial clinical experience

    The purpose of this study was to compare LV function and mass quantification derived from cardiac dual-source CT (DSCT) exams with those obtained by MRI in heart transplant recipients. Twelve heart transplant recipients who underwent cardiac DSCT and MRI examination were included. Double-oblique short-axis 8-mm slice thickness images were evaluated. Left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, cardiac output and myocardial mass were manually assessed for each patient by two blinded readers. A systematic overestimation of all left ventricular volumes by DSCT when compared with MRI was observed. Mean difference was 16.58±18.61 ml for EDV, 4.94±6.84 ml for ESV, 11.64±13.58 ml for SV and 5.73±1.14 l/min for CO. Slightly lower values for left ventricular ejection fraction with DSCT compared with MRI were observed (mean difference 0.34±3.18%, p=0.754). Correlation between DSCT and MRI for left ventricular mass was excellent (rho = 0.972). Bland and Altman plots and CCC indicated good agreement between DSCT and MRI left ventricular function and mass measurements. The interobserver correlation was good. In conclusion, DSCT accurately estimates left ventricular ejection fraction, volumes and mass in heart transplant recipients. (orig.)

  2. Whole-body [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT in the assessment of bone lesions in oncological patients: initial results

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Huebner, Michael; Grueneisen, Johannes; Nensa, Felix; Kuehl, Hilmar; Umutlu, Lale; Lauenstein, Thomas C. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp [University of Duesseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena; Rosenbaum-Krumme, Sandra [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Essen, Essen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    To compare [{sup 18} F]FDG PET/MRI with PET/CT for the assessment of bone lesions in oncologic patients. This prospective study included 67 patients with solid tumours scheduled for PET/CT with [{sup 18} F]FDG who also underwent a whole-body PET/MRI scan. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated by two readers regarding lesion conspicuity (four-point scale) and diagnostic confidence (five-point scale). Median scores were compared using the Wilcoxon test. Bone metastases were present in ten patients (15 %), and benign bone lesions in 15 patients (22 %). Bone metastases were predominantly localized in the pelvis (18 lesions, 38 %) and the spine (14 lesions, 29 %). Benign bone lesions were exclusively osteosclerotic and smaller than the metastases (mean size 6 mm vs. 23 mm). While PET/CT allowed identification of 45 of 48 bone metastases (94 %), PET/MRI allowed identification of all bone metastases (100 %). Conspicuity of metastases was high for both modalities with significantly better results using PET/MRI (p < 0.05). Diagnostic confidence in lesion detection was high for both modalities without a significant difference. In benign lesions, conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were significantly higher with PET/CT (p < 0.05). [{sup 18} F]FDG PET/MRI shows high potential for the assessment of bone metastases by offering superior lesion conspicuity when compared to PET/CT. In hypersclerotic, benign bone lesions PET/CT still sets the reference. (orig.)

  3. Whole-body [18F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT in the assessment of bone lesions in oncological patients: initial results

    To compare [18 F]FDG PET/MRI with PET/CT for the assessment of bone lesions in oncologic patients. This prospective study included 67 patients with solid tumours scheduled for PET/CT with [18 F]FDG who also underwent a whole-body PET/MRI scan. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated by two readers regarding lesion conspicuity (four-point scale) and diagnostic confidence (five-point scale). Median scores were compared using the Wilcoxon test. Bone metastases were present in ten patients (15 %), and benign bone lesions in 15 patients (22 %). Bone metastases were predominantly localized in the pelvis (18 lesions, 38 %) and the spine (14 lesions, 29 %). Benign bone lesions were exclusively osteosclerotic and smaller than the metastases (mean size 6 mm vs. 23 mm). While PET/CT allowed identification of 45 of 48 bone metastases (94 %), PET/MRI allowed identification of all bone metastases (100 %). Conspicuity of metastases was high for both modalities with significantly better results using PET/MRI (p 18 F]FDG PET/MRI shows high potential for the assessment of bone metastases by offering superior lesion conspicuity when compared to PET/CT. In hypersclerotic, benign bone lesions PET/CT still sets the reference. (orig.)

  4. Quantification of left ventricular function and mass in heart transplant recipients using dual-source CT and MRI: initial clinical experience

    Bastarrika, Gorka; Arraiza, Maria; Cecco, Carlo N. de; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Ubilla, Matias; Rabago, Gregorio [Clinica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain); Universita' di Roma ' ' Sapienza' ' -Ospedale Sant' Andrea, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Clinica Universitaria, Universidad de Navarra, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Pamplona (Spain)

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare LV function and mass quantification derived from cardiac dual-source CT (DSCT) exams with those obtained by MRI in heart transplant recipients. Twelve heart transplant recipients who underwent cardiac DSCT and MRI examination were included. Double-oblique short-axis 8-mm slice thickness images were evaluated. Left ventricular ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, cardiac output and myocardial mass were manually assessed for each patient by two blinded readers. A systematic overestimation of all left ventricular volumes by DSCT when compared with MRI was observed. Mean difference was 16.58{+-}18.61 ml for EDV, 4.94{+-}6.84 ml for ESV, 11.64{+-}13.58 ml for SV and 5.73{+-}1.14 l/min for CO. Slightly lower values for left ventricular ejection fraction with DSCT compared with MRI were observed (mean difference 0.34{+-}3.18%, p=0.754). Correlation between DSCT and MRI for left ventricular mass was excellent (rho = 0.972). Bland and Altman plots and CCC indicated good agreement between DSCT and MRI left ventricular function and mass measurements. The interobserver correlation was good. In conclusion, DSCT accurately estimates left ventricular ejection fraction, volumes and mass in heart transplant recipients. (orig.)

  5. MRI Scans

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  6. [18F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT for whole-body staging in patients with recurrent malignancies of the female pelvis: initial results

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [18F]FDG in recurrent ovarian and cervical cancer in comparison to PET/CT. A group of 19 patients with suspected recurrence of pelvic malignancies (ovarian cancer, 11 patients; cervical cancer, 8 patients) scheduled for an [18F]FDG PET/CT were subsequently enrolled for a PET/MRI. The scan protocol comprised: (1) a T1-W axial VIBE after contrast agent adminstration, (2) an axial T2-W HASTE, (3) a coronal TIRM, (4) an axial DWI, and dedicated MR sequences of the female pelvis including (5) a T1-W VIBE before contrast agent adminstration, (6) a sagittal T2-W TSE, and (7) a sagittal T1-W dynamic VIBE. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated separately by two readers regarding lesion count, lesion localization, lesion conspicuity (four-point scale), lesion characterization (benign/malignant/indeterminate) and diagnostic confidence (three-point scale). All available data (histology, prior examinations, PET/CT, PET/MRI, follow-up examinations) served as standard of reference. Median values were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Metastatic lesions were present in 16 of the 19 patients. A total of 78 lesions (malignant, 58; benign, 20) were described. Both PET/CT and PET/MRI allowed correct identification of all malignant lesions and provided equivalent conspicuity (3.86 ± 0.35 for PET/CT, 3.91 ± 0.28 for PET/MRI; p > 0.05). Diagnostic confidence was significantly higher for PET/MRI in malignant (p < 0.01) and benign lesions (p < 0.05). Both PET/CT and PET/MRI offer an equivalently high diagnostic value for recurrent pelvic malignancies. PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic confidence in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Considering the reduced radiation dose and superior lesion discrimination, PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative to PET/CT in the future. (orig.)

  7. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/MRI vs. PET/CT for whole-body staging in patients with recurrent malignancies of the female pelvis: initial results

    Beiderwellen, Karsten; Grueneisen, Johannes; Forsting, Michael; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Ruhlmann, Verena [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Buderath, Paul; Aktas, Bahriye [University Hospital Essen, University of Duisburg-Essen, Clinic for Obstetrics and Gynecology, Essen (Germany); Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Dusseldorf (Germany); Kraff, Oliver [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic potential of PET/MRI with [{sup 18}F]FDG in recurrent ovarian and cervical cancer in comparison to PET/CT. A group of 19 patients with suspected recurrence of pelvic malignancies (ovarian cancer, 11 patients; cervical cancer, 8 patients) scheduled for an [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT were subsequently enrolled for a PET/MRI. The scan protocol comprised: (1) a T1-W axial VIBE after contrast agent adminstration, (2) an axial T2-W HASTE, (3) a coronal TIRM, (4) an axial DWI, and dedicated MR sequences of the female pelvis including (5) a T1-W VIBE before contrast agent adminstration, (6) a sagittal T2-W TSE, and (7) a sagittal T1-W dynamic VIBE. The datasets (PET/CT, PET/MRI) were rated separately by two readers regarding lesion count, lesion localization, lesion conspicuity (four-point scale), lesion characterization (benign/malignant/indeterminate) and diagnostic confidence (three-point scale). All available data (histology, prior examinations, PET/CT, PET/MRI, follow-up examinations) served as standard of reference. Median values were compared using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Metastatic lesions were present in 16 of the 19 patients. A total of 78 lesions (malignant, 58; benign, 20) were described. Both PET/CT and PET/MRI allowed correct identification of all malignant lesions and provided equivalent conspicuity (3.86 ± 0.35 for PET/CT, 3.91 ± 0.28 for PET/MRI; p > 0.05). Diagnostic confidence was significantly higher for PET/MRI in malignant (p < 0.01) and benign lesions (p < 0.05). Both PET/CT and PET/MRI offer an equivalently high diagnostic value for recurrent pelvic malignancies. PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic confidence in the discrimination of benign and malignant lesions. Considering the reduced radiation dose and superior lesion discrimination, PET/MRI may serve as a powerful alternative to PET/CT in the future. (orig.)

  8. Initial experience with lung-MRI at 3.0 T: Comparison with CT and clinical data in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease activity

    Objectives: We evaluated the feasibility of highfield lung-MRI at 3.0 T. A comparison with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical data regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with diffuse lung disease was performed. Material and methods: Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (15 males, 6 females, 43-80 y) with diffuse lung diseases who underwent clinical work-up inclusive laboratory tests, lung-function tests and transbronchial biopsy. After routine helical CT (additional 12 HRCT) a lung-MRI (3.0 Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using a T2-weighted, cardiac and respiratory triggered Fast-Spinecho-Sequence (TE/TR = 80/1500-2500 ms, 22 transverse slices, 7/2 mm slice-thickness/-gap) was performed. A pneumologist classified the cases into two groups: A = temporary acute interstitial disease or chronic interstitial lung disease with acute episode or superimposed infection/B = burned out interstitial lung disease without activity. Two blinded CT-radiologists graded the cases in active/inactive disease on the basis of nine morphological criteria each. A third radiologist rated the MRI-cases as active/inactive, depending on the signal-intensities of lung tissues. Results: The pneumologist classified 14 patients into group A and 7 patients into group B. Using CT, 6 cases were classified as active, 15 cases as inactive disease. With MRI 12 cases were classified as active and 9 cases as inactive. In the complete group of 21 patients MRI decisions and CT decisions respectively were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/4/15 respectively 0/8/13 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 72% (MRI) respectively 62% (CT). In the subgroup of 12 cases including HRCT, MRI respectively CT were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/1/9 respectively 0/5/7 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 75% (MRI) respectively 58% (CT). Conclusion: Highfield MRI of the lung is feasible and performed slightly better compared to CT in the

  9. Initial experience with lung-MRI at 3.0 T: Comparison with CT and clinical data in the evaluation of interstitial lung disease activity

    Lutterbey, G. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany)]. E-mail: goetz.lutterbey@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Grohe, C. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J. [PHILIPS Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Falkenhausen, M. von [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Morakkabati, N. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Wattjes, M.P. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Manka, R. [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Bonn (Germany); Trog, D. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H. [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Objectives: We evaluated the feasibility of highfield lung-MRI at 3.0 T. A comparison with Computed Tomography (CT) and clinical data regarding the assessment of inflammatory activity in patients with diffuse lung disease was performed. Material and methods: Prospective evaluation of 21 patients (15 males, 6 females, 43-80 y) with diffuse lung diseases who underwent clinical work-up inclusive laboratory tests, lung-function tests and transbronchial biopsy. After routine helical CT (additional 12 HRCT) a lung-MRI (3.0 Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using a T2-weighted, cardiac and respiratory triggered Fast-Spinecho-Sequence (TE/TR = 80/1500-2500 ms, 22 transverse slices, 7/2 mm slice-thickness/-gap) was performed. A pneumologist classified the cases into two groups: A = temporary acute interstitial disease or chronic interstitial lung disease with acute episode or superimposed infection/B = burned out interstitial lung disease without activity. Two blinded CT-radiologists graded the cases in active/inactive disease on the basis of nine morphological criteria each. A third radiologist rated the MRI-cases as active/inactive, depending on the signal-intensities of lung tissues. Results: The pneumologist classified 14 patients into group A and 7 patients into group B. Using CT, 6 cases were classified as active, 15 cases as inactive disease. With MRI 12 cases were classified as active and 9 cases as inactive. In the complete group of 21 patients MRI decisions and CT decisions respectively were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/4/15 respectively 0/8/13 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 72% (MRI) respectively 62% (CT). In the subgroup of 12 cases including HRCT, MRI respectively CT were false positive/false negative/correct in 2/1/9 respectively 0/5/7 cases. Correct diagnoses were obtained in 75% (MRI) respectively 58% (CT). Conclusion: Highfield MRI of the lung is feasible and performed slightly better compared to CT in the

  10. In Vivo Correlation of Glucose Metabolism, Cell Density and Microcirculatory Parameters in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Initial Results Using Simultaneous PET/MRI.

    Matthias Gawlitza

    Full Text Available To demonstrate the feasibility of simultaneous acquisition of 18F-FDG-PET, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (T1w-DCE in an integrated simultaneous PET/MRI in patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC and to investigate possible correlations between these parameters.17 patients that had given informed consent (15 male, 2 female with biopsy-proven HNSCC underwent simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE. SUVmax, SUVmean, ADCmean, ADCmin and Ktrans, kep and ve were measured for each tumour and correlated using Spearman's ρ.Significant correlations were observed between SUVmean and Ktrans (ρ = 0.43; p ≤ 0.05; SUVmean and kep (ρ = 0.44; p ≤ 0.05; Ktrans and kep (ρ = 0.53; p ≤ 0.05; and between kep and ve (ρ = -0.74; p ≤ 0.01. There was a trend towards statistical significance when correlating SUVmax and ADCmin (ρ = -0.35; p = 0.08; SUVmax and Ktrans (ρ = 0.37; p = 0.07; SUVmax and kep (ρ = 0.39; p = 0.06; and ADCmean and ve (ρ = 0.4; p = 0.06.Simultaneous 18F-FDG-PET/MRI including DWI and T1w-DCE in patients with HNSCC is feasible and allows depiction of complex interactions between glucose metabolism, microcirculatory parameters and cellular density.

  11. Utility of Postmortem Autopsy via Whole-Body Imaging: Initial Observations Comparing MDCT and 3.0T MRI Findings with Autopsy Findings

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Kim, Dong Hun; Paik, Sang Hyun [National Institute of Scientific Investigation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We prospectively compared whole-body multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and 3.0T magnetic resonance (MR) images with autopsy findings. Five cadavers were subjected to whole-body, 16- channel MDCT and 3.0T MR imaging within two hours before an autopsy. A radiologist classified the MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings into major and minor findings, which were compared with autopsy findings. Most of the imaging findings, pertaining to head and neck, heart and vascular, chest, abdomen, spine, and musculoskeletal lesions, corresponded to autopsy findings. The causes of death that were determined on the bases of MDCT and 3.0T MRI findings were consistent with the autopsy findings in four of five cases. CT was useful in diagnosing fatal hemorrhage and pneumothorax, as well as determining the shapes and characteristics of the fractures and the direction of external force. MRI was effective in evaluating and tracing the route of a metallic object, soft tissue lesions, chronicity of hemorrhage, and bone bruises. A postmortem MDCT combined with MRI is a potentially powerful tool, providing noninvasive and objective measurements for forensic investigations

  12. Neuronal fiber pathway abnormalities in autism: An initial MRI diffusion tensor tracking study of hippocampo-fusiform and amygdalo-fusiform pathways

    Conturo, Thomas E.; Williams, Diane L.; Smith, Charles D.; GULTEPE, EREN; Akbudak, Erbil; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2008-01-01

    MRI diffusion-tensor tracking (DTT) was performed in 17 high-functioning adolescents/adults with autism and 17 pairwise-matched controls. White matter pathways involved in face processing were examined due to the relevance of face perception to the social symptoms of autism, and due to known behavioral and functional imaging findings in autism. The hippocampo-fusiform (HF) and amygdalo-fusiform (AF) pathways had normal size and shape but abnormal microstructure in the autism group. The right ...

  13. MRI assessment program. Consensus statement on clinical efficacy of MRI

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    This consensus statement is largely based on the experience gained at the MRI units at the four hospitals which have operated scanners in the MRI program. It reflects the considered opinion of the radiologists responsible for the MRI services at those hospitals. Account has also been taken of relevant overseas data. This collection of opinion relates particularly to comparison with other imaging modalities. The specific comments will require further consideration as technical developments with MRI become available, additional experience is gained with gadolinium contrast material and additional data are obtained on the influence of MRI on patient management. MRI, at present, is used either to improve diagnostic accuracy when other tests are negative or equivocal, when there is strong clinical suspicion of disease, or to improve surgical or other management planning when the diagnosis known. In some situations (eg syringomyelia, congenital spinal disease, posterior fossa/cerebello-pontine angle tumours) it may entirely replace other tests (eg myelography, air contrast, CT) which are substantially less accurate and/or more invasive. In other situations (eg hemispheric brain tumours, lumbar disc protrusions) when other tests, such as CT, can be as accurate, MRI is not usually or initially indicated because it is currently more expensive and of limited availability. However, balanced against this is the fact that it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionising radiation. It is also stressed that MRI images depend on complex, widely variable and, as yet, incompletely understood parameters. There is concern that this may result in false positive diagnoses, especially where MRI is used alone as a screening test, or used as the initial test. For several reasons (availability, cost, medical and diagnostic efficacy), the specific comments on indications for MRI presented are based upon the assumption that MRI is a tertiary and complementary imaging examination

  14. MRI assessment program. Consensus statement on clinical efficacy of MRI

    This consensus statement is largely based on the experience gained at the MRI units at the four hospitals which have operated scanners in the MRI program. It reflects the considered opinion of the radiologists responsible for the MRI services at those hospitals. Account has also been taken of relevant overseas data. This collection of opinion relates particularly to comparison with other imaging modalities. The specific comments will require further consideration as technical developments with MRI become available, additional experience is gained with gadolinium contrast material and additional data are obtained on the influence of MRI on patient management. MRI, at present, is used either to improve diagnostic accuracy when other tests are negative or equivocal, when there is strong clinical suspicion of disease, or to improve surgical or other management planning when the diagnosis known. In some situations (eg syringomyelia, congenital spinal disease, posterior fossa/cerebello-pontine angle tumours) it may entirely replace other tests (eg myelography, air contrast, CT) which are substantially less accurate and/or more invasive. In other situations (eg hemispheric brain tumours, lumbar disc protrusions) when other tests, such as CT, can be as accurate, MRI is not usually or initially indicated because it is currently more expensive and of limited availability. However, balanced against this is the fact that it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionising radiation. It is also stressed that MRI images depend on complex, widely variable and, as yet, incompletely understood parameters. There is concern that this may result in false positive diagnoses, especially where MRI is used alone as a screening test, or used as the initial test. For several reasons (availability, cost, medical and diagnostic efficacy), the specific comments on indications for MRI presented are based upon the assumption that MRI is a tertiary and complementary imaging examination

  15. Multi-modal MRI analysis with disease-specific spatial filtering: initial testing to predict mild cognitive impairment patients who convert to Alzheimer’s disease

    Kenichi eOishi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alterations of the gray and white matter have been identified in Alzheimer’s disease (AD by structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. However, whether the combination of these modalities could increase the diagnostic performance is unknown.Methods: Participants included 19 AD patients, 22 amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI patients, and 22 cognitively normal elderly (NC. The aMCI group was further divided into an aMCI-converter group (converted to AD dementia within three years, and an aMCI-stable group who did not convert in this time period. A T1-weighted image, a T2 map, and a DTI of each participant were normalized, and voxel-based comparisons between AD and NC groups were performed. Regions-of-interest, which defined the areas with significant differences between AD and NC, were created for each modality and named disease-specific spatial filters (DSF. Linear discriminant analysis was used to optimize the combination of multiple MRI measurements extracted by DSF to effectively differentiate AD from NC. The resultant DSF and the discriminant function were applied to the aMCI group to investigate the power to differentiate the aMCI-converters from the aMCI-stable patients. Results: The multi-modal approach with AD-specific filters led to a predictive model with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of 0.93, in differentiating aMCI-converters from aMCI-stable patients. This AUC was better than that of a single-contrast-based approach, such as T1-based morphometry or diffusion anisotropy analysis. Conclusion: The multi-modal approach has the potential to increase the value of MRI in predicting conversion from aMCI to AD.

  16. Comparison of FDG-PET, PET/CT and MRI for follow-up of colorectal liver metastases treated with radiofrequency ablation: Initial results

    Purpose: Morphologic imaging after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases is hampered by rim-like enhancement in the ablation margin, making the identification of local tumor progression (LTP) difficult. Follow-up with PET/CT is compared to follow-up with PET alone and MRI after RFA. Methods and materials: Sixteen patients showed 25 FDG-positive colorectal liver metastases in pre-interventional PET/CT. Post-interventional PET/CT was performed 24 h after ablation and was repeated after 1, 3 and 6 months and then every 6 months. PET and PET/CT data were compared with MR data sets acquired within 14 days before or after these time points. Either histological proof by biopsy or resection, or a combination of contrast-enhanced CT at fixed time points and clinical data served as a reference. Results: The 25 metastases showed a mean size of 20 mm and were treated with 39 RFA sessions. Ten lesions which developed LTP received a second round of RFA; four lesions received three rounds of treatment. The mean follow-up time was 22 months. Seventy-two PET/CT and 57 MR examinations were performed for follow-up. The accuracy and sensitivity for tumor detection was 86% and 76% for PET alone, 91% and 83% for PET/CT and 92% and 75% for MRI, respectively. Conclusions: In comparison to PET alone, PET/CT was significantly better for detecting LTP after RFA. There were no significant differences between MRI and PET/CT. These preliminary results, however, need further verification

  17. Value of SPIO for MRI of the bone marrow before and after total body irradiation (TBI) - initial investigations in an animal model

    Evaluation of the value of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO; Endorem trademark) for MRI-derived quantifications of the permeability of the blood-bone marrow barrier and the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system (RES) bone marrow cells before and after TBI. Methods: 12 New Zealand white rabbits underwent MRI of the lumbar spine and os sacrum using T1-weighted spinecho (SE) and T2-weighted Turbo-SE (TSE) sequences before and after injection of SPIO (Endorem trademark). Four animals each were examined without irradiation, after 4 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and after 12 Gy TBI. Changes in bone marrow signal intensities (SI) after contrast agent injection were quantified as Δ SI(%) = vertical stroke ((SIpost-SIpre)/SIpre) x 100% vertical stroke and these data were correlated with bone marrow histopathology. Results: Histopathology of the bone marrow revealed a radiation-induced decline of all hematopoetic cell lines. SPIO were phagocytosed by bone marrow RES cells and caused a significant bone marrow signal decline on postcontrast T2-weighted images (p 2-weighted images were significantly higher for the irradiated bone marrow as compared to non-irradiated controls (p 1-weighted images directly after contrast medium injection were not able to characterize the permeability of the blood-bone marrow barrier. Conclusion: Hematopoetic bone marrow can be labelled with SPIO. Irradiation does not impair the phagocytic activity of bone marrow RES cells. However, the bone marrow enhancement with SPIO is smaller as compared to previous results obtained by our group with USPIO. (orig.)

  18. Abdominal MRI

    ... kidney and ureter Insulinoma Islet of Langerhans tumor Medullary cystic disease Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Multiple endocrine neoplasia ( ... kidney and ureter Insulinoma Kidney stones Lymphofollicular ... kidney disease MRI Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Multiple endocrine ...

  19. Pediatric MRI

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  20. The use of high-pressure injector and its nursing care during 3 D dynamic enhanced MR portography%三维动态增强磁共振门静脉造影中高压注射器的使用及护理配合

    刘翠莲

    2010-01-01

    @@ 本文拟通过对120例使用专用的防磁双筒高压注射器行三维动态增强磁共振门静脉造影(3 D dynamic congtrast-enhanced MR portography,3 D DCE-MRP)患者的结果分析,探讨磁共振高压注射器在门静脉造影血管成像中的应用及护理配合,并对其使用过程中的要点和护理进行讨论.

  1. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  2. MRI EVALUATION OF SUPRATENTORIAL TUMOURS

    Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumours represents 1.7% of all cancers and contributes 1.8% of all cancer deaths. Of all the brain tumours 80% are supratentorial.1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an important modality, having higher sensitivity for detecting intracranial pathology. Multiplanar imaging is possible with MRI which helps in detection, localization and characterization of the lesion. The MRI examination has helped in early diagnosis, accurate localization of the tumour with prompt initiation of appropriate medical or surgical therapy. Recent advances like Magnetic Resonance (MR spectroscopy, MR fluoroscopy with stereotactic guided biopsy have revolutionized the role of MRI in study of intracranial tumours.

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important ... MRI is often used for diagnosis or for monitoring disease. For example, if someone is having severe ...

  4. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  5. Initial results of shoulder MRI in external rotation after primary shoulder dislocation and after immobilization in external rotation; Initiale Ergebnisse der Schulter-MRT in Aussenrotation bei primaerer Schulterluxation und nach Ruhigstellung in Aussenrotation

    Pennekamp, W.; Nicolas, V. [Klinikum Bergmannsheil, Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer diagnostische unter interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Gekle, C.; Seybold, D. [Klinikum Bergmannsheil, Bochum Univ. (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik

    2006-04-15

    Purpose: A change in the strategy for treating primary anterior traumatic dislocation of the shoulder has occurred. To date, brief fixation of internal rotation via a Gilchrist bandage has been used. Depending on the patient's age, a redislocation is seen in up to 90% of cases. This is due to healing of the internally rotated labrum-ligament tear in an incorrect position. In the case of external rotation of the humerus, better repositioning of the labrum ligament complex is achieved. Using MRI of the shoulder in external rotation, the extent of the improved labrum-ligament adjustment can be documented, and the indication of immobilization of the shoulder in external rotation can be derived. The aim of this investigation is to describe the degree of position changing of the labrum-ligament tear in internal and external rotation. Materials and Methods: 10 patients (9 male, 1 female, mean age 30.4 years, range 15-43 years) with a primary anterior dislocation of the shoulder without hyper laxity of the contra lateral side and labrum-ligament lesion substantiated by MRI were investigated using a standard shoulder MRI protocol (PD-TSE axial fs, PD-TSE coronar fs, T2-TSE sagittal, T1-TSE coronar) by an axial PD-TSE sequence in internal and external rotation. The dislocation and separation of the anterior labrum-ligament complex were measured. The shoulders were immobilized in 10 external rotation for 3 weeks. After 6 weeks a shoulder MRI in internal rotation was performed. Results: In all patients there was a significantly better position of the labrum-ligament complex of the inferior rim in external rotation, because of the tension of the ventral capsule and the subscapular muscle. In the initial investigation, the separation of the labrum-ligament complex in internal rotation was 0.44{+-}0.27 mm and the dislocation was 0.45{+-}0.33 mm. In external rotation the separation was 0.01{+-}0.19 mm and the dislocation was -0.08{+-}0.28 mm. After 6 weeks of immobilization

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging of normal-appearing temporal white matter on conventional MRI in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after irradiation therapy: initial experience

    Objective: To detect radiation-induced changes of temporal lobe normal-appearing white matter on conventional MRI following radiation therapy (RT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: The clinical and imaging features of 75 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were retrospectively analyzed, all patients were confirmed by biopsy. All patients performed conventional MRI and Diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) examinations, and there was no abnormal finding on conventional MRI. Eighteen patients without radiotherapy were selected as the control group and fifty-seven patients with radiotherapy were as the experimental group. We divided the experimental group into five subgroups based on completion time of RT: group 1 (less than 3 months, n=16), group 2 (3 to 6 months, n=12), group 3 (6 to 9 months; n=10), group 4 (9 to 12 months, n=8), and group 5 (more than 12 months, n=11). The mean diffusivity (MD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (λ⊥) and axial diffusivity (k ‖) were calculated in bilateral temporal lobe.One-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA) test was used for comparison among groups. Results: The mean λ⊥ values of the control group and experimental groups (group 1-5) after radiotherapy were (6.075 ± 0.341) × 10-4 (6.700±0.379) × 10-4,(6.976 ±0.527) ×10-4,(6.621 ±0.388) ×10-4,(6.751 ±0.460) ×10-4,(6.222 ±0.256) × 10-4 mm2/s, respectively. The mean λ ‖ values of the control group and experimental groups were (12.524±0.713) ×10-4, (11.764 ±0.574) ×l0-4, (11.842±0.471) ×10-4, (11.569 ± 0.552) × 10-4, (12.050 ±0.614) × 10-4, (12.100 ±0.529) × 10-4 mm2/s, respectively. The mean FA values of the control group and experimental groups were 0.452 ± 0.030, 0.379 ± 0.028, 0.382 ± 0.028, 0.389 ± 0.032, 0.388 ± 0.022, 0.423 ± 0.232, respectively. The three indicators were significantly different among groups (F=10.485, 4.625, 16.539, respectively, P<0.05). Multiple

  7. Portable MRI

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  8. Portable MRI

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  9. Fetal MRI

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  10. Fetal MRI

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  11. MRI zoo

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard proced...

  12. Battlefield MRI

    Espy, Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  13. Situs anomalies on prenatal MRI

    Objective: Situs anomalies refer to an abnormal organ arrangement, which may be associated with severe errors of development. Due regard being given to prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US), this study sought to demonstrate the in utero visualization of situs anomalies on MRI, compared to US. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 12 fetuses with situs anomalies depicted on fetal MRI using prenatal US as a comparison modality. With an MRI standard protocol, the whole fetus was assessed for anomalies, with regard to the position and morphology of the following structures: heart; venous drainage and aorta; stomach and intestines; liver and gallbladder; and the presence and number of spleens. Results: Situs inversus totalis was found in 3/12 fetuses; situs inversus with levocardia in 1/12 fetuses; situs inversus abdominis in 2/12 fetuses; situs ambiguous with polysplenia in 3/12 fetuses, and with asplenia in 2/12 fetuses; and isolated dextrocardia in 1/12 fetuses. Congenital heart defects (CHDs), vascular anomalies, and intestinal malrotations were the most frequent associated malformations. In 5/12 cases, the US and MRI diagnoses were concordant. Compared to US, in 7/12 cases, additional MRI findings specified the situs anomaly, but CHDs were only partially visualized in six cases. Conclusions: Our initial MRI results demonstrate the visualization of situs anomalies and associated malformations in utero, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Using a standard protocol, MRI may identify additional findings, compared to US, which confirm and specify the situs anomaly, but, with limited MRI visualization of fetal CHDs.

