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Sample records for 3d reconstructed tomosynthesis

  1. Improved 3D reconstructions for generalized tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemler, Paul F.; Robinson, Stephen B.

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes a unique system for constructing a three-dimensional volume from a set of two-dimensional (2D) x-ray projection images based on optical aperture theory. This proprietary system known as Tuned-Aperture Computed Tomography (TACT) is novel in that only a small number of projections acquired from arbitrary or task-specific projection angles is required for the reconstruction process. We used TACT to reconstruct a simulated phantom from seven 2D projections made with the x-ray source positioned within 30 degrees of perpendicular to a detector array. The distance from the x-ray source was also varied to change the amount of perspective distortion in each projection. Finally, we determined the reconstruction accuracy of TACT and compared it to that of a conventional tomosynthesis system. We found the reconstructed volumetric data sets computed with TACT to be geometrically accurate and contain significantly less visible blurring than a similar data set computed with the control technique.

  2. Compressed-sensing (CS)-based digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstruction for low-dose, accurate 3D breast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-08-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic techniques, such as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), computed tomography (CT), etc., there are often challenges for accurate image reconstruction from incomplete data. In DBT, in particular, the limited-angle and few-view projection data are theoretically insufficient for exact reconstruction; thus, the use of common filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithms leads to severe image artifacts, such as the loss of the average image value and edge sharpening. One possible approach to alleviate these artifacts may employ iterative statistical methods because they potentially yield reconstructed images that are in better accordance with the measured projection data. In this work, as another promising approach, we investigated potential applications to low-dose, accurate DBT imaging with a state-of-the-art reconstruction scheme based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory. We implemented an efficient CS-based DBT algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. We successfully obtained DBT images of substantially very high accuracy by using the algorithm and expect it to be applicable to developing the next-generation 3D breast X-ray imaging system.

  3. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the background tissues with confidence. Methods In this paper, we propose a new method to suppress the inter-plane artifacts in FPD-based tomosynthesis. If 3D whole volume CT images are available before the tomosynthesis scan, the CT image data can be incorporated into the tomosynthesis image reconstruction to suppress the inter-plane artifacts, hence, improving the image contrast. In the proposed technique, the projection components stemming from outside the region-of-interest (ROI are subtracted from the measured tomosynthesis projection data to suppress the inter-plane artifacts. The projection components stemming from outside the ROI are calculated from the 3D whole volume CT images which usually have lower lateral resolution than the tomosynthesis images. The tomosynthesis images are reconstructed from the subtracted projection data which account for the x-ray attenuation through the ROI. After verifying the proposed method by simulation, we have performed both CT scan and tomosynthesis scan on a phantom and a sacrificed rat using a FPD-based micro-CT. Results We have measured contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR from the tomosynthesis images which is an indicator of the residual inter-plane artifacts on the focal-plane image. In both cases of the simulation and experimental imaging studies of the contrast evaluating phantom, CNRs have been significantly improved by the proposed method. In the rat imaging also, we have observed better visual contrast from the tomosynthesis images reconstructed by the proposed method. Conclusions The proposed tomosynthesis technique can improve image contrast with aids of 3D whole volume CT images. Even though local tomosynthesis needs extra 3D CT scanning, it may find clinical applications in special situations in which extra 3D CT scan is already available or allowed.

  4. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly suggestive for malignancy (BIRADS 5) indicating the required variety of shapes and margins of these models. The assessment of the BIRADS scores for all observers indicated good agreement based on Kendall's coefficient for both the 2D and the tomosynthesis evaluations. The paired analysis of the BIRADS scores between 2D and tomosynthesis for each observer revealed consistent behavior for the real and simulated masses. Conclusions: A database of 3D mass models, with variety of shapes and margins, was validated for the realism of their appearance for 2D digital mammography and for breast tomosynthesis. This database is suitable for use in future observer performance studies whether in virtual clinical trials or in patient images with simulated lesions

  5. 3D heart reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Roxo, Diogo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to achieve a 3D reconstruction of the four heart chambers using 2D echocardiographic images. A level set algorithm based on the phase symmetry approach and on a new logarithmic based stopping function was used to extract simultaneously the four heart cavities from these images in a fully automatic way. However to proceed to the 3D reconstruction using the segmented images, it was first necessary to satisfy clinical practise requirements. This means that the algo...

  6. Oblique reconstructions in tomosynthesis. II. Super-resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In tomosynthesis, super-resolution has been demonstrated using reconstruction planes parallel to the detector. Super-resolution allows for subpixel resolution relative to the detector. The purpose of this work is to develop an analytical model that generalizes super-resolution to oblique reconstruction planes.Methods: In a digital tomosynthesis system, a sinusoidal test object is modeled along oblique angles (i.e., “pitches”) relative to the plane of the detector in a 3D divergent-beam acquisition geometry. To investigate the potential for super-resolution, the input frequency is specified to be greater than the alias frequency of the detector. Reconstructions are evaluated in an oblique plane along the extent of the object using simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection (FBP). By comparing the amplitude of the reconstruction against the attenuation coefficient of the object at various frequencies, the modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated to determine whether modulation is within detectable limits for super-resolution. For experimental validation of super-resolution, a goniometry stand was used to orient a bar pattern phantom along various pitches relative to the breast support in a commercial digital breast tomosynthesis system.Results: Using theoretical modeling, it is shown that a single projection image cannot resolve a sine input whose frequency exceeds the detector alias frequency. The high frequency input is correctly visualized in SBP or FBP reconstruction using a slice along the pitch of the object. The Fourier transform of this reconstructed slice is maximized at the input frequency as proof that the object is resolved. Consistent with the theoretical results, experimental images of a bar pattern phantom showed super-resolution in oblique reconstructions. At various pitches, the highest frequency with detectable modulation was determined by visual inspection of the bar patterns. The dependency of the highest detectable frequency on pitch followed the same trend as the analytical model. It was demonstrated that super-resolution is not achievable if the pitch of the object approaches 90°, corresponding to the case in which the test frequency is perpendicular to the breast support. Only low frequency objects are detectable at pitches close to 90°.Conclusions: This work provides a platform for investigating super-resolution in oblique reconstructions for tomosynthesis. In breast imaging, this study should have applications in visualizing microcalcifications and other subtle signs of cancer

  7. Oblique reconstructions in tomosynthesis. II. Super-resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: In tomosynthesis, super-resolution has been demonstrated using reconstruction planes parallel to the detector. Super-resolution allows for subpixel resolution relative to the detector. The purpose of this work is to develop an analytical model that generalizes super-resolution to oblique reconstruction planes.Methods: In a digital tomosynthesis system, a sinusoidal test object is modeled along oblique angles (i.e., “pitches”) relative to the plane of the detector in a 3D divergent-beam acquisition geometry. To investigate the potential for super-resolution, the input frequency is specified to be greater than the alias frequency of the detector. Reconstructions are evaluated in an oblique plane along the extent of the object using simple backprojection (SBP) and filtered backprojection (FBP). By comparing the amplitude of the reconstruction against the attenuation coefficient of the object at various frequencies, the modulation transfer function (MTF) is calculated to determine whether modulation is within detectable limits for super-resolution. For experimental validation of super-resolution, a goniometry stand was used to orient a bar pattern phantom along various pitches relative to the breast support in a commercial digital breast tomosynthesis system.Results: Using theoretical modeling, it is shown that a single projection image cannot resolve a sine input whose frequency exceeds the detector alias frequency. The high frequency input is correctly visualized in SBP or FBP reconstruction using a slice along the pitch of the object. The Fourier transform of this reconstructed slice is maximized at the input frequency as proof that the object is resolved. Consistent with the theoretical results, experimental images of a bar pattern phantom showed super-resolution in oblique reconstructions. At various pitches, the highest frequency with detectable modulation was determined by visual inspection of the bar patterns. The dependency of the highest detectable frequency on pitch followed the same trend as the analytical model. It was demonstrated that super-resolution is not achievable if the pitch of the object approaches 90°, corresponding to the case in which the test frequency is perpendicular to the breast support. Only low frequency objects are detectable at pitches close to 90°.Conclusions: This work provides a platform for investigating super-resolution in oblique reconstructions for tomosynthesis. In breast imaging, this study should have applications in visualizing microcalcifications and other subtle signs of cancer.

  8. Segmentation of adipose and glandular tissue for breast tomosynthesis imaging using a 3D hidden-Markov model trained on breast MRIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Christina M.; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2011-03-01

    Breast tomosynthesis involves a restricted number of images acquired in an arc in conventional mammography projection geometry. Despite its angular undersampling, tomosynthesis projections are reconstructed into a volume at a dose comparable to mammography. Tomosynthesis thus provides depth information, which is especially beneficial to patients with dense breasts. Because the device can be based on an existing FFDM unit, tomosynthesis may be used to accurately assess breast tissue composition, which would greatly benefit high-risk patients with less access to costly imaging modalities such as MRI. This study plans to extract quantitative 3D breast tissue density information using a fully automatic probabilistic model trained on segmented MRIs. The MRI ground truth was obtained for 293 breasts by iterative threshold-based fatty / glandular tissue segmentation. After training a 3D hidden Markov model (HMM) on 10 MR volumes, our model was validated by segmenting 214 of the 293 breasts. After the tomosynthesis value optimization, the same trained HMM was tested to segment breast tomosynthesis volumes of subjects whose MRIs were used for validation. Initial training / testing of the HMM on MRIs matched density to thresholding within 5% for 70/214 breasts and 10% for 127/214 breasts. HMM segmentation was qualitatively superior at the cranial/caudal end slices in MRIs and quantitatively superior for most tested tomosynthesis volumes. Its robustness and ease of modification give the HMM great promise and potential for expansion in this multi-modality study.

  9. Simulation of 3D objects into breast tomo-synthesis images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomo-synthesis is a new three-dimensional (3D) breast-imaging modality that produces images of cross-sectional planes parallel to the detector plane from a limited number of X-ray projections over a limited angular range. Several technical and clinical parameters have not yet been completely optimised. Some of the open questions could be addressed experimentally; other parameter settings cannot be easily realised in practice and the associated optimisation process requires therefore a theoretical approach. Rather than simulating the complete 3D imaging chain, it is hypothesised that the simulation of small lesions into clinical (or test object) images can be of help in the optimisation process. In the present study, small 3D objects have been simulated into real projection images. Subsequently, these hybrid projection images are reconstructed using the routine clinical reconstruction tools. In this study, the validation of this simulation framework is reported through the comparison between simulated and real objects in reconstructed planes. The results confirm that there is no statistically significant difference between the simulated and the real objects. This suggests that other small mathematical or physiological objects could be simulated with the same approach. (authors)

  10. Optimizing filtered backprojection reconstruction for a breast tomosynthesis prototype device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertelmeier, Thomas; Orman, Jasmina; Haerer, Wolfgang; Dudam, Mithun K.

    2006-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis is a new technique intended to overcome the limitations of conventional projection mammography by reconstructing slices through the breast from projection views acquired from different angles with respect to the breast. We formulate a general theory of filtered backprojection reconstruction for linear tomosynthesis. The filtering step consists of an MTF inversion filter, a spectral filter, and a slice thickness filter. In this paper the method is applied first to simulated data to understand the basic effects of the various filtering steps. We then demonstrate the impact of the filter functions with simulated projections and with clinical data acquired with a research breast tomosynthesis system.** With this reconstruction method the image quality can be controlled regarding noise and spatial resolution. In a wide range of spatial frequencies the slice thickness can be kept constant and artifacts caused by the incompleteness of the data can be suppressed.

  11. 3D statistical facial reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Berar, M; Bailly, G; Payan, Y; Berar, Maxime; Desvignes, Michel; Payan, Yohan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of craniofacial reconstruction is to produce a likeness of a face from the skull. Few works in computerized assisted facial reconstruction have been done in the past, due to poor machine performances and data availability, and major works are manually reconstructions. In this paper, we present an approach to build 3D statistical models of the skull and the face with soft tissues from the skull of one individual. Results on real data are presented and seem promising.

  12. Preliminary attempt on maximum likelihood tomosynthesis reconstruction of DEI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomosynthesis is a three-dimension reconstruction method that can remove the effect of superimposition with limited angle projections. It is especially promising in mammography where radiation dose is concerned. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood tomosynthesis reconstruction algorithm (ML-TS) on the apparent absorption data of diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The motivation of this contribution is to develop a tomosynthesis algorithm in low-dose or noisy circumstances and make DEI get closer to clinic application. The theoretical statistical models of DEI data in physics are analyzed and the proposed algorithm is validated with the experimental data at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF). The results of ML-TS have better contrast compared with the well known 'shift-and-add' algorithm and FBP algorithm. (authors)

  13. Virtual 3-D Facial Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Paul Evison

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Facial reconstructions in archaeology allow empathy with people who lived in the past and enjoy considerable popularity with the public. It is a common misconception that facial reconstruction will produce an exact likeness; a resemblance is the best that can be hoped for. Research at Sheffield University is aimed at the development of a computer system for facial reconstruction that will be accurate, rapid, repeatable, accessible and flexible. This research is described and prototypical 3-D facial reconstructions are presented. Interpolation models simulating obesity, ageing and ethnic affiliation are also described. Some strengths and weaknesses in the models, and their potential for application in archaeology are discussed.

  14. Fast reconstruction for unconstrained cone-beam tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Beilei; Barner, Kenneth; Lee, Denny

    2004-05-01

    Traditional Tomosynthesis requires the X-ray source to be parallel beams or cone beams constrained to the same plane above the object of interest. Commonly, the X-ray sources are placed uniformly around a circle or along a line in the same plane, which demands fixed and high-precision equipment. To eliminate the constraints on the X-ray sources and obtain fast and efficient reconstruction with adequate quality, a fast and unconstrained cone beam Tomosynthesis reconstruction method as well as the corresponding deblurring method is presented in this paper. In this method, two reference balls, whose connecting line is parallel to the detector, are placed above the detector. According to the information provided by these two balls, the X-ray source position and its relative motion are readily calculated for the reconstruction and the corresponding deblurring processes. A layer-by-layer, rather than a voxel-by-voxel, reconstruction is utilized in order to speed up the calculation. This fast and unconstrained cone beam Tomosynthesis has a large commercial value, allowing unconstrained projection acquisition and making portable and relatively cheap Tomosynthesis equipment possible.

  15. A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three algorithms for breast tomosynthesis reconstruction were compared in this paper, including (1) a back-projection (BP) algorithm (equivalent to the shift-and-add algorithm), (2) a Feldkamp filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm, and (3) an iterative Maximum Likelihood (ML) algorithm. Our breast tomosynthesis system acquires 11 low-dose projections over a 50 deg. angular range using an a-Si (CsI:Tl) flat-panel detector. The detector was stationary during the acquisition. Quality metrics such as signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) and artifact spread function (ASF) were used for quantitative evaluation of tomosynthesis reconstructions. The results of the quantitative evaluation were in good agreement with the results of the qualitative assessment. In patient imaging, the superimposed breast tissues observed in two-dimensional (2D) mammograms were separated in tomosynthesis reconstructions by all three algorithms. It was shown in both phantom imaging and patient imaging that the BP algorithm provided the best SDNR for low-contrast masses but the conspicuity of the feature details was limited by interplane artifacts; the FBP algorithm provided the highest edge sharpness for microcalcifications but the quality of masses was poor; the information of both the masses and the microcalcifications were well restored with balanced quality by the ML algorithm, superior to the results from the other two algorithms

  16. Adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongting; Inscoe, Christine; Calliste, Jabari; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides 3D images which remove tissue overlapping and enables better cancer detection. Stationary DBT (s-DBT) uses a fixed X-ray source array to eliminate image blur associated with the x-ray tube motion and provides better image quality as well as faster scanning speed. For limited angle tomography, it is known that iterative reconstructions generally produces better images with fewer artifacts. However classical iterative tomosynthesis reconstruction methods are considerably slower than the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction. The linear x-ray source array used in s-DBT enables a computationally more efficient volume reconstruction using adapted fan beam slice sampling, which transforms the 3-D cone beam reconstruction to a series of 2-D fan beam slice reconstructions. In this paper, we report the first results of the adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) for the s-DBT system currently undergoing clinical trial at UNC, using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). An analytic breast phantom is used to quantitatively analyze the performance of the AFVR. Image quality of a CIRS biopsy phantom reconstructed using the AFVR method are compared to that using FBP algorithm with a commercial package. Our results show a significant reduction in memory usage and an order of magnitude speed increase in reconstructing speed using AFVR compared to that of classical 3-D cone beam reconstruction. We also observed that images reconstructed by AFVR with SART had a better sharpness and contrast compared to that using FBP. Preliminary results on patient images demonstrates the improved detectability of the s-DBT system over the mammography. By utilizing parallel computing with graphics processing unit (GPU), it is expected that the AFVR method will enable iterative reconstruction technique to be practical for clinical applications.

  17. Comparison of reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Reiser, I; Nishikawa, R M; Sidky, E Y; Pan, X

    2009-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is an emerging modality for breast imaging. A typical tomosynthesis image is reconstructed from projection data acquired at a limited number of views over a limited angular range. In general, the quantitative accuracy of the image can be significantly compromised by severe artifacts and non-isotropic resolution resulting from the incomplete data. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that DBT may yield useful information for detection/classification tasks and thus is considered a promising breast imaging modality currently undergoing pre-clinical evaluation trials. The purpose of this work is to conduct a preliminary, but systematic, investigation and evaluation of the properties of reconstruction algorithms that have been proposed for DBT. We use a breast phantom designed for DBT evaluation to generate analytic projection data for a typical DBT configuration, which is currently undergoing pre-clinical evaluation. The reconstruction algorithms under comparison include (i) f...

  18. Numerical Methods for Coupled Reconstruction and Registration in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Guang; Hawkes, David J; Arridge, Simon R

    2013-01-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) provides an insight into the fine details of normal fibroglandular tissues and abnormal lesions by reconstructing a pseudo-3D image of the breast. In this respect, DBT overcomes a major limitation of conventional X-ray mammography by reducing the confounding effects caused by the superposition of breast tissue. In a breast cancer screening or diagnostic context, a radiologist is interested in detecting change, which might be indicative of malignant disease. To help automate this task image registration is required to establish spatial correspondence between time points. Typically, images, such as MRI or CT, are first reconstructed and then registered. This approach can be effective if reconstructing using a complete set of data. However, for ill-posed, limited-angle problems such as DBT, estimating the deformation is complicated by the significant artefacts associated with the reconstruction, leading to severe inaccuracies in the registration. This paper presents a mathemati...

  19. The development of an 'on-belt tomosynthesis' system for cost-effective (3D) baggage screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokytha, S.; Speller, Robert; Robson, Stuart

    2013-06-01

    This study describes a cost-effective check-in baggage screening system, based on `on-belt tomosynthesis' (ObT) and close-range photogrammetry, which is designed to address the limitations of the most common method of baggage screening, conventional projection radiography. The latter's limitations can lead to loss of information and an increase in baggage handling time, as baggage is manually searched or screened with more advanced systems. This project proposes a system that overcomes such limitations creating a cost-effective automated pseudo-3D imaging system, by combining x-ray and optical imaging to form digital tomograms. Tomosynthesis is the creation of pseudo-3D images from a number of 2D projections which are acquired at a range of orientations around a static object. In the ObT system, instead of moving the source and detectors around the object, as in conventional CT, the movement of bags around bends in the baggage transport system provides the required relative motion between source, object and a fan configuration of stripdetectors. For image reconstruction it is necessary to accurately establish the sequential position and orientation of each bag as it is imaged. For this, a low-cost photogrammetric solution is used, based on geometrically calibrated web- cameras positioned around the bends where the bags are imaged. This paper describes a study demonstrating the feasibility of implementing close-range photogrammetry to a potential ObT system, for accurate determination of the object location. After this, an optimum ObT system is designed and built, the process of which is presented in this paper.

  20. The development of a pseudo-3D imaging system (tomosynthesis) for security screening of passenger baggage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a study investigating the potential of tomosynthesis as a post check-in baggage scanning system. A laboratory system has been constructed consisting of a moveable source and detector, arranged around a mini 90o bend conveyor system, from which multiple projection images can be collected. Simulation code has been developed to allow the optimum source and detector positions to be determined. Reconstruction methods are being developed to modify the Shift-And-Add (SAA) algorithm to accommodate the non-typical imaging geometry.

  1. Convergence of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil; JØrgensen, Jakob Heide

    2012-01-01

    Most iterative image reconstruction algorithms are based on some form of optimization, such as minimization of a data-fidelity term plus an image regularizing penalty term. While achieving the solution of these optimization problems may not directly be clinically relevant, accurate optimization solutions can aid in iterative image reconstruction algorithm design. This issue is particularly acute for iterative image reconstruction in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT), where the corresponding data model IS particularly poorly conditioned. The impact of this poor conditioning is that iterative algorithms applied to this system can be slow to converge. Recent developments in first-order algorithms are now beginning to allow for accurate solutions to optimization problems of interest to tomographic imaging in general. In particular, we investigate an algorithm developed by Chambolle and Pock (2011 J. Math. Imag. Vol. 40, pgs 120-145) and apply it to iterative image reconstruction in DBT.

  2. A comparative analysis of 2D and 3D CAD for calcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Conant, Emily F.

    2015-03-01

    Many medical centers offer digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and 2D digital mammography acquired under the same compression (i.e., "Combo" examination) for screening. This paper compares a conventional 2D CAD algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® CAD v9.4) for calcification detection against a prototype 3D algorithm (Hologic® ImageChecker® 3D Calc CAD v1.0). Due to the newness of DBT, the development of this 3D CAD algorithm is ongoing, and it is currently not FDA-approved in the United States. For this study, DBT screening cases with suspicious calcifications were identified retrospectively at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert radiologist (E.F.C.) reviewed images with both 2D and DBT CAD marks, and compared the marks to biopsy results. Control cases with one-year negative follow-up were also studied; these cases either possess clearly benign calcifications or lacked calcifications. To allow the user to alter the sensitivity for cancer detection, an operating point is assigned to each CAD mark. As expected from conventional 2D CAD, increasing the operating point in 3D CAD increases sensitivity and reduces specificity. Additionally, we showed that some cancers are occult to 2D CAD at all operating points. By contrast, 3D CAD allows for detection of some cancers that are missed on 2D CAD. We also demonstrated that some non-cancerous CAD marks in 3D are not present at analogous locations in the 2D image. Hence, there are additional marks when using both 2D and 3D CAD in combination, leading to lower specificity than with conventional 2D CAD alone.

  3. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene

  4. Forensic 3D Scene Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTLE,CHARLES Q.; PETERS,RALPH R.; RIGDON,J. BRIAN; SMALL,DANIEL E.

    1999-10-12

    Traditionally law enforcement agencies have relied on basic measurement and imaging tools, such as tape measures and cameras, in recording a crime scene. A disadvantage of these methods is that they are slow and cumbersome. The development of a portable system that can rapidly record a crime scene with current camera imaging, 3D geometric surface maps, and contribute quantitative measurements such as accurate relative positioning of crime scene objects, would be an asset to law enforcement agents in collecting and recording significant forensic data. The purpose of this project is to develop a feasible prototype of a fast, accurate, 3D measurement and imaging system that would support law enforcement agents to quickly document and accurately record a crime scene.

  5. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Izak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  6. 3D surface reconstruction from range slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingming; Zhu, Feng; Hao, Ying-ming

    2014-11-01

    Research on three-dimensional (3D) surface reconstruction from range slices obtained from range-gated laser imaging system is of significance. 3D surfaces reconstructed based on existing binarization method or centroid method are rough or discontinuous in some circumstances. In this paper we address these problems and develop a 3D surface reconstruction algorithm based on the idea that combining the centroid method with weighted linear interpolation and mean filter. The algorithm consists of three steps. In the first step, interesting regions are extracted from each range slice based on mean filter, and then are merged to derive a single range image. In the second step, the derived range image is denoised and smoothed based on adaptive histogram method, weighted linear interpolation and mean filter method respectively. Finally, nonzero valued pixels in the after processed range image are converted to point cloud according to the range-gated imaging parameters, and then 3D surface meshes are established from the point cloud based on the topological relationship between adjacent pixels in the range image. Experiment is conducted on range slices generated from range-gated laser imaging simulation platform, and the registration result of the reconstructed surface of our method with the original surface of the object shows that the proposed method can reconstruct object surface accurately, so it can be used for the designing of reconstruction and displaying of range-gated laser imaging system, and also can be used for 3D object recognition.

  7. Clinical image benefits after model-based reconstruction for low dose dedicated breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haneda, Eri; Tkaczyk, J. Eric; Palma, Giovanni; Iordache, R?zvan; Muller, Serge; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) is implemented to process full clinical data sets of dedicated breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in a low dose condition and achieves less spreading of anatomical structure between slices. MBIR is a statistical based reconstruction which can control the trade-off between data fitting and image regularization. In this study, regularization is formulated with anisotropic prior weighting that independently controls the image regularization between in-plane and out-of-plane voxel neighbors. Studies at complete and partial convergence show that the appropriate formulation of data-fit and regularization terms along with anisotropic prior weighting leads to a solution with improved localization of objects within a more narrow range of slices. This result is compared with the solutions using simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), which is one of the state of art reconstruction in DBT. MBIR yields higher contrast-to-noise for medium and large size microcalcifications and diagnostic structures in volumetric breast images and supports opportunity for dose reduction for 3D breast imaging.

  8. 3D Reconstruction Using Optical Images

    CERN Document Server

    Tsyganov, E N; Mason, D R; Parkey, R W; Seliounine, S Y; Slavin, N V; Zinchenko, A I; Tsyganov, Edward N.; Antich, Pietro P.; Mason, Dr. R.; Parkey, Robert W.; Seliounine, Serguei Y.; Slavine, Nikolai V.; Zinchenko, Alexander I.

    2004-01-01

    Various imaging methods for small animals are rapidly gaining acceptance in biology and medical research. Optical imaging is a very fast and convenient method of biological interrogation, but suffers from significant disadvantages, such as the absence of 3D image reconstruction algorithms. This have up until now impeded progress to a quantitative stage. Here we propose a 3D reconstruction algorithm for imaging light emitted at depths in small living animals. We believe the methods discussed here are novel and lead to a novel imaging paradigm, which we call Light Emission Tomography.

  9. Neural Network Based 3D Surface Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincy Joseph

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel neural-network-based adaptive hybrid-reflectance three-dimensional (3-D surface reconstruction model. The neural network combines the diffuse and specular components into a hybrid model. The proposed model considers the characteristics of each point and the variant albedo to prevent the reconstructed surface from being distorted. The neural network inputs are the pixel values of the two-dimensional images to be reconstructed. The normal vectors of the surface can then be obtained from the output of the neural network after supervised learning, where the illuminant direction does not have to be known in advance. Finally, the obtained normal vectors can be applied to integration method when reconstructing 3-D objects. Facial images were used for training in the proposed approach

  10. Analyse, Reconstruction 3D, & Animation du Visage

    OpenAIRE

    Ghys, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Face analysis fields are widely spread out over a large quantity of domains : Human Computer Interaction, security, movies post-production, games... It includes detection, recognition, 3D reconstruction, animation, and emotion analysis. Face animation was the main motivation of this thesis, and we always kept it in mind at anytime. We discuss here, most of the fields. We first talk about face reconstruction and face modeling with a new model inspired by the Candide Model. Then, we address fac...

  11. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Jae G; Jin Seung O; Cho Min H; Lee Soo Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD) based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the backgro...

  12. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    Cambridge : The Electromagnetics Academy, 2010, s. 1043-1046. ISBN 978-1-934142-14-1. [PIERS 2010 Cambridge. Cambridge (US), 05.07.2010-08.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  13. 3D puzzle reconstruction for archeological fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampy, F.; Hostein, A.; Fauvet, E.; Laligant, O.; Truchetet, F.

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of broken artifacts is a common task in archeology domain; it can be supported now by 3D data acquisition device and computer processing. Many works have been dedicated in the past to reconstructing 2D puzzles but very few propose a true 3D approach. We present here a complete solution including a dedicated transportable 3D acquisition set-up and a virtual tool with a graphic interface allowing the archeologists to manipulate the fragments and to, interactively, reconstruct the puzzle. The whole lateral part is acquired by rotating the fragment around an axis chosen within a light sheet thanks to a step-motor synchronized with the camera frame clock. Another camera provides a top view of the fragment under scanning. A scanning accuracy of 100?m is attained. The iterative automatic processing algorithm is based on segmentation into facets of the lateral part of the fragments followed by a 3D matching providing the user with a ranked short list of possible assemblies. The device has been applied to the reconstruction of a set of 1200 fragments from broken tablets supporting a Latin inscription dating from the first century AD.

  14. 3D Medical image reconstruction: on digital breast tomosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Isabel Catarina Castro

    2009-01-01

    O cancro da mama é uma patologia mortal e é um dos tipos de cancro com maior incidência. O cancro da mama é assintomático nos estádios iniciais, mas tem elevadas taxa de sobrevivência quando detectado precocemente. Isto torna o rastreio e o diagnóstico preciso questões de grande importância. Com o objectivo de reduzir as consequências das doenças da mama, têm surgido novas técnicas de imagem e as existentes estão em constante melhoramento. A Tomossíntese Digital da Mama (TDM) ...

  15. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  16. Fully 3D GPU PET reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herraiz, J.L., E-mail: joaquin@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cal-Gonzalez, J. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Departmento de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Departmento Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Fully 3D iterative tomographic image reconstruction is computationally very demanding. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) has been proposed for many years as potential accelerators in complex scientific problems, but it has not been used until the recent advances in the programmability of GPUs that the best available reconstruction codes have started to be implemented to be run on GPUs. This work presents a GPU-based fully 3D PET iterative reconstruction software. This new code may reconstruct sinogram data from several commercially available PET scanners. The most important and time-consuming parts of the code, the forward and backward projection operations, are based on an accurate model of the scanner obtained with the Monte Carlo code PeneloPET and they have been massively parallelized on the GPU. For the PET scanners considered, the GPU-based code is more than 70 times faster than a similar code running on a single core of a fast CPU, obtaining in both cases the same images. The code has been designed to be easily adapted to reconstruct sinograms from any other PET scanner, including scanner prototypes.

  17. 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this project has been to implement a software system, that is able to create a 3-D reconstruction from two or more 2-D photographic images made from different positions. The height is determined from the disparity difference of the images. The general purpose of the system is mapping of planetary surfaces, but other purposes is considered as well. The system performance is measured with respect to the precision and the time consumption.The reconstruction process is divided into four m...

  18. A stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system: Design simulation, characterization and image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ramya

    Conventional screen-film and/or digital mammography, despite being the most popular breast imaging modalities, suffer from certain limitations, most important of which is tissue overlap and false diagnoses arising thereof. A new three-dimensional alternative for breast cancer screening and diagnosis is tomosynthesis in which a limited number of low-dose two-dimensional projection images of a patient are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional tissue information. The tomosynthesis systems currently under development all incorporate an x-ray source that moves over a certain angle to acquire images. This tube motion is a major limitation because it degrades image quality, increases the scan time and causes prolonged patient discomfort. The availability of independently controllable carbon nanotube cathodes enabled us to explore the possibility of setting up a stationary multi-beam imaging system. In this dissertation we have proposed a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis scanner using spatially distributed carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray sources. We have presented details about the design, set-up, characterization and image reconstruction of the completely stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time and improve the image quality in breast imaging. Extensive design simulation results have been used to decide on the final system set-up. The fully assembled actual experimental system is capable of acquiring all the images in as little as eight seconds and yield superior image quality as well. The system has been completely characterized in terms of focal spot size, system resolution and geometric calibration. Certain important results have been obtained during the process that we hope will set the standard for the characterization of the future systems. A novel iterative reconstruction algorithm has been tried on the projection images obtained from the tomosynthesis system. Our algorithm has demonstrated image quality that is on par with the other tomosynthesis systems under development.

  19. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields

  20. 3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defrise, Michel; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2005-02-17

    Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields.

  1. Photogrammetric 3D reconstruction using mobile imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Dieter; Syll, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    In our paper we demonstrate the development of an Android Application (AndroidSfM) for photogrammetric 3D reconstruction that works on smartphones and tablets likewise. The photos are taken with mobile devices, and can thereafter directly be calibrated using standard calibration algorithms of photogrammetry and computer vision, on that device. Due to still limited computing resources on mobile devices, a client-server handshake using Dropbox transfers the photos to the sever to run AndroidSfM for the pose estimation of all photos by Structure-from-Motion and, thereafter, uses the oriented bunch of photos for dense point cloud estimation by dense image matching algorithms. The result is transferred back to the mobile device for visualization and ad-hoc on-screen measurements.

  2. Three-dimensional digital tomosynthesis iterative reconstruction, artifact reduction and alternative acquisition geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Levakhina, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Yulia Levakhina gives an introduction to the major challenges of image reconstruction in Digital Tomosynthesis (DT), particularly to the connection of the reconstruction problem with the incompleteness of the DT dataset. The author discusses the factors which cause the formation of limited angle artifacts and proposes how to account for them in order to improve image quality and axial resolution of modern DT. The addressed methods include a weighted non-linear back projection scheme for algebraic reconstruction and?novel dual-axis acquisition geometry. All discussed algorithms and methods are supplemented by detailed illustrations, hints for practical implementation, pseudo-code, simulation results and real patient case examples.

  3. Weighted simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper introduces a nonlinear weighting scheme into the backprojection operation within the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). It is designed for tomosynthesis imaging of objects with high-attenuation features in order to reduce limited angle artifacts. Methods: The algorithm estimates which projections potentially produce artifacts in a voxel. The contribution of those projections into the updating term is reduced. In order to identify those projections automatically, a four-dimensional backprojected space representation is used. Weighting coefficients are calculated based on a dissimilarity measure, evaluated in this space. For each combination of an angular view direction and a voxel position an individual weighting coefficient for the updating term is calculated. Results: The feasibility of the proposed approach is shown based on reconstructions of the following real three-dimensional tomosynthesis datasets: a mammography quality phantom, an apple with metal needles, a dried finger bone in water, and a human hand. Datasets have been acquired with a Siemens Mammomat Inspiration tomosynthesis device and reconstructed using SART with and without suggested weighting. Out-of-focus artifacts are described using line profiles and measured using standard deviation (STD) in the plane and below the plane which contains artifact-causing features. Artifacts distribution in axial direction is measured using an artifact spread function (ASF). The volumes reconstructed with the weighting scheme demonstrate the reduction of out-of-focus artifacts, lower STD (meaning reduction of artifacts), and narrower ASF compared to nonweighted SART reconstruction. It is achieved successfully for different kinds of structures: point-like structures such as phantom features, long structures such as metal needles, and fine structures such as trabecular bone structures. Conclusions: Results indicate the feasibility of the proposed algorithm to reduce typical tomosynthesis artifacts produced by high-attenuation features. The proposed algorithm assigns weighting coefficients automatically and no segmentation or tissue-classification steps are required. The algorithm can be included into various iterative reconstruction algorithms with an additive updating strategy. It can also be extended to computed tomography case with the complete set of angular data.

  4. 3-D reconstruction using an efficient Octree encoding scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reconstruction of a three dimensional (3-D) model of biological objects from their thin section 2-D slices is a valuable tool for biomedical research. The goal of a 3-D reconstruction routine is to find the 3-D structure from a set of sliced images and display the 3-D view on a 2-D screen. Octree has been widely used as a powerful data structure to represent 3-D objects in computer. The encoding technique is specially useful for the representation of objects with irregular shape, such as biomedical objects. A method called level-wise pointerless representation which can offer much less storage requirement has been developed. In addition, a complete software package has been designed using the efficient data structure to reconstruct 3-D objects from 2-D sliced images and to display the 3-D objects on 2-D screen

  5. 3D geometrical segmentation and reconstruction of anatomical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, G.; Flores, C.; Martinez, A.; Cosias, P.

    2005-04-01

    In this paper an improved method for 3D surface reconstruction from 2D images together with the 2D/3D segmentation method is presented. The method aims to model and parameterise anatomical structures previously segmented from medical images. The whole automatic method may be divided into segmentation and reconstruction, which is carried out in four steps: 1) Geodesic based segmentation of the anatomical structures under consideration, 2) Contour representation and simplification based on Douglas-Peucker algorithm, 3) Global 3D incremental Delaunay Triangulation and 4) a final sculpting process of the non-object tetrahedral. The sculpting process is based on the spatial information and contour parameterisation obtained in the segmentation stage. Our 3D reconstruction method is global and free of parameters, which is not the case of other 3D reconstruction techniques. Moreover, it allows to include at any time vertex and contour points information. Results for CT and MR images are presented. Geodesic 3D based segmentation is compared to the reconstruction result. A comparison between 3D reconstructions and 3D segmentation is presented.

  6. Reconstruction of High Resolution 3D Objects from Incomplete Images and 3D Information

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Pacheco; Holman Bolívar; Jordán Pascual Espada; Rubén González Crespo

    2014-01-01

    To this day, digital object reconstruction is a quite complex area that requires many techniques and novel approaches, in which high-resolution 3D objects present one of the biggest challenges. There are mainly two different methods that can be used to reconstruct high resolution objects and images: passive methods and active methods. This methods depend on the type of information available as input for modeling 3D objects. The passive methods use information contained in the images and the a...

  7. 3D reconstruction for diverging X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to promote 3D display techniques it is necessary to accelerate 3D acquisition devices. One solution is to use a 2D X-ray detector. In that case the acquisition procedure can be depicted by the divergent beam transform. For a circular trajectory near of the object, the slice by slice reconstruction is no more accurate. It is necessary to use a 3D reconstruction algorithm. This paper develops an original method based on an approximated evaluation of the 3D Radon Transform and on use of its inversion formula

  8. Reconstruction of 3-D digital cores using a hybrid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuefeng; Sun, Jianmeng; Wang, Haitao

    2009-06-01

    A 3-D digital core describes the pore space microstructure of rocks. An X-ray micro CT scan is the most accurate and direct but costly method to obtain a 3-D digital core. In this study, we propose a hybrid method which combines sedimentation simulation and simulated annealing (SA) method to generate 3-D digital cores based on 2-D images of rocks. The method starts with the sedimentation simulation to build a 3-D digital core, which is the initial configuration for the SA method. We update the initial digital core using the SA method to match the auto-correlation function of the 2-D rock image and eventually build the final 3-D digital core. Compared with the typical SA method, the hybrid method has significantly reduced the computation time. Local porosity theory is applied to quantitatively compare the reconstructed 3-D digital cores with the X-ray micro CT 3-D images. The results indicate that the 3-D digital cores reconstructed by the hybrid method have homogeneity and geometric connectivity similar to those of the X-ray micro CT image. The formation factors and permeabilities of the reconstructed 3-D digital cores are estimated using the finite element method (FEM) and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), respectively. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. Comparison of the simulation results suggests that the digital cores reconstructed by the hybrid method more closely reflect the true transport properties than the typical SA method alone.

  9. 3D Medical Volume Reconstruction Using Web Services

    OpenAIRE

    Kooper, Rob; Shirk, Andrew; Lee, Sang-Chul; Lin, AMY; Folberg, Robert; Bajcsy, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We address the problem of 3D medical volume reconstruction using web services. The use of proposed web services is motivated by the fact that the problem of 3D medical volume reconstruction requires significant computer resources and human expertise in medical and computer science areas. Web services are implemented as an additional layer to a dataflow framework called Data to Knowledge. In the collaboration between UIC and NCSA, pre-processed input images at NCSA are made accessible to medic...

  10. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Ro?. 6, ?. 7 (2010), s. 617-620. ISSN 1931-7360 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : reconstruction methods * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  11. 3D Reconstruction from Full-view Fisheye Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chuiwen; Liang SHI; Huang, Hanlu; Yan, Mengyuan

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we proposed a 3D reconstruction method for the full-view fisheye camera. The camera we used is Ricoh Theta, which captures spherical images and has a wide field of view (FOV). The conventional stereo apporach based on perspective camera model cannot be directly applied and instead we used a spherical camera model to depict the relation between 3D point and its corresponding observation in the image. We implemented a system that can reconstruct the 3D scene us...

  12. 3D fast reconstruction in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The issue of long reconstruction times in positron emission tomography (PET) has been addressed from several points of view, resulting in an affordable dedicated system capable of handling routine 3D reconstructions in a few minutes per frame : on the hardware side using fast processors and a parallel architecture, and on the software side, using efficient implementation of computationally less intensive algorithms

  13. 3D Beam Reconstruction by Fluorescence Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Radwell, Neal; Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    We present a technique for mapping the complete 3D spatial intensity profile of a laser beam from its fluorescence in an atomic vapour. We propagate shaped light through a rubidium vapour cell and record the resonant scattering from the side. From a single measurement we obtain a camera limited resolution of 200 x 200 transverse points and 659 longitudinal points. In constrast to invasive methods in which the camera is placed in the beam path, our method is capable of measuring patterns formed by counterpropagating laser beams. It has high resolution in all 3 dimensions, is fast and can be completely automated. The technique has applications in areas which require complex beam shapes, such as optical tweezers, atom trapping and pattern formation.

  14. QUANTITATIVE 3D RECONSTRUCTIONS AS IDENTIFICATION TOOL IN HEART DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre T Soufan; Jan M Ruijter; Maurice JB Van Den Hoff; Antoon FM Moorman

    2011-01-01

    A method for displaying quantitative information in 3D reconstructions of the embryonic heart was developed to investigate spatial distributions of cell division and cell density. The method utilizes serial sections to extract morphological as well as quantitative data. The morphological data are used to reconstruct the embryonic heart and the quantitative data are classified and superimposed on the resulting reconstruction. The bias, which would result from size differences between cell popu...

  15. Multiview Videodatasets for Evaluation and Testing of 3D Tracking and 3D Reconstruction Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Stamou, G.; Nikolaidis, N.; Pitas, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a dataset that can be used for testing and evaluation of computer vision-based algorithms for 3D reconstruction and 3D person tracking. Additional possible uses include the building of 3D human head models and the production of stereoscopic sequences. A number of different scenes are included in the dataset. They are mostly single-subject scenes captured with two different lighting conditions (optimal and sub-optimal), subject motion based on simple as well as random motio...

  16. Reconstruction of High Resolution 3D Objects from Incomplete Images and 3D Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Pacheco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To this day, digital object reconstruction is a quite complex area that requires many techniques and novel approaches, in which high-resolution 3D objects present one of the biggest challenges. There are mainly two different methods that can be used to reconstruct high resolution objects and images: passive methods and active methods. This methods depend on the type of information available as input for modeling 3D objects. The passive methods use information contained in the images and the active methods make use of controlled light sources, such as lasers. The reconstruction of 3D objects is quite complex and there is no unique solution- The use of specific methodologies for the reconstruction of certain objects it’s also very common, such as human faces, molecular structures, etc. This paper proposes a novel hybrid methodology, composed by 10 phases that combine active and passive methods, using images and a laser in order to supplement the missing information and obtain better results in the 3D object reconstruction. Finally, the proposed methodology proved its efficiency in two complex topological complex objects.

  17. Improving automated 3D reconstruction methods via vision metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Isabella; Nocerino, Erica; Hess, Mona; Menna, Fabio; Sargeant, Ben; MacDonald, Lindsay; Remondino, Fabio; Robson, Stuart

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to provide a procedure for improving automated 3D reconstruction methods via vision metrology. The 3D reconstruction problem is generally addressed using two different approaches. On the one hand, vision metrology (VM) systems try to accurately derive 3D coordinates of few sparse object points for industrial measurement and inspection applications; on the other, recent dense image matching (DIM) algorithms are designed to produce dense point clouds for surface representations and analyses. This paper strives to demonstrate a step towards narrowing the gap between traditional VM and DIM approaches. Efforts are therefore intended to (i) test the metric performance of the automated photogrammetric 3D reconstruction procedure, (ii) enhance the accuracy of the final results and (iii) obtain statistical indicators of the quality achieved in the orientation step. VM tools are exploited to integrate their main functionalities (centroid measurement, photogrammetric network adjustment, precision assessment, etc.) into the pipeline of 3D dense reconstruction. Finally, geometric analyses and accuracy evaluations are performed on the raw output of the matching (i.e. the point clouds) by adopting a metrological approach. The latter is based on the use of known geometric shapes and quality parameters derived from VDI/VDE guidelines. Tests are carried out by imaging the calibrated Portable Metric Test Object, designed and built at University College London (UCL), UK. It allows assessment of the performance of the image orientation and matching procedures within a typical industrial scenario, characterised by poor texture and known 3D/2D shapes.

  18. A comparison of reconstruction algorithms for C-arm mammography tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital tomosynthesis is an imaging technique to produce a tomographic image from a series of angular digital images in a manner similar to conventional focal plane tomography. Unlike film focal plane tomography, the acquisition of the data in a C-arm geometry causes the image receptor to be positioned at various angles to the reconstruction tomogram. The digital nature of the data allows for input images to be combined into the desired plane with the flexibility of generating tomograms of many separate planes from a single set of input data. Angular datasets were obtained of a low contrast detectability (LCD) phantom and cadaver breast utilizing a Lorad stereotactic biopsy unit with a coupled source and digital detector in a C-arm configuration. Datasets of 9 and 41 low-dose projections were collected over a 30 deg. angular range. Tomographic images were reconstructed using a Backprojection (BP) algorithm, an Iterative Subtraction (IS) algorithm that allows the partial subtraction of out-of-focus planes, and an Algebraic Reconstruction (AR) algorithm. These were compared with single view digital radiographs. The methods' effectiveness at enhancing visibility of an obscured LCD phantom was quantified in terms of the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR), and Signal to Background Ratio (SBR), all normalized to the metric value for the single projection image. The methods' effectiveness at removing ghosting artifacts in a cadaver breast was quantified in terms of the Artifact Spread Function (ASF). The technology proved effective at partially removing out of focus structures and enhancing SNR and SBR. The normalized SNR was highest at 4.85 for the obscured LCD phantom, using nine projections and IS algorithm. The normalized SBR was highest at 23.2 for the obscured LCD phantom, using 41 projections and an AR algorithm. The highest normalized metric values occurred with the obscured phantom. This supports the assertion that the greatest value of tomosynthesis is in imaging fibroglandular breasts. The ASF performance was best with the AR technique and nine projections

  19. Rapidly 3D Texture Reconstruction Based on Oblique Photography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Chunsen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a city texture fast reconstruction method based on aerial tilt image for reconstruction of three-dimensional city model. Based on the photogrammetry and computer vision theory and using the city building digital surface model obtained by prior treatment, through collinear equation calculation geometric projection of object and image space, to obtain the three-dimensional information and texture information of the structure and through certain the optimal algorithm selecting the optimal texture on the surface of the object, realize automatic extraction of the building side texture and occlusion handling of the dense building texture. The real image texture reconstruction results show that: the method to the 3D city model texture reconstruction has the characteristics of high degree of automation, vivid effect and low cost and provides a means of effective implementation for rapid and widespread real texture rapid reconstruction of city 3D model.

  20. Streaming Surface Reconstruction from Real Time 3D Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Bodenmüller, Tim

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, a robust method for fast surface reconstruction from real time 3D point streams is presented. It is designed for the integration in a fast visual feedback system that supports a user while manually 3D scanning objects. The method iteratively generates a dense and homogeneous triangular mesh by inserting sample points from the real time data stream and refining the surface model locally. A spatial data structure ensures a fast access to growing point sets and continuously updat...

  1. Building with Drones: Accurate 3D Facade Reconstruction using MAVs

    OpenAIRE

    Daftry, Shreyansh; Hoppe, Christof; Bischof, Horst

    2015-01-01

    Automatic reconstruction of 3D models from images using multi-view Structure-from-Motion methods has been one of the most fruitful outcomes of computer vision. These advances combined with the growing popularity of Micro Aerial Vehicles as an autonomous imaging platform, have made 3D vision tools ubiquitous for large number of Architecture, Engineering and Construction applications among audiences, mostly unskilled in computer vision. However, to obtain high-resolution and a...