  14. High-resolution black-blood MRI findings of carotid atherosclerotic plaque in initial and recurrent acute ischemic stroke: a comparison study

    Objective: To investigate MR imaging characteristics of carotid plaque in patients with first-time and recurrent acute ischemic stroke. Methods: During the period from Aug. 2009 to Nov. 2010, high-resolution black-blood MR scanning of carotid was carried out in 89 patients with recently-developed acute ischemic stroke, which included initial attack (n=51) and recurrent attack (n=38). The ipsilateral responsible carotid arteries were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. The carotid plaque burden and compositional features were compared between the initial and recurrent stroke patients. Results: Of the 89 patients, 51 had first-time stroke and 38 had recurrent stroke. The mean WA, WT and PWV were greater in patients with recurrent stroke than those in patients with first-time stroke (P<0.05). Compared with the first- time stroke patients, the recurrent stroke patients had significantly higher prevalence of calcification (44.7% versus 23.5%, P=0.035) and larger volume of LRNC as well (179.14±254.81 mm2 versus 71.65± 111.15 mm2, P=0.027). IPH and/or fibrous cap rupture were observed in 15.8% of patients with recurrent stroke and only 3.9% of patients with first-time stroke. Conclusion: Carotid plaques in patients with recurrent ischemic stroke are significantly worse than those in patients with first-time stroke. Monitoring the carotid plaques in patients with initial stroke by MR scanning may be helpful for the prevention of recurrent stroke. (authors)

  15. Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy

    Highlights: • Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases (NPV: 100%). • Malignancy rate in the BI-RADS 0 population is substantial with 13.5%. • Breast MRI used as a problem-solving tool reliably excludes malignancy. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of breast MRI if used as a problem-solving tool in BI-RADS 0 cases. Material and methods: In this IRB-approved, single-center study, 687 women underwent high-resolution-3D, dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2012 and December 2012. Of these, we analyzed 111 consecutive patients (mean age, 51 ± 12 years; range, 20–83 years) categorized as BI-RADS 0. Breast MRI findings were stratified by clinical presentations, conventional imaging findings, and breast density. MRI results were compared to the reference standard, defined as histopathology or an imaging follow-up of at least 1 year. Results: One hundred eleven patients with BI-RADS 0 conventional imaging findings revealed 30 (27%) mammographic masses, 57 (51.4%) mammographic architectural distortions, five (4.5%) mammographic microcalcifications, 17 (15.3%) ultrasound-only findings, and two palpable findings without imaging correlates. There were 15 true-positive, 85 true-negative, 11 false-positive, and zero false-negative breast MRI findings, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of 100% (15/15), 88.5% (85/96), 57.7% (15/26), and 100% (85/85), respectively. Breast density and reasons for referral had no significant influence on the diagnostic performance of breast MRI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Breast MRI reliably excludes malignancy in conventional BI-RADS 0 cases resulting in a NPV of 100% (85/85) and a PPV of 57.7% (15/26)

  16. Hepatocellular carcinoma: perfusion quantification with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Taouli, B.; Johnson, R.S.; Hajdu, C.H.; Oei, M.T.H.; Merad, M.; Yee, H.; Rusinek, H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of our study was to report our initial experience with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) for perfusion quantification of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and surrounding liver.DCE-MRI of the liver was prospectively performed on 31 patients with HCC (male-female ratio, 26:5; mean ag

  17. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  18. What Is Chest MRI?

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  19. Knee MRI scan

    MRI - knee ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ... less anxious. Your provider may suggest an "open" MRI, in which the machine is not as close ...

  20. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    Weber-Donat, G.; Potet, J.; Baccialone, J.; Teriitehau, C. [Military Hospital Percy, Radiology Department, Clamart (France); Amabile, J.C.; Laroche, P. [Military Hospital Percy, Army Institute of Radioprotection, Clamart (France); Lahutte-Auboin, M. [Military Hospital Val-de-Grace, Radiology Department, Paris (France); Bey, E. [Military Hospital Percy, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Department, Clamart (France)

    2012-12-15

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  1. MRI assessment of local acute radiation syndrome

    To describe local acute radiation syndrome and its radiological imaging characteristics. We performed a retrospective study of patients who had suffered skin and deeper radiation damage who were investigated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared the clinical findings, C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and MRI results. A total of 22 MRI examinations were performed between 2005 and 2010 in 7 patients; 6 patients had increased CRP levels and MRI abnormalities. They were treated by surgery and local cellular therapy. One patient had no CRP or MRI abnormalities, and had a spontaneous good outcome. Eighteen abnormal MR examinations demonstrated high STIR signal and/or abnormal enhancement in the dermis and muscle tissues. Three MRI examinations demonstrated skeletal abnormalities, consistent with radionecrosis. The four normal MRI examinations were associated only with minor clinical manifestations such as pain and pigmentation disorders. MRI seems to be a useful and promising imaging investigation in radiation burns management i.e. initial lesion evaluation, treatment evaluation and complication diagnosis. MRI findings correlated perfectly with clinical stage and no false negative examinations were obtained. In particular, the association between normal MRI and low CRP level seems to be related to good outcome without specific treatment. (orig.)

  2. Lagrangian structures, integrability and chaos for 3D dynamical equations

    Bustamante, M D; Bustamante, Miguel D.; Hojman, Sergio A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we consider the general setting for constructing Action Principles for three-dimensional first order autonomous equations. We present the results for some integrable and non-integrable cases of the Lotka-Volterra equation, and we show Lagrangian descriptions which are valid for systems satisfying Shil'nikov criteria on the existence of strange attractors, though chaotic behavior or homoclinic orbits have not been verified up to now. The Euler-Lagrange equations we get for these systems usually present "time reparameterization" symmetry, though other kinds of invariance may be found according to the kernel of the associated symplectic 2-form. The formulation of a Hamiltonian structure (Poisson brackets and Hamiltonians) for these systems from the Lagrangian viewpoint leads to a method of finding new constants of the motion starting from known ones, which is applied to some systems found in the literature known to possess a constant of the motion, to find the other and thus showing their integrabi...

  3. Introducing a new 3D dynamical model for barred galaxies

    Jung, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The regular or chaotic dynamics of an analytical realistic three dimensional model composed of a spherically symmetric central nucleus, a bar and a flat disk is investigated. For describing the properties of the bar we introduce a new simple dynamical model and we explore the influence on the character of orbits of all the involved parameters of it, such as the mass and the scale length of the bar, the major semi-axis and the angular velocity of the bar as well as the energy. Regions of phase space with ordered and chaotic motion are identified in dependence on these parameters and for breaking the rotational symmetry. First we study in detail the dynamics in the invariant plane $z = p_z = 0$ using the Poincar\\'e map as a basic tool and then we study the full 3 dimensional case using the SALI method as principal tool for distinguishing between order and chaos. We also present strong evidence obtained through the numerical simulations that our new bar model can realistically describe the formation and the evol...

  4. Lagrangian structures, integrability and chaos for 3D dynamical equations

    In this paper, we consider the general setting for constructing action principles for three-dimensional first-order autonomous equations. We present the results for some integrable and non-integrable cases of the Lotka-Volterra equation, and show Lagrangian descriptions which are valid for systems satisfying Shil'nikov criteria on the existence of strange attractors, though chaotic behaviour has not been verified up to now. The Euler-Lagrange equations we get for these systems usually present 'time reparametrization' invariance, though other kinds of invariance may be found according to the kernel of the associated symplectic 2-form. The formulation of a Hamiltonian structure (Poisson brackets and Hamiltonians) for these systems from the Lagrangian viewpoint leads to a method of finding new constants of the motion starting from known ones, which is applied to some systems found in the literature known to possess a constant of the motion, to find the other and thus showing their integrability. In particular, we show that the so-called ABC system is completely integrable if it possesses one constant of the motion

  5. Contribution of MRI in lung cancer staging

    A. Khalil; Bouhela, T; Carette, MF

    2013-01-01

    Major advances in the WB-MRI in the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with lung cancer have been performed in recent years. Multicentric studies using different magnet systems are necessary to confirm these promising results.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  7. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona;

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9...

  8. Competitive advantage of PET/MRI

    Multimodality imaging has made great strides in the imaging evaluation of patients with a variety of diseases. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is now established as the imaging modality of choice in many clinical conditions, particularly in oncology. While the initial development of combined PET/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) was in the preclinical arena, hybrid PET/MR scanners are now available for clinical use. PET/MRI combines the unique features of MRI including excellent soft tissue contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, fMRI and other specialized sequences as well as MR spectroscopy with the quantitative physiologic information that is provided by PET. Most evidence for the potential clinical utility of PET/MRI is based on studies performed with side-by-side comparison or software-fused MRI and PET images. Data on distinctive utility of hybrid PET/MRI are rapidly emerging. There are potential competitive advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT. In general, PET/MRI may be preferred over PET/CT where the unique features of MRI provide more robust imaging evaluation in certain clinical settings. The exact role and potential utility of simultaneous data acquisition in specific research and clinical settings will need to be defined. It may be that simultaneous PET/MRI will be best suited for clinical situations that are disease-specific, organ-specific, related to diseases of the children or in those patients undergoing repeated imaging for whom cumulative radiation dose must be kept as low as reasonably achievable. PET/MRI also offers interesting opportunities for use of dual modality probes. Upon clear definition of clinical utility, other important and practical issues related to business operational model, clinical workflow and reimbursement will also be resolved

  9. MRI of car occupants with whiplash injury

    Our purpose was to document and investigate the prognostic significance of features seen on MRI of patients with whiplash injury following relatively minor road traffic crashes. MRI was obtained shortly and at 6 months after the crash using a 0.5 T imager. The images were assessed independently by two radiologists for evidence of fracture or other injury; loss of lordosis and spondylosis were also recorded. Clinical examinations were used to assess the status of patients initially and at 6 months. The results of the independent MRI and clinical investigations were then examined for association using statistical tests. Initial MRI was performed on 29 patients, of whom 19 had repeat studies at 6 months; 48 examinations were thus examined. Apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, only one abnormality was detected: an intramedullary lesion consistent with a small cyst or syrinx. There were no statistically significant associations between the outcome of injury and spondylosis or loss of lordosis. No significant changes were found when comparing the initial and follow-up MRI. It appears that MRI of patients with relatively less severe whiplash symptoms reveals a low frequency of abnormalities, apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, which have little short-term prognostic value. Routine investigation of such patients with MRI is not justified in view of the infrequency of abnormalities detected, the lack of prognostic value and the high cost of the procedure. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. MRI of car occupants with whiplash injury

    Voyvodic, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Dolinis, J. [National Injury Surveillance Unit, Bedford Park, SA (Australia)]|[National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Moore, V.M. [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Ryan, G.A. [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia); Slavotinek, J.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park, SA (Australia); Whyte, A.M. [Ashford Hospital Specialist Centre, SA (Australia); Hoile, R.D. [Ashford Hospital Specialist Centre, SA (Australia); Taylor, G.W. [National Health and Medical Research Council Road Accident Research Unit, Univ. of Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to document and investigate the prognostic significance of features seen on MRI of patients with whiplash injury following relatively minor road traffic crashes. MRI was obtained shortly and at 6 months after the crash using a 0.5 T imager. The images were assessed independently by two radiologists for evidence of fracture or other injury; loss of lordosis and spondylosis were also recorded. Clinical examinations were used to assess the status of patients initially and at 6 months. The results of the independent MRI and clinical investigations were then examined for association using statistical tests. Initial MRI was performed on 29 patients, of whom 19 had repeat studies at 6 months; 48 examinations were thus examined. Apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, only one abnormality was detected: an intramedullary lesion consistent with a small cyst or syrinx. There were no statistically significant associations between the outcome of injury and spondylosis or loss of lordosis. No significant changes were found when comparing the initial and follow-up MRI. It appears that MRI of patients with relatively less severe whiplash symptoms reveals a low frequency of abnormalities, apart from spondylosis and loss of lordosis, which have little short-term prognostic value. Routine investigation of such patients with MRI is not justified in view of the infrequency of abnormalities detected, the lack of prognostic value and the high cost of the procedure. (orig.). With 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Initial clinical results of simultaneous {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI in comparison to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with head and neck cancer

    Kubiessa, K.; Gawlitza, M.; Kuehn, A.; Fuchs, J.; Kahn, T.; Stumpp, P. [University Hospital of Leipzig, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Purz, S.; Steinhoff, K.G.; Sabri, O.; Kluge, R. [University Hospital of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Boehm, A. [University Hospital of Leipzig, ENT Department, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic capability of simultaneous {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI compared to {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as well as their single components in head and neck cancer patients. In a prospective study 17 patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for staging or follow-up and an additional {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MRI scan with whole-body imaging and dedicated examination of the neck. MRI, CT and PET images as well as PET/MRI and PET/CT examinations were evaluated independently and in a blinded fashion by two reader groups. Results were compared with the reference standard (final diagnosis determined in consensus using all available data including histology and follow-up). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. A total of 23 malignant tumours were found with the reference standard. PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 82.7 %, a specificity of 87.3 %, a PPV of 73.2 % and a NPV of 92.4 %. Corresponding values for PET/MRI were 80.5, 88.2, 75.6 and 92.5 %. No statistically significant difference in diagnostic capability could be found between PET/CT and PET/MRI. Evaluation of the PET part from PET/CT revealed highest sensitivity of 95.7 %, and MRI showed best specificity of 96.4 %. There was a high inter-rater agreement in all modalities (Cohen's kappa 0.61-0.82). PET/MRI of patients with head and neck cancer yielded good diagnostic capability, similar to PET/CT. Further studies on larger cohorts to prove these first results seem justified. (orig.)

  12. Validation of Continuously Tagged MRI for the Measurement of Dynamic 3D Skeletal Muscle Tissue Deformation

    Moerman, Kevin M; Simms, Ciaran K; Lamerichs, Rolf M; Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J

    2016-01-01

    A SPAMM tagged MRI methodology is presented allowing continuous (3.3-3.6 Hz) sampling of 3D dynamic soft tissue deformation using non-segmented 3D acquisitions. The 3D deformation is reconstructed by the combination of 3 mutually orthogonal tagging directions, thus requiring only 3 repeated motion cycles. In addition a fully automatic post-processing framework is presented employing Gabor scale-space and filter-bank analysis for tag extrema segmentation and triangulated surface fitting aided by Gabor filter bank derived surface normals. Deformation is derived following tracking of tag surface triplet triangle intersections. The dynamic deformation measurements were validated using indentation tests (~20 mm deep at 12 mm/s) on a silicone gel soft tissue phantom containing contrasting markers which provide a reference measure of deformation. In addition, the techniques were evaluated in-vivo for dynamic skeletal muscle tissue deformation measurement during indentation of the biceps region of the upper arm in a ...

  13. Improved visualization of delayed perfusion in lung MRI

    Introduction: The investigation of pulmonary perfusion by three-dimensional (3D) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was proposed recently. Subtraction images are generated for clinical evaluation, but temporal information is lost and perfusion defects might therefore be masked in this process. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a simple analysis strategy and classification for 3D-DCE-MRI perfusion datasets in the lung without omitting the temporal information. Materials and methods: Pulmonary perfusion measurements were performed in patients with different lung diseases using a 1.5 T MR-scanner with a time-resolved 3D-GRE pulse sequence. 25 3D-volumes were acquired after iv-injection of 0.1 mmol/kg KG Gadolinium-DTPA. Three parameters were determined for each pixel: (1) peak enhancement Sn,max normalized to the arterial input function to detect regions of reduced perfusion; (2) time between arterial peak enhancement in the large pulmonary artery and tissue peak enhancement τ to visualize regions with delayed bolus onset; and (3) ratio R = Sn,max/τ was calculated to visualize impaired perfusion, irrespectively of whether related to reduced or delayed perfusion. Results: A manual selection of peak perfusion images is not required. Five different types of perfusion can be found: (1) normal perfusion; (2) delayed non-reduced perfusion; (3) reduced non-delayed perfusion; (4) reduced and delayed perfusion; and (5) no perfusion. Types II and IV could not be seen in subtraction images since the temporal information is necessary for this purpose. Conclusions: The analysis strategy in this study allows for a simple and observer-independent visualization and classification of impaired perfusion in dynamic contrast-enhanced pulmonary perfusion MRI by using the temporal information of the datasets.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  15. Interventional MRI: update

    Lufkin, R.B. [Department of Radiology, University of California Los Angeles, School of Medicine, 10 833 Le Comte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1721 (United States); Gronemeyer, D.H.W.; Seibel, R.M.M. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Computerscience, University Witten/Herdecke (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Interventional MRI is in its early stages of development. Nevertheless, the design of new interventional MRI scanners that allow maximum direct access to the patient combined with the development of new interventional MRI pulse sequences and localization systems, means that the archetypal operating rooms of the 21st century may well contain dedicated interventional MRI units for combined radiological and surgical procedures. The present article looks at the state of interventional MRI today and looks ahead to what may be forthcoming in the not-too-distant future. After briefly discussing the instrumentation necessary for practical interventional MRI, the article will go on to describe a number of different approaches to, and clinical applications for, interventional MRI. The use of MRI in guiding and controlling tumor ablation, aspiration cytology and surgical biopsy of different body parts is described. (orig.) With 13 figs., 1 tab., 114 refs.

  16. Abdominal MRI scan

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  17. Neurosarcoidosis with unusual MRI findings

    Handler, M.S. (Dept. of Pathology and Oncology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States)); Johnson, L.M. (Dept. of Neurology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States)); Dick, A.R. (Dept. of Neurology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States)); Batnitzky, S. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Kansas Univ. Medical Center, KS (United States))

    1993-02-01

    This 53-year-old white male presented with a 4-month-history of weakness and pain. Despite an initial partial response to steroid therapy, his neurologic deterioration progressed culminating in paraparesis, paresthesias, urinary incontinence, altered mentation and a 20 Ib weight loss. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI study showed a pattern suggestive of perivascular involvement. A subsequent cerebral biopsy was diagnostic for neurosarcoidosis. (orig.)

  18. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with the standardized uptake value (SUV) in hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lesions. Initial results

    Purpose: To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in non-small cell lung cancer lesions with standardized uptake values (SUV) derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (FDG-PET/MRI) and those derived from FDG-PET/CT. Materials and Methods: In 18 consecutive patients with histologically proven NSCLC (17 men, 1 woman; mean age, 61 ± 12 years), whole-body FDG-PET/MRI was performed after whole-body FDG-PET/CT. Regions of interest (ROI) encompassing the entire primary tumor were drawn into FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MR images to determine the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUVmax; SUVmean) and into ADC parameter maps to assess mean ADC values. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to compare SUV and ADC values. Results: The SUVmax of NSCLC was 12.3 ± 4.8 [mean ± SD], and the SUVmean was 7.2 ± 2.8 as assessed by FDG-PET/MRI. The SUVmax and SUVmean derived from FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MRI correlated well (R = 0.93; p mean of the pulmonary tumors was 187.9 ± 88.8 x 10-5mm2/s [mean ± SD]. The ADCmean exhibited a significant inverse correlation with the SUVmax (R = -0.72; p < 0.001) as well as with the SUVmean assessed by FDG-PET/MRI (R = -0.71; p < 0.001). Conclusion: This simultaneous PET/MRI study corroborates the assumed significant inverse correlation between increased metabolic activity on FDG-PET and restricted diffusion on DWI in NSCLC. (orig.)

  19. MRI of radiographically occult ischial apophyseal avulsions

    Acute avulsions of unossified ischial apophyses in children may go undetected on radiography. Therapy includes rest and rehabilitation; however, substantial displacement may require surgery. Our purpose is to illustrate the utility of MRI in the detection of these radiographically occult injuries in skeletally immature children. This retrospective study of more than 5 years included children with ischial avulsions who were evaluated with both radiography and MRI within 3 weeks of acute injury. Initially, radiographs were reviewed to identify those children with unossified ischial apophyses. Subsequently, their MRI examinations were assessed for physeal disruption, bone/soft tissue edema, periosteal/perichondrial elevation and disruption. Initial and follow-up radiographs (if available) were reviewed. Patient age, symptoms and offending activity were determined from clinical records. Five children met inclusion criteria. All initial radiographs were normal. MRI showed: edema (n = 5), periosteal elevation (n = 4), periosteal/perichondrial disruption (n = 4), >5.5 mm displacement (n = 0). Follow-up radiographs in two children (2 and 2.5 months from MRI) showed osseous ischial irregularity. The apophyses remained unossified. Acute unossified ischial apophyseal avulsions in children may be radiographically undetected. In the setting of correlative clinical symptoms, MRI can be used to identify these injuries and to help direct appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  20. MRI of radiographically occult ischial apophyseal avulsions

    Meyers, Arthur B. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Children' s Hospital of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Laor, Tal; Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Anton, Christopher G. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Acute avulsions of unossified ischial apophyses in children may go undetected on radiography. Therapy includes rest and rehabilitation; however, substantial displacement may require surgery. Our purpose is to illustrate the utility of MRI in the detection of these radiographically occult injuries in skeletally immature children. This retrospective study of more than 5 years included children with ischial avulsions who were evaluated with both radiography and MRI within 3 weeks of acute injury. Initially, radiographs were reviewed to identify those children with unossified ischial apophyses. Subsequently, their MRI examinations were assessed for physeal disruption, bone/soft tissue edema, periosteal/perichondrial elevation and disruption. Initial and follow-up radiographs (if available) were reviewed. Patient age, symptoms and offending activity were determined from clinical records. Five children met inclusion criteria. All initial radiographs were normal. MRI showed: edema (n = 5), periosteal elevation (n = 4), periosteal/perichondrial disruption (n = 4), >5.5 mm displacement (n = 0). Follow-up radiographs in two children (2 and 2.5 months from MRI) showed osseous ischial irregularity. The apophyses remained unossified. Acute unossified ischial apophyseal avulsions in children may be radiographically undetected. In the setting of correlative clinical symptoms, MRI can be used to identify these injuries and to help direct appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  1. MRI of Stroke Recovery

    Jiang, Quan; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2009-01-01

    MRI is a vital tool for the measurement of acute stroke and has been used to visualize changes in activation patterns during stroke recovery. There is emerging interest on using MRI to monitor the structural substrates of spontaneous recovery and neurorestorative treatment of stroke. In this review, we describe the use of MRI and its associated challenges to measure vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to spontaneous and therapy-induced stroke recovery. We demonstrate that MRI methodo...

  2. MRI in cranial tuberculosis

    Just, M.; Higer, H.P.; Betting, O.; Bockenheimer, S.; Pfannenstiel, P.

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of the high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. (orig.)

  3. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  4. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.;

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  5. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  6. Getting an MRI

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en ... Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  7. Getting an MRI

    Full Text Available ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en ... Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  8. Getting an MRI

    Full Text Available ... Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  9. Leptomeningeal metastasis: a CT and MRI study

    We evaluated 35 patients with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) that was proved by repeated positive cytology (33 patients) and/or autopsy (10 patients) with T1-weighted Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI and contrast-enhanced CT. The patients (20 women and 15 men) ranged in age from 5-77 years (mean 56 years). Tumour histology included 26 carcinomas, 1 sarcoma, 6 leucaemias, 1 medulloblastoma and 1 primary CNS lymphoma. Intracranial abnormalities were noted in 58% of cases by CT and 88% by MRI, and included hydrocephalus, meningeal or ependymal enhancement, subarachnoidal or intraparenchymal nodules. Leptomeningeal metastasis was detected by MRI in 13 of 17 examined patients, including the three cases with a positive CT. It was proved that MRI is equal or superior to CT in demonstrating meningeal or ependymal enhancement and quantifying enhanced subarachnoidal or parenchymal nodules. However, in the evaluation of leptomeningeal metastasis both modalities had a high incidence of false-negative studies, 89% (31 of 35) by CT and 24% (4 of 17) by MRI. In contrast, two patients with initially negative cytology had pathological MRI findings. Our data indicate that Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is the preferred imaging modality in leptomeningeal metastasis, and suggest that CT does not add significant additional information. However, LM is primarily a histological diagnosis by detecting tumour cells in the cerebrospinal fluid. (orig.)

  10. Leptomeningeal metastasis: a CT and MRI study

    Oschmann, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Giessen (Germany); Bauer, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Giessen (Germany); Kaps, M. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Giessen (Germany); Trittmacher, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Giessen (Germany); Dorndorf, W. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Giessen (Germany)

    1994-08-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) that was proved by repeated positive cytology (33 patients) and/or autopsy (10 patients) with T1-weighted Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI and contrast-enhanced CT. The patients (20 women and 15 men) ranged in age from 5-77 years (mean 56 years). Tumour histology included 26 carcinomas, 1 sarcoma, 6 leucaemias, 1 medulloblastoma and 1 primary CNS lymphoma. Intracranial abnormalities were noted in 58% of cases by CT and 88% by MRI, and included hydrocephalus, meningeal or ependymal enhancement, subarachnoidal or intraparenchymal nodules. Leptomeningeal metastasis was detected by MRI in 13 of 17 examined patients, including the three cases with a positive CT. It was proved that MRI is equal or superior to CT in demonstrating meningeal or ependymal enhancement and quantifying enhanced subarachnoidal or parenchymal nodules. However, in the evaluation of leptomeningeal metastasis both modalities had a high incidence of false-negative studies, 89% (31 of 35) by CT and 24% (4 of 17) by MRI. In contrast, two patients with initially negative cytology had pathological MRI findings. Our data indicate that Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is the preferred imaging modality in leptomeningeal metastasis, and suggest that CT does not add significant additional information. However, LM is primarily a histological diagnosis by detecting tumour cells in the cerebrospinal fluid. (orig.)

  11. MRI diagnosis of multiple sclerosis

    Objective: It's a study of MRI diagnosis and differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in 49 cases. Methods: 49 patients were diagnosed as MS of brain or/and spinal cord in the year of 1995 to 2002. All cases had clinical informations, including evoked potential. MR brain scan was done in 49 patients, and spinal cord scan was performed in 10 cases out of 49. Enhanced scan were done in 29 cases. A follow-up examination was done in 17 patients within 30 days after the initial study. Results: Multiple brain lesions, located in peri-ventricular region, semi-elliptical center, cerebellum and brain stem, were revealed in 47 patients, MS plaques were speckle or patchy and the largest one was 2.2 x 5.0 cm. Simple spinal Cord lesions involving at least 2 sections were revealed in 2 patients. Two cases were initially misdiagnosed as encephalitis. Another case was defined as tumor because of the brainstem swelling and enhanced plaques. Optic nerve impairment was found in a case besides the brain lesions. Complicated brain and spinal Cord lesions were shown in 4 cases. Enhanced MRI scan was performed in 29 cases: non-enhanced lesions were revealed in 7 cases and lesions were enhanced in the rest 22. Mottling or plaque enhancement was presented in 20 cases, while ring enhancement was presented in 2. Follow-up study showed the improvement in 17 cases. Conclusion: Brain and spinal cord MS plaques can be demonstrated on MRI, while clinical manifestation is necessary for MRI diagnosis in atypical lesions. Serial study is helpful for differential diagnosis

  12. MRI in psychiatry

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  14. Abdominal MRI in childhood

    MRI provides diagnostic information in multiple abdominal diseases in childhood. Additional information to sonographic findings can be achieved in the diagnosis of abdominal malformation as well as in several inflammatory processes. In childhood cancer imaging MRI is essential at the beginning as well as during therapy to assess response to therapy. Because of radiation protection MRI has to replace CT in abdominal imaging in children. Some technical details have to be considered when children are examined. (orig.)

  15. MRI of adrenal masses

    The diagnostic usefulness of MRI was evaluated on 38 adrenal masses. The most important finding differentiating adenomas from metastases was the size of the tumor and the signal intensity of the mass. Adenomas showed a tendency to be smaller and homogeneous in signal intensity. On MRI with Gd-DTPA adenomas also showed moderate homogeneous enhancement, but metastases were inhomogeneously enhanced. The detectability by MRI was almost comparable with CT. Three cases of small adenomas and hyperplasia 1-1.5 cm in diameter were detectable only with CT. MRI seems to be complementary to CT in the diagnosis of adrenal masses. (author)

  16. MRI assessment program

    Usage, cost and efficacy data from the MRI Assessment Program to 30 March 1988 is presented, as a continuation of an earlier analysis. Analysis has been performed on data from 8565 examinations relating to 7997 patients at 4 hospitals. MRI was used mainly for examination of the head and spine. Some details of the follow up studies being conducted on selected patients and disease categories are given. A consensus statement is included which summaries the view of the Technical Committee on the potential applications of MRI in Australia. The MRI unit quench incident at Royal Adelaide Hospital is described. Refs., 10 figs., tabs

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... medically necessary. MRI may not always distinguish between cancer tissue and fluid, known as edema . MRI typically ...

  19. Implementation of Multi-parametric Prostate MRI in Clinical Practice.

    Kierans, Andrea S; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    While initial implementations of prostate MRI suffered from suboptimal performance in tumor detection, technological advances over the past decade have allowed modern multi-parametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) to achieve high diagnostic accuracy for detection, localization, and staging and thereby impact patient management. A particular emerging application of mpMRI is in the pre-biopsy setting to allow for MRI-targeted biopsy, for instance, through real-time MRI/ultrasound fusion, which may help reduce the over-detection of low-risk disease and selectively detect clinically significant cancers, in comparison with use of standard systematic biopsy alone. mpMRI and MRI-targeted biopsy are spreading beyond the large academic centers to increasingly be adopted within small and community practices. Aims of this review article are to summarize the hardware and sequences used for performing mpMRI, explore patient specific technical considerations, delineate approaches for study interpretation and reporting [including the recent American College of Radiology Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2], and describe challenges and implications relating to the widespread clinical implementation of mpMRI. PMID:26077358

  20. MRI of Listeria rhombencephalitis

    A case of Listeria rhombencephalitis in a patient, who was evaluated by MRI, is reported. MRI shows areas of high signal intensity on T2-weighted images in the rhombencephalon and confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a brainstem affection by Listeria monocytogenes. (orig.)

  1. Play the MRI Game

    ... Play MRI the Magnetic Miracle Game About the game In the MRI imaging technique, strong magnets and radio waves are used for getting images of inner organs made of soft tissue, compared to X-ray imaging where you get images of hard tissue, ...

  2. Getting an MRI

    Full Text Available ... School Butterflies? Read This Chloe & Nurb Meet The Brain (Movie) Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) ...

  3. Getting an MRI

    Full Text Available ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A ...

  4. High Dimensional Classification of Structural MRI Alzheimer’s Disease Data Based on Large Scale Regularization

    Ramon Casanova; Whitlow, Christopher T.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Shumaker, Sally A.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we use a large scale regularization approach based on penalized logistic regression to automatically classify structural MRI images (sMRI) according to cognitive status. Its performance is illustrated using sMRI data from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) clinical database. We downloaded sMRI data from 98 subjects (49 cognitive normal and 49 patients) matched by age and sex from the ADNI website. Images were segmented and normalized using SPM8 and ANTS software...

  5. New method for 3D parametric visualization of contrast-enhanced pulmonary perfusion MRI data

    Three-dimensional (3D) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (3D DCE-MRI) has been proposed for the assessment of regional perfusion. The aim of this work was the implementation of an algorithm for a 3D parametric visualization of lung perfusion using different cutting planes and volume rendering. Our implementation was based on 3D DCE-MRI data of the lungs of five patients and five healthy volunteers. Using the indicator dilution theory, the regional perfusion parameters, tissue blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time were calculated. Due to the required temporal resolution, the volume elements of dynamic MR data sets show a reduced spatial resolution in the z-direction. Therefore, perfusion parameter volumes were interpolated. Linear interpolation and a combination of linear and nearest-neighbor interpolation were evaluated. Additionally, ray tracing was applied for 3D visualization. The linear interpolation algorithm caused interpolation errors at the lung borders. Using the combined interpolation, visualization of perfusion information in arbitrary cutting planes and in 3D using volume rendering was possible. This facilitated the localization of perfusion deficits compared with the coronal orientated source data. The 3D visualization of perfusion parameters using a combined interpolation algorithm is feasible. Further studies are required to evaluate the additional benefit from the 3D visualization. (orig.)

  6. Explaining MRI examinations DVD

    When conducting MRI examinations, there are various things to be careful of. There is often stress related to the MRI examinations, so in order to perform an examination safely and smoothly, sufficient explanation must be given. An explanation of what to do and what not to do during an examination should be outlined in a brochure given to patients before the examination. There may be many patients who have misgivings about their MRI examinations, so to reduce their anxiousness and deepen their understanding of MRI examinations and to improve the safety and effiency of MRI examinations,; we created a DVD about MRI examinations. We gathered MRI-related safety information and instructions, and assessed the effect that the information might have on patients. We started a workgroup for a project to plan and record a video according to the Storyboard. When editing, we reviewed the length of each segment, the amount of information on screen, and the overall length of the DVD. We discussed the issue within the workgroup and had hospital approval. It was possible for us to complete it without depending on the supplier and the cost was kept to a minimum. Finally, we decided on a viewing location. We asked a hospital volunteers to see a complete DVD and we evaluated their responses by questionnaires. As the result, their understanding and anxieties related to MRI examinations were alleviated, as expected. Their anxiety seemed to be eased. Patients also seemed to have a deeper understanding of MRI examinations having seen an examination being conducted. (author)

  7. MRI in perianal fistulae

    MRI has become the method of choice for evaluating perianal fistulae due to its ability to display the anatomy of the sphincter muscles orthogonally, with good contrast resolution. In this article we give an outline of the classification of perianal fistulae and present a pictorial assay of sphincter anatomy and the MRI findings in perianal fistulae. This study is based on a retrospective analysis of 43 patients with a clinical diagnosis of perianal fistula. MRI revealed a total of 44 fistulae in 35 patients; eight patients had only perianal sinuses

  8. MRI of brachial plexopathies

    Sureka, J. [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)], E-mail: drjyoticmch@rediffmail.com; Cherian, R.A.; Alexander, M.; Thomas, B.P. [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore (India)

    2009-02-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the primary imaging technique in the evaluation of brachial plexus pathology, and plays an important role in the identification, localization, and characterization of the cause. Improvements in MRI technique have helped in detecting changes in the signal intensity of nerves, subtle enhancement, and in detecting perineural pathology, thereby refining the differential diagnosis. The present review of the visualization of brachial plexus abnormalities using MRI is based on a review of 26 cases. The causes include trauma and a spectrum of non-traumatic causes, such as acute idiopathic/viral plexitis, metastases, immune-mediated plexitis, and mass lesions compressing the brachial plexus.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  10. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  12. MRI of the Chest

    ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... in diagnosing a broad range of conditions, including cancer, heart and vascular disease, heart valve abnormalities, bone ...

  13. MRI of the shoulder

    Magnetic resonance imaging has become available at a time in which shoulder pathology is more frequently seen. It is a noninvasive procedure that does not use ionizing radiation. It provides detailed visualization of soft-tissue structures that is not possible with other imaging modalities. Though not as widely available as conventional radiographs or computed tomography scanning, the number of MRI units worldwide is increasing steadily. The main features of the present book are as follows: The physical basis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), normal shoulder anatomy and MRI, diagnosis of shoulder disorders, MRI of patients with shoulder pain or instability, case studies as well as treatment of shoulder disorders. (orig./MG) With 145 figs

  14. Combined PET/MRI

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  15. MRI of myelitis

    Hodel, J.; Outteryck, O; Jissendi, P; Zins, M.; Leclerc, X; Pruvo, J P

    2012-01-01

    The diagnosis of myelitis relies on MRI. The purpose of this review is to describe the imaging findings in patients with myelitis through clinical cases. MR findings in Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica and others Transverse Myelitis are highlighted.

  16. MRI of intracranial calcifications

    Kang, Jin Wha; Chang, Kee Hyun; Park, Jung Mi; Han, Moon Hee; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-12-15

    Recently computed tomography(CT) has been rapidly replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosis of majority of intracranial diseases. But MRI still has some limitation, one of which is its inferiority in detecting calcification. MRI of intracranial calcification has been known to be variable in signal intensity. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI of 26 patients with intracranial calcified lesions in order to evaluate the MR intensity of calcification and to assess the capability of MRI in detecting calcification in various intracranial lesions. All the MRI were obtained using routine T1-and T2-weighted spin eco pulse sequences on 2.0T superconducting system. The 26 patients consisted of 13 brain tumors (4 oligodendrogliomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 2 astrocytomas, 1 gem cell tumor, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 ependympma, and pathologically unconfirmed 2 cases), 11 infectious diseases (1 paragonimiasis, 1 sparganosis, 2 cysticercosis, 3 tuberculosis, and 4 unknown cases), and 2 undetermined pathologies. Eighty-two percent (9/11) of infections disease, and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group showed signal diminution or signal void on both T1-and T2-weighted image (T1W1, T2W1). Twenty-four percent (3/13) of brain tumors showed signal diminution on both T1W1 and T2W1. In 46% (6/13) and 61% (8/13) of brain tumors the signal intensities were isointense on T1W1 and T1W1, respectively. Unexpectedly, 3 oligodendrogliomas showed high signal intensity on T1W1, two of which showed com plexed signal intensity mixed with high, iso, and low signal intensities on T2W1. In remained cases (18% (2/11) of infectious diseases and 50% (1/2) of undetermined group) the signal intensities were mixed. With simultaneous review of CT and MRI in each case, the calcification (at least one in cases showing multiple ones) was identifiable on MRI in 62% (8/13) of rumors, 82% (9/11) of infectious diseases, and 100% (2/2) in undetermined group. In 36% (4/11) of infectious diseases, fewer number of

  17. MRI of the penis

    Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    MRI of the penis is an expensive test that is not always superior to clinical examination or ultrasound. However, it shows many of the important structures, and in particular the combination of tumescence from intracavernosal alprostadil, and high-resolution T2 sequences show the glans, corpora and the tunica albuginea well. In this paper we summarise the radiological anatomy and discuss the indications for MRI. For penile cancer, it may be useful in cases where the local stage is not apparen...

  18. MRI assessment program

    The MRI Assessment Program involves installation and operation of five MRI units in Australian public hospitals and the evaluation at each unit of the cost and efficacy of the technology over a period of two years. This first report in a series presents preliminary usage and cost data for the year to 30 June 1987 as well as describing the background and the data set. 6 figs., tabs

  19. MRI in osteochondrosis dissecans

    The osseous manifestations of osteochondrosis dissecans are well demonstrated by conventional and computerised tomography. Beyond that, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is effective in evaluating the vitality and loosening of an osseous dissecate. Subchondral cavities and cartilaginous defects are detected with high acccuracy. Further, MRI seems to be a useful method in childhood to differentiate a variant irregularity of the osseous articular surface from definite osteochondrosis dissecans. (orig.)

  20. MRI of plantar fasciitis

    Roger, B.; Grenier, P. [Service de Radiologie Polyvalente Diagnostique et Interventionelle, Hopital de la Pitie, 83, boulevard de l`Hopital, F-75651 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1997-12-01

    At present, MRI is the only imaging method that can precisely visualize lesions of the superficial plantar aponeurosis, whether they be musculoaponeurositides, enthesopathies or tears, and whether they be acute or chronic, with or without complications. By its direct visualization of the lesion, MRI enables an accurate assessment of the injury to be made and thereby better orients the therapeutic strategy. (orig.) With 11 figs., 15 refs.

  1. Fetal MRI in experimental tracheal occlusion

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high mortality, which is mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension. In severely affected fetuses, tracheal occlusion (TO) is performed prenatally to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, because TO leads to accelerated lung growth. Prenatal imaging is important to identify fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia, to diagnose high-risk fetuses who would benefit from TO, and to monitor the effect of TO after surgery. In fetal imaging, ultrasound (US) is the method of choice, because it is widely available, less expensive, and less time-consuming to perform than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there are some limitations for US in the evaluation of CDH fetuses. In those cases, MRI is helpful because of a better tissue contrast between liver and lung, which enables evaluation of liver herniation for the diagnosis of a high-risk fetus. MRI provides the ability to determine absolute lung volumes to detect lung hypoplasia. In fetal sheep with normal and hyperplastic lungs after TO, lung growth was assessed on the basis of cross-sectional US measurements, after initial lung volume determination by MRI. To monitor fetal lung growth after prenatal TO, both MRI and US seem to be useful methods

  2. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  3. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  4. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  5. MRI of fish

    Recently, rats and mice are popular and useful as an experimental model for MRI. However, MRI for fishes has been unknown. This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of living fishes as a new experimental model for MRI. MR images were collected with a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE) or echo-planar imaging pulse sequence (EPI) using 2T MR imaging system for animal. Carp, which was able to be alive for a long time in the air, was examined. Enhancement study was examined by use of Gd-DOTMA (gadolinium hydrogen alpha, alpha', alpha'', alpha'''-tetramethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetate). On both SE and EPI images, the internal components of the head and chest in carp were clearly recognized. On the T1-weighted image acquisition time of MRI with sufficient resolution was short (in about one minute) in comparison with that of rat. The head in carp was well enhanced by administration of Gd-DOTMA on the T1-weighted image. In addition, the time course of contrast enhancement effect of images was observed after administration of Gd-DOTMA. The authors concluded that fishes, such as a carp, can be readily imaged on MRI, and could be potential in the future investigation of contrast enhancement effect and relaxation effect as a living body phantom for MRI. (author)

  6. Posttraumatic pseudolipoma: MRI appearances

    Theumann, N.; Abdelmoumene, A.; Wintermark, M.; Schnyder, P.; Gailloud, M.C.; Resnick, D. [CHUV, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the MRI characteristics of posttraumatic pseudolipomas. Ten patients with previous history of blunt trauma or local surgery were investigated with MRI at the level of their deformity. The etiology was blunt trauma in eight patients and postoperative trauma in two. For all patients medical documentation, in the form of clinical history and physical examination, confirmed that a visible hematoma was present acutely at the same location following the injury and that the contour deformity subsequently appeared. All patients underwent liposuction. Preoperative bilateral MRI examinations were performed on all patients. The mean clinical follow-up was 17.8 months. MRI examinations were interpreted in consensus by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with attention to fatty extension (subcutaneous fatty thickness and anatomical extension), asymmetry compared with the asymptomatic side, the presence or absence of fibrous septae or nonfatty components, and patterns of contrast enhancement. Ten posttraumatic pseudolipomas were identified. Clinically, they showed as subcutaneous masses with the consistency of normal adipose tissue. Their locations were the abdomen (n=1), hip (n=1), the upper thigh (n=6), the knee (n=1), and the ankle (n=1). On MRI examinations, using the contralateral side as a control, pseudolipomas appeared as focal fatty masses without a capsule or contrast enhancement. Posttraumatic pseudolipomas may develop at a site of blunt trauma or surgical procedures often antedated by a soft tissue hematoma. Characteristic MRI findings are unencapsulated subcutaneous fatty masses without contrast enhancement. (orig.)

  7. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament healing

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Miwa, Megumi; Deya, Keizo; Torisu, Kenji [Kyushu Rosai Hospital, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate using MRI the natural healing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) when treated conservatively by early protective motion. Consecutive acute complete intraligamentous ruptures of the ACL in 50 cases that were allowed to heal without surgery were evaluated before and after 3 month treatment by MRI, arthroscopy, and stress radiographs. Twenty-nine of the 50 patients were also reevaluated 11 months from the initial injury, of which 7 were reevaluated again 24 months from the initial injury by MRI. The MR appearance of the treated ACL was categorized into four grades depending on homogeneity, straight band, and size. MR assessment of the ACL after 3 month treatment demonstrated a well defined normal-sized straight band in 37 cases (74%). There was a significant relationship between the 3 and 11 month MR evaluations (r. = 0.801, p < 0.0001). There were also significant relationships between the MR and arthroscopic evaluations (r, = 0.455, p < 0.005) and between the MR and stress radiographic evaluations (r, = 0.348, p < 0.025) after the 3 month treatment. MRI can demonstrate ACL healing when treated conservatively with early protective mobilization. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. No erosive progression revealed by MRI in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with etanercept, even in patients with persistent MRI and clinical signs of joint inflammation

    Døhn, Uffe Møller; Skjødt, Henrik; Hetland, Merete; Vestergaard, Aage; Møller, Jakob M; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Ejbjerg, Bo Jannik; Thomsen, Henrik S; Hetland, Merete Lund; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the course of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of inflammatory and destructive changes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints during etanercept treatment. MRI of the non-dominant wrist and second to fifth MCP joints was...... performed in five clinical active RA patients before and 4 and 16 weeks after initiation of etanercept treatment. MRI was evaluated according to the EULAR-OMERACT RA MRI reference image atlas. The median 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS28; erythrocyte sedimentation rate based) was 5.6 (range 5...... patient showed erosive regression, while no patient showed erosive progression on MRI during 16 weeks of etanercept therapy; even though clinical and MRI signs of joint inflammation remained. This small study supports that erosive progression judged by MRI is minimal in RA patients treated with etanercept...

  9. Value of SPIO for MRI of the bone marrow before and after total body irradiation (TBI) - initial investigations in an animal model; Experimentelle Untersuchungen zur Wertigkeit von SPIO fuer die MRT des Knochenmarkes vor und nach Ganzkoerperbestrahlung

    Daldrup-Link, H.E.; Link, T.M.; Rummeny, E.J. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Reinlaender, C. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Richter, K.J. [Zentrale Tierexperimentelle Einrichtung der Westfaelischen Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany); Koenemann, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Evaluation of the value of superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIO; Endorem {sup trademark}) for MRI-derived quantifications of the permeability of the blood-bone marrow barrier and the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system (RES) bone marrow cells before and after TBI. Methods: 12 New Zealand white rabbits underwent MRI of the lumbar spine and os sacrum using T{sub 1}-weighted spinecho (SE) and T{sub 2}-weighted Turbo-SE (TSE) sequences before and after injection of SPIO (Endorem {sup trademark}). Four animals each were examined without irradiation, after 4 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and after 12 Gy TBI. Changes in bone marrow signal intensities (SI) after contrast agent injection were quantified as {delta} SI(%) = vertical stroke ((SIpost-SIpre)/SIpre) x 100% vertical stroke and these data were correlated with bone marrow histopathology. Results: Histopathology of the bone marrow revealed a radiation-induced decline of all hematopoetic cell lines. SPIO were phagocytosed by bone marrow RES cells and caused a significant bone marrow signal decline on postcontrast T{sub 2}-weighted images (p < 0.05). {delta} SI(%) data for T{sub 2}-weighted images were significantly higher for the irradiated bone marrow as compared to non-irradiated controls (p < 0.05). Dynamic T{sub 1}-weighted images directly after contrast medium injection were not able to characterize the permeability of the blood-bone marrow barrier. Conclusion: Hematopoetic bone marrow can be labelled with SPIO. Irradiation does not impair the phagocytic activity of bone marrow RES cells. However, the bone marrow enhancement with SPIO is smaller as compared to previous results obtained by our group with USPIO. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Wertigkeit von superparamagnetischen Eisenoxidpartikeln (SPIO) fuer die MR-tomographische Beurteilung der Permeabilitaet der Knochenmarkssinus und der RES-Phagozytoseaktivitaet des Knochenmarkes vor und nach fraktionierter Ganzkoerperbestrahlung. Methoden

  10. Parametric T2 and T2* mapping techniques to visualize intervertebral disc degeneration in patients with low back pain: initial results on the clinical use of 3.0 Tesla MRI

    To assess, compare and correlate quantitative T2 and T2* relaxation time measurements of intervertebral discs (IVDs) in patients suffering from low back pain, with respect to the IVD degeneration as assessed by the morphological Pfirrmann Score. Special focus was on the spatial variation of T2 and T2* between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and the nucleus pulposus (NP). Thirty patients (mean age: 38.1 ± 9.1 years; 20 female, 10 male) suffering from low back pain were included. Morphological (sagittal T1-FSE, sagittal and axial T2-FSE) and biochemical (sagittal T2- and T2* mapping) MRI was performed at 3 Tesla covering IVDs L1-L2 to L5-S1. All IVDs were morphologically classified using the Pfirrmann score. Region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was performed on midsagittal T2 and T2* maps at five ROIs from anterior to posterior to obtain information on spatial variation between the AF and the NP. Statistical analysis-of-variance and Pearson correlation was performed. The spatial variation as an increase in T2 and T2* values from the AF to the NP was highest at Pfirmann grade I and declined at higher Pfirmann grades II-IV (p < 0.05). With increased IVD degeneration, T2 and T2* revealed a clear differences in the NP, whereas T2* was additionally able to depict changes in the posterior AF. Correlation between T2 and T2* showed a medium Pearson's correlation (0.210 to 0.356 [p < 0.001]). The clear differentiation of IVD degeneration and the possible quantification by means of T2 and fast T2* mapping may provide a new tool for follow-up therapy protocols in patients with low back pain. (orig.)

  11. Parametric T2 and T2* mapping techniques to visualize intervertebral disc degeneration in patients with low back pain: initial results on the clinical use of 3.0 Tesla MRI

    Welsch, Goetz Hannes [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); University of Erlangen, Department of Trauma Surgery, Erlangen (Germany); Trattnig, Siegfried; Goed, Sabine; Stelzeneder, David [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Physical Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Bohndorf, Klaus [Klinikum Augsburg, Department of Radiology, Augsburg (Germany); Mamisch, Tallal Charles [Medical University of Vienna, MR Center - High Field MR, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); University of Berne, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    To assess, compare and correlate quantitative T2 and T2* relaxation time measurements of intervertebral discs (IVDs) in patients suffering from low back pain, with respect to the IVD degeneration as assessed by the morphological Pfirrmann Score. Special focus was on the spatial variation of T2 and T2* between the annulus fibrosus (AF) and the nucleus pulposus (NP). Thirty patients (mean age: 38.1 {+-} 9.1 years; 20 female, 10 male) suffering from low back pain were included. Morphological (sagittal T1-FSE, sagittal and axial T2-FSE) and biochemical (sagittal T2- and T2* mapping) MRI was performed at 3 Tesla covering IVDs L1-L2 to L5-S1. All IVDs were morphologically classified using the Pfirrmann score. Region-of-interest (ROI) analysis was performed on midsagittal T2 and T2* maps at five ROIs from anterior to posterior to obtain information on spatial variation between the AF and the NP. Statistical analysis-of-variance and Pearson correlation was performed. The spatial variation as an increase in T2 and T2* values from the AF to the NP was highest at Pfirmann grade I and declined at higher Pfirmann grades II-IV (p < 0.05). With increased IVD degeneration, T2 and T2* revealed a clear differences in the NP, whereas T2* was additionally able to depict changes in the posterior AF. Correlation between T2 and T2* showed a medium Pearson's correlation (0.210 to 0.356 [p < 0.001]). The clear differentiation of IVD degeneration and the possible quantification by means of T2 and fast T2* mapping may provide a new tool for follow-up therapy protocols in patients with low back pain. (orig.)

  12. MRI of the lung

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  13. MRI in Japanese encephalitis

    Kumar, S. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Misra, U.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Kalita, J. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Neurology; Salwani, V. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gupta, R.K. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology; Gujral, R. [Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Inst. of Medical Sciences, Lucknow (India). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-03-01

    We document the MRI features in seven patients with Japanese encephalitis. MRI was carried out on a 1.5 T system within 10-60 days of onset. In all the patients MRI revealed bilateral thalamic lesions, haemorrhagic in five. Signal changes were present in the cerebrum in four patients, the midbrain and cerebellum in three each, the pons in two and the basal ganglia in one. The lesions were haemorrhagic in three of the four patients with lesions in the cortex, two of the three with lesions in the midbrain and cerebellum, but the pontine lesions were haemorrhagic in both patients. Spinal cord involvement was seen in one of the three patients who underwent MRI. In two patients MRI was repeated 3 years after the onset, showing marked reduction in abnormal signal; and all the lesions gave low signal on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Bilateral thalamic involvement, especially haemorrhagic, may be considered characteristic of Japanese encephalitis, especially in endemic areas. (orig.)

  14. MRI of the lung

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  15. Contrast agents for MRI

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible. - Highlights: • This paper studies the contrast agents for MRI. • Fe―Co alloys and Mn-ferrites exhibit suitable contrast enhancement. • Nonhydrolytic thermal-decomposition synthetic method is suitable to produce MNPs. • This method allows controlling the size, magnetic dopants, magneto-crystalline anisotropy. • The increase in the superparamagnetic size leads to the contrast-enhancement

  16. Optimised, low cost, low field dedicated extremity MRI is highly specific and sensitive for synovitis and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis wrist and finger joints: comparison with conventional high field MRI and radiography

    Ejbjerg, B.J; Narvestad, E; Jacobsen, S;

    2005-01-01

    were performed. In an initial low field MRI 'sequence selection phase', based on a subset of 10 patients and 10 controls, sequences for comparison with high field MRI were selected. RESULTS: With high field, spin echo MRI considered as the reference method, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a low field dedicated extremity MRI unit for detection of bone erosions, synovitis, and bone marrow oedema in wrist and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, with a high field MRI unit as the standard reference. METHODS: In 37 patients with RA and 28 healthy controls MRI of the...... wrist and 2nd-5th MCP joints was performed on a low field MRI unit (0.2 T Esaote Artoscan) and a high field MRI unit (1.0 T Siemens Impact) on 2 subsequent days. MRI was performed and evaluated according to OMERACT recommendations. Additionally, conventional x ray, clinical, and biochemical examinations...

  17. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  18. Reprint of "Hypomyelinating disorders: An MRI approach.

    Barkovich, A James; Deon, Sean

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of hypomyelinating disorders has been proposed as a group of disorders with varying systemic manifestations that are identified by MR findings of absence or near absence of the T2 hypointensity that develops in white matter as a result of myelination. Initially proposed as a separate group because they were the largest single category of undiagnosed leukodystrophies, their separation as a distinct group that can be recognized by looking for a specific MRI feature has resulted in a marked increase in their diagnosis and a better understanding of the different causes of hypomyelination. This review will discuss the clinical presentations, imaging findings on standard MRI, and new MRI-related techniques that allow a better understanding of these disorders and proposed methods for quantifying the myelination as a potential means of assessing disease course and the effects of proposed treatments. Disorders with hypomyelination of white matter, or hypomyelinating disorders (HMDs), represent the single largest category among undiagnosed genetic leukoencephalopathies (Schiffmann and van der Knaap, 2009; Steenweg et al., 2010). This group of inborn errors of metabolism is characterized by a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of reduced or absent myelin development: delay in the development of T2 hypointensity and, often, T1 hyperintensity in the white matter of the brain. The concept of hypomyelination was first conceptualized by (Schiffmann and van der Knaap, 2009; Steenweg et al., 2010; Schiffmann et al., 1994) in a series of papers that showed that these MRI characteristics were easily recognized, were different from the MRI characteristics of dysmyelinating and demyelinating disorders, and that the combination of these imaging findings with specific other clinical and imaging features could be used to make diagnoses with some confidence. In this manuscript, we will discuss the physiologic and genetic bases of hypomyelinating

  19. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    Bierry, Guillaume; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  20. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  1. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsy uses imaging ... Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsies are performed ...

  2. MRI Physics Workshop:

    Daryoush Saedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of the basic principle of imaging physics helps better understanding of normal anatomy and pathological imaging findings of the diseases."n"n This is more necessary in advanced imaging techniques like MRI because of the complexity of the basic physics of the technique. In basic MRI physics workshop, we discuss about this technique from the primary concepts. The content is very simplified and is showed by slides, animation and easy pictures for better understanding. In the beginning of the lecture, the structure of atoms and their magnetic characteristics are explained and then step by step, we learn how to use this character to produce signal and usages of it to make an image. Also basic pulse sequence will be explained subsequently. This workshop is recommended for all radiologists, residents of radiology, technologists and anyone who wants to know more about MRI.    

  3. MRI in gout

    The appearance of gouty tophus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is characteristic. On T1- and T2-weighted SE images, the signal intensity of tophaceous lesions is similar to that of muscles. According to the histology, T2-weighted SE images demonstrate extremely hyperintense signals, which reflect the high protein content in the amorpheous center of the tophus. The microscopic urate crystals deposited there have no MRI signal and are of no further diagnostic impact. Vascularized granulation tissue surrounding the tophus center enhance after intervenous application of contrast agents (Gadolinium). The inflammed tophus is associated with local edema, causing high signal intensity. MRI is superior to plain radiography for early detection of intraosseous tophi. Involvement of anatomical structures such as ligaments and tendons can be evaluated sufficiently. For peripheral joints, axial slice orientation is most helpful. (orig.)

  4. MRI of congenital and developmental abnormalities of the knee

    The knee joint is the one of the most common locations for congenital and developmental musculoskeletal abnormalities. Initial imaging of the knee joint should always begin with conventional radiographs. However, evaluation of the bone marrow, cartilaginous, ligamentous, and other soft-tissue components of the knee joint are better characterized with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We present the MRI findings of prevalent congenital and developmental abnormalities in the paediatric knee with particular emphasis on the components of the growing skeleton.

  5. Comparison of different cardiac MRI sequences at 1.5T/3.0T with respect to signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios - initial experience

    Purpose: To compare image quality, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of different MRI sequences for cardiac imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T in volunteers. Material and Methods: 10 volunteers (5 male, 5 female) with a mean age of 33 years (±8) without any history of cardiac diseases were examined on a GE Signa 3.0 T and a GE Signa 1.5 T TwinSpeed Excite (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) scanner using a 4-element phased array surface coil (same design) on the same day. For tissue characterization ECG gated Fast Spinecho (FSE) T1- (Double IR), T1-STIR (Triple IR) and T2-weighted sequences in transverse orientation were used. For functional analysis a steady state free precession (SSFP-FIESTA) sequence was performed in the 4-chamber, 2-chamber long axis and short axis view. The flip angle used for the SSFP sequence at 3.0 T was reduced from 45 to 30 to keep short TR times while staying within the pre-defined SAR limitations. All other sequence parameters were kept constant. Results: All acquisitions could successfully be completed for the 10 volunteers. The mean SNR 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was remarkably increased (p2 - (160% SNR increase), the STIR-T1- (123%) and the T1- (91%) weighted FSE. Similar results were found comparing CNR at 3.0 T and 1.5 T. The mean SNR achieved using the SSFP sequences was more than doubled by 3.0 T (150%), but did not have any significant effect on the CNR. The image quality at 3.0 T did not appear to be improved, and was considered to be significantly worse when using SSFP sequences. Artefacts like shading in the area of the right ventricle (RV) were found to be more present at 3.0 T using FSE sequences. After a localized shim had been performed in 5/10 volunteers at the infero-lateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) with the SSFP sequences at 3.0 T no significant increase in artefacts could be detected. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams; however, older ... MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

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  18. MRI of vaginal conditions

    Lopez, C. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: carolina.lopez@bwhct.nhs.uk; Balogun, M. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Ganesan, R. [Department of Histopathology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Olliff, J.F. [University Hospital Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an important part of the assessment of suspected vaginal pathology. This pictorial review demonstrates the MRI features and some of the histopathological findings of a variety of vaginal conditions. These may be congenital (total vaginal agenesis, partial vaginal agenesis, longitudinal vaginal septum, transverse vaginal septum), benign (Bartholin's cyst, diffuse vaginal inflammation, invasive endometriosis, ureterovaginal fistula, post-surgical appearances with the formation of a neovagina and adhesions) or malignant, usually due to extension or recurrence from another pelvic malignancy. In this paper, examples of the above are described and illustrated together with examples of the much rarer primary vaginal malignancies.

  19. CT and MRI of dementia disorders

    Momoshima, Suketaka; Fujiwara, Hirokazu [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-06-01

    Imaging diagnosis plays a critical role in the initial evaluation of dementia disorders despite its limited specificity. The two major causes of dementia are neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease and diffuse vascular disorders, some of which show characteristic findings on CT and MRI. Although effective treatment is not yet available for most of these entities, there is possibility that early diagnosis by imaging could lead to preventive measures in future. Some illustrative cases of dementia diseases are demonstrated. (author)

  20. CT and MRI of dementia disorders

    Imaging diagnosis plays a critical role in the initial evaluation of dementia disorders despite its limited specificity. The two major causes of dementia are neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease and diffuse vascular disorders, some of which show characteristic findings on CT and MRI. Although effective treatment is not yet available for most of these entities, there is possibility that early diagnosis by imaging could lead to preventive measures in future. Some illustrative cases of dementia diseases are demonstrated. (author)

  1. MRI evaluation of tuberous sclerosis

    The authors present four cases of tuberous sclerosis examined with MRI. The patho-anatomic aspects are reviewed and analysed with respect to MRI data. MRI appears superior to the CT particularly for imaging of cortical tubers, cystic lesions, and heterotopic clusters; these last two features were never described with MRI before. Here is also presented the second progressive case of giant intracranial aneurysm associated with tuberous sclerosis. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique that does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI can help physicians evaluate the structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ...

  3. MRI of intact plants

    As, van H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  4. Cardiac MRI tagging

    Cardiac MRI tagging is an original technique based upon the perturbation of the magnetization of determined regions of the myocardium (tags). The motion of the tags accurately reflects the deformation of the underlying tissue. Data analysis requires special techniques to reconstruct the 3D motion of the heart, and to evaluate the myocardial strain, locally and throughout the whole heart. (authors)

  5. MRI of intact plants.

    As, H. van; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transpor

  6. MRI and interventions

    Roberto Blanco Sequeiros

    2002-01-01

    @@ Interventional radiology was started not long after the discovery of X - rays. Interventions started as image guided biopsies and angiographies early this century, later emerged computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound-guided interventions in the 1970s and ultimately the magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) guided interventions at the 1980s.

  7. MRI in decompression illness

    We report a case of decompression illness in which the patient developed paraparesis during scuba diving after rapid ascent. MRI of the spine revealed a focal intramedullary lesion consistent with the symptoms. The pathophysiological and radiological aspects of spinal decompression illness are discussed. (orig.)

  8. MRI Findings in Patients with TMJ Click

    Mahrokh Imanimoghaddam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been shown that joint click, an initial and common finding in internal derangement (ID, respond to neither conservative treatment nor surgical intervention. This raises the question as to whether it must be treated in the absence of other pertinent signs and symptoms, so the aim of this study was to investigate and compare the MRI findings of TMJ in both normal subjects and patients with click, in order to determine the importance of click in predicting TMJ pathological changes. Methods: A total of 26 patients with clinical symptoms of disk displacement with reduction (DDwR according to RDC/TMD were compared to 14 normal subjects in terms of their MRI findings, including disk displacement, effusion, condylar osteoarthritic changes and disk deformities. Results: Out of 80 joints in total (52 affected joints in 26 patients and 28 joints in control group, 48 were shown with normal disk position in MRI whereas 28 (35% and 4 (5% were categorised as DDwR and (disk displacement without reduction DDwoR, respectively. Statistically significant correlations were established between the following pairs of variables in order: Click and disk displacement, effusion and disk displacement, disk displacement and effusion with disk deformity. Conclusion: The correlation between the presence of click and disk displacement, disk deformity and effusion emphasizes the importance of MRI for an accurate diagnosis and development of an appropriate treatment plan in these cases and shows that clinical examination is not sufficient for these purposes.