  2. 3D Reconstruction of Extensive Air Showers from Fluorescence Data

    OpenAIRE

    Andringa, S.; Pato, M; Pimenta, M.; Collaboration, for the Pierre Auger

    2007-01-01

    A new method to reconstruct the 3-dimensional structure of extensive air showers, seen by fluorescence detectors, is proposed. The observation of the shower is done in 2-dimensional pixels, for consecutive time bins. Time corresponds to a third dimension. Assuming that the cosmic ray shower propagates as a plane wave front moving at the speed of light, a complex 3D volume in space can be associated to each measured charge (per pixel and time bin). The 3D description in space...

  3. Tomo3D 2.0--exploitation of advanced vector extensions (AVX) for 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agulleiro, Jose-Ignacio; Fernandez, Jose-Jesus

    2015-02-01

    Tomo3D is a program for fast tomographic reconstruction on multicore computers. Its high speed stems from code optimization, vectorization with Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE), multithreading and optimization of disk access. Recently, Advanced Vector eXtensions (AVX) have been introduced in the x86 processor architecture. Compared to SSE, AVX double the number of simultaneous operations, thus pointing to a potential twofold gain in speed. However, in practice, achieving this potential is extremely difficult. Here, we provide a technical description and an assessment of the optimizations included in Tomo3D to take advantage of AVX instructions. Tomo3D 2.0 allows huge reconstructions to be calculated in standard computers in a matter of minutes. Thus, it will be a valuable tool for electron tomography studies with increasing resolution needs. PMID:25528570

  4. 3D surface reconstruction multi-scale hierarchical approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Bellocchio, Francesco; Ferrari, Stefano; Piuri, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    3D Surface Reconstruction: Multi-Scale Hierarchical Approaches presents methods to model 3D objects in an incremental way so as to capture more finer details at each step. The configuration of the model parameters, the rationale and solutions are described and discussed in detail so the reader has a strong understanding of the methodology. Modeling starts from data captured by 3D digitizers and makes the process even more clear and engaging. Innovative approaches, based on two popular machine learning paradigms, namely Radial Basis Functions and the Support Vector Machines, are also introduced

  5. Iterative Reconstruction of Volumetric Particle Distribution for 3D Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieneke, Bernhard; Neal, Douglas

    2011-11-01

    A number of different volumetric flow measurement techniques exist for following the motion of illuminated particles. For experiments that have lower seeding densities, 3D-PTV uses recorded images from typically 3-4 cameras and then tracks the individual particles in space and time. This technique is effective in flows that have lower seeding densities. For flows that have a higher seeding density, tomographic PIV uses a tomographic reconstruction algorithm (e.g. MART) to reconstruct voxel intensities of the recorded volume followed by the cross-correlation of subvolumes to provide the instantaneous 3D vector fields on a regular grid. A new hybrid algorithm is presented which iteratively reconstructs the 3D-particle distribution directly using particles with certain imaging properties instead of voxels as base functions. It is shown with synthetic data that this method is capable of reconstructing densely seeded flows up to 0.05 particles per pixel (ppp) with the same or higher accuracy than 3D-PTV and tomographic PIV. Finally, this new method is validated using experimental data on a turbulent jet.

  6. Use of a model for 3D image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a software for 3D image reconstruction in transmission tomography. This software is based on the use of a model and of the RADON algorithm developed at LETI. The introduction of a markovian model helps us to enhance contrast and straitened the natural transitions existing in the objects studied, whereas standard transform methods smoothe them

  7. Automated 3D reconstruction of interiors with multiple scan views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Vitor; Ng, Kia C.; Wolfart, Erik; Goncalves, Joao G. M.; Hogg, David C.

    1998-12-01

    This paper presents two integrated solutions for realistic 3D model acquisition and reconstruction; an early prototype, in the form of a push trolley, and a later prototype in the form of an autonomous robot. The systems encompass all hardware and software required, from laser and video data acquisition, processing and output of texture-mapped 3D models in VRML format, to batteries for power supply and wireless network communications. The autonomous version is also equipped with a mobile platform and other sensors for the purpose of automatic navigation. The applications for such a system range from real estate and tourism (e.g., showing a 3D computer model of a property to a potential buyer or tenant) or as tool for content creation (e.g., creating 3D models of heritage buildings or producing broadcast quality virtual studios). The system can also be used in industrial environments as a reverse engineering tool to update the design of a plant, or as a 3D photo-archive for insurance purposes. The system is Internet compatible: the photo-realistic models can be accessed via the Internet and manipulated interactively in 3D using a common Web browser with a VRML plug-in. Further information and example reconstructed models are available on- line via the RESOLV web-page at http://www.scs.leeds.ac.uk/resolv/.

  8. GPU based 3D SAFT reconstruction including phase aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzek, E.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2014-03-01

    3D ultrasound computer tomography (3D USCT) promises reproducible high-resolution images for early detection of breast tumors. The KIT prototype provides three different modalities (reflectivity, speed of sound (SOS), and attenuation). For high resolution reflectivity images phase aberration correction using the SOS images is necessary. The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) used for reflectivity image reconstruction is highly compute-intensive but suitable for an accelerated execution on GPUs. In this paper we investigate how the calculation of the phase aberration correction can be optimized and integrated into the SAFT algorithm. We analysed different strategies to optimize the trade off between memory requirement and image quality. For 64 slices with 10242 pixels a reconstruction can be done in 34 min on eight GPUs with a performance of 58.4 GV/s in comparison to the GPU reconstruction without phase aberration correction which needs 23 min. The average error made by the optimized SOS calculation is negligible.

  9. Recent advances in 3D SEM surface reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Alavi, Zahrasadat; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2015-11-01

    The scanning electron microscope (SEM), as one of the most commonly used instruments in biology and material sciences, employs electrons instead of light to determine the surface properties of specimens. However, the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface attributes, we need to restore the 3D shape model from the SEM images. 3D surface reconstruction is a longstanding topic in microscopy vision as it offers quantitative and visual information for a variety of applications consisting medicine, pharmacology, chemistry, and mechanics. In this paper, we attempt to explain the expanding body of the work in this area, including a discussion of recent techniques and algorithms. With the present work, we also enhance the reliability, accuracy, and speed of 3D SEM surface reconstruction by designing and developing an optimized multi-view framework. We then consider several real-world experiments as well as synthetic data to examine the qualitative and quantitative attributes of our proposed framework. Furthermore, we present a taxonomy of 3D SEM surface reconstruction approaches and address several challenging issues as part of our future work. PMID:26277082

  10. High Resolution 3d Reconstructions of Rocks and Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg E.

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Ten micrometers resolution 3D representations of different media, were obtained with a laboratory computer microtomograph developed from an electron microprobe column. From the original electron microprobe, only minor modifications have been required, indeed several of the utilities of the microprobe have been used to ensure high resolution radiography (2 micrometers. The impact of the electron beam focused onto a thin film is used to form a pointX-ray source and the radiographic image of the sample is acquired on a CCD camera. A specimen rotation mechanism allows multiple radiograph acquisition and reconstruction of the X-ray attenuation 3D cartography. Since X-ray attenuation is directly related to density and atomic number, the microscanner provides 3D cartographs of the different phases present in the sample. System performances have been evaluated on various samples, mainly rocks and composites. Comparison with scanning electron micrographs was used when possible to validate the reconstructions. Results are mostly qualitative but already show the potential of the technique in describing 3D connectivity and topology of pore networks or 3D orientation of fibres in composites.

  11. 3D reconstruction and analysis of the vertebral body line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelong, Pierre; Gerard, Olivier; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif; Verdonck, Bert; Breeuwer, Marcel; Nijlunsing, Rutger; Cheung, John; Veldhuizen, Albert

    2002-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of 3D spinal deformities includes measurements related to individual vertebrae and measurements related to the overall shape of the spine. For the latter aspect, we propose to build a 3D model of the line that connects all vertebrae centres. We present two methods that allow reconstructing this vertebral body line in a quick and easy way. Various new descriptors of the spinal shape can be automatically computed. A study is under way to assess their clinical relevance and reliability. PMID:15456026

  12. Deformable Surface 3D Reconstruction from Monocular Images

    CERN Document Server

    Salzmann, Matthieu

    2010-01-01

    Being able to recover the shape of 3D deformable surfaces from a single video stream would make it possible to field reconstruction systems that run on widely available hardware without requiring specialized devices. However, because many different 3D shapes can have virtually the same projection, such monocular shape recovery is inherently ambiguous. In this survey, we will review the two main classes of techniques that have proved most effective so far: The template-based methods that rely on establishing correspondences with a reference image in which the shape is already known, and non-rig

  13. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo

    2014-09-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15-60° with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle-dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  14. Image reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) by using projection-angle-dependent filter functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yeonok; Park, Chulkyu; Cho, Hyosung; Je, Uikyu; Hong, Daeki; Lee, Minsik; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is considered in clinics as a standard three-dimensional imaging modality, allowing the earlier detection of cancer. It typically acquires only 10-30 projections over a limited angle range of 15 - 60 .deg. with a stationary detector and typically uses a computationally-efficient filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm for image reconstruction. However, a common FBP algorithm yields poor image quality resulting from the loss of average image value and the presence of severe image artifacts due to the elimination of the dc component of the image by the ramp filter and to the incomplete data, respectively. As an alternative, iterative reconstruction methods are often used in DBT to overcome these difficulties, even though they are still computationally expensive. In this study, as a compromise, we considered a projection-angle dependent filtering method in which one-dimensional geometry-adapted filter kernels are computed with the aid of a conjugate-gradient method and are incorporated into the standard FBP framework. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the imaging characteristics. Our results indicate that the proposed method is superior to a conventional FBP method for DBT imaging and has a comparable computational cost, while preserving good image homogeneity and edge sharpening with no serious image artifacts.

  15. 3D reconstruction, a new challenge in industrial radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a NDT context, industrial radiography enables the detection of defects through their projection on a film. EDF has studied the benefit that may be brought in terms of localisation and orientation of the defects by the mean of 3D reconstruction using a very limited number of radiographs. The reconstruction issue consists of solving an integral equation of the first kind ; in a noisy context, the reconstruction belongs to the so-called ill-posed class of problem. Appropriate solutions may only be found with the help of regularization technique, by the introduction of a priori knowledge concerning the unknown solution and also by the use of a statistical modelization of the physical process which produces radiographs. Another approach simplifies the problem and reconstructs the skeleton of a defect only. All these methods coming from applied mathematical sciences enable a more precise diagnosis in non-destructive testing of thick inhomogeneous material. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs

  16. Investigating 3d Reconstruction Methods for Small Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgenikou, V.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2015-02-01

    Small artifacts have always been a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling. They usually present severe difficulties for their 3D reconstruction. Lately, the demand for the production of 3D models of small artifacts, especially in the cultural heritage domain, has dramatically increased. As with many cases, there are no specifications and standards for this task. This paper investigates the efficiency of several mainly low cost methods for 3D model production of such small artifacts. Moreover, the material, the color and the surface complexity of these objects id also investigated. Both image based and laser scanning methods have been considered as alternative data acquisition methods. The evaluation has been confined to the 3D meshes, as texture depends on the imaging properties, which are not investigated in this project. The resulting meshes have been compared to each other for their completeness, and accuracy. It is hoped that the outcomes of this investigation will be useful to researchers who are planning to embark into mass production of 3D models of small artifacts.

  17. Reconstruct holographic 3D objects by double phase hologram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chih-Hung; Wakunami, Koki; Yamamoto, Kenji; Huang, Yi-Pai

    2015-05-01

    To develop a 3D display which can show true 3D images is very important and necessary. Holography has great potential to achieve the objective because holography can actually reconstruct the recorded object in space by reconstruction of wavefront. Further, computer generated hologram (CGH) is used to solve the major issue of conventional holography, which means the recoding process is quite complicated and needs the real objects. The reconstructed image, however, will be blurred and with the unexpected light if using only one phase-only spatial light modulator (PSLM). Although to use two PSLMs by dual-phase modulation method (DPMM) can modulate the phase and the amplitude information simultaneously to enhance the quality of the reconstructed image, it is hard to use in practical application because of the extremely high accurate calibration of the two PSLMs. Therefore, double phase hologram (DPH) was proposed to use only one PSLM to modulate the phase and the amplitude information simultaneously to make the reconstructed image be more focused and eliminate the unexpected light.

  18. On detailed 3D reconstruction of large indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, Egor

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present techniques for highly detailed 3D reconstruction of extra large indoor environments. We discuss the benefits and drawbacks of low-range, far-range and hybrid sensing and reconstruction approaches. The proposed techniques for low-range and hybrid reconstruction, enabling the reconstruction density of 125 points/cm3 on large 100.000 m3 models, are presented in detail. The techniques tackle the core challenges for the above requirements, such as a multi-modal data fusion (fusion of a LIDAR data with a Kinect data), accurate sensor pose estimation, high-density scanning and depth data noise filtering. Other important aspects for extra large 3D indoor reconstruction are the point cloud decimation and real-time rendering. In this paper, we present a method for planar-based point cloud decimation, allowing for reduction of a point cloud size by 80-95%. Besides this, we introduce a method for online rendering of extra large point clouds enabling real-time visualization of huge cloud spaces in conventional web browsers.

  19. GPU-based 3D SAFT reconstruction including attenuation correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzek, E.; Hopp, T.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    3D Ultrasound Computer Tomography (3D USCT) promises reproducible high-resolution images for early detection of breast tumors. The KIT prototype provides three different modalities: reflectivity, speed of sound, and attenuation. The reflectivity images are reconstructed using a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm. For high-resolution re ectivity images, with spatially homogeneous reflectivity, attenuation correction is necessary. In this paper we present a GPU accelerated attenuation correction for 3D USCT and evaluate the method by means of image quality metrics; i.e. absolute error, contrast and spatially homogeneous reflectivity. A threshold for attenuation correction was introduced to preserve a high contrast. Simulated and in-vivo data were used for analysis of the image quality. Attenuation correction increases the image quality by improving spatially homogeneous reflectivity by 25 %. This leads to a factor 2.8 higher contrast for in-vivo data.

  20. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions

  1. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance. PMID:26230701

  2. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Tuong Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement. This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  3. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C.; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants.This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance. PMID:26230701

  4. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  5. 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images : Master Thesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this project has been to implement a software system, that is able to create a 3-D reconstruction from two or more 2-D photographic images made from different positions. The height is determined from the disparity difference of the images. The general purpose of the system is mapping of planetary surfaces, but other purposes is considered as well. The system performance is measured with respect to the precision and the time consumption.The reconstruction process is divided into four major areas: Acquisition, calibration, matching/reconstruction and presentation. Each of these areas are treated individually. A detailed treatment of various lens distortions is required, in order to correct for these problems. This subject is included in the acquisition part. In the calibration part, the perspective distortion is removed from the images. Most attention has been paid to the matching problem, where various methods have been tested in order to optimize the performance. The match results are used in the reconstruction part to establish a 3-D digital representation and finally, different presentation forms are discussed.

  6. A new algorithm for 3D reconstruction from support functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, Richard; Kiderlen, Markus

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a new algorithm for reconstructing an unknown shape from a finite number of noisy measurements of its support function. The algorithm, based on a least squares procedure, is very easy to program in standard software such as Matlab and allows, for the first time, good 3D reconstructions to be performed on an ordinary PC. Under mild conditions, theory guarantees that outputs of the algorithm will converge to the input shape as the number of measurements increases. Reconstructions may be obtained without any pre- or post-processing steps and with no restriction on the sets of measurement directions except their number, a limitation dictated only by computing time. In addition we offer a linear program version of the new algorithm that is much faster and better, or at least comparable, in performance at low levels of noise and reasonably small numbers of measurements. Another modification of the algorithm, suitable for use in a ``focus of attention'' scheme, is also described.

  7. Large Scale 3D Image Reconstruction in Optical Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Schutz, Antony; Mary, David; Thiébaut, Eric; Soulez, Ferréol

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical optical interferometers (OI) sample the Fourier transform of the intensity distribution of a source at the observation wavelength. Because of rapid atmospheric perturbations, the phases of the complex Fourier samples (visibilities) cannot be directly exploited , and instead linear relationships between the phases are used (phase closures and differential phases). Consequently, specific image reconstruction methods have been devised in the last few decades. Modern polychromatic OI instruments are now paving the way to multiwavelength imaging. This paper presents the derivation of a spatio-spectral ("3D") image reconstruction algorithm called PAINTER (Polychromatic opticAl INTErferometric Reconstruction software). The algorithm is able to solve large scale problems. It relies on an iterative process, which alternates estimation of polychromatic images and of complex visibilities. The complex visibilities are not only estimated from squared moduli and closure phases, but also from differential phase...

  8. 3D reconstruction of highly fragmented bone fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Andrew; Anderson, Donald; Thomas, Thad; Brown, Thomas; Marsh, J. Lawrence

    2007-03-01

    A system for the semi-automatic reconstruction of highly fragmented bone fractures, developed to aid in treatment planning, is presented. The system aligns bone fragment surfaces derived from segmentation of volumetric CT scan data. Each fragment surface is partitioned into intact- and fracture-surfaces, corresponding more or less to cortical and cancellous bone, respectively. A user then interactively selects fracture-surface patches in pairs that coarsely correspond. A final optimization step is performed automatically to solve the N-body rigid alignment problem. The work represents the first example of a 3D bone fracture reconstruction system and addresses two new problems unique to the reconstruction of fractured bones: (1) non-stationary noise inherent in surfaces generated from a difficult segmentation problem and (2) the possibility that a single fracture surface on a fragment may correspond to many other fragments.

  9. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  10. Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis using a slot scanning technique: Fixed-focus reconstruction and the resulting image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Koichi, E-mail: shibatak@suzuka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Health Science, Suzuka University of Medical Science 1001-1, Kishioka-cho, Suzuka 510-0293 (Japan); Notohara, Daisuke; Sakai, Takihito [R and D Department, Medical Systems Division, Shimadzu Corporation 1, Nishinokyo-Kuwabara-cho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Parallel-scanning tomosynthesis (PS-TS) is a novel technique that fuses the slot scanning technique and the conventional tomosynthesis (TS) technique. This approach allows one to obtain long-view tomosynthesis images in addition to normally sized tomosynthesis images, even when using a system that has no linear tomographic scanning function. The reconstruction technique and an evaluation of the resulting image quality for PS-TS are described in this paper. Methods: The PS-TS image-reconstruction technique consists of several steps (1) the projection images are divided into strips, (2) the strips are stitched together to construct images corresponding to the reconstruction plane, (3) the stitched images are filtered, and (4) the filtered stitched images are back-projected. In the case of PS-TS using the fixed-focus reconstruction method (PS-TS-F), one set of stitched images is used for the reconstruction planes at all heights, thus avoiding the necessity of repeating steps (1)–(3). A physical evaluation of the image quality of PS-TS-F compared with that of the conventional linear TS was performed using a R/F table (Sonialvision safire, Shimadzu Corp., Kyoto, Japan). The tomographic plane with the best theoretical spatial resolution (the in-focus plane, IFP) was set at a height of 100 mm from the table top by adjusting the reconstruction program. First, the spatial frequency response was evaluated at heights of ?100, ?50, 0, 50, 100, and 150 mm from the IFP using the edge of a 0.3-mm-thick copper plate. Second, the spatial resolution at each height was visually evaluated using an x-ray test pattern (Model No. 38, PTW Freiburg, Germany). Third, the slice sensitivity at each height was evaluated via the wire method using a 0.1-mm-diameter tungsten wire. Phantom studies using a knee phantom and a whole-body phantom were also performed. Results: The spatial frequency response of PS-TS-F yielded the best results at the IFP and degraded slightly as the distance from the IFP increased. A visual evaluation of the spatial resolution using the x-ray test pattern indicated that the resolution was 1.8 lp/mm at the IFP and 1.2 lp/mm at heights of ?100 and 100 mm from the IFP. The authors demonstrated that a spatial resolution of 1.2–1.8 lp/mm could be obtained within heights of 200 mm of the IFP. The slice sensitivity varied between 11.1 and 13.8 mm for heights between ?50 and 100 mm, and there was no critical change in the slice sensitivity within a height range of 150 mm around the IFP. The phantom results demonstrated that tomosynthesis and long-view images could be reconstructed. Conclusions: PS-TS-F provides tomosynthesis images while using low-cost systems that have no tomographic scanning function, such as tableside-controlled universal R/F systems or universal radiographic systems.

  11. One-step reconstruction of assembled 3D holographic scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez Zea, Alejandro; Barrera-Ramírez, John Fredy; Torroba, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    We present a new experimental approach for reconstructing in one step 3D scenes otherwise not feasible in a single snapshot from standard off-axis digital hologram architecture, due to a lack of illuminating resources or a limited setup size. Consequently, whenever a scene could not be wholly illuminated or the size of the scene surpasses the available setup disposition, this protocol can be implemented to solve these issues. We need neither to alter the original setup in every step nor to cover the whole scene by the illuminating source, thus saving resources. With this technique we multiplex the processed holograms of actual diffuse objects composing a scene using a two-beam off-axis holographic setup in a Fresnel approach. By registering individually the holograms of several objects and applying a spatial filtering technique, the filtered Fresnel holograms can then be added to produce a compound hologram. The simultaneous reconstruction of all objects is performed in one step using the same recovering procedure employed for single holograms. Using this technique, we were able to reconstruct, for the first time to our knowledge, a scene by multiplexing off-axis holograms of the 3D objects without cross talk. This technique is important for quantitative visualization of optically packaged multiple images and is useful for a wide range of applications. We present experimental results to support the method.

  12. Real-Time Camera Guidance for 3d Scene Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, F.; Förstner, W.

    2012-07-01

    We propose a framework for operator guidance during the image acquisition process for reliable multi-view stereo reconstruction. Goal is to achieve full coverage of the object and sufficient overlap. Multi-view stereo is a commonly used method to reconstruct both camera trajectory and 3D object shape. After determining an initial solution, a globally optimal reconstruction is usually obtained by executing a bundle adjustment involving all images. Acquiring suitable images, however, still requires an experienced operator to ensure accuracy and completeness of the final solution. We propose an interactive framework for guiding unexperienced users or possibly an autonomous robot. Using approximate camera orientations and object points we estimate point uncertainties within a sliding bundle adjustment and suggest appropriate camera movements. A visual feedback system communicates the decisions to the user in an intuitive way. We demonstrate the suitability of our system with a virtual image acquisition simulation as well as in real-world scenarios. We show that when following the camera movements suggested by our system, the proposed framework is able to generate good approximate values for the bundle adjustment, leading to accurate results compared to ground truth after few iterations. Possible applications are non-professional 3D acquisition systems on low-cost platforms like mobile phones, autonomously navigating robots as well as online flight planning of unmanned aerial vehicles.

  13. 3D reconstruction of porous electrodes and microstructure modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joos, Jochen; Rueger, Bernd; Weber, Andre; Ivers-Tiffee, Ellen [Karlsruher Institute fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik (IWE); Carraro, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Mathematik

    2010-07-01

    The performance of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is limited by electrode polarisation processes, depending both on material composition and microstructure characteristics. To understand and improve electrode performance, a detailed knowledge of the electrode microstructure is essential. Recent developments in 3D image reconstruction combined with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques proved a way to achieve highly detailed microstructural data. From this data the determination of valuable microstructural parameters is possible. The microstructure is commonly described by parameters as volume/porosity fraction, tortuosity of pores/materal (or: tortuosity of electronic and ionic transport in 2-phase materials), three-phase boundary length (electronic conducting electrodes) or electrode surface area (mixed conducting electrodes). Based on these parameters and with the help of adequate models, the electrode performance can be estimated. It is obvious that the accurateness of the model prediction depends on the quality of the parameters. Different groups reported first trials in the reconstruction of SOFC electrodes by FIB/SEM methods. They all used the reconstruction to calculate microstructural parameters. But nevertheless a lot of questions remain, primarily questions concerning the accuracy of the reconstruction or the minimum size of the volume that has to be reconstructed to obtain meaningful results. In this contribution, a ZEISS 1540XB CrossBeam {sup registered} was used to provide over 700 consecutive images of a porous LSCF (La{sub 0.58}Sr{sub 0.4}CO{sub 0.2.}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}})-cathode. The calculation of the key microstructural parameters (i) volume/porosity fraction (ii) electrode surface area and (iii) tortuosity of pores and material from 3D FIB/SEM-data will be presented. Additionally the influence of the reconstruction-volume on the calculated parameters will be discussed. Also the presented technique is applied on a SOFC electrode it constitutes a general method for the 3D characterization of complex multiple-phase materials including battery electrodes. (orig.)

  14. 3D Image Reconstructions and the Nyquist-Shannon Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, T.; Martišek, D.

    2015-09-01

    Fracture surfaces are occasionally modelled by Fourier's two-dimensional series that can be converted into digital 3D reliefs mapping the morphology of solid surfaces. Such digital replicas may suffer from various artefacts when processed inconveniently. Spatial aliasing is one of those artefacts that may devalue Fourier's replicas. According to the Nyquist-Shannon sampling theorem the spatial aliasing occurs when Fourier's frequencies exceed the Nyquist critical frequency. In the present paper it is shown that the Nyquist frequency is not the only critical limit determining aliasing artefacts but there are some other frequencies that intensify aliasing phenomena and form an infinite set of points at which numerical results abruptly and dramatically change their values. This unusual type of spatial aliasing is explored and some consequences for 3D computer reconstructions are presented.

  15. Two complementary model observers to evaluate reconstructions of simulated micro-calcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michielsen, Koen; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas; Bosmans, Hilde; Nuyts, Johan

    2013-03-01

    New imaging modalities need to be properly evaluated before being introduced in clinical practice. The gold standard is to perform clinical trials or dedicated clinical performance related observer experiments with experienced readers. Unfortunately this is not feasible during development or optimization of new reconstruction algorithms due to their many degrees of freedom. Our goal is to design a set of model observers to evaluate the performance of newly developed reconstruction methods on the assessment of micro-calcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis. In order to do so, the model observers need to evaluate both detection and classification of micro-calcifications. A channelized Hotelling observer was created for the detection task and a Hotelling observer working on an extracted feature vector was implemented for the classification task. These observers were evaluated on their ability to predict the results of human observers. Results from a previous observer study were used as reference to compare performance between human and model observers. This study evaluated detection of small micro-calcifications (100 { 200 _m) by a free search task in a power law filtered noise background and classification of two types of larger micro-calcifications (200 {600 _m) in the same background. Scores from the free search study were evaluated using the weighted JAFROC method and the classification scores were analyzed using the DBM MRMC method. The same analysis methods were applied to the model observer scores. Results of the detection model observer were related linearly with the human observer results with a correlation coefficient of 0.962. The correlation coefficient for the classification task was 0.959 with a power law non-linear regression.

  16. 3D Reconstruction in Spiral Multislice CT Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghafouri

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: The rapid development of spiral (helical computed tomography (CT has resulted in exciting new applications for CT. One of these applications, three-dimensional (3D CT with volume ren-dering, is now a major area of clinical and academic interest. One of the greatest advantages of spiral CT with 3D volume rendering is that it provides all the necessary information in a single radiologic study (and there-fore at the lowest possible price in cases that previously required two or more studies. Three-dimensional vol-ume rendering generates clinically accurate and immediately available images from the full CT data set with-out extensive editing. It allows the radiologist and clinician to address specific questions concerning patient care by interactively exploring different aspects of the data set. Three-dimensional images integrate a series of axial CT sections into a form that is often easier to interpret than the sections themselves and can be made to appear similar to other more familiar images such as catheter angiograms. The data are organized into a 3D matrix of volume elements (voxels. The screen of the computer monitor is a 2D-surface composed of discrete picture elements (pixels. Presenting what is stored in memory (ie, floating within the monitor on a 2D-screen is a challenge, but it is the very problem that 3D reconstruc-tion software has creatively solved. Voxel selection is usually accomplished by projecting lines (rays through the data set that correspond to the pixel matrix of the desired 2D image. Differences in the images produced with various 3D rendering techniques are the result of variations in how voxels are selected and weighted. In this article, I compare 3D volume rendering of spiral CT data with other rendering techniques (shaded surface display, maximum intensity projection and present a brief history of 3D volume rendering and discuss the im-plementation of this promising technology in terms of strategies for volume data management, selection of rendering parameters, and features of data display. In addition, I present recent research on the accuracy of the technique in specific medical applications and discuss a number of current clinical applications of 3D volume rendering of spiral CT data.

  17. Optimized 3D Street Scene Reconstruction from Driving Recorder Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an automatic region detection based method to reconstruct street scenes from driving recorder images. The driving recorder in this paper is a dashboard camera that collects images while the motor vehicle is moving. An enormous number of moving vehicles are included in the collected data because the typical recorders are often mounted in the front of moving vehicles and face the forward direction, which can make matching points on vehicles and guardrails unreliable. Believing that utilizing these image data can reduce street scene reconstruction and updating costs because of their low price, wide use, and extensive shooting coverage, we therefore proposed a new method, which is called the Mask automatic detecting method, to improve the structure results from the motion reconstruction. Note that we define vehicle and guardrail regions as “mask” in this paper since the features on them should be masked out to avoid poor matches. After removing the feature points in our new method, the camera poses and sparse 3D points that are reconstructed with the remaining matches. Our contrast experiments with the typical pipeline of structure from motion (SfM reconstruction methods, such as Photosynth and VisualSFM, demonstrated that the Mask decreased the root-mean-square error (RMSE of the pairwise matching results, which led to more accurate recovering results from the camera-relative poses. Removing features from the Mask also increased the accuracy of point clouds by nearly 30%–40% and corrected the problems of the typical methods on repeatedly reconstructing several buildings when there was only one target building.

  18. Calibration of x-ray projections in 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Mou, Xuanqin; Qin, Zhongyuan; Cai, Yuanlong

    2001-09-01

    In cone-beam 3D CT, 2D X-ray projections determine the reconstruction quality directly. However, the generation of an X-ray projection is a complex process that includes the emission, the conversion and the transfer of X-ray latent information, so the pixel value of a projection has no exact meaning generally. In this paper, we suggest a way by experiments to model the whole imaging system based on 'equivalent single energy' which is used to analyze polychromatic X-ray. We define each tissue's SCF(single calibration factor) of human and get GCF (gross calibration factor) by summing up every weighted SCF, then we can use GCF to calibrate and linearize X-ray projections. After such processing, X-ray projection will have explicit meaning, i.e. its pixel value can denote the equivalent material thickness linearly, which will be advantageous to the algorithm research of 3D reconstruction and other quantitative analyses of human's physiological parameters.

  19. Digital 3D facial reconstruction of George Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdan, Anshuman; Schwartz, Jeff; Tocheri, Mathew; Hansford, Dianne

    2006-02-01

    PRISM is a focal point of interdisciplinary research in geometric modeling, computer graphics and visualization at Arizona State University. Many projects in the last ten years have involved laser scanning, geometric modeling and feature extraction from such data as archaeological vessels, bones, human faces, etc. This paper gives a brief overview of a recently completed project on the 3D reconstruction of George Washington (GW). The project brought together forensic anthropologists, digital artists and computer scientists in the 3D digital reconstruction of GW at 57, 45 and 19 including detailed heads and bodies. Although many other scanning projects such as the Michelangelo project have successfully captured fine details via laser scanning, our project took it a step further, i.e. to predict what that individual (in the sculpture) might have looked like both in later and earlier years, specifically the process to account for reverse aging. Our base data was GWs face mask at Morgan Library and Hudons bust of GW at Mount Vernon, both done when GW was 53. Additionally, we scanned the statue at the Capitol in Richmond, VA; various dentures, and other items. Other measurements came from clothing and even portraits of GW. The digital GWs were then milled in high density foam for a studio to complete the work. These will be unveiled at the opening of the new education center at Mt Vernon in fall 2006.

  20. Fast fully 3-D image reconstruction in PET using planograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasse, D; Kinahan, P E; Clackdoyle, R; Defrise, M; Comtat, C; Townsend, D W

    2004-04-01

    We present a method of performing fast and accurate three-dimensional (3-D) backprojection using only Fourier transform operations for line-integral data acquired by planar detector arrays in positron emission tomography. This approach is a 3-D extension of the two-dimensional (2-D) linogram technique of Edholm. By using a special choice of parameters to index a line of response (LOR) for a pair of planar detectors, rather than the conventional parameters used to index a LOR for a circular tomograph, all the LORs passing through a point in the field of view (FOV) lie on a 2-D plane in the four-dimensional (4-D) data space. Thus, backprojection of all the LORs passing through a point in the FOV corresponds to integration of a 2-D plane through the 4-D "planogram." The key step is that the integration along a set of parallel 2-D planes through the planogram, that is, backprojection of a plane of points, can be replaced by a 2-D section through the origin of the 4-D Fourier transform of the data. Backprojection can be performed as a sequence of Fourier transform operations, for faster implementation. In addition, we derive the central-section theorem for planogram format data, and also derive a reconstruction filter for both backprojection-filtering and filtered-backprojection reconstruction algorithms. With software-based Fourier transform calculations we provide preliminary comparisons of planogram backprojection to standard 3-D backprojection and demonstrate a reduction in computation time by a factor of approximately 15. PMID:15084067

  1. 3D Surface Reconstruction and Volume Calculation of Rills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brings, Christine; Gronz, Oliver; Becker, Kerstin; Wirtz, Stefan; Seeger, Manuel; Ries, Johannes B.

    2015-04-01

    We use the low-cost, user-friendly photogrammetric Structure from Motion (SfM) technique, which is implemented in the Software VisualSfM, for 3D surface reconstruction and volume calculation of an 18 meter long rill in Luxembourg. The images were taken with a Canon HD video camera 1) before a natural rainfall event, 2) after a natural rainfall event and before a rill experiment and 3) after a rill experiment. Recording with a video camera results compared to a photo camera not only a huge time advantage, the method also guarantees more than adequately overlapping sharp images. For each model, approximately 8 minutes of video were taken. As SfM needs single images, we automatically selected the sharpest image from 15 frame intervals. The sharpness was estimated using a derivative-based metric. Then, VisualSfM detects feature points in each image, searches matching feature points in all image pairs, recovers the camera positions and finally by triangulation of camera positions and feature points the software reconstructs a point cloud of the rill surface. From the point cloud, 3D surface models (meshes) are created and via difference calculations of the pre and post models a visualization of the changes (erosion and accumulation areas) and quantification of erosion volumes are possible. The calculated volumes are presented in spatial units of the models and so real values must be converted via references. The outputs are three models at three different points in time. The results show that especially using images taken from suboptimal videos (bad lighting conditions, low contrast of the surface, too much in-motion unsharpness), the sharpness algorithm leads to much more matching features. Hence the point densities of the 3D models are increased and thereby clarify the calculations.

  2. 3-D RECONSTRUCTION FROM NARROW-ANGLE RADIOGRAPHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So as to detect and characterize potential defects in pipes, inspections are carried out with the help of non-destructive examination techniques (NDE) including x- or ? radiography. Should a defect be detected, one can be asked to prove the component still stands the mechanical constraints. In these cases of expertise, the use of a 3-D reconstruction processing technique can be very useful. One characteristic of such applications is that, in general the number and angles of projections are very limited and the data are very noisy, so classical tomography algorithms cannot solve the problem. In this work, we study two methods of reconstruction that allows to take the specificity of radiography inspection into account through two different means: a reconstruction technique based on a priori model (Markov-Potts), a binary technique that constrain the solution to be either 0 or 1 and called 'BLMR'. This paper focuses on first results we obtain on simulated data and real data corresponding to a mock-up with several electro-dynamically manufactured cylindrical defects

  3. Colored 3D surface reconstruction using Kinect sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lian-peng; Chen, Xiang-ning; Chen, Ying; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    A colored 3D surface reconstruction method which effectively fuses the information of both depth and color image using Microsoft Kinect is proposed and demonstrated by experiment. Kinect depth images are processed with the improved joint-bilateral filter based on region segmentation which efficiently combines the depth and color data to improve its quality. The registered depth data are integrated to achieve a surface reconstruction through the colored truncated signed distance fields presented in this paper. Finally, the improved ray casting for rendering full colored surface is implemented to estimate color texture of the reconstruction object. Capturing the depth and color images of a toy car, the improved joint-bilateral filter based on region segmentation is used to improve the quality of depth images and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is approximately 4.57 dB, which is better than 1.16 dB of the joint-bilateral filter. The colored construction results of toy car demonstrate the suitability and ability of the proposed method.

  4. 3-D Reconstruction of Medical Image Using Wavelet Transform and Snake Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyong Cheng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical image segmentation is an important step in 3-D reconstruction, and 3-D reconstruction from medical images is an important application of computer graphics and biomedicine image processing. An improved image segmentation method which is suitable for 3-D reconstruction is presented in this paper. A 3-D reconstruction algorithm is used to reconstruct the 3-D model from medical images. Rough edge is obtained by multi-scale wavelet transform at first. With the rough edge, improved gradient vector flow snake model is used and the object contour in the image is found. In the experiments, we reconstruct 3-D models of kidney, liver and brain putamen. The performances of the experiments indicate that the new algorithm can produce accurate 3-D reconstruction.

  5. 3D Lunar Terrain Reconstruction from Apollo Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxton, Michael J.; Nefian, Ara V.; Moratto, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Lundy, Michael; Segal, Alkeksandr V.

    2009-01-01

    Generating accurate three dimensional planetary models is becoming increasingly important as NASA plans manned missions to return to the Moon in the next decade. This paper describes a 3D surface reconstruction system called the Ames Stereo Pipeline that is designed to produce such models automatically by processing orbital stereo imagery. We discuss two important core aspects of this system: (1) refinement of satellite station positions and pose estimates through least squares bundle adjustment; and (2) a stochastic plane fitting algorithm that generalizes the Lucas-Kanade method for optimal matching between stereo pair images.. These techniques allow us to automatically produce seamless, highly accurate digital elevation models from multiple stereo image pairs while significantly reducing the influence of image noise. Our technique is demonstrated on a set of 71 high resolution scanned images from the Apollo 15 mission

  6. Characterization of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of machine learning in projection views and reconstructed slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), quasi-three-dimensional (3D) structural information is reconstructed from a small number of 2D projection view (PV) mammograms acquired over a limited angular range. The authors developed preliminary computer-aided diagnosis (CADx) methods for classification of malignant and benign masses and compared the effectiveness of analyzing lesion characteristics in the reconstructed DBT slices and in the PVs. Methods: A data set of MLO view DBT of 99 patients containing 107 masses (56 malignant and 51 benign) was collected at the Massachusetts General Hospital with IRB approval. The DBTs were obtained with a GE prototype system which acquired 11 PVs over a 50 deg. arc. The authors reconstructed the DBTs at 1 mm slice interval using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique. The region of interest (ROI) containing the mass was marked by a radiologist in the DBT volume and the corresponding ROIs on the PVs were derived based on the imaging geometry. The subsequent processes were fully automated. For classification of masses using the DBT-slice approach, the mass on each slice was segmented by an active contour model initialized with adaptive k-means clustering. A spiculation likelihood map was generated by analysis of the gradient directions around the mass margin and spiculation features were extracted from the map. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to a band of pixels around the segmented mass boundary. The RBST image was enhanced by Sobel filtering in the horizontal and vertical directions, from which run-length statistics texture features were extracted. Morphological features including those from the normalized radial length were designed to describe the mass shape. A feature space composed of the spiculation features, texture features, and morphological features extracted from the central slice alone and seven feature spaces obtained by averaging the corresponding features from three to 19 slices centered at the central slice were compared. For classification of masses using the PV approach, a feature extraction process similar to that described above for the DBT approach was performed on the ROIs from the individual PVs. Six feature spaces obtained from the central PV alone and by averaging the corresponding features from three to 11 PVs were formed. In each feature space for either the DBT-slice or the PV approach, a linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was trained and tested using a two-loop leave-one-case-out resampling procedure. Simplex optimization was used to guide feature selection automatically within the training set in each leave-one-case-out cycle. The performance of the classifiers was evaluated by the area (Az) under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Results: The test Az values from the DBT-slice approach ranged from 0.87±0.03 to 0.93±0.02, while those from the PV approach ranged from 0.78±0.04 to 0.84±0.04. The highest test Az of 0.93±0.02 from the nine-DBT-slice feature space was significantly (p=0.006) better than the highest test Az of 0.84±0.04 from the nine-PV feature space. Conclusion: The features of breast lesions extracted from the DBT slices consistently provided higher classification accuracy than those extracted from the PV images.

  7. The new CORIMP CME catalog & 3D reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Jason; Morgan, Huw; Gallagher, Peter; Habbal, Shadia; Davies, Jackie

    2015-04-01

    A new coronal mass ejection catalog has been built from a unique set of coronal image processing techniques, called CORIMP, that overcomes many of the limitations of current catalogs in operation. An online database has been produced for the SOHO/LASCO data and event detections therein; providing information on CME onset time, position angle, angular width, speed, acceleration, and mass, along with kinematic plots and observation movies. The high-fidelity and robustness of these methods and derived CME structure and kinematics will lead to an improved understanding of the dynamics of CMEs, and a realtime version of the algorithm has been implemented to provide CME detection alerts to the interested space weather community. Furthermore, STEREO data has been providing the ability to perform 3D reconstructions of CMEs that are observed in multipoint observations. This allows a determination of the 3D kinematics and morphologies of CMEs characterised in STEREO data via the 'elliptical tie-pointing' technique. The associated observations of SOHO, SDO and PROBA2 (and intended use of K-Cor) provide additional measurements and constraints on the CME analyses in order to improve their accuracy.

  8. Overview of digital breast tomosynthesis: Clinical cases, benefits and disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T; Levy, G; Poncelet, E; Le Thanh, T; Prolongeau, J F; Phalippou, J; Massoni, F; Laurent, N

    2015-09-01

    In France, the national breast cancer-screening program is based on mammography combined with clinical breast examination, and sometimes breast ultrasound for patients with high breast density. Digital breast tomosynthesis is a currently assessed 3D imaging technique in which angular projections of the stationary compressed breast are acquired automatically. When combined with mammography, clinicians can review both conventional (2D) as well as three-dimensional (3D) data. The purpose of this article is to review recent reports on this new breast imaging technique and complements this information with our personal experience. The main advantages of tomosynthesis are that it facilitates the detection and characterization of breast lesions, as well as the diagnosis of occult lesions in dense breasts. However, to do this, patients are exposed to higher levels of radiation than with 2D mammography. In France, the indications for tomosynthesis and its use in breast cancer-screening (individual and organized) are yet to be defined, as is its role in the diagnosis and staging of breast cancer (multiple lesions). Further studies assessing in particular the combined reconstruction of the 2D view using 3D tomosynthesis data acquired during a single breast compression event, and therefore reducing patient exposure to radiation, are expected to provide valuable insight. PMID:26275829

  9. A Method for Interactive 3D Reconstruction of Piecewise Planar Objects from Single Images

    OpenAIRE

    STURM, Peter; Maybank, Steve

    1999-01-01

    We present an approach for 3D reconstruction of objects from a single image. Obviously, constraints on the 3D structure are needed to perform this task. Our approach is based on user-provided coplanarity, perpendicularity and parallelism constraints. These are used to calibrate the image and perform 3D reconstruction. The method is described in detail and results are provided.

  10. Uncertainties in polarimetric 3D reconstructions of coronal mass ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Bemporad, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    This work is aimed at quantifying the uncertainties in the 3D reconstruction of the location of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) obtained with the polarization ratio technique. The method takes advantage of the different distributions along the line of sight (LOS) of total (tB) and polarized (pB) brightnesses to estimate the average location of the emitting plasma. To this end, we assumed two simple electron density distributions along the LOS (a constant density and Gaussian density profiles) for a plasma blob and synthesized the expected tB and pB for different distances $z$ of the blob from the plane of the sky (POS) and different projected altitudes $\\rho$. Reconstructed locations of the blob along the LOS were thus compared with the real ones, allowing a precise determination of uncertainties in the method. Independently of the analytical density profile, when the blob is centered at a small distance from the POS (i.e. for limb CMEs) the distance from the POS starts to be significantly overestimated. Polari...

  11. DIACHRONIC 3D RECONSTRUCTION FOR LOST CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Guidi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultural Heritage artifacts can often be underestimated for their hidden presence in the landscape. Such problem is particularly large in countries like Italy, where the massive amount of "famous" artifacts tends to neglect other presences unless properly exposed, or when the remains are dramatically damaged leaving very few interpretation clues to the visitor. In such cases a virtual presentation of the Cultural Heritage site can be of great help, specially for explaining the evolution of its status, giving sometimes sense to few spare stones. The definition of these digital representations deal with two crucial aspects: on the one hand the possibility of 3D surveying the relics in order to have an accurate geometrical image of the current status of the artifact; on the other hand the presence of historical sources both in form of written text or images, that once properly matched with the current geometrical data, may help to recreate digitally a set of 3D models representing visually the various historical phases (diachronic model, up to the current one. The core of this article is the definition of an integrated methodology that starts from an high-resolution digital survey of the remains of an ancient building and develops a coherent virtual reconstruction from different historical sources, suggesting a scalable method suitable to be re-used for generating a 4D (geometry + time model of the artifact. This approach has been experimented on the "Basilica di San Giovanni in Conca" in Milan, a very significant example for its complex historic evolution that combines evident historic values with an invisible presence inside the city.

  12. Integration of real-time 3D capture, reconstruction, and light-field display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoxing; Geng, Zheng; Li, Tuotuo; Pei, Renjing; Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Effective integration of 3D acquisition, reconstruction (modeling) and display technologies into a seamless systems provides augmented experience of visualizing and analyzing real objects and scenes with realistic 3D sensation. Applications can be found in medical imaging, gaming, virtual or augmented reality and hybrid simulations. Although 3D acquisition, reconstruction, and display technologies have gained significant momentum in recent years, there seems a lack of attention on synergistically combining these components into a "end-to-end" 3D visualization system. We designed, built and tested an integrated 3D visualization system that is able to capture in real-time 3D light-field images, perform 3D reconstruction to build 3D model of the objects, and display the 3D model on a large autostereoscopic screen. In this article, we will present our system architecture and component designs, hardware/software implementations, and experimental results. We will elaborate on our recent progress on sparse camera array light-field 3D acquisition, real-time dense 3D reconstruction, and autostereoscopic multi-view 3D display. A prototype is finally presented with test results to illustrate the effectiveness of our proposed integrated 3D visualization system.

  13. 3D reconstruction of the final PHILAE landing site: Abydos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capanna, Claire; Jorda, Laurent; Lamy, Philippe; Gesquière, Gilles; Delmas, Cédric; Durand, Joëlle; Gaudon, Philippe; Jurado, Eric

    2015-11-01

    The Abydos region is the region of the final landing site of the PHILAE lander. The landing site has been potentially identified on images of this region acquired by the OSIRIS imaging system aboard the orbiter before (Oct 22, 2014) and after (Dec 6-13, 2014) the landing of PHILAE (Lamy et al., in prep.). Assuming that this identification is correct, we reconstructed the topography of Abydos in 3D using a method called ``multiresolution photoclinometry by deformation'' (MPCD, Capanna et al., The Visual Computer, 29(6-8): 825-835, 2013). The method works in two steps: (a) a DTM of this region is extracted from the global MPCD shape model, (b) the resulting triangular mesh is progressively deformed at increasing spatial resolution in order to match a set of 14 images of Abydos at pixel resolutions between 1 and 8 m. The method used to perform the image matching is the L-BFGS-b non-linear optimization (Morales et al., ACM Trans. Math. Softw., 38(1): 1-4, 2011).In spite of the very unfavourable illumination conditions, we achieve a vertical accuracy of about 3 m, while the horizontal sampling is 0.5 m. The accuracy is limited by high incidence angles on the images (about 60 deg on average) combined with a complex topography including numerous cliffs and a few overhangs. We also check the compatibility of the local DTM with the images obtained by the CIVA-P instrument aboard PHILAE. If the Lamy et al. identification is correct, our DTM shows that PHILAE landed in a cavity at the bottom of a small cliff of 8 m height.