  9. Postinterventional MRI findings following MRI-guided laser ablation of osteoid osteoma

    Objective: To evaluate postinterventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics following MRI-guided laser ablation of osteoid osteoma (OO). Materials and methods: 35 patients treated with MRI-guided laser ablation underwent follow-up MRI immediately after the procedure, after 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and up to 48 months. The imaging protocol included multiplanar fat-saturated T2w TSE, unenhanced and contrast-enhanced T1w SE, and subtraction images. MR images were reviewed regarding the appearance and size of treated areas, and presence of periablation bone and soft tissue changes. Imaging was correlated with clinical status. Results: Mean follow-up time was 13.6 months. 28/35 patients (80%) showed a postinterventional “target-sign” appearance consisting of a fibrovascular rim zone and a necrotic core area. After an initial increase in total lesion diameter after 3 months, a subsequent progressive inward remodeling process of the zonal compartments was observed for up to 24 months. Periablation bone and soft tissue changes showed a constant decrease over time. MR findings correlated well with the clinical status. Clinical success was achieved in 32/35 (91%). Conclusions: Evaluation of long-term follow-up MRI after laser ablation of OO identified typical postinterventional changes and thus may contribute to the interpretation of therapeutic success and residual or recurrent OO in suspected cases

  10. Clinical impact of MRI in acute wrist fractures

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of MRI in the early diagnosis of wrist trauma. High-resolution MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T unit (Symphony Quantum, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using coronal and axial T1- and T2-weighted fat-saturated turbo-spin-echo sequence via a dedicated wrist coil within a mean of 6.6 days after initial radiographs in 54 patients (56 wrists) with clinical suspicion of wrist fractures and normal plain or indistinct radiographs. Initial radiographs were evaluated independently by two senior radiologists and the hand surgeon without knowledge of the MRI findings. The initial treatment protocol was based on evaluation of plain films and clinical findings by the hand surgeon. Treatment protocol was changed after MRI examination if necessary. In 31 of 56 wrists MRI findings resulted in a change of diagnosis. There were false-positive diagnoses on plain radiographs in nearly one half (n=25) of the patients. False-negative diagnoses on plain radiographs resulted in 6 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional injuries of soft tissue in more than one third (n=20). In 22 of 56 wrists the period of immobilization could be shortened or ended, in 12 of 56 it was prolonged, and in 3 of 56 a surgical intervention was necessary. In 19 wrists MRI had no therapeutic consequences. Our data demonstrate the high clinical impact of MRI in the detection of acute wrist fractures. We recommend MRI of the wrist immediately on the day of trauma if there is clinical suspicion and normal plain radiographs. Accurate diagnosis by MRI examination within the first days following trauma may reduce economic costs due to shortened immobilization time in cases with a suspected fracture but plain radiographs. (orig.)

  11. Clinical impact of MRI in acute wrist fractures

    Mack, Martin G.; Keim, Sabine; Balzer, Joern O.; Schwarz, Wolfram; Hochmuth, Kathrin; Vogl, Thomas J. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt/Main, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Windolf, Joachim [Department of Traumatology and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Hamburg, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of MRI in the early diagnosis of wrist trauma. High-resolution MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T unit (Symphony Quantum, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using coronal and axial T1- and T2-weighted fat-saturated turbo-spin-echo sequence via a dedicated wrist coil within a mean of 6.6 days after initial radiographs in 54 patients (56 wrists) with clinical suspicion of wrist fractures and normal plain or indistinct radiographs. Initial radiographs were evaluated independently by two senior radiologists and the hand surgeon without knowledge of the MRI findings. The initial treatment protocol was based on evaluation of plain films and clinical findings by the hand surgeon. Treatment protocol was changed after MRI examination if necessary. In 31 of 56 wrists MRI findings resulted in a change of diagnosis. There were false-positive diagnoses on plain radiographs in nearly one half (n=25) of the patients. False-negative diagnoses on plain radiographs resulted in 6 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging detected additional injuries of soft tissue in more than one third (n=20). In 22 of 56 wrists the period of immobilization could be shortened or ended, in 12 of 56 it was prolonged, and in 3 of 56 a surgical intervention was necessary. In 19 wrists MRI had no therapeutic consequences. Our data demonstrate the high clinical impact of MRI in the detection of acute wrist fractures. We recommend MRI of the wrist immediately on the day of trauma if there is clinical suspicion and normal plain radiographs. Accurate diagnosis by MRI examination within the first days following trauma may reduce economic costs due to shortened immobilization time in cases with a suspected fracture but plain radiographs. (orig.)

  12. Cine MRI of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Cine MRI was performed using 1.5T or 0.5T MR units in eleven patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Septal and posterior wall thickness measured by cine MRI correlated well with those obtained by ultrasonographic cardiogram. In hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, cine MRI demonstrated the site and nature of obstructive change in left ventricle. Cine MRI also showed flow void due to mitral regurgitation successfully. We considered cine MRI is useful means to evaluate the anatomical and functional findings in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  13. High-quality breast MRI.

    Hendrick, R Edward

    2014-05-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demands the competing factors of high spatial resolution, good temporal resolution, high signal-to-noise ratios, and complete bilateral breast coverage. Achieving these competing factors requires modern MRI equipment with high magnetic field strength and homogeneity, high maximum gradient strength with short rise times, dedicated multichannel bilateral breast coils with prone patient positioning, and 3D (volume) gradient-echo MRI pulse sequences with short TR, short TE, high spatial resolution, and reasonably short acquisition times. This article discusses the equipment and pulse sequences needed to achieve high-quality breast MRI and summarizes requirements of the ACR Breast MRI Accreditation Program. PMID:24792656

  14. Three-Dimensional Expansion of a Dynamic Programming Method for Boundary Detection and Its Application to Sequential Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI

    Da-Chuan Cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a fast 3D dynamic programming expansion to find a shortest surface in a 3D matrix. This algorithm can detect boundaries in an image sequence. Using phantom image studies with added uniform distributed noise from different SNRs, the unsigned error of this proposed method is investigated. Comparing the automated results to the gold standard, the best averaged relative unsigned error of the proposed method is 0.77% (SNR = 20 dB, and its corresponding parameter values are reported. We further apply this method to detect the boundary of the real superficial femoral artery (SFA in MRI sequences without a contrast injection. The manual tracings on the SFA boundaries are performed by well-trained experts to be the gold standard. The comparisons between the manual tracings and automated results are made on 16 MRI sequences (800 total images. The average unsigned error rate is 2.4% (SD = 2.0%. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can perform qualitatively better than the 2D dynamic programming for vessel boundary detection on MRI sequences.

  15. The MRI appearances of early vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis

    Dunbar, J.A.T.; Sandoe, J.A.T. [Department of Microbiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rao, A.S. [Department of Orthopaedics, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Crimmins, D.W. [Department of Neurosurgery, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Baig, W. [Department of Cardiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Rankine, J.J., E-mail: james.rankine@leedsth.nhs.u [Department of Radiology, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Leeds Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in patients with a clinical history suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis who underwent MRI very early in their clinical course. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the database of spinal infections from a spinal microbiological liaison team was performed over a 2 year period to identify cases with clinical features suggestive of spinal infection and an MRI that did not show features typical of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. All patients had positive microbiology and a follow up MRI showing typical features of spinal infection. Results: In four cases the features typical of spinal infection were not evident at the initial MRI. In three cases there was very subtle endplate oedema associated with disc degeneration, which was interpreted as Modic type I degenerative endplate change. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued prior to repeat MRI examinations. The mean time to the repeat examination was 17 days with a range of 8-22 days. The second examinations clearly demonstrated vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Conclusion: Although MRI is the imaging method of choice for vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis in the early stages, it may show subtle, non-specific endplate subchondral changes; a repeat examination may be required to show the typical features.

  16. The MRI appearances of early vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis

    Aim: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances in patients with a clinical history suggestive of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis who underwent MRI very early in their clinical course. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the database of spinal infections from a spinal microbiological liaison team was performed over a 2 year period to identify cases with clinical features suggestive of spinal infection and an MRI that did not show features typical of vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. All patients had positive microbiology and a follow up MRI showing typical features of spinal infection. Results: In four cases the features typical of spinal infection were not evident at the initial MRI. In three cases there was very subtle endplate oedema associated with disc degeneration, which was interpreted as Modic type I degenerative endplate change. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was continued prior to repeat MRI examinations. The mean time to the repeat examination was 17 days with a range of 8-22 days. The second examinations clearly demonstrated vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Conclusion: Although MRI is the imaging method of choice for vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis in the early stages, it may show subtle, non-specific endplate subchondral changes; a repeat examination may be required to show the typical features.

  17. MRI of interstitial lung diseases. What is possible?

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs is becoming increasingly appreciated as a third diagnostic imaging modality besides chest x-ray and computed tomography (CT). Its value is well acknowledged for pediatric patients or for scientific use particularly when radiation exposure should be strictly avoided. However, the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is the biggest challenge of all indications. The objective of this article is a summary of the current state of the art for diagnostic MRI of interstitial lung diseases. This article reflects the results of a current search of the literature and discusses them against the background of the authors own experience with lung MRI. Due to its lower spatial resolution and a higher susceptibility to artefacts MRI does not achieve the sensitivity of CT for the detection of small details for pattern recognition (e.g. fine reticulation and micronodules) but larger details (e.g. coarse fibrosis and honeycombing) can be clearly visualized. Moreover, it could be shown that MRI has the capability to add clinically valuable information on regional lung function (e.g. ventilation, perfusion and mechanical properties) and inflammation with native signal and contrast dynamics. In its present state MRI can be used for comprehensive cardiopulmonary imaging in patients with sarcoidosis or for follow-up of lung fibrosis after initial correlation with CT. Far more indications are expected when the capabilities of MRI for the assessment of regional lung function and activity of inflammation can be transferred into robust protocols for clinical use. (orig.)

  18. Clinical evaluation of 3D/3D MRI-CBCT automatching on brain tumors for online patient setup verification - A step towards MRI-based treatment planning

    Buhl, Sune K.; Duun-Christensen, Anne Katrine; Kristensen, Brian H.;

    2010-01-01

    undergoing postoperative radiotherapy for malignant brain tumors received a weekly CBCT. In total 18 scans was matched with both CT and MRI as reference. The CBCT scans were acquired using a Clinac iX 2300 linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems) with an On-Board Imager (OBI). Results. For the phantom......Background. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is often used in modern day radiotherapy (RT) due to superior soft tissue contrast. However, treatment planning based solely on MRI is restricted due to e. g. the limitations of conducting online patient setup verification using MRI as reference. In this...... study 3D/3D MRI-Cone Beam CT (CBCT) automatching for online patient setup verification was investigated. Material and methods. Initially, a multi-modality phantom was constructed and used for a quantitative comparison of CT-CBCT and MRI-CBCT automatching. Following the phantom experiment three patients...

  19. MRI of the posttraumatic shoulder

    functional discomfort during the joint loading. Compression on the rotator cuff from the overlying acromion and the subsequent tissue reaction in the subacromial bursa causes suffering tendons of these muscles. Unrated its diagnostic leads to deepen the ‘subacromial conflict’ and reach rotator cuff initially partial and later progressed. The shoulder stiffness is a condition in which the passive motion restriction is combined with pain in their final phase as well as during sleep. This also affects the active movements which are also reduced. ‘The shoulder hardening’ is at the organic component expense and it must be distinguished from the functional disorders such as muscle contracture and ‘subacromial conflict’. Restoration of work capacity in patients with idiopathic ‘frozen shoulder’ is faster than in post-traumatic shoulder. Diagnostic estimated joint capsule fibrosis more quickly gives a way to the treatment, which shortens the patient’s suffering. MRI imaging is a method of choice for the diagnosis of these conditions. MRI shows not only broken integrity of the rotator cuff tendons, but also the fluid in the subacromial bursa, which means that, must have a lesion. MRI provides information about fatty degeneration of the tendon. MRI registers the distance of the torn tendon retraction, the rupture size, may advise the surgeon on its mobility, and hence the expected forecast. However in the impingement indicative are only local areas with increased signal on T 2 images and data about severe osteophytosis in the area of the acromioclavicular joint. Outlined are the areas of present calcification in the subacromial bursa and, what is more important for the process of treatment, - their density. In shoulder instability MRI demonstrates the presence of lesions type Bankart, partial rotator cuff lesions, lesions of the ligament apparatus in combination with SLAP lesions, lesions of the posterior labrum and refers to the type of instability and the choice of

  20. X-Ray and MRI Correlation of Bone Tumours

    Mitesh D. Ghadiali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The evaluation of all skeletal lesions should begin with plain radiographic imaging. These images give basic information about its site, its location,its morphology, its aggressiveness. After the initial plain radiographic evaluation, the next imaging modality of choice is MRI. its clinical applications in the form of diagnostic and therapeutic monitoring has reached a new height in musculoskeletal imaging1. Method: Correlating x-ray findings with mri findings to know the sensitivity and specificity of each diagnostic modality and to know role of each in planning management 30 patients were studied,The plain film included at least 2 projection depending on location and then patients underwent MRI. Result: MRI is useful for information regarding soft tissue component, periosteal reaction where as XRAY is useful for information regarding bone and tumour calcification [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(4.000: 309-311

  1. 腕关节3D LAVA动态增强在判断类风湿性关节炎疾病进程的价值研究%The value of 3D dynamic contrast enhanced LAVA in evaluating the progression of rheumatoid arthritis of the wrist

    傅丽晖; 李晖; 王波; 胡斌; 王莹莹; 梁良

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨3.0T MRI LAVA动态增强检查在判断类风湿性关节炎(RA)疾病进程的价值.方法:收集临床确诊的RA患者35例,其中关节炎活动期20例,缓解期15例,进行碗关节MRI平扫加动态增强扫描,并将采集的动态增强图像进行后处理,每位患者选取碗关节周围滑膜异常强化6个感兴趣区,获得动态增强时间信号曲线,分别计算每个感兴趣区的滑膜强化率并取平均值,同时测量6个感兴趣区的滑膜厚度并取平均值.将活动期和缓解期患者的滑膜强化率、滑膜厚度差异进行统计学比较,将所有患者的滑膜强化率及滑膜厚度与血沉(ESR)、C反应蛋白(CRP)的相关性进行统计学研究.结果:活动期的时间信号曲线为快速上升平台型,缓解期的时间信号曲线为缓慢上升型.活动期患者的平均滑膜强化率(2.27±0.56)与缓解期患者的平均滑膜强化率(1.04 ±0.42)差别有统汁学意义,P<0.01;活动期平均滑膜厚度((5.9±0.4)mm)与缓解期滑膜平均厚度((2.9±0.6)mm)差别具有统计学意义,P<0.01..患者的滑膜强化率分别与ESR及CRP呈正相关(相关系数R值分别为0.778和0.816,P值分别为0.02和0.01),滑膜厚度与ESR及CRP具有一定相关性(相关系数R值分别为0.506和0.402,P值均为0.05).结论:动态增强MRI时间信号曲线形状、滑膜强化率及滑膜厚度对判断RA的活动性具有较高价值.

  2. MRI of the shoulder

    Vahlensieck, M.

    2000-02-01

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  3. MRI of cardiovascular malformations

    Kastler, Bruno [Centre Hospitalier Univ. Jean Minjoz, Besancon (France); Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (FR). Lab. I4S (Health, Innovation, Intervention, Imaging, Engineering); Centre Hospitalier Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    MRI is a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality that is perfectly suited for the diagnosis and follow-up of both pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. It provides a large field of view and has the unique ability to depict complex cardiac and vascular anatomy and to measure cardiac function and flow within one examination. MRI is the ideal complement to echocardiography whenever the information provided by the latter is limited. This book has been conceived as a self-teaching manual that will assist qualified radiologists, cardiologists, and pediatricians, as well as those in training. It is richly illustrated with numerous images and drawings that cover all usual and most unusual anomalies. The principal author, Professor Bruno Kastler, is head of radiology at Besancon University Hospital, France and is board certified in both radiology and cardiology. (orig.)

  4. MRI of the shoulder

    Shoulder imaging is one of the major applications in musculoskeletal MRI. In order to analyze the images it is important to keep informed about anatomical and pathological findings and publications. In this article MRI technique, anatomy and pathology is reviewed. Technical considerations about MR sequences and examination strategy are only shortly discussed with emphasis on turbo spin echo and short T1 inversion recovery imaging. Basic anatomy as well as recent findings, including macroscopic aspects of the supraspinatus fat pad, composition of the supraspinatus muscle belly, and variability of the glenohumeral ligaments or coracoid ligament, are presented. Basic pathological conditions are described in detail, e. g. instability particularly problems in differentiating the various subtypes of labral pathology. Rotator cuff diseases are elucidated with emphasis on some rarer entities such as subscapularis calcifying tendinitis, coracoid impingement, chronic bursitis producing the double-line sign, prominent coraco-acromial ligament and the impingement due to an inflamed os acromiale. (orig.)

  5. The MRI characteristics of Hashimoto encephalopathy

    Objective: To study the MRI findings of HE and the pathological mechanism and to improve the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of HE. Methods: Five patients of HE diagnosed by clinical and laboratory examination were examined with conventional MRI scan. Additional DWI, MRA and enhancement MRI scan were performed on 3 patients in which abnormal findings was detected on the conventional MRI. The distribution of lesions and signal characteristics were analyzed. The ADC values of the lesions and of the contralateral non-lesion area were measured. Moreover, the possible pathological mechanisms of HE were discussed on the basis of changes of clinical and imaging manifestations in the two cases with serial clinical and MRI data. Results: Of 5 patients, brain abnormalities were found in 3 cases, which showed scattered spotted supratentorial white matter lesions of isointensity on T1WI and DWI, and high signal intensity on T2WI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Meanwhile, multiple plaque-like lesions involving both white matter and gray matter were found, mainly located at the basal ganglia nuclei, hippocampus and cingulate cortex. The lesions demonstrated iso-or hypo-intensity on T1WI, and iso-or hyper-intensity on T2WI, FlAIR and DWI at the initial stage. No enhancement was found in these lesions and MRA disclosed no remarkable findings. The ADC value of the lesions [(0.449±0.092)×10-3 mm2/S] was decreased significantly compared with the contralateral noninvolved area [(0.838± 0.062)×10-3 mm2/s] at the early onset. In 2 cases with glucocorticoid therapy, together with symptom relief, MRI follow-up scan demonstrated the reduction of lesion volume, the signal change to hyperintensity on T1WI and hypo-intensity on DWI. The ADC of the lesions increased significantly. Conclusion: The MRI could be one of the effective tools for diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and judging the prognosis and therapeutic results of HE. Meanwhile, it may be a non

  6. MRI of restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of MRI in combination of delayed gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging for the identification of restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Methods: One hundred sixteen patients with RCM underwent ECG, thoracic radiography, echocardiography and MRI. The final diagnosis was made on comprehensive evaluation in consideration of patient history, clinical symptoms and imaging appearances. Fifty-five normal subjects were used as the controls. All patients were divided into two groups according to contrast-enhanced MRI patterns: RCM with delayed enhancement (RCM with DE, n=35) and RCM without delayed enhancement (RCM without DE, n=81). Bi-atrial and bi-ventricular size, ventricular septal and left free wall thickness were measured. A paired t-test was used for statistic analysis. Results: Bi-atrial size, right ventricular diastolic diameter (RVDD), ventricular septal and left free wall thickness were significantly larger in RCM patients than in normal subjects (P0.05). Visual observation showed mild mitral regurgitation (50 cases), moderate mitral regurgitation (24 cases ), mild tricuspid regurgitation (32 cases) and severe tricuspid regurgitation (46 cases). Thirty-five RCMs with DE presented diffuse (15 cases) or segmental (20 cases) enhancement. Twelve RCMs with diffuse delayed enhancement showed powdery, enhancement, and 3 showed petaline enhancement. Three cases with powdery enhancement were histologically proven as myocardial amyloidosis. Ventricular septum was the most vulnerable segment in patients with segmental enhancement. Six cases presented subendocardial enhancement that corresponded to apical obliteration, of which one case was confirmed as hypereosinophilia by bone marrow biopsy and the other 14 cases didn't present any regular enhancement. In 81 RCMs without DE, marked bi-atrial dilation, near-normal ventricular chambers and near-normal ventricular thickness were presented. Conclusion: MRI is an excellent imaging modality for

  7. MRI of maxillary sinuses

    A mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus is clinically important in the dental fields. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can demonstrate a mucous membrane because the mucosa contains rich free water. However, the morphology and location of the mucous membrane of normal maxillary sinuses have not been studied well by MRI. T2-weighted coronal images were obtained by spin echo technique in 40 normal volunteers. The eight maxillary sinuses were classified into four groups (Type 1∼IV) according to the morphology and also classified into five groups (Type a, b1, b2, b3, c) according to the location of the mucous membrane. Coronal images obtained at a standard angle of 77 degree to the Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was the best for the evaluation of maxillary sinus because the image displayed the maximum cross-section of the maxillary sinus. In the normal cases, Type I (no high signal intensity) was observed in 20 sites, Type II (linear high signal intensity) in 48 sites, Type III (belt-like high signal intensity) in 11 sites and Type IV (mass-like high signal intensity) in 1 site. Type a (medial∼basal wall) was observed in 46 sites, Type b1 (medial wall alone) in 4 sites, Type b2 (basal wall alone) in 8 sites and Type c (entire wall) in 2 sites. Half of the cases showed the same findings bilaterally. Thus, MRI could demonstrate the morphology and location of the mucous membrane in the normal maxillary sinus so clearly that MRI was considered to be a useful diagnostic tool in the dento-maxillo-facial region. (author)

  8. [MRI in coma survivors].

    Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Bruno, M A; Boly, M; Soddu, A; Laureys, S; Moonen, G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injured disorders of consciousness patients are still challenging for diagnosis, prognosis, ethical and socio-economic reasons. Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers, et al. 2009). Recent advances in MRI techniques (diffusion tensor, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional imaging) provide data that could improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:20085015

  9. Measuring MRI noise

    Hoiting, Gerke Jan

    2005-01-01

    De MRI-scanner wordt tegenwoordig veel gebruikt voor medisch onderzoek. Het lawaai dat het apparaat produceert (110 dB en meer), is echter een storende factor die lastig te beteugelen is. Weliswaar kan het geluiddruk vooraf berekend worden, maar de tot nu gehanteerde methode geeft een foute voorspelling wanneer het over een lage geluidsdruk gaat. Gerke Hoiting stelt in zijn proefschrift een nieuwe methode voor, die bij lage geluidsdruk wel een correcte voorspelling doet. Het proefschrift beva...

  10. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  11. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  12. MRI follow-up of conservatively treated meniscal knee lesions in general practice

    Oei, Edwin H.G.; Hunink, M.G.M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Program for the Assessment of Radiological Technology (ART Program), Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Koster, Ingrid M. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Hensen, Jan-Hein J.; Vroegindeweij, Dammis [Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boks, Simone S. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Maasstad Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Diaconessenhuis Meppel, Department of Radiology, Meppel (Netherlands); Wagemakers, Harry P.A.; Koes, Bart W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M.A. [University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of General Practice, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate meniscal status change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, prognostic factors and association with clinical outcome in patients with conservatively treated knee injury. We analysed 403 meniscal horns in 101 conservatively treated patients (59 male; mean age 40 years) in general practice who underwent initial knee MRI within 5 weeks of trauma. We performed ordinal logistic regression analysis to analyse prognostic factors for meniscal change on follow-up MRI after 1 year, and we assessed the association with clinical outcome. On follow-up MRI 49 meniscal horns had deteriorated and 18 had improved. Age (odds ratio [OR] 1.3/decade), body weight (OR 1.2/10 kg), total anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture on initial MRI (OR 2.4), location in the posterior horn of the medial meniscus (OR 3.0) and an initial meniscal lesion (OR 0.3) were statistically significant predictors of meniscal MRI appearance change after 1 year, which was not associated with clinical outcome. In conservatively treated patients, meniscal deterioration on follow-up MRI 1 year after trauma is predicted by higher age and body weight, initial total ACL rupture, and location in the medial posterior horn. Change in MRI appearance is not associated with clinical outcome. (orig.)

  13. MRI diagnosis of meningovascular neurosyphilis

    Objective: To evaluate the value and limitation of MRI in the diagnosis of meningovascular neurosyphilis. Methods: Five cases of neurosyphilis confirmed by clinical history/laboratory were examined with MRI (3 plain MRI, 2 enhanced MRI). The results of blood and CSF TPPA/RPR were positive and HIV was negative. Results: Abnormal signals were demonstrated in the temporal lobe in 3 cases, and infarction was revealed in the basal ganglion and periventricular white matter in another 2 cases. There was no marked contrast enhancement in the 2 cases. Conclusion: Meningovascular neurosyphilis has no characteristic features on MRI, but MRI is an effective method in delineating the size, range, and characters of neurosyphilis, and it is also an useful modality to follow-up after antibiotic therapy. (authors)

  14. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A;

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems...... imaging methods such as echo-planar imaging (EPI) or spiral acquisitions that can push the scanner hardware to its limits. High temporal stability sustained over the course of a scan session (up to 2 h) is required to obtain quality data within a single subject, sustained stability is required to obtain...

  15. MRI of the fetal abdomen

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important diagnostic component for central nervous system and thoracic diseases during fetal development. Although ultrasound remains the method of choice for observing the fetus during pregnancy, fetal MRI is being increasingly used as an additional technique for the accurate diagnosis of abdominal diseases. Recent publications confirm the value of MRI in the diagnosis of fetal gastrointestinal tract and urogenital system diseases. The following report provides an overview of MRI-examination techniques for the most frequent diseases of the abdomen. (orig.)

  16. MRI quantification of rheumatoid arthritis: Current knowledge and future perspectives

    Boesen, Mikael [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: parker@frh.regionh.dk; Ostergaard, Mikkel [Department of Rheumatology, Hvidovre and Herlev University Hospitals, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cimmino, Marco A. [Department of Rheumatology, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Kubassova, Olga [Image Analysis LTD, Leeds (United Kingdom); Jensen, Karl Erik [Department of Radiology, MR section, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-08-15

    The international consensus on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for which a reliable identification of early disease is mandatory. Conventional radiography of the joints is considered the standard method for detecting and quantifying joint damage in RA. However, radiographs only show late disease manifestations as joint space narrowing and bone erosions, whereas it cannot detect synovitis and bone marrow oedema, i.e., inflammation in the synovium or the bone, which may be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) months to years before erosions develop. Furthermore, MRI allows earlier visualization of bone erosions than radiography. In order to allow early treatment initiation and optimal guidance of the therapeutic strategy, there is a need for methods which are capable of early detection of inflammatory joint changes. In this review, we will discuss available data, advantages, limitations and potential future of MRI in RA.

  17. Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) versus axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) to detect and measure bone metastases in prostate cancer (PCa)

    To compare whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) and axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) in detecting and measuring bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). WB-MRI and AS-MRI examinations were performed in 60 patients with PCa at high risk of metastases. Two radiologists separately categorised the AS-MRI and WB-MRI as negative or positive for metastases, and measured focal metastases using the ''Response evaluation criteria in solid tumours'' (RECIST) criteria transposed to bone. One radiologist reviewed all examinations 2 months later. Inter- and intraobserver agreements in establishing the presence/absence of metastases were calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess measurement agreement between AS-MRI and WB-MRI. Strong to perfect inter- and intraobserver agreements were found between AS-MRI and WB-MRI in defining the presence/absence of bone metastases. There were no patients with isolated ''peripheral'' metastases at WB-MRI, missed at AS-MRI. There was no difference in lesion count between the two radiologists. AS-MRI and WB-MRI provided statistically equivalent RECIST values for one radiologist and slightly lower values at AS-MRI for the other. In our series of PCa patients, AS-MRI and WB-MRI were equivalent in determining the presence/absence of bone metastases and provided similar evaluation of the metastatic burden. (orig.)

  18. Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) versus axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) to detect and measure bone metastases in prostate cancer (PCa)

    Lecouvet, F.E.; Simon, M.; Berg, B.C.V.; Simoni, P. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Brussels (Belgium); Tombal, B. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, Department of Urology, Brussels (Belgium); Jamart, J. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Clinique Universitaire de Mont-Godinne, Center of Biostatistics and Medical Documentation, Yvoir (Belgium)

    2010-12-15

    To compare whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) and axial skeleton MRI (AS-MRI) in detecting and measuring bone metastases in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). WB-MRI and AS-MRI examinations were performed in 60 patients with PCa at high risk of metastases. Two radiologists separately categorised the AS-MRI and WB-MRI as negative or positive for metastases, and measured focal metastases using the ''Response evaluation criteria in solid tumours'' (RECIST) criteria transposed to bone. One radiologist reviewed all examinations 2 months later. Inter- and intraobserver agreements in establishing the presence/absence of metastases were calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to assess measurement agreement between AS-MRI and WB-MRI. Strong to perfect inter- and intraobserver agreements were found between AS-MRI and WB-MRI in defining the presence/absence of bone metastases. There were no patients with isolated ''peripheral'' metastases at WB-MRI, missed at AS-MRI. There was no difference in lesion count between the two radiologists. AS-MRI and WB-MRI provided statistically equivalent RECIST values for one radiologist and slightly lower values at AS-MRI for the other. In our series of PCa patients, AS-MRI and WB-MRI were equivalent in determining the presence/absence of bone metastases and provided similar evaluation of the metastatic burden. (orig.)

  19. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  20. MRI finding of hemangioblastomas

    Park, Seung Cheol; Oh, Min Cheol; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Seol, Hye Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of posterior fossa hemanangioblastoma and usefulness of contrast enhancement with Gd-DTPA. Seven patients with posterior fossa hemangioblastoma were studied with both pre- and post-enhanced MRI. The MR images were reviewed regarding the location, size, signal intensities of cysts and mural nodules, and their contrast enhancement pattern. Five tumors were located in cerebellar hemisphere, one in vermis, and one in posterior part of medulla. One patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease had a medullary hemangioblastoma with multiple pancreatic cysts. In 6 cases, the major portion of the tumor was cysts and had small mulkal nodules. The solid portion was relatively lange in one cases, cemprising half of the tumor cysts were oval shaped and their sized were 3-6.7 cm in diameter. In five cases(71%), septations were noted within the cysts. Cysts were isointense or slightly hyperintense on T1-weighted image and hyperintense on T2- weighted image compared with cerebrospinal fluid. Mural nodules were oval or rounded radiotherapy had better prognosis than those treated with radiotherapy alwas 0.5-2.5 cm in diameter. Mural nodules were isointense to gray matter. They were detected in five cases on T1-weighted images and one case on T2-weighted images. In two cases, vascular signal void area was noted in mural nodules. On contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, all mural nodules were intensely enhanced. MRI provide to be a good diagnostic method to detect and characterize posterior fossa hemangioblastoma. The most common finding is Cystic posterior fossa lesion with enhancing mural nodule. Contrast enhancement is essential for specific diagnosis.

  1. Rabies, encephalomyelitis: MRI findings

    The authors present a 14 year old patient who started with walking and swallowing difficulty; followed by fever, abdominal and lower back pain. Mechanical breathing difficulties required a respiratory mechanic assistance. The diagnosis of Guillain-Barre syndrome was thought at first. Since the patient have had previous contact with a bat two months before the symptoms began, this suggested rabies as the main diagnosis, which was later confirmed by hair-bulb, cornea, oral mucosa and salival immunofluorescence. The brain and spinal cord MRI showed focal lesions in T2 and FLAIR sequences, compatible with encephalomyelitis. (author)

  2. MRI of intact plants

    As, van, H.; Scheenen, T.; Vergeldt, F.J.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-destructive and non-invasive technique that can be used to acquire two- or even three-dimensional images of intact plants. The information within the images can be manipulated and used to study the dynamics of plant water relations and water transport in the stem, e.g., as a function of environmental (stress) conditions. Non-spatially resolved portable NMR is becoming available to study leaf water content and distribution of water in different...

  3. Magnetic rubber inspection (MRI)

    Magnetic Rubber Inspection (MRI) was developed to inspect for small cracks and flaws encountered in high performance aircraft. A formula of very fine magnetic particles immersed in a room temperature curing rubber is catalysed and poured into dams (retainers) on the surface of the part to be inspected. Inducing a magnetic field then causes the particles to be drawn to discontinuities in the component under test. These indicating particles are held to the discontinuity by magnetic attraction, as the rubber cures. The solid rubber cast (Replica) is then removed and examined under a microscope for indicating lines of particle concentrations. 3 refs., 6 figs

  4. Juvenile osteochondritis dissecans: a 5-year review of the natural history using clinical and MRI evaluation

    Although MRI prognostic features for juvenile osteochondritis dissecans (JOCD) have been determined, the natural history of JOCD on serial MRI has not been fully documented. To document the natural history of JOCD on serial MRI and to correlate this with arthroscopy and clinical outcome over a 5-year follow-up. Twenty-one knees in 19 patients (15 boys, 4 girls; age range 5-15 years) with JOCD underwent MRI and clinical follow-up over 5 years. Lesions were classified as stable or unstable on MRI and compared with clinical and arthroscopic data. On 5-year follow-up, 17 of 19 patients were asymptomatic and 2 of 19 had minimal pain. Fourteen arthroscopies were performed on 11/21 knees. One of twenty-one had fragment fixation. On initial MRI, eight knees had marked fragmentation, high signal at the fragment/bone interface and incomplete defects in the hyaline cartilage (MRI stage III-stable), but no tear. Of these, five had arthroscopy, all confirming intact cartilage. One of twenty-one knees was unstable (MRI stage IVb) with a detached osteochondral fragment, requiring surgery. Despite extensive subchondral bone changes on MRI, all cases with intact cartilage (95%) improved with conservative treatment. Early MRI allows prompt diagnosis and institution of conservative treatment. This results in healing and avoidance of surgery in most patients. (orig.)

  5. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  6. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23–37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... metallic items, which can distort MRI images removable dental work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings In most cases, an MRI exam is safe for patients with metal implants, except for a few types. People with the ...

  11. Postmortem MRI of bladder agenesis

    Barber, Brendan R. [St George' s Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom); Weber, Martin A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Bockenhauer, Detlef [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Nephrology, London (United Kingdom); Hiorns, Melanie P.; McHugh, Kieran [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    We report a 35-week preterm neonate with bladder agenesis and bilateral dysplastic kidneys. A suprapubic catheter was inadvertently inserted into one of the larger inferior cysts of the left dysplastic kidney. A postmortem MRI scan was performed with the findings being confirmed on autopsy. We are unaware of another postmortem MRI study demonstrating bladder agenesis. (orig.)

  12. MRI Findings In Dengue Encephalitis

    Ashraf V.V

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological manifestations are rare in dengue fever. Two cases with encephalopathy and systemic features of dengue fever with abnormal CSF and MR imaging are reported. Striking MRI finding was bilateral symmetrical thalamic lesions similar to those reported in Japanese encephalitis. This report highlights that MRI findings can be similar in dengue and Japanese encephalitis.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures are clearer and more detailed than with other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in early diagnosis and evaluation of many conditions, including tumors. MRI enables the discovery of ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic ... that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... MRI exam is assumed to outweigh the potential risks. Pregnant women should not receive injections of gadolinium contrast ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits ... (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of the brain and other cranial structures ...

  16. Cardiovascular MRI with ferumoxytol.

    Finn, J P; Nguyen, K-L; Han, F; Zhou, Z; Salusky, I; Ayad, I; Hu, P

    2016-08-01

    The practice of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) has changed significantly in the span of a decade. Concerns regarding gadolinium (Gd)-associated nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in those with severely impaired renal function spurred developments in low-dose CEMRA and non-contrast MRA as well as efforts to seek alternative MR contrast agents. Originally developed for MR imaging use, ferumoxytol (an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle), is currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in adults with renal disease. Since its clinical availability in 2009, there has been rising interest in the scientific and clinical use of ferumoxytol as an MR contrast agent. The unique physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of ferumoxytol, including its long intravascular half-life and high r1 relaxivity, support a spectrum of MRI applications beyond the scope of Gd-based contrast agents. Moreover, whereas Gd is not found in biological systems, iron is essential for normal metabolism, and nutritional iron deficiency poses major public health challenges worldwide. Once the carbohydrate shell of ferumoxytol is degraded, the elemental iron at its core is incorporated into the reticuloendothelial system. These considerations position ferumoxytol as a potential game changer in the field of CEMRA and MRI. In this paper, we aim to summarise our experience with the cardiovascular applications of ferumoxytol and provide a brief synopsis of ongoing investigations on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR applications. PMID:27221526

  17. MRI of the cartilage

    With the introduction of fat-suppressed gradient-echo and fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences in clinical routine MR visualization of the hyaline articular cartilage is routinely possible in the larger joints. While 3D gradient-echo with fat suppression allows exact depiction of the thickness and surface of cartilage, FSE outlines the normal and abnormal internal structures of the hyaline cartilage; therefore, both sequences seem to be necessary in a standard MRI protocol for cartilage visualization. In diagnostically ambiguous cases, in which important therapeutic decisions are required, direct MR arthrography is the established imaging standard as an add-on procedure. Despite the social impact and prevalence, until recent years there was a paucity of knowledge about the pathogenesis of cartilage damage. With the introduction of high-resolution MRI with powerful surface coils and fat-suppression techniques, visualization of the articular cartilage is now routinely possible in many joints. After a short summary of the anatomy and physiology of the hyaline cartilage, the different MR imaging methods are discussed and recommended standards are suggested. (orig.)

  18. Tailgut cysts: MRI findings

    Aflalo-Hazan, V.; Rousset, P.; Lewin, M.; Azizi, L. [Hopital Saint Antoine, Department of Radiology, PARIS Cedex 12 (France); Mourra, N. [Hopital Saint Antoine, Department of Pathology, PARIS Cedex 12 (France); Hoeffel, C. [Hopital Robert Debre, Department of Radiology, Reims Cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 11 surgically resected pelvic tailgut cysts were analyzed with reference to histopathologic and clinical data. Homogeneity, size, location, signal intensity, appearance and presence of septa and/or nodules and/or peripheral rim and involvement of surrounding structures were studied. Histological examination demonstrated 11 tailgut cysts (TGC), including one infected TGC and one TGC with a component of adenocarcinoma. Lesions (3-8 cm in diameter) were exclusively or partly retrorectal in all cases but one, with an extension down the anal canal in five cases. Lesions were multicystic in all patients but one. On T1-weighted MR images, all cystic lesions contained at least one hyperintense cyst. The peripheral rim of the cystic lesion was regular and non or moderately enhancing in all cases but the two complicated TGC. Nodular peripheral rim and irregular septa were seen in the degenerated TGC. Marked enhancement of the peripheral structures was noted in the two complicated TGC. Pelvic MRI is a valuable tool in the preoperative evaluation of TGC. (orig.)

  19. Tailgut cysts: MRI findings.

    Aflalo-Hazan, V; Rousset, P; Mourra, N; Lewin, M; Azizi, L; Hoeffel, C

    2008-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 11 surgically resected pelvic tailgut cysts were analyzed with reference to histopathologic and clinical data. Homogeneity, size, location, signal intensity, appearance and presence of septa and/or nodules and/or peripheral rim and involvement of surrounding structures were studied. Histological examination demonstrated 11 tailgut cysts (TGC), including one infected TGC and one TGC with a component of adenocarcinoma. Lesions (3-8 cm in diameter) were exclusively or partly retrorectal in all cases but one, with an extension down the anal canal in five cases. Lesions were multicystic in all patients but one. On T1-weighted MR images, all cystic lesions contained at least one hyperintense cyst. The peripheral rim of the cystic lesion was regular and non or moderately enhancing in all cases but the two complicated TGC. Nodular peripheral rim and irregular septa were seen in the degenerated TGC. Marked enhancement of the peripheral structures was noted in the two complicated TGC. Pelvic MRI is a valuable tool in the preoperative evaluation of TGC. PMID:18566821

  20. MRI in the assessment of congenital vaginal anomalies

    Humphries, P.D. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Simpson, J.C.; Creighton, S.M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hall-Craggs, M.A. [Department of Radiology, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: margaret.hall-craggs@uclh.nhs.uk

    2008-04-15

    Aim: To assess accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the delineation of morphological abnormalities of the vagina in patients with congenital anomalies of the genito-urinary tract. Materials and methods: Fifty-one patients (median age 19 years; range 12-40 years) were studied. All were consecutively referred for MRI to assess genital tract anatomy, between 1996 and 2004, from a clinic specializing in congenital abnormalities of the urogenital tract. All patients were assessed clinically and underwent MRI. Images were reviewed retrospectively by an experienced radiologist. Where there was discordance between clinical and radiological findings a consensus diagnosis was achieved by the gynaecologists and radiologists reviewing all of the clinical and radiological evidence together, including assessment of vaginal length. Results: The clinical data were incomplete for five women and the images non-diagnostic in two cases; consequently, 44 of 51 women had complete datasets and could be evaluated. Vaginas were abnormal in 30 of the 44 patients. There was discordance between the clinical and imaging findings at the initial review in three of the 44 cases (6.8%). After consensus review, and with the inclusion of measurement of the vaginal length on MRI, the MRI and clinical findings were concordant in all cases. The initial discordance was due to two vaginal dimples not being appreciated on MRI and one case in which presence of vaginal tissue proximal to a mid-segment obstruction was not appreciated clinically. Conclusion: MRI is an accurate method of imaging vaginal anomalies. However, to achieve reliable results the radiologist requires details of previous surgery and the vaginal length must be measured.

  1. MRI diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the cuboid bone in two infants

    We describe two infants in whom MRI diagnosed osteomyelitis of the cuboid bone when conventional X-rays were negative. Neoplastic, traumatic and ischaemic aetiologies could be excluded with the initial MR examinations. (orig.)

  2. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  3. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao (Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-01-01

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  4. MRI diagnosis for prostate cancer

    Tamada, Tsutomu; Nagai, Kiyohisa; Imai, Shigeki; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Jo, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Fukunaga, Masao [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Matsuki, Takakazu

    1998-12-31

    Recently, in Japan, both the Westernization of life styles and the advent of an aged-society have led to an increase in the incidence of prostate cancer. In making a localizing diagnosis of prostate cancer, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has excellent contrast resolution, and transrectal ultrasonography, are used clinically, and their usefulness is being established. MRI is employed in the diagnosis of prostate cancer to detect tumors, and to determine the stage of such tumors. For the visualization of prostate cancer by MRI, T2-weighted axial images are used exclusively. After becoming familiar with normal prostate images, it is important to evaluate the localization of a tumor, and the invasion of the capsule and seminal vesicles. Future applications of new techniques for MRI will undoubtedly be found. In this paper, the present state of MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer at Kawasaki Medical School Hospital will be reviewed. (author)

  5. MRI in ischemic heart disease

    Full text: The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease has increased over the last years. Cardiac MRI is the only imaging modality that provides 'one stop shop' assessment. Information about ventricular function, myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability can be obtained in a single cardiac MRI session. Additionally, Cardiac MRI has become a gold standard method in evaluation of myocardial viability and in assessment of ventricular mass and function. As a result, cardiac MRI enable radiologist to comprehensively assess ischemic heart disease. The aim of this presentation is to provide the reader a state-of-the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study ischemic heart disease patients.

  6. Fast Reference-Based MRI

    Weizman, Lior; Ben-Basaht, Dafna

    2015-01-01

    In many clinical MRI scenarios, existing imaging information can be used to significantly shorten acquisition time or to improve Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR). In some cases, a previously acquired image can serve as a reference image, that may exhibit similarity to the image being acquired. Examples include similarity between adjacent slices in high resolution MRI, similarity between various contrasts in the same scan and similarity between different scans of the same patient. In this paper we present a general framework for utilizing reference images for fast MRI. We take into account that the reference image may exhibit low similarity with the acquired image and develop an iterative weighted approach for reconstruction, which tunes the weights according to the degree of similarity. Experiments demonstrate the performance of the method in three different clinical MRI scenarios: SNR improvement in high resolution brain MRI, utilizing similarity between T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR)...

  7. MRI findings in Hirayama disease

    Raval Monali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7, abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30-40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast.

  8. MRI findings in Hirayama disease

    The objective of the study was to study the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of Hirayama disease on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Nine patients with clinically suspected Hirayama disease were evaluated with neutral position, flexion, contrast-enhanced MRI and fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) sequences. The spectrum of MRI features was evaluated and correlated with the clinical and electromyography findings. MRI findings of localized lower cervical cord atrophy (C5-C7), abnormal curvature, asymmetric cord flattening, loss of attachment of the dorsal dural sac and subjacent laminae in the neutral position, anterior displacement of the dorsal dura on flexion and a prominent epidural space were revealed in all patients on conventional MRI as well as with the dynamic 3D-FIESTA sequence. Intramedullary hyperintensity was seen in four patients on conventional MRI and on the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Flow voids were seen in four patients on conventional MRI sequences and in all patients with the 3D-FIESTA sequence. Contrast enhancement of the epidural component was noted in all the five patients with thoracic extensions. The time taken for conventional and contrast-enhanced MRI was about 30–40 min, while that for the 3D-FIESTA sequence was 6 min. Neutral and flexion position MRI and the 3D-FIESTA sequence compliment each other in displaying the spectrum of findings in Hirayama disease. A flexion study should form an essential part of the screening protocol in patients with suspected Hirayama disease. Newer sequences such as the 3D-FIESTA may help in reducing imaging time and obviating the need for contrast

  9. Pediatric Burkitt lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis: MRI characteristics

    Amodio, John; Brodsky, Jennie E. [SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare initial presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with few reported cases described in older adults and even fewer in children. MRI features of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas are sparse in the radiologic literature. We present a 6-year-old boy who presented with pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice, which was the result of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas. The imaging findings of pancreatic involvement of Burkitt lymphoma on MRI are discussed and the contributory role of the radiologist in guiding the appropriate clinical work-up of this disease is highlighted. (orig.)

  10. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv;

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change in...... hippocampal volume. We tested the hypothesis that hippocampal texture has association to early cognitive loss beyond that of volumetric changes. The texture marker was trained and evaluated using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and subsequently...

  11. Pediatric Burkitt lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis: MRI characteristics

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare initial presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with few reported cases described in older adults and even fewer in children. MRI features of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas are sparse in the radiologic literature. We present a 6-year-old boy who presented with pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice, which was the result of Burkitt lymphoma of the pancreas. The imaging findings of pancreatic involvement of Burkitt lymphoma on MRI are discussed and the contributory role of the radiologist in guiding the appropriate clinical work-up of this disease is highlighted. (orig.)

  12. MRI findings in bipartite patella

    Kavanagh, Eoin C. [University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Zoga, Adam; Omar, Imran [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ford, Stephanie; Eustace, Stephen [Cappagh National Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Schweitzer, Mark [Hospital for Joint Disease, Orthopedic Institute, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Bipartite patella is a known cause of anterior knee pain. Our purpose was to detail the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bipartite patella in a retrospective cohort of patients imaged at our institution. MRI exams from 53 patients with findings of bipartite patella were evaluated to assess for the presence of bone marrow edema within the bipartite fragment and for the presence of abnormal signal across the synchondrosis or pseudarthrosis. Any other significant knee pathology seen at MRI was also recorded. We also reviewed 400 consecutive knee MRI studies to determine the MRI prevalence of bipartite patella. Of the 53 patients with bipartite patella 40 (75%) were male; 35 (66%) had edema within the bipartite fragment. Of the 18 with no edema an alternative explanation for knee pain was found in 13 (72%). Edema within the bipartite fragment was the sole finding in 26 of 53 (49%) patients. Bipartite patella was seen in 3 (0.7%) of 400 patients. In patients with bipartite patella at knee MRI, bone marrow edema within the bipartite fragment was the sole finding on knee MRI in almost half of the patients in our series. (orig.)

  13. MRI of plants and foods.

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory. PMID:23369439

  14. MRI findings of neuro-Behcet's disease.

    Borhani Haghighi, Afshin; Sarhadi, Sirous; Farahangiz, Siamak

    2011-06-01

    Neurological manifestations present in 5% to 30% of patients with Behçet's disease. We studied consecutive patients with relapsing--remitting or progressive neuro-Behcet's disease who referred from January 2002 to January 2009 to Nemazee Hospital, Shiraz, southern Iran. Sequential MRIs were performed during clinical relapses in patients with relapsing--remitting course or during relentless progression after first referral of patients with progressive course. We reviewed 55 MRIs of 17 patients (ten men and seven women) with age of 36.4 ± 8.1 years at the time of first MRI. Nine (53%) patients had a relapsing-remitting course and eight (47%) had a progressive course. The initial and last follow-up studies had a mean interval of 29.2 months (range, 24 to 84). Of the patients with progressive neuro-Behcet's disease, 50% had brainstem atrophy and 75% had black holes in their last follow-up MRIs. The respective prevalence rates for those with relapsing--remitting neuro-Behcet's disease were 0% and 11%. In the total population of patients with neuro-Behcet's disease, the number of lesions (p = 0.002) and MRI burden (p = 0.016) had a significant increase in the last follow-up studies in comparison to the initial studies. Incremental pattern in the number of lesions and MRI burdens in patients with parenchymal neuro-Behcet's disease in our longitudinal study may imply an ongoing pathologic process. PMID:21165752

  15. MRI of herpes simplex encephalitis

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in eight patients with herpes simplex meningoence phalitis were reviewed: 14 examinations were analysed. The most striking finding was high signal intensity in the temporal lobe(s) with the typical configuration known from CT. Meningeal enhancement after Gd-DTPA administration was clearly seen in four patients. Haemorrhagic changes are much better seen on MRI than on CT. When adequate motion control can be achieved, MRI becomes the examination of choice in the diagnosis and follow-up of herpes simplex encephalitis. Localized 1H MR spectroscopy also proved promising in the study of neuronal loss. (orig.)

  16. MRI of cystic pituitary tumors

    We retrospectively reviewed MRI findings of 17 patients with 3 histologically proven cystic pituitary tumors. They consisted of 10 cystic pituitary adenomas, 4 craniopharyngiomas and 3 Rathke's cleft cysts. We analyzed the following MRI parameters such as cyst wall appearance, enhancement pattern of cyst wall, location of residual pituitary gland and location of tumor. They were clinically significant parameters for histological differentiation. Even though combinations of such MRI parameters helped for more accurate preoperative diagnosis, the differentiation between craniopharyngioma and Rathke's cleft cyst was difficult in some cases. (author)

  17. Brain venous pathologies: MRI findings

    Purpose: To describe MRI findings of the different brain venous pathologies. Material and Methods: Between January 2002 and March 2004, 18 patients were studied 10 males and 8 females between 6 and 63 years old; with different brain venous pathologies. In all cases brain MRI were performed including morphological sequences with and without gadolinium injection and angiographic venous sequences. Results: 10 venous occlusions were found, 6 venous angiomas, and 2 presented varices secondary to arteriovenous dural fistula. Conclusion: Brain venous pathologies can appear in many different clinical contexts, with different prognosis and treatment. In all the cases brain MRI was the best imaging study to disclose typical morphologic abnormalities. (author)

  18. International symposium: MRI update 1988

    The Second International Symposium on MRI update was held in Kumamoto, Japan, under the sponsorship of the Department of Radiology, Kumamoto University (Japan) and of UCLA (the USA) from August 31 through September 2, 1988. This report contains presentations on MRI from the basic to the most sophisticated aspects with emphasis on the most commonly encountered diseases and findings in the practice of radiology. An up-to-date MRI was discussed in terms of the following organs: chest, brain, bone and joints, head and neck, spine and its contents, abdomen, pelvis, and liver. (N.K.)

  19. Childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: the role of brain and spinal cord MRI

    Background. It is recognised that the clinical and radiological spectrum of childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is wide. Objective. To determine whether initial MRI features are predictive of clinical outcome and to determine the role of MRI in the management of ADEM. Materials and methods. The MRI scans of ten consecutive children (eight boys, two girls), clinically and radiologically diagnosed to have ADEM, were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up MRI was available for eight patients. Results. Lesions ranged from small and punctate (<1 cm) to moderate sized and confluent (4-5 cm) to diffuse and extensive. Spinal cord lesions, seen in five of seven children, were contiguous or segmental. Seven children (70%) made good clinical recovery while three children (30%) remained severely handicapped. There was no correlation between the site, extent and pattern of involvement and clinical outcome. However, the evolution of MRI findings on follow-up correlated well with the subsequent clinical course and outcome. Conclusions. Although the extent and site of lesions on initial MRI scans are not predictive of clinical outcome, early MRI of the brain and spine is useful in aiding clinical diagnosis, and subsequent follow-up MRI is helpful in monitoring disease progression. (orig.)

  20. MRI in spinal cord decompression sickness

    Spinal cord decompression sickness (DCS) is a rare condition that can lead to spinal cord infarction. Despite the low incidence of diving-related DCS, we have managed to collect the data and MRI findings of seven patients who have been diagnosed with and treated for DCS in our local hyperbaric facility. This study describes the clinical presentation, MRI spinal cord findings, treatment administered and outcome of these patients. The patient medical records, from 1997 to 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients with a final diagnosis of DCS and who underwent examination were included. The images were independently reviewed by two radiologists who recorded the location and number of lesions within the spinal cord. The Frankel grading was used to assess the initial and clinical outcome response. Patchy-increased T2W changes affecting several levels at the same time were found. Contrary to the popular notion that venous infarction is the leading cause of DCS, most of our patients also demonstrated affliction of grey matter, which is typically seen in an arterial pattern of infarction. Initial involvement of multiple (>6) spinal cord levels was associated with a poor outcome. Patients who continued to have multiple neurological sequelae with less than 50% resolution of symptoms despite recompression treatment were also those who had onset of symptoms within 30 min of resurfacing. DCS is probably a combination of both arterial and venous infarction. Short latency to the onset of neurological symptoms and multilevel cord involvement may be associated with a poorer outcome.

  1. Toward a 3D dynamic model of a faulty duplex ball bearing

    Kogan, Gideon; Klein, Renata; Kushnirsky, Alex; Bortman, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Bearings are vital components for safe and proper operation of machinery. Increasing efficiency of bearing diagnostics usually requires training of health and usage monitoring systems via expensive and time-consuming ground calibration tests. The main goal of this research, therefore, is to improve bearing dynamics modeling tools in order to reduce the time and budget needed to implement the health and usage monitoring approach. The proposed three-dimensional ball bearing dynamic model is based on the classic dynamic and kinematic equations. Interactions between the bodies are simulated using non-linear springs combined with dampers described by Hertz-type contact relation. The force friction is simulated using the hyperbolic-tangent function. The model allows simulation of a wide range of mechanical faults. It is validated by comparison to known bearing behavior and to experimental results. The model results are verified by demonstrating numerical convergence. The model results for the two cases of single and duplex angular ball bearings with axial deformation in the outer ring are presented. The qualitative investigation provides insight into bearing dynamics, the sensitivity study generalizes the qualitative findings for similar cases, and the comparison to the test results validates model reliability. The article demonstrates the variety of the cases that the 3D bearing model can simulate and the findings to which it may lead. The research allowed the identification of new patterns generated by single and duplex bearings with axially deformed outer race. It also enlightened the difference between single and duplex bearing manifestation. In the current research the dynamic model enabled better understanding of the physical behavior of the faulted bearings. Therefore, it is expected that the modeling approach has the potential to simplify and improve the development process of diagnostic algorithms. • A deformed outer race of a single axially loaded bearing is simulated. • The model results are subjected to a sensitivity study. • Duplex bearing with deformed outer race is simulated as well as tested. • The simulation results are in a good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. 3D Dynamic Response of Layered Unsaturated Soils to Harmonic Loads

    XU Ming-jiang; WEI De-min

    2010-01-01

    Considering compression of solid grain and pore fluids,viscous-coupling interactions and inertial force of fluids,dynamic governing equations for unsaturated soils are established by adopting an exact constitutive formula of saturation.These equations are highly versatile and completely compatible with Biot's wave equations for the special case of fully saturated soils.The governing equations in Cartesian coordinates are firstly transformed into a group of state differential equations by introducing the state vector.Then the transfer matrix for layered media are derived by means of a double Fourier transform.Using the transfer matrix followed by boundary and continuity conditions between strata,solutions of steady-state dynamic response for multi-layered unsaturated soils are obtained.Numerical examples show that the echoes generated by boundary and stratum interfaces make the displacement amplitude of the ground surface fluctuate with distance;the relative position of soft and hard strata has a significant influence on displacement.

  3. The 3D dynamics of the Cosserat rod as applied to continuum robotics

    Jones, Charles Rees

    2011-12-01

    In the effort to simulate the biologically inspired continuum robot's dynamic capabilities, researchers have been faced with the daunting task of simulating---in real-time---the complete three dimensional dynamics of the "beam-like" structure which includes the three "stiff" degrees-of-freedom transverse and dilational shear. Therefore, researchers have traditionally limited the difficulty of the problem with simplifying assumptions. This study, however, puts forward a solution which makes no simplifying assumptions and trades off only the real-time requirement of the desired solution. The solution is a Finite Difference Time Domain method employing an explicit single step method with cheap right hands sides. The cheap right hand sides are the result of a rather ingenious formulation of the classical beam called the Cosserat rod by, first, the Cosserat brothers and, later, Stuart S. Antman which results in five nonlinear but uncoupled equations that require only multiplication and addition. The method is therefore suitable for hardware implementation thus moving the real-time requirement from a software solution to a hardware solution.

  4. A Novel Flow-Perfusion Bioreactor Supports 3D Dynamic Cell Culture

    Alexander M. Sailon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bone engineering requires thicker three-dimensional constructs than the maximum thickness supported by standard cell-culture techniques (2 mm. A flow-perfusion bioreactor was developed to provide chemotransportation to thick (6 mm scaffolds. Methods. Polyurethane scaffolds, seeded with murine preosteoblasts, were loaded into a novel bioreactor. Control scaffolds remained in static culture. Samples were harvested at days 2, 4, 6, and 8 and analyzed for cellular distribution, viability, metabolic activity, and density at the periphery and core. Results. By day 8, static scaffolds had a periphery cell density of 67%±5.0%, while in the core it was 0.3%±0.3%. Flow-perfused scaffolds demonstrated peripheral cell density of 94%±8.3% and core density of 76%±3.1% at day 8. Conclusions. Flow perfusion provides chemotransportation to thick scaffolds. This system may permit high throughput study of 3D tissues in vitro and enable prefabrication of biological constructs large enough to solve clinical problems.

  5. 3D dynamics of hydrous thermal-chemical plumes in subduction zones

    Zhu, G.; Gerya, T.; Yuen, D.; Connolly, J. A. D.

    2009-04-01

    Mantle wedges are identified as sites of intense thermal convection and thermal-chemical Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities ("cold plumes") controlling distribution and intensity of magmatic activity in subduction zones. To investigate 3D hydrous partially molten cold plumes forming in the mantle wedge in response to slab dehydration, we perform 3D petrological-thermomechanical numerical simulations of the intraoceanic one-sided subduction with spontaneously bending retreating slab characterized by weak hydrated upper interface. I3ELVIS code is used which is developed based on multigrid approach combined with marker-in-cell method with conservative finite-difference schemes. We investigated regional 800 km wide and 200 km deep 3D subduction models with variable 200 to 800 km lateral dimension along the trench using uniform numerical staggered grid with 405x101x101 nodal points and up to 50 million markers. Our results show three patterns (roll(sheet)-, zig-zag- and finger-like) of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities can develop above the subducting slab, which are controlled by effective viscosity of partially molten rocks. Spatial and temporal periodicity of plumes correlate well with that of volcanic activity in natural intraoceanic arcs such as Japan. High laterally variable surface heat flow predicted in the arc region in response to thermal-chemical plumes activity is also consistent with natural observations.

  6. KMOS^3D: Dynamical constraints on the mass budget in early star-forming disks

    Wuyts, S; Wisnioski, E; Genzel, R; Burkert, A; Bandara, K; Beifiori, A; Belli, S; Bender, R; Brammer, G B; Chan, J; Davies, R; Fossati, M; Galametz, A; Kulkarni, S K; Lang, P; Lutz, D; Mendel, J T; Momcheva, I G; Naab, T; Nelson, E J; Saglia, R P; Seitz, S; Tacconi, L J; Tadaki, K; Übler, H; van Dokkum, P G; Wilman, D J; Wuyts, E

    2016-01-01

    We exploit deep integral-field spectroscopic observations with KMOS/VLT of 240 star-forming disks at 0.6 2 being strongly baryon-dominated within $R_e$. Substantial object-to-object variations in both stellar and baryonic mass fractions are observed among the galaxies in our sample, larger than what can be accounted for by the formal uncertainties in their respective measurements. In both cases, the mass fractions correlate most strongly with measures of surface density. High $\\Sigma_{star}$ galaxies feature stellar mass fractions closer to unity, and systems with high inferred gas or baryonic surface densities leave less room for additional mass components other than stars and molecular gas. Our findings can be interpreted as more extended disks probing further (and more compact disks probing less far) into the dark matter halos that host them. However, a non-negligible tail of the derived baryonic mass fraction distribution reaching into the unphysical $f_{bar} > 1$ regime may in addition hint at more effi...

  7. Dynamic echo-planar MR imaging of the diaphragm for a 3D dynamic analysis

    The purpose of this study was to prove the feasibility of 3D reconstructions of the diaphragm during the respiratory cycle using EPI sequences (EPI acquisition, 270 ms/image, on a healthy subject breathing spontaneously and at 0.1 Hz). Continuously recorded respiratory signal allowed for retrospective synchronization with respiratory phases for reconstruction of successive diaphragm surfaces using a specifically designed software. Displacements, area and volume changes of the diaphragm were quantified. Our measurements were comparable with the data in the literature. Reconstructed surfaces allowed in vivo diaphragm dynamic evaluation in terms of displacements, area and volume variations. EPI has adequate spatial and temporal resolution for studying diaphragm dynamics during natural breathing. (orig.)

  8. 3D Dynamics of Magnetopause Reconnection Using Hall-MHD Global Simulations

    Maynard, K.; Germaschewski, K.; Raeder, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection at Earth's magnetopause and in the magnetotail is of crucial importance for the dynamics of the global magnetosphere and space weather. Even though the plasma conditions in the magnetosphere are largely in the collisionless regime, most of the existing research using global computational models employ single-fluid magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with artificial resistivity. Studies of reconnection in simplified, two-dimensional geometries have established that two-fluid and kinetic effects can dramatically alter dynamics and reconnection rates when compared with single-fluid models. These enhanced models also introduce particular signatures, for example a quadrupolar out-of-plane magnetic field component that has already been observed in space by satellite measurements. However, results from simplified geometries cannot be translated directly to the dynamics of three-dimensional magnetospheric reconnection. For instance, magnetic flux originating from the solar wind and arriving at the magnetopause can either reconnect or be advected around the magnetosphere. In this study, we use a new version of the OpenGGCM code that incorporates the Hall term in a Generalized Ohm's Law to study magnetopause reconnection under synthetic solar wind conditions and investigate how reconnection rates and dynamics of flux transfer events depend on the strength of the Hall term. The OpenGGCM, a global model of Earth's magnetosphere, has recently been ported to exploit modern computing architectures like the Cell processor and SIMD capabilities of conventional processors using an automatic code generator. These enhancements provide us with the performance needed to include the computationally expensive Hall physics.