  14. A novel solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) scanning scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) recently gained extensive research interests in both diagnostic and radiation therapy fields. Conventional DTS images are generated by scanning an x-ray source and flat-panel detector pair on opposite sides of an object, with the scanning trajectory on a one-dimensional curve. A novel tomosynthesis method named solid-angle tomosynthesis (SAT) is proposed, where the x-ray source scans on an arbitrary shaped two-dimensional surface. Methods: An iterative algorithm in the form of total variation regulated expectation maximization is developed for SAT image reconstruction. The feasibility and effectiveness of SAT is corroborated by computer simulation studies using three-dimensional (3D) numerical phantoms including a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom and a volumetric CT image set of a human breast. Results: SAT is able to cover more space in Fourier domain more uniformly than conventional DTS. Greater coverage and more isotropy in the frequency domain translate to fewer artifacts and more accurately restored features in the in-plane reconstruction. Conclusions: Comparing with conventional DTS, SAT allows cone-shaped x-ray beams to project from more solid angles, thus provides more coverage in the spatial-frequency domain, resulting in better quality of reconstructed image.

  15. Image Reconstruction from 2D stack of MRI/CT to 3D using Shapelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Image reconstruction is an active research field, due to the increasing need for geometric 3D models in movie industry, games, virtual environments and in medical fields. 3D image reconstruction aims to arrive at the 3D model of an object, from its 2D images taken at different viewing angles. Medical images are multimodal, which includes MRI, CT scan image, PET and SPECT images. Of these, MRI and CT scan images of an organ when taken, is available as a stack of 2D images, taken at different angles. This 2D stack of images is used to get a 3D view of the organ of interest, to aid doctors in easier diagnosis. Existing 3D reconstruction techniques are voxel based techniques, which tries to reconstruct the 3D view based on the intensity value stored at each voxel location. These techniques don’t make use of the shape/depth information available in the 2D image stack. In this work, a 3D reconstruction technique for MRI/CT 2D image stack, based on Shapelets has been proposed. Here, the shape/depth information available in each 2D image in the image stack is manipulated to get a 3D reconstruction, which gives a more accurate 3D view of the organ of interest. Experimental results exhibit the efficiency of this proposed technique.

  16. Detection of calcification clusters in digital breast tomosynthesis slices at different dose levels utilizing a SRSAR reconstruction and JAFROC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberg, P.; Dustler, M.; Petersson, H.; Tingberg, A.; Zackrisson, S.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate detection performance for calcification clusters in reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) slices at different dose levels using a Super Resolution and Statistical Artifact Reduction (SRSAR) reconstruction method. Method: Simulated calcifications with irregular profile (0.2 mm diameter) where combined to form clusters that were added to projection images (1-3 per abnormal image) acquired on a DBT system (Mammomat Inspiration, Siemens). The projection images were dose reduced by software to form 35 abnormal cases and 25 normal cases as if acquired at 100%, 75% and 50% dose level (AGD of approximately 1.6 mGy for a 53 mm standard breast, measured according to EUREF v0.15). A standard FBP and a SRSAR reconstruction method (utilizing IRIS (iterative reconstruction filters), and outlier detection using Maximum-Intensity Projections and Average-Intensity Projections) were used to reconstruct single central slices to be used in a Free-response task (60 images per observer and dose level). Six observers participated and their task was to detect the clusters and assign confidence rating in randomly presented images from the whole image set (balanced by dose level). Each trial was separated by one weeks to reduce possible memory bias. The outcome was analyzed for statistical differences using Jackknifed Alternative Free-response Receiver Operating Characteristics. Results: The results indicate that it is possible reduce the dose by 50% with SRSAR without jeopardizing cluster detection. Conclusions: The detection performance for clusters can be maintained at a lower dose level by using SRSAR reconstruction.

  17. From 2D PET to 3D PET. Issues of data representation and image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET), intrinsically a 3D imaging technique, was for a long time exclusively operated in 2D mode, using septa to shield the detectors from photons emitted obliquely to the detector planes. However, the use of septa results in a considerable loss of sensitivity. From the late 1980s, significant efforts have been made to develop a methodology for the acquisition and reconstruction of 3D PET data. This paper focuses on the differences between data acquisition in 2D and 3D mode, especially in terms of data set sizes and representation. Although the real time data acquisition aspect in 3D has been mostly solved in modern PET scanner systems, there still remain questions on how to represent and how to make best use of the information contained in the acquired data sets. Data representation methods, such as list-mode and matrix-based methods, possibly with additional compression, will be discussed. Moving from 2D to 3D PET has major implications on the way these data are reconstructed to images. Two fundamentally different approaches exist, the analytical one and the iterative one. Both, at different expenses, can be extended to directly handle 3D data sets. Either way the computational burden increases heavily compared to 2D reconstruction. One possibility to benefit from the increased sensitivity in 3D PET while sticking to high-performance 2D reconstruction algorithms is to rebin 3D into 2D data sets. The value of data rebinning will be explored. An ever increasing computing power and the concept of distributed or parallel computing have made direct 3D reconstruction feasible. Following a short review of reconstruction methods and their extensions to 3D, we focus on numerical aspects that improve reconstruction performance, which is especially important in solving large equation systems in 3D iterative reconstruction. Finally exemplary results are shown to review the properties of the discussed algorithms. (orig.)

  18. 3D reconstruction of the coronary tree usig Biplane Snakes

    OpenAIRE

    Cañero Morales, Cristina

    2003-01-01

    Esta tesis explora los problemas de la reconstrucción 3D de los vasos coronarios a partir de angiografías: calibración, extracción de los vasos a partir de las imágenes, y reconstrucción 3D del vaso. La calibración se divide en dos procedimientos: El primer procedimiento corrige la distorsión geométrica, y el segundo se concentra en la estimación de los parámetros extrínsecos e intrínsicos del sistema de adquisición. La distorsión geométrica} introducida por el intensificador de imagen se cor...

  19. 3D Reconstruction in Spiral Multislice CT Scans

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ghafouri

    2005-01-01

    Introduction & Background: The rapid development of spiral (helical) computed tomography (CT) has resulted in exciting new applications for CT. One of these applications, three-dimensional (3D) CT with volume ren-dering, is now a major area of clinical and academic interest. One of the greatest advantages of spiral CT with 3D volume rendering is that it provides all the necessary information in a single radiologic study (and there-fore at the lowest possible price) in cases that previousl...

  20. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  1. A methodology for testing for statistically significant differences between fully 3D PET reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a practical methodology for evaluating 3D PET reconstruction methods. It includes generation of random samples from a statistically described ensemble of 3D images resembling those to which PET would be applied in a medical situation, generation of corresponding projection data with noise and detector point spread function simulating those of a 3D PET scanner, assignment of figures of merit appropriate for the intended medical applications, optimization of the reconstruction algorithms on a training set of data, and statistical testing of the validity of hypotheses that say that two reconstruction algorithms perform equally well (from the point of view of a particular figure of merit) as compared to the alternative hypotheses that say that one of the algorithms outperforms the other. Although the methodology was developed with the 3D PET in mind, it can be used, with minor changes, for other 3D data collection methods, such as fully 3D CT or SPECT. (Author)

  2. Enhanced imaging colonoscopy facilitates dense motion-based 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantarilla, Pablo F; Bartoli, Adrien; Chadebecq, Francois; Tilmant, Christophe; Lepilliez, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for estimating a dense 3D model of neoplasia in colonoscopy using enhanced imaging endoscopy modalities. Estimating a dense 3D model of neoplasia is important to make 3D measurements and to classify the superficial lesions in standard frameworks such as the Paris classification. However, it is challenging to obtain decent dense 3D models using computer vision techniques such as Structure-from-Motion due to the lack of texture in conventional (white light) colonoscopy. Therefore, we propose to use enhanced imaging endoscopy modalities such as Narrow Band Imaging and chromoendoscopy to facilitate the 3D reconstruction process. Thanks to the use of these enhanced endoscopy techniques, visualization is improved, resulting in more reliable feature tracks and 3D reconstruction results. We first build a sparse 3D model of neoplasia using Structure-from-Motion from enhanced endoscopy imagery. Then, the sparse reconstruction is densified using a Multi-View Stereo approach, and finally the dense 3D point cloud is transformed into a mesh by means of Poisson surface reconstruction. The obtained dense 3D models facilitate classification of neoplasia in the Paris classification, in which the 3D size and the shape of the neoplasia play a major role in the diagnosis. PMID:24111442

  3. Regularization approach for tomosynthesis X-ray inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tigkos, Konstantinos; Hassler, Ulf; Holub, Wolfgang; Woerlein, Norbert; Rehak, Markus [Fraunhofer Development Center X-ray Technologies (EZRT), Dept. Application Specific Methods and Systems (AMS), Fraunhofer IIS, Flugplatzstraße 75, 90768 Fürth (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    X-ray inspection is intended to be used as an escalation technique for inspection of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) in aerospace applications, especially in case of unclear indications from ultrasonic or other NDT modalities. Due to their large dimensions, most aerospace components cannot be scanned by conventional computed tomography. In such cases, X-ray Laminography may be applied, allowing a pseudo 3D slice-by-slice reconstruction of the sample with Tomosynthesis. However, due to the limited angle acquisition geometry, reconstruction artifacts arise, especially at surfaces parallel to the imaging plane. To regularize the Tomosynthesis approach, we propose an additional prescan of the object to detect outer sample surfaces. We recommend the use of contrasted markers which are temporarily attached to the sample surfaces. The depth position of the markers is then derived from that prescan. As long as the sample surface remains simple, few markers are required to fit the respective object surfaces. The knowledge about this surface may then be used to regularize the final Tomosynthesis reconstruction, performed with markerless projections. Eventually, it can also serve as prior information for an ART reconstruction or to register a CAD model of the sample. The presented work is carried out within the European FP7 project QUICOM. We demonstrate the proposed approach within a simulation study applying an acquisition geometry suited for CFRP part inspection. A practical verification of the approach is planned later in the project.

  4. Reconstruction of 3D models of cast sculptures using close-range photogrammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ž. Santoši

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the possibilities of application of close-range photogrammetry, based on the Structure-from- Motion (SfM approach, in 3D model’s reconstruction of bronze cast sculptures. Special attention was dedicated to the analysis of image processing strategy, and its impact on the 3D model reconstruction quality. For the purpose of analysis a bust of Nikola Tesla, placed in front of the Faculty of Technical Sciences University of Novi Sad was used. Experimental results indicate that the strategy employing multi-group photo processing provides substantial reductions in processing time while providing satisfactory results in 3D reconstruction.

  5. RECONSTRUCCIÓN DE OBJETO 3D A PARTIR DE IMÁGENES CALIBRADAS 3D OBJECT RECONSTRUCTION WITH CALIBRATED IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natividad Grandón-Pastén

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta el desarrollo de un sistema de reconstrucción de objeto 3D, a partir de una colección de vistas. El sistema se compone de dos módulos principales. El primero realiza el procesamiento de imagen, cuyo objetivo es determinar el mapa de profundidad en un par de vistas, donde cada par de vistas sucesivas sigue una secuencia de fases: detección de puntos de interés, correspondencia de puntos y reconstrucción de puntos; en el proceso de reconstrucción se determinan los parámetros que describen el movimiento (matriz de rotación R y el vector de traslación T entre las dos vistas. Esta secuencia de pasos se repite para todos los pares de vista sucesivas del conjunto. El segundo módulo tiene como objetivo crear el modelo 3D del objeto, para lo cual debe determinar el mapa total de todos los puntos 3D generados; en cada iteración del módulo anterior, una vez obtenido el mapa de profundidad total, genera la malla 3D, aplicando el método de triangulación de Delaunay [28]. Los resultados obtenidos del proceso de reconstrucción son modelados en un ambiente virtual VRML para obtener una visualización más realista del objeto.The system is composed of two main modules. The first one, carries out the image prosecution, whose objective is to determine the depth map of a pair of views where each pair of successive views continues a sequence of phases: interest points detection, points correspondence and points reconstruction; in the reconstruction process, is determined the parameters that describe the movement (rotation matrix R and the translation vector T between the two views. This an sequence of steps is repeated for all the peers of successive views of the set. The second module has as objective to create the 3D model of the object, for it should determine the total map of all the 3D points generated, by each iteration of the previous module, once obtained the map of total depth generates the 3D netting, applying the triangulation method of Delaunay [28]. The results obtained of the reconstruction process are shaped in a VRML virtual environment, to obtain a viewing more realist of the object.

  6. The New Approach to Sport Medicine: 3-D Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Alparslan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present a new approach to sport medicine. Comparative analysis of the Vertebrae Lumbales was done in sedentary group and Muay Thai athletes. It was done by acquiring three dimensional (3-D) data and models through photogrammetric methods from the Multi-detector Computerized Tomography (MDCT) images of the Vertebrae…

  7. Reconstructing Plant Architecture from 3D Laser scanner data

    OpenAIRE

    Preuksakarn, Chakkrit; Boudon, Frédéric; Ferraro, Pascal; Durand, Jean-Baptiste; Nikinmaa, Ekko; Godin, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Automatic acquisition of plant phenotypes constitutes a major bottleneck in the construction of quantitative models of plant development. This issue needs to be addressed to build accurate models of plant, useful for instance in agronomic and forestry applications. In this work, we present a method for reconstructing plant architecture from laser scanner data. A dedicated evaluation procedure based on a detailed comparison between expert and automatic reconstruction was developed to quantify ...

  8. A storage method of 3D CT image reconstruction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to realize the miniaturization of three-dimensional cone-beam CT image reconstruction system to small-scale, A three-dimensional image reconstruction system based on FPGA is established. The memory bandwidth requirement of the FDK reconstruction algorithms and the data throughput of the storage system which is composed of SDRAM, SRAM and the internal RAM resource of FPGA is introduced. First, based on filtering algorithms and back projection algorithms the memory bandwidth requirement of a three-dimensional cone-beam CT image reconstruction system is studied. Then, a data access scheme is presented, which uses a SDRAM chip as its main storage a SRAM chip as its external cache and the SRAM resources of FPGA as its internal cache.Then, the process of the implementation and the testing methods of the storage scheme is introduced. Finally, data access capacity of the three-dimensional image reconstruction system was tested. Experimental results indicate that: the storage system can achieve a sequential access data rate of 151.9MB/s and a random access data rate of 100MB/s. It can satisfy the memory bandwidth requirement of a small-scale three-dimensional image reconstruction system. (authors)

  9. On the Performance Evaluation of 3D Reconstruction Techniques from a Sequence of Images

    OpenAIRE

    Aly Farag; Ahmed Eid

    2005-01-01

    The performance evaluation of 3D reconstruction techniques is not a simple problem to solve. This is not only due to the increased dimensionality of the problem but also due to the lack of standardized and widely accepted testing methodologies. This paper presents a unified framework for the performance evaluation of different 3D reconstruction techniques. This framework includes a general problem formalization, different measuring criteria, and a classification method as a first step in stan...

  10. RECONSTRUCCIÓN DE OBJETO 3D A PARTIR DE IMÁGENES CALIBRADAS / 3D OBJECT RECONSTRUCTION WITH CALIBRATED IMAGES

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Natividad, Grandón-Pastén; Diego, Aracena-Pizarro; Clésio Luis, Tozzi.

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo presenta el desarrollo de un sistema de reconstrucción de objeto 3D, a partir de una colección de vistas. El sistema se compone de dos módulos principales. El primero realiza el procesamiento de imagen, cuyo objetivo es determinar el mapa de profundidad en un par de vistas, donde cada p [...] ar de vistas sucesivas sigue una secuencia de fases: detección de puntos de interés, correspondencia de puntos y reconstrucción de puntos; en el proceso de reconstrucción se determinan los parámetros que describen el movimiento (matriz de rotación R y el vector de traslación T) entre las dos vistas. Esta secuencia de pasos se repite para todos los pares de vista sucesivas del conjunto. El segundo módulo tiene como objetivo crear el modelo 3D del objeto, para lo cual debe determinar el mapa total de todos los puntos 3D generados; en cada iteración del módulo anterior, una vez obtenido el mapa de profundidad total, genera la malla 3D, aplicando el método de triangulación de Delaunay [28]. Los resultados obtenidos del proceso de reconstrucción son modelados en un ambiente virtual VRML para obtener una visualización más realista del objeto. Abstract in english The system is composed of two main modules. The first one, carries out the image prosecution, whose objective is to determine the depth map of a pair of views where each pair of successive views continues a sequence of phases: interest points detection, points correspondence and points reconstructio [...] n; in the reconstruction process, is determined the parameters that describe the movement (rotation matrix R and the translation vector T) between the two views. This an sequence of steps is repeated for all the peers of successive views of the set. The second module has as objective to create the 3D model of the object, for it should determine the total map of all the 3D points generated, by each iteration of the previous module, once obtained the map of total depth generates the 3D netting, applying the triangulation method of Delaunay [28]. The results obtained of the reconstruction process are shaped in a VRML virtual environment, to obtain a viewing more realist of the object.

  11. 3D surface reconstruction based on image stitching from gastric endoscopic video sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Mengyao; Xu, Rong; Ohya, Jun

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a method for reconstructing 3D detailed structures of internal organs such as gastric wall from endoscopic video sequences. The proposed method consists of the four major steps: Feature-point-based 3D reconstruction, 3D point cloud stitching, dense point cloud creation and Poisson surface reconstruction. Before the first step, we partition one video sequence into groups, where each group consists of two successive frames (image pairs), and each pair in each group contains one overlapping part, which is used as a stitching region. Fist, the 3D point cloud of each group is reconstructed by utilizing structure from motion (SFM). Secondly, a scheme based on SIFT features registers and stitches the obtained 3D point clouds, by estimating the transformation matrix of the overlapping part between different groups with high accuracy and efficiency. Thirdly, we select the most robust SIFT feature points as the seed points, and then obtain the dense point cloud from sparse point cloud via a depth testing method presented by Furukawa. Finally, by utilizing Poisson surface reconstruction, polygonal patches for the internal organs are obtained. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves a high accuracy and efficiency for 3D reconstruction of gastric surface from an endoscopic video sequence.

  12. 3D Fractal reconstruction of terrain profile data based on digital elevation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) often makes it difficult for terrain reconstruction and data storage due to the failure in acquisition of details with higher resolution. If original terrain of DEM can be simulated, resulting in geographical details can be represented precisely while reducing the data size, then an effective reconstruction scheme is essential. This paper adopts two sets of real-world 3D terrain profile data to proceed data reducing, i.e. data sampling randomly, then reconstruct them through 3D fractal reconstruction. Meanwhile, the quantitative and qualitative difference generated from different reduction rates were evaluated statistically. The research results show that, if 3D fractal interpolation method is applied to DEM reconstruction, the higher reduction rate can be obtained for DEM of larger data size with respect to that of smaller data size under the assumption that the entire terrain structure is still maintained.

  13. Preoperative Planning Using 3D Reconstructions and Virtual Endoscopy for Location of the Frontal Sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu, João Paulo Saraiva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Computed tomography (TC generated tridimensional (3D reconstructions allow the observation of cavities and anatomic structures of our body with detail. In our specialty there have been attempts to carry out virtual endoscopies and laryngoscopies. However, such application has been practically abandoned due to its complexity and need for computers with high power of graphic processing. Objective: To demonstrate the production of 3D reconstructions from CTs of patients in personal computers, with a free specific program and compare them to the surgery actual endoscopic images. Method: Prospective study in which the CTs proper files of 10 patients were reconstructed with the program Intage Realia, version 2009, 0, 0, 702 (KGT Inc., Japan. The reconstructions were carried out before the surgeries and a virtual endoscopy was made to assess the recess and frontal sinus region. After this study, the surgery was digitally performed and stored. The actual endoscopic images of the recess and frontal sinus region were compared to the virtual images. Results: The 3D reconstruction and virtual endoscopy were made in 10 patients submitted to the surgery. The virtual images had a large resemblance with the actual surgical images. Conclusion: With relatively simple tools and personal computer, we demonstrated the possibility to generate 3D reconstructions and virtual endoscopies. The preoperative knowledge of the frontal sinus natural draining path location may generate benefits during the performance of surgeries. However, more studies must be developed for the evaluation of the real roles of such 3D reconstructions and virtual endoscopies.

  14. Assessing 3D tunnel position in ACL reconstruction using a novel single image 3D-2D registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, X.; Yau, W. P.; Otake, Y.; Cheung, P. Y. S.; Hu, Y.; Taylor, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    The routinely used procedure for evaluating tunnel positions following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions based on standard X-ray images is known to pose difficulties in terms of obtaining accurate measures, especially in providing three-dimensional tunnel positions. This is largely due to the variability in individual knee joint pose relative to X-ray plates. Accurate results were reported using postoperative CT. However, its extensive usage in clinical routine is hampered by its major requirement of having CT scans of individual patients, which is not available for most ACL reconstructions. These difficulties are addressed through the proposed method, which aligns a knee model to X-ray images using our novel single-image 3D-2D registration method and then estimates the 3D tunnel position. In the proposed method, the alignment is achieved by using a novel contour-based 3D-2D registration method wherein image contours are treated as a set of oriented points. However, instead of using some form of orientation weighting function and multiplying it with a distance function, we formulate the 3D-2D registration as a probability density estimation using a mixture of von Mises-Fisher-Gaussian (vMFG) distributions and solve it through an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Compared with the ground-truth established from postoperative CT, our registration method in an experiment using a plastic phantom showed accurate results with errors of (-0.43°+/-1.19°, 0.45°+/-2.17°, 0.23°+/-1.05°) and (0.03+/-0.55, -0.03+/-0.54, -2.73+/-1.64) mm. As for the entry point of the ACL tunnel, one of the key measurements, it was obtained with high accuracy of 0.53+/-0.30 mm distance errors.

  15. Autonomous Planetary 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    A common task for many deep space missions is autonomous generation of 3-D representations of planetary surfaces onboard unmanned spacecrafts. The basic problem for this class of missions is, that the closed loop time is far too long. The closed loop time is defined as the time from when a human operator detects an interesting object or feature on a, say, asteroid, to a command is issued to aim a science instrument at the feature. This delay may be in the range of hours for all except the object...

  16. Neural Network Based Reconstruction of a 3D Object from a 2D Wireframe

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Kyle; Lipson, Hod

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new approach for constructing a 3D representation from a 2D wireframe drawing. A drawing is simply a parallel projection of a 3D object onto a 2D surface; humans are able to recreate mental 3D models from 2D representations very easily, yet the process is very difficult to emulate computationally. We hypothesize that our ability to perform this construction relies on the angles in the 2D scene, among other geometric properties. Being able to reproduce this reconstruction process automatically would allow for efficient and robust 3D sketch interfaces. Our research focuses on the relationship between 2D geometry observable in the sketch and 3D geometry derived from a potential 3D construction. We present a fully automated system that constructs 3D representations from 2D wireframes using a neural network in conjunction with a genetic search algorithm.

  17. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha Sara dos Santos; Ramos Dalton Luiz de Paula; Cavalcanti Marcelo de Gusmão Paraíso

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using craniometric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering techni...

  18. Precipitate shape fitting and reconstruction by means of 3D Zernike functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D Zernike functions are defined and used for the reconstruction of precipitate shapes. These functions are orthogonal over the unit ball and allow for an arbitrary shape, scaled to fit inside an embedding sphere, to be decomposed into 3D harmonics. Explicit expressions are given for the general Zernike moments, correcting typographical errors in the literature. Explicit expressions of the Zernike moments for the ellipsoid and the cube are given. The 3D Zernike functions and moments are applied to the reconstruction of ?' precipitate shapes in two Ni-based superalloys, one with nearly cuboidal precipitate shapes, and one with more complex dendritic shapes

  19. 3D reconstruction software comparison for short sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupczewski, Adam; Czupry?ski, B?a?ej

    2014-11-01

    Large scale multiview reconstruction is recently a very popular area of research. There are many open source tools that can be downloaded and run on a personal computer. However, there are few, if any, comparisons between all the available software in terms of accuracy on small datasets that a single user can create. The typical datasets for testing of the software are archeological sites or cities, comprising thousands of images. This paper presents a comparison of currently available open source multiview reconstruction software for small datasets. It also compares the open source solutions with a simple structure from motion pipeline developed by the authors from scratch with the use of OpenCV and Eigen libraries.

  20. GOTHIC CHURCHES IN PARIS ST GERVAIS ET ST PROTAIS IMAGE MATCHING 3D RECONSTRUCTION TO UNDERSTAND THE VAULTS SYSTEM GEOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Capone

    2015-02-01

    benefits and the troubles. From a methodological point of view this is our workflow: - theoretical study about geometrical configuration of rib vault systems; - 3D model based on theoretical hypothesis about geometric definition of the vaults' form; - 3D model based on image matching 3D reconstruction methods; - comparison between 3D theoretical model and 3D model based on image matching;

  1. Autonomous Planetary 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    A common task for many deep space missions is autonomous generation of 3-D representations of planetary surfaces onboard unmanned spacecrafts. The basic problem for this class of missions is, that the closed loop time is far too long. The closed loop time is defined as the time from when a human operator detects an interesting object or feature on a, say, asteroid, to a command is issued to aim a science instrument at the feature. This delay may be in the range of hours for all except the objects closest to the Earth. Because the transit time of a typical interesting feature is in the range of seconds to a few minutes, the closed loop time effectively precludes active human control.The only way to circumvent this problem is to build an artificial feature extractor operating autonomously onboard the spacecraft.Different artificial feature extractors are presented and their efficiency is discussed.Based on such features, 3-D representations may be compiled from two or more 2-D satellite images. The main purposes of such a mapping system are extraction of landing sites, objects of scientific interest and general planetary surveying. All data processing is performed autonomously onboard in order to reduce data transfer to ground station and to eliminate the closed loop time delay.

  2. Track reconstruction by GPU in 3D particle tracking detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozza, Cristiano; De Sio, Chiara; Kose, Umut; Stellacci, Simona Maria

    2015-09-01

    3D detectors for high-energy physics have always needed large computing power. Its availability has sometimes determined the statistics and performance of experiments. The increasing specific computing power of GPUs in recent years offers new opportunities for this field of application that should not be missed. The paper shows a novel algorithm that supports, as a by-product of speed, wider angular acceptance with respect to established techniques based on CPUs. While the algorithm has been developed in the environment of nuclear emulsions, it has been conceived from the very beginning as a tool for general tracking in 3D detectors. The overall logic can apply to many operational contexts in which tracking occurs in high combinatorial background. The performances of the algorithm are evaluated from different points of view, describing the details of the computing technique that are common to tracking problems and discussing measurements and data from a test-beam exposure. Computing speed has been evaluated on a broad variety of hardware, investigating an approximated scaling formula.

  3. Spatial resolution of the HRRT PET scanner using 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Sibomana, Merence; Keller, Sune Høgild; Andersen, Flemming; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Holm, Søren; Svarer, Claus; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2009-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) dedicated brain PET scanner installed at Copenhagen University Hospital (Rigshospitalet) was measured using a point-source phantom with high statistics. Further, it was demonstrated how the newly developed 3D-OSEM PSF reconstruction can improve the resolution in reconstructed images with high signal-to-noise-ratios.

  4. 3D reconstruction of a human heart fascicle using SurfDriver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Robert J.; Phillips, Steven J.; LaFollette, Paul S., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    The Temple University Medical School has a sequence of over 400 serial sections of adult normal ventricular human heart tissue, cut at 25 micrometer thickness. We used a Zeiss Ultraphot with a 4x planapo objective and a Pixera digital camera to make a series of 45 sequential montages to use in the 3D reconstruction of a fascicle (muscle bundle). We wrote custom software to merge 4 smaller image fields from each section into one composite image. We used SurfDriver software, developed by Scott Lozanoff of the University of Hawaii and David Moody of the University of Alberta, for registration, object boundary identification, and 3D surface reconstruction. We used an Epson Stylus Color 900 printer to get photo-quality prints. We describe the challenge and our solution to the following problems: image acquisition and digitization, image merge, alignment and registration, boundary identification, 3D surface reconstruction, 3D visualization and orientation, snapshot, and photo-quality prints.

  5. A fast 3D reconstruction system with a low-cost camera accessory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwei; Gibson, Graham M.; Hay, Rebecca; Bowman, Richard W.; Padgett, Miles J.; Edgar, Matthew P.

    2015-06-01

    Photometric stereo is a three dimensional (3D) imaging technique that uses multiple 2D images, obtained from a fixed camera perspective, with different illumination directions. Compared to other 3D imaging methods such as geometry modeling and 3D-scanning, it comes with a number of advantages, such as having a simple and efficient reconstruction routine. In this work, we describe a low-cost accessory to a commercial digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera system allowing fast reconstruction of 3D objects using photometric stereo. The accessory consists of four white LED lights fixed to the lens of a commercial DSLR camera and a USB programmable controller board to sequentially control the illumination. 3D images are derived for different objects with varying geometric complexity and results are presented, showing a typical height error of <3?mm for a 50?mm sized object.

  6. Reconstruction of 3D morphology of polyhedral nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiaojing; Saghi, Zineb; Gay, Ralph; Moebus, Guenter [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-06

    The three-dimensional (3D) faceting morphology of ceria nanoparticles is analysed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based computed tomography on the nanometre scale. A novel tomography mode of electron energy loss spectroscopic imaging using a single energy window for inelastically scattered electrons is introduced and found to be reliable and fast for freestanding nanoparticles. To compare the new tomographic method with other methods, we provide the first comprehensive application of three complementary TEM-based imaging techniques, including bright field TEM and annular dark field specific TEM (STEM). Traditional bright-field TEM tomography is found to be applicable, in spite of obvious artefacts, for crystalline particles of constant composition. However, the safest interpretation is achieved by a combined recording of bright field and spectroscopic images.

  7. Digital Holographic Capture and Optoelectronic Reconstruction for 3D Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Kujawinska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of digital holography as a viable solution to 3D capture and display technology is examined. A review of the current state of the field is presented in which some of the major challenges involved in a digital holographic solution are highlighted. These challenges include (i the removal of the DC and conjugate image terms, which are features of the holographic recording process, (ii the reduction of speckle noise, a characteristic of a coherent imaging process, (iii increasing the angular range of perspective of digital holograms (iv and replaying captured and/or processed digital holograms using spatial light modulators. Each of these challenges are examined theoretically and several solutions are put forward. Experimental results are presented that demonstrate the validity of the theoretical solutions.

  8. 3-d reconstruction of neurons from multichannel confocal laser scanning image series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouterlood, Floris G

    2014-01-01

    A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) collects information from a thin, focal plane and ignores out-of-focus information. Scanning of a specimen, with stepwise axial (Z-) movement of the stage in between each scan, produces Z-series of confocal images of a tissue volume, which then can be used to 3-D reconstruct structures of interest. The operator first configures separate channels (e.g., laser, filters, and detector settings) for each applied fluorochrome and then acquires Z-series of confocal images: one series per channel. Channel signal separation is extremely important. Measures to avoid bleaching are vital. Post-acquisition deconvolution of the image series is often performed to increase resolution before 3-D reconstruction takes place. In the 3-D reconstruction programs described in this unit, reconstructions can be inspected in real time from any viewing angle. By altering viewing angles and by switching channels off and on, the spatial relationships of 3-D-reconstructed structures with respect to structures visualized in other channels can be studied. Since each brand of CLSM, computer program, and 3-D reconstruction package has its own proprietary set of procedures, a general approach is provided in this protocol wherever possible. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci 67:2.8.1-2.8.18. © 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:24723320

  9. Method for secondary reconstruction of planar images from MRT 3D data sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of a method to reconstruct planar images from MRT 3D data sets. These images can be of varying orientation. Reconstruction requires a computer and the control panel of a normal magnetic resonance tomography equipment. Calculation of reconstruction is done in a few minutes. Patients can be examined parallel to this without difficulty. The method yields in a much shorter time than before images with a definitely higher resolution than by the conventinal technique. (orig.)

  10. Region-of-interest reconstructions from truncated 3D x-ray projections

    OpenAIRE

    Azencott, Robert; Bodmann, Bernhard G.; Labate, Demetrio; Sen, Anando; Vera, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a method of region-of-interest (ROI) reconstruction from truncated 3D X-ray projections, consisting of a wavelet-based regularized iterative reconstruction procedure that, under appropriate conditions, converges within the ROI to an exact or highly accurate solution. ROI tomography is motivated by the goal to reduce the overall radiation exposure when primarily the reconstruction of a specified region rather than the entire object is required. Our appro...

  11. 3D parameter reconstruction in hyperspectral diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibaba, Arvind K.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Anderson, Pamela G.; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Miller, Eric L.; Fantini, Sergio; Kilmer, Misha E.

    2015-03-01

    The imaging of shape perturbation and chromophore concentration using Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) data can be mathematically described as an ill-posed and non-linear inverse problem. The reconstruction algorithm for hyperspectral data using a linearized Born model is prohibitively expensive, both in terms of computation and memory. We model the shape of the perturbation using parametric level-set approach (PaLS). We discuss novel computational strategies for reducing the computational cost based on a Krylov subspace approach for parameteric linear systems and a compression strategy for the parameter-to-observation map. We will demonstrate the validity of our approach by comparison with experiments.

  12. Parallel OSEM Reconstruction Algorithm for Fully 3-D SPECT on a Beowulf Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Zhou; Tianyu, Ma; Yongjie, Jin

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the computation speed of ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm for fully 3-D single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction, an experimental beowulf-type cluster was built and several parallel reconstruction schemes were described. We implemented a single-program-multiple-data (SPMD) parallel 3-D OSEM reconstruction algorithm based on message passing interface (MPI) and tested it with combinations of different number of calculating processors and different size of voxel grid in reconstruction (64×64×64 and 128×128×128). Performance of parallelization was evaluated in terms of the speedup factor and parallel efficiency. This parallel implementation methodology is expected to be helpful to make fully 3-D OSEM algorithms more feasible in clinical SPECT studies. PMID:17282575

  13. Bayesian 3d velocity field reconstruction with VIRBIuS

    CERN Document Server

    Lavaux, G

    2015-01-01

    I describe a new Bayesian based algorithm to infer the full three dimensional velocity field from observed distances and spectroscopic galaxy catalogues. In addition to the velocity field itself, the algorithm reconstructs true distances, some cosmological parameters and specific non-linearities in the velocity field. The algorithm takes care of selection effects, miscalibration issues and can be easily extended to handle direct fitting of, e.g., the inverse Tully-Fisher relation. I first describe the algorithm in details alongside its performances. This algorithm is implemented in the VIRBIuS (VelocIty Reconstruction using Bayesian Inference Software) software package. I then test it on different mock distance catalogues with a varying complexity of observational issues. The model proved to give robust measurement of velocities for mock catalogues of 3,000 galaxies. I expect the core of the algorithm to scale to tens of thousands galaxies. It holds the promises of giving a better handle on future large and d...

  14. Reconstructing 3-D Ship Motion for Synthetic Aperture Sonar Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, D. R.; Chadwell, C. D.; Sandwell, D.

    2004-12-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of coherent ping-to-ping processing of multibeam sonar data for high-resolution mapping and change detection in the deep ocean. Theoretical calculations suggest that standard multibeam resolution can be improved from 100 m to ~10 m through coherent summation of pings similar to synthetic aperture radar image formation. A requirement for coherent summation of pings is to correct the phase of the return echoes to an accuracy of ~3 cm at a sampling rate of ~10 Hz. In September of 2003, we conducted a seagoing experiment aboard R/V Revelle to test these ideas. Three geodetic-quality GPS receivers were deployed to recover 3-D ship motion to an accuracy of +- 3cm at a 1 Hz sampling rate [Chadwell and Bock, GRL, 2001]. Additionally, inertial navigation data (INS) from fiber-optic gyroscopes and pendulum-type accelerometers were collected at a 10 Hz rate. Independent measurements of ship orientation (yaw, pitch, and roll) from the GPS and INS show agreement to an RMS accuracy of better than 0.1 degree. Because inertial navigation hardware is susceptible to drift, these measurements were combined with the GPS to achieve both high accuracy and high sampling rate. To preserve the short-timescale accuracy of the INS and the long-timescale accuracy of the GPS measurements, time-filtered differences between the GPS and INS were subtracted from the INS integrated linear velocities. An optimal filter length of 25 s was chosen to force the RMS difference between the GPS and the integrated INS to be on the order of the accuracy of the GPS measurements. This analysis provides an upper bound on 3-D ship motion accuracy. Additionally, errors in the attitude can translate to the projections of motion for individual hydrophones. With lever arms on the order of 5m, these errors will likely be ~1mm. Based on these analyses, we expect to achieve the 3-cm accuracy requirement. Using full-resolution hydrophone data collected by a SIMRAD EM/120 echo sounder we are applying the 6 components of ship motion to correct the phase center of each hydrophone. Successive pings will be analyzed for phase coherence.

  15. Two approaches to 3D reconstruction in NMR zeugmatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) zeugmatography, the primary data pertain to integrals of the unknown nuclear spin density f(x,y,z) over planes instead of lines in R3. Two natural approaches to reconstructing f from such data are: (1) By numerical implementation of the inverse Radon transform in three dimensions (the direct approach), and (2) by application, in two successive stages, of existing well-known algorithms for inverting the two-dimensional Radon transform (the two-stage approach). These two approaches are discussed and compared, both from a theoretical standpoint and through computer results obtained with real NMR data. For the cases studied to date the two methods appear to produce qualitatively similar results

  16. 3D geometric reconstruction of thoracic aortic aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohiaddin Raad H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA is a pathology that involves an expansion of the aortic diameter in the thoracic aorta, leading to risk of rupture. Recent studies have suggested that internal wall stress, which is affected by TAA geometry and the presence or absence of thrombus, is a more reliable predictor of rupture than the maximum diameter, the current clinical criterion. Accurate reconstruction of TAA geometry is a crucial step in patient-specific stress calculations. Methods In this work, a novel methodology was developed, which combines data from several sets of magnetic resonance (MR images with different levels of detail and different resolutions. Two sets of images were employed to create the final model, which has the highest level of detail for each component of the aneurysm (lumen, thrombus, and wall. A reference model was built by using a single set of images for comparison. This approach was applied to two patient-specific TAAs in the descending thoracic aorta. Results The results of finite element simulations showed differences in stress pattern between the coarse and fine models: higher stress values were found with the coarse model and the differences in predicted maximum wall stress were 30% for patient A and 11% for patient B. Conclusion This paper presents a new approach to the reconstruction of an aneurysm model based on the use of several sets of MR images. This enables more accurate representation of not only the lumen but also the wall surface of a TAA taking account of intraluminal thrombus.

  17. Accelerated 3D-OSEM image reconstruction using a Beowulf PC cluster for pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conventional pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a single circular orbit has limitations associated with non-uniform spatial resolution or axial blurring. Recently, we demonstrated that three-dimensional (3D) images with uniform spatial resolution and no blurring can be obtained by complete data acquired using two-circular orbit, combined with the 3D ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) reconstruction method. However, a long computation time is required to obtain the reconstruction image, because of the fact that 3D-OSEM is an iterative method and two-orbit acquisition doubles the size of the projection data. To reduce the long reconstruction time, we parallelized the two-orbit pinhole 3D-OSEM reconstruction process by using a Beowulf personal computer (PC) cluster. The Beowulf PC cluster consists of seven PCs connected to Gbit Ethernet switches. Message passing interface protocol was utilized for parallelizing the reconstruction process. The projection data in a subset are distributed to each PC. The partial image forward-and back-projected in each PC is transferred to all PCs. The current image estimate on each PC is updated after summing the partial images. The performance of parallelization on the PC cluster was evaluated using two independent projection data sets acquired by a pinhole SPECT system with two different circular orbits. Parallelization using the PC cluster improved the reconstruction time with increasing number of PCs. The reconstruction time of 54 min by the single PC was decreased to 10 min when six or seven PCs were used. The speed-up factor was 5.4. The reconstruction image by the PC cluster was virtually identical with that by the single PC. Parallelization of 3D-OSEM reconstruction for pinhole SPECT using the PC cluster can significantly reduce the computation time, whereas its implementation is simple and inexpensive. (author)

  18. Comparison of 3d Reconstruction Services and Terrestrial Laser Scanning for Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasztovits, S.; Dorninger, P.

    2013-07-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) is an established method to reconstruct the geometrical surface of given objects. Current systems allow for fast and efficient determination of 3D models with high accuracy and richness in detail. Alternatively, 3D reconstruction services are using images to reconstruct the surface of an object. While the instrumental expenses for laser scanning systems are high, upcoming free software services as well as open source software packages enable the generation of 3D models using digital consumer cameras. In addition, processing TLS data still requires an experienced user while recent web-services operate completely automatically. An indisputable advantage of image based 3D modeling is its implicit capability for model texturing. However, the achievable accuracy and resolution of the 3D models is lower than those of laser scanning data. Within this contribution, we investigate the results of automated web-services for image based 3D model generation with respect to a TLS reference model. For this, a copper sculpture was acquired using a laser scanner and using image series of different digital cameras. Two different webservices, namely Arc3D and AutoDesk 123D Catch were used to process the image data. The geometric accuracy was compared for the entire model and for some highly structured details. The results are presented and interpreted based on difference models. Finally, an economical comparison of the generation of the models is given considering the interactive and processing time costs.

  19. 3D Building Modeling and Reconstruction using Photometric Satellite and Aerial Imageries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Mohammad

    In this thesis, the problem of three dimensional (3D) reconstruction of building models using photometric satellite and aerial images is investigated. Here, two systems are pre-sented: 1) 3D building reconstruction using a nadir single-view image, and 2) 3D building reconstruction using slant multiple-view aerial images. The first system detects building rooftops in orthogonal aerial/satellite images using a hierarchical segmentation algorithm and a shadow verification approach. The heights of detected buildings are then estimated using a fuzzy rule-based method, which measures the height of a building by comparing its predicted shadow region with the actual shadow evidence in the image. This system finally generated a KML (Keyhole Markup Language) file as the output, that contains 3D models of detected buildings. The second system uses the geolocation information of a scene containing a building of interest and uploads all slant-view images that contain this scene from an input image dataset. These images are then searched automatically to choose image pairs with different views of the scene (north, east, south and west) based on the geolocation and auxiliary data accompanying the input data (metadata that describes the acquisition parameters at the capture time). The camera parameters corresponding to these images are refined using a novel point matching algorithm. Next, the system independently reconstructs 3D flat surfaces that are visible in each view using an iterative algorithm. 3D surfaces generated for all views are combined, and redundant surfaces are removed to create a complete set of 3D surfaces. Finally, the combined 3D surfaces are connected together to generate a more complete 3D model. For the experimental results, both presented systems are evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively and different aspects of the two systems including accuracy, stability, and execution time are discussed.

  20. A software-based x-ray scatter correction method for breast tomosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Feng, Steve Si; Sechopoulos, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a software-based scatter correction method for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging and investigate its impact on the image quality of tomosynthesis reconstructions of both phantoms and patients.

  1. Numerical solution of a nonlinear least squares problem in digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G.; Loli Piccolomini, E.; Nagy, J. G.

    2015-11-01

    In digital tomosynthesis imaging, multiple projections of an object are obtained along a small range of different incident angles in order to reconstruct a pseudo-3D representation (i.e., a set of 2D slices) of the object. In this paper we describe some mathematical models for polyenergetic digital breast tomosynthesis image reconstruction that explicitly takes into account various materials composing the object and the polyenergetic nature of the x-ray beam. A polyenergetic model helps to reduce beam hardening artifacts, but the disadvantage is that it requires solving a large-scale nonlinear ill-posed inverse problem. We formulate the image reconstruction process (i.e., the method to solve the ill-posed inverse problem) in a nonlinear least squares framework, and use a Levenberg-Marquardt scheme to solve it. Some implementation details are discussed, and numerical experiments are provided to illustrate the performance of the methods.

  2. A multiscale/multiframe approach to 3D PET data reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Luis; Ferreira, Nuno [Coimbra Univ. (Portugal). Inst. de Biofisica/Biomatematica; ICNAS - Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares Aplicadas a Saude, Coimbra (Portugal); Comtat, Claude [CEA/DSV/12BM, Orsay (France). Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot

    2011-07-01

    A multiscale/multiframe 3D reconstruction scheme for Positron Emission Tomography is presented. Usually the dimensions of the reconstructed volume or the projection space binning do not change during the image reconstruction process. In this paper we introduce the concept of time frame to the multiscale reconstruction proposed by Raheja et al. This approach can be used for the generation of images reconstructed in near real time using a suitable scale, taking full advantage of list mode reconstruction techniques. When compared with the Maximum Likelihood - Expectation Maximization algorithm (single scale ML-EM), the Multiscale/Multiframe proposed in this work improves the convergence speed in particular in cold regions, as well as performing a fast reconstruction. The generation of different image sequences at different spatial scales and times may be useful to optimize the acquisition clinical protocols on the fly. (orig.)

  3. Comparisons of CME morphological characteristics derived from five 3D reconstruction methods

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Li; Marilena, Mierla

    2012-01-01

    We compare different methods to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) CME morphology. The explored methods include geometric localisation, mask fitting, forward modeling, polarisation ratio and local correlation tracking plus triangulation. The five methods are applied to the same CME event, which occurred on August 7 2010. Their corresponding results are presented and compared, especially in their propagation direction and spatial extent in 3D. We find that mask fitting and geometric localisation method produce consistent results. Reconstructions including three-view observations are more precise than reconstructions done with only two views. Compared to the forward modeling method, in which a-priori shape of the CME geometry is assumed, mask fitting has more flexibility. Polarisation ratio method makes use of the Thomson scattering geometry. We find spatially the 3D CME derived from mask fitting lies mostly in the overlap region obtained with the polarisation method from COR2 A and B. In addition, mask fit...

  4. Computer-aided detection of clustered microcalcifications in multiscale bilateral filtering regularized reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection (CADe) system for clustered microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) volume enhanced with multiscale bilateral filtering (MSBF) regularization. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval and written informed consent, two-view DBT of 154 breasts, of which 116 had biopsy-proven microcalcification (MC) clusters and 38 were free of MCs, was imaged with a General Electric GEN2 prototype DBT system. The DBT volumes were reconstructed with MSBF-regularized simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) that was designed to enhance MCs and reduce background noise while preserving the quality of other tissue structures. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of MCs was further improved with enhancement-modulated calcification response (EMCR) preprocessing, which combined multiscale Hessian response to enhance MCs by shape and bandpass filtering to remove the low-frequency structured background. MC candidates were then located in the EMCR volume using iterative thresholding and segmented by adaptive region growing. Two sets of potential MC objects, cluster centroid objects and MC seed objects, were generated and the CNR of each object was calculated. The number of candidates in each set was controlled based on the breast volume. Dynamic clustering around the centroid objects grouped the MC candidates to form clusters. Adaptive criteria were designed to reduce false positive (FP) clusters based on the size, CNR values and the number of MCs in the cluster, cluster shape, and cluster based maximum intensity projection. Free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) and jackknife alternative FROC (JAFROC) analyses were used to assess the performance and compare with that of a previous study. Results: Unpaired two-tailedt-test showed a significant increase (p < 0.0001) in the ratio of CNRs for MCs with and without MSBF regularization compared to similar ratios for FPs. For view-based detection, a sensitivity of 85% was achieved at an FP rate of 2.16 per DBT volume. For case-based detection, a sensitivity of 85% was achieved at an FP rate of 0.85 per DBT volume. JAFROC analysis showed a significant improvement in the performance of the current CADe system compared to that of our previous system (p = 0.003). Conclusions: MBSF regularized SART reconstruction enhances MCs. The enhancement in the signals, in combination with properly designed adaptive threshold criteria, effective MC feature analysis, and false positive reduction techniques, leads to a significant improvement in the detection of clustered MCs in DBT

  5. Real-Time Camera Tracking and 3D Reconstruction Using Signed Distance Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Bylow, Erik; Sturm, Jürgen; Kerl, Christian; Kahl, Fredrik; Cremers, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The ability to quickly acquire 3D models is an essential capability needed in many disciplines including robotics, computer vision, geodesy, and architecture. In this paper we present a novel method for real-time camera tracking and 3D reconstruction of static indoor environments using an RGB-D sensor. We show that by representing the geometry with a signed distance function (SDF), the camera pose can be efficiently estimated by directly minimizing the error of the depth images on the SDF....