  9. 3D Dynamical Modeling of Wind Accretion in Cyg X-3

    Okazaki, Atsuo T

    2014-01-01

    Cyg X-3 is a high mass X-ray binary consisting of a Wolf-Rayet star and a compact object in a very short orbital period of 4.8h. The only confirmed microquasar with high energy gamma-ray emission, Cyg X-3 provides a unique opportunity to study the relationship between the accretion power and the power in high energy emission. Because of a compact orbit and a slow Wolf-Rayet wind, the flow structure around the compact object is thought to be strongly affected by the orbital motion, details of which can be obtained only by numerical simulations. In this paper, we report on the results from 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the wind accretion in Cyg X-3. For simplicity we adopt an anti-gravity-like force that emulates the radiative acceleration consistent with the beta-velocity wind. Due to the rapid orbital motion, the flow around the compact object has large density gradients. As a result, the accretion rate onto the compact object is significantly lower than that of the Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton rate. We also calcul...

  10. Solid friction at high sliding velocities: an explicit 3D dynamical SPH approach

    Maveyraud, C.; Benz, W.; Ouillon, G.; Sornette, A.; Sornette, D.

    1998-01-01

    We present realistic 3D numerical simulations of elastic bodies sliding on top of each other in a regime of velocities ranging from meters to tens of meters per second using the so-called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method. Our investigations are restricted to regimes of pressure and roughness where only elastic deformations occur between asperities at the contact surface between the slider block and the substrate. In this regime, solid friction is due to the generation of vibration...

  11. A 3D dynamical biomechanical tongue model to study speech motor control

    Gérard, J M; Perrier, P; Payan, Y; Gerard, Jean-Michel; Wilhelms-Tricarico, Reiner; Perrier, Pascal; Payan, Yohan

    2003-01-01

    A 3D biomechanical dynamical model of human tongue is presented, that is elaborated in the aim to test hypotheses about speech motor control. Tissue elastic properties are accounted for in Finite Element Modeling (FEM). The FEM mesh was designed in order to facilitate the implementation of muscle arrangement within the tongue. Therefore, its structure was determined on the basis of accurate anatomical data about the tongue. Mechanically, the hypothesis of hyperelasticity was adopted with the Mooney-Rivlin formulation of the strain energy function. Muscles are modeled as general force generators that act on anatomically specified sets of nodes of the FEM structure. The 8 muscles that are known to be largely involved in the production of basic speech movements are modeled. The model and the solving of the Lagrangian equations of movement are implemented using the ANSYSTM software. Simulations of the influence of muscle activations onto the tongue shape are presented and analyzed.

  12. Pictorial essay: MRI of the fetal brain

    MRI is a useful supplement to USG for the assessment of fetal brain malformations. Superior soft tissue contrast and the ability to depict sulcation and myelination are the strengths of MRI. Subtle or inconclusive USG abnormalities can be confirmed or ruled out by MRI. In some cases, additional findings detected with MRI often help in arriving at a definitive diagnosis, which is necessary for parental counseling and for guiding management. Fast T2W sequences form the basis of fetal MRI. There have been no reports of deleterious effects of MRI on the fetus. A few case examples are presented to illustrate the advantages of MRI

  13. Real-time functional MR imaging (fMRI) for presurgical evaluation of paediatric epilepsy

    Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Kumar Gupta, Arun [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India); Sujesh, Sreedharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Trivandrum (India); Ashalata, Radhakrishnan; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum (India); Abraham, Mathew [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurosurgery, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-10-15

    The role of fMRI in the presurgical evaluation of children with intractable epilepsy is being increasingly recognized. Real-time fMRI allows the clinician to visualize functional brain activation in real time. Since there is no off-line data analysis as in conventional fMRI, the overall time for the procedure is reduced, making it clinically feasible in a busy clinical sitting. (1) To study the accuracy of real-time fMRI in comparison to conventional fMRI with off-line processing; (2) to determine its effectiveness in mapping the eloquent cortex and language lateralization in comparison to invasive procedures such as intraoperative cortical stimulation and Wada testing; and (3) to evaluate the role of fMRI in presurgical decision making in children with epilepsy. A total of 23 patients (age range 6-18 years) underwent fMRI with sensorimotor, visual and language paradigms. Data processing was done in real time using in-line BOLD. The results of real-time fMRI matched those of off-line processing done using the well-accepted standard technique of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in all the initial ten patients in whom the two techniques were compared. Coregistration of the fMRI data on a 3-D FLAIR sequence rather than a T1-weighted image gave better information regarding the relationship of the lesion to the area of activation. The results of intraoperative cortical stimulation and fMRI matched in six out of six patients, while the Wada test and fMRI had similar results in four out of five patients in whom these techniques were performed. In the majority of patients in this series the technique influenced patient management. Real-time fMRI is an easily performed and reliable technique in the presurgical workup of children with epilepsy. (orig.)

  14. Real-time functional MR imaging (fMRI) for presurgical evaluation of paediatric epilepsy

    The role of fMRI in the presurgical evaluation of children with intractable epilepsy is being increasingly recognized. Real-time fMRI allows the clinician to visualize functional brain activation in real time. Since there is no off-line data analysis as in conventional fMRI, the overall time for the procedure is reduced, making it clinically feasible in a busy clinical sitting. (1) To study the accuracy of real-time fMRI in comparison to conventional fMRI with off-line processing; (2) to determine its effectiveness in mapping the eloquent cortex and language lateralization in comparison to invasive procedures such as intraoperative cortical stimulation and Wada testing; and (3) to evaluate the role of fMRI in presurgical decision making in children with epilepsy. A total of 23 patients (age range 6-18 years) underwent fMRI with sensorimotor, visual and language paradigms. Data processing was done in real time using in-line BOLD. The results of real-time fMRI matched those of off-line processing done using the well-accepted standard technique of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in all the initial ten patients in whom the two techniques were compared. Coregistration of the fMRI data on a 3-D FLAIR sequence rather than a T1-weighted image gave better information regarding the relationship of the lesion to the area of activation. The results of intraoperative cortical stimulation and fMRI matched in six out of six patients, while the Wada test and fMRI had similar results in four out of five patients in whom these techniques were performed. In the majority of patients in this series the technique influenced patient management. Real-time fMRI is an easily performed and reliable technique in the presurgical workup of children with epilepsy. (orig.)

  15. Acute head trauma in children - early application of MRI

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the present diagnostic potential of MRI in early stage head trauma and possibly to replace CT studies in children. FLAIR-techniques consequently applied as 'scout sequences' provided reliable identification of traumatic intra- and extracranial lesions yet during the first measurement in all 24 cases. Follow-up scan confirmed the initial results. The reliability of MRI in acute pediatric head trauma is underlined by the fact that CT scans were no longer necessary within the last three years. Therefore, the imaging algorithm of acute head trauma in children has changed in our institution: medium and high risk patients undergo MRI, in young infants we do US first. HR-CT is reserved for lesions of the visceral cranium. X rays are out. (orig.)

  16. High resolution pituitary gland MRI at 7.0 tesla: a clinical evaluation in Cushing's disease

    Rotte, Alexandra A.J. de; Groenewegen, Amy; Rutgers, Dik R.; Witkamp, Theo; Luijten, Peter R.; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Zelissen, Pierre M.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Internal Medicine (Section of Endocrinology), Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijer, F.J.A. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hermus, Ad [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine (Section of Endocrinology), Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    To evaluate the detection of pituitary lesions at 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T MRI in 16 patients with clinically and biochemically proven Cushing's disease. In seven patients, no lesion was detected on the initial 1.5 T MRI, and in nine patients it was uncertain whether there was a lesion. Firstly, two readers assessed both 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI examinations unpaired in a random order for the presence of lesions. Consensus reading with a third neuroradiologist was used to define final lesions in all MRIs. Secondly, surgical outcome was evaluated. A comparison was made between the lesions visualized with MRI and the lesions found during surgery in 9/16 patients. The interobserver agreement for lesion detection was good at 1.5 T MRI (κ = 0.69) and 7.0 T MRI (κ = 0.62). In five patients, both the 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI enabled visualization of a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland. In three patients, 7.0 T MRI detected a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland, while no lesion was visible at 1.5 T MRI. The interobserver agreement of image assessment for 7.0 T MRI in patients with Cushing's disease was good, and lesions were detected more accurately with 7.0 T MRI. (orig.)

  17. High resolution pituitary gland MRI at 7.0 tesla: a clinical evaluation in Cushing's disease

    To evaluate the detection of pituitary lesions at 7.0 T compared to 1.5 T MRI in 16 patients with clinically and biochemically proven Cushing's disease. In seven patients, no lesion was detected on the initial 1.5 T MRI, and in nine patients it was uncertain whether there was a lesion. Firstly, two readers assessed both 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI examinations unpaired in a random order for the presence of lesions. Consensus reading with a third neuroradiologist was used to define final lesions in all MRIs. Secondly, surgical outcome was evaluated. A comparison was made between the lesions visualized with MRI and the lesions found during surgery in 9/16 patients. The interobserver agreement for lesion detection was good at 1.5 T MRI (κ = 0.69) and 7.0 T MRI (κ = 0.62). In five patients, both the 1.5 T and 7.0 T MRI enabled visualization of a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland. In three patients, 7.0 T MRI detected a lesion on the correct side of the pituitary gland, while no lesion was visible at 1.5 T MRI. The interobserver agreement of image assessment for 7.0 T MRI in patients with Cushing's disease was good, and lesions were detected more accurately with 7.0 T MRI. (orig.)

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  3. MRI of the hip joint

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org : Radiation Therapy for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and ...

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  7. Scientists attack European MRI rules

    Harris, Margaret

    2010-08-01

    A report by the European Science Foundation (ESF) has sharply criticized a European Union (EU) directive on electromagnetic fields, arguing that limits on workers' exposure will have "potentially disastrous" consequences for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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  9. Intracranial tuberculoma: CT and MRI

    The appearances of intracranial tuberculoma on CT and MRI are described. Eight patients (6 males and 2 females) with intracranial tuberculomas studied over the past 4 years are presented. Four patients had AIDS and among the four non-AIDS patients 1 had undergone hepatic transplantation. All the cases were studied with CT and 6 underwent MRI. Five lesions were infratentorial, and 2 patients had double lesions. In 2 patients obstructive triventricular hydrocephalus was present. No patient had meningeal involvement. The stage of evolution was cerebritis in 1 case, incipient tuberculoma in 3 cases, mature tuberculoma in 1 case and tuberculous abscess in 5 cases. Diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma was determined histologically in 5 patients and by good response to specific therapy in the remaining patients. Although CT allows differentiation between incipient and mature tuberculoma, MRI allows a better determination of the evolutonary stage. In most cases combined CT and MRI examinations provide an accurate diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma. (orig.)

  10. Intracranial tuberculoma: CT and MRI

    Bargallo, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona (Spain); Berenguer, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona (Spain); Tomas, X. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona (Spain); Nicolau, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona (Spain); Cardenal, C. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona (Spain); Mercader, J.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona (Spain)

    1993-04-01

    The appearances of intracranial tuberculoma on CT and MRI are described. Eight patients (6 males and 2 females) with intracranial tuberculomas studied over the past 4 years are presented. Four patients had AIDS and among the four non-AIDS patients 1 had undergone hepatic transplantation. All the cases were studied with CT and 6 underwent MRI. Five lesions were infratentorial, and 2 patients had double lesions. In 2 patients obstructive triventricular hydrocephalus was present. No patient had meningeal involvement. The stage of evolution was cerebritis in 1 case, incipient tuberculoma in 3 cases, mature tuberculoma in 1 case and tuberculous abscess in 5 cases. Diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma was determined histologically in 5 patients and by good response to specific therapy in the remaining patients. Although CT allows differentiation between incipient and mature tuberculoma, MRI allows a better determination of the evolutonary stage. In most cases combined CT and MRI examinations provide an accurate diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma. (orig.)

  11. Clinical application of functional MRI

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  12. MRI evaluation of vascular dementia

    Yicheng Liu; Hongxing Zhang; Wei Huang; Wenjun Wan; Hongfen Peng

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTTVE: To explain the association between vascular dementia and the cranial MRI manifestations, and recognize the value of cranial MRI in the early diagnosis of vascular dementia and the assessment of disease conditions.DATA SOURCES: Pubmed database was searched to identify articles about the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia published in English from January 1992 to June 2006 by using the key words of "MRI, vascular dementia". Others were collected by searching the name of journals and title of articles in the Chinese full-text journal database.STUDY SELECTTON: The collected articles were primarily checked, those correlated with the cranial MRI manifestations of patients with vascular dementia were selected, while the obviously irrelative ones were excluded, and the rest were retrieved manually, the full-texts were searched.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 255 articles were collected, 41 of them were involved, and the other 214 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: MRI can be taken as one of the effective methods for the early diagnosis and disease evaluation of vascular dementia. White matter lesions are the important risk factors of vascular dementia.Vascular dementia is accompanied by the atrophy of related brain sites, but further confirmation is needed to investigate whether there is significant difference. MRI can be used to quantitatively investigate the infarcted sites and sizes of patients with vascular dementia after infarction, but there is still lack of systematic investigation on the association of the infarcted sites and sizes with the cognitive function of patients with vascular dementia.CONCLUSTON: Cranial MRI can detect the symptoms of vascular dementia at early period, so that corresponding measures can be adopted to prevent and treat vascular dementia in time.

  13. MRI findings of Intracranial hemangioblastoma

    Kim, Jong Deok; Cho, Mee Young [College of Medicine, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Seung Kug [Wallace Memorial Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sun Sub [College of Medicine Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soo; Chung, Chun Phil [Maryknoll Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    Complete resection of the tumor nodule (mural nodule or solid portion of the tumor) is the essential goal of surgical treatment for hemangioblastoma. The purpose of this study was to classify the morphologic types of intracranial hemangioblastoma on MRI and to compare the location and contour of tumor nodule on MRI with those on angiography. The MRI findings of 34 lesions (38 lesions if 4 spinal cord lesions were included) in 26 patients (17 males and 9 females, range of age, 18-67 years, mean, 39 years) with surgically and histopathologically proved intracranial hemangioblastomas were reviewed. Seventeen patients underwent CT scanning in a short interval. Contrast-enahnced T1-weighted imaging patterns of hemangioblastoma were classified according to Ho's morphologic types. The location and contour of tumor nodule were compared between MRI and angiography in 15 patients (24 lesions). By location, cerebellar hemisphere predominated (55%), followed by cerebellar vermis (26%), supratentorial region (5%), and medulla oblongata (3%). Spinal cord lesions (11%) were seen in 3 patients of 5 von Hippel-Lindau diseases. The frequency of morphologic types was as follows; Type 1 (purely cystic), 3%, Type 2 (mural nodule), 50%, Type 3 (cyst with wall enhancement), 3%, Type 4 (cystic nodule), 15%, Type 5 (solid with internal cyst), 9%, and Type 6 (solid), 20%. All tumor nodules (33 lesions) enhanced intensely with intravenous contrast material on MRI, of which 24 lesions (in 15 patients) revealed hypervascular masses fed by pial arteries on angiography. They were superficial and abutted pia mater partially or in large portion on both MRI and angiography. Over 70% of intracranial hemangioblastomas had a surrounding cyst, and superficial, pial-based location and number of the tumor nodules on MRI was correlated well with those on angiography. MRI is the examination of choice for preoperative evaluation of intracranial hemangioblastoma.

  14. Dynamic MRI CSF imaging

    Full text: Understanding of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow physiological and anatomical substrate underwent the revolutionary process during the last one hundred years, resulting with the theory of what we call today the 'bulk' flow. Due to almost incredible technological advance we experienced a prominent clinical and experimental advance in the field of CSF creation, flow, and absorption that have brought the 'bulk' flow theory partly under question. There are still a large number of uncertainties in our truly understanding of basic CSF flow physiology, but also pathology, that are persistently present, requesting further and ever more advanced investigation in order to provide the most adequate diagnosis for the benefit of the patient. It is my strong believe that the diagnostic reality nowadays is that we are still facing the major lack of understanding how is CSF actually created, what are the CSF pathways trough the intracranial and extracranial spaces, and finally where and how does CSF got absorbed. This certainly opens the space for numerous different theories pretending to give correct explanation of CSF physiological behavior. On the other hand, a proper and valuable technique which would provide us with the wanted information may still not be available at the present time. Therefore, as the radiologists examining the patients with CSF flow disorders, we are constantly challenged by the number of questions in an attempt to achieve the relevant and overall, accurate diagnostic information on the type of the CSF flow disorder, in order to facilitate the planning of the better individually optimized neurosurgical treatment. Though MRI, with mostly used phase-contrast but also technically older maximum dephasing techniques allows dynamic CSF flow visualization introducing us into the field of CSF hydrodynamics disorder diagnostics, we should face the fact that in the routine radiological examination with currently available and most dedicated

  15. MRI and ultrasound in children with juvenile chronic arthritis

    In this era of advancing imaging technology, a knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). After clinical examination, plain films remain the initial investigation. The need for radiation protection must be a priority in children with JCA. Conventional radiographs allow grouping of the various arthritides (on the base of the distribution and pattern of joint space changes) and staging of disease progression. Ultrasound (US) is very sensitive in the detection of joint effusions, especially in the hip, and guides fluid aspiration. US and Doppler can be used for the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy and activity. Arthrography and to a certain extent nuclear studies have been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI can demonstrate articular cartilage, joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy, cortical and medullary bone, cartilage and bone perfusion, and fibrocartilaginous structures (menisci and ligaments). Contrast enhanced MRI is the most sensitive modality to determine whether an arthritic condition is present. However, it does not assist in establishing a specific diagnosis. MRI determines accurately the activity and the extent of the disease and is particularly useful in the early detection of articular damage. Finally, MRI is of major importance in the evaluation of response to local therapy (especially steroids) and the detection of complications

  16. MRI and ultrasound in children with juvenile chronic arthritis

    Lamer, S.; Sebag, G.H

    2000-02-01

    In this era of advancing imaging technology, a knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). After clinical examination, plain films remain the initial investigation. The need for radiation protection must be a priority in children with JCA. Conventional radiographs allow grouping of the various arthritides (on the base of the distribution and pattern of joint space changes) and staging of disease progression. Ultrasound (US) is very sensitive in the detection of joint effusions, especially in the hip, and guides fluid aspiration. US and Doppler can be used for the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy and activity. Arthrography and to a certain extent nuclear studies have been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI can demonstrate articular cartilage, joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy, cortical and medullary bone, cartilage and bone perfusion, and fibrocartilaginous structures (menisci and ligaments). Contrast enhanced MRI is the most sensitive modality to determine whether an arthritic condition is present. However, it does not assist in establishing a specific diagnosis. MRI determines accurately the activity and the extent of the disease and is particularly useful in the early detection of articular damage. Finally, MRI is of major importance in the evaluation of response to local therapy (especially steroids) and the detection of complications.

  17. Imaging the fetus: when does MRI really help?

    Garel, Catherine [Hopital d' Enfants Armand-Trousseau, Service de Radiologie Pediatrique, Paris Cedex 12 (France)

    2008-06-15

    It is widely accepted that fetal MRI should be used to complement rather than to replace US, which remains the primary screening modality. Under certain circumstances where US is limited, such as maternal obesity, fetal MRI may be useful as a primary screening tool. It is well known that maternal obesity is increasing worldwide and is more common in certain countries. It certainly contributes to a shift from US to MRI as a prenatal diagnostic imaging modality. Inadequacies of US may also be directly related to the sonographer's level of experience. Use and development of fetal US are not comparable in different countries. Some countries prioritise the development of fetal US and increase the experience of sonographers by political initiatives such as reimbursement of US by social insurance, thus raising people's expectations. In other countries, fetal US is considered of secondary importance and is not exploited as much as it could be. Consequently, in those countries, the place occupied by fetal MRI and the expectations regarding its diagnostic accuracy are much more prominent. This is undoubtedly the reason why there are so many discrepancies regarding the relative contributions of fetal MRI and fetal US in the prenatal literature. (orig.)

  18. Congenital dacryocystocele: prenatal MRI findings

    Yazici, Zeynep [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Uludag University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey); Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Rubio, Eva I.; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Linam, Leann E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Yazici, Bulent [Uludag University, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Congenital dacryocystocele can be diagnosed prenatally by imaging. Prenatal MRI is increasingly utilized for fetal diagnosis. To present the radiological and clinical features of seven fetuses with congenital dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI. The institutional database of 1,028 consecutive prenatal MR examinations performed during a period of 4 years was reviewed retrospectively. The cases of congenital dacryocystocele were identified by reading the report of each MRI study. The incidence of dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI was 0.7% (n=7/1,028). The dacryocystocele was bilateral in three fetuses. Mean gestational age at the time of diagnosis was 31 weeks. The indication for prenatal MRI was the presence or the suspicion of central nervous system abnormality in six fetuses and diaphragmatic hernia in one. Dacryocystocele was associated with an intranasal cyst in six of ten eyes. Prenatal sonography revealed dacryocystocele in only two of seven fetuses. Of eight eyes with postnatal follow-up, four did not have any lacrimal symptoms. Prenatal MRI can delineate congenital dacryocystocele more clearly and in a more detailed fashion than ultrasonography. Presence of dacryocystocele was symptomatic in only 50% of our patients, supporting that prenatal diagnosis of dacryocystocele might follow a benign course. (orig.)

  19. MRI-Guided Electrophysiology Intervention

    Henry R. Halperin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catheter ablation is a first-line treatment for many cardiac arrhythmias and is generally performed under X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. However, current techniques for ablating complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia are associated with sub-optimal success rates and prolonged radiation exposure. Pre-procedure 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved understanding of the anatomic basis of complex arrhythmias and is being used for planning and guidance of ablation procedures. A particular strength of MRI compared to other imaging modalities is the ability to visualize ablation lesions. Post-procedure MRI is now being applied to assess ablation lesion location and permanence with the goal of identifying factors leading to procedure success and failure. In the future, intra-procedure real-time MRI, together with the ability to image complex 3-D arrhythmogenic anatomy and target additional ablation to regions of incomplete lesion formation, may allow for more successful treatment of even complex arrhythmias without exposure to ionizing radiation. Development of clinical grade MRI-compatible electrophysiology devices is required to transition intra-procedure MRI from preclinical studies to more routine use in patients.

  20. MRI of acute cerebral infarction

    Sequential changes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sixteen patients with acute cerebral infarction are studied in comparison with the findings of computed tomography (CT). The sixteen patients were examined within 36 hours from the onset of syptoms on resistive type MRI (0.15T) using T1 weighted image (IR2000/500) and T2 weighted image (SE2000/80), and on CT. In general, large infarcted lesions of the cortexsubcortex seemed to be visualized earlier than small lesions of the basal ganglia and brainstem. In 8 patients, the infarcted lesions were detected on MRI earlier than on CT. For example, early detecting time within 12 hours were 2, 6, 7, and 10 hours after onset. In two patients of this group, lesions were detected on T2 weighted image earlier than on T1-weighted image. In two cases, small lesions of the brainstem were detected only on MRI. The size of abnormal findings gradually developed and reached a maximum on days 5 to 7 sequentially. The difference between infarction and perifocal edema was not clear even on MRI. The changes gradually subsided and assumed a stable size after about 2 months. Contrast enhancement effect was observed in four patients. In two of these cases, the signal intensity of T2-weighted imaging was decreased just at the region which was enhanced with contrast medium. MRI is useful for early diagnosis of ischemic cerebral infarction, and may eludidate some aspects of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke. (author)

  1. Semicircular canal dehiscence: comparison of T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MRI and CT

    Krombach, G.A.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Haage, P.; Guenther, R.W. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); DiMartino, E. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Prescher, A. [Department of Anatomy, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Kinzel, S. [Department of Experimental Veterinary Medicine, University of Technology, Pauwelstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    We assessed the value of MRI for delineation of dehiscence of the superior or posterior semicircular canal, as compared with CT, the current standard study for this entity. We reviewed heavily T2-weighted fast spin-echo images and high-resolution CT of the temporal bones of 185 patients independently semicircular canal dehiscence and its extent. In 30 patients (19 men, 11 women) we identified dehiscence of the bone over the superior and/or posterior semicircular canal on MRI. In 27 of these cases CT also showed circumscribed bone defects. In one patient dehiscence of the superior semicircular canal was initially overlooked on MRI, but seen on CT. MRI imaging thus had a sensitivity of 96% and specificity of 98%. Knowledge of the appearances of this entity on MRI may contribute to early diagnosis in patients with vertigo due to semicircular canal dehiscence. (orig.)

  2. Dynamic MRI of the liver with parallel acquisition technique. Characterization of focal liver lesions and analysis of the hepatic vasculature in a single MRI session

    Purpose: to retrospectively evaluate the performance of breath-hold contrast-enhanced 3D dynamic parallel gradient echo MRI (pMRT) for the characterization of focal liver lesions (standard of reference: histology) and for the analysis of hepatic vasculature (standard of reference: contrast-enhanced 64-detector row computed tomography; MSCT) in a single MRI session. Materials and method: two blinded readers independently analyzed preoperative pMRT data sets (1.5T-MRT) of 45 patients (23 men, 22 women; 28 - 77 years, average age, 48 years) with a total of 68 focal liver lesions with regard to image quality of hepatic arteries, portal and hepatic veins, presence of variant anatomy of the hepatic vasculature, as well as presence of portal vein thrombosis and hemodynamically significant arterial stenosis. In addition, both readers were asked to identify and characterize focal liver lesions. Imaging parameters of pMRT were: TR/TE/matrix/slice thickness/acquisition time: 3.1 ms/1.4 ms/384 x 224/4 mm/15 - 17 s. MSCT was performed with a pitch of 1.2, an effective slice thickness of 1 mm and a matrix of 512 x 512. Results: based on histology, the 68 liver lesions were found to be 42 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC), 20 metastases, 3 cholangiocellular carcinomas (CCC) as well as 1 dysplastic nodule, 1 focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and 1 atypical hemangioma. Overall, the diagnostic accuracy was high for both readers (91 - 100%) in the characterization of these focal liver lesions with an excellent interobserver agreement (κ-values of 0.89 [metastases], 0.97 [HCC] and 1 [CCC]). On average, the image quality of all vessels under consideration was rated good or excellent in 89% (reader 1) and 90% (reader 2). Anatomical variants of the hepatic arteries, hepatic veins and portal vein as well as thrombosis of the portal vein were reliably detected by pMRT. Significant arterial stenosis was found with a sensitivity between 86% and 100% and an excellent interobserver agreement (κ

  3. MRI of acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: correlation with pathology

    Objective: To investigate the MR imaging findings of acute experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in correlation with pathology. Methods: An EAE model was induced by intradermal inoculation with guinea pig CNS homogenate in 6 female Lewis rats. Another 6 rats served as control. The clinical presentation and body weight of the animals were recorded daily. Routine MRI, Gd-enhanced MRI were performed when EAE animals showed the initial symptoms. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) colloid solution was also administrated intravenously and MRI was performed again after 24 hours. The brain was removed instantly after the second MR imaging. The pathological exams including HE staining, myelin sheath staining and prussian staining were performed. The imaging findings were observed in correlation with pathological results. Results: The EAE rats showed decrease of body weight on the 6th to 7th day after inoculation, and the clinical symptoms appeared on the 10th to 11th day after inoculation. Routine MRI did not show any definite abnormalities. The Gd-enhanced MRI found the diffuse thickening and enhancement of brain meninges. The USPIO-enhanced MRI showed areas of low signal intensity at white matter of medulla oblongata on T2WI, and high signal intensity was observed at the corresponding area on T1WI. Gradient T2* WI found more foci of low signal intensity in cerebellar white matter besides the lesions in the brain stem. The range of abnormal signal intensity was larger in animal with higher clinical scores than that with lower score. There were no abnormal findings in control animal. The pathological exam found 'perivascular cuff' in the brain white matter in EAE animals, some accompanied with adjacent demyelination. The prussian staining found blue particles within the cytoplasm of the macrophages around the lesion, which corresponded to the area of low signal intensity on T2WI. Conclusion: USPIO-enhanced MRI could reveal acute EAE lesions which were

  4. Dementia: role of MRI

    Full text: This presentation will focus on the role of MRI in the diagnosis of dementia and related diseases. We will discuss the following subjects: 1. Systematic assessment of MR in dementia 2. MR protocol for dementia 3. Typical findings in the most common dementia syndrome Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal lobe dementia (FTLD) 4. Short overview of neurodegenerative disorders which may be associated with dementia. The role of neuroimaging in dementia nowadays extends to support the diagnosis of specific neurodegenerative disorders. It is a challenge to the early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Early diagnosis includes recognition of predementia conditions, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Neuroimaging may also be used to assess disease progression and is adopted in current trials investigating MCI and AD. An MR-study of a patient suspected of having dementia must be assessed in a standardized way. First of all, treatable diseases like subdural hematomas, tumors and hydrocephalus need to be excluded. Next we should look for signs of specific dementias such as: Alzheimer's disease (AD): medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and parietal atrophy. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD): (asymmetric) frontal lobe atrophy and atrophy of the temporal pole. Vascular Dementia (VaD): global atrophy, diffuse white matter lesions, lacunas and 'strategic infarcts' (infarcts in regions that are involved in cognitive function). Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB): in contrast to other forms of dementia usually no specific abnormalities. So when we study the MR images we should score in a systematic way for global atrophy, focal atrophy and for vascular disease (i.e. infarcts, white matter lesions, lacunas)

  5. MRI in patients with general paresis

    Few cases of MRI in neurosyphilis have been reported. We examined the value of MRI in patients with general paresis; MRI was performed on four HIV-negative patients with parenchymatous neurosyphilis. It demonstrated frontal and temporal atrophy, subcortical gliosis and, in one patient, increased ferritin in the basal ganglia. The progression of the lesions on MRI correlated well with the neuropsychiatric disturbances. The MRI findings correlated with the wellknown neuropathological findings. This combination of pathological findings in neurosyphilis has not been described before and we suggest that MRI is of prognostic value in patients with general paresis. (orig.)

  6. Automated planning of MRI neuro scans

    Young, Stewart; Bystrov, Daniel; Netsch, Thomas; Bergmans, Rene; van Muiswinkel, Arianne; Visser, Fredy; Sprigorum, Rudolf; Gieseke, Jürgen

    2006-03-01

    In clinical MRI examinations, the geometry of diagnostic scans is defined in an initial planning phase. The operator plans the scan volumes (off-centre, angulation, field-of-view) with respect to patient anatomy in 'scout' images. Often multiple plans are required within a single examination, distracting attention from the patient waiting in the scanner. A novel and robust method is described for automated planning of neurological MRI scans, capable of handling strong shape deviations from healthy anatomy. The expert knowledge required to position scan geometries is learned from previous example plans, allowing site-specific styles to be readily taken into account. The proposed method first fits an anatomical model to the scout data, and then new scan geometries are positioned with respect to extracted landmarks. The accuracy of landmark extraction was measured to be comparable to the inter-observer variability, and automated plans are shown to be highly consistent with those created by expert operators using clinical data. The results of the presented evaluation demonstrate the robustness and applicability of the proposed approach, which has the potential to significantly improve clinical workflow.