  6. INTERACTIVE PARAMETRIC MODELLING. POG a tool the cultural heritage monument 3D reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Chevrier, Christine; Perrin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Historic monument and archaeological site 3D reconstruction is nowadays often required for many applications (scientific and architectural studies, virtual visits for a better understanding of the monument, etc). This task is very time-consuming. Automating the modelling of the most common components could ease this 3D work and produce accurate, consistent and re-usable models. Based upon compound rules of architectural elements but also upon various other data sources such as photographs and...

  7. 3D Reconstruction and Digital Visualization of the South of the Royal Palace in Great Preslav

    OpenAIRE

    Boneva, Tsvetanka; Yorgova, Severina

    2013-01-01

    The report presents the film 10th century. The South of the Royal Palace in Great Preslav. It consists of two parts – 10th century. The Royal Palace in Great Prelsav. The Square with the Pinnacle and The Ruler’s Lodgings. 3D and virtual reconstructions of an architectural ensemble – part of the Preslav Royal Court unearthed during archaeological researches are used in the film. 3D documentaries have already gained popularity around the world and are well received by both schola...

  8. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  9. SU-E-J-128: 3D Surface Reconstruction of a Patient Using Epipolar Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain a 3D surface data of a patient in a non-invasive way can substantially reduce the effort for the registration of patient in radiation therapy. To achieve this goal, we introduced the multiple view stereo technique, which is known to be used in a 'photo tourism' on the internet. Methods: 70 Images were taken with a digital single-lens reflex camera from different angles and positions. The camera positions and angles were inferred later in the reconstruction step. A sparse 3D reconstruction model was locating by SIFT features, which is robust for rotation and shift variance, in each image. We then found a set of correspondences between pairs of images by computing the fundamental matrix using the eight-point algorithm with RANSAC. After the pair matching, we optimized the parameter including camera positions to minimize the reprojection error by use of bundle adjustment technique (non-linear optimization). As a final step, we performed dense reconstruction and associate a color with each point using the library of PMVS. Results: Surface data were reconstructed well by visual inspection. The human skin is reconstructed well, althogh the reconstruction was time-consuming for direct use in daily clinical practice. Conclusion: 3D reconstruction using multi view stereo geometry is a promising tool for reducing the effort of patient setup. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI(25861128)

  10. Full 3-D cluster-based iterative image reconstruction tool for a small animal PET camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valastyán, I.; Imrek, J.; Molnár, J.; Novák, D.; Balkay, L.; Emri, M.; Trón, L.; Bükki, T.; Kerek, A.

    2007-02-01

    Iterative reconstruction methods are commonly used to obtain images with high resolution and good signal-to-noise ratio in nuclear imaging. The aim of this work was to develop a scalable, fast, cluster based, fully 3-D iterative image reconstruction package for our small animal PET camera, the miniPET. The reconstruction package is developed to determine the 3-D radioactivity distribution from list mode type of data sets and it can also simulate noise-free projections of digital phantoms. We separated the system matrix generation and the fully 3-D iterative reconstruction process. As the detector geometry is fixed for a given camera, the system matrix describing this geometry is calculated only once and used for every image reconstruction, making the process much faster. The Poisson and the random noise sensitivity of the ML-EM iterative algorithm were studied for our small animal PET system with the help of the simulation and reconstruction tool. The reconstruction tool has also been tested with data collected by the miniPET from a line and a cylinder shaped phantom and also a rat.

  11. SU-E-J-128: 3D Surface Reconstruction of a Patient Using Epipolar Geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotoku, J; Nakabayashi, S; Kumagai, S; Ishibashi, T; Kobayashi, T [Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Haga, A; Saotome, N [University of Tokyo Hospital, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Arai, N [Teikyo University Hospital, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To obtain a 3D surface data of a patient in a non-invasive way can substantially reduce the effort for the registration of patient in radiation therapy. To achieve this goal, we introduced the multiple view stereo technique, which is known to be used in a 'photo tourism' on the internet. Methods: 70 Images were taken with a digital single-lens reflex camera from different angles and positions. The camera positions and angles were inferred later in the reconstruction step. A sparse 3D reconstruction model was locating by SIFT features, which is robust for rotation and shift variance, in each image. We then found a set of correspondences between pairs of images by computing the fundamental matrix using the eight-point algorithm with RANSAC. After the pair matching, we optimized the parameter including camera positions to minimize the reprojection error by use of bundle adjustment technique (non-linear optimization). As a final step, we performed dense reconstruction and associate a color with each point using the library of PMVS. Results: Surface data were reconstructed well by visual inspection. The human skin is reconstructed well, althogh the reconstruction was time-consuming for direct use in daily clinical practice. Conclusion: 3D reconstruction using multi view stereo geometry is a promising tool for reducing the effort of patient setup. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI(25861128)

  12. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical applications. Learning Objectives: Learn the general methodologies associated with model-based 3D image reconstruction. Learn the potential advantages in image quality and dose associated with model-based image reconstruction. Learn the challenges associated with computational load and image quality assessment for such reconstruction methods. Learn how imaging task can be incorporated as a means to drive optimal image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. Learn how model-based reconstruction methods can incorporate prior information to improve image quality, ease sampling requirements, and reduce dose

  13. Sensor Fusion of Cameras and a Laser for City-Scale 3D Reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Yunsu Bok; Dong-Geol Choi; In So Kweon

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensor for large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on a fast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor, and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is done by estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previous works. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but e...

  14. On the use of Orientation Filters for 3D Reconstruction in Event-Driven Stereo Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis AlejandroCamunas-Mesa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The recently developed Dynamic Vision Sensors (DVS sense visual information asynchronously and code it into trains of events with sub-micro second temporal resolution. This high temporal precision makes the output of these sensors especially suited for dynamic 3D visual reconstruction, by matching corresponding events generated by two different sensors in a stereo setup. This paper explores the use of Gabor filters to extract information about the orientation of the object edges that produce the events, therefore increasing the number of restrictions applied to the matching algorithm. This strategy provides a larger number of pairs of matching events, improving the final 3D reconstruction.

  15. [3D temperature field reconstruction of Ar plasma jet using CCD cpectrum tomography technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jian; Wan, Xiong; Sun, Xiao-Gang; Dai, Jing-Min; Gao, Yi-Qing

    2009-11-01

    For realizing real-time 3D temperature field reconstruction of Ar plasma jet, an orthogonal area array CCD (charge coupled device) spectrum tomography experimental system was proposed according to spectrum relative intensity diagnosis method. The size of tested field was measured using comparison between the tested field image caught through CCD and the plotting paper image when plotting paper was placed in the tested field position with no plasma jet; the emission intensity distribution of tested field was obtained using stepping motor taking fiber probe to scan tested field, and the spectrum analysis instrument was used to show the spectrum intensity information. Based on spectrum selection principle of the spectrum relative intensity method, spectra at 696.5 and 763.5 nm were studied as characteristic spectrum. Novel grad attenuation was designed based on the size and intensity distribution of tested field for not exceeding limen of CCD and avoiding the spectrum information loss at tested field edge. The narrowband filter was set between grad attenuation and CCD, so the whole tested spectrum information can be stored in computer real-time. According to orthogonal two-view spectrum tomography reconstruction algorithm, when tested field is axially symmetric, the reconstruction result is well. So four area array CCDs is placed orthogonally, and the same spectrum narrowband filters are placed in front of two orthogonal CCDs to reconstruct 3D emissivity factor field. Based on the 3D emissivity factor field and spectrum relative intensity theory, 3D temperature field of the tested field was reconstructed satisfactorily. The reconstruction result showed that it agreed with the results from fiber scanning diagnosis system, and the uncertain degreed is 3.3%. The proposed experimental device meets the needs of real-time 3D temperature field reconstruction. It provided a stable base for real-time diagnosis of plasma jet density field, pressure field and velocity field. PMID:20101978

  16. Grammar-based Automatic 3D Model Reconstruction from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.; West, G.

    2014-04-01

    The automatic reconstruction of 3D buildings has been an important research topic during the last years. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to automatically reconstruct the 3D building models from segmented data based on pre-defined formal grammar and rules. Such segmented data can be extracted e.g. from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning devices. Two steps are considered in detail. The first step is to transform the segmented data into 3D shapes, for instance using the DXF (Drawing Exchange Format) format which is a CAD data file format used for data interchange between AutoCAD and other program. Second, we develop a formal grammar to describe the building model structure and integrate the pre-defined grammars into the reconstruction process. Depending on the different segmented data, the selected grammar and rules are applied to drive the reconstruction process in an automatic manner. Compared with other existing approaches, our proposed method allows the model reconstruction directly from 3D shapes and takes the whole building into account.

  17. 3D VIRTUAL RECONSTRUCTIONS OF MINOAN RURAL SITES: THE CASE OF LIVARI CHEROMYLIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Alusik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of 3D sophisticated visualizations and reconstructions is still not common during the process of reconstruction or recreation of the appearance of any preserved architecture of prehistoric (Bronze Age Crete. However, the author believes that in modern archaeology the use of the up-to-date computer technologies and sophisticated software is necessary. In their opinion, in case of presenting of sites with preserved architecture a creation of ideal 3D reconstruction should become a standard feature of final publications in the near future. The author deals with the study of Minoan architecture, settlement pattern and rural aspect of Minoan Crete in the last years. In this paper, the author – in cooperation with an architect and a specialist in technical modelling – is presenting an ideal 3D virtual reconstruction of the small rural site of Livari Cheromylia (consisting of 4 main structures and several terrace walls, situated on the southern coast in the Bay of Livari, between Goudouras and Aghia Irini. The 3D reconstruction of the individual structures and the site as a whole based on the up-to-date scholarship on Minoan architecture and the actual archaeological/architectural parallels in situ as well as on the iconographical sources, is presented below.

  18. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey; Jørgensen, E.; Meincke, P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering to obtain a more accurate measured field. Results obtained by real measured data are presented. Special attention is given to the computational advantages given by the higher-order Method of Moments-base...

  19. In vivo bioluminescence tomography based on multi-view projection and 3D surface reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Kun; Leng, Chengcai; Deng, Kexin; Hu, Yifang; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) is a powerful optical molecular imaging modality, which enables non-invasive realtime in vivo imaging as well as 3D quantitative analysis in preclinical studies. In order to solve the inverse problem and reconstruct inner light sources accurately, the prior structural information is commonly necessary and obtained from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. This strategy requires expensive hybrid imaging system, complicated operation protocol and possible involvement of ionizing radiation. The overall robustness highly depends on the fusion accuracy between the optical and structural information. In this study we present a pure optical bioluminescence tomographic system (POBTS) and a novel BLT method based on multi-view projection acquisition and 3D surface reconstruction. The POBTS acquired a sparse set of white light surface images and bioluminescent images of a mouse. Then the white light images were applied to an approximate surface model to generate a high quality textured 3D surface reconstruction of the mouse. After that we integrated multi-view luminescent images based on the previous reconstruction, and applied an algorithm to calibrate and quantify the surface luminescent flux in 3D.Finally, the internal bioluminescence source reconstruction was achieved with this prior information. A BALB/C mouse with breast tumor of 4T1-fLuc cells mouse model were used to evaluate the performance of the new system and technique. Compared with the conventional hybrid optical-CT approach using the same inverse reconstruction method, the reconstruction accuracy of this technique was improved. The distance error between the actual and reconstructed internal source was decreased by 0.184 mm.

  20. Applicator reconstruction in MRI 3D image-based dose planning of brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Nielsen, Søren Kynde; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Gelineck, John; Tanderup, Kari

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To elaborate a method for applicator reconstruction for MRI-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Custom-made plastic catheters with a copper sulphate solution were made for insertion in the source channels of MR-CT compatible applicators: plastic and titanium tandem ring applicators, and titanium needles. The applicators were CT and MR scanned in a phantom for accurate 3D assessment of applicator visibility and geometry. A reconstruction method ...

  1. The role of 3D Helical CT in the reconstructive treatment of maxillofacial cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose of this work is to investigate the role of Helical CT and the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) imaging for pre-operative planning and follow-up of reconstructive maxillofacial surgery with alloplastic material in neoplastic disease involving this region. From 1996 to 1999 eleven patients were examined with Helical CT and 3D images for planning of maxillofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery for advanced cancer of this anatomically complex region. A 3D-modulated titanium mesh (100%) or micro nets was used to rebuild the anterior surface of maxillary bone and the orbital floor. The mesh was cut to the appropriate size and shape and curved where necessary. Within the residual sinusal cavity a siliconed filling was used surmounting an acrylic prosthesis with dental arch to rebuild the palate. A rehydrated bovine pericardium was affixed and moduled on the borders in two cases only. Three-dimensionally reconstructed CT images were obtained preoperatively and at least 6 months postoperatively in all patients. The images were generated on a computer workstation using the shaded surface display (SSD) software with threshold values ranging 425 to 630 HU, and a more closed window for the imaging of titanium mesh/bone interface in the post surgical follow-up. It was obtained an excellent complete spatial depiction of maxillo facial region both before and after surgery, with no artefacts so important as to affect the 3D reconstruction process and the image quality. Together with the head-neck surgical team it could be worked for preoperative planning through CT scans by different 3D points of view. The 3D reconstructed follow-up scans showed good filling of the defect in the area where the titanium mesh had been used. Then efficacious bone modelling and good biocompatibility of the alloplastic material were seen in all patients, with no inflammatory reactions. Titanium is a well-known material, which is widely used for cranioplasty. It is a radiolucent, non-ferrous metal of low atomic number that allows very clear CT and MR images to be obtained. Further Ti features are strength, biocompatibility and easy handling. 3D Helical CT scan has proven to be the most complete and accurate imaging technique for reconstructive plastic surgery with alloplastic material in advanced maxillofacial cancer, also considering the anatomic and functional complexity of his area. The prospect is provided to identify virtual 3D presurgical ablation planes. These may allow the surgeon to improve plastic reconstruction and shorten intervention time

  2. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. PMID:20696448

  3. 3D reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine using differential volume rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the technique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians. (author)

  4. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  5. HeinzelCluster: accelerated reconstruction for FORE and OSEM3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmar, S; Michel, C; Treffert, J T; Newport, D F; Casey, M; Knöss, C; Wienhard, K; Liu, X; Defrise, M; Heiss, W D

    2002-08-01

    Using iterative three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction techniques for reconstruction of positron emission tomography (PET) is not feasible on most single-processor machines due to the excessive computing time needed, especially so for the large sinogram sizes of our high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT). In our first approach to speed up reconstruction time we transform the 3D scan into the format of a two-dimensional (2D) scan with sinograms that can be reconstructed independently using Fourier rebinning (FORE) and a fast 2D reconstruction method. On our dedicated reconstruction cluster (seven four-processor systems, Intel PIII@700 MHz, switched fast ethernet and Myrinet, Windows NT Server), we process these 2D sinograms in parallel. We have achieved a speedup > 23 using 26 processors and also compared results for different communication methods (RPC, Syngo, Myrinet GM). The other approach is to parallelize OSEM3D (implementation of C Michel), which has produced the best results for HRRT data so far and is more suitable for an adequate treatment of the sinogram gaps that result from the detector geometry of the HRRT. We have implemented two levels of parallelization for four dedicated cluster (a shared memory fine-grain level on each node utilizing all four processors and a coarse-grain level allowing for 15 nodes) reducing the time for one core iteration from over 7 h to about 35 min. PMID:12200930

  6. High speed stereoscopic shadowgraph imaging and its digital 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stereoscopic shadowgraph system has been developed based on the conventional z-type schlieren configuration. The test volume is set at the intersection of two inclined converging beams formed by two pairs of parabolic mirrors. Two synchronized high speed cameras are applied to record the shadowgraph image pairs simultaneously. A precisely etched metal mesh plate is used to calibrate the stereoscopic shadowgraph system. By combining the calibration parameters and coordinates of the matching points in stereo images, the depth information and the 3D view of the shadowgraph images are obtained. A crystal block with internal 3D images created by laser etching is used as a model for static object reconstruction and validation. The 3D coordinates obtained by the digital 3D reconstruction are in good agreement with the real dimensions. The developed stereoscopic technique is then applied to investigate the bursting dynamics of a bubble. The time resolved bubble-bursting process has been reconstructed successfully. The quantitative velocity measurement reveals that the bubble collapses at a constant velocity of around 7 m s?1, which corresponds to a high Weber number. As a result, finger-like structures are observable around the rim of the collapsing bubble. The stereoscopic shadowgraph technique has been shown to be effective for 3D visualization and quantitative measurement

  7. A Smartphone Interface for a Wireless EEG Headset with Real-Time 3D Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stahlhut, Carsten; Petersen, Michael Kai; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a fully functional handheld brain scanner consisting of a low-cost 14-channel EEG headset with a wireless connec- tion to a smartphone, enabling minimally invasive EEG monitoring in naturalistic settings. The smartphone provides a touch-based interface with real-time brain state decoding and 3D reconstruction.

  8. Fuzzy zoning for feature matching technique in 3D reconstruction of nasal endoscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanalappaiboon, Surapong; Bhongmakapat, Thongchai; Ritthipravat, Panrasee

    2015-12-01

    3D reconstruction from nasal endoscopic images greatly supports an otolaryngologist in examining nasal passages, mucosa, polyps, sinuses, and nasopharyx. In general, structure from motion is a popular technique. It consists of four main steps; (1) camera calibration, (2) feature extraction, (3) feature matching, and (4) 3D reconstruction. Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is normally used for both feature extraction and feature matching. However, SIFT algorithm relatively consumes computational time particularly in the feature matching process because each feature in an image of interest is compared with all features in the subsequent image in order to find the best matched pair. A fuzzy zoning approach is developed for confining feature matching area. Matching between two corresponding features from different images can be efficiently performed. With this approach, it can greatly reduce the matching time. The proposed technique is tested with endoscopic images created from phantoms and compared with the original SIFT technique in terms of the matching time and average errors of the reconstructed models. Finally, original SIFT and the proposed fuzzy-based technique are applied to 3D model reconstruction of real nasal cavity based on images taken from a rigid nasal endoscope. The results showed that the fuzzy-based approach was significantly faster than traditional SIFT technique and provided similar quality of the 3D models. It could be used for creating a nasal cavity taken by a rigid nasal endoscope. PMID:26498516

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ADAM: 3D asteroid shape reconstruction code (Viikinkoski+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viikinkoski, M.; Kaasalainen, M.; Durech, J.

    2015-02-01

    About the code: ADAM is a collection of routines for 3D asteroid shape reconstruction from disk-resolved observations. Any combination of lightcurves, adaptive optics images, HST/FGS data, range-Doppler radar images and disk-resolved thermal images may be used as data sources. The routines are implemented in a combination of MATLAB and C. (2 data files).

  10. Virtual 3D reconstruction of embryonic head structures from physical sections.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janá?ek, Ji?í; Kundrát, M.

    2004-01-01

    Ro?. 260, ?. 3 (2004), s. 302. ISSN 0362-2525 R&D Projects: GA AV ?R(CZ) KJB6111301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : embryonic heads * 3D reconstruction Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.528, year: 2004

  11. Toward 3D Reconstruction of Outdoor Scenes Using an MMW Radar and a Monocular Vision Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natour, Ghina El; Ait-Aider, Omar; Rouveure, Raphael; Berry, François; Faure, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a geometric method for 3D reconstruction of the exterior environment using a panoramic microwave radar and a camera. We rely on the complementarity of these two sensors considering the robustness to the environmental conditions and depth detection ability of the radar, on the one hand, and the high spatial resolution of a vision sensor, on the other. Firstly, geometric modeling of each sensor and of the entire system is presented. Secondly, we address the global calibration problem, which consists of finding the exact transformation between the sensors' coordinate systems. Two implementation methods are proposed and compared, based on the optimization of a non-linear criterion obtained from a set of radar-to-image target correspondences. Unlike existing methods, no special configuration of the 3D points is required for calibration. This makes the methods flexible and easy to use by a non-expert operator. Finally, we present a very simple, yet robust 3D reconstruction method based on the sensors' geometry. This method enables one to reconstruct observed features in 3D using one acquisition (static sensor), which is not always met in the state of the art for outdoor scene reconstruction. The proposed methods have been validated with synthetic and real data. PMID:26473874

  12. Array diagnostics, spatial resolution, and filtering of undesired radiation with the 3D reconstruction algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pivnenko, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on three important features of the 3D reconstruction algorithm of DIATOOL: the identification of array elements improper functioning and failure, the obtainable spatial resolution of the reconstructed fields and currents, and the filtering of undesired radiation and scattering to obtain a more accurate measured field. Results obtained by real measured data are presented. Special attention is given to the computational advantages given by the higher-order Method of Moments-based formulation of DIATOOL. Guidelines on the recommended measurement sampling and measured field truncation for achieving the best possible reconstruction results are also provided.

  13. Non-periodic 3-D motion estimation and reconstruction of coronary stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-arm CT enables 3-D imaging at high spatial resolution. Image quality would be sufficient for coronary artery stents at rest. However, spatial resolution is severely degraded by cardiac motion which needs to be considered in the reconstruction step. Existing approaches are based on detecting markers in the projection images. Based on the exact marker locations in all images, motion estimation and compensation is performed in the 2-D projection image domain and thus no 3-D motion information of the stent is available. In this paper a novel method for computing the non-periodic location of the stent markers in 3-D is proposed. The motion estimation step comprises marker detection in 2-D, computation of periodic 3-D motion and computation of non-periodic 3-D motion. For motion compensation the 3- D marker positions are used to compute an affine motion model as input for a motion compensated FDK reconstruction algorithm. First clinical results suggest a high image quality and the possibility to compute physiological parameters e.g. velocity curves. (orig.)

  14. Fast, automatic, and accurate catheter reconstruction in HDR brachytherapy using an electromagnetic 3D tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this technical note is to evaluate the accuracy and the robustness of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system for automated and real-time catheter reconstruction. Methods: For this preclinical study, a total of ten catheters were inserted in gelatin phantoms with different trajectories. Catheters were reconstructed using a 18G biopsy needle, used as an EM stylet and equipped with a miniaturized sensor, and the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator from Northern Digital Inc. The Aurora EM system provides position and orientation value with precisions of 0.7 mm and 0.2°, respectively. Phantoms were also scanned using a ?CT (GE Healthcare) and Philips Big Bore clinical computed tomography (CT) system with a spatial resolution of 89 ?m and 2 mm, respectively. Reconstructions using the EM stylet were compared to ?CT and CT. To assess the robustness of the EM reconstruction, five catheters were reconstructed twice and compared. Results: Reconstruction time for one catheter was 10 s, leading to a total reconstruction time inferior to 3 min for a typical 17-catheter implant. When compared to the ?CT, the mean EM tip identification error was 0.69 ± 0.29 mm while the CT error was 1.08 ± 0.67 mm. The mean 3D distance error was found to be 0.66 ± 0.33 mm and 1.08 ± 0.72 mm for the EM and CT, respectively. EM 3D catheter trajectories were found to be more accurate. A maximum difference of less than 0.6 mm was found between successive EM reconstructions. Conclusions: The EM reconstruction was found to be more accurate and precise than the conventional methods used for catheter reconstruction in HDR-B. This approach can be applied to any type of catheters and applicators

  15. Reconstruction for 3D PET Based on Total Variation Constrained Direct Fourier Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiqing; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Heye; Loong Wong, Kelvin Kian; Chen, Yunmei; Liu, Huafeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a total variation (TV) regularized reconstruction algorithm for 3D positron emission tomography (PET). The proposed method first employs the Fourier rebinning algorithm (FORE), rebinning the 3D data into a stack of ordinary 2D data sets as sinogram data. Then, the resulted 2D sinogram are ready to be reconstructed by conventional 2D reconstruction algorithms. Given the locally piece-wise constant nature of PET images, we introduce the total variation (TV) based reconstruction schemes. More specifically, we formulate the 2D PET reconstruction problem as an optimization problem, whose objective function consists of TV norm of the reconstructed image and the data fidelity term measuring the consistency between the reconstructed image and sinogram. To solve the resulting minimization problem, we apply an efficient methods called the Bregman operator splitting algorithm with variable step size (BOSVS). Experiments based on Monte Carlo simulated data and real data are conducted as validations. The experiment results show that the proposed method produces higher accuracy than conventional direct Fourier (DF) (bias in BOSVS is 70% of ones in DF, variance of BOSVS is 80% of ones in DF). PMID:26398232

  16. Pragmatic fully 3D image reconstruction for the MiCES mouse imaging PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a pragmatic approach to image reconstruction for data from the micro crystal elements system (MiCES) fully 3D mouse imaging positron emission tomography (PET) scanner under construction at the University of Washington. Our approach is modelled on fully 3D image reconstruction used in clinical PET scanners, which is based on Fourier rebinning (FORE) followed by 2D iterative image reconstruction using ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM). The use of iterative methods allows modelling of physical effects (e.g., statistical noise, detector blurring, attenuation, etc), while FORE accelerates the reconstruction process by reducing the fully 3D data to a stacked set of independent 2D sinograms. Previous investigations have indicated that non-stationary detector point-spread response effects, which are typically ignored for clinical imaging, significantly impact image quality for the MiCES scanner geometry. To model the effect of non-stationary detector blurring (DB) in the FORE+OSEM(DB) algorithm, we have added a factorized system matrix to the ASPIRE reconstruction library. Initial results indicate that the proposed approach produces an improvement in resolution without an undue increase in noise and without a significant increase in the computational burden. The impact on task performance, however, remains to be evaluated

  17. Weak lensing reconstructions in 2D & 3D: implications for cluster studies

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Adrienne; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We compare the efficiency with which 2D and 3D weak lensing mass mapping techniques are able to detect clusters of galaxies using two state-of-the-art mass reconstruction techniques: MRLens in 2D and GLIMPSE in 3D. We simulate otherwise-empty cluster fields for 96 different virial mass-redshift combinations spanning the ranges $3\\times10^{13}h^{-1}M_\\odot \\le M_{vir}\\le 10^{15}h^{-1}M_\\odot$ and $0.05 \\le z_{\\rm cl} \\le 0.75$, and for each generate 1000 realisations of noisy shear data in 2D and 3D. For each field, we then compute the cluster (false) detection rate as the mean number of cluster (false) detections per reconstruction over the sample of 1000 reconstructions. We show that both MRLens and GLIMPSE are effective tools for the detection of clusters from weak lensing measurements, and provide comparable quality reconstructions at low redshift. At high redshift, GLIMPSE reconstructions offer increased sensitivity in the detection of clusters, yielding cluster detection rates up to a factor of $\\sim 10\\...

  18. Computer-assisted registration, segmentation, and 3D reconstruction from images of neuronal tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlbom, I; Terzopoulos, D; Harris, K M

    1994-01-01

    Neuroscientists have studied the relationship between nerve cell morphology and function for over a century. To pursue these studies, they need accurate three-dimensional models of nerve cells that facilitate detailed anatomical measurement and the identification of internal structures. Although serial transmission electron microscopy has been a source of such models since the mid 1960s, model reconstruction and analysis remain very time consuming. The authors have developed a new approach to reconstructing and visualizing 3D nerve cell models from serial microscopy. An interactive system exploits recent computer graphics and computer vision techniques to significantly reduce the time required to build such models. The key ingredients of the system are a digital "blink comparator" for section registration, "snakes," or active deformable contours, for semiautomated cell segmentation, and voxel-based techniques for 3D reconstruction and visualization of complex cell volumes with internal structures. PMID:18218511

  19. Reconstructing the 3-D medial axes of coronary arteries in single-view cineangiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe a technique for reconstructing the skeletal structure of coronary arteries from a succession of frames of a single-view cineangiogram. They use local features in each frame to determine correspondences of arterial segments in successive frames. They define a similarity measure in 2-D image space as the change in angular coordinates of corresponding pairs. They use a form of gradient descent to find those depth coordinates that minimize the average deviation of the 3-D angular coordinates of all points on the skeleton from the coordinates produced by a 3-D scaling transformation. In experiments with software models the reconstruction error was approximately two pixels when the initial guessed reconstruction was as large as 30 pixels

  20. Reconstructing the 3-D medial axes of coronary arteries in single-view cineangiograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.V. (California State Univ., Long Beach, CA (United States). Dept. of Computer Engineering); Sklansky, J. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1994-03-01

    The authors describe a technique for reconstructing the skeletal structure of coronary arteries from a succession of frames of a single-view cineangiogram. They use local features in each frame to determine correspondences of arterial segments in successive frames. They define a similarity measure in 2-D image space as the change in angular coordinates of corresponding pairs. They use a form of gradient descent to find those depth coordinates that minimize the average deviation of the 3-D angular coordinates of all points on the skeleton from the coordinates produced by a 3-D scaling transformation. In experiments with software models the reconstruction error was approximately two pixels when the initial guessed reconstruction was as large as 30 pixels.

  1. Reconstructing the 3-D medial axes of coronary arteries in single-view cineangiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, T V; Sklansky, J

    1994-01-01

    Describes a technique for reconstructing the skeletal structure of coronary arteries from a succession of frames of a single-view cineangiogram. The authors use local features in each frame to determine correspondences of arterial segments in successive frames. They define a similarity measure in 2D image space as the change in angular coordinates of corresponding pairs. They use a form of gradient descent to find those depth coordinates that minimize the average deviation of the 3D angular coordinates of all points on the skeleton from the coordinates produced by a 3D scaling transformation. In experiments with software models the reconstruction error was approximately two pixels when the initial guessed reconstruction was as large as 30 pixels. PMID:18218484

  2. 3D High Resolution l1-SPIRiT Reconstruction on Gadgetron based Cloud : no. 1882

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Hui; Kelmann, Peter

    Applying non-linear reconstruction to high resolution 3D MRI is challenging because of the lengthy computing time needed for those iterative algorithms. To achieve practical processing duration to enable clinical usage of non-linear reconstruction, we have extended previously published Gadgetron framework to support distributed computing in a cloud environment. This extension is named GT-Plus. A cloud version of 3D l1-SPIRiT was implemented on the GT-Plus framework. We demonstrate that a 3mins reconstruction could be achieved for 1mm3 isotropic resolution neuro scans with significantly improved image quality using two dimensional acceleration factors of R=3×2 and 3×3

  3. Internet2-based 3D PET image reconstruction using a PC cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, D W; Rapela, J; Asma, E; Chatzioannou, A; Qi, J; Leahy, R M

    2002-08-01

    We describe an approach to fast iterative reconstruction from fully three-dimensional (3D) PET data using a network of PentiumIII PCs configured as a Beowulf cluster. To facilitate the use of this system, we have developed a browser-based interface using Java. The system compresses PET data on the user's machine, sends these data over a network, and instructs the PC cluster to reconstruct the image. The cluster implements a parallelized version of our preconditioned conjugate gradient method for fully 3D MAP image reconstruction. We report on the speed-up factors using the Beowulf approach and the impacts of communication latencies in the local cluster network and the network connection between the user's machine and our PC cluster. PMID:12200939

  4. Internet2-based 3D PET image reconstruction using a PC cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an approach to fast iterative reconstruction from fully three-dimensional (3D) PET data using a network of PentiumIII PCs configured as a Beowulf cluster. To facilitate the use of this system, we have developed a browser-based interface using Java. The system compresses PET data on the user's machine, sends these data over a network, and instructs the PC cluster to reconstruct the image. The cluster implements a parallelized version of our preconditioned conjugate gradient method for fully 3D MAP image reconstruction. We report on the speed-up factors using the Beowulf approach and the impacts of communication latencies in the local cluster network and the network connection between the user's machine and our PC cluster. (author)

  5. Modifications in SIFT-based 3D reconstruction from image sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenzhong; Ding, Boshen; Wang, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we aim to reconstruct 3D points of the scene from related images. Scale Invariant Feature Transform( SIFT) as a feature extraction and matching algorithm has been proposed and improved for years and has been widely used in image alignment and stitching, image recognition and 3D reconstruction. Because of the robustness and reliability of the SIFT's feature extracting and matching algorithm, we use it to find correspondences between images. Hence, we describe a SIFT-based method to reconstruct 3D sparse points from ordered images. In the process of matching, we make a modification in the process of finding the correct correspondences, and obtain a satisfying matching result. By rejecting the "questioned" points before initial matching could make the final matching more reliable. Given SIFT's attribute of being invariant to the image scale, rotation, and variable changes in environment, we propose a way to delete the multiple reconstructed points occurred in sequential reconstruction procedure, which improves the accuracy of the reconstruction. By removing the duplicated points, we avoid the possible collapsed situation caused by the inexactly initialization or the error accumulation. The limitation of some cases that all reprojected points are visible at all times also does not exist in our situation. "The small precision" could make a big change when the number of images increases. The paper shows the contrast between the modified algorithm and not. Moreover, we present an approach to evaluate the reconstruction by comparing the reconstructed angle and length ratio with actual value by using a calibration target in the scene. The proposed evaluation method is easy to be carried out and with a great applicable value. Even without the Internet image datasets, we could evaluate our own results. In this paper, the whole algorithm has been tested on several image sequences both on the internet and in our shots.

  6. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsap Leonid V

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell, and its state. Analysis of chromosome structure is significant in the detection of diseases, identification of chromosomal abnormalities, study of DNA structural conformation, in-depth study of chromosomal surface morphology, observation of in vivo behavior of the chromosomes over time, and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The methodology incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  7. Recovery and Visualization of 3D Structure of Chromosomes from Tomographic Reconstruction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, S; Liao, P; Shin, M C; Tsap, L V

    2004-04-28

    The objectives of this work include automatic recovery and visualization of a 3D chromosome structure from a sequence of 2D tomographic reconstruction images taken through the nucleus of a cell. Structure is very important for biologists as it affects chromosome functions, behavior of the cell and its state. Chromosome analysis is significant in the detection of deceases and in monitoring environmental gene mutations. The algorithm incorporates thresholding based on a histogram analysis with a polyline splitting algorithm, contour extraction via active contours, and detection of the 3D chromosome structure by establishing corresponding regions throughout the slices. Visualization using point cloud meshing generates a 3D surface. The 3D triangular mesh of the chromosomes provides surface detail and allows a user to interactively analyze chromosomes using visualization software.

  8. Mutual information as a measure of reconstruction quality in 3D dynamic lung EIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a pilot study with healthy subjects who had an MR scan in addition to EIT data acquired with the Manchester fEITER system. The MR images are used to inform the external shape of a 3D EIT reconstruction model of the thorax, and small changes in the boundary that occur during respiration are addressed by incorporating the sensitivity with respect to boundary shape into a robust reconstruction algorithm. A quantitative comparison of the image quality for different EIT reconstructions is achieved through calculation of their mutual information with a segmented MR image. A shape corrected reconstruction algorithm reduces boundary artefacts relative to a standard reconstruction, and has a greater mutual information of approximately 4% with the segmented MR image.

  9. Real-Time Large Scale 3d Reconstruction by Fusing Kinect and Imu Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huai, J.; Zhang, Y.; Yilmaz, A.

    2015-08-01

    Kinect-style RGB-D cameras have been used to build large scale dense 3D maps for indoor environments. These maps can serve many purposes such as robot navigation, and augmented reality. However, to generate dense 3D maps of large scale environments is still very challenging. In this paper, we present a mapping system for 3D reconstruction that fuses measurements from a Kinect and an inertial measurement unit (IMU) to estimate motion. Our major achievements include: (i) Large scale consistent 3D reconstruction is realized by volume shifting and loop closure; (ii) The coarse-to-fine iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm, the SIFT odometry, and IMU odometry are combined to robustly and precisely estimate pose. In particular, ICP runs routinely to track the Kinect motion. If ICP fails in planar areas, the SIFT odometry provides incremental motion estimate. If both ICP and the SIFT odometry fail, e.g., upon abrupt motion or inadequate features, the incremental motion is estimated by the IMU. Additionally, the IMU also observes the roll and pitch angles which can reduce long-term drift of the sensor assembly. In experiments on a consumer laptop, our system estimates motion at 8Hz on average while integrating color images to the local map and saving volumes of meshes concurrently. Moreover, it is immune to tracking failures, and has smaller drift than the state-of-the-art systems in large scale reconstruction.

  10. Real-Time 3d Reconstruction from Images Taken from AN Uav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingoni, A.; Diani, M.; Corsini, G.; Masini, A.

    2015-08-01

    We designed a method for creating 3D models of objects and areas from two aerial images acquired from an UAV. The models are generated automatically and in real-time, and consist in dense and true-colour reconstructions of the considered areas, which give the impression to the operator to be physically present within the scene. The proposed method only needs a cheap compact camera, mounted on a small UAV. No additional instrumentation is necessary, so that the costs are very limited. The method consists of two main parts: the design of the acquisition system and the 3D reconstruction algorithm. In the first part, the choices for the acquisition geometry and for the camera parameters are optimized, in order to yield the best performance. In the second part, a reconstruction algorithm extracts the 3D model from the two acquired images, maximizing the accuracy under the real-time constraint. A test was performed in monitoring a construction yard, obtaining very promising results. Highly realistic and easy-to-interpret 3D models of objects and areas of interest were produced in less than one second, with an accuracy of about 0.5m. For its characteristics, the designed method is suitable for video-surveillance, remote sensing and monitoring, especially in those applications that require intuitive and reliable information quickly, as disasters monitoring, search and rescue and area surveillance.

  11. Accuracy assessment of 3D bone reconstructions using CT: an intro comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalone, Emily A; Willing, Ryan T; Shannon, Hannah L; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography provides high contrast imaging of the joint anatomy and is used routinely to reconstruct 3D models of the osseous and cartilage geometry (CT arthrography) for use in the design of orthopedic implants, for computer assisted surgeries and computational dynamic and structural analysis. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of bone and cartilage surface model reconstructions by comparing reconstructed geometries with bone digitizations obtained using an optical tracking system. Bone surface digitizations obtained in this study determined the ground truth measure for the underlying geometry. We evaluated the use of a commercially available reconstruction technique using clinical CT scanning protocols using the elbow joint as an example of a surface with complex geometry. To assess the accuracies of the reconstructed models (8 fresh frozen cadaveric specimens) against the ground truth bony digitization-as defined by this study-proximity mapping was used to calculate residual error. The overall mean error was less than 0.4 mm in the cortical region and 0.3 mm in the subchondral region of the bone. Similarly creating 3D cartilage surface models from CT scans using air contrast had a mean error of less than 0.3 mm. Results from this study indicate that clinical CT scanning protocols and commonly used and commercially available reconstruction algorithms can create models which accurately represent the true geometry. PMID:26037323

  12. 3D dose reconstruction for narrow beams using ion chamber array measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schombourg, Karin; Bochud, Francois O.; Moeckli, Raphael [Lausanne Univ., University Hospital Centre (Switzerland). Inst. of Radiation Physics; Mirimanoff, Rene-Olivier [Lausanne Univ., University Hospital Centre (Switzerland). Radio-Oncology Dept.

    2012-07-01

    3D dose reconstruction is a verification of the delivered absorbed dose. Our aim was to describe and evaluate a 3D dose reconstruction method applied to phantoms in the context of narrow beams. A solid water phantom and a phantom containing a bone-equivalent material were irradiated on a 6 MV linac. The transmitted dose was measured by using one array of a 2D ion chamber detector. The dose reconstruction was obtained by an iterative algorithm. A phantom set-up error and organ interfraction motion were simulated to test the algorithm sensitivity. In all configurations convergence was obtained within three iterations. A local reconstructed dose agreement of at least 3% / 3 mm with respect to the planned dose was obtained, except in a few points of the penumbra. The reconstructed primary fluences were consistent with the planned ones, which validates the whole reconstruction process. The results validate our method in a simple geometry and for narrow beams. The method is sensitive to a set-up error of a heterogeneous phantom and interfraction heterogeneous organ motion. (orig.)

  13. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Sara dos Santos [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Odontologia Forense; Ramos, Dalton Luiz de Paula [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. of Odontologia Social; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2003-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using cranio metric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) cranio metric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution. (author)

  14. Recursive 3D-reconstruction of structured scenes using a moving camera - application to robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is devoted to the perception of a structured environment, and proposes a new method which allows a 3D-reconstruction of an interesting part of the world using a mobile camera. Our work is divided into three essential parts dedicated to 2D-information aspect, 3D-information aspect, and a validation of the method. In the first part, we present a method which produces a topologic and geometric image representation based on 'segment' and 'junction' features. Then, a 2D-matching method based on a hypothesis prediction and verification algorithm is proposed to match features issued from two successive images. The second part deals with 3D-reconstruction using a triangulation technique, and discuses our new method introducing an 'Estimation-Construction-Fusion' process. This ensures a complete and accurate 3D-representation, and a permanent position estimation of the camera with respect to the model. The merging process allows refinement of the 3D-representation using a powerful tool: a Kalman Filter. In the last part, experimental results issued from simulated and real data images are reported to show the efficiency of the method. (author)

  15. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using cranio metric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) cranio metric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution. (author)

  16. 3D Reconstruction of Static Human Body with a Digital Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remondino, Fabio

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays the interest in 3D reconstruction and modeling of real humans is one of the most challenging problems and a topic of great interest. The human models are used for movies, video games or ergonomics applications and they are usually created with 3D scanner devices. In this paper a new method to reconstruct the shape of a static human is presented. Our approach is based on photogrammetric techniques and uses a sequence of images acquired around a standing person with a digital still video camera or with a camcorder. First the images are calibrated and orientated using a bundle adjustment. After the establishment of a stable adjusted image block, an image matching process is performed between consecutive triplets of images. Finally the 3D coordinates of the matched points are computed with a mean accuracy of ca 2 mm by forward ray intersection. The obtained point cloud can then be triangulated to generate a surface model of the body or a virtual human model can be fitted to the recovered 3D data. Results of the 3D human point cloud with pixel color information are presented.

  17. A Bayesian approach for suppression of limited angular sampling artifacts in single particle 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Toshio; Acar, Erman; Cheng, R Holland; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2015-09-01

    In the single particle reconstruction, the initial 3D structure often suffers from the limited angular sampling artifact. Selecting 2D class averages of particle images generally improves the accuracy and efficiency of the reference-free 3D angle estimation, but causes an insufficient angular sampling to fill the information of the target object in the 3D frequency space. Similarly, the initial 3D structure by the random-conical tilt reconstruction has the well-known "missing cone" artifact. Here, we attempted to solve the limited angular sampling problem by sequentially applying maximum a posteriori estimate with expectation maximization algorithm (sMAP-EM). Using both simulated and experimental cryo-electron microscope images, the sMAP-EM was compared to the direct Fourier method on the basis of reconstruction error and resolution. To establish selection criteria of the final regularization weight for the sMAP-EM, the effects of noise level and sampling sparseness on the reconstructions were examined with evenly distributed sampling simulations. The frequency information filled in the missing cone of the conical tilt sampling simulations was assessed by developing new quantitative measurements. All the results of visual and numerical evaluations showed the sMAP-EM performed better than the direct Fourier method, regardless of the sampling method, noise level, and sampling sparseness. Furthermore, the frequency domain analysis demonstrated that the sMAP-EM can fill the meaningful information in the unmeasured angular space without detailed a priori knowledge of the objects. The current research demonstrated that the sMAP-EM has a high potential to facilitate the determination of 3D protein structures at near atomic-resolution. PMID:26193484

  18. Automatic system for 3D reconstruction of the chick eye based on digital photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexander; Genest, Reno; Chandrashekar, Naveen; Choh, Vivian; Irving, Elizabeth L

    2012-01-01

    The geometry of anatomical specimens is very complex and accurate 3D reconstruction is important for morphological studies, finite element analysis (FEA) and rapid prototyping. Although magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and laser scanners can be used for reconstructing biological structures, the cost of the equipment is fairly high and specialised technicians are required to operate the equipment, making such approaches limiting in terms of accessibility. In this paper, a novel automatic system for 3D surface reconstruction of the chick eye from digital photographs of a serially sectioned specimen is presented as a potential cost-effective and practical alternative. The system is designed to allow for automatic detection of the external surface of the chick eye. Automatic alignment of the photographs is performed using a combination of coloured markers and an algorithm based on complex phase order likelihood that is robust to noise and illumination variations. Automatic segmentation of the external boundaries of the eye from the aligned photographs is performed using a novel level-set segmentation approach based on a complex phase order energy functional. The extracted boundaries are sampled to construct a 3D point cloud, and a combination of Delaunay triangulation and subdivision surfaces is employed to construct the final triangular mesh. Experimental results using digital photographs of the chick eye show that the proposed system is capable of producing accurate 3D reconstructions of the external surface of the eye. The 3D model geometry is similar to a real chick eye and could be used for morphological studies and FEA. PMID:21181572

  19. Reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ewald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three dimensional (3-D radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be improved crucially with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of static LES model clouds, the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds are changing quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  20. Use of 3D MR reconstructions in the evaluation of glenoid bone loss: a clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the ability of 3D MR shoulder reconstructions to accurately quantify glenoid bone loss in the clinical setting using findings at the time of arthroscopy as the gold standard. Retrospective review of patients with MR shoulder studies that included 3D MR reconstructions (3D MR) produced using an axial Dixon 3D-T1W-FLASH sequence at our institution was conducted with the following inclusion criteria: history of anterior shoulder dislocation, arthroscopy (OR) performed within 6 months of the MRI, and an estimate of glenoid bone loss made in the OR using the bare-spot method. Two musculoskeletal radiologists produced estimates of bone loss along the glenoid width, measured in mm and %, on 3D MR using the best-fit circle method, which were then compared to the OR measurements. There were a total of 15 patients (13 men, two women; mean age, 28, range, 19-51 years). There was no significant difference, on average, between the MRI (mean 3.4 mm/12.6 %; range, 0-30 %) and OR (mean, 12.7 %; range, 0-30 %) measurements of glenoid bone loss (p = 0.767). A 95 % confidence interval for the mean absolute error extended from 0.45-2.21 %, implying that, when averaged over all patients, the true mean absolute error of the MRI measurements relative to the OR measurements is expected to be less than 2.21 %. Inter-reader agreement between the two readers had an IC of 0.92 and CC of 0.90 in terms of percentage of bone loss. 3D MR reconstructions of the shoulder can be used to accurately measure glenoid bone loss. (orig.)

  1. Use of 3D MR reconstructions in the evaluation of glenoid bone loss: a clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyftopoulos, Soterios; Beltran, Luis S.; Yemin, Avner; Recht, Michael P. [NYU Langone Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Strauss, Eric; Meislin, Robert; Jazrawi, Laith [NYU Langone Medical Center, Center for Musculoskeletal Care, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the ability of 3D MR shoulder reconstructions to accurately quantify glenoid bone loss in the clinical setting using findings at the time of arthroscopy as the gold standard. Retrospective review of patients with MR shoulder studies that included 3D MR reconstructions (3D MR) produced using an axial Dixon 3D-T1W-FLASH sequence at our institution was conducted with the following inclusion criteria: history of anterior shoulder dislocation, arthroscopy (OR) performed within 6 months of the MRI, and an estimate of glenoid bone loss made in the OR using the bare-spot method. Two musculoskeletal radiologists produced estimates of bone loss along the glenoid width, measured in mm and %, on 3D MR using the best-fit circle method, which were then compared to the OR measurements. There were a total of 15 patients (13 men, two women; mean age, 28, range, 19-51 years). There was no significant difference, on average, between the MRI (mean 3.4 mm/12.6 %; range, 0-30 %) and OR (mean, 12.7 %; range, 0-30 %) measurements of glenoid bone loss (p = 0.767). A 95 % confidence interval for the mean absolute error extended from 0.45-2.21 %, implying that, when averaged over all patients, the true mean absolute error of the MRI measurements relative to the OR measurements is expected to be less than 2.21 %. Inter-reader agreement between the two readers had an IC of 0.92 and CC of 0.90 in terms of percentage of bone loss. 3D MR reconstructions of the shoulder can be used to accurately measure glenoid bone loss. (orig.)