  7. CT and MRI in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Radiological findings and course of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in 14 patients (1 woman, 13 men; 13 HIV seropositive, 1 chronic lymphatic leukaemia) were analysed retrospectively and correlated with clinical symptoms. A total of 21 CT and 16 MRI studies were evaluated. CT scans and MR images of 9 patients, which had been obtained in less than two weeks, could be compared to each other. MRI was superior to CT: 6 lesions with a diameter of 1 cm and below were not detected on CT scans, in 5 patients the extent of lesions was underestimated. Cortical involvement, mass effect or signs of atrophy were missing. Only 1 of 65 lesions showed a tiny enhancement after Gd injection. Due to the pattern and spread of lesions, which showed a close correlation to the neurologic symptoms, three different types of PML are suggested: 1. Initial precentral demyelinisation with contralateral hemiparesis (n=8); 2. lesions in temporo-occipital locations with visual disturbances (n=2); 3. predominantly bilateral lesions of cerebellar white matter with ataxia (n=4). (orig.)

  8. MRI diagnosis of meniscal tears

    We studied the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in fifty-six patients who were also examined arthroscopically. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity were 96%, 100%, and 95% for medial meniscal tears, and 91%, 67%, and 100% for lateral meniscal tears respectively. Two MRIs of the medial meniscus were false-positives. These MRI findings were both meniscocapsular separation of the medial meniscus, but the arthroscopic findings were normal. One case was an ACL injury and the other PCL and MCL injury. Hemorrhage and edema of the medial capsule caused by valgus stress at injury may look like a meniscal pseudo-tear on MRI. Five MRIs of the lateral meniscus were false-negatives. All menisci showed normal signal and shape on MRI but traumatic and stable tears of the lateral meniscus were identified arthroscopically. All were associated with ACL tears and lateral condylar bone bruise. The traumatic and stable tear of the meniscus tended to be overlooked on MRI because a meniscus without degeneration shows a normal signal. (author)

  9. MRI of ischaemic heart disease

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRS) and spectroscopy (MRS) can provide information concerning morphology, function, tissue characterization and metabolism in ischaemic heart disease. Currently MRI is used to define the presence and extent of infarctions and to demonstrate complications of infarction such as left ventricular true and false aneurysm formation and mural thrombus. The role of MRI up to the current time has been limited by its inability to differentiate between ischaemic and normal myocardium. MR contrast media will be needed fully to exploit the capabilities of MRI in the diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease. 2 Classes of contrast media have the potential to expand the efficacy of MRI: T1 relaxation enhancing agents increase signal intensity on T1-weighted images and magnetic susceptibility agents decrease or erase signal from tissue on T2-weighted, gradient echo and echoplanar images. The agents currently being tested include: manganese dipyridoxal diphosphate, gadolinium-DTPA-BMA, and dysprosium DTPABMA. These contrast agents have been used to accomplish the following goals in the MRI of ischaemic heart disease: 1.Delineation of the myocardial ischaemic region and the jeopardized region produced by acute coronary occlusion; 2.Improved discrimination between normal and infarcted myocardium; 3.Distinction between occlusive and reperfused myocardial infarctions; 4.Differentiation between reversible and irreversible myocardial injury for reperfused myocardial regions. (author). 21 refs.; 7 figs

  10. [MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy].

    Daecke, W; Libicher, M; Mädler, U; Rumpf, C; Bernd, L

    2003-02-01

    MRI-guided musculoskeletal biopsy has been mentioned to be a minimally invasive method to obtain specimens for diagnostic purposes in bone tumors. To evaluate the viability, to assess the accuracy, and to record possible complications of this method, clinical data of 19 MRI-guided biopsies were analyzed. Interventions were performed on 18 patients (1-78 years) as an outpatient procedure: 15 skeletal and 4 soft tissue biopsies were taken from the pelvis, upper limb,or lower limb. We used T1-weighted gradient echoes (GE) for locating the puncture site and T2-weighted turbo spin echoes (TSE) for visualization of needle position. In 14 of 18 MRI-guided biopsies, a definite histological diagnosis was obtained. According to the pathologist, the inadequate size of the specimen was the main reason for missing the diagnoses in four cases.Long intervention time and inappropriate biopsy tools proved to be the main disadvantages of MRI-guided biopsy, but technical improvement might solve these technical problems in future.A postbiopsy hematoma was the only complication observed. Once technically improved, MRI-guided biopsy could be a precise alternative routine method for musculoskeletal biopsies in future. PMID:12607083

  11. Whole-body MRI screening

    Puls, Ralf [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Hosten, Norbert (ed.) [Universitaetsklinikum Greifswald (Germany). Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2014-07-01

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  12. Whole-body MRI screening

    The advent of dedicated whole-body MRI scanners has made it possible to image the human body from head to toe with excellent spatial resolution and with the sensitivity and specificity of conventional MR systems. A comprehensive screening examination by MRI relies on fast image acquisition, and this is now feasible owing to several very recent developments, including multichannel techniques, new surface coil systems, and automatic table movement. The daily analysis of whole-body MRI datasets uncovers many incidental findings, which are discussed by an interdisciplinary advisory board of physicians from all specialties. This book provides a systematic overview of these incidental findings with the aid of approximately 240 high-quality images. The radiologists involved in the project have written chapters on each organ system, presenting a structured compilation of the most common findings, their morphologic appearances on whole-body MRI, and guidance on their clinical management. Chapters on technical and ethical issues are also included. It is hoped that this book will assist other diagnosticians in deciding how to handle the most common incidental findings encountered when performing whole-body MRI.

  13. Initial Study

    Torp, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    increased. In the initial study presented here, the time it takes to pass an intersection is studied in details. Two major signal-controlled four-way intersections in the center of the city Aalborg are studied in details to estimate the congestion levels in these intersections, based on the time it takes to...

  14. Perfusion MRI in cerebral infarction

    Purpose: To investigate the hemodynamic changes in patients with acute cerebral stroke by perfusion MRI. Materials and methods: In 12 patients with acute stroke in the territory of the middle cerebral artery, perfusion MRI was performed. Peak time, mean transit time, regional cerebral blood volume and regional cerebral blood flow were calculated in the infarction, the peri-infarction area and the contralateral hemisphere. Results: In the infarction the mean blood flow was 29 ml/100 g/min, compared to about 40 ml/100 g/min in the peri-infarction area and the contralateral hemisphere. In two patients increased cortical blood flow was found in the infarction due to luxury perfusion. The cerebral blood volume was reduced in the infarction, but significantly increased, to 7.3 ml/100 g, in the peri-infarction tissue. Conclusion: Perfusion MRI allows one to differentiate various patterns of perfusion disorders in patients with acute cerebral stroke. (orig./AJ)

  15. Ischiopubic insufficiency fractures: MRI appearances

    Objective. To evaluate the MRI appearances in insufficiency fractures. Design. A retrospective analysis of spin echo MR images with gadolinium-enhancement was undertaken with the emphasis on the signal change and the shape of the fracture gap and the adjacent bone marrow. Patients. Five elderly women who had ischiopubic insufficiency fractures (pubis, 4; ischium 1) underwent MRI to exclude the possibility of pathologic fractures. Results and conclusions. In no case was contrast enhancement noted at the fracture gap or the adjacent bone marrow, but a cleft-life, elongated bright signal area suggesting ''fluid collection'' was noted within the fracture gap. Absence of contrast enhancement and ''fluid collection'' at the fracture gap might suggest nonunion of a fracture, which is additional information provided only by MRI. (orig.)

  16. MRI findings of orbital mass

    A total of 41 cases (17 pseudotumor, 11 lymphoma, 4 cavernous hemangioma, and 9 others) with a orbital mass (es), who underwent MRI, are the basis of this study. The 14 MRI findings (size, shape, signal intensity, etc.) were retrospectively analyzed. Subjective rating score of irregular undulation, homogeneity of signal intensity (SI) on T1WI and SI on (fat-sat) T2WI of cavernous hemangioma was significantly higher than that of pseudotumor. Subjective rating score of irregular undulation, SI on (fat-sat) T2WI and homogeneity of SI on (fat-sat) T2WI of cavernous hemangioma was significantly higher than that of lymphoma. Subjective rating score of lymphoma was significantly higher than that of pseudotumor. There was no significant difference in age, sex and subjective rating score of 9 MRI findings (size, shape, etc). (author)

  17. Modification of Angular Velocity by Inhomogeneous MRI Growth in Protoplanetary Disks

    Kato, M T; Nakamura, K.; Tandokoro, R.; Fujimoto, M.; Ida, S.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated evolution of magneto-rotational instability (MRI) in protoplanetary disks that have radially non-uniform magnetic field such that stable and unstable regions coexist initially, and found that a zone in which the disk gas rotates with a super-Keplerian velocity emerges as a result of the non-uniformly growing MRI turbulence. We have carried out two-dimensional resistive MHD simulations with a shearing box model. We found that if the spatially averaged magnetic Reynolds num...

  18. MRI appearance of massive renal replacement lipomatosis in the absence of renal calculus disease

    Fitzgerald, E; Melamed, J.; Taneja, S. S.; Rosenkrantz, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Renal replacement lipomatosis is a rare benign entity in which extensive fibrofatty proliferation of the renal sinus is associated with marked renal atrophy. In this report, we present a case of massive renal replacement lipomatosis demonstrated on MRI. The presentation was atypical given an absence of associated renal calculus disease, and an initial CT scan was interpreted as suspicious for a liposarcoma. The differential diagnosis and key MRI findings that served to establish this specific...

  19. Value of retrospective image fusion of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and MRI for preoperative staging of head and neck cancer: Comparison with PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI

    Kanda, Tomonori [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Hyogo (Japan); Kitajima, Kazuhiro, E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Suenaga, Yuko; Konishi, Jyunya [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sasaki, Ryohei [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Morimoto, Koichi; Saito, Miki; Otsuki, Naoki; Nibu, Ken-ichi [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical value of retrospective image fusion of neck MRI and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET for locoregional extension and nodal staging of neck cancer. Materials and methods: Thirty patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity or hypopharynx underwent PET/CT and contrast-enhanced neck MRI for initial staging before surgery including primary tumor resection and neck dissection. Diagnostic performance of PET/CT, MRI, and retrospective image fusion of PET and MRI (fused PET/MRI) for assessment of the extent of the primary tumor (T stage) and metastasis to regional lymph nodes (N stage) was evaluated. Results: Accuracy for T status was 87% for fused PET/MRI and 90% for MRI, thus proving significantly superior to PET/CT, which had an accuracy of 67% (p = 0.041 and p = 0.023, respectively). Accuracy for N status was 77% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, being superior to MRI, which had an accuracy of 63%, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.13). On a per-level basis, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of nodal metastasis were 77%, 96% and 93% for both fused PET/MRI and PET/CT, compared with 49%, 99% and 91% for MRI, respectively. The differences for sensitivity (p = 0.0026) and accuracy (p = 0.041) were significant. Conclusion: Fused PET/MRI combining the individual advantages of MRI and PET is a valuable technique for assessment of staging neck cancer.

  20. Clinical applications of functional MRI in epilepsy

    The role of functional MRI (fMRI) in the presurgical evaluation of patients with intractable epilepsy is being increasingly recognized. Real-time fMRI is an easily performable diagnostic technique in the clinical setting. It has become a noninvasive alternative to intraoperative cortical stimulation and the Wada test for eloquent cortex mapping and language lateralization, respectively. Its role in predicting postsurgical memory outcome and in localizing the ictal activity is being recognized. This review article describes the biophysical basis of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI and the methodology adopted, including the design, paradigms, the fMRI setup, and data analysis. Illustrative cases have been discussed, wherein the fMRI results influenced the seizure team's decisions with regard to diagnosis and therapy. Finally, the special issues involved in fMRI of epilepsy patients and the various challenges of clinical fMRI are detailed

  1. Interstitial pregnancy: role of MRI

    We report the MRI features of two cases of interstitial pregnancy. In both cases, MRI was able to localize the ectopic pregnancy by showing a gestational structure surrounded by a thick wall in the upper part of the uterine wall separated from the endometrium by an uninterrupted junctional zone. Because US may confuse angular and interstitial pregnancies and because interstitial pregnancy has a particular evolutive course, MR imaging may play a key role in the diagnosis and management of women with interstitial pregnancy. (orig.)

  2. MRI EVALUATION OF KNEE CARTILAGE

    Rodrigues, Marcelo Bordalo; Camanho, Gilberto Luís

    2015-01-01

    Through the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to characterize soft tissue noninvasively, it has become an excellent method for evaluating cartilage. The development of new and faster methods allowed increased resolution and contrast in evaluating chondral structure, with greater diagnostic accuracy. In addition, physiological techniques for cartilage assessment that can detect early changes before the appearance of cracks and erosion have been developed. In this updating article, the various techniques for chondral assessment using knee MRI will be discussed and demonstrated. PMID:27022562

  3. MRI/TRUS data fusion for brachytherapy

    Daanen, V; Giraud, J Y; Fourneret, P; Descotes, J L; Bolla, M; Collomb, D; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate brachytherapy consists in placing radioactive seeds for tumour destruction under transrectal ultrasound imaging (TRUS) control. It requires prostate delineation from the images for dose planning. Because ultrasound imaging is patient- and operator-dependent, we have proposed to fuse MRI data to TRUS data to make image processing more reliable. The technical accuracy of this approach has already been evaluated. METHODS: We present work in progress concerning the evaluation of the approach from the dosimetry viewpoint. The objective is to determine what impact this system may have on the treatment of the patient. Dose planning is performed from initial TRUS prostate contours and evaluated on contours modified by data fusion. RESULTS: For the eight patients included, we demonstrate that TRUS prostate volume is most often underestimated and that dose is overestimated in a correlated way. However, dose constraints are still verified for those eight patients. CONCLUSIONS: This confirms our init...

  4. mritc: A Package for MRI Tissue Classification

    Luke Tierney

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an R package for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI tissue classification. The methods include using normal mixture models, hidden Markov normal mixture models, and a higher resolution hidden Markov normal mixture model fitted by various optimization algorithms and by a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method. Functions to obtain initial values of parameters of normal mixture models and spatial parameters are provided. Supported input formats are ANALYZE, NIfTI, and a raw byte format. The function slices3d in misc3d is used for visualizing data and results. Various performance evaluation indices are provided to evaluate classification results. To improve performance, table lookup methods are used in several places, and vectorized computation taking advantage of conditional independence properties are used. Some computations are performed by C code, and OpenMP is used to parallelize key loops in the C code.

  5. Benign cardiac tumours: cardiac CT and MRI imaging appearances

    Full text: Primary benign cardiac tumours are rarely found in clinical practice and are generally evaluated with echocardiography. However, with the increasing usage of helical multislice CT, the initial detection and evaluation of these masses may be made by the radiologist during routine daily practice for other indications. The echocardiographic, CT and cardiac MRI appearances of various benign cardiac tumours and masses are described and illustrated in this review

  6. Directed evolution of protein-based neurotransmitter sensors for MRI

    Romero, Philip A.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.; Frances H Arnold; Jasanoff, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The production of contrast agents sensitive to neuronal signaling events is a rate- limiting step in the development of molecular-level functional magnetic resonance imaging (molecular fMRI) approaches for studying the brain. High throughput generation and evaluation of potential probes is possible using techniques for macromolecular engineering of protein-based contrast agents. In an initial exploration of this strategy, we used the method of directed evolution to identify mutants of a bacte...

  7. MRI and neurological findings in patients with spinal metastases

    Switlyk, M.D.; Hole, K.H.; Knutstad, K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: marta.switlyk@radiumhospitalet.no; Skjeldal, S.; Zaikova, O. [Department of Orthopedics, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Hald, J.K. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, T. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway)

    2012-12-15

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the recommended primary investigation method for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Initiating treatment before the development of motor deficits is essential to preserve neurological function. However, the relationship between MRI-assessed grades of spinal metastatic disease and neurological status has not been widely investigated. Purpose. To analyze the association between neurological function and MRI-based assessment of the extent of spinal metastases using two different grading systems. Material and Methods. A total of 284 patients admitted to our institution for initial radiotherapy or surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases were included in the study. Motor and sensory deficits were categorized according to the Frankel classification system. Pre-treatment MRI evaluations of the entire spine were scored for the extent of spinal metastases, presence and severity of spinal cord compression, and nerve root compression. Two MRI-based scales were used to evaluate the degree of cord compression and spinal canal narrowing and relate these findings to neurological function. Results. Of the patients included in the study, 28 were non-ambulatory, 49 were ambulatory with minor motor deficits, and 207 had normal motor function. Spinal cord compression was present in all patients with Frankel scores of B or C, 23 of 35 patients with a Frankel score of D (66%), and 48 of 152 patients with a Frankel score of E (32%). The percentage of patients with severe spinal canal narrowing increased with increasing Frankel grades. The grading according to the scales showed a significant association with the symptoms according to the Frankel scale (P < 0.001). Conclusion. In patients with neurological dysfunction, the presence and severity of impairment was associated with the epidural tumor burden. A significant number of patients had radiological spinal cord compression and normal motor function (occult MSCC)

  8. Contribution of plexus MRI in the diagnosis of atypical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    Lozeron, Pierre; Lacour, Marie-Christine; Vandendries, Christophe; Théaudin, Marie; Cauquil, Cécile; Denier, Christian; Lacroix, Catherine; Adams, David

    2016-01-15

    Nerve enlargement has early been recognized in CIDP and plexus MRI hypertrophy has been reported in typical CIDP cases. Our aim is to determine plexus MRI value in the diagnosis of CIDP with an initial atypical presentation, which, up to now, has not been demonstrated. Retrospective study of 33 consecutive patients suspected of CIDP. Plexus MRI was performed on the most affected territory (brachial or lumbar). Were assessed: plexus trophicity, T2-STIR signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement. Final CIDP diagnosis was made after comprehensive workup. A histo-radiological correlation was performed. Final CIDP diagnosis was made in 25 (76%) including 21 with initial atypical clinical presentation. Eleven CIDP patients (52%) with initial atypical clinical presentation had abnormal plexus MRI including 9 suggestive of CIDP (43%) and none of the patients with an alternative diagnosis. Hypertrophy of the proximal plexus and/or extraforaminal roots was found in 8 cases and Gadolinium enhancement in 2 cases. Abnormalities were more frequent on brachial (86%) than lumbosacral MRIs (29%) and asymmetrical (72%) and most often associated with histological signs of demyelination. The nerve biopsy was suggestive of CIDP in 9/13 patients with normal MRI. Plexus MRI seems useful in the diagnostic strategy of patients with suspicion of CIDP with atypical presentation. Nerve biopsy remains important when other investigations are inconclusive. PMID:26723995

  9. Moyamoya disease: diagnostic accuracy of MRI

    MRI may be employed to investigate moyamoya disease, since it provides vascular information without use of contrast medium. We reported the usefulness and limitations of MR angiography (MRA) in moyamoya disease. To our knowledge, no report has appeared dealing with the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in a large number of cases of moyamoya disease, although MRI is used more commonly than MRA. We therefore undertook to evaluate the accuracy of MRI in moyamoya disease. (orig.)

  10. Breast MRI in high risk patients

    A.I.M. Obdeijn (Inge-Marie)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis we address various indications of breast MRI, with the emphasis on the value of MRI in screening of women with high genetic risk for breast cancer, and especially in BRCA1 mutation carriers. We showed that in the era of up-to-date MRI expertise and digital

  11. Characterization and staging of renal tumors: significance of MRI diagnostics

    Purpose: Retrospective evaluation of MRI in the diagnosis of renal masses and determination of the correlation of MRI with histology or follow-up. Materials and methods: 46 consecutive patients (13 female, 33 male, mean age 64.7 yrs) with suspected renal tumors were examined with a 1.5T MR scanner using a standardized protocol (TSE T2fs, 2DGRE T1, dynam. ce3DGRE T1fs, ce2DGRE T1fs, ce3DGRE urogram). Results: 142 renal lesions were found with diameters of <2 cm up to 14 x 18 cm. A primary classification as solid and cystic lesions was performed according to MRI criteria. In 29 cases we found lesions bilaterally, in 17 patients only in one kidney, and in four cases we found multifocal renal tumors unilaterally (n=3) or bilaterally (n=1). In 22 patients with renal tumors, cystic lesions could be seen as well. In 19 cases these were uncomplicated cysts, and in 3 cases these were complicated cysts. 35/43 lesions were histologically proven solid vascularized tumors (29 renal cell carcinomas, 6 urothelial carcinomas), five additional masses with tumor signs in MRI appeared to be progressive during follow-up thus suggesting malignancy, and one case was a multifocal bilateral renal tumor. 3/43 lesions were initially reported as being suspected of malignancy but were proven during follow-up or histologically to be benign. Tumor thrombus was depicted in MRI in the renal vein in 5 cases, stretching into the IVC in 4 cases and proven histologically in 4 and 3 cases, respectively. Of these solid masses, 99 cystic lesions could be differentiated clearly in MRI (88 simple cysts, 11 complicated cysts) that remained unchanged during follow-up (6-65 months) or were proven to be cysts histologically. In 17 cases these cysts were bilateral, in 19 cases unilateral, and 33 kidneys showed multicystic changes. In characterizing renal masses, MRI showed a positive predictive value of 93% for the diagnosis of a malignant tumor. The T-stage of histologically proven renal cell carcinomas using

  12. Polyethylene glycol and contrast-enhanced MRI of Crohn's disease in children: preliminary experience

    To assess the ability of MRI to detect bowel abnormalities in children affected by Crohn's disease (CD). We studied 22 children (age range 8-18 years) referred to us with a known history of CD. MRI was carried out using a 1.5-T unit with a maximum gradient field strength of 16 mT and a phased-array body coil. The sequences performed were breath-hold coronal and axial T2-weighted, express fat saturation, followed by T1-weighted, spoiled gradient, fast fat saturation after IV injection of gadolinium chelate (0.3 mmol/kg) for contrast enhancement of the bowel wall. Bowel distension was achieved using oral administration of isosmotic polyethylene glycol solution. Ileo-colonoscopy was considered the gold standard for evaluation of superficial abnormalities and stenoses of the colon and terminal ileum. MRI findings of bowel-wall thickening, increased vascularisation and extramural involvement were compared with the findings using B-mode and Doppler US. Concordance between MRI and endoscopy, B-mode US and Doppler US findings was determined by the Kappa statistical method. Superficial lesions were not shown by MRI. MR enteroclysis easily detected stenoses, thickening and hyperaemia of bowel wall. Concordance of findings between MRI and endoscopy was 90% (K=0.79, substantial concordance). Concordance of findings between MRI and US concerning bowel-wall thickening and increased vascularisation was 95% (K=0.875, excellent concordance) and 80% (K=0.6, fairly good concordance), respectively. Our initial results show that MRI can detect intra- and extra-mural lesions of CD. The high concordance observed between MRI, endoscopy, US and Doppler US findings suggests that MRI is at least comparable for diagnostic capability with these techniques offering, thanks to multiplanar projections, an improved visualisation of the bowel without ionising radiation. (orig.)

  13. Sequential changes in the femoral head after intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck. MRI findings

    Authors obtained T1-weighted MRI images of the femoral head after fracture of the femoral neck and classified the signals into four patterns to investigate the sequential changes of the femoral head. The T1-weighted MRI images obtained initially after femoral neck fracture showed a normal pattern in 10 of the 15 hip joints studied. MRI images obtained subsequently still showed the normal signal pattern in eight of the 10 hip joints which had shown the normal pattern in the first MRI, while two of the 10 joints subsequently showed a band pattern. The joint with the homogeneous pattern in the first MRI subsequently showed a band pattern. Of the three joints with an inhomogeneous pattern in the first MRI, two joints showed a subsequent band pattern, and the other a normal pattern. The joints which showed a band pattern continued to show a similar band pattern. Eventually, all hip joints studied showed a normal or band pattern within six months after intracapsular fracture of the femoral neck. The joints which showed a band pattern in the first MRI continued to show a similar band pattern in the subsequent MRI, without any change. Collapse occurred in one hip joint which showed an extensive band pattern. Plain X-rays showed collapse of one of the joints with a band pattern in the MRI image. It was therefore suggested that necrosis may be present histologically in the femoral head after fracture of the femoral neck even when no abnormalities are present in plain X-rays. Based on the above results, it is considered necessary to follow-up patients with femoral neck fracture with MRI for at least six months until the normal or band pattern is observed. (K.H.)

  14. Surveillance imaging in children with malignant CNS tumors: low yield of spine MRI.

    Perreault, Sébastien; Lober, Robert M; Carret, Anne-Sophie; Zhang, Guohua; Hershon, Linda; Décarie, Jean-Claude; Vogel, Hannes; Yeom, Kristen W; Fisher, Paul G; Partap, Sonia

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely obtained in patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but few studies have been conducted to evaluate this practice. We assessed the benefits of surveillance MRI and more specifically spine MRI in a contemporary cohort. We evaluated MRI results of children diagnosed with CNS tumors from January 2000 to December 2011. Children with at least one surveillance MRI following the diagnosis of medulloblastoma (MB), atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT), pineoblastoma (PB), supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor, supratentorial high-grade glioma (World Health Organization grade III-IV), CNS germ cell tumors or ependymoma were included. A total of 2,707 brain and 1,280 spine MRI scans were obtained in 258 patients. 97% of all relapses occurred in the brain and 3% were isolated to the spine. Relapse was identified in 226 (8%) brain and 48 (4%) spine MRI scans. The overall rate of detecting isolated spinal relapse was 9/1,000 and 7/1,000 for MB patients. MRI performed for PB showed the highest rate for detecting isolated spinal recurrence with 49/1,000. No initial isolated spinal relapse was identified in patients with glioma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor and ATRT. Isolated spinal recurrences are infrequent in children with malignant CNS tumors and the yield of spine MRI is very low. Tailoring surveillance spine MRI to patients with higher spinal relapse risk such as PB, MB with metastatic disease and within 3 years of diagnosis could improve allocation of resources without compromising patient care. PMID:24401959

  15. Use of 3D DCE-MRI for the estimation of renal perfusion and glomerular filtration rate: an intrasubject comparison of FLASH and KWIC with a comprehensive framework for evaluation.

    Eikefjord, Eli; Andersen, Erling; Hodneland, Erlend; Zöllner, Frank; Lundervold, Arvid; Svarstad, Einar; Rørvik, Jarle

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to compare two 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI measurement techniques for MR renography, a radial k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC) sequence and a cartesian FLASH sequence, in terms of intrasubject differences in estimates of renal functional parameters and image quality characteristics. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Ten healthy volunteers underwent repeated breath-hold KWIC and FLASH sequence examinations with temporal resolutions of 2.5 and 2.8 seconds, respectively. A two-compartment model was used to estimate MRI-derived perfusion parameters and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The latter was compared with the iohexol GFR and the estimated GFR. Image quality was assessed using a visual grading characteristic analysis of relevant image quality criteria and signal-to-noise ratio calculations. RESULTS. Perfusion estimates from FLASH were closer to literature reference values than were the KWIC sequences. In relation to the iohexol GFR (mean [± SD], 103 ± 11 mL/min/1.73 m(2)), KWIC produced significant underestimations and larger bias in GFR values (mean, 70 ± 30 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = -33.2 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) compared with the FLASH GFR (110 ± 29 mL/min/1.73 m(2); bias = 6.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). KWIC was statistically significantly (p renal function estimates. PMID:25714312

  16. Usefulness of Integrated PET/MRI in Head and Neck Cancer: A Preliminary Study

    Lee, Soo Jin; Seo, Hyo Jung; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, E. Edmund; Kang, Keon Wook; Paeng, Jin Chul; Chung, Junekey; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    The new modality of an integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) has recently been introduced but not validated. Our objective was to evaluate clinical performance of {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET/MRI in patients with head and neck cancer. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2013 and February 2013. Ten patients (eight men, two women; mean age, 61.4±13.4 years) with histologically proven head and neck tumors were enrolled.Whole-body PET/MRI and regional positron emission tomography (PET) with dedicated MRI were sequentially obtained. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUVmean, metabolic tumor volume, total lesion glycolysis and contrast enhancement were analyzed. A total of ten whole-body positron emission tomography (PET), ten regional positron emission tomography (PET), ten dedicated MRI and ten regional PET/gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (Gd)-MRI images were analyzed for initial staging. Two nuclear medicine physicians analyzed positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/MRI with a consensus. One radiologist analyzed dedicated MRI. The primary lesions and number of metastatic lymph nodes analyzed from each image were compared. Eight patients were diagnosed with head and neck cancer (one tongue cancer, four tonsillar cancers, one nasopharyngeal cancer and two hypopharyngeal cancers) by histological diagnosis. Two benign tumors (pleomorphic adenoma and Warthin tumor) were diagnosed with surgical operation. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) and regional positron emission tomography (PET) attenuated by MRI showed good image quality for the lesion detection. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) and regional positron emission tomography (PET) detected ten primary sites and compensated for a missed lesion on dedicated MRI. A discordant number of suspicious lymph node metastases was noted according to the different images; 22, 16, 39 and 40 in the whole

  17. Krabbe disease: unusual MRI findings

    Nagar, Veena A.; Ursekar, Meher A.; Krishnan, Pradeep; Jankharia, Bhavin G. [Jankharia Imaging Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2006-01-01

    We present the MRI findings in a case of infantile-onset Krabbe disease. Enlargement of the intracranial optic nerves and cervical cord were detected in addition to more typical changes in the cerebral white matter and thalami. We also review the proton MR spectroscopic findings in Krabbe disease. (orig.)

  18. Brain MRI of diabetes Mellitus

    Araki, Yutaka; Tanaka, Hisashi; Ohtani, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Tsukaguchi, Isao (Osaka Rosai Hospital, Sakai (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 2,566 patients without DM were studied on brain MRI. The results taught us that the incidence of cerebral atrophy was significantly higher in DM patients than in controls. Unexpectedly, the incidence of cerebral infarction showed no significant difference between the two groups. (author).

  19. MRI of closed spinal dysraphisms

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Phillips, Grace S.; Thapa, Mahesh M.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital and University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We present a pictorial review of MRI features of various closed spinal dysraphisms based on previously described clinicoradiological classification of spinal dysraphisms proposed. The defining imaging features of each dysraphism type are highlighted and a diagnostic algorithm for closed spinal dysraphisms is suggested. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  1. MRI of the pulmonary parenchyma

    Imaging of the pulmonary parenchyma represents a unique challenge for MRI. Limited signal is caused by low proton density, susceptibility artifacts, and physiological motion (cardiac pulsation, respiration). Recently, further improvements in MRI techniques have widened the potential for investigations of pulmonary parenchymal disease. These include very short echo times, ultrafast turbo-spin-echo acquisitions, projection reconstruction technique, breathhold imaging, ECG triggering, contrast agents (perfusion imaging, aerosols), sodium imaging, hyperpolarized noble gas imaging, and oxygen enhancement. By using widely available techniques, MRI is helpful in the assessment of (a) acute alveolitic processes in chronic infiltrative lung disease, (b) detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules, (c) detection, characterization, and follow-up of pneumonia, (d) differentiation of obstructive atelectasis from non-obstructive atelectasis and infarctions, and (e) measurements of lung water content. Chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and emphysema are not readily assessable by routine MRI techniques. More sophisticated techniques are under investigation for MR imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. They represent the beginning of functional MR imaging of the lung which will be established in the future. (orig.)