  2. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 ?m pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS were found to be different due to the difference in the tomosynthesis image reconstruction algorithms. Conclusions: It is feasible to simultaneously generate x-ray differential phase contrast, phase contrast, and absorption contrast tomosynthesis images using a grating-based data acquisition setup. The method shows promise in improving the visibility of several low-density materials and therefore merits further investigation

  3. Grating-based phase contrast tomosynthesis imaging: Proof-of-concept experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ke; Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: This paper concerns the feasibility of x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging using a grating-based DPC benchtop experimental system, which is equipped with a commercial digital flat-panel detector and a medical-grade rotating-anode x-ray tube. An extensive system characterization was performed to quantify its imaging performance. Methods: The major components of the benchtop system include a diagnostic x-ray tube with a 1.0 mm nominal focal spot size, a flat-panel detector with 96 ?m pixel pitch, a sample stage that rotates within a limited angular span of ±30°, and a Talbot-Lau interferometer with three x-ray gratings. A total of 21 projection views acquired with 3° increments were used to reconstruct three sets of tomosynthetic image volumes, including the conventional absorption contrast tomosynthesis image volume (AC-tomo) reconstructed using the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm with the ramp kernel, the phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (PC-tomo) reconstructed using FBP with a Hilbert kernel, and the differential phase contrast tomosynthesis image volume (DPC-tomo) reconstructed using the shift-and-add algorithm. Three inhouse physical phantoms containing tissue-surrogate materials were used to characterize the signal linearity, the signal difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR), the three-dimensional noise power spectrum (3D NPS), and the through-plane artifact spread function (ASF). Results: While DPC-tomo highlights edges and interfaces in the image object, PC-tomo removes the differential nature of the DPC projection data and its pixel values are linearly related to the decrement of the real part of the x-ray refractive index. The SDNR values of polyoxymethylene in water and polystyrene in oil are 1.5 and 1.0, respectively, in AC-tomo, and the values were improved to 3.0 and 2.0, respectively, in PC-tomo. PC-tomo and AC-tomo demonstrate equivalent ASF, but their noise characteristics quantified by the 3D NPS were found to be different due to the difference in the tomosynthesis image reconstruction algorithms. Conclusions: It is feasible to simultaneously generate x-ray differential phase contrast, phase contrast, and absorption contrast tomosynthesis images using a grating-based data acquisition setup. The method shows promise in improving the visibility of several low-density materials and therefore merits further investigation.

  4. 3D reconstruction of the coronary arterial tree from multiview digital angiography. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current state of 3D reconstruction coronary artery vascular bed from multiview ECG correlated digital cardiac angiography is discussed and details are provided on progress toward applications in geometric assessment of lesion severity, absolute blood flow determinations and the correlation of lesion morphology with calcium deposition determined by quantitative computed tomography. Each of these applications requires accurate determinations of the three-dimensional position, orientation and cross-sectional area on a significant fraction of the major branches of the vascular bed. Therefore some studies of reconstruction accuracy and precision are reviewed using contrast embedded latex arterial casts, and computer simulation where care is taken to account for the physics of the imaging system (scatter, beam hardening, etc.). 3D reconstruction is a multistep process that requires specification of the vascular bed structure and approximate location in each image, a dynamic programming algorithm to determine accurately vessel centerline and edge locations and compute the 3D vessel structure, and orientation corrected densiometry to determine vessel lumen areas. The computer simulations and vessel cast studies have demonstrated that sub-pixel accuracy and precision are possible using densiometric techniques and that scatter and beam hardening cause a systematic (although small) error in measurement that depends on vessel size. Reconstruction of any specific vessel segment depends on the number of views in which the segment is clearly visible. The fraction of the arterial bed that cannot be analyzed decreases approximately exponentially with the number of views. (author). 13 refs.; 11 figs.; 2 tabs

  5. Intuitive terrain reconstruction using height observation-based ground segmentation and 3D object boundary estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Won, Chee Sun; Sim, Sungdae

    2012-01-01

    Mobile robot operators must make rapid decisions based on information about the robot's surrounding environment. This means that terrain modeling and photorealistic visualization are required for the remote operation of mobile robots. We have produced a voxel map and textured mesh from the 2D and 3D datasets collected by a robot's array of sensors, but some upper parts of objects are beyond the sensors' measurements and these parts are missing in the terrain reconstruction result. This result is an incomplete terrain model. To solve this problem, we present a new ground segmentation method to detect non-ground data in the reconstructed voxel map. Our method uses height histograms to estimate the ground height range, and a Gibbs-Markov random field model to refine the segmentation results. To reconstruct a complete terrain model of the 3D environment, we develop a 3D boundary estimation method for non-ground objects. We apply a boundary detection technique to the 2D image, before estimating and refining the actual height values of the non-ground vertices in the reconstructed textured mesh. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment in which trees and buildings were not completely sensed. Our results show that the time required for ground segmentation is faster than that for data sensing, which is necessary for a real-time approach. In addition, those parts of objects that were not sensed are accurately recovered to retrieve their real-world appearances. PMID:23235454

  6. Intuitive Terrain Reconstruction Using Height Observation-Based Ground Segmentation and 3D Object Boundary Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungdae Sim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robot operators must make rapid decisions based on information about the robot’s surrounding environment. This means that terrain modeling and photorealistic visualization are required for the remote operation of mobile robots. We have produced a voxel map and textured mesh from the 2D and 3D datasets collected by a robot’s array of sensors, but some upper parts of objects are beyond the sensors’ measurements and these parts are missing in the terrain reconstruction result. This result is an incomplete terrain model. To solve this problem, we present a new ground segmentation method to detect non-ground data in the reconstructed voxel map. Our method uses height histograms to estimate the ground height range, and a Gibbs-Markov random field model to refine the segmentation results. To reconstruct a complete terrain model of the 3D environment, we develop a 3D boundary estimation method for non-ground objects. We apply a boundary detection technique to the 2D image, before estimating and refining the actual height values of the non-ground vertices in the reconstructed textured mesh. Our proposed methods were tested in an outdoor environment in which trees and buildings were not completely sensed. Our results show that the time required for ground segmentation is faster than that for data sensing, which is necessary for a real-time approach. In addition, those parts of objects that were not sensed are accurately recovered to retrieve their real-world appearances.

  7. 3D-guided CT reconstruction using time-of-flight camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mahmoud; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2011-03-01

    We propose the use of a time-of-flight (TOF) camera to obtain the patient's body contour in 3D guided imaging reconstruction scheme in CT and C-arm imaging systems with truncated projection. In addition to pixel intensity, a TOF camera provides the 3D coordinates of each point in the captured scene with respect to the camera coordinates. Information from the TOF camera was used to obtain a digitized surface of the patient's body. The digitization points are transformed to X-Ray detector coordinates by registering the two coordinate systems. A set of points corresponding to the slice of interest are segmented to form a 2D contour of the body surface. Radon transform is applied to the contour to generate the 'trust region' for the projection data. The generated 'trust region' is integrated as an input to augment the projection data. It is used to estimate the truncated, unmeasured projections using linear interpolation. Finally the image is reconstructed using the combination of the estimated and the measured projection data. The proposed method is evaluated using a physical phantom. Projection data for the phantom were obtained using a C-arm system. Significant improvement in the reconstructed image quality near the truncation edges was observed using the proposed method as compared to that without truncation correction. This work shows that the proposed 3D guided CT image reconstruction using a TOF camera represents a feasible solution to the projection data truncation problem.

  8. Compton scatter and randoms corrections for origin ensembles 3D PET reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we develop a novel approach to correction for scatter and randoms in reconstruction of data acquired by 3D positron emission tomography (PET) applicable to tomographic reconstruction done by the origin ensemble (OE) approach. The statistical image reconstruction using OE is based on calculation of expectations of the numbers of emitted events per voxel based on complete-data space. Since the OE estimation is fundamentally different than regular statistical estimators such those based on the maximum likelihoods, the standard methods of implementation of scatter and randoms corrections cannot be used. Based on prompts, scatter, and random rates, each detected event is graded in terms of a probability of being a true event. These grades are utilized by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm used in OE approach for calculation of the expectation over the complete-data space of the number of emitted events per voxel (OE estimator). We show that the results obtained with the OE are almost identical to results obtained by the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm for reconstruction for experimental phantom data acquired using Siemens Biograph mCT 3D PET/CT scanner. The developed correction removes artifacts due to scatter and randoms in investigated 3D PET datasets. (orig.)

  9. Compton scatter and randoms corrections for origin ensembles 3D PET reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitek, Arkadiusz [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Kadrmas, Dan J. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Utah Center for Advanced Imaging Research (UCAIR)

    2011-07-01

    In this work we develop a novel approach to correction for scatter and randoms in reconstruction of data acquired by 3D positron emission tomography (PET) applicable to tomographic reconstruction done by the origin ensemble (OE) approach. The statistical image reconstruction using OE is based on calculation of expectations of the numbers of emitted events per voxel based on complete-data space. Since the OE estimation is fundamentally different than regular statistical estimators such those based on the maximum likelihoods, the standard methods of implementation of scatter and randoms corrections cannot be used. Based on prompts, scatter, and random rates, each detected event is graded in terms of a probability of being a true event. These grades are utilized by the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm used in OE approach for calculation of the expectation over the complete-data space of the number of emitted events per voxel (OE estimator). We show that the results obtained with the OE are almost identical to results obtained by the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) algorithm for reconstruction for experimental phantom data acquired using Siemens Biograph mCT 3D PET/CT scanner. The developed correction removes artifacts due to scatter and randoms in investigated 3D PET datasets. (orig.)

  10. Locating the Acupoint Baihui (GV20) Beneath the Cerebral Cortex with MRI Reconstructed 3D Neuroimages

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Yin Chen; Ming-Fan Lin; Fun-Jou Chen; Ein-Yiao Shen

    2011-01-01

    Baihui (GV20) is one of the most important acupoints of the Du meridian (the government vessel) and is commonly used in neurology and psychiatry and as a distal point of anorectal disorders by general practitioners. The anatomical relationship between the scalp region of the acupoint and the underlying corresponding cortex remains obscure. In this study, we first prepared the indicator for MRI scanning on a GE 1.5 T excite machine in a mode suitable for 3D reconstruction. The 3D Avizo softwar...

  11. Comparison of 3D Reconstructive Technologies Used for Morphometric Research and the Translation of Knowledge Using a Decision Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charys M.; Roach, Victoria A.; Nguyen, Ngan; Rice, Charles L.; Wilson, Timothy D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) models for education, pre-operative assessment, presurgical planning, and measurement have become more prevalent. With the increase in prevalence of 3D models there has also been an increase in 3D reconstructive software programs that are used to create these models. These software programs differ in…

  12. CAVAREV-an open platform for evaluating 3D and 4D cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Hornegger, Joachim [Pattern Recognition Lab, Department of Computer Science, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Lauritsch, Guenter [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Keil, Andreas, E-mail: christopher.rohkohl@informatik.uni-erlangen.d, E-mail: guenter.lauritsch@siemens.co, E-mail: andreas.keil@cs.tum.ed, E-mail: joachim.hornegger@informatik.uni-erlangen.d [Computer Aided Medical Procedures and Augmented Reality, TU Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-05-21

    The 3D reconstruction of cardiac vasculature, e.g. the coronary arteries, using C-arm CT (rotational angiography) is an active and challenging field of research. There are numerous publications on different reconstruction techniques. However, there is still a lack of comparability of achieved results for several reasons: foremost, datasets used in publications are not open to public and thus experiments are not reproducible by other researchers. Further, the results highly depend on the vasculature motion, i.e. cardiac and breathing motion patterns which are also not comparable across publications. We aim to close this gap by providing an open platform, called Cavarev (CArdiac VAsculature Reconstruction EValuation). It features two simulated dynamic projection datasets based on the 4D XCAT phantom with contrasted coronary arteries which was derived from patient data. In the first dataset, the vasculature undergoes a continuous periodic motion. The second dataset contains aperiodic heart motion by including additional breathing motion. The geometry calibration and acquisition protocol were obtained from a real-world C-arm system. For qualitative evaluation of the reconstruction results, the correlation of the morphology is used. Two segmentation-based quality measures are introduced which allow us to assess the 3D and 4D reconstruction quality. They are based on the spatial overlap of the vasculature reconstruction with the ground truth. The measures enable a comprehensive analysis and comparison of reconstruction results independent from the utilized reconstruction algorithm. An online platform (www.cavarev.com) is provided where the datasets can be downloaded, researchers can manage and publish algorithm results and download a reference C++ and Matlab implementation.

  13. CAVAREV-an open platform for evaluating 3D and 4D cardiac vasculature reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3D reconstruction of cardiac vasculature, e.g. the coronary arteries, using C-arm CT (rotational angiography) is an active and challenging field of research. There are numerous publications on different reconstruction techniques. However, there is still a lack of comparability of achieved results for several reasons: foremost, datasets used in publications are not open to public and thus experiments are not reproducible by other researchers. Further, the results highly depend on the vasculature motion, i.e. cardiac and breathing motion patterns which are also not comparable across publications. We aim to close this gap by providing an open platform, called Cavarev (CArdiac VAsculature Reconstruction EValuation). It features two simulated dynamic projection datasets based on the 4D XCAT phantom with contrasted coronary arteries which was derived from patient data. In the first dataset, the vasculature undergoes a continuous periodic motion. The second dataset contains aperiodic heart motion by including additional breathing motion. The geometry calibration and acquisition protocol were obtained from a real-world C-arm system. For qualitative evaluation of the reconstruction results, the correlation of the morphology is used. Two segmentation-based quality measures are introduced which allow us to assess the 3D and 4D reconstruction quality. They are based on the spatial overlap of the vasculature reconstruction with the ground truth. The measures enable a comprehensive analysis and comparison of reconstruction results independent from the utilized reconstruction algorithm. An online platform (www.cavarev.com) is provided where the datasets can be downloaded, researchers can manage and publish algorithm results and download a reference C++ and Matlab implementation.

  14. SU-E-J-02: 4D Digital Tomosynthesis Based On Algebraic Image Reconstruction and Total-Variation Minimization for the Improvement of Image Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In this paper, we implemented the four-dimensional (4D) digital tomosynthesis (DTS) imaging based on algebraic image reconstruction technique and total-variation minimization method in order to compensate the undersampled projection data and improve the image quality. Methods: The projection data were acquired as supposed the cone-beam computed tomography system in linear accelerator by the Monte Carlo simulation and the in-house 4D digital phantom generation program. We performed 4D DTS based upon simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) among the iterative image reconstruction technique and total-variation minimization method (TVMM). To verify the effectiveness of this reconstruction algorithm, we performed systematic simulation studies to investigate the imaging performance. Results: The 4D DTS algorithm based upon the SART and TVMM seems to give better results than that based upon the existing method, or filtered-backprojection. Conclusion: The advanced image reconstruction algorithm for the 4D DTS would be useful to validate each intra-fraction motion during radiation therapy. In addition, it will be possible to give advantage to real-time imaging for the adaptive radiation therapy. This research was supported by Leading Foreign Research Institute Recruitment Program (Grant No.2009-00420) and Basic Atomic Energy Research Institute (BAERI); (Grant No. 2009-0078390) through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (MSIP)

  15. 3D reconstruction of carbon nanotube networks from neutron scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Mostafa; Baniassadi, Majid; Baghani, Mostafa; Dadmun, Mark; Tehrani, Mehran

    2015-09-01

    Structure reconstruction from statistical descriptors, such as scattering data obtained using x-rays or neutrons, is essential in understanding various properties of nanocomposites. Scattering based reconstruction can provide a realistic model, over various length scales, that can be used for numerical simulations. In this study, 3D reconstruction of a highly loaded carbon nanotube (CNT)-conducting polymer system based on small and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS and USANS, respectively) data was performed. These light-weight and flexible materials have recently shown great promise for high-performance thermoelectric energy conversion, and their further improvement requires a thorough understanding of their structure-property relationships. The first step in achieving such understanding is to generate models that contain the hierarchy of CNT networks over nano and micron scales. The studied system is a single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly (styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). SANS and USANS patterns of the different samples containing 10, 30, and 50 wt% SWCNTs were measured. These curves were then utilized to calculate statistical two-point correlation functions of the nanostructure. These functions along with the geometrical information extracted from SANS data and scanning electron microscopy images were used to reconstruct a representative volume element (RVE) nanostructure. Generated RVEs can be used for simulations of various mechanical and physical properties. This work, therefore, introduces a framework for the reconstruction of 3D RVEs of high volume faction nanocomposites containing high aspect ratio fillers from scattering experiments.

  16. Reconstruction of 3D Radar Targets from Profile Functions in Arbitrary Directions with Level-set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The profile function of an object is defined as its transverse cross-sectional area versus distance along the observing direction and it is used by the ramp response technique to identify radar targets. Existing reconstruction algorithms have good performance with profile functions from 3 mutually orthogonal directions, while they give distorted results otherwise. To solve this inverse problem, we use the level set method, which iteratively deforms the shape of the target under a velocity field. An appropriate velocity is used and satisfactory reconstructed 3D images are presented for arbitrary directions

  17. Optimization of slice sensitivity profile for radiographic tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similar to other tomographic imaging modalities, the slice sensitivity profile (SSP) is an important image quality metric for radiographic tomosynthesis. In this study, the relationship between the acquisition angular range (?) and the SSP for the linear trajectory system was carefully investigated from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. A mathematical SSP model was derived for arbitrary points in the reconstructed volume. We used a newly developed flat-panel tomosynthesis prototype system to experimentally validate the mathematical model from 20 deg. (±10 deg.) to 60 deg. (±30 deg.) angular ranges. The SSP was measured by imaging an edge phantom placed at an angle with respect to the detector plane using the modulation transfer function degradation (MTF-d) method. In addition to the experiments, computer simulations were performed to investigate the relationship in a wider angular range (2.5 deg. to 60 deg.). Furthermore, image data from an anthropomorphic phantom were collected to corroborate the system analysis. All the images in this study were constructed using a 3D view-weighted cone-beam filtered backprojection algorithm (3D VW CB-FBP). The theoretical analysis reveals that the SSP of linear trajectory tomosynthesis is inversely proportional to tan(?/2). This theory was supported by both simulation (?2=1.415, DF=7, p=0.985) and phantom experiment (r=0.999, p<0.001) and was further confirmed by an analysis of the reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic phantom. The results imply that the benefit of narrower SSP by increasing angular range quickly diminishes once beyond 40 deg. The advantages of the MTF-d method were also demonstrated

  18. Robust Stereo-Vision Based 3D Object Reconstruction for the Assistive Robot FRIEND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COJBASIC, Z.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A key requirement of assistive robot vision is the robust 3D object reconstruction in complex environments for reliable autonomous object manipulation. In this paper the idea is presented of achieving high robustness of a complete robot vision system against external influences such as variable illumination by including feedback control of the object segmentation in stereo images. The approach used is to change the segmentation parameters in closed-loop so that object features extraction is driven to a desired result. Reliable feature extraction is necessary to fully exploit a neuro-fuzzy classifier which is the core of the proposed 2D object recognition method, predecessor of 3D object reconstruction. Experimental results on the rehabilitation assistive robotic system FRIEND demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Reconstruction of 3D solid objects from 2D orthographic views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomura, Tsukasa

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this paper was to design an automatic system for transform 2D orthographic views to 3D solid objects. The input drawing contains geometric information of lines and circles. The reconstructed objects may be boxes, cylinders and their composites. This system used AutoCAD as a drawing tool. An input 2D orthographic view was created by using this package drawing editor. By using data interchange file (DXF) capabilities the application programs can access AutoCAD database. The script facility was used to execute the set of drawing commands which will create a continuous running display for output. The system was implemented in 7 steps. First, the 2D drawing was created and saved in ASCII code. Then DXF file was created and extracted into drawing commands. The transitional sweep operation was used to reconstruct subparts. The relationships between subparts are utilized to compose the final part. Finally the 3D solid object was displayed.

  20. Estimation of solar prominence magnetic fields based on the reconstructed 3D trajectories of prominence knots

    CERN Document Server

    Zapiór, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    We present an estimation of the lower limits of local magnetic fields in quiescent, activated, and active (surges) promineces, based on reconstructed 3-dimensional (3D) trajectories of individual prominence knots. The 3D trajectories, velocities, tangential and centripetal accelerations of the knots were reconstructed using observational data collected with a single ground-based telescope equipped with a Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass imaging spectrograph. Lower limits of magnetic fields channeling observed plasma flows were estimated under assumption of the equipartition principle. Assuming approximate electron densities of the plasma n_e = 5*10^{11} cm^{-3} in surges and n_e = 5*10^{10} cm^{-3} in quiescent/activated prominences, we found that the magnetic fields channeling two observed surges range from 16 to 40 Gauss, while in quiescent and activated prominences they were less than 10 Gauss. Our results are consistent with previous detections of weak local magnetic fields in the solar prominences.

  1. Estimation of Solar Prominence Magnetic Fields Based on the Reconstructed 3D Trajectories of Prominence Knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapiór, Maciej; Rudawy, Pawe?

    2012-10-01

    We present an estimation of the lower limits of local magnetic field strengths in quiescent, activated, and active (surges) prominences, based on reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) trajectories of individual prominence knots. The 3D trajectories, velocities, tangential and centripetal accelerations of the knots were reconstructed using observational data collected with a single ground-based telescope equipped with a Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass imaging spectrograph. Lower limits of magnetic fields channeling observed plasma flows were estimated under assumption of the equipartition principle. Assuming approximate electron densities of the plasma n e=5×1011 cm-3 in surges and n e=5×1010 cm-3 in quiescent/activated prominences, we found that the magnetic fields channeling two observed surges range from 16 to 40 Gauss, while in quiescent and activated prominences they were less than 10 Gauss. Our results are consistent with previous detections of weak local magnetic fields in the solar prominences.

  2. Utility of reconstructed image from 3-D MRI in the region of oral cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Shumei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Nakatani, Atsutoshi; Furuya, Shigeo; Furukawa, Shouhei; Fuchihata, Hajime [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-12-01

    The 3-D MRI with short TR was performed in the region of oral cavity, jaw and face, and utility of the reconstructed image was examined. Subjects were 8 healthy volunteers and 12 patients. The 3-D MRI was performed using SPGR with the following parameters; TR: 8 or 9 msec, TE: 2 or 3 msec, and FA: 20-30 degrees. Imaging direction was vertical to body axis. The matrix number was 256 x 192, slice thickness was 1 mm, slice interval was 0 and slice number was 128. The obtained image was reconstructed using software Reformat``. Detectability of temporomandibular joint disc was not enough in 8 of 20 cases. Detectability of mandibular canal was clear in 18 of 20 cases. In panorama MRI, soft tissue such as submandibular gland was detected. But, in hard tissue such as teeth or maxilla, there was a more little information in panorama MRI than in panorama X-ray photography. (K.H.)

  3. 3D image reconstruction on x-ray micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louk, Andreas C.

    2015-03-01

    A model for 3D image reconstruction of x-ray micro-computed tomography scanner (micro-CTScan) has been developed. A small object has been put under inspection on an x-ray micro-CTScan. The object cross-section was assumed on the x-y plane, while its height was along the z-axis. Using a radiography plane detector, a set of digital radiographs represents multiple angle of views from 0º to 360º with an interval of 1º was obtained. Then, a set of crosssectional tomography, slice by slice was reconstructed. At the end, all image slices were stacked together sequentially to obtain a 3D image model of the object being inspected. From this development, lessons on the way to have better understanding on the internal structure of the object can be approached based on the cross-sectional image slice by slice and surface skin.

  4. Utility of reconstructed image from 3-D MRI in the region of oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3-D MRI with short TR was performed in the region of oral cavity, jaw and face, and utility of the reconstructed image was examined. Subjects were 8 healthy volunteers and 12 patients. The 3-D MRI was performed using SPGR with the following parameters; TR: 8 or 9 msec, TE: 2 or 3 msec, and FA: 20-30 degrees. Imaging direction was vertical to body axis. The matrix number was 256 x 192, slice thickness was 1 mm, slice interval was 0 and slice number was 128. The obtained image was reconstructed using software Reformat''. Detectability of temporomandibular joint disc was not enough in 8 of 20 cases. Detectability of mandibular canal was clear in 18 of 20 cases. In panorama MRI, soft tissue such as submandibular gland was detected. But, in hard tissue such as teeth or maxilla, there was a more little information in panorama MRI than in panorama X-ray photography. (K.H.)

  5. In-line monitoring and reverse 3D model reconstruction in additive manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Bue Technical University of Denmark,

    2010-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for close-to unrestrained geometrical freedom in part design. The ability to manufacture geometries of such complexity is however limited by the fact that it proves difficult to verify tolerances of these parts. Tolerancs of featuress that are inaccessible with traditional measuring equipment such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM's) can not easily be verified. This paradox is addresses by the proposal of an in-line reverse engineering and 3D reconstruction method that alows for a true to scale reconstruction of a part that is being additivelymanufactures on 3D printing (3DP), or Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) equipment. The system will be implemented and tested on a 3DP machine with modifications developed at the author's university.

  6. Renal Tumor Cryoablation Planning. The Efficiency of Simulation on Reconstructed 3D CT Scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Valerian LUCAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nephron-sparing surgical techniques risks are related to tumor relationships with adjacent anatomic structures. Complexity of the renal anatomy drives the interest to develop tools for 3D reconstruction and surgery simulation. The aim of the article was to assess the simulation on reconstructed 3D CT scan used for planning the cryoablation. Material & Method: A prospective randomized study was performed between Jan. 2007 and July 2009 on 27 patients who underwent retroperitoneoscopic T1a renal tumors cryoablation (RC. All patients were assessed preoperatively by CT scan, also used for 3D volume rendering. In the Gr.A, the patients underwent surgery planning by simulation on 3D CT scan. In the Gr.B., patients underwent standard RC. The two groups were compared in terms of surgical time, bleeding, postoperative drainage, analgesics requirement, hospital stay, time to socio-professional reintegration. Results: Fourteen patients underwent preoperative cryoablation planning (Gr.A and 13 patients underwent standard CR (Gr.B. All parameters analyzed were shorter in the Gr.A. On multivariate logistic regression, only shortens of the surgical time (138.79±5.51 min. in Gr.A. vs. 140.92±5.54 min in Gr.B. and bleeding (164.29±60.22 mL in Gr.A. vs. 215.38±100.80 mL in Gr.B. achieved statistical significance (p<0.05. The number of cryoneedles assessed by simulation had a 92.52% accuracy when compared with those effectively used. Conclusions: Simulation of the cryoablation using reconstructed 3D CT scan improves the surgical results. The application used for simulation was able to accurately assess the number of cryoneedles required for tumor ablation, their direction and approach.

  7. Reconstruction of 3d Objects of Assets and Facilities by Using Benchmark Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, S. U.; Rahman, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    Acquiring and modeling 3D geo-data of building assets and facility objects is one of the challenges. A number of methods and technologies are being utilized for this purpose. Total station, GPS, photogrammetric and terrestrial laser scanning are few of these technologies. In this paper, points commonly shared by potential facades of assets and facilities modeled from point clouds are identified. These points are useful for modeling process to reconstruct 3D models of assets and facilities stored to be used for management purposes. These models are segmented through different planes to produce accurate 2D plans. This novel method improves the efficiency and quality of construction of models of assets and facilities with the aim utilize in 3D management projects such as maintenance of buildings or group of items that need to be replaced, or renovated for new services.

  8. In-line monitoring and reverse 3D model reconstruction in additive manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, David Bue; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2010-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for close-to unrestrained geometrical freedom in part design. The ability to manufacture geometries of such complexity is however limited by the fact that it proves difficult to verify tolerances of these parts. Tolerancs of featuress that are inaccessible with traditional measuring equipment such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM's) can not easily be verified. This paradox is addresses by the proposal of an in-line reverse engineering and 3D reconstruction...

  9. 3D Reconstruction Using Interval Methods on The Kinect Device Coupled With an IMU

    OpenAIRE

    Aymeric Bethencourt; Luc Jaulin

    2012-01-01

    The principle behind VSLAM applications like 3D object reconstruction or indoor mapping is to estimate the spatial transformation between two large clouds of points, which represent two poses of the same scene. They can further be processed to obtain detailed surfaces. Since its introduction in 1992, the standard algorithm for finding the alignment between two point clouds is ICP (Iterative Closest Point) and its variants, combined with RANSAC (RANdom SAmple Consensus). This paper presents a ...

  10. CUDA based Level Set Method for 3D Reconstruction of Fishes from Large Acoustic Data

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ojaswa; Anton, François

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic images present views of underwater dynamics, even in high depths. With multi-beam echo sounders (SONARs), it is possible to capture series of 2D high resolution acoustic images. 3D reconstruction of the water column and subsequent estimation of fish abundance and fish species identification is highly desirable for planning sustainable fisheries. Main hurdles in analysing acoustic images are the presence of speckle noise and the vast amount of acoustic data. This paper presents a leve...

  11. Robust Stereo-Vision Based 3D Object Reconstruction for the Assistive Robot FRIEND

    OpenAIRE

    COJBASIC, Z.; Graser, A; GRIGORESCU, S. M.; RISTIC-DURRANT, D.; NIKOLIC, V.

    2011-01-01

    A key requirement of assistive robot vision is the robust 3D object reconstruction in complex environments for reliable autonomous object manipulation. In this paper the idea is presented of achieving high robustness of a complete robot vision system against external influences such as variable illumination by including feedback control of the object segmentation in stereo images. The approach used is to change the segmentation parameters in closed-loop so that object features extraction ...

  12. Molecular-Frame 3D Photoelectron Momentum Distributions by Tomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, Jochen; Dimitrovski, Darko; Christensen, Lauge; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene molecules are fixed in space by a laser field and rotated, in 2° steps, over 180°. For each orientation, they are ionized by an intense, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse, and the 2D projection of the photoelectron momentum distribution is recorded. The molecular-frame 3D momentum distribution is obtained by tomographic reconstruction from all 90 projections. It reveals an anisotropic electron distribution, angularly shifted in the polarization plane, that is not accessibl...

  13. 3D reconstruction of the developing dentition in the incisor region of the pig.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kope?ný, Michal; Witter, K.; Míšek, Ivan

    York : York, 2004, s. 84-84. [8th Meeting - Tooth Morphogenesis and Differentiation. York (GB), 21.07.2004-25.07.2004] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GP206/04/P197; GA MŠk OC B23.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : incisor region * pig * 3D reconstruction Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  14. In-process 3D geometry reconstruction of objects produced by direct light projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Vølcker; Pedersen, David Bue; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows close-to unrestrained geometrical freedom in part design. The ability to manufacture geometries of such complexity is however limited by the difficulty of verifying the tolerances of these parts. Tolerances of features that are inaccessible with traditional measuring equipment such as coordinate measuring machines cannot be verified easily. This problem is addressed by developing an in-line reverse engineering and 3D reconstruction method that allows a true-to-scale...

  15. CUDA based Level Set Method for 3D Reconstruction of Fishes from Large Acoustic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa; Anton, François

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic images present views of underwater dynamics, even in high depths. With multi-beam echo sounders (SONARs), it is possible to capture series of 2D high resolution acoustic images. 3D reconstruction of the water column and subsequent estimation of fish abundance and fish species identification is highly desirable for planning sustainable fisheries. Main hurdles in analysing acoustic images are the presence of speckle noise and the vast amount of acoustic data. This paper presents a level s...

  16. Model-Free 3D Reconstruction of Weld Joint Using Laser Scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Keshmiri, Soheil; Ahmed, Syeda Mariam; Wu, Yue; Chew, Chee Meng; Pang, Chee Khiang

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a novel utilization of the concept of entropy in information theory to model-free 3D reconstruction of weld joint in presence of noise. We show that our formulation attains its global minimum at the upper edge of this joint. This property significantly simplifies the extraction of this welding joint. Furthermore, we present an approach to compute the volume of this extracted space to facilitate the monitoring of the progress of the welding task. Moreove...

  17. Radar investigation on civil structures using 3D data reconstruction and transmission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Topczewski, Lukasz; Fernandes, Francisco M.; Cruz, Paulo J. S.; Louren??o, Paulo B.; Ramos, Lu??s F.

    2006-01-01

    Non-destructive investigation using Ground Penetrating Radar is becoming more popular during the inspection of civil structures. Currently, traditional 2D imaging is also used as a preliminary tool to find possible areas of interest for more detailed inspection, which can be accomplished by 3D image reconstruction or tomography techniques. In this paper, a general overview of the work done at University of Minho regarding these techniques is presented. Data acquisition was performed on two ma...

  18. 3D-RECONSTRUCTION of Absorbed Dose Obtained from Gel-Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarinl, G.; Carrara, M.; Valente, M.

    2006-04-01

    An experimental method for obtaining images and volume reconstruction of in-phantom absorbed dose is described. The method utilises layers of a tissue-equivalent gel matrix in which a proper chemical dosimeter has been incorporated (gel dosimeter). From the images of visible light transmittance, detected with a CCD camera before and after exposure, suitably developed software gives dose images and 3D representations.

  19. 3D Reflectivity Reconstruction by Means of Spatially Distributed Kalman Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzenberg, Gregor F.; Mayer, Uwe; Nicole V. Ruiter; Hanebeck, Uwe D.

    2008-01-01

    In seismic, radar, and sonar imaging the exact determination of the reflectivity distribution is usually intractable so that approximations have to be applied. A method called synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is typically used for such applications as it provides a fast and simple method to reconstruct (3D) images. Nevertheless, this approach has several drawbacks such as causing image artifacts as well as offering no possibility to model system-specific uncertainties. In this pap...

  20. Reconstruction Error of Calibration Volume’s Coordinates for 3D Swimming Kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Machado, Leandro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of above and underwater 3D reconstruction of three calibration volumes with different control points disposal (#1 - on vertical and horizontal rods; #2 - on vertical and horizontal rods and facets; #3 - on crossed horizontal rods). Each calibration volume (3 × 2 × 3 m) was positioned in a 25 m swimming pool (half above and half below the water surface) and recorded with four underwater and two above water synchronised camer...

  1. 3-D reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mummy using X-ray computer tomography.

    OpenAIRE

    Baldock, C; Hughes, S. W.; Whittaker, D. K.; Taylor, J.; DAVIS, R; Spencer, A J; Tonge, K; Sofat, A

    1994-01-01

    Computer tomography has been used to image and reconstruct in 3-D an Egyptian mummy from the collection of the British Museum. This study of Tjentmutengebtiu, a priestess from the 22nd dynasty (945-715 BC) revealed invaluable information of a scientific, Egyptological and palaeopathological nature without mutilation and destruction of the painted cartonnage case or linen wrappings. Precise details on the removal of the brain through the nasal cavity and the viscera from the abdominal cavity w...

  2. Cryptotomography: reconstructing 3D Fourier intensities from randomly oriented single-shot diffraction patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, N. D.; M. Bogan; Elser, V; A. Barty; Boutet, S.; Bajt, S.; J. Hajdu; T. Ekeberg; Maia, F. R. N. C.; J. Schulz; M.M. Seibert; B. Iwan; N. Timneanu; Marchesini, S.; Schlichting, I.

    2010-01-01

    We reconstructed the 3D Fourier intensity distribution of mono-disperse prolate nano-particles using single-shot 2D coherent diffraction patterns collected at DESY's FLASH facility when a bright, coherent, ultrafast X-ray pulse intercepted individual particles of random, unmeasured orientations. This first experimental demonstration of cryptotomography extended the Expansion-Maximization-Compression (EMC) framework to accommodate unmeasured fluctuations in photon fluence and...

  3. Multiresolution Reconstruction for Cone-Beam Tomography from Raw Data Projections Using 3D Ridgelets

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, Francisco; Santa Marta, Cristina; Romero, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method which reconstructs any desired 3D image resolution from raw cone-beam CT data. X-ray attenuation through the object is approximated using ridgelet basis functions which allow us to have multiresolution representation levels. Since the Radon data have preferential orientations by nature, a spherical wavelet transform is used to compute the ridgelet coefficients from the Radon shell data. The whole method uses the classical Grangeat’s relation for computing de...

  4. Image Processing for the Purpose of 3D Reconstruction of Porous Membrane Support.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Vladimír; ?apek, P.; Brabec, Libor

    - : -, 2009, Poster 29. ISBN N. [Annual Meeting of the North American Membran e Society /19./. Charleston, South Carolina (US), 20.06.2009-24.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA203/09/1353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : image processing * 3D reconstruction * porous Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry http://www.icom2008.org/nams2009/

  5. In-line monitoring and reverse 3D model reconstruction in additive manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Bue; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    2010-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows for close-to unrestrained geometrical freedom in part design. The ability to manufacture geometries of such complexity is however limited by the fact that it proves difficult to verify tolerances of these parts. Tolerancs of featuress that are inaccessible with traditional measuring equipment such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM's) can not easily be verified. This paradox is addresses by the proposal of an in-line reverse engineering and 3D reconstruction me...

  6. Reconstruction of 3d video from 2d real-life sequences

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Eduardo, Ramos Diaz; Volodymyr, Ponomaryov.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo, se propone un método novedoso que permite generar secuencias de video en 3D usando secuencias de video reales en 2D. La reconstrucción de la secuencia de video en 3D se realiza usando el cálculo del mapa de profundidad y la síntesis de anaglifos. El mapa de profundidad es formado u [...] sando la técnica de correspondencia estéreo basada en la minimización de la energía de error global a partir de funciones de suavizado. La construcción del anaglifo es realizada usando la alineación del componente de color interpolándolo con el mapa de profundidad previamente formado. Adicionalmente, se emplea la transformación del mapa de profundidad para reducir el rango dinámico de los valores de disparidad, minimizando el efecto fantasma mejorando la preservación de color. Se usaron numerosas secuencias de video a color reales que contienen diferentes tipos de movimientos como traslacional, rotacional, acercamiento, y la combinación de los anteriores, demostrando buen funcionamiento visual de la reconstrucción de secuencias de video en 3D propuesta. Abstract in english In this paper, a novel method that permits to generate 3D video sequences using 2D real-life sequences is proposed. Reconstruction of 3D video sequence is realized using depth map computation and anaglyph synthesis. The depth map is formed employing the stereo matching technique based on global erro [...] r energy minimization with smoothing functions. The anaglyph construction is implemented using the red component alignment interpolating the previously formed depth map. Additionally, the depth map transformation is realized in order to reduce the dynamic range of the disparity values, minimizing ghosting and enhancing color preservation. Several real-life color video sequences that contain different types of motions, such as translational, rotational, zoom and combination of previous ones are used demonstrating good visual performance of the proposed 3D video sequence reconstruction.

  7. 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF AN UNDERWATER ARCHAELOGICAL SITE: COMPARISON BETWEEN LOW COST CAMERAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Capra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction with a metric content of a submerged area, where objects and structures of archaeological interest are found, could play an important role in the research and study activities and even in the digitization of the cultural heritage. The reconstruction of 3D object, of interest for archaeologists, constitutes a starting point in the classification and description of object in digital format and for successive fruition by user after delivering through several media. The starting point is a metric evaluation of the site obtained with photogrammetric surveying and appropriate 3D restitution. The authors have been applying the underwater photogrammetric technique since several years using underwater digital cameras and, in this paper, digital low cost cameras (off-the-shelf. Results of tests made on submerged objects with three cameras are presented: © Canon Power Shot G12, © Intova Sport HD e © GoPro HERO 2. The experimentation had the goal to evaluate the precision in self-calibration procedures, essential for multimedia underwater photogrammetry, and to analyze the quality of 3D restitution. Precisions obtained in the calibration and orientation procedures was assessed by using three cameras, and an homogeneous set control points. Data were processed with © Agisoft Photoscan. Successively, 3D models were created and the comparison of the models derived from the use of different cameras was performed. Different potentialities of the used cameras are reported in the discussion section. The 3D restitution of objects and structures was integrated with sea bottom floor morphology in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the site. A possible methodology of survey and representation of submerged objects is therefore illustrated, considering an automatic and a semi-automatic approach.

  8. 3D TEM reconstruction and segmentation process of laminar bio-nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructure of laminar bio-nanocomposites (Poly (lactic acid)(PLA)/clay) depends on the amount of clay platelet opening after integration with the polymer matrix and determines the final properties of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique is the only one that can provide a direct observation of the layer dispersion and the degree of exfoliation. However, the orientation of the clay platelets, which affects the final properties, is practically immeasurable from a single 2D TEM image. This issue can be overcome using transmission electron tomography (ET), a technique that allows the complete 3D characterization of the structure, including the measurement of the orientation of clay platelets, their morphology and their 3D distribution. ET involves a 3D reconstruction of the study volume and a subsequent segmentation of the study object. Currently, accurate segmentation is performed manually, which is inefficient and tedious. The aim of this work is to propose an objective/automated segmentation methodology process of a 3D TEM tomography reconstruction. In this method the segmentation threshold is optimized by minimizing the variation of the dimensions of the segmented objects and matching the segmented Vclay (%) and the actual one. The method is first validated using a fictitious set of objects, and then applied on a nanocomposite

  9. 3D TEM reconstruction and segmentation process of laminar bio-nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrondobeitia, M.; Okariz, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, R.; Jimbert, P.; Guraya, T.; Ibarretxe, J.

    2015-03-01

    The microstructure of laminar bio-nanocomposites (Poly (lactic acid)(PLA)/clay) depends on the amount of clay platelet opening after integration with the polymer matrix and determines the final properties of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique is the only one that can provide a direct observation of the layer dispersion and the degree of exfoliation. However, the orientation of the clay platelets, which affects the final properties, is practically immeasurable from a single 2D TEM image. This issue can be overcome using transmission electron tomography (ET), a technique that allows the complete 3D characterization of the structure, including the measurement of the orientation of clay platelets, their morphology and their 3D distribution. ET involves a 3D reconstruction of the study volume and a subsequent segmentation of the study object. Currently, accurate segmentation is performed manually, which is inefficient and tedious. The aim of this work is to propose an objective/automated segmentation methodology process of a 3D TEM tomography reconstruction. In this method the segmentation threshold is optimized by minimizing the variation of the dimensions of the segmented objects and matching the segmented Vclay (%) and the actual one. The method is first validated using a fictitious set of objects, and then applied on a nanocomposite.

  10. 3D TEM reconstruction and segmentation process of laminar bio-nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturrondobeitia, M., E-mail: maider.iturrondobeitia@ehu.es; Okariz, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, R.; Jimbert, P.; Guraya, T.; Ibarretxe, J. [eMERG, University of the Basque Country, Rafael Moreno Pitxitxi street 2 and 3, 48013, Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-03-30

    The microstructure of laminar bio-nanocomposites (Poly (lactic acid)(PLA)/clay) depends on the amount of clay platelet opening after integration with the polymer matrix and determines the final properties of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique is the only one that can provide a direct observation of the layer dispersion and the degree of exfoliation. However, the orientation of the clay platelets, which affects the final properties, is practically immeasurable from a single 2D TEM image. This issue can be overcome using transmission electron tomography (ET), a technique that allows the complete 3D characterization of the structure, including the measurement of the orientation of clay platelets, their morphology and their 3D distribution. ET involves a 3D reconstruction of the study volume and a subsequent segmentation of the study object. Currently, accurate segmentation is performed manually, which is inefficient and tedious. The aim of this work is to propose an objective/automated segmentation methodology process of a 3D TEM tomography reconstruction. In this method the segmentation threshold is optimized by minimizing the variation of the dimensions of the segmented objects and matching the segmented V{sub clay} (%) and the actual one. The method is first validated using a fictitious set of objects, and then applied on a nanocomposite.

  11. Sensor fusion of cameras and a laser for city-scale 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, Yunsu; Choi, Dong-Geol; Kweon, In So

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensorfor large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on afast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor,and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is doneby estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previousworks. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but estimates free motion(including absolute scale) in 3D space using both laser data and image features. In orderto avoid the degeneration associated with typical three-point algorithms, we present a newalgorithm that selects 3D points from two frames captured by multiple cameras. The problemof error accumulation is solved by loop closing, not by GPS. The experimental resultsshow that the estimated path is successfully overlaid on the satellite images, such that thereconstruction result is very accurate. PMID:25375758

  12. Sensor Fusion of Cameras and a Laser for City-Scale 3D Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsu Bok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sensor fusion system of cameras and a 2D laser sensorfor large-scale 3D reconstruction. The proposed system is designed to capture data on afast-moving ground vehicle. The system consists of six cameras and one 2D laser sensor,and they are synchronized by a hardware trigger. Reconstruction of 3D structures is doneby estimating frame-by-frame motion and accumulating vertical laser scans, as in previousworks. However, our approach does not assume near 2D motion, but estimates free motion(including absolute scale in 3D space using both laser data and image features. In orderto avoid the degeneration associated with typical three-point algorithms, we present a newalgorithm that selects 3D points from two frames captured by multiple cameras. The problemof error accumulation is solved by loop closing, not by GPS. The experimental resultsshow that the estimated path is successfully overlaid on the satellite images, such that thereconstruction result is very accurate.

  13. On the Performance Evaluation of 3D Reconstruction Techniques from a Sequence of Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Farag

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance evaluation of 3D reconstruction techniques is not a simple problem to solve. This is not only due to the increased dimensionality of the problem but also due to the lack of standardized and widely accepted testing methodologies. This paper presents a unified framework for the performance evaluation of different 3D reconstruction techniques. This framework includes a general problem formalization, different measuring criteria, and a classification method as a first step in standardizing the evaluation process. Performance characterization of two standard 3D reconstruction techniques, stereo and space carving, is also presented. The evaluation is performed on the same data set using an image reprojection testing methodology to reduce the dimensionality of the evaluation domain. Also, different measuring strategies are presented and applied to the stereo and space carving techniques. These measuring strategies have shown consistent results in quantifying the performance of these techniques. Additional experiments are performed on the space carving technique to study the effect of the number of input images and the camera pose on its performance.

  14. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, Kelly; de Jesus, Karla; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Machado, Leandro José

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500?mm) with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points--with 8 common points at water surface--and 92 validation points) was positioned on a 25?m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.). Root Mean Square (RMS) error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P ? 0.03). With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P ? 0.47). Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P ? 0.04) and the opposite was observed for validation points (P ? 0.04). It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy. PMID:26175796

  15. A complete system for 3D reconstruction of roots for phenotypic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cai, Jinhai; Miklavcic, Stanley J

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a complete system for 3D reconstruction of roots grown in a transparent gel medium or washed and suspended in water. The system is capable of being fully automated as it is self calibrating. The system starts with detection of root tips in root images from an image sequence generated by a turntable motion. Root tips are detected using the statistics of Zernike moments on image patches centred on high curvature points on root boundary and Bayes classification rule. The detected root tips are tracked in the image sequence using a multi-target tracking algorithm. Conics are fitted to the root tip trajectories using a novel ellipse fitting algorithm which weighs the data points by its eccentricity. The conics projected from the circular trajectory have a complex conjugate intersection which are image of the circular points. Circular points constraint the image of the absolute conics which are directly related to the internal parameters of the camera. The pose of the camera is computed from the image of the rotation axis and the horizon. The silhouettes of the roots and camera parameters are used to reconstruction the 3D voxel model of the roots. We show the results of real 3D reconstruction of roots which are detailed and realistic for phenotypic analysis. PMID:25381112

  16. A graphic user interface for efficient 3D photo-reconstruction based on free software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carlos; James, Michael; Gómez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, different studies have stressed the applicability of 3D photo-reconstruction based on Structure from Motion algorithms in a wide range of geoscience applications. For the purpose of image photo-reconstruction, a number of commercial and freely available software packages have been developed (e.g. Agisoft Photoscan, VisualSFM). The workflow involves typically different stages such as image matching, sparse and dense photo-reconstruction, point cloud filtering and georeferencing. For approaches using open and free software, each of these stages usually require different applications. In this communication, we present an easy-to-use graphic user interface (GUI) developed in Matlab® code as a tool for efficient 3D photo-reconstruction making use of powerful existing software: VisualSFM (Wu, 2015) for photo-reconstruction and CloudCompare (Girardeau-Montaut, 2015) for point cloud processing. The GUI performs as a manager of configurations and algorithms, taking advantage of the command line modes of existing software, which allows an intuitive and automated processing workflow for the geoscience user. The GUI includes several additional features: a) a routine for significantly reducing the duration of the image matching operation, normally the most time consuming stage; b) graphical outputs for understanding the overall performance of the algorithm (e.g. camera connectivity, point cloud density); c) a number of useful options typically performed before and after the photo-reconstruction stage (e.g. removal of blurry images, image renaming, vegetation filtering); d) a manager of batch processing for the automated reconstruction of different image datasets. In this study we explore the advantages of this new tool by testing its performance using imagery collected in several soil erosion applications. References Girardeau-Montaut, D. 2015. CloudCompare documentation accessed at http://cloudcompare.org/ Wu, C. 2015. VisualSFM documentation access at http://ccwu.me/vsfm/doc.html#.

  17. Applicator reconstruction in MRI 3D image-based dose planning of brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, SØren; Nielsen, SØren Kynde

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To elaborate a method for applicator reconstruction for MRI-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Custom-made plastic catheters with a copper sulphate solution were made for insertion in the source channels of MR-CT compatible applicators: plastic and titanium tandem ring applicators, and titanium needles. The applicators were CT and MR scanned in a phantom for accurate 3D assessment of applicator visibility and geometry. A reconstruction method was developed and evaluated in 19 patient MR examinations with ring applicator (plastic: 14, titanium: 5). MR applicator reconstruction uncertainties related to inter-observer variation were evaluated. RESULTS: The catheters were visible in the plastic applicator on T1-weighted images in phantom and in 14/14 clinical applications. On T2-weighted images, the catheters appeared weaker but still visible in phantom and in 13/14 MR clinical applications. In the titanium applicator, the catheters could not be separated from the artifacts from the applicator itself. However, these artifacts could be used to localize both titanium ring applicator (5/5 clinical applications) and needles (6/6 clinical applications). Standard deviations of inter-observer differences were below 2mm in all directions. CONCLUSION: 3D applicator reconstruction based on MR imaging could be performed for plastic and titanium applicators. Plastic applicators proved well to be suited for MRI-based reconstruction. For improved practicability of titanium applicator reconstruction, development of MR applicator markers is essential. Reconstruction of titanium applicator and needles at 1.5T MR requires geometric evaluations in phantoms before using the applicator in patients.

  18. Reconstruction of 3D Human Facial Images Using Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyad Elyan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenging problems in geometric modeling and computer graphics is the construction of realistic human facial geometry. Such geometry are essential for a wide range of applications, such as 3D face recognition, virtual reality applications, facial expression simulation and computer based plastic surgery application. This paper addresses a method for the construction of 3D geometry of human faces based on the use of Elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDE. Here the geometry corresponding to a human face is treated as a set of surface patches, whereby each surface patch is represented using four boundary curves in the 3-space that formulate the appropriate boundary conditions for the chosen PDE. These boundary curves are extracted automatically using 3D data of human faces obtained using a 3D scanner. The solution of the PDE generates a continuous single surface patch describing the geometry of the original scanned data. In this study, through a number of experimental verifications we have shown the efficiency of the PDE based method for 3D facial surface reconstruction using scan data. In addition to this, we also show that our approach provides an efficient way of facial representation using a small set of parameters that could be utilized for efficient facial data storage and verification purposes.

  19. Reconstruction of 3D structure using stochastic methods: morphology and transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Gerke, Kirill; ?apek, Pavel; Vasilyev, Roman; Korost, Dmitry; Skvortsova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    One of the main factors defining numerous flow phenomena in rocks, soils and other porous media, including fluid and solute movements, is pore structure, e.g., pore sizes and their connectivity. Numerous numerical methods were developed to quantify single and multi-phase flow in such media on microscale. Among most popular ones are: 1) a wide range of finite difference/element/volume solutions of Navier-Stokes equations and its simplifications; 2) lattice-Boltzmann method; 3) pore-network models, among others. Each method has some advantages and shortcomings, so that different research teams usually utilize more than one, depending on the study case. Recent progress in 3D imaging of internal structure, e.g., X-ray tomography, FIB-SEM and confocal microscopy, made it possible to obtain digitized input pore parameters for such models, however, a trade-off between resolution and sample size is usually unavoidable. There are situations then only standard two-dimensional information of porous structure is known due to tomography high cost or resolution limitations. However, physical modeling on microscale requires 3D information. There are three main approaches to reconstruct (using 2D cut(s) or some other limited information/properties) porous media: 1) statistical methods (correlation functions and simulated annealing, multi-point statistics, entropy methods), 2) sequential methods (sphere or other granular packs) and 3) morphological methods. Stochastic reconstructions using correlation functions possess some important advantage - they provide a statistical description of the structure, which is known to have relationships with all physical properties. In addition, this method is more flexible for other applications to characterize porous media. Taking different 3D scans of natural and artificial porous materials (sandstones, soils, shales, ceramics) we choose some 2D cut/s as sources of input correlation functions. Based on different types of correlation functions we reconstruct 3D images using. The quality of reconstructions (we compare directly original and resulting 3D images) are assessed by pore-scale simulations of flow, cluster analysis and local porosity theory analysis. We also show how these reconstructions can be utilized for upscaling and multi-scale imaging of materials with wide range of pore sizes.

  20. Segmentation, Reconstruction, and Analysis of Blood Thrombus Formation in 3D 2-Photon Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhiliang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the problem of segmenting, reconstructing, and analyzing the structure growth of thrombi (clots in blood vessels in vivo based on 2-photon microscopic image data. First, we develop an algorithm for segmenting clots in 3D microscopic images based on density-based clustering and methods for dealing with imaging artifacts. Next, we apply the union-of-balls (or alpha-shape algorithm to reconstruct the boundary of clots in 3D. Finally, we perform experimental studies and analysis on the reconstructed clots and obtain quantitative data of thrombus growth and structures. We conduct experiments on laser-induced injuries in vessels of two types of mice (the wild type and the type with low levels of coagulation factor VII and analyze and compare the developing clot structures based on their reconstructed clots from image data. The results we obtain are of biomedical significance. Our quantitative analysis of the clot composition leads to better understanding of the thrombus development, and is valuable to the modeling and verification of computational simulation of thrombogenesis.

  1. 3D nanostructure reconstruction based on the SEM imaging principle, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses a novel 3D reconstruction method for nanostructures based on the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging principle. In this method, the shape from shading (SFS) technique is employed, to analyze the gray-scale information of a single top-view SEM image which contains all the visible surface information, and finally to reconstruct the 3D surface morphology. It offers not only unobstructed observation from various angles but also the exact physical dimensions of nanostructures. A convenient and commercially available tool (NanoViewer) is developed based on this method for nanostructure analysis and characterization of properties. The reconstruction result coincides well with the SEM nanostructure image and is verified in different ways. With the extracted structure information, subsequent research of the nanostructure can be carried out, such as roughness analysis, optimizing properties by structure improvement and performance simulation with a reconstruction model. Efficient, practical and non-destructive, the method will become a powerful tool for nanostructure surface observation and characterization. (paper)

  2. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR/FB, 85601-970, Caixa Postal 135, Francisco Beltrao - PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana-UTFPR/FB,85601-970,Caixa Postal 135,Francisco Beltrao-PR (Brazil) and Faculdades Pequeno Principe-FPP, Av. Iguacu, 333, Rebou (Brazil); Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina - UFSC/ARA, 88900-000, Rua Pedro Joao Pereira, 150, Ararangua - SC (Brazil); Klock, Margio C. L. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR Litoral, 80230-901, Rua Jaguaraiva 512, Caioba, Matinhos - PR (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  3. Multiresolution reconstruction for cone-beam tomography from raw data projections using 3D ridgelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Francisco; Santa Marta, Cristina; Romero, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method which reconstructs any desired 3D image resolution from raw cone-beam CT data. X-ray attenuation through the object is approximated using ridgelet basis functions which allow us to have multiresolution representation levels. Since the Radon data have preferential orientations by nature, a spherical wavelet transform is used to compute the ridgelet coefficients from the Radon shell data. The whole method uses the classical Grangeat's relation for computing derivatives of the Radon data which are then integrated and projected to a spherical wavelet representation and back-reconstructed using a modified version of the well known back-projection algorithm. Unlike previous reconstruction methods, this proposal uses a multiscale representation of the Radon data and therefore allows fast display of low-resolution data level. PMID:21360215

  4. Direct fourier methods in 3D-reconstruction from cone-beam data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of 3D-reconstruction is encountered in both medical and industrial applications of X-ray tomography. A method able to utilize a complete set of projections complying with Tuys condition was proposed by Grangeat. His method is mathematically exact and consists of two distinct phases. In phase 1 cone-beam projection data are used to produce the derivative of the radon transform. In phase 2, after interpolation, the radon transform data are used to reconstruct the three-dimensional object function. To a large extent our method is an extension of the Grangeat method. Our aim is to reduce the computational complexity, i.e. to produce a faster method. The most taxing procedure during phase 1 is computation of line-integrals in the detector plane. By applying the direct Fourier method in reverse for this computation, we reduce the complexity of phase 1 from O(N4) to O(N3logN). Phase 2 can be performed either as a straight 3D-reconstruction or as a sequence of two 2D-reconstructions in vertical and horizontal planes, respectively. Direct Fourier methods can be applied for the 2D- and for the 3D-reconstruction, which reduces the complexity of phase 2 from O(N4) to O(N3logN) as well. In both cases, linogram techniques are applied. For 3D-reconstruction the inversion formula contains the second derivative filter instead of the well-known ramp-filter employed in the 2D-case. The derivative filter is more well-behaved than the 2D ramp-filter. This implies that less zeropadding is necessary which brings about a further reduction of the computational efforts. The method has been verified by experiments on simulated data. The image quality is satisfactory and independent of cone-beam angles. For a 5123 volume we estimate that our method is ten times faster than Grangeats method

  5. 3D reconstruction of internal structure of animal body using near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trung Nghia; Yamamoto, Kohei; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    To realize three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging of the internal structure of animal body, we have developed a new technique to reconstruct CT images from two-dimensional (2D) transillumination images. In transillumination imaging, the image is blurred due to the strong scattering in the tissue. We had developed a scattering suppression technique using the point spread function (PSF) for a fluorescent light source in the body. In this study, we have newly proposed a technique to apply this PSF for a light source to the image of unknown light-absorbing structure. The effectiveness of the proposed technique was examined in the experiments with a model phantom and a mouse. In the phantom experiment, the absorbers were placed in the tissue-equivalent medium to simulate the light-absorbing organs in mouse body. Near-infrared light was illuminated from one side of the phantom and the image was recorded with CMOS camera from another side. Using the proposed techniques, the scattering effect was efficiently suppressed and the absorbing structure can be visualized in the 2D transillumination image. Using the 2D images obtained in many different orientations, we could reconstruct the 3D image. In the mouse experiment, an anesthetized mouse was held in an acrylic cylindrical holder. We can visualize the internal organs such as kidneys through mouse's abdomen using the proposed technique. The 3D image of the kidneys and a part of the liver were reconstructed. Through these experimental studies, the feasibility of practical 3D imaging of the internal light-absorbing structure of a small animal was verified.

  6. 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF BUILDINGS WITH GABLED AND HIPPED STRUCTURES USING LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Amini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are the most important objects in urban areas. Thus, building detection using photogrammetry and remote sensing data as well as 3D model of buildings are very useful for many applications such as mobile navigation, tourism, and disaster management. In this paper, an approach has been proposed for detecting buildings by LiDAR data and aerial images, as well as reconstructing 3D model of buildings. In this regard, firstly, building detection carried out by utilizing a Supper Vector Machine (SVM as a supervise method. The supervise methods need training data that could be collected from some features. Hence, LiDAR data and aerial images were utilized to produce some features. The features were selected by considering their abilities for separating buildings from other objects. The evaluation results of building detection showed high accuracy and precision of the utilized approach. The detected buildings were labeled in order to reconstruct buildings, individually. Then the planes of each building were separated and adjacent planes were recognized to reduce the calculation volume and to increase the accuracy. Subsequently, the bottom planes of each building were detected in order to compute the corners of hipped roofs using intersection of three adjacent planes. Also, the corners of gabled roofs were computed by both calculating the intersection line of the adjacent planes and finding the intersection between the planes intersection line and their detected parcel. Finally, the coordinates of some nodes in building floor were computed and 3D model reconstruction was carried out. In order to evaluate the proposed method, 3D model of some buildings with different complexity level were generated. The evaluation results showed that the proposed method has reached credible performance.

  7. 3D Reconstruction of Interplanetary Scintillation (IPS) Remote-Sensing Data: Global Solar Wind Boundaries for Driving 3D-MHD Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H.-S.; Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Buffington, A.; Odstrcil, D.; Wu, C.-C.; Davies, J. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Tokumaru, M.

    2015-09-01

    The University of California, San Diego, time-dependent analyses of the heliosphere provide three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of solar wind velocities and densities from observations of interplanetary scintillation (IPS). Using data from the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Japan, these reconstructions provide a real-time prediction of the global solar-wind density and velocity throughout the whole heliosphere with a temporal cadence of about one day (ips.ucsd.edu). Updates to this modeling effort continue: in the present article, near-Sun results extracted from the time-dependent 3D reconstruction are used as inner boundary conditions to drive 3D-MHD models ( e.g. ENLIL and H3D-MHD). This allows us to explore the differences between the IPS kinematic-model data-fitting procedure and current 3D-MHD modeling techniques. The differences in these techniques provide interesting insights into the physical principles governing the expulsion of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here we detail for the first time several specific CMEs and an induced shock that occurred in September 2011 that demonstrate some of the issues resulting from these analyses.

  8. 3D MRI findings of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction at follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the postoperative 3D MRI appearances and their evolvement patterns of ACL grafts and bone tunnels at follow-up. Methods: There were 2,6 double bundles ACL reconstructions and 16 single bundle ACL reconstructions, and a total of 56 follow-up 3D MR Imaging. MR images were reconstructed with MPR technique to evaluate grafts, bone tunnels, fixers and associated complications. Proportions of grafts with hypointensity or hyperintensity and occurrence rates of marrow edema around bone tunnels were calculated respectively among groups of different periods after operation. Results: There were 2, 4 grafts of hypointensity and 32 grafts of hyperintensity. Grafts of 2 cases were suspended with cross pins within femoral tunnels, graft of 1 case was suspended with an endobutton within the femoral tunnel, and grafts of other sites were fixed with interference screws. In the three periods as 3 months, 6 to 9 months and over 12 months after cruciate ligament reconstruction, proportions of hypointensive grafts were 20/25, 0/14 and 4/10 respectively, while proportions of hyperintensive grafts were 5/25, 14/14 and 6/10 respectively, occurrence proportions of marrow edema around bone tunnels were 54/54, 10/32 and 4/26 respectively. There was 1 tear graft, 4 tibial tunnels placed anteriorly with ACL graft impingement on the intercondylar roof, 3 femoral tunnels placed anteriorly, and 2 bone tunnels with mismatching interference screws. Conclusion: 3D MRI can accurately demonstrate the state of ACL grafts, bone tunnels, fixers and associated complications. Intensity of grafts presented a rise and reduce pattern after operation. (authors)

  9. Detectability limitations with 3-D point reconstruction algorithms using digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindgren, Erik, E-mail: erik.lindgren@chalmers.se [Department of Materials and Manufacturing Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Göteborg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2015-03-31

    The estimated impact of pores in clusters on component fatigue will be highly conservative when based on 2-D rather than 3-D pore positions. To 3-D position and size defects using digital radiography and 3-D point reconstruction algorithms in general require a lower inspection time and in some cases work better with planar geometries than X-ray computed tomography. However, the increase in prior assumptions about the object and the defects will increase the intrinsic uncertainty in the resulting nondestructive evaluation output. In this paper this uncertainty arising when detecting pore defect clusters with point reconstruction algorithms is quantified using simulations. The simulation model is compared to and mapped to experimental data. The main issue with the uncertainty is the possible masking (detectability zero) of smaller defects around some other slightly larger defect. In addition, the uncertainty is explored in connection to the expected effects on the component fatigue life and for different amount of prior object-defect assumptions made.

  10. Detectability limitations with 3-D point reconstruction algorithms using digital radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Erik

    2015-03-01

    The estimated impact of pores in clusters on component fatigue will be highly conservative when based on 2-D rather than 3-D pore positions. To 3-D position and size defects using digital radiography and 3-D point reconstruction algorithms in general require a lower inspection time and in some cases work better with planar geometries than X-ray computed tomography. However, the increase in prior assumptions about the object and the defects will increase the intrinsic uncertainty in the resulting nondestructive evaluation output. In this paper this uncertainty arising when detecting pore defect clusters with point reconstruction algorithms is quantified using simulations. The simulation model is compared to and mapped to experimental data. The main issue with the uncertainty is the possible masking (detectability zero) of smaller defects around some other slightly larger defect. In addition, the uncertainty is explored in connection to the expected effects on the component fatigue life and for different amount of prior object-defect assumptions made.

  11. Detectability limitations with 3-D point reconstruction algorithms using digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimated impact of pores in clusters on component fatigue will be highly conservative when based on 2-D rather than 3-D pore positions. To 3-D position and size defects using digital radiography and 3-D point reconstruction algorithms in general require a lower inspection time and in some cases work better with planar geometries than X-ray computed tomography. However, the increase in prior assumptions about the object and the defects will increase the intrinsic uncertainty in the resulting nondestructive evaluation output. In this paper this uncertainty arising when detecting pore defect clusters with point reconstruction algorithms is quantified using simulations. The simulation model is compared to and mapped to experimental data. The main issue with the uncertainty is the possible masking (detectability zero) of smaller defects around some other slightly larger defect. In addition, the uncertainty is explored in connection to the expected effects on the component fatigue life and for different amount of prior object-defect assumptions made

  12. Implementation of a fast running full core pin power reconstruction method in DYN3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Torres, Armando Miguel [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Department of Nuclear Systems, Carretera Mexico – Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, 52750 Ocoyoacac (Mexico); Sanchez-Espinoza, Victor Hugo, E-mail: victor.sanchez@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-vom-Helmhotz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kliem, Sören; Gommlich, Andre [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • New pin power reconstruction (PPR) method for the nodal diffusion code DYN3D. • Flexible PPR method applicable to a single, a group or to all fuel assemblies (square, hex). • Combination of nodal with pin-wise solutions (non-conform geometry). • PPR capabilities shown for REA of a Minicore (REA) PWR whole core. - Abstract: This paper presents a substantial extension of the pin power reconstruction (PPR) method used in the reactor dynamics code DYN3D with the aim to better describe the heterogeneity within the fuel assembly during reactor simulations. The flexibility of the new implemented PPR permits the local spatial refinement of one fuel assembly, of a cluster of fuel assemblies, of a quarter or eight of a core or even of a whole core. The application of PPR in core regions of interest will pave the way for the coupling with sub-channel codes enabling the prediction of local safety parameters. One of the main advantages of considering regions and not only a hot fuel assembly (FA) is the fact that the cross flow within this region can be taken into account by the subchannel code. The implementation of the new PPR method has been tested analysing a rod ejection accident (REA) in a PWR minicore consisting of 3 × 3 FA. Finally, the new capabilities of DNY3D are demonstrated by the analysing a boron dilution transient in a PWR MOX core and the pin power of a VVER-1000 reactor at stationary conditions.

  13. 3D Indoor Building Environment Reconstruction using calibration of Range finder Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamali, Ali; Anton, François

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, municipalities intend to have 3D city models for facility management, disaster management and architectural planning. 3D data acquisition can be done by laser scanning for indoor environment which is a costly and time consuming process. Currently, for indoor surveying, Electronic Distance Measurement (EDM) and Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) are mostly used. In this paper, several techniques for indoor 3D building data acquisition have been investigated. For reducing the time and cost of indoor building data acquisition process, the Trimble LaserAce 1000 range finder is used. The accuracy of the rangefinder is evaluated and a simple spatial model is reconstructed from real data. This technique is rapid (it requires a shorter time as compared to others), but the results show inconsistencies in horizontal angles for short distances in indoor environments. The range finder was calibrated using a least square adjustment algorithm. To control the uncertainty of the calibration and of the reconstruction of the building from the measurements, interval analysis and homotopy continuation are used.

  14. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  15. Pediatric skull fracture diagnosis: should 3D CT reconstructions be added as routine imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Gunes; Wagner, Matthias W; Seeburg, Daniel; Zamora, Carlos A; Oshmyansky, Alexander; Tekes, Aylin; Poretti, Andrea; Jallo, George I; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Bosemani, Thangamadhan

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT The authors compared the efficacy of combining 2D+3D CT reconstructions with standard 2D CT images in the diagnosis of linear skull fractures in children with head trauma. METHODS This was a retrospective evaluation of consecutive head CT studies of children presenting with head trauma. Two experienced pediatric neuroradiologists in consensus created the standard of reference. Three readers independently evaluated the 2D CT images alone and then in combination with the 3D reconstructions for the diagnosis of linear skull fractures. Sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of linear skull fractures utilizing 2D and 2D+3D CT in combination were measured for children less than 2 years of age and for all children for analysis by the 3 readers. RESULTS Included in the study were 250 consecutive CT studies of 250 patients (167 boys and 83 girls). The mean age of the children was 7.82 years (range 4 days to 17.4 years). 2D+3D CT combined had a higher sensitivity and specificity (83.9% and 97.1%, respectively) compared with 2D alone (78.2% and 92.8%, respectively) with statistical significance for specificity (p 3D CT combined had a higher sensitivity and specificity (81.3% and 90.5%, respectively) compared with 2D alone (74.5% and 89.1%, respectively) with statistical significance for sensitivity (p 3D CT in combination showed increased sensitivity in the diagnosis of linear skull fractures in all children and increased specificity in children less than 2 years of age. In children less than 2 years of age, added confidence in the interpretation of fractures by distinguishing them from sutures may have a significant implication in the setting of nonaccidental trauma. Furthermore, 3D CT is available at no added cost, scan time, or radiation exposure, providing trainees and clinicians with limited experience an additional valuable tool for routine imaging of pediatric head trauma. PMID:26186360

  16. Evaluation of the image quality in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) employed with a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm by using the mammographic accreditation phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonok; Cho, Heemoon; Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Park, Chulkyu; Lim, Hyunwoo; Kim, Kyuseok; Kim, Guna; Park, Soyoung; Woo, Taeho; Choi, Sungil

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system which mainly consists of an x-ray generator (28 kVp, 7 mA s), a CMOS-type flat-panel detector (70-?m pixel size, 230.5×339 mm2 active area), and a rotational arm to move the x-ray generator in an arc. We employed a compressed-sensing (CS)-based reconstruction algorithm, rather than a common filtered-backprojection (FBP) one, for more accurate DBT reconstruction. Here the CS is a state-of-the-art mathematical theory for solving the inverse problems, which exploits the sparsity of the image with substantially high accuracy. We evaluated the reconstruction quality in terms of the detectability, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the slice-sensitive profile (SSP) by using the mammographic accreditation phantom (Model 015, CIRS Inc.) and compared it to the FBP-based quality. The CS-based algorithm yielded much better image quality, preserving superior image homogeneity, edge sharpening, and cross-plane resolution, compared to the FBP-based one.

  17. In-process 3D geometry reconstruction of objects produced by direct light projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik VØlcker; Pedersen, David Bue

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing allows close-to unrestrained geometrical freedom in part design. The ability to manufacture geometries of such complexity is however limited by the difficulty of verifying the tolerances of these parts. Tolerances of features that are inaccessible with traditional measuring equipment such as coordinate measuring machines cannot be verified easily. This problem is addressed by developing an in-line reverse engineering and 3D reconstruction method that allows a true-to-scale reconstruction of a part being additively manufactured. In earlier works (Pedersen et al. 2010; Hansen et al. 2011), this method has shown its potential with 3D printing (3DP) and selective laser sintering additive manufacturing processes, where it is possible to directly capture the geometrical features of each individual layer during a build job using a digital camera. When considering the process of direct light projection (DLP), the possibility of directly capturing the geometrical features of the object during abuild job is limited by the specific machine design and the fact that photoactivated monomers often do not change optical characteristics in the polymerization process. Therefore, a variant of the previously tested and verified method has been implemented on DLP machine, where instead of capturing the geometrical features of the produced objects during the build job directly, these features are captured indirectly by capturing the reflection of the projected light projected during the build job. Test series were made, and a reconstruction of two octave spheres were produced and compared with the input CAD file and scans of the produced objects. The comparison showed a good correlation between the reconstructions and the scans considering the resolution of the images used for the reconstruction, and it was thereby concluded that the method has a promising potential as a verification method for DLP machines.

  18. Object-shape recognition and 3D reconstruction from tactile sensor images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnobish, Anwesha; Singh, Garima; Jati, Arindam; Konar, Amit; Tibarewala, D N

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a novel approach of edged and edgeless object-shape recognition and 3D reconstruction from gradient-based analysis of tactile images. We recognize an object's shape by visualizing a surface topology in our mind while grasping the object in our palm and also taking help from our past experience of exploring similar kind of objects. The proposed hybrid recognition strategy works in similar way in two stages. In the first stage, conventional object-shape recognition using linear support vector machine classifier is performed where regional descriptors features have been extracted from the tactile image. A 3D shape reconstruction is also performed depending upon the edged or edgeless objects classified from the tactile images. In the second stage, the hybrid recognition scheme utilizes the feature set comprising both the previously obtained regional descriptors features and some gradient-related information from the reconstructed object-shape image for the final recognition in corresponding four classes of objects viz. planar, one-edged object, two-edged object and cylindrical objects. The hybrid strategy achieves 97.62 % classification accuracy, while the conventional recognition scheme reaches only to 92.60 %. Moreover, the proposed algorithm has been proved to be less noise prone and more statistically robust. PMID:24469960

  19. Approximation of a foreign object using x-rays, reference photographs and 3D reconstruction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Matt; Shanmugam, Mohan

    2013-12-01

    This case study describes how a 3D animation was created to approximate the depth and angle of a foreign object (metal bar) that had become embedded into a patient's head. A pre-operative CT scan was not available as the patient could not fit though the CT scanner, therefore a post surgical CT scan, x-ray and photographic images were used. A surface render was made of the skull and imported into Blender (a 3D animation application). The metal bar was not available, however images of a similar object that was retrieved from the scene by the ambulance crew were used to recreate a 3D model. The x-ray images were then imported into Blender and used as background images in order to align the skull reconstruction and metal bar at the correct depth/angle. A 3D animation was then created to fully illustrate the angle and depth of the iron bar in the skull. PMID:24206011

  20. A computer simulation platform for the optimization of a breast tomosynthesis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In breast tomosynthesis there is a compromise between resolution, noise, and acquisition speed for a given glandular dose. The purpose of the present work is to develop a simulation platform to investigate the potential imaging performance for the many possible tomosynthesis system configurations. The simulation platform was used to investigate the dependence of image blur and signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) for several different tomosynthesis acquisition configurations. Simulated projections of a slanted thin tungsten wire placed in different object planes were modified according to the detector's modulation transfer function (MTF), with or without pixel binning. In addition, the focal spot blur (FSB), which depends on the location of the wire, the system geometry, the source-detector movement speed, and the exposure time, was also incorporated into the projections. Both expectation maximization (EM) and filtered back projection (FBP) based algorithms were used for 3D image reconstruction. The in-plane MTF was calculated from the reconstructed image of the wire. To evaluate the noise performance, simulated noiseless projections of calcification and tumor in uniform breast tissue were modified with the noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from a cascaded linear system model for the detector for a given x-ray dose. The SDNR of the reconstructed images was calculated with different tomosynthesis configurations, e.g., pixel binning, view number, and angular range. Our results showed that for a source-to-imager distance (SID) of 66 cm, pixel binning (2x2) caused more degradation to the in-plane MTF than the blur caused by the moving focal spot and reconstruction. The in-depth resolution can be improved by increasing the angular range

  1. Quantitative roughness characterization and 3D reconstruction of electrode surface using cyclic voltammetry and SEM image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Area measurements from cyclic voltammetry (CV) and image from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to characterize electrode statistical morphology, 3D surface reconstruction and its electroactivity. SEM images of single phased materials correspond to two-dimensional (2D) projections of 3D structures, leading to an incomplete characterization. Lack of third dimension information in SEM image is circumvented using equivalence between denoised SEM image and CV area measurements. This CV-SEM method can be used to estimate power spectral density (PSD), width, gradient, finite fractal nature of roughness and local morphology of the electrode. We show that the surface morphological statistical property like distribution function of gradient can be related to local electro-activity. Electrode surface gradient micrographs generated here can provide map of electro-activity sites. Finally, the densely and uniformly packed small gradient over the Pt-surface is the determining criterion for high intrinsic electrode activity.

  2. 3D tracking the Brownian motion of colloidal particles using digital holographic microscopy and joint reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Fournel, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    In-line digital holography is a valuable tool for sizing, locating and tracking micro- or nano-objects in a volume. When a parametric imaging model is available, Inverse Problems approaches provide a straightforward estimate of the object parameters by fitting data with the model, thereby allowing accurate reconstruction. As recently proposed and demonstrated, combining pixel super-resolution techniques with Inverse Problems approaches improves the estimation of particle size and 3D-position. Here we demonstrate the accurate tracking of colloidal particles in Brownian motion. Particle size and 3D-position are jointly optimized from video holograms acquired with a digital holographic microscopy set up based on a "low-end" microscope objective ($\\times 20$, $\\rm NA\\ 0.5$). Exploiting information redundancy makes it possible to characterize particles with a standard deviation of 15 nm in size and a theoretical resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 nm$^3$ for position under additive white Gaussian noise assumption.

  3. 3D tracking the Brownian motion of colloidal particles using digital holographic microscopy and joint reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Nicolas; Fournier, Corinne; Fournel, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    In-line digital holography is a valuable tool for sizing, locating and tracking micro- or nano-objects in a volume. When a parametric imaging model is available, Inverse Problems approaches provide a straightforward estimate of the object parameters by fitting data with the model, thereby allowing accurate reconstruction. As recently proposed and demonstrated, combining pixel super-resolution techniques with Inverse Problems approaches improves the estimation of particle size and 3D-position. Here we demonstrate the accurate tracking of colloidal particles in Brownian motion. Particle size and 3D-position are jointly optimized from video holograms acquired with a digital holographic microscopy set up based on a "low-end" microscope objective ($\\times 20$, $\\rm NA\\ 0.5$). Exploiting information redundancy makes it possible to characterize particles with a standard deviation of 15 nm in size and a theoretical resolution of 2 x 2 x 5 nm$^3$ for position under additive white Gaussian noise assumption.

  4. 3D CAD model reconstruction of a human femur from MRI images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benaissa EL FAHIME

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical practice and life sciences take full advantage of progress in engineering disciplines, in particular the computer assisted placement technique in hip surgery. This paper describes the three dimensional model reconstruction of human femur from MRI images. The developed program enables to obtain digital shape of 3D femur recognized by all CAD software and allows an accurate placement of the femoral component. This technic provides precise measurement of implant alignment during hip resurfacing or total hip arthroplasty, thereby reducing the risk of component mal-positioning and femoral neck notching.

  5. Implementation of the Hough Transform for 3D Track Reconstruction in Drift Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Belkov, A A

    2002-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the method for 3D reconstruction of the straight tracks in the tracking system consisting of the drift-chamber stereo layers. The method is based on the Hough-transform approach - the discrete case of more general Radon transform - and takes into account both coordinates of the hit wires and drift distances not only for the measurements in one projection, but also in the rotated stereo layers. The proposed method allows one to resolve the right-left ambiguity and provides the accordance between vertical and horizontal projections of the track.

  6. Implementation of the Hough Transform for 3D Track Reconstruction in Drift Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    Belkov, Ar.

    2002-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the method for 3D reconstruction of the straight tracks in the tracking system consisting of the drift-chamber stereo layers. The method is based on the Hough-transform approach - the discrete case of more general Radon transform - and takes into account both coordinates of the hit wires and drift distances not only for the measurements in one projection, but also in the rotated stereo layers. The proposed method allows one to resolve the right-left...

  7. Molecular-Frame 3D Photoelectron Momentum Distributions by Tomographic Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurer, Jochen; Dimitrovski, Darko

    2012-01-01

    Naphthalene molecules are fixed in space by a laser field and rotated, in 2° steps, over 180°. For each orientation, they are ionized by an intense, circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse, and the 2D projection of the photoelectron momentum distribution is recorded. The molecular-frame 3D momentum distribution is obtained by tomographic reconstruction from all 90 projections. It reveals an anisotropic electron distribution, angularly shifted in the polarization plane, that is not accessible by the 2D momentum images. Our theoretical analysis shows that the magnitude of the angular shift is very sensitive to the exact form of the laser-modified molecular potential.

  8. Compensation and evaluation of errors of 3D reconstructions from confocal microscopic images.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    ?apek, Martin; Br?ža, Petr; Kocandová, L.; Janá?ek, Ji?í; Kubínová, Lucie; Vagnerová, R.

    Vol. 1. Berlin : Springer, 2008 - (Luysberg, M.; Tillman, K.; Weirich, T.), s. 781-782 ISBN 978-3-540-85154-7. [European Microscopy Congress EMC 2008 /14./. Aachen (DE), 01.09.2008-05.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA100110502; GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA500200510; GA ?R(CZ) GA102/08/0691 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * confocal microscopy * error Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics

  9. Cryptotomography: reconstructing 3D Fourier intensities from randomly oriented single-shot diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, N D; Bogan, M J; Elser, V; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Bajt, S; Hajdu, J; Ekeberg, T; Maia, F R N C; Schulz, J; Seibert, M M; Iwan, B; Timneanu, N; Marchesini, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Lomb, L; Frank, M; Liang, M; Chapman, H N

    2010-06-01

    We reconstructed the 3D Fourier intensity distribution of monodisperse prolate nanoparticles using single-shot 2D coherent diffraction patterns collected at DESY's FLASH facility when a bright, coherent, ultrafast x-ray pulse intercepted individual particles of random, unmeasured orientations. This first experimental demonstration of cryptotomography extended the expansion-maximization-compression framework to accommodate unmeasured fluctuations in photon fluence and loss of data due to saturation or background scatter. This work is an important step towards realizing single-shot diffraction imaging of single biomolecules. PMID:20867179

  10. Cryptotomography: reconstructing 3D Fourier intensities from randomly oriented single-shot diffraction patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, N D; Elser, V; Barty, A; Boutet, S; Bajt, S; Hajdu, J; Ekeberg, T; Maia, F R N C; Schulz, J; Seibert, M M; Iwan, B; Timneanu, N; Marchesini, S; Schlichting, I; Shoeman, R L; Lomb, L; Frank, M; Liang, M; Chapman, H N

    2010-01-01

    We reconstructed the 3D Fourier intensity distribution of mono-disperse prolate nano-particles using single-shot 2D coherent diffraction patterns collected at DESY's FLASH facility when a bright, coherent, ultrafast X-ray pulse intercepted individual particles of random, unmeasured orientations. This first experimental demonstration of cryptotomography extended the Expansion-Maximization-Compression (EMC) framework to accommodate unmeasured fluctuations in photon fluence and loss of data due to saturation or background scatter. This work is an important step towards realizing single-shot diffraction imaging of single biomolecules.

  11. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    OpenAIRE

    Fogtmann, Mads; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, François; Studholme, Colin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3-D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid...

  12. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher; Cheng, Xi; Chapman, Teresa; Wilm, Jakob; Rousseau, Francois; Studholme, Colin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid usi...

  13. Detector modeling techniques for pre-clinical 3D PET reconstruction on the GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magdics, M.; Toth, B.; Szecsi, L. [Budapest Univ. of Technology and Economics (Hungary). Dept. of Control Engineering and Information Technology; Semmelweis Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncotherapy] [and others

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents methods to the efficient handling of gamma interaction within the detector crystal matrix in ML-EM-based 3D reconstruction algorithms for positron emission tomography (PET). Geometric calculations as well as the approximation of inter-crystal scattering are executed on the GPU. The main characteristics of the scattering effect are captured by factorized models incorporating both on-the-fly simulation and the use of pre-computed data. The discussed methods involve the modification of the detector radius in the geometric model; applying 4D shifting of the LORs regarding the precalculated crystal-transport probability distributions; replacing the simulated detector response function by an approximated one; or full Monte Carlo simulation of the detector. Results of these different approaches are reported using phantom simulations as well as reconstructing real measurements performed on the NanoPET trademark /CT small animal PET scanner. (orig.)

  14. Improved 3D reconstruction in smart-room environments using ToF imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðmundsson, Sigurjón Árni; Pardas, Montse

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of Time-of-Flight (ToF) cameras in smart-rooms and how this leads to improved results in segmenting the people in the room from the background and consequently better 3D reconstruction of foreground objects. A calibrated rig consisting of one Swissranger SR3100 Time-of-Flight range camera and a high resolution standard CCD camera is set in a smart-room containing five other standard cameras. A probabilistic background model is used to segment each view and a shape from silhouette volume is reconstructed. It is shown that the presence of the range camera gives ways of eliminating regional artifacts and therefore creating a more robust input for higher level applications such as people tracking or human motion analysis.

  15. Nonintrusive 3D reconstruction of human bone models to simulate their bio-mechanical response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Tsouknidas; Antonis, Lontos; Savvas, Savvakis; Nikolaos, Michailidis

    2012-06-01

    3D finite element models representing functional parts of the human skeletal system, have been repeatedly introduced over the last years, to simulate biomechanical response of anatomical characteristics or investigate surgical treatment. The reconstruction of geometrically accurate FEM models, poses a significant challenge for engineers and physicians, as recent advances in tissue engineering dictate highly customized implants, while facilitating the production of alloplast materials that are employed to restore, replace or supplement the function of human tissue. The premises of every accurate reconstruction method, is to encapture the precise geometrical characteristics of the examined tissue and thus the selection of a sufficient imaging technique is of the up-most importance. This paper reviews existing and potential applications related to the current state-of-the-art of medical imaging and simulation techniques. The procedures are examined by introducing their concepts; strengths and limitations, while the authors also present part of their recent activities in these areas. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. GPS tomography: validation of reconstructed 3-D humidity fields with radiosonde profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shangguan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Water vapor plays an important role in meteorological applications; GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ therefore developed a tomographic system to derive 3-D distributions of the tropospheric water vapor above Germany using GPS data from about 300 ground stations. Input data for the tomographic reconstructions are generated by the Earth Parameter and Orbit determination System (EPOS software of the GFZ, which provides zenith total delay (ZTD, integrated water vapor (IWV and slant total delay (STD data operationally with a temporal resolution of 2.5 min (STD and 15 min (ZTD, IWV. The water vapor distribution in the atmosphere is derived by tomographic reconstruction techniques. The quality of the solution is dependent on many factors such as the spatial coverage of the atmosphere with slant paths, the spatial distribution of their intersections and the accuracy of the input observations. Independent observations are required to validate the tomographic reconstructions and to get precise information on the accuracy of the derived 3-D water vapor fields. To determine the quality of the GPS tomography, more than 8000 vertical water vapor profiles at 13 German radiosonde stations were used for the comparison. The radiosondes were launched twice a day (at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC in 2007. In this paper, parameters of the entire profiles such as the wet refractivity, and the zenith wet delay have been compared. Before the validation the temporal and spatial distribution of the slant paths, serving as a basis for tomographic reconstruction, as well as their angular distribution were studied. The mean wet refractivity differences between tomography and radiosonde data for all points vary from ?1.3 to 0.3, and the root mean square is within the range of 6.5–9. About 32% of 6803 profiles match well, 23% match badly and 45% are difficult to classify as they match only in parts.

  17. GPS tomography. Validation of reconstructed 3-D humidity fields with radiosonde profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shangguan, M.; Bender, M.; Ramatschi, M.; Dick, G.; Wickert, J. [Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), Potsdam (Germany); Raabe, A. [Leipzig Institute for Meteorology (LIM), Leipzig (Germany); Galas, R. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Dept. for Geodesy and Geoinformation Sciences

    2013-11-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in meteorological applications; GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) therefore developed a tomographic system to derive 3-D distributions of the tropospheric water vapor above Germany using GPS data from about 300 ground stations. Input data for the tomographic reconstructions are generated by the Earth Parameter and Orbit determination System (EPOS) software of the GFZ, which provides zenith total delay (ZTD), integrated water vapor (IWV) and slant total delay (STD) data operationally with a temporal resolution of 2.5 min (STD) and 15 min (ZTD, IWV). The water vapor distribution in the atmosphere is derived by tomographic reconstruction techniques. The quality of the solution is dependent on many factors such as the spatial coverage of the atmosphere with slant paths, the spatial distribution of their intersections and the accuracy of the input observations. Independent observations are required to validate the tomographic reconstructions and to get precise information on the accuracy of the derived 3-D water vapor fields. To determine the quality of the GPS tomography, more than 8000 vertical water vapor profiles at 13 German radiosonde stations were used for the comparison. The radiosondes were launched twice a day (at 00:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC) in 2007. In this paper, parameters of the entire profiles such as the wet refractivity, and the zenith wet delay have been compared. Before the validation the temporal and spatial distribution of the slant paths, serving as a basis for tomographic reconstruction, as well as their angular distribution were studied. The mean wet refractivity differences between tomography and radiosonde data for all points vary from -1.3 to 0.3, and the root mean square is within the range of 6.5-9. About 32% of 6803 profiles match well, 23% match badly and 45% are difficult to classify as they match only in parts.

  18. Out-of-plane photon compensation for 3-D SPECT image reconstruction with generalized matrix inverses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computationally efficient 3-D image reconstruction method which compensates for detected out-of-plane photons has been developed for SPECT image reconstruction with generalized matrix inverses (GMI). Fully 3-D image reconstruction is approximated by a series of coupled 2-D image reconstructions for projection data acquired with parallel hole collimators, significantly reducing computer memory requirements. In this method, projection data are compensated for detected scattered photons using dual energy window scatter subtraction (Step 1). An initial source activity estimate in each transverse plane is then made using line source response functions in the system matrix (Step 2). With these activity estimates the contributions of out-of-plane unscattered photons are modeled and subtracted from the projection data, and an updated source activity estimate is computed (Step 3). For noise-free projection data from a Monte Carlo simulated myocardial perfusion study, lesion contrast increases and activity spillover from the myocardium into the adjacent cardiac blood pool is reduced. For projection data with Poisson noise, activity estimates from Step 3 are inferior to those from Step 2. One reason is that the relative noise level of the projection data is substantially increased by subtracting the estimated out-of-plane contribution. The Step 3 activity estimation is also sensitive to the source activity distribution used for out-of-plane unscattered photon compensation. Though the out-of-plane compensation technique of Step 3 provides some benefit for noise-free projection data, this study suggests that it may not be well-suited for practical application to count-limited clinical SPECT studies

  19. Enhanced 3D PET OSEM reconstruction using inter-update Metz filtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an enhancement of the OSEM (ordered set expectation maximization) algorithm for 3D PET reconstruction, which we call the inter-update Metz filtered OSEM (IMF-OSEM). The IMF-OSEM algorithm incorporates filtering action into the image updating process in order to improve the quality of the reconstruction. With this technique, the multiplicative correction image - ordinarily used to update image estimates in plain OSEM - is applied to a Metz-filtered version of the image estimate at certain intervals. In addition, we present a software implementation that employs several high-speed features to accelerate reconstruction. These features include, firstly, forward and back projection functions which make full use of symmetry as well as a fast incremental computation technique. Secondly, the software has the capability of running in parallel mode on several processors. The parallelization approach employed yields a significant speed-up, which is nearly independent of the amount of data. Together, these features lead to reasonable reconstruction times even when using large image arrays and non-axially compressed projection data. The performance of IMF-OSEM was tested on phantom data acquired on the GE Advance scanner. Our results demonstrate that an appropriate choice of Metz filter parameters can improve the contrast-noise balance of certain regions of interest relative to both plain and post-filtered OSEM, and to the GE commercial reprojection algorithm software. (author)

  20. Towards the reconstruction of 3D orientation information from direction-sensitive X-ray projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For medical in vivo applications the resolution of a computed tomography (CT) scan is limited by the acceptable patient received dose. Thus it does not allow to image microstructures in the body. Novel X-ray contrast mechanisms provide two additional signal channels, phase contrast and dark-field contrast. In this study we report on our progress to use the dark-field signal to gain micro-structural information by reconstructing a tensor field describing the local sample scattering power. For that purpose we developed an experimental setup composed of an X-ray tube, a Talbot Lau interferometer, an Euler cradle to orient the sample and a detector. This setup allows a direct measurement of the sample scattering strength in all directions. The reconstruction of several test samples is done using filtered back-projection or the algebraic reconstruction technique. The definition of the physical model behind the reconstructed quantity is obtained from a second ansatz by using 3D density map (micro-CT) data as an input to a computer simulation of the whole setup. We consider this project important for diagnostic improvements in the case of bone pathologies. (orig.)

  1. Towards the reconstruction of 3D orientation information from direction-sensitive X-ray projections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malecki, Andreas; Biernath, Thomas; Bech, Martin; Potdevin, Guillaume; Pfeiffer, Franz [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Physics (E17); Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. of Medical Engineering (IMETUM); Lasser, Tobias [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Chair for Computer Aided Medical Procedures and Augmented Reality (CAMP)

    2011-07-01

    For medical in vivo applications the resolution of a computed tomography (CT) scan is limited by the acceptable patient received dose. Thus it does not allow to image microstructures in the body. Novel X-ray contrast mechanisms provide two additional signal channels, phase contrast and dark-field contrast. In this study we report on our progress to use the dark-field signal to gain micro-structural information by reconstructing a tensor field describing the local sample scattering power. For that purpose we developed an experimental setup composed of an X-ray tube, a Talbot Lau interferometer, an Euler cradle to orient the sample and a detector. This setup allows a direct measurement of the sample scattering strength in all directions. The reconstruction of several test samples is done using filtered back-projection or the algebraic reconstruction technique. The definition of the physical model behind the reconstructed quantity is obtained from a second ansatz by using 3D density map (micro-CT) data as an input to a computer simulation of the whole setup. We consider this project important for diagnostic improvements in the case of bone pathologies. (orig.)

  2. 3D Monte Carlo Reconstruction and Characterization of LiCoO2 Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Wei, JIANG Fang-Ming, CHEN Zhi, WANG Ying, ZHAO Feng-Gang, ZENG Yu-Qun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction and characterization of the porous composite electrode via experimental and numerical approaches are the basis and prerequisite of pore-scale modeling. The Monte Carlo approach was employed to reconstruct the LiCoO2 cathode of a Li-ion battery. The reconstructed electrode resolves sub-micrometer microstructure, thus evidently distinguishing the three individual phases: LiCoO2 as active material, pores (electrolyte, and additives. An extensive characterization was subsequently performed to calculate some important structural parameters and transport properties, including the geometrical connectivity and the specific surface area, etc. Particularly, a self-developed D3Q15 LB (Lattice Boltzmann model was used to calculate the effective thermal (or electric conductivity and the effective species diffusivity in electrolyte (or solid phase, and the tortuosity of an individual phase. The reconstructed 3D microstructure is consistent with the real cathode microstructure concerning several important statistical features including porosity, volume fraction of each phase, and two-point correlation functions etc. LB model predictions indicate that the effective transport coefficients are closely related to the micro-morphology in electrodes.

  3. Reconstructing 2-D/3-D Building Shapes from Spaceborne Tomographic Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, M.; Zhu, X. X.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we present an approach that allows automatic (parametric) reconstruction of building shapes in 2-D/3-D using TomoSAR point clouds. These point clouds are generated by processing radar image stacks via advanced interferometric technique, called SAR tomography. The proposed approach reconstructs the building outline by exploiting both the available roof and façade information. Roof points are extracted out by employing a surface normals based region growing procedure via selected seed points while the extraction of façade points is based on thresholding the point scatterer density SD estimated by robust M-estimator. Spatial clustering is then applied to the extracted roof points in a way such that each roof cluster represents an individual building. Extracted façade points are reconstructed and afterwards incorporated to the segmented roof cluster to reconstruct the complete building shape. Initial building footprints are derived by employing alpha shapes method that are later regularized. Finally, rectilinear constraints are added to yield better geometrically looking building shapes. The proposed approach is illustrated and validated by examples using TomoSAR point clouds generated from a stack of TerraSAR-X high-resolution spotlight images from ascending orbit only covering two different test areas with one containing relatively smaller buildings in densely populated regions and the other containing moderate sized buildings in the city of Las Vegas.