  2. MRI of the pulmonary parenchyma

    Kauczor, H.U.; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    1999-07-01

    Imaging of the pulmonary parenchyma represents a unique challenge for MRI. Limited signal is caused by low proton density, susceptibility artifacts, and physiological motion (cardiac pulsation, respiration). Recently, further improvements in MRI techniques have widened the potential for investigations of pulmonary parenchymal disease. These include very short echo times, ultrafast turbo-spin-echo acquisitions, projection reconstruction technique, breathhold imaging, ECG triggering, contrast agents (perfusion imaging, aerosols), sodium imaging, hyperpolarized noble gas imaging, and oxygen enhancement. By using widely available techniques, MRI is helpful in the assessment of (a) acute alveolitic processes in chronic infiltrative lung disease, (b) detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules, (c) detection, characterization, and follow-up of pneumonia, (d) differentiation of obstructive atelectasis from non-obstructive atelectasis and infarctions, and (e) measurements of lung water content. Chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and emphysema are not readily assessable by routine MRI techniques. More sophisticated techniques are under investigation for MR imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. They represent the beginning of functional MR imaging of the lung which will be established in the future. (orig.)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ... into the bloodstream. The radiologist , technologist or a nurse may ask if you have allergies of any ...

  4. MRI of Little Leaguer's shoulder

    The MRI appearance of 'Little Leaguer's shoulder' has not been previously reported in the radiology literature. Purported etiologies include proximal humeral epiphyseolysis, osteochondrosis of the proximal humeral epiphysis, stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate, and rotational stress fracture of the proximal humeral epiphyseal plate. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings in four patients and review the literature. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician ... when absolutely necessary for medical treatment. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and MRI. ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician ... may follow your regular daily routine and take food and medications as usual. Some MRI examinations may ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... have allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or if you have asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an MRI exam contains a metal called ... with iodine contrast allergy, but may require pre-medication. It is far ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... body structures. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). Detailed MR images allow physicians to evaluate various ... kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or the environment, or ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. top of page What are the limitations of MRI of the Head? High-quality images are assured only if you are able to ...

  10. Brain MRI of diabetes Mellitus

    One hundred and fifty-nine patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and 2,566 patients without DM were studied on brain MRI. The results taught us that the incidence of cerebral atrophy was significantly higher in DM patients than in controls. Unexpectedly, the incidence of cerebral infarction showed no significant difference between the two groups. (author)

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... entire examination is usually completed within 45 minutes. MR spectroscopy, which provides additional information on the chemicals present in the body's cells, may also be performed during the MRI exam and may add approximately ... to remain still during MR imaging. Others experience a sense of being closed- ...

  12. MRI of rectal stromal tumour

    Dam, Claus; Lindebjerg, Jan; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2012-01-01

    aware of for the rectal multidisciplinary team. On suspicion of GIST, patients should be referred to a sarcoma centre. The diagnosis of rectal GIST can be suggested on MRI by the presence of a well-defined heterogeneously large mass with a necrotic center associated with a prominent extra...

  13. MRI of medulloblastoma in adults

    Malheiros, S.M.F.; Santos, A.J.; Borges, L.R.R.; Guimaraes, I.F.; Franco, C.M.R.; Gabbai, A.A. [Department of Neurology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Carrete, H. [Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Stavale, J.N.; Pelaez, M.P. [Department of Pathology, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo Rua Botucatu 740, SP 04023-900, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Medulloblastoma has variable appearances on MRI in both children and adults. Adults are more likely to have heterogeneous cerebellar hemisphere tumours, and this is thought to be related to the greater prevalence of desmoplastic tumours in adulthood. Few studies have addressed the MRI features of adult medulloblastoma and the specific characteristics of desmoplastic and classic tumours have not been analysed. Our aim was to analyse the imaging characteristics of desmoplastic (DM) and classic (CM) medulloblastomas in adult. We retrospectively studied preoperative MRI of six men and three women, median age 33 years, range 23-53 years, with pathologically proved medulloblastomas. There were six (67%) with DM. The tumour was in the cerebellar hemisphere in eight patients (89%), including the three with CM, one of which was bilateral. All tumours were heterogeneous, giving predominantly low or isointense signal on T1- and isointense signal on T2-weighted images. Cystic or necrotic areas in all patients were particularly visible on T2-weighted images. Contrast enhancement was absent in one DM and varied from slight to intense in eight (three CM), homogeneous in one DM and patchy in seven. All tumours extended to the surface of the cerebellum and two had well-defined margins. MRI does not allow a clear distinction between DM and CM in adults. (orig.)

  14. 7 T renal MRI: challenges and promises.

    de Boer, Anneloes; Hoogduin, Johannes M; Blankestijn, Peter J; Li, Xiufeng; Luijten, Peter R; Metzger, Gregory J; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Umutlu, Lale; Visser, Fredy; Leiner, Tim

    2016-06-01

    The progression to 7 Tesla (7 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) yields promises of substantial increase in signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. This increase can be traded off to increase image spatial resolution or to decrease acquisition time. However, renal 7 T MRI remains challenging due to inhomogeneity of the radiofrequency field and due to specific absorption rate (SAR) constraints. A number of studies has been published in the field of renal 7 T imaging. While the focus initially was on anatomic imaging and renal MR angiography, later studies have explored renal functional imaging. Although anatomic imaging remains somewhat limited by inhomogeneous excitation and SAR constraints, functional imaging results are promising. The increased SNR at 7 T has been particularly advantageous for blood oxygen level-dependent and arterial spin labelling MRI, as well as sodium MR imaging, thanks to changes in field-strength-dependent magnetic properties. Here, we provide an overview of the currently available literature on renal 7 T MRI. In addition, we provide a brief overview of challenges and opportunities in renal 7 T MR imaging. PMID:27008461

  15. MRI diagnosis of bone marrow relapse in children with ALL

    Diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia is well known, but there are few reports describing the MRI features of pediatric leukemic relapse. Our purpose was to describe the MRI appearance of pediatric leukemic relapse. A total of 53 consecutive children with a history of ALL were referred for musculoskeletal MRI from 1 January 1998 to 28 February 2007 at one center, and from 1 January 2000 to 2 May 2007 at a second center. From this group, 14 children seen at initial diagnosis of leukemia and 2 children who underwent MRI after therapy for relapse were excluded. The remaining 37 children, 8 with relapse and 29 in remission, were studied. Images of patients with relapse and in remission were reviewed for type and configuration of marrow infiltration; coexisting marrow alterations including osteonecrosis or stress reaction were also reviewed. All eight children with relapse demonstrated nodular lesions with well-defined margins. Coexisting osteonecrosis was present in three children (38%) and pathologic fracture in one. Among the 29 children in remission, 9 showed stress reaction/fracture, 14 showed osteonecrosis and 9 showed ill-defined nodules, and in 5 the marrow was completely normal. Well-defined nodules in all patients with leukemic relapse suggest that this appearance is characteristic and distinct from the published findings of diffuse marrow replacement in acute leukemia. (orig.)

  16. First trimester caesarean scar ectopic pregnancy evaluation using MRI

    Aim: To determine the features of caesarean scar ectopic pregnancy (CSP) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the first trimester. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine women with CSP in the first trimester were initially selected and underwent transvaginal ultrasound and MRI examinations. Thirty-five patients with CSP were finally included in this study. Results: The CSPs were categorized into three groups: type I, in which a thin-walled diverticulum is present at the caesarean section scar (CSS) defect and the gestational sac (GS) is embedded in the diverticulum; type II, in which a thin-walled diverticulum is present at the CSS defect and the GS is partially embedded in the diverticulum; type III, in which a niche is present in the CSS defect and the GS is mainly embedded in the isthmus. Types I, II, and III CSP occurred in 40, 46, and 14% of the women, respectively. There was no significant difference between the three types in the minimum thickness of the CSS defect. In types I and II, there was a positive correlation in the maximum inlet diameter of the CSS defect and the approximate area of the GS. Conclusion: Using MRI, most CSPs present as a diverticulum at the CSS defect, and the CSS defect becomes weaker with the growth of the GS. MRI showed detailed features of the CSP

  17. Rill Initiation

    Ottosen, Thor-Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    This project is about rill erosion. The aim is to test whether rill initiation can be predicted from the shear strength of the soil as measured with a torvane on saturated soil. This approach was set forward by Rauws and Govers 1988. Rainfall simulation experiments are conducted at a plot size 2x1m, performed in May on the Marbjerg experimental field. The results are evaluated using a chain set to measure alterations of the surface roughness as a result of the erosion, visual evaluation of ph...

  18. MRI diagnosis of aggressive fibromatosis

    Objective: To analyze the MRI features of aggressive fibromatosis (AF) in order to improve its diagnostic accuracy. Method: The clinical files and MRI appearances of 66 AF patients (primary 19 cases, recurrent 47 cases) were reviewed and compared with the postoperative pathological findings. Results: The median age of all patients was 31 years (-range, 11-60 years) with a male-to-female sex ratio of 1 : 3.4. Eighty tumors were discovered. There were 5 superficial fibromatosis and 75 deep fibromatosis in which 2 lesions were intraabdominal, 6 lesions in the abdominal wall and 67 lesions extraabdominal. The average long diameter of all lesions was (8.7±5.4) cm, of superficial lesions (5.7± 2.8)cm, of deep lesions (8.9±5.5) cm. Of the 80 tumors, 79 were displayed as space-occupying intramuscular lesions, 47 (58.8%) were ovoid or lobulated and 22 (27.5%) were infiltrative in shape; 48 (60%) lesions had a well-defined margin, of which 4 formed a pseudocapsule as they enlarged by compressing normal tissue. To compare with the muscle signal intensity on MRI, 75 lesions demonstrated isointensity, mild hyperintensity or hypointensity on T1WI , heterogeneous high intensity on T2WI, and avid heterogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. There was no necrosis or surrounding edema in all lesions. Tumors destroyed bone in 2, cases. Conclusion: Aggressive fibromatosis has characteristic features on MRI, and MRI is valuable in diagnosing AF and evaluating the extend of lesion and involvement of adjacent structures. (authors)

  19. fMRI-BCI: a Review

    Da-Huan Li; Qin Gao; Wei-Shuai Lü; Hua-Fu Chen

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a new tool for brain-computer interface (BCI).This paper presents an overview to fMRI-BCI.Our attention is mainly put on the methods of signal acquisition,signal preprocessing,and signal analysis of basic fMRI-BCI structure.The available softwares and the applications of fMRI-BCI are briefly introduced.At last,we suggest focusing on some technologies to make fMRI-BCI more perfect.

  20. Clinical presentations and MRI findings of angiographically occult vascular malformations

    Various clinical features as well as MRI findings of AOVM (angiographically occult vascular malformation) were studied. Amongst out patients, since January 1988, there have been 30 cases of symptomatic AOVM (20 males, 10 females) including 4 cases with multiple lesions. The age ranged from 3 to 60 years of age, with a mean of 33.4 years. The locations of symptomatic lesions were in the cerebral hemisphere (15), the thalamus (4), the brain stem (8) and in the cerebellum (3). The initial presentations of these 30 cases were either by hemorrhage (18), convulsive seizure (9) or by progressive neurological deficits (3). The initial presentation was not related to the patient's age and the size of the lesion, but apparently related to the location of AOVM. Most of the lesions in the cerebral hemisphere presented seizures, but all of the lesions in the thalamus, the brain stem and the cerebellum disclosed hemorrhage as an initial presentation. In fact it was noticed that brain stem lesions tend to cause repetitive hemorrhage in a relatively short period. AOVM lesions were clearly visualized with T2-weighted MRI images, consisting of high intensity cores with surrounding low intensity rims. Most of the symptomatic lesions were partially enhanced by Gd-DTPA with varied intensity. Dynamic changes in size and enhancement pattern on MRI were occasionally seen, usually accompanied with episodes such as hemorrhage or neurological deterioration. Although AOVMs were angiographically negative some strands indicating draining veins were observed on MRI in several cases. In contrast, none of the nonsymptomatic lesions (22 lesions) demonstrated enhancement effects with Gd-DTPA. (author)

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liver and brain in haematologic-organic patients with fever of unknown origin

    To examine the advantage of liver and brain MRI in clinically anomalous haematological patients with fever of unknown origin. Material and Methods: Twenty liver MRI (T2-TSE, T2-HASTE, T1-FLASH±Gd dynamic) and 16 brain MRI (T2-TSE, FLAIR, T1-TSE±Gd) were performed searching for a focus of fever with a suspected organ system. Comparison with clinical follow-up. Results: suspected organ system. Comparison with clinical follow-up. Results: A focus was detected in 11/20 liver MRI. Candidiasis (n=3), mycobacteriosis (n=2), relapse of haematological disease (n=3), graft versus host disease (n=1), non-clarified (n=2). The remaining 9 cases with normal MRI were not suspicious of infectious hepatic disease during follo-wup. In brain MRI, 3/16 showed a focus (toxoplasmosis, aspergillosis, mastoiditis). Clinical indication for an infectious involvement of the brain was found in 4/16 cases 2--5 months after initially normal brain MRI. No suspicion of an infectious involvement of brain was present in the remaining 9/16 cases. Conclusion: In case of fever of unknown origin and suspicion of liver involvement, MRI of the liver should be performed due to data given in literature and its sensitivity of 100%. Because of the delayed detectability of cerebral manifestations, in cases of persisting suspicion even a previously normal MRI of the brain should be repeated. (orig.)

  2. Correlation of quantitative diffusion-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI parameters with prognostic factors in prostate cancer

    The aim of this study was to determine if correlations exist between quantitative parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk group, Gleason score (GS), maximum tumour diameter (MTD), pre-treatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA), clinical T stage and MRI prostate volume in prostate cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 3T multiparametric MRI reports on biopsy-proven prostate cancer patients performed during radiation treatment evaluation or an active surveillance protocol. DCE-MRI parameters included Ktrans (influx volume transfer coefficient), Kep (efflux reflux rate constant) and iAUC (initial area under the curve). Average DCE and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were recorded for regions of interest on DW-MRI. Relationships between MRI metrics and risk group, GS, MTD, PSA, clinical T stage and MRI prostate volume were examined using analysis of variance. Central and peripheral tumours were also analysed separately in a sub-analysis. Statistical significance was defined as Ptrans significantly correlated with PSA. For central tumours, Ktrans significantly correlated with MTD and PSA, and Kep significantly correlated with PSA. For peripheral tumours, iAUC was significantly different when stratified by L/I/H risk and GS, and ADC score with L/I/H risk, GS, and clinical T stage. DCE- and DW-MRI metrics correlate with some risk stratification factors in prostate cancer. Further work is required to determine if MRI metrics are complementary or independent prognostic factors.

  3. IMAGING OF ROTATOR CUFF PATHOLOGY- IS ULTRASOUND AS GOOD AS MRI

    Vinot

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound versus MRI in detecting rotator cuff pathology. Rotator cuff pathology involves group of disorder, which progresses from bursitis to tendinitis to partial tear and full thickenss tear. The most commonly affected tendon is the supraspinatus tendon. In our prospective study of 35 patients as initial ultrasound was followed by MRI sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosis of full thickness tear of supraspinatus when USG was compared to MRI was 100%, whereas sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnosing partial thickness tear using ultrasound compared to MRI are 100%, 78% and 84%. There is no significant p value difference on comparing ultrasound with MRI on detecting tears. Ultrasound and MRI showed almost similar diagnostic accuracy in associated findings like tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, bursal effusion. Ultrasound also has additional value of dynamic evaluation, which is useful in evaluating subacromial and subcoracoid impingement. Modality choice for the evaluation of rotator cuff pathology should be based on several factors like availability, patient preference and clinical information being sought. The high resolution sonography is an attractive screening modality for rotator cuff in patients presenting with painful shoulder. A well performed ultrasound examination in most cases obviates the need for more invasive diagnostic tests like arthrography and cumbersome and expensive MRI examinations.

  4. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  5. Role of MRI in the Risk Assessment of Primary Prostate Cancer.

    Wibmer, Andreas; Verma, Sadhna; Vargas, Hebert A

    2016-06-01

    A successful paradigm shift toward personalized management strategies for patients with prostate cancer (PCa) is heavily dependent on the availability of noninvasive diagnostic tools capable of accurately establishing the true extent of disease at the time of diagnosis and estimating the risk of subsequent disease progression and related mortality. Although there is still considerable scope for improvement in its diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic capabilities, multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently regarded as the imaging modality of choice for local staging of PCa. A negative MRI, that is, the absence of any MRI-visible intraprostatic lesion, has a high negative predictive value for the presence of clinically significant PCa and can substantiate the consideration of active surveillance as a preferred initial management approach. MRI-derived quantitative and semi-quantitative parameters can be utilized to noninvasively characterize MRI-visible prostate lesions and identify those patients who are most likely to benefit from radical treatment, and differentiate them from patients with benign or indolent prostate pathology that may also be visible on MRI. This literature review summarizes current strategies how MRI can be used to determine a tailored management strategy for an individual patient. PMID:27187162

  6. The diagnostic and therapeutic impact of MRI: an observational multi-centre study

    AIM: To provide information about the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the findings across diagnostic groups. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, observational study of 2017 consecutive referrals for MRI of the head, spine or knee at four imaging centres. Clinicians completed questionnaires before MRI stating initial diagnoses, diagnostic confidence and treatment plans. After imaging, a second questionnaire evaluated clinicians' revised diagnosis and treatment plans in the light of imaging findings. Patients were grouped into nine diagnostic categories for analysis. Comparison between pre- and post-imaging was used to assess the diagnostic and therapeutic impact of MRI. RESULTS: In seven of nine diagnostic groups MRI findings were associated with a diagnostic impact. Diagnoses were revised or discarded following normal MR findings and diagnostic confidence was increased by confirmative MR findings. There was no statistically significant diagnostic impact for suspected pituitary or cerebello-pontine angle lesions. In five of nine diagnostic groups (knee meniscus, knee ligament, multiple sclerosis, lumbar and cervical spine) MRI findings had a clear impact on treatment plans. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that in most diagnostic categories, MRI influences diagnosis and treatment. However, experimental studies are needed to prove that these diagnostic and therapeutic impacts lead to improved health. Hollingworth (2000)

  7. Pathophysiological changes detected by MRI within 24 hours after head injury

    This report concerns the evaluation of the usefulness of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with head injuries. For this purpose we compared the CT and MRI results obtained on 48 such patients. MRI of all cases was taken within 24 hours after head injury using a 1.5-Tesla unit. The sensitivity of the two modalities in the detection of small traumatic lesions was compared. Traumatic lesions of 23 patients (47.9%) were not detected by CT, but they were demonstrated on MRI. Overall, MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detecting early and/or subtle traumatic changes of the brain parenchyma (P1-WI and T2-WI. (B) Corpus callosum lesions with hyperintensity on T2-WI were in fact hemorrhagic contusions by signal changes on sequential MRI. The follow-up of chronological changes of a given corpus callosum lesion was essential for confirmation of its pathology. (C) In one case, scratch-like lesions with strong hypointensity on T1-WI and hyperintensity on T2-WI were clearly demonstrated in the white matter. These observations appeared to indicate axonal damages. (D) Even if initial GCS score is low (2-WI and subsequently disappeared completely. We conclude that performing MRI in the early stage of a head injury is of utility for the understanding of pertinent pathophysiological changes and for predicting outcome. (author)

  8. MRI in the management of scaphoid fractures in skeletally immature patients

    Johnson, K.J.; Haigh, S.F. [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Trust (United Kingdom). Radiology Dept.; Symonds, K.E. [Diana Princess of Wales Children' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Accident and Emergengency

    2000-10-01

    Background. The scaphoid is the commonest fractured carpal bone, but excluding a scaphoid fracture with plain radiographs is difficult. Other imaging modalities are being increasingly evaluated in the management of scaphoid injuries. MRI has been shown to be of considerable value in the adult population but there have been limited studies of its use in children. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in the acute management of suspected scaphoid injuries in children. Methods and materials. Fifty-six children (57 injuries) who had a suspected scaphoid injury underwent MRI within 10 days of their initial trauma. The results of MRI were used to dictate management of the injury. Results. In 33 (58 %) of the 57 injuries, MRI was normal and the patient was discharged from care. In 16 cases (28 %), a fractured scaphoid was diagnosed and appropriate treatment started early. Additionally, other fractures around the wrist joint and ganglion cysts were demonstrated on MRI. Conclusions. MRI of acute scaphoid injuries in children significantly alters management. Those children with normal scans are discharged earlier. Scaphoid fractures are confirmed earlier and other pathological conditions are also detected. (orig.)

  9. MRI in the management of scaphoid fractures in skeletally immature patients

    Background. The scaphoid is the commonest fractured carpal bone, but excluding a scaphoid fracture with plain radiographs is difficult. Other imaging modalities are being increasingly evaluated in the management of scaphoid injuries. MRI has been shown to be of considerable value in the adult population but there have been limited studies of its use in children. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in the acute management of suspected scaphoid injuries in children. Methods and materials. Fifty-six children (57 injuries) who had a suspected scaphoid injury underwent MRI within 10 days of their initial trauma. The results of MRI were used to dictate management of the injury. Results. In 33 (58 %) of the 57 injuries, MRI was normal and the patient was discharged from care. In 16 cases (28 %), a fractured scaphoid was diagnosed and appropriate treatment started early. Additionally, other fractures around the wrist joint and ganglion cysts were demonstrated on MRI. Conclusions. MRI of acute scaphoid injuries in children significantly alters management. Those children with normal scans are discharged earlier. Scaphoid fractures are confirmed earlier and other pathological conditions are also detected. (orig.)

  10. MRI findings of serous atrophy of bone marrow and associated complications

    Boutin, Robert D. [Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); White, Lawrence M. [University of Toronto, Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Laor, Tal [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, Damon J. [New England Baptist Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Lopez-Ben, Robert R. [Carolinas HealthCare System, Charlotte Radiology, Diagnostic Radiology, Charlotte, NC (United States); Stevens, Kathryn J. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To report the MRI appearance of serous atrophy of bone marrow (SABM) and analyse clinical findings and complications of SABM. A retrospective search of MRI examinations of SABM was performed. Symptoms, underlying conditions, MRI findings, delay in diagnosis and associated complications were recorded. We identified 30 patients (15 male, 15 female; mean age: 46 ± 21 years) with MRI findings of SABM. Underlying conditions included anorexia nervosa (n = 10), cachexia from malignant (n = 5) and non-malignant (n = 7) causes, massive weight loss after bariatric surgery (n = 1), biliary atresia (n = 1), AIDS (n = 3), endocrine disorders (n = 2) and scurvy (n = 1). MRI showed mildly hypointense signal on T1- weighted and hyperintense signal on fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive images of affected bone marrow in all cases and similar signal abnormalities of the adjacent subcutaneous fat in 29/30 cases. Seven patients underwent repeat MRI due to initial misinterpretation of bone marrow signal as technical error. Superimposed fractures of the hips and lower extremities were common (n = 14). SABM occurs most commonly in anorexia nervosa and cachexia. MRI findings of SABM are often misinterpreted as technical error requiring unnecessary repeat imaging. SABM is frequently associated with fractures of the lower extremities. (orig.)

  11. Learning Computational Models of Video Memorability from fMRI Brain Imaging.

    Han, Junwei; Chen, Changyuan; Shao, Ling; Hu, Xintao; Han, Jungong; Liu, Tianming

    2015-08-01

    Generally, various visual media are unequally memorable by the human brain. This paper looks into a new direction of modeling the memorability of video clips and automatically predicting how memorable they are by learning from brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We propose a novel computational framework by integrating the power of low-level audiovisual features and brain activity decoding via fMRI. Initially, a user study experiment is performed to create a ground truth database for measuring video memorability and a set of effective low-level audiovisual features is examined in this database. Then, human subjects' brain fMRI data are obtained when they are watching the video clips. The fMRI-derived features that convey the brain activity of memorizing videos are extracted using a universal brain reference system. Finally, due to the fact that fMRI scanning is expensive and time-consuming, a computational model is learned on our benchmark dataset with the objective of maximizing the correlation between the low-level audiovisual features and the fMRI-derived features using joint subspace learning. The learned model can then automatically predict the memorability of videos without fMRI scans. Evaluations on publically available image and video databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework. PMID:25314715

  12. [Progress of clinical application of functional MRI in the localization of brain language area].

    Zhang, Nan; Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong

    2016-02-01

    For surgical operation in the functional area in the brain, it's commonly demanded to resect the lesion to the maximal extent on the basis of preserve the normal neural function, thus the precise localization of functional area is extremely important. As for the advantages of being widely available, easy to grasp and non-invasive, the functional MRI (fMRI) has come into wide use, while the application of language fMRI is still in the initial stage. It's important to choose appropriate fMRI task according to the individual condition of the subject, the commonly-adopted tasks include verb generation, picture naming, word recognition, word generation, etc. However, the effectiveness of using fMRI to localize language area is not totally satisfactory, adopting multiple task is an effective approach to improve the sensitivity of this technique. The application of resting state fMRI in the localization of language area and the further research of the role of fMRI in localizing the Chinese language area are the important future directions. PMID:26876086

  13. Equilibrium disks, MRI mode excitation, and steady state turbulence in global accretion disk simulations

    Parkin, E R

    2012-01-01

    Global three dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of turbulent accretion disks are presented which start from fully equilibrium initial conditions in which the magnetic forces are accounted for and the induction equation is satisfied. The local linear theory of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is used as a predictor of the growth of magnetic field perturbations in the global simulations. The linear growth estimates and global simulations diverge when non-linear motions - perhaps triggered by the onset of turbulence - upset the velocity perturbations used to excite the MRI. The saturated state is found to be independent of the initially excited MRI mode, showing that once the disk has expelled the initially net flux field and settled into quasi-periodic oscillations in the toroidal magnetic flux, the dynamo cycle regulates the global saturation stress level. Furthermore, time-averaged measures of converged turbulence, such as the ratio of magnetic energies, are found to be in agreement with...

  14. CT and MRI of the epigastrium - is the MRI competitive?

    The conclusion drawn in this article is: - CT will continue to rank first as a method for diagnostic evaluation of the entire abdomen. - MRI now offers advantages over CT for diagnostic identification of focal liver lesions, both with regard to detection as such and to a differential diagnosis of liver tumors. - CT continues to be the modality of first choice for diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis. - CT offers advantages for the diagnostic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract (as e.g. in case of complications in the course of inflammatory intestinal affection). - Interventional measures such as biopsies or abscess drainage will still be best controlled by CT, and MRI is not likely to become a really competitive method for such tasks in the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  15. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    Roberta Fusco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI.

  16. The added diagnostic value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T in nonpalpable breast lesions.

    Laura G Merckel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the added diagnostic value of 3.0 Tesla breast MRI over conventional breast imaging in the diagnosis of in situ and invasive breast cancer and to explore the role of routine versus expert reading. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated MRI scans of patients with nonpalpable BI-RADS 3-5 lesions who underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced 3.0 Tesla breast MRI. Initially, MRI scans were read by radiologists in a routine clinical setting. All histologically confirmed index lesions were re-evaluated by two dedicated breast radiologists. Sensitivity and specificity for the three MRI readings were determined, and the diagnostic value of breast MRI in addition to conventional imaging was assessed. Interobserver reliability between the three readings was evaluated. RESULTS: MRI examinations of 207 patients were analyzed. Seventy-eight of 207 (37.7% patients had a malignant lesion, of which 33 (42.3% patients had pure DCIS and 45 (57.7% invasive breast cancer. Sensitivity of breast MRI was 66.7% during routine, and 89.3% and 94.7% during expert reading. Specificity was 77.5% in the routine setting, and 61.0% and 33.3% during expert reading. In the routine setting, MRI provided additional diagnostic information over clinical information and conventional imaging, as the Area Under the ROC Curve increased from 0.76 to 0.81. Expert MRI reading was associated with a stronger improvement of the AUC to 0.87. Interobserver reliability between the three MRI readings was fair and moderate. CONCLUSIONS: 3.0 T breast MRI of nonpalpable breast lesions is of added diagnostic value for the diagnosis of in situ and invasive breast cancer.

  17. Lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis: MRI grading

    Borre, Daniel G. [Department of MRI, RM-Hastings, Clinica Monte Grande, Monte Grande, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of MRI, Oncologic Center of Excellence, Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sociedad Argentina de Radiologia, Arenales 1985 P.B., Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires C1124AAC (Argentina); Borre, Guillermo E. [Department of MRI, RM-Hastings, Clinica Monte Grande, Monte Grande, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Department of MRI, Oncologic Center of Excellence, Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Aude, Flavio [Department of MRI, Oncologic Center of Excellence, Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Gladys N. [Department of MRI, RM-Hastings, Clinica Monte Grande, Monte Grande, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2003-07-01

    Lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis (LEL) is characterized by excessive deposition of epidural fat (EF). The purpose of our retrospective study was to quantify normal and pathologic amounts of EF in order to develop a reproducible MRI grading of LEL. In this study of 2528 patients (1095 men and 1433 women; age range 18-84 years, mean age 47.3 years) we performed a retrospective analysis of MRI exams. We obtained four linear measurements at the axial plane parallel and tangent to the superior end plate of S1 vertebral body: antero-posterior diameter of dural sac (A-Pd DuS), A-Pd of EF, located ventrally and dorsally to the DuS, and A-Pd of the spinal canal (Spi C). We calculated (a) DuS/EF index and (b) EF/Spi C index. We developed the following MRI grading of LEL: normal, grade 0: DuS/EF index {>=}1.5, EF/Spi C index {<=}40%; LEL grade I: DuS/EF index 1.49-1, EF/Spi C index 41-50% (mild EF overgrowth); LEL grade II: DuS/EF index 0.99-0.34, EF/Spi C index 51-74% (moderate EF overgrowth); LEL grade III: DuS/EF index {<=}0.33, EF/Spi C index {>=}75% (severe EF overgrowth). The MRI exams were evaluated independently by three readers. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities were obtained by calculating Kappa statistics. The MRI grading showed the following distribution: grade 0, 2003 patients (79.2%); LEL grade I, 308 patients (12.2%); LEL grade II, 165 patients (6.5%); and LEL grade III, 52 patients (2.1%). The kappa coefficients for intra- and interobserver agreement in a four-grade classification system were substantial to excellent: intraobserver, kappa range 0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.65-0.93] to 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70-0.95); interobserver, kappa range 0.76 (95% CI, 0.62-0.91) to 0.85 (95% CI, 0.73-0.97). In LEL grade I, there were no symptomatic cases due to fat hypertrophy. LEL grade II was symptomatic in only 24 cases (14.5%). In LEL grade III, all cases were symptomatic. A subgroup of 22 patients (42.3%) showed other substantial spinal pathologies (e

  18. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  19. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  20. Fetal MRI Characteristics of Exencephaly: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Sharif, Ali; Zhou, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    We present the fetal MRI characteristics of exencephaly, a rare malformation of the cranium. The fetus was initially misdiagnosed as anencephaly at 14 weeks of estimated gestational age (EGA) and later mislabeled as acrania at 20 weeks of EGA by ultrasound. A confirmatory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 29 weeks of EGA demonstrated findings consistent with exencephaly, which was confirmed after birth. To our knowledge, no full fetal MRI characteristics have been described. We hope to use this case to review the key MRI findings in differentiating exencephaly from other cranial vault defects and to help early diagnosis of exencephaly as the appropriate use of correct nomenclature allows better research while giving parents the most accurate and appropriate counseling. PMID:26955498