  4. Automatic detection of patient position for incorporation in exact 3D reconstruction for emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: SPECT involves acquiring a set of projection images using one or more rotating gamma cameras. The projections are then reconstructed to create transverse slices. Patient motion during the scan can introduce inconsistencies into the data leading to artifacts. There remains a need for robust and effective motion correction. One approach uses the (corrupt) data itself to derive the patient position at each projection angle. Corrected data is periodically incorporated into a 3-D reconstruction. Fundamental aspects of the algorithm mechanics, particularly performance in the presence of Poisson noise, have been examined. Brain SPECT studies were simulated using a digital version of the Huffman brain phantom. Projection datasets with Poisson noise imposed, generated for different positions of the phantom, were combined and reconstructed to produce motion-corrupted reconstructions. To examine the behaviour of the cost function as the object position was changed, the corrupted re-construction was forward projected and the mean square difference (MSD) between the resulting re-projections and corresponding original projections was calculated. The ability to detect mis-positioned projections for different degrees of freedom, the importance of using dual-head camera geometry, and the effect of smoothing the original projections prior to the MSD calculation were assessed. Re-projection of the corrupt reconstruction was able to correctly identify mis-positioned projection data. The degree of movement as defined by MSD was more easily identified for translations than for rotations. Noise resulted in an increasing bias that made it difficult to distinguish the minimum MSD, particularly for z-axis rotations. This was improved by median filtering of projections. Right-angled dual-head geometry is necessary to provide stability to the algorithm and to better identify motion in all 6 degrees of freedom. These findings will assist the optimisation of a fully automated motion correction algorithm. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  5. 3D finite element model for reconstructed mixed-conducting cathodes: I. Performance quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is strongly affected by electrode polarization losses, which are related to the composition and the microstructure of the porous materials. A model that can decouple the effects associated to the geometrical arrangement, shape and size of the particles together with material distribution on one side and the material properties on the other can give a relevant improvement in the understanding of the underlying processes. A porous mixed ionic–electronic conducting (MIEC) cathode was reconstructed by a tomography technique based on focused ion beam coupled with scanning electronic microscope (FIB/SEM). The detailed geometry of the microstructure is here used for 3D calculations of the electrochemical processes in the electrode. In addition, the area specific resistance (ASRcat) of the reconstructed porous cathode is calculated as a performance index. To this aim we have developed a model based on the finite element method (FEM), which numerical solution requires the use of high performance computing techniques (HPC) because of the detailed geometry. In this work we show the comparison of the 3D microstructure model with a well established 1D averaged model.

  6. Reconstruction and Visualization of Coordinated 3D Cell Migration Based on Optical Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappe, Christopher P; Schutz, Lucas; Gunther, Stefan; Hufnagel, Lars; Lemke, Steffen; Leitte, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Animal development is marked by the repeated reorganization of cells and cell populations, which ultimately determine form and shape of the growing organism. One of the central questions in developmental biology is to understand precisely how cells reorganize, as well as how and to what extent this reorganization is coordinated. While modern microscopes can record video data for every cell during animal development in 3D+t, analyzing these videos remains a major challenge: reconstruction of comprehensive cell tracks turned out to be very demanding especially with decreasing data quality and increasing cell densities. In this paper, we present an analysis pipeline for coordinated cellular motions in developing embryos based on the optical flow of a series of 3D images. We use numerical integration to reconstruct cellular long-term motions in the optical flow of the video, we take care of data validation, and we derive a LIC-based, dense flow visualization for the resulting pathlines. This approach allows us to handle low video quality such as noisy data or poorly separated cells, and it allows the biologists to get a comprehensive understanding of their data by capturing dynamic growth processes in stills. We validate our methods using three videos of growing fruit fly embryos. PMID:26529743

  7. Reconstruction Error of Calibration Volume's Coordinates for 3D Swimming Kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Pedro; Machado, Leandro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy and reliability of above and underwater 3D reconstruction of three calibration volumes with different control points disposal (#1 - on vertical and horizontal rods; #2 - on vertical and horizontal rods and facets; #3 - on crossed horizontal rods). Each calibration volume (3 × 2 × 3 m) was positioned in a 25 m swimming pool (half above and half below the water surface) and recorded with four underwater and two above water synchronised cameras (50 Hz). Reconstruction accuracy was determined calculating the RMS error of twelve validation points. The standard deviation across all digitisation of the same marker was used for assessing the reliability estimation. Comparison among different number of control points showed that the set of 24 points produced the most accurate results. The volume #2 presented higher accuracy (RMS errors: 5.86 and 3.59 mm for x axis, 3.45 and 3.11 mm for y axis and 4.38 and 4.00 mm for z axis, considering under and above water, respectively) and reliability (SD: underwater cameras ± [0.2; 0.6] mm; above water cameras ± [0.2; 0.3] mm) that may be considered suitable for 3D swimming kinematic analysis. Results revealed that RMS error was greater during underwater analysis, possibly due to refraction. PMID:23486761

  8. A 3D endoscopy reconstruction as a saliency map for analysis of polyp shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Josue; Martínez, Fabio; Gómez, Martín.; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A first diagnosis of colorectal cancer is performed by examination of polyp shape and appearance during an endoscopy routine procedure. However, the video-endoscopy is highly noisy because exacerbated physiological conditions like increased motility or secretion may limit the visual analysis of lesions. In this work a 3D reconstruction of the digestive tract is proposed, facilitating the polyp shape evaluation by highlighting its surface geometry and allowing an analysis from different perspectives. The method starts by a spatio-temporal map, constructed to group the different regions of the tract by their similar dynamic patterns during the sequence. Then, such map was convolved with a second derivative of a Gaussian kernel that emulates the camera distortion and allows to highlight the polyp surface. The position initialization in each frame of the kernel was computed from expert manual delineation and propagated along the sequence based on. Results show reliable reconstructions, with a salient 3D polyp structure that can then be better observed.

  9. 3D surface reconstruction and FIB microscopy of worn alumina hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in alumina-on-alumina total hip replacements (THR) continues to grow for the young and active patient due to their superior wear performance and biocompatibility compared to the alternative traditional polymer/metal prostheses. While alumina on alumina bearings offer an excellent solution, a region of high wear, known as stripe wear, is commonly observed on retrieved alumina hip components that poses concern. These in-vivo stripe wear mechanisms can be replicated in vitro by the introduction of micro-separation during the simulated walking cycle in hip joint simulation. However, the understanding of the mechanisms behind the stripe wear processes is relatively poor. 3D topographic reconstructions of titled SEM stereo pairs from different zones have been obtained to determine the local worn surface topography. Focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy was applied to examine the subsurface damage across the stripe wear. The paper presents novel images of sub-surface microcracks in alumina along with 3D reconstructions of the worn ceramic surfaces and a classification of four distinct wear zones following microseparation in hip prostheses.

  10. Stereo-vision and 3D reconstruction for nuclear mobile robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to perceive the geometric structure of the surrounding environment of a mobile robot, a 3D reconstruction system has been developed. Its main purpose is to provide geometric information to an operator who has to telepilot the vehicle in a nuclear power plant. The perception system is split into two parts: the vision part and the map building part. Vision is enhanced with a fusion process that rejects bas samples over space and time. The vision is based on trinocular stereo-vision which provides a range image of the image contours. It performs line contour correlation on horizontal image pairs and vertical image pairs. The results are then spatially fused in order to have one distance image, with a quality independent of the orientation of the contour. The 3D reconstruction is based on grid-based sensor fusion. As the robot moves and perceives its environment, distance data is accumulated onto a regular square grid, taking into account the uncertainty of the sensor through a sensor measurement statistical model. This approach allows both spatial and temporal fusion. Uncertainty due to sensor position and robot position is also integrated into the absolute local map. This system is modular and generic and can integrate 2D laser range finder and active vision. (author)

  11. A New 3D Shape Reconstruction Method for celestial bodies: Multi-Resolution Stereophotoclinometry by Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capanna, Claire; Jorda, Laurent; Gesquière, Gilles; Groussin, Olivier; Gutiérrez, Pedro; Hviid, Stubbe; Lamy, Philippe; Rodionov, Sergey; Vibert, Didier

    2015-04-01

    In astrophysics, direct measures on celestial bodies are not always feasible. 3D shape models allow to overcome this kind of problem. We thus developed a new 3D shape reconstruction method which combines stereo, photoclinometry and the deformation of a triangular mesh describing the surface of the object. The method deforms the mesh - initially a sphere - until the set of synthetic images, created from the mesh (Jorda et al., SPIE 2010) match the observed one. Stereo control points can be used as a constraint in the deformation of the mesh, but it is not required at low resolutions. This new technique has been applied to images of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko acquired by the OSIRIS instrument aboard the Rosetta spacecraft. It allowed to reconstruct the shape of the nucleus and to retrieve its rotational parameters from low-resolution images obtained with the narrow-angle camera of OSIRIS in mid-July 2014, when stereo-based techniques were still inapplicable. The technique has also been applied to higher-resolution images of the nucleus later on, using the stereo information as a constraint.

  12. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification Aplicabilidade da reconstrução facial em 3D-TC para identificação individual forense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara dos Santos Rocha

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT. The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using craniometric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10 craniometric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution.A tomografia computadorizada (TC tem sido utilizada em diversas áreas clínicas da Odontologia; utilizam-se tanto seus cortes originais quanto as reconstruções em duas e três dimensões (2D-TC e 3D-TC. O presente estudo propõe avaliar a precisão das medidas lineares realizadas na 3D-TC, utilizando a craniometria, para fins de identificação individual na Odontologia Forense. Cinco cabeças de cadáveres foram submetidas a tomografia computadorizada em espiral por meio de cortes axiais e reconstruções em 3D-TC foram obtidas por meio da técnica de volume, utilizando recursos da computação gráfica. Medidas craniométricas (n = 10 foram determinadas nas imagens em 3D-TC por dois examinadores independentemente, duas vezes cada um, e uma análise de erro padrão percentual das medidas intra- e inter-examinadores foi realizada. Os resultados demonstraram um erro padrão percentual baixo apresentado por essas medidas, variando entre 0,85% e 3,09%. Em conclusão, as medidas lineares obtidas nas estruturas ósseas e tegumentares foram consideradas precisas em 3D-TC, com alta qualidade e resolução de imagem.

  13. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification / Aplicabilidade da reconstrução facial em 3D-TC para identificação individual forense

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sara dos Santos, Rocha; Dalton Luiz de Paula, Ramos; Marcelo de Gusmão Paraíso, Cavalcanti.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A tomografia computadorizada (TC) tem sido utilizada em diversas áreas clínicas da Odontologia; utilizam-se tanto seus cortes originais quanto as reconstruções em duas e três dimensões (2D-TC e 3D-TC). O presente estudo propõe avaliar a precisão das medidas lineares realizadas na 3D-TC, utilizando a [...] craniometria, para fins de identificação individual na Odontologia Forense. Cinco cabeças de cadáveres foram submetidas a tomografia computadorizada em espiral por meio de cortes axiais e reconstruções em 3D-TC foram obtidas por meio da técnica de volume, utilizando recursos da computação gráfica. Medidas craniométricas (n = 10) foram determinadas nas imagens em 3D-TC por dois examinadores independentemente, duas vezes cada um, e uma análise de erro padrão percentual das medidas intra- e inter-examinadores foi realizada. Os resultados demonstraram um erro padrão percentual baixo apresentado por essas medidas, variando entre 0,85% e 3,09%. Em conclusão, as medidas lineares obtidas nas estruturas ósseas e tegumentares foram consideradas precisas em 3D-TC, com alta qualidade e resolução de imagem. Abstract in english Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using craniometric patterns for indi [...] vidual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) craniometric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution.

  14. Application of 3D reconstruction for surgical treatment of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yi-Biao; Bai, Lei; Aji, Tuerganaili; Jiang, Yi; Zhao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Jin-Hui; Shao, Ying-Mei; Liu, Wen-Ya; Wen, Hao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the reliability and accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction for liver resection in patients with hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE). METHODS: One-hundred and six consecutive patients with HAE underwent hepatectomy at our hospital between May 2011 and January 2015. Fifty-nine patients underwent preoperative 3D reconstruction and “virtual” 3D liver resection before surgery (Group A). Another 47 patients used conventional imaging methods for preoperative assessment (Group B). Outcomes of hepatectomy were compared between the two groups. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in preoperative data between the two groups. Compared with patients in Group B, those in Group A had a significantly shorter operation time (227.1 ± 51.4 vs 304.6 ± 88.1 min; P < 0.05), less intraoperative blood loss (308.1 ± 135.4 vs 458.1 ± 175.4 mL; P < 0.05), and lower requirement for intraoperative blood transfusion (186.4 ± 169.6 vs 289.4 ± 199.2 mL; P < 0.05). Estimated resection liver volumes in both groups had good correlation with actual graft weight (Group A: r = 0.978; Group B: r = 0.960). There was a significant higher serum level of albumin in Group A (26.3 ± 5.9 vs 22.6 ± 4.3 g/L, P < 0.05). Other postoperative laboratory parameters (serum levels of aminotransferase and bilirubin; prothrombin time) and duration of postoperative hospital stay were similar. Sixteen complications occurred in Group A and 19 in Group B. All patients were followed for 3-46 (mean, 17.3) mo. There was no recurrence of lesions in Group A, but two recurrences in Group B. There were three deaths: two from cerebrovascular accident, and one from car accident. CONCLUSION: 3D reconstruction provides comprehensive and precise anatomical information for the liver. It also improves the chance of success and reduces the risk of hepatectomy in HAE. PMID:26401085

  15. 3-D-CT reconstructions in fractures of the skull base and facial skeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3-D reconstructions of the skull base, temporal bone, and skull fractures were compared to 2-D CT to evaluate the diagnostic value in traumatized patients. 38 patients with 22 fractures of the facial skeleton (orbita, zygomatic, Le Fort), 12 temporal bone, and 4 skull fractures were investigated. Subjective grading was perfomed by two physicians (ENT/RAD) in respect of quality diagnostic validity and estimated clinical impact. The average image validity and quality were graded good. In the temporal bone the average information supplied by 3-D was of inferior value; here, the lack of information regarding the inner ear structures was responsible for the lack of clinical impact. In fractures of the facial skeleton and the skull base of good to very good image quality was seen and clinical relevance was high. 3-D CT is capable of demonstrating fractures, which is of little value in the temporal bone, but of high value in the skull base and the facial skeleton, especially if surfaces are involved or fragments are displaced. (orig.)

  16. On the 3-D reconstruction of Coronal Mass Ejections using coronagraph data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mierla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronal Mass ejections (CMEs are enormous eruptions of magnetized plasma expelled from the Sun into the interplanetary space, over the course of hours to days. They can create major disturbances in the interplanetary medium and trigger severe magnetic storms when they collide with the Earth's magnetosphere. It is important to know their real speed, propagation direction and 3-D configuration in order to accurately predict their arrival time at the Earth. Using data from the SECCHI coronagraphs onboard the STEREO mission, which was launched in October 2006, we can infer the propagation direction and the 3-D structure of such events. In this review, we first describe different techniques that were used to model the 3-D configuration of CMEs in the coronagraph field of view (up to 15 R?. Then, we apply these techniques to different CMEs observed by various coronagraphs. A comparison of results obtained from the application of different reconstruction algorithms is presented and discussed.

  17. An Analytical Review of Stereovision Techniques to Reconstruct 3D Coordinates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheel Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Stereovision based on 3D environment reconstruction provides a true picture of real world situations for detection of objects’ locations. This approach has specific use in the scenarios like identifying traffic jams on the roads, locating curves and bends on the roads, finding obstacles in the construction sites, etc. This paper describes different methods used in stereovision to detect images like use of trinocular stereovision, calculating correlation between left and right contours for achieving accuracy, use of prior information with intrinsic and extrinsic parameters, detection of side lane and 3D points of guardrails and fences, use of dense stereovision information, especially in urban environment. The paper also discusses Forward Collision Detection method that uses Elevation Map with Dense Stereovision, tracking of multiple objects using two-level approach and building an enhanced grid that involves obstacle cells. Hybrid dense stereo engine, which is used in urban detection scenarios is also discussed in the paper along with a solution of lane estimation in different situations using particle filtering method. Pattern matching using 3D image for pedestrian detection and lane estimation based on the particle filtering with greyscale images are also explored. The use of the rectangular digital elevation map for transforming stereo based information and the methodology used to enhance the sub pixel accuracy are also part of the paper.

  18. Applying CCD Cameras in Stereo Panorama Systems for 3d Environment Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashamini, A. Sh.; Varshosaz, M.; Saadatseresht, M.

    2012-07-01

    Proper recontruction of 3D environments is nowadays needed by many organizations and applications. In addition to conventional methods the use of stereo panoramas is an appropriate technique to use due to simplicity, low cost and the ability to view an environment the way it is in reality. This paper investigates the ability of applying stereo CCD cameras for 3D reconstruction and presentation of the environment and geometric measuring among that. For this purpose, a rotating stereo panorama was established using two CCDs with a base-length of 350 mm and a DVR (digital video recorder) box. The stereo system was first calibrated using a 3D test-field and used to perform accurate measurements. The results of investigating the system in a real environment showed that although this kind of cameras produce noisy images and they do not have appropriate geometric stability, but they can be easily synchronized, well controlled and reasonable accuracy (about 40 mm in objects at 12 meters distance from the camera) can be achieved.

  19. A new combined prior based reconstruction method for compressed sensing in 3D ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Muhammad S.; Islam, Rafiqul; Tahtali, Murat; Lambert, Andrew J.; Pickering, Mark R.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is one of the most popular medical imaging modalities, with 3D US imaging gaining popularity recently due to its considerable advantages over 2D US imaging. However, as it is limited by long acquisition times and the huge amount of data processing it requires, methods for reducing these factors have attracted considerable research interest. Compressed sensing (CS) is one of the best candidates for accelerating the acquisition rate and reducing the data processing time without degrading image quality. However, CS is prone to introduce noise-like artefacts due to random under-sampling. To address this issue, we propose a combined prior-based reconstruction method for 3D US imaging. A Laplacian mixture model (LMM) constraint in the wavelet domain is combined with a total variation (TV) constraint to create a new regularization regularization prior. An experimental evaluation conducted to validate our method using synthetic 3D US images shows that it performs better than other approaches in terms of both qualitative and quantitative measures.

  20. Contributions à la modélisation 3D des villes : reconstruction 3D de modèles de bâtiments polyédriques à partir d'images aériennes et modélisation 3D de façades à partir de nuage de points 3D et d'images terrestres

    OpenAIRE

    Hammoudi, Karim

    2011-01-01

    L'objectif principal de ce travail est le développement de recherches en modélisation 3D du bâti. En particulier, la recherche en reconstruction 3D de bâtiment est un sujet très développé depuis les années 90. Malgré tout, il paraît nécessaire de poursuivre les recherches dans cet axe étant données que les approches actuelles consacrées à la reconstruction 3D de bâtiment (bien qu'efficaces) rencontrent encore des difficultés en terme de généralisation, de cohérence et de précision. Par ailleu...

  1. The 3D geological model of the 1963 Vajont rockslide, reconstructed with implicit surface methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, Andrea; Massironi, Matteo; Francese, Roberto; Giorgi, Massimo; Taller, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    The Vajont rockslide has been the object of several studies because of its catastrophic consequences and of its particular evolution. Several qualitative or quantitative models have been presented in the last 50 years, but a complete explanation of all the relevant geological and mechanical processes remains elusive. In order to better understand the mechanics and dynamics of the 1963 event, we have reconstructed the first 3D geological model of the rockslide, which allowed us to accurately investigate the rockslide structure and kinematics. The input data for the model consisted in: pre- and post-rockslide geological maps, pre- and post-rockslide orthophotos, pre- and post-rockslide digital elevation models, structural data, boreholes, and geophysical data (2D and 3D seismics and resistivity). All these data have been integrated in a 3D geological model implemented in Gocad®, using the implicit surface modelling method. Results of the 3D geological model include the depth and geometry of the sliding surface, the volume of the two lobes of the rockslide accumulation, kinematics of the rockslide in terms of the vector field of finite displacement, and high quality meshes useful for mechanical and hydrogeological simulations. The latter can include information about the stratigraphy and internal structure of the rock masses and allow tracing the displacement of different material points in the rockslide from the pre-1963-failure to the post-rockslide state. As a general geological conclusion, we may say that the 3D model allowed us to recognize very effectively a sliding surface, whose non-planar geometry is affected by the interference pattern of two regional-scale fold systems. The rockslide is partitioned into two distinct and internally continuous rock masses with a distinct kinematics, which were characterised by a very limited internal deformation during the slide. The continuity of these two large blocks points to a very localized deformation, occurring along a thin, continuous and weak cataclastic horizon. Finally, the chosen modelling strategy, based on both traditional "explicit" and implicit techniques, was found to be very effective for reconstructing complex folded and faulted geological structures, and could be applied also to other geological environments.

  2. Parallel performances of three 3D reconstruction methods on MIMD computers: Feldkamp, block ART and SIRT algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the parallel implementations of reconstruction methods in 3D tomography. 3D tomography requires voluminous data and long computation times. Parallel computing, on MIMD computers, seems to be a good approach to manage this problem. In this study, we present the different steps of the parallelization on an abstract parallel computer. Depending on the method, we use two main approaches to parallelize the algorithms: the local approach and the global approach. Experimental results on MIMD computers are presented. Two 3D images reconstructed from realistic data are showed

  3. Automatic Model Selection for 3d Reconstruction of Buildings from Satellite Imagary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partovi, T.; Arefi, H.; Krauß, T.; Reinartz, P.

    2013-09-01

    Through the improvements of satellite sensor and matching technology, the derivation of 3D models from space borne stereo data obtained a lot of interest for various applications such as mobile navigation, urban planning, telecommunication, and tourism. The automatic reconstruction of 3D building models from space borne point cloud data is still an active research topic. The challenging problem in this field is the relatively low quality of the Digital Surface Model (DSM) generated by stereo matching of satellite data comparing to airborne LiDAR data. In order to establish an efficient method to achieve high quality models and complete automation from the mentioned DSM, in this paper a new method based on a model-driven strategy is proposed. For improving the results, refined orthorectified panchromatic images are introduced into the process as additional data. The idea of this method is based on ridge line extraction and analysing height values in direction of and perpendicular to the ridgeline direction. After applying pre-processing to the orthorectified data, some feature descriptors are extracted from the DSM, to improve the automatic ridge line detection. Applying RANSAC a line is fitted to each group of ridge points. Finally these ridge lines are refined by matching them or closing gaps. In order to select the type of roof model the heights of point in extension of the ridge line and height differences perpendicular to the ridge line are analysed. After roof model selection, building edge information is extracted from canny edge detection and parameters derived from the roof parts. Then the best model is fitted to extracted façade roofs based on detected type of model. Each roof is modelled independently and final 3D buildings are reconstructed by merging the roof models with the corresponding walls.

  4. RECONSTRUCTION OF 3D VECTOR MODELS OF BUILDINGS BY COMBINATION OF ALS, TLS AND VLS DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Boulaassal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS and Vehicle based Laser Scanning (VLS are widely used as data acquisition methods for 3D building modelling. ALS data is often used to generate, among others, roof models. TLS data has proven its effectiveness in the geometric reconstruction of building façades. Although the operating algorithms used in the processing chain of these two kinds of data are quite similar, their combination should be more investigated. This study explores the possibility of combining ALS and TLS data for simultaneously producing 3D building models from bird point of view and pedestrian point of view. The geometric accuracy of roofs and façades models is different due to the acquisition techniques. In order to take these differences into account, the surfaces composing roofs and façades are extracted with the same algorithm of segmentation. Nevertheless the segmentation algorithm must be adapted to the properties of the different point clouds. It is based on the RANSAC algorithm, but has been applied in a sequential way in order to extract all potential planar clusters from airborne and terrestrial datasets. Surfaces are fitted to planar clusters, allowing edge detection and reconstruction of vector polygons. Models resulting from TLS data are obviously more accurate than those generated from ALS data. Therefore, the geometry of the roofs is corrected and adapted according to the geometry of the corresponding façades. Finally, the effects of the differences between raw ALS and TLS data on the results of the modeling process are analyzed. It is shown that such combination could be used to produce reliable 3D building models.

  5. 3D reconstruction of digitized histological sections for vasculature quantification in the mouse hind limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yiwen; Pickering, J. Geoffrey; Nong, Zengxuan; Gibson, Eli; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    In contrast to imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and micro computed tomography, digital histology reveals multiple stained tissue features at high resolution (0.25?m/pixel). However, the two-dimensional (2D) nature of histology challenges three-dimensional (3D) quantification and visualization of the different tissue components, cellular structures, and subcellular elements. This limitation is particularly relevant to the vasculature, which has a complex and variable structure within tissues. The objective of this study was to perform a fully automated 3D reconstruction of histology tissue in the mouse hind limb preserving the accurate systemic orientation of the tissues, stained with hematoxylin and immunostained for smooth muscle ? actin. We performed a 3D reconstruction using pairwise rigid registrations of 5?m thick, paraffin-embedded serial sections, digitized at 0.25?m/pixel. Each registration was performed using the iterative closest points algorithm on blood vessel landmarks. Landmarks were vessel centroids, determined according to a signed distance map of each pixel to a decision boundary in hue-saturation-value color space; this decision boundary was determined based on manual annotation of a separate training set. Cell nuclei were then automatically extracted and corresponded to refine the vessel landmark registration. Homologous nucleus landmark pairs appearing on not more than two adjacent slides were chosen to avoid registrations which force curved or non-sectionorthogonal structures to be straight and section-orthogonal. The median accumulated target registration errors ± interquartile ranges for the vessel landmark registration, and the nucleus landmark refinement were 43.4+/-42.8?m and 2.9+/-1.7?m, respectively (pmouse hind limb histology imaging is feasible based on extracted vasculature and nuclei.

  6. A Novel 3D Reconstruction Approach from Uncalibrated Multiple Views Based on Homography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Liu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on a kind of 3D object shape reconstruction from images and put forward a metric approach to recover the object based on slicing planes by homography transformation and image consistency between multiple images.  This approach done here eliminates the requirement for camera calibration, the estimation of the fundamental matrix, feature matches and pose estimation. We adopt a set of hypothetical planes to intersect the reconstructed object to obtain every slicing plane of the reconstructed object by homography transformation and recover it to 3D adding vanishing points by the constraints of silhouette and the scene. The experiment shows that the approach is much validated, and something useful is obtained. topological changes of 2D curves, we adopt a physically-based 2D level set model to animate the evolution and propagation of the interface. We build a level set equation to model the evolution of the interface. In addition, to handle the large scale virtual environment correctly in our physically-based level set model, an image-based 2D voxelization method is proposed in the paper. In the voxelization method, the virtual environment will be converted to boundary conditions when solving the level set equation. Finally, the water pollutants diffusion phenomenon is simulated on large scale water surface by merging the interface animation results as well as the large scale virtual environment. Animation results about the algae propagation phenomenon in Taihu Lake show that our method is intuitively to be implemented and very convenient to produce visually interesting results.

  7. Toward quantification of breast tomosynthesis imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Christina M.; Samei, Ehsan; Saunders, Robert S.; Zerhouni, Moustafa; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2008-03-01

    Due to the high prevalence of breast cancer among women, much is being done to detect breast cancer earlier and more accurately. In current clinical practice, the most widely-used mode of breast imaging is mammography. Its main advantages are high sensitivity and low patient dose, although it is still merely a two-dimensional projection of a three-dimensional object. In digital breast tomosynthesis, a three-dimensional image of the breast can be reconstructed, but x-ray projection images of the breast are taken over a limited angular span. However, the breast tomosynthesis device itself is more similar to a digital mammography system and thus is a feasible replacement for mammography. Because of the angular undersampling in breast tomosynthesis, the reconstructed images are not considered quantitative, so a worthwhile question to answer would be whether the voxel values (VVs) in breast tomosynthesis images can be made to indicate tissue type as Hounsfield units do in CT. through some image processing scheme. To investigate this, simple phantoms were imaged consisting of layers of uniform, tissue-equivalent plastic for the background sandwiching a layer of interest containing multiple, small cuboids of tissue-equivalent plastic. After analyzing the reconstructed tomosynthesis images, it was found that the VV in each lesion increases linearly with tissue glandularity. However, for the two different x-ray tube energies and for the two different beam exposure levels tested, the trend-lines all have different slopes and y-intercepts. Thus, breast tomosynthesis has a definite potential to be quantitative, and it would be worthwhile to study other possible dependent parameters (phantom thickness, overall density, etc.) as well as alternative reconstruction algorithms.

  8. Region-Based 3d Surface Reconstruction Using Images Acquired by Low-Cost Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Rawabdeh, A.; He, F.; Habib, A.; El-Sheimy, N.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate 3D surface reconstruction of our environment has become essential for an unlimited number of emerging applications. In the past few years, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are evolving as low-cost and flexible platforms for geospatial data collection that could meet the needs of aforementioned application and overcome limitations of traditional airborne and terrestrial mobile mapping systems. Due to their payload restrictions, these systems usually include consumer-grade imaging and positioning sensor which will negatively impact the quality of the collected geospatial data and reconstructed surfaces. Therefore, new surface reconstruction surfaces are needed to mitigate the impact of using low-cost sensors on the final products. To date, different approaches have been proposed to for 3D surface construction using overlapping images collected by imaging sensor mounted on moving platforms. In these approaches, 3D surfaces are mainly reconstructed based on dense matching techniques. However, generated 3D point clouds might not accurately represent the scanned surfaces due to point density variations and edge preservation problems. In order to resolve these problems, a new region-based 3D surface renostruction trchnique is introduced in this paper. This approach aims to generate a 3D photo-realistic model of individually scanned surfaces within the captured images. This approach is initiated by a Semi-Global dense Matching procedure is carried out to generate a 3D point cloud from the scanned area within the collected images. The generated point cloud is then segmented to extract individual planar surfaces. Finally, a novel region-based texturing technique is implemented for photorealistic reconstruction of the extracted planar surfaces. Experimental results using images collected by a camera mounted on a low-cost UAS demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach for photorealistic 3D surface reconstruction.

  9. 3D-ANTLERS: Virtual Reconstruction and Three-Dimensional Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, S.; Fiorillo, F.; De Feo, E.

    2013-02-01

    The main objective of this paper is to establish a procedural method for measuring and cataloguing antlers through the use of laser scanner and of a 3D reconstruction of complex modeling. The deer's antlers have been used as a test and subjected to capture and measurement. For this purpose multiple data sources techniques have been studied and compared, (also considering low-cost sensors) estimating the accuracy and its errors in order to demonstrate the validity of the process. A further development is the comparison of results with applications of digital photogrammetry, considering also cloud computing software. The study has began with an introduction to sensors, addressing the underlying characteristics of the technology available, the scope and the limits of these applications. We have focused particularly on the "structured light", as the acquisition will be completed through three-dimensional scanners: DAVID and the ARTEC MH. The first is a low-cost sensor, a basic webcam and a linear laser pointer, red coloured, that leads to acquisition of three-dimensional strips. The other one is a hand scanner; even in this case we will explain how to represent a 3D model, with a pipeline that provides data export from the "proprietary" to a "reverse engineering" software. Typically, these are the common steps to the two approaches that have been performed in WRAP format: point sampling, manual and global registration, repair normals, surface editing and texture projection. In fact, after a first and common data processing was done with the use of a software supplied with the equipment, the proto-models thus obtained were treated in Geomagic Studio, which was also chosen to allow the homogenization and standardization of data in order to make a more objective comparison. It is commonplace to observe that the editing of the digital mock-up obtained with the DAVID - which had not yet been upgraded to the 3.5 release at the time of this study - is substantially different. In the ARTEC digital mock-up for example, it shows the ability to select the individual frames, already polygonal and geo-referenced at the time of capture; however, it is not possible to make an automated texturization differently from the low-cost environment which allows to produce a good graphics' definition. Once the final 3D models were obtained, we have proceeded to do a geometric and graphic comparison of the results. Therefore, in order to provide an accuracy requirement and an assessment for the 3D reconstruction we have taken into account the following benchmarks: cost, captured points, noise (local and global), shadows and holes, operability, degree of definition, quality and accuracy. Subsequently, these studies carried out in an empirical way on the virtual reconstructions, a 3D documentation was codified with a procedural method endorsing the use of terrestrial sensors for the documentation of antlers. The results thus pursued were compared with the standards set by the current provisions (see "Manual de medición" of Government of Andalusia-Spain); to date, in fact, the identification is based on data such as length, volume, colour, texture, openness, tips, structure, etc. Data, which is currently only appreciated with traditional instruments, such as tape measure, would be well represented by a process of virtual reconstruction and cataloguing.

  10. CUDA based Level Set Method for 3D Reconstruction of Fishes from Large Acoustic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Ojaswa; Anton, François

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic images present views of underwater dynamics, even in high depths. With multi-beam echo sounders (SONARs), it is possible to capture series of 2D high resolution acoustic images. 3D reconstruction of the water column and subsequent estimation of fish abundance and fish species identification is highly desirable for planning sustainable fisheries. Main hurdles in analysing acoustic images are the presence of speckle noise and the vast amount of acoustic data. This paper presents a level set formulation for simultaneous fish reconstruction and noise suppression from raw acoustic images. Despite the presence of speckle noise blobs, actual fish intensity values can be distinguished by extremely high values, varying exponentially from the background. Edge detection generally gives excessive false edges that are not reliable. Our approach to reconstruction is based on level set evolution using Mumford-Shah segmentation functional that does not depend on edges in an image. We use the implicit function in conjunction with the image to robustly estimate a threshold for suppressing noise in the image by solving a second differential equation. We provide details of our estimation of suppressing threshold and show its convergence as the evolution proceeds. We also present a GPU based streaming computation of the method using NVIDIA's CUDA framework to handle large volume data-sets. Our implementation is optimised for memory usage to handle large volumes.

  11. 3D VIRTUAL RECONSTRUCTION OF AN URBAN HISTORICAL SPACE: A CONSIDERATION ON THE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galizia

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Urban historical spaces are often characterized by a variety of shapes, geometries, volumes, materials. Their virtual reconstruction requires a critical approach in terms of acquired data's density, timing optimization, final product's quality and slimness. The research team has focused its attention on the study on Francesco Neglia square (previously named Saint Thomas square in Enna. This square is an urban space fronted by architectures which present historical and stylistic differences. For example you can find the Saint Thomas'church belfry (in aragounese-catalan stile dated XIV century and the porch, the Anime Sante baroque's church (XVII century, Saint Mary of the Grace's nunnery (XVIII century and as well as some civil buildings of minor importance built in the mid twentieth century. The research has compared two different modeling tools approaches: the first one is based on the construction of triangulated surfaces which are segmented and simplified; the second one is based on the detection of surfaces geometrical features, the extraction of the more significant profiles by using a software dedicated to the elaboration of cloud points and the subsequent mathematical reconstruction by using a 3d modelling software. The following step was aimed to process the virtual reconstruction of urban scene by assembling the single optimized models. This work highlighted the importance of the image of the operator and of its cultural contribution, essential to recognize geometries which generates surfaces in order to create high quality semantic models.

  12. 3D reconstruction for sinusoidal motion based on different feature detection algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Huaxia; Yu, Liandong

    2015-02-01

    The dynamic testing of structures and components is an important area of research. Extensive researches on the methods of using sensors for vibration parameters have been studied for years. With the rapid development of industrial high-speed camera and computer hardware, the method of using stereo vision for dynamic testing has been the focus of the research since the advantages of non-contact, full-field, high resolution and high accuracy. But in the country there is not much research about the dynamic testing based on stereo vision, and yet few people publish articles about the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of feature points in the case of dynamic. It is essential to the following analysis whether it can obtain accurate movement of target objects. In this paper, an object with sinusoidal motion is detected by stereo vision and the accuracy with different feature detection algorithms is investigated. Three different marks including dot, square and circle are stuck on the object and the object is doing sinusoidal motion by vibration table. Then use feature detection algorithm speed-up robust feature (SURF) to detect point, detect square corners by Harris and position the center by Hough transform. After obtaining the pixel coordinate values of the feature point, the stereo calibration parameters are used to achieve three-dimensional reconstruction through triangulation principle. The trajectories of the specific direction according to the vibration frequency and the frequency camera acquisition are obtained. At last, the reconstruction accuracy of different feature detection algorithms is compared.

  13. Rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Wintermark, Max; Mugler, John P; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI measures the perfusion bolus at multiple observation times and yields accurate estimates of cerebral blood flow in the presence of variations in arterial transit time. ASL has intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is sensitive to motion, so that extensive signal averaging is typically required, leading to long scan times for dynamic ASL. The goal of this study was to develop an accelerated dynamic ASL method with improved SNR and robustness to motion using a model-based image reconstruction that exploits the inherent sparsity of dynamic ASL data. The first component of this method is a single-shot 3D turbo spin echo spiral pulse sequence accelerated using a combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing. This pulse sequence was then incorporated into a dynamic pseudo continuous ASL acquisition acquired at multiple observation times, and the resulting images were jointly reconstructed enforcing a model of potential perfusion time courses. Performance of the technique was verified using a numerical phantom and it was validated on normal volunteers on a 3-Tesla scanner. In simulation, a spatial sparsity constraint improved SNR and reduced estimation errors. Combined with a model-based sparsity constraint, the proposed method further improved SNR, reduced estimation error and suppressed motion artifacts. Experimentally, the proposed method resulted in significant improvements, with scan times as short as 20s per time point. These results suggest that the model-based image reconstruction enables rapid dynamic ASL with improved accuracy and robustness. PMID:26169322

  14. Evaluation of task-oriented performance of several fully 3D PET reconstruction algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative performance of five fully 3D PET reconstruction algorithms is evaluated. The algorithms are a filtered backprojection (FBP) method and two variants each of the EM-ML and ART iterative methods. For each of the iterative methods, one variant makes use of voxels and the other makes use of 'blobs' (spherically symmetric functions smoothly decaying to zero at their boundaries) as basis functions in its discrete reconstruction model. The methods are evaluated from the point of view of the efficacy of the reconstructions produced by them for three typical medical tasks - estimation of the average activity inside specific regions of interest, detection of hot spots, and detection of cold spots. A free parameter is allowed in the description of each of the five algorithms; the parameters are determined by a training process during which a value of the free parameter is selected which (nearly maximizes a technical figure of merit. Such training and the actual comparative evaluation is done by making use of randomly generated phantoms and their projection data. The methodology allows assignation of levels of statistical significance to claims of the relative superiority of one algorithm over another for a particular task. We find that using blobs as basis functions in the iterative algorithms is definitely advantageous over using voxels. This result has high statistical significance. (Author)

  15. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D reconstructions of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data provide a virtual morphological basis for anterior lumbar surgery.

  16. A 3D model of non-uniform attenuation and detector response for efficient iterative reconstruction in SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D physical model for iterative reconstruction in SPECT has been developed and applied to experimental data. The model incorporates non-uniform attenuation using reconstructed transmission CT data and distance-dependent detector response based on response function measurements over a range of distances from the detector. The 3D model has been implemented in a computationally efficient manner with practical memory requirements. The features of the model that provide efficiency are described including a new region-dependent reconstruction (RDR) technique. With RDR, filtered backprojection is used to reconstruct areas of the image of minimal clinical importance, and the result is used to supplement the iterative reconstruction of the clinically important areas of the image. The 3D model was incorporated into the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) reconstruction algorithm and tested in three phantoms studies - a point source, a uniform cylinder, and a anthropomorphic thorax - and a patient 99Tcm sestamibi study. Reconstructed images with the 3D method exhibited excellent noise and resolution characteristics. With the sestamibi data, the RDR technique produced essentially the conventional ML-EM estimate in the cardiac region with substantial time savings. (Author)

  17. Operator-free, film-based 3D seed reconstruction in brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In brachytherapy implants, the accuracy of dose calculation depends on the ability to localize radioactive sources correctly. If performed manually using planar images, this is a time-consuming and often error-prone process - primarily because each seed must be identified on (at least) two films. In principle, three films should allow automatic seed identification and position reconstruction; however, practical implementation of the numerous algorithms proposed so far appears to have only limited reliability. The motivation behind this work is to create a fast and reliable system for real-time implant evaluation using digital planar images obtained from radiotherapy simulators, or mobile x-ray/fluoroscopy systems. We have developed algorithms and code for 3D seed coordinate reconstruction. The input consists of projections of seed positions in each of three isocentric images taken at arbitrary angles. The method proposed here consists of a set of heuristic rules (in a sense, a learning algorithm) that attempts to minimize seed misclassifications. In the clinic, this means that the system must be impervious to errors resulting from patient motion as well as from finite tolerances accepted in equipment settings. The software program was tested with simulated data, a pelvic phantom and patient data. One hundred and twenty permanent prostate implants were examined (105125I and 15103Pd) with the number of seeds ranging from 35 to 138 (average 79). The mean distance between actual and reconstructed seed positions is in the range 0.03-0.11 cm. On a Pentium III computer at 600 MHz the reconstruction process takes 10-30 s. The total number of seeds is independently validated. The process is robust and able to account for errors introduced in the clinic. (author)

  18. An automated workflow for reconstructing 3D glacier thickness and volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, William

    2015-04-01

    There is a pressing need to constrain the volume and distributed ice thickness of both former and contemporary mountain glaciers. The availability of high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), contemporary glacier outlines and former terminus positions has opened up the possibility of rapidly reconstructing former ice surfaces and estimating current bed topographies in a GIS environment. Whilst it has been proven that 'perfect plasticity' based models can be used to estimate ice thickness values along a central flow line in a 2D manner, there is potential to expand such models further by automating the entire process and interpolating full 3D surface/bed topographies. This presentation firstly introduces the VOLTA (Volume and Topography Automation) model, which is a GIS based tool for estimating contemporary ice thickness distribution and volume. Novel algorithms for automatic centreline production and branch delineation are employed to automate the entire process, requiring just a DEM and glacier outline as inputs, running as a standard geoprocessing tool in ArcGIS. VOLTA is shown to perform well when tested on glaciers where the bed topography is known from field measurements and initial model results for the New Zealand Southern Alps are presented. By removing the distributed ice thickness calculated by VOLTA from the contemporary DEM, an "ice-free" surface can be created. This is the initial input required for reconstructing former ice-surfaces using a perfect plasticity approach. An additional workflow is presented for automatically removing postglacial sediment infill, a step which is often overlooked but can improve the accuracy of reconstruction models. By applying these tools to the Southern Alps of New Zealand, preliminary reconstructions of the LGM will be discussed.

  19. 2D and 3D reconstruction and geomechanical characterization of kilometre-scale complex folded structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Agliardi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.; Villa, Alberto; Bistacchi, Andrea; Iudica, Gaetano

    2015-04-01

    The geometrical, structural and geomechanical characterization of large-scale folded structures in sedimentary rocks is an important issue for different geological and geo-hazard applications (e.g. hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoir exploitation, natural rock slope stability, mining, and tunnelling). Fold geometry controls topography and the spatial distribution of rock types with different strength and permeability. Fold-related fracture systems condition the fracture intensity, degree of freedom, and overall strength of rock masses. Nevertheless, scale issues and limited accessibility or partial exposure of structures often hamper a complete characterization of these complex structures. During the last years, advances in remote survey techniques as terrestrial Lidar (TLS) allowed significant improvements in the geometrical and geological characterization of large or inaccessible outcrops. However, sound methods relating structures to rock mass geomechanical properties are yet to be developed. Here we present results obtained by integrating remote survey and field assessment techniques to characterize a folded sedimentary succession exposed in unreachable vertical rock walls. The study area is located in the frontal part of the Southern Alps near Bergamo, Italy. We analysed large-scale detachment folds developed in the Upper Triassic sedimentary cover in the Zu Limestone. Folds are parallel and disharmonic, with regular wavelengths and amplitudes of about 200-250 m. We used a Riegl VZ-1000 long-range laser scanner to obtain points clouds with nominal spacings between 5 cm and 20 cm from 9 scan positions characterized by range between 350 m and 1300 m. We fixed shadowing and occlusion effects related to fold structure exposure by filling point clouds with data collected by terrestrial digital photogrammetry (TDP). In addition, we carried out field surveys of fold-related brittle structures and their geomechanical attributes at key locations. We classified cloud points based on their normal vector orientations to identify and map bedding and fractures. Combined stereographic analysis of bedding orientations and use of filters allowed the quantification of fold hinge and limb geometries and their 3D reconstruction in GOCAD. Fracture patterns derived from points clouds and field data allowed identifying different geomechanical domains associated to the folded structure. Our results encourage the integrated analysis of high-resolution point clouds and detailed structural and geomechanical field data as inputs to the 3D geometrical reconstruction and modelling of folded rock masses. Validation of virtual outcrop reconstructions through a comparison with field structural measurements suggests that very precise geometrical constraints can be obtained by TLS on geological bodies with complex geometrical features. However, additional constraints on TLS survey layout design are required to optimise the reconstruction and distinction of specific structural elements associated to folding as bedding and fold-related fracture systems.

  20. Modeling, measurement, and 3-D equilibrium reconstruction of the bootstrap current in the Helically Symmetric Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, J. C.; Talmadge, J. N.; Anderson, D. T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Hanson, J. D. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The bootstrap current for three electron cyclotron resonance heated plasma scenarios in a quasihelically symmetric stellarator (the Helically Symmetric Experiment) are analyzed and compared to a neoclassical transport code PENTA. The three conditions correspond to 50?kW input power with a resonance that is off-axis, 50?kW on-axis heating and 100?kW on-axis heating. When the heating location was moved from off-axis to on-axis with 50?kW heating power, the stored energy and the extrapolated steady-state current were both observed to increase. When the on-axis heating power was increased from 50?kW to 100?kW, the stored energy continued to increase while the bootstrap current slightly decreased. This trend is qualitatively in agreement with the calculations which indicate that a large positive electric field for the 100?kW case was driving the current negative in a small region close to the magnetic axis and accounting for the decrease in the total integrated current. This trend in the calculations is only observed to occur when momentum conservation between particle species is included. Without momentum conservation, the calculated bootstrap current increases monotonically. We show that the magnitude of the bootstrap current as calculated by PENTA agrees better with the experiment when momentum conservation between plasma species is included in the calculation. The total current was observed in all cases to flow in a direction to unwind the transform, unlike in a tokamak in which the bootstrap current adds to the transform. The 3-D inductive response of the plasma is simulated to predict the evolution of the current profile during the discharge. The 3-D equilibrium reconstruction code V3FIT is used to reconstruct profiles of the plasma pressure and current constrained by measurements with a set of magnetic diagnostics. The reconstructed profiles are consistent with the measured plasma pressure profile and the simulated current profile when the reconstruction is constrained by the measured data from a diagnostic array that is internal to the vacuum chamber.

  1. 3D shape reconstruction of medical images using a perspective shape-from-shading method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3D shape reconstruction approach for medical images using a shape-from-shading (SFS) method was proposed in this paper. A new reflectance map equation of medical images was analyzed with the assumption that the Lambertian reflectance surface was irradiated by a point light source located at the light center and the image was formed under perspective projection. The corresponding static Hamilton–Jacobi (H–J) equation of the reflectance map equation was established. So the shape-from-shading problem turned into solving the viscosity solution of the static H–J equation. Then with the conception of a viscosity vanishing approximation, the Lax–Friedrichs fast sweeping numerical method was used to compute the viscosity solution of the H–J equation and a new iterative SFS algorithm was gained. Finally, experiments on both synthetic images and real medical images were performed to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed SFS method

  2. EFFECT OF DIGITAL FRINGE PROJECTION PARAMETERS ON 3D RECONSTRUCTION ACCURACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Babaei

    2013-09-01

    This paper aims to evaluate different parameters which affect the accuracy of the final results. For this purpose, some test were designed and implemented. These tests assess the number of phase shifts, spatial frequency of the fringe pattern, light condition, noise level of images, and the color and material of target objects on the quality of resulted phase map. The evaluation results demonstrate that digital fringe projection method is capable of obtaining depth map of complicated object with high accuracy. The contrast test results showed that this method is able to work under different ambient light condition; although at places with high light condition will not work properly. The results of implementation on different objects with various materials, color and shapes demonstrate the high capability of this method of 3D reconstruction.

  3. QUALITY ASSESSMENT OF 3D RECONSTRUCTION USING FISHEYE AND PERSPECTIVE SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Strecha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent mathematical advances, growing alongside the use of unmanned aerial vehicles, have not only overcome the restriction of roll and pitch angles during flight but also enabled us to apply non-metric cameras in photogrammetric method, providing more flexibility for sensor selection. Fisheye cameras, for example, advantageously provide images with wide coverage; however, these images are extremely distorted and their non-uniform resolutions make them more difficult to use for mapping or terrestrial 3D modelling. In this paper, we compare the usability of different camera-lens combinations, using the complete workflow implemented in Pix4Dmapper to achieve the final terrestrial reconstruction result of a well-known historical site in Switzerland: the Chillon Castle. We assess the accuracy of the outcome acquired by consumer cameras with perspective and fisheye lenses, comparing the results to a laser scanner point cloud.

  4. 3D optical phase reconstruction within PMMA samples using a spectral OCT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones-R., Manuel d. J.; De La Torre-Ibarra, Manuel H.; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    The optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique has proved to be a useful method in biomedical areas such as ophthalmology, dentistry, dermatology, among many others. In all these applications the main target is to reconstruct the internal structure of the samples from which the physician's expertise may recognize and diagnose the existence of a disease. Nowadays OCT has been applied one step further and is used to study the mechanics of some particular type of materials, where the resulting information involves more than just their internal structure and the measurement of parameters such as displacements, stress and strain. Here we report on a spectral OCT system used to image the internal 3D microstructure and displacement maps from a PMMA (Poly-methyl-methacrylate) sample, subjected to a deformation by a controlled three point bending and tilting. The internal mechanical response of the polymer is shown as consecutive 2D images.

  5. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agurto Carla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better agreement with clinical measures than measures from single view reconstructions. Conclusions Multi-view 3D reconstruction from sparse 2D freehand B-mode images leads to more accurate volume quantification compared to single view systems. The flexibility and low-cost of the proposed system allow for fine control of the image acquisition planes for optimal 3D reconstructions from multiple views.

  6. Integration of knowledge to support automatic object reconstruction from images and 3D data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object reconstruction is a important task in many fields of application as it allows to generate digital representations of our physical world used as base for analysis, planning, construction, visualization or other aims. A reconstruction itself normally is based on reliable data (images, 3D point clouds for example) expressing the object in his complete extension. This data then has to be compiled and analyzed in order to extract all necessary geometrical elements, which represent the object and form a digital copy of it. Traditional strategies are largely based on manual interaction and interpretation, because with increasing complexity of objects human understanding is inevitable to achieve acceptable and reliable results. But human interaction is time consuming and expensive, why many research has already been invested to integrate algorithmic support, what allows to speed up the process and reduce manual work load. Presently most such algorithms are data-driven and concentrate on specific features of the objects, being accessible to numerical models. By means of these models, which normally will represent geometrical (flatness, roughness, for example) or physical features (color, texture), the data is classified and analyzed. This is succesful for objects with a limited complexity, but gets to its limits with increasing complexity of objects. Then purely numerical strategies are not able to sufficiently model the reality. Therefore, the intention of our approach is to take human cogni-tive strategy as an example, and to simulate extraction processes based on available knowledge for the objects of interest. Such processes will introduce a semantic structure for the objects and guide the algorithms used to detect and recognize objects, which will yield a higher effectiveness. Hence, our research proposes an approach using knowledge to guide the algorithms in 3D point cloud and image processing.

  7. The Avignon Bridge: a 3d Reconstruction Project Integrating Archaeological, Historical and Gemorphological Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, M.; Nony, N.; Gugi, L.; Bishop, A.; De Luca, L.

    2015-02-01

    The history and identity of the Avignon's bridge is inseparable from that of the Rhône river. Therefore, in order to share the history and memory of the Rhône, it is essential to get to know this bridge and especially to identify and make visible the traces of its past, its construction, its interaction with the river dynamics, which greatly influenced his life. These are the objectives of the PAVAGE project that focuses on digitally surveying, modelling and re-visiting a heritage site of primary importance with the aim of virtually restoring the link between the two sides which, after the disappearance of the Roman bridge of Arles, constituted for a long time the only connection between Lyon or Vienna and the sea. Therefore, this project has an important geo-historical dimension for which geo-morphological and paleoenvironmental studies were implemented in connection with the latest digital simulation methods exploiting geographic information systems. By integrating knowledge and reflections of archaeologists, historians, geomorphologists, environmentalists, architects, engineers and computer scientists, the result of this project (which involved 5 laboratories during 4 years) is a 3D digital model covering an extension of 50 km2 achieved by integrating satellite imagery, UAV-based acquisitions, terrestrial laser scanning and photogrammetry, etc. Beyond the actions of scientific valorisation concerning the historical and geomorphological dimensions of the project, the results of this work of this interdisciplinary investigation and interpretation of this site are today integrated within a location-based augmented reality application allowing tourists to exploring the virtual reconstruction of the bridge and its environment through tablets inside the portion of territory covered by this project (between Avignon and Villeneuve-lez-Avignon). This paper presents the main aspects of the 3D virtual reconstruction approach.

  8. A LabVIEW based user-friendly nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction platform

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shenghao; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Wu, Zhao; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanometer computed tomography (nano-CT) offers applications and opportunities in many scientific researches and industrial areas. Here we present a user-friendly and fast LabVIEW based package running, after acquisition of the raw projection images, a procedure to obtain the inner structure of the sample under analysis. At first, a reliable image alignment procedure fixes possible misalignments among image series due to mechanical errors, thermal expansion and other external contributions, then a novel fast parallel beam 3D reconstruction performs the tomographic reconstruction. The remarkable improved reconstruction after the image calibration confirms the fundamental role of the image alignment procedure. It minimizes blurring and additional streaking artifacts present in a reconstructed slice that cause loss of information and faked structures in the observed material. The nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction LabVIEW package significantly reducing the data process, makes faster and easier th...

  9. Locating the Acupoint Baihui (GV20) Beneath the Cerebral Cortex with MRI Reconstructed 3D Neuroimages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ein-Yiao; Chen, Fun-Jou; Chen, Yun-Yin; Lin, Ming-Fan

    2011-01-01

    Baihui (GV20) is one of the most important acupoints of the Du meridian (the government vessel) and is commonly used in neurology and psychiatry and as a distal point of anorectal disorders by general practitioners. The anatomical relationship between the scalp region of the acupoint and the underlying corresponding cortex remains obscure. In this study, we first prepared the indicator for MRI scanning on a GE 1.5 T excite machine in a mode suitable for 3D reconstruction. The 3D Avizo software system (version 6.0, Mercury Computer Systems, Inc., Germany) was then used for image processing and the resulting data subsequently analyzed using descriptive statistics and analysis of variance (ANOVA). The mean distance from the Baihui anterior to the central sulcus in the adult group was greater than that in the child group (22.7 ± 2.2 and 19.7 ± 2.2?mm, resp., P = .042), whereas in the child group the distance between the Baihui anterior and the precentral sulcus was greater than in the adult group (6.8 ± 0.8 and 3.8 ± 0.8?mm, resp., P < .001). This MRI presentation demonstrates that the location of Baihui (GV20) can be identified using the distance from the central or precentral sulcus. PMID:21785620

  10. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Niklas, Martin; Akselrod, Mark S; Abollahi, Amir; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors. This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In-situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory info...

  11. Cardiac C-arm computed tomography using a 3D + time ROI reconstruction method with spatial and temporal regularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mory, Cyril, E-mail: cyril.mory@philips.com [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Auvray, Vincent; Zhang, Bo [Philips Research Medisys, 33 rue de Verdun, 92156 Suresnes (France); Grass, Michael; Schäfer, Dirk [Philips Research, Röntgenstrasse 24–26, D-22335 Hamburg (Germany); Chen, S. James; Carroll, John D. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado Denver, 12605 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Rit, Simon [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Centre Léon Bérard, 28 rue Laënnec, F-69373 Lyon (France); Peyrin, Françoise [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); X-ray Imaging Group, European Synchrotron, Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Douek, Philippe; Boussel, Loïc [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1 (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, 28 Avenue du Doyen Jean Lépine, 69500 Bron (France)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Reconstruction of the beating heart in 3D + time in the catheter laboratory using only the available C-arm system would improve diagnosis, guidance, device sizing, and outcome control for intracardiac interventions, e.g., electrophysiology, valvular disease treatment, structural or congenital heart disease. To obtain such a reconstruction, the patient's electrocardiogram (ECG) must be recorded during the acquisition and used in the reconstruction. In this paper, the authors present a 4D reconstruction method aiming to reconstruct the heart from a single sweep 10 s acquisition. Methods: The authors introduce the 4D RecOnstructiOn using Spatial and TEmporal Regularization (short 4D ROOSTER) method, which reconstructs all cardiac phases at once, as a 3D + time volume. The algorithm alternates between a reconstruction step based on conjugate gradient and four regularization steps: enforcing positivity, averaging along time outside a motion mask that contains the heart and vessels, 3D spatial total variation minimization, and 1D temporal total variation minimization. Results: 4D ROOSTER recovers the different temporal representations of a moving Shepp and Logan phantom, and outperforms both ECG-gated simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and prior image constrained compressed sensing on a clinical case. It generates 3D + time reconstructions with sharp edges which can be used, for example, to estimate the patient's left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions: 4D ROOSTER can be applied for human cardiac C-arm CT, and potentially in other dynamic tomography areas. It can easily be adapted to other problems as regularization is decoupled from projection and back projection.

  12. Spiral CT and 3D reconstruction of the tracheobronchial tree for individual double-lumen-tube-selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the potential of 3 D spiral CT in the selection of adequate double-lumen tubes (DLT) for one-lung-ventilation. Materials and methods: 3 D-spiral CT of eight different DLTs was performed with standardized acquisition parameters: Section thickness 4 mm, table speed 6 mm/s, increment 3 mm and standardised thresholds, window settings and magnification zoom. The accuracy was confirmed by measuring 3 D objects on screen and original DLTs by vernier caliper. 3 D spiral CT was performed in 20 patients preoperatively with slice thickness 4-8 mm, pitch 1-1.5, increment 4-8 mm. To select the adequate DLT size the 3 D reconstructions of the patient's tracheobronchial tree and of the DLT were superimposed by templates or computer animation. The accuracy was controlled by endoscopic and clinical measurements. Results: The accuracy of the 3 D spiral CT was nearly 0.1 mm. The superimposition with templates was easy and reliable. The 3 D spiral CT determined DLTs were shown to fit perfectly by clinical and endoscopic measurements in all cases. Conclusion: 3 D reconstructions of the tracheobronchial tree obtained from routinepreoperative spiral CT scans allow for an easy and accurate individual selection of double-lumen tubes. (orig.)

  13. 3D PET image reconstruction based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation Method (MLEM) algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    S?omski, Artur; Bednarski, Tomasz; Bia?as, Piotr; Czerwi?ski, Eryk; Kap?on, ?ukasz; Kochanowski, Andrzej; Korcyl, Grzegorz; Kowal, Jakub; Kowalski, Pawe?; Kozik, Tomasz; Krzemie?, Wojciech; Molenda, Marcin; Moskal, Pawe?; Nied?wiecki, Szymon; Pa?ka, Marek; Pawlik, Monika; Raczy?ski, Lech; Salabura, Piotr; Gupta-Sharma, Neha; Silarski, Micha?; Smyrski, Jerzy; Strzelecki, Adam; Wi?licki, Wojciech; Zieli?ski, Marcin; Zo?, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomographs (PET) do not measure an image directly. Instead, they measure at the boundary of the field-of-view (FOV) of PET tomograph a sinogram that consists of measurements of the sums of all the counts along the lines connecting two detectors. As there is a multitude of detectors build-in typical PET tomograph structure, there are many possible detector pairs that pertain to the measurement. The problem is how to turn this measurement into an image (this is called imaging). Decisive improvement in PET image quality was reached with the introduction of iterative reconstruction techniques. This stage was reached already twenty years ago (with the advent of new powerful computing processors). However, three dimensional (3D) imaging remains still a challenge. The purpose of the image reconstruction algorithm is to process this imperfect count data for a large number (many millions) of lines-of-responce (LOR) and millions of detected photons to produce an image showing the distribution of the l...

  14. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biha?owicz, Jan Stefan

    2015-02-01

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E? > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 1013?/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  15. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biha?owicz, Jan Stefan [Institute of Experimental Physics Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-02-24

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E{sub ?} > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 10{sup 13}?/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP.

  16. Fusion of ALS Point Cloud and Optical Imagery for 3D Reconstruction of Building's Roof

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Hujebri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional building models are important in various applications such as disaster management and urban planning. In this paper a method based on fusion of LiDAR point cloud and aerial image data sources has been proposed. Firstly using 2D map, the point set relevant to each building separated from the overall LiDAR point cloud. In the next step, the mean shift clustering algorithm applied to the points of different buildings in the feature space. Finally the segmentation stage ended with the separation of parallel and coplanar segments. Then using the adjacency matrix, adjacent segments are intersected and inner vertices are determined. In the other space, the area of any building cropped in the image space and the mean shift algorithm applied to it. Then, the lines of roof’s outline edge extracted by the Hough transform algorithm and the points obtained from the intersection of these lines transformed to the ground space. Finally, by integration of structural points of intersected adjacent facets and the transformed points from image space, reconstruction performed. In order to evaluate the efficiency of proposed method, buildings with different shapes and different level of complexity selected and the results of the 3D model reconstruction evaluated. The results showed credible efficiency of method for different buildings.

  17. 3D reconstruction of nuclear reactions using GEM TPC with planar readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research program of the Extreme Light Infrastructure – Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) laboratory under construction in Magurele, Romania facilities the need of developing a gaseous active-target detector providing 3D reconstruction of charged products of nuclear reactions induced by gamma beam. The monoenergetic, high-energy (E? > 19 MeV) gamma beam of intensity 1013?/s allows studying nuclear reactions in astrophysics. A Time Projection Chamber with crossed strip readout (eTPC) is proposed as one of the imaging detectors. The special feature of the readout electrode structure is a 2D reconstruction based on the information read out simultaneously from three arrays of strips that form virtual pixels. It is expected to reach similar spatial resolution as for pixel readout at largely reduced cost of electronics. The paper presents the current progress and first results of the small scale prototype TPC which is a one of implementation steps towards eTPC detector proposed in the Technical Design Report of Charged Particles Detection at ELI-NP

  18. Motion compensated digital tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) is a limited angle image reconstruction method for cone beam projections that offers patient surveillance capabilities during VMAT based SBRT delivery. Motion compensation (MC) has the potential to mitigate motion artifacts caused by respiratory motion, such as blur. The purpose of this feasibility study was therefore to develop and evaluate motion-compensated DTS (MC-DTS). Material and methods: MC-DTS images were reconstructed by back projection of X-ray projection images acquired over 30° arcs. Back projection lines were deformed according to an a priori motion model derived from the 4D planning CT. MC-DTS was evaluated on a respiratory motion phantom and 3 lung cancer patients. Respiratory artifact reduction was assessed visually and quantified by fitting a cumulative Gaussian function to profiles along the background-GTV transition in the CC direction. Results: MC reconstruction was fast enough to keep up with image acquisition and considerably reduced motion blur visually. Quantitatively, MC reduced the background-GTV transition distance by 49%. Conclusion: Motion compensation considerably improved the image quality of DTS images of lung cancer patients, giving an opportunity for more accurate DTS guidance and intra-fraction monitoring concurrent with VMAT delivery

  19. 3D phase micro-object studies by means of digital holographic tomography supported by algebraic reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilski, B. J.; Jozwicka, A.; Kujawinska, M.

    2007-09-01

    Constant development of microelements' technology requires a creation of new instruments to determine their basic physical parameters in 3D. The most efficient non-destructive method providing 3D information is tomography. In this paper we present Digital Holographic Tomography (DHT), in which input data is provided by means of Di-git- al Holography (DH). The main advantage of DH is the capability to capture several projections with a single hologram [1]. However, these projections have uneven angular distribution and their number is significantly limited. Therefore - Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART), where a few phase projections may be sufficient for proper 3D phase reconstruction, is implemented. The error analysis of the method and its additional limitations due to shape and dimensions of investigated object are presented. Finally, the results of ART application to DHT method are also presented on data reconstructed from numerically generated hologram of a multimode fibre.

  20. Orientation determination by wavelets matching for 3D reconstruction of very noisy electron microscopic virus images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Ali

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to perform a 3D reconstruction of electron microscopic images of viruses, it is necessary to determine the orientation (Euler angels of the 2D projections of the virus. The projections containing high resolution information are usually very noisy. This paper proposes a new method, based on weighted-projection matching in wavelet space for virus orientation determination. In order to speed the retrieval of the best match between projections from a model and real virus particle, a hierarchical correlation matching method is also proposed. Results A data set of 600 HSV-1 capsid particle images in different orientations was used to test the proposed method. An initial model of about 40 Å resolutions was used to generate projections of an HSV-1 capsid. Results show that a significant improvement, in terms of accuracy and speed, is obtained for the initial orientation estimates of noisy herpes virus images. For the bacteriophage (P22, the proposed method gave the correct reconstruction compared to the model, while the classical method failed to resolve the correct orientations of the smooth spherical P22 viruses. Conclusion This paper introduces a new method for orientation determination of low contrast images and highly noisy virus particles. This method is based on weighted projection matching in wavelet space, which increases the accuracy of the orientations. A hierarchical implementation of this method increases the speed of orientation determination. The estimated number of particles needed for a higher resolution reconstruction increased exponentially. For a 6 Å resolution reconstruction of the HSV virus, 50,000 particles are necessary. The results show that the proposed method reduces the amount of data needed in a reconstruction by at least 50 %. This may result in savings 2 to 3 man-years invested in acquiring images from the microscope and data processing. Furthermore, the proposed method is able to determine orientations for some difficult particles like P22 with accuracy and consistency. Recently a low PH sindbis capsid was determined with the proposed method, where other methods based on the common line fail.

  1. Historic photos and TLS data fusion for the 3D reconstruction of a monastery altar ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, K.; Moser, M.; Rampold, R.

    2015-08-01

    The basis of the photogrammetric reconstruction of the altar at the monastery / church are 2 historic photos from around 1920's as well as a 3D documentation of the church from terrestrial laser scanning. The point cloud from the laser scan was the starting point for an approximate computation of the interior and exterior orientation of that image that also contains parts of the altar area that still do exist. Using a projection of the recent geometry into the image allowed the analysis of changes of the altar ensemble since the time of image acquisition. Those parts that are still in situ are the origin for further action. Whether fragments and parts should be used further or newly positioned was decided in the next phase of reconstruction process. The focus of the first step of the workflow was at the outlines of the parts in the center of the altar. Using a monoplotting approach and assuming that the profiles are vertical and parallel to each other these object could be definitely compiled. Theses outlines also allowed an approximate determination of the interior and exterior orientation of the second historic photograph in which otherwise the complete connection to the recent altar area was missing. The side parts of the altar showed to be more complicated for reconstruction. The difference in depth of the varying edges could not be distinguished any more in the images. Such, the sequence and form of the different edges was adopted, scaled and transferred from the central part of the altar to the peripheral ones. Using this geometric information it was possible to define the necessary projection planes for the monoplotting restitution of the visible outlines. A concluding rigorous control was accomplished by back projection of the geometry into both historical images.

  2. 3D-printed haptic "reverse" models for preoperative planning in soft tissue reconstruction: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Michael P; Lin, Frank; Spychal, Robert T; Hunter-Smith, David J; Rozen, Warren Matthew

    2015-02-01

    In reconstructive surgery, preoperative planning is essential for optimal functional and aesthetic outcome. Creating a three-dimensional (3D) model from two-dimensional (2D) imaging data by rapid prototyping has been used in industrial design for decades but has only recently been introduced for medical application. 3D printing is one such technique that is fast, convenient, and relatively affordable. In this report, we present a case in which a reproducible method for producing a 3D-printed "reverse model" representing a skin wound defect was used for flap design and harvesting. This comprised a 82-year-old man with an exposed ankle prosthesis after serial soft tissue debridements for wound infection. Soft tissue coverage and dead-space filling were planned with a composite radial forearm free flap (RFFF). Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of the donor site (left forearm), recipient site (right ankle), and the left ankle was performed. 2D data from the CTA was 3D-reconstructed using computer software, with a 3D image of the left ankle used as a "control." A 3D model was created by superimposing the left and right ankle images, to create a "reverse image" of the defect, and printed using a 3D printer. The RFFF was thus planned and executed effectively, without complication. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a mechanism of calculating a soft tissue wound defect and producing a 3D model that may be useful for surgical planning. 3D printing and particularly "reverse" modeling may be versatile options in reconstructive planning, and have the potential for broad application. PMID:25046728

  3. Physical characterization of photon-counting tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Karl; Lundqvist, Mats; Cederström, Björn; Danielsson, Mats E.; Fredenberg, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Tomosynthesis is emerging as a next generation technology in mammography. Combined with photon-counting detectors with the ability for energy discrimination, a novel modality is enabled — spectral tomosynthesis. Further advantages of photon-counting detectors in the context of tomosynthesis include elimination of electronic noise, efficient scatter rejection (in some geometries) and no lag. Fourier-based linear-systems analysis is a well-established method for optimizing image quality in two-dimensional x-ray systems. The method has been successfully adapted to threedimensional imaging, including tomosynthesis, but several areas need further investigation. This study focuses on two such areas: 1) Adaption of the methodology to photon-counting detectors, and 2) violation of the shift-invariance and stationarity assumptions in non-cylindrical geometries. We have developed a Fourier-based framework to study the image quality in a photon-counting tomosynthesis system, assuming locally linear, stationary, and shift-invariant system response. The framework includes a cascaded-systems model to propagate the modulation-transfer function (MTF) and noise-power spectrum (NPS) through the system. The model was validated by measurements of the MTF and NPS. High degrees of non-shift invariance and non-stationarity were observed, in particular for the depth resolution as the angle of incidence relative the reconstruction plane varied throughout the imaging volume. The largest effects on image quality in a given point in space were caused by interpolation from the inherent coordinate system of the x-rays to the coordinate system that was used for reconstruction. This study is part of our efforts to fully characterize the spectral tomosynthesis system, we intend to extend the model further to include the detective-quantum efficiency, observer modelling, and spectral effects.

  4. Molecular Breast Imaging Using Emission Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopan, O. [University of Florida; Gilland, D. [University of Florida; Weisenberger, Andrew G. [JLAB; Kross, Brian J. [JLAB; Welch, Benjamin L. [Dilon Technologies

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Tour objective is to design a novel SPECT system for molecular breast imaging (MBI) and evaluate its performance. The limited angle SPECT system, or emission tomosynthesis, is designed to achieve 3D images of the breast with high spatial resolution/sensitivity. The system uses a simplified detector motion and is conducive to on-board biopsy and mult-modal imaging with mammography. Methods: The novel feature of the proposed gamma camera is a variable-angle, slant-hole (VASH) collimator, which is well suited for limited angle SPECT of a mildly compressed breast. The collimator holes change slant angle while the camera surface remains flush against the compression paddle. This allows the camera to vary the angular view ({+-}30{degrees}, {+-}45{degrees}) for tomographic imaging while keeping the camera close to the object for high spatial resolution and/or sensitivity. Theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations were performed assuming a point source and isolated breast phantom. Spatial resolution, sensitivity, contrast and SNR were measured. Results were compared to single-view, planar images and conventional SPECT. For both conventional SPECT and VASH, data were reconstructed using iterative algorithms. Finally, a proof-of-concept VASH collimator was constructed for experimental evaluation. Results: Measured spatial resolution/sensitivity with VASH showed good agreement with theory including depth-of-interaction (DOI) effects. The DOI effect diminished the depth resolution by approximately 2 mm. Increasing the slant angle range from {+-}30{degrees} to {+-}45{degrees} resulted in an approximately 1 mm improvement in the depth resolution. In the breast phantom images, VASH showed improved contrast and SNR over conventional SPECT and improved contrast over planar scintimmammography. Reconstructed images from the proof-of-concept VASH collimator demonstrated reasonable depth resolution capabilities using limited angle projection data. Conclusion: We conclude that this limited angle SPECT approach using a VASH collimator can achieve superior 3D image quality for MBI in a design that has attractive characteristics for clinical imaging.

  5. Examination of a novel reconstruction function in 3D CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel reconstruction function, VR Kernel (VRK), was evaluated by comparison with the conventional standard function (Standard) for imaging of blood vessels and their morphology by 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) of abdomen. The machine was PHILIPS Brilliance CT64 with the workstation of Extended Brilliance Work Space and AZE Virtual Place Lexus, PHILIPS EBW AVA software was for measuring the blood vessel diameter, and image analytical software was that of Kanazawa Univ. for calculating modulation transfer function (MTF). Examinations were on the resolution and noise characteristics with use of PHILIPS head and trunk phantom, on shape appearance and diameters with Kyoto-Kagaku simulated blood vessel phantom and on visual observation of the actual clinical 3D-CTA image at the level of renal artery of human abdomen for seeing the surface shape and calcification on aorta and the capacity of image characterization of peripheral vessels. VRK was found to give higher MTF values at up to 0.4 cycles/mm than Standard, indicating satisfactory spatial resolution and as well, larger standard deviation (SD) values suggestive of lower image quality. However, in the examination of shape appearance, VRK image quality was comparable to Standard's and capacity was improved at 1.8-1.0 mm diameter, probably by the increased CT number of the vessels. Further, steeper peak was given in the profiling curve of the simulated vessel by VRK, suggesting its clearer imaging. At the normal level (image at CT number of aorta, ca. 350 HU and SD, ca. 10), the clinical image quality was seemingly improved in VRK, and the capacity to characterize peripheral vessels was better despite roughness of the whole image at the poor level (CT number, at 200 and SD, ca. 15). VRK was thus found to more clearly display the margin of blood vessels due to the improved image quality by increased CT number, and to give better shape appearance, and was thought to be more useful to observe the peripheral vessels. (T.T.)

  6. Analysis of a 3D imaging device by reconstruction from cone beam X ray radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of our study is to analyse the principle of a 3D imaging device which attempts to restore the local density on a cuberill from a set of digital radiographs taken around the object. We have to use a ponctual radiation source to localize the acquisition lines. Therefore the attenuation measurements are modelled by the cone beam X ray transform. In the analysis of the inverse problem, we work out two inversion diagrams which compute the original function, the image of the object, by a sequence of transforms. The theoretical and algorithmical difficulty comes from the fact that, even in the simple case of a circular acquisition trajectory, the cone-shaped geometry prohibits splitting the problem into a superposition of reconstructions in two dimensions. We describe a novel theoretical framework based on the Radon transform. In this new representation space, it becomes possible by a rebinning operation to redistribute the integral values associated to planes from the coordinates system linked to source positions to the spherical coordinates system of the domain. To ensure this shift of space, we have established two formulas, the first approximate but leading to faster processing, related to the Radon transform, the second exact, related to the first derivative of the Radon transform. The inversion of these transforms completes the reconstruction. We state a theorem where we present the hypothesis under which the exact diagram does restore the original function. These are not verified for a circular trajectory, owing to a shadow zone in the Radon domain associated to the planes which intersect the object but not the trajectory. We propose either to restore the missing information or to use an oscillating trajectory

  7. Assessment of a fully 3D Monte Carlo reconstruction method for preclinical PET with iodine-124

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, M.; Buvat, I.; Ammour, L.; Chouin, N.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.; Chérel, M.; Carlier, T.

    2015-03-01

    Iodine-124 is a radionuclide well suited to the labeling of intact monoclonal antibodies. Yet, accurate quantification in preclinical imaging with I-124 is challenging due to the large positron range and a complex decay scheme including high-energy gammas. The aim of this work was to assess the quantitative performance of a fully 3D Monte Carlo (MC) reconstruction for preclinical I-124 PET. The high-resolution small animal PET Inveon (Siemens) was simulated using GATE 6.1. Three system matrices (SM) of different complexity were calculated in addition to a Siddon-based ray tracing approach for comparison purpose. Each system matrix accounted for a more or less complete description of the physics processes both in the scanned object and in the PET scanner. One homogeneous water phantom and three heterogeneous phantoms including water, lungs and bones were simulated, where hot and cold regions were used to assess activity recovery as well as the trade-off between contrast recovery and noise in different regions. The benefit of accounting for scatter, attenuation, positron range and spurious coincidences occurring in the object when calculating the system matrix used to reconstruct I-124 PET images was highlighted. We found that the use of an MC SM including a thorough modelling of the detector response and physical effects in a uniform water-equivalent phantom was efficient to get reasonable quantitative accuracy in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms. Modelling the phantom heterogeneities in the SM did not necessarily yield the most accurate estimate of the activity distribution, due to the high variance affecting many SM elements in the most sophisticated SM.

  8. First report of fossil "keratose" demosponges in Phanerozoic carbonates: preservation and 3-D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cui; Reitner, Joachim

    2014-06-01

    Fossil record of Phanerozoic non-spicular sponges, beside of being important with respect to the lineage evolution per se, could provide valuable references for the investigation of Precambrian ancestral animal fossils. However, although modern phylogenomic studies resolve non-spicular demosponges as the sister group of the remaining spiculate demosponges, the fossil record of the former is extremely sparse or unexplored compared to that of the latter; the Middle Cambrian Vauxiidae Walcott 1920, is the only confirmed fossil taxon of non-spicular demosponges. Here, we describe carbonate materials from Devonian (Upper Givetian to Lower Frasnian) bioherms of northern France and Triassic (Anisian) microbialites of Poland that most likely represent fossil remnants of keratose demosponges. These putative fossils of keratose demosponges are preserved as automicritic clumps. They are morphologically distinguishable from microbial fabrics but similar to other spiculate sponge fossils, except that the skeletal elements consist of fibrous networks instead of assembled spicules. Consistent with the immunological behavior of sponges, these fibrous skeletons often form a rim at the edge of the automicritic aggregate, separating the inner part of the aggregate from foreign objects. To confirm the architecture of these fibrous networks, two fossil specimens and a modern thorectid sponge for comparison were processed for three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction using serial grinding tomography. The resulting fossil reconstructions are three-dimensionally anastomosing, like modern keratose demosponges, but their irregular and nonhierarchical meshes indicate a likely verongid affinity, although a precise taxonomic conclusion cannot be made based on the skeletal architecture alone. This study is a preliminary effort, but an important start to identify fossil non-spicular demosponges in carbonates and to re-evaluate their fossilization potential.

  9. Atomic force microscopy imaging and 3-D reconstructions of serial thin sections of a single cell and its interior structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thin sectioning has been widely applied in electron microscopy (EM), and successfully used for an in situ observation of inner ultrastructure of cells. This powerful technique has recently been extended to the research field of atomic force microscopy (AFM). However, there have been no reports describing AFM imaging of serial thin sections and three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of cells and their inner structures. In the present study, we used AFM to scan serial thin sections approximately 60 nm thick of a mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell, and to observe the in situ inner ultrastructure including cell membrane, cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus membrane, and linear chromatin. The high-magnification AFM imaging of single mitochondria clearly demonstrated the outer membrane, inner boundary membrane and cristal membrane of mitochondria in the cellular compartment. Importantly, AFM imaging on six serial thin sections of a single mouse ES cell showed that mitochondria underwent sequential changes in the number, morphology and distribution. These nanoscale images allowed us to perform 3-D surface reconstruction of interested interior structures in cells. Based on the serial in situ images, 3-D models of morphological characteristics, numbers and distributions of interior structures of the single ES cells were validated and reconstructed. Our results suggest that the combined AFM and serial-thin-section technique is useful for the nanoscale imaging and 3-D reconstruction of single cells and their inner structures. This technique may facilitate studies of proliferating and differentiating stages of stem cells or somatic cells at a nanoscale

  10. Automatic Orientation of Multi-Scale Terrestrial Images for 3D Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. G. Tommaselli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Image orientation requires ground control as a source of information for both indirect estimation and quality assessment to guarantee the accuracy of the photogrammetric processes. However, the orientation still depends on interactive measurements to locate the control entities over the images. This paper presents an automatic technique used to generate 3D control points from vertical panoramic terrestrial images. The technique uses a special target attached to a GPS receiver and panoramic images acquired in nadir view from different heights. The reference target is used as ground control to determine the exterior orientation parameters (EOPs of the vertical images. These acquired multi-scale images overlap in the central region and can be used to compute ground coordinates using photogrammetric intersection. Experiments were conducted in a terrestrial calibration field to assess the geometry provided by the reference target and the quality of the reconstructed object coordinates. The analysis was based on the checkpoints, and the resulting discrepancies in the object space were less than 2 cm in the studied cases. As a result, small models and ortho-images can be produced as well as georeferenced image chips that can be used as high-quality control information.

  11. AX-PET A novel PET detector concept with full 3D reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Braem, A; Séguinot, J; Dissertori, G; Djambazov, L; Lustermann, W; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pauss, F; Schinzel, D; Solevi, P; Lacasta, C; Oliver, J F; Rafecas, M; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Vilardi, I; Chesi, E; Cochran, E; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Rudge, A; Smith, S; Weilhammer, P; Johnson, I; Renker, D; Clinthorne, N; Huh, S; Bolle, E; Stapnes, S; Meddi, F

    2009-01-01

    We describe the concept and first experimental tests of a novel 3D axial Positron Emission Tomography (PET) geometry. It allows for a new way of measuring the interaction point in the detector with very high precision. It is based on a matrix of long Lutetium-Yttrium OxyorthoSilicate (LYSO) crystals oriented in the axial direction, each coupled to one Geiger Mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) array. To derive the axial coordinate, Wave Length Shifter (WLS) strips are mounted orthogonally and interleaved between the crystals. The light from the WLS strips is read by custom-made G-APDs. The weighted mean of the signals in the WLS strips has proven to give very precise axial resolution. The achievable resolution along the three axes is mainly driven by the dimensions of the LYSO crystals and WLS strips. This concept is inherently free of parallax errors. Furthermore, it will allow identification of Compton interactions in the detector and for reconstruction of a fraction of them, which is expected to enhance imag...

  12. SCORPIO-VVER with advanced 3D power reconstruction and limit checking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCORPIO-VVER core monitoring system has proved since the first installation at Dukovany NPP in 1999 to be a valuable tool for the reactor operators and reactor physicists. It is now installed on four units of Dukovany NPP and two units of Bohunice NPP replacing the original Russian VK3 system. By both Czech and Slovak nuclear regulatory bodies it was licensed as a Technical Specification Surveillance tool. Since its first installation, the development of SCORPIO-VVER system continues along with the changes in VVER reactors operation. The system is being adapted according the utility needs and several notable improvements in physical modules of the system were introduced. The latest most significant changes were done in connection with implementation of a new digital I and C system, loading of the optimized Gadolinium bearing Gd 2 fuel assemblies, improvements in the area of core design (neutron physics, core thermal hydraulics and fuel thermal mechanics) and improvements in the predictive part of the system (Strategy Generator). Next to the adaptation of the system to up-rated unit conditions the currently running upgrades (Upgrade 2 at EBO Slovakia, Upgrade 5 at EDU Czech Republic) include further improvements of methods applied in physical modules. Among the most important changes are the improvement of 3D power reconstruction with increased importance to the SPND detectors measurements and the implementation of the on-line shutdown margin calculation. (authors)

  13. Stochastic Reasoning for Uav Supported Reconstruction of 3d Building Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch-Dehbi, S.; Dehbi, Y.; Plümer, L.

    2013-08-01

    The acquisition of detailed information for buildings and their components becomes more and more important. However, an automatic reconstruction needs high-resolution measurements. Such features can be derived from images or 3D laserscans that are e.g. taken by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Since this data is not always available or not measurable at the first for example due to occlusions we developed a reasoning approach that is based on sparse observations. It benefits from an extensive prior knowledge of probability density distributions and functional dependencies and allows for the incorporation of further structural characteristics such as symmetries. Bayesian networks are used to determine posterior beliefs. Stochastic reasoning is complex since the problem is characterized by a mixture of discrete and continuous parameters that are in turn correlated by nonlinear constraints. To cope with this kind of complexity, the implemented reasoner combines statistical methods with constraint propagation. It generates a limited number of hypotheses in a model-based top-down approach. It predicts substructures in building facades - such as windows - that can be used for specific UAV navigations for further measurements.

  14. Fast iterative image reconstruction methods for fully 3D multispectral bioluminescence tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate fast iterative image reconstruction methods for fully 3D multispectral bioluminescence tomography for applications in small animal imaging. Our forward model uses a diffusion approximation for optically inhomogeneous tissue, which we solve using a finite element method (FEM). We examine two approaches to incorporating the forward model into the solution of the inverse problem. In a conventional direct calculation approach one computes the full forward model by repeated solution of the FEM problem, once for each potential source location. We describe an alternative on-the-fly approach where one does not explicitly solve for the full forward model. Instead, the solution to the forward problem is included implicitly in the formulation of the inverse problem, and the FEM problem is solved at each iteration for the current image estimate. We evaluate the convergence speeds of several representative iterative algorithms. We compare the computation cost of those two approaches, concluding that the on-the-fly approach can lead to substantial reductions in total cost when combined with a rapidly converging iterative algorithm

  15. A 3D approach to reconstruct continuous optical images using lidar and MODIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HuaGuo Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Monitoring forest health and biomass for changes over time in the global environment requires the provision of continuous satellite images. However, optical images of land surfaces are generally contaminated when clouds are present or rain occurs. Methods To estimate the actual reflectance of land surfaces masked by clouds and potential rain, 3D simulations by the RAPID radiative transfer model were proposed and conducted on a forest farm dominated by birch and larch in Genhe City, DaXing’AnLing Mountain in Inner Mongolia, China. The canopy height model (CHM from lidar data were used to extract individual tree structures (location, height, crown width. Field measurements related tree height to diameter of breast height (DBH, lowest branch height and leaf area index (LAI. Series of Landsat images were used to classify tree species and land cover. MODIS LAI products were used to estimate the LAI of individual trees. Combining all these input variables to drive RAPID, high-resolution optical remote sensing images were simulated and validated with available satellite images. Results Evaluations on spatial texture, spectral values and directional reflectance were conducted to show comparable results. Conclusions The study provides a proof-of-concept approach to link lidar and MODIS data in the parameterization of RAPID models for high temporal and spatial resolutions of image reconstruction in forest dominated areas.

  16. Automated high resolution 3D reconstruction of cultural heritage using multi-scale sensor systems and semi-global matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfeil, J.; Strackenbrock, B.; Kossyk, I.

    2013-11-01

    3D surface models with high resolution and high accuracy are of great value in many applications, especially if these models are true to scale. As a promising alternative to active scanners (light section, structured light, laser scanners, etc.) new photogrammetric approaches are coming up. They use modern structure from motion (SfM) techniques, using the camera as main sensor. Unfortunately, the accuracy and resolution achievable with the available tools is very limited. When reconstructing large objects with high resolution an unacceptably high laborious effort is another problem. This paper shows an approach to overcome these limitations. It combines the strengths of modern surface reconstruction techniques from the remote sensing sector with novel SfM technologies, resulting in accurate 3D models of indoor and outdoor scenes. Starting with the image acquisition all particular steps to a final 3D model are explained. Finally the results of the evaluation of the approach at different indoor scenes are presented.

  17. 3D PET image reconstruction including both motion correction and registration directly into an MR or stereotaxic spatial atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, Paul; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Reader, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the feasibility and impact of including both the motion correction and the image registration transformation parameters from positron emission tomography (PET) image space to magnetic resonance (MR), or stereotaxic, image space within the system matrix of PET image reconstruction. This approach is motivated by the fields of neuroscience and psychiatry, where PET is used to investigate differences in activation patterns between different groups of participants, requiring all images to be registered to a common spatial atlas. Currently, image registration is performed after image reconstruction which introduces interpolation effects into the final image. Furthermore, motion correction (also requiring registration) introduces a further level of interpolation, and the overall result of these operations can lead to resolution degradation and possibly artifacts. It is important to note that performing such operations on a post-reconstruction basis means, strictly speaking, that the final images are not ones which maximize the desired objective function (e.g. maximum likelihood (ML), or maximum a posteriori reconstruction (MAP)). To correctly seek parameter estimates in the desired spatial atlas which are in accordance with the chosen reconstruction objective function, it is necessary to include the transformation parameters for both motion correction and registration within the system modeling stage of image reconstruction. Such an approach not only respects the statistically chosen objective function (e.g. ML or MAP), but furthermore should serve to reduce the interpolation effects. To evaluate the proposed method, this work investigates registration (including motion correction) using 2D and 3D simulations based on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner geometry, with and without resolution modeling, using the ML expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The quality of reconstruction was assessed using bias-variance and root mean squared error analyses, comparing the proposed method to conventional post-reconstruction registration methods. An overall reduction in bias (for a cold region: from 41% down to 31% (2D) and 97% down to 65% (3D), and for a hot region: from 11% down to 8% (2D) and from 16% down to 14% (3D)) and in root mean squared error analyses (for a cold region: from 43% to 37% (2D) and from 97% to 65% (3D), and for a hot region: from 11% to 9% (2D) and from 16% down to 14% (3D)) in reconstructed regional mean activities (full regions of interest; all with statistical significance: p cost of about 40 min. In this context, this work constitutes an important step toward the goal of estimating parameters of interest directly from the raw Poisson-distributed PET data, and hence toward the complete elimination of post-processing steps.

  18. i-BRUSH: a gaze-contingent virtual paintbrush for dense 3D reconstruction in robotic assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentini-Scarzanella, Marco; Mylonas, George P; Stoyanov, Danail; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    With increasing demand on intra-operative navigation and motion compensation during robotic assisted minimally invasive surgery, real-time 3D deformation recovery remains a central problem. Currently the majority of existing methods rely on salient features, where the inherent paucity of distinctive landmarks implies either a semi-dense reconstruction or the use of strong geometrical constraints. In this study, we propose a gaze-contingent depth reconstruction scheme by integrating human perception with semi-dense stereo and p-q based shading information. Depth inference is carried out in real-time through a novel application of Bayesian chains without smoothness priors. The practical value of the scheme is highlighted by detailed validation using a beating heart phantom model with known geometry to verify the performance of gaze-contingent 3D surface reconstruction and deformation recovery. PMID:20426007

  19. 3D reconstruction for a multi-ring PET scanner by single-slice rebinning and axial deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction method, which was originally developed for a positron emission tomography (PET) system consisting of two rotating scintillation cameras, has now been implemented for a multi-ring PET scanner with retractable septa. The method is called 'single-slice rebinning with axial deconvolution' (SSAD), and can be described as follows. The projection data are sorted into transaxial 2D sinograms. Correction for the axial blurring is made by deconvolution in the sinograms. To obtain the axial spread functions, which depend on the activity distribution, 2D reconstruction is first made using a limited axial acceptance angle. The final 3D image is obtained by 2D reconstruction of transaxial planes. The method is simple but not approximate, has a modest memory requirement, and can be combined with different 2D techniques. Evaluations by Monte Carlo simulations and phantom studies have been made. (Author)

  20. Determining gully volume from straightforward photo-based 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, M. R.; Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; Taguas, E. V.; Gomez, J. A.; Quinton, J. N.

    2012-04-01

    In order to quantify soil loss through gully erosion, accurate measurements of gully volume are required. However, gullys are usually extended features, often with complex morphologies and are challenging to survey appropriately and efficiently. Here we explore the use of a photo-based technique for deriving 3D gully models suitable for detailed erosion studies. Traditional aerial and oblique close-range photogrammetry approaches have been previously used to produce accurate digital elevation models (DEMs) from photographs. However, these techniques require expertise to carry out successfully, use proprietry software and usually need apriori camera calibration. The computer vision approach we adopt here relaxes these requirements and allows 3D models to be automatically produced from collections of unordered photos. We use a freely available 'reconstruction pipeline' (http://blog.neonascent.net/archives/bundler-photogrammetry-package/) that combines structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo algorithms (SfM-MVS) to generate dense point clouds (millions of points). The model is derived from photos taken from different positions with a consumer camera and is then scaled and georeferenced using additional software (http://www.lancs.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm) and observations of some control points in the scene. The approach was tested on a ~7-m long sinous gully section (average width and depth ~2.4 and 1.2 m respectively) in Vertisol soils, near Cordoba, Spain. For benchmark data, the gully topography was determined with a terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl LMS-Z420i, with a cited range accuracy of 10 mm). 191 photos were taken with a Canon EOS 450D with a prime (fixed) 28 mm lens over a period of ~10 minutes. In order to georeference the SfM-MVS model for comparison with the TLS data, 6 control targets were located around the gully and their locations determined by dGPS. Differences between the TLS and SfM-MVS surfaces are dominated by areas of data gaps from either one of the techniques with some additional issues related to small amounts of vegetation on steep gully walls. The overall difference between the surfaces represents volume surveyed. This supports the viability of SfM-MVS as a useful tool for gully evaluations, capable of producing accurate DEMs at low cost.

  1. The 3D tomographic image reconstruction software for prompt-gamma measurement of the boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tomographic imaging system based on the spatial distribution measurement of the neutron capture reaction during Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) would be very useful for clinical purpose. Using gamma-detectors in a 2D-panel, boron neutron capture and hydrogen neutron capture gamma-rays emitted by the neutron irradiated region can be detected, and an image of the neutron capture events can be reconstructed. A 3D reconstruction software package has been written to support the development of a 3D prompt-gamma tomographic system. The package consists of three independent modules: phantom generation, reconstruction and evaluation modules. The reconstruction modules are based on algebraic approach of the iterative reconstruction algorithm (ART), and on the maximum likelihood estimation method (ML-EM). In addition to that, two subsets of the ART, the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) and the component averaging algorithms (CAV) have been included to the package employing parallel codes for multiprocessor architecture. All implemented algorithms use two different field functions for the reconstruction of the region. One is traditional voxel function, another is, so called, blob function, smooth spherically symmetric generalized Kaiser-Bessel function. The generation module provides the phantom and projections with background by tracing the prompt gamma-rays for a given scanner geometry. The evaluation module makes statistical comparisons between the generated and reconstructed images, and provides figure-of-merit (FOM) values for the applied reconstruction algorithms. The package has been written in C language and tested under Linux and Windows platforms. The simple graphical user interface (GUI) is used for command execution and visualization purposed. (author)

  2. A new approach for 3D reconstruction from bright field TEM imaging: Beam precession assisted electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful combination of electron beam precession and bright field electron tomography for 3D reconstruction is reported. Beam precession is demonstrated to be a powerful technique to reduce the contrast artifacts due to diffraction and curvature in thin foils. Taking advantage of these benefits, Precession assisted electron tomography has been applied to reconstruct the morphology of Sn precipitates embedded in an Al matrix, from a tilt series acquired in a range from +49o to -61o at intervals of 2o and with a precession angle of 0.6o in bright field mode. The combination of electron tomography and beam precession in conventional TEM mode is proposed as an alternative procedure to obtain 3D reconstructions of nano-objects without a scanning system or a high angle annular dark field detector. -- Highlights: ? Electron beam precession reduces spurious diffraction contrast in bright field mode. ? Bend contour related contrast depends on precession angle. ? Electron beam precession is combined with bright field electron tomography. ? Precession assisted BF tomography allowed 3D reconstruction of a Sn precipitate.

  3. Síndrome "Nutcracker"o Cascanueces: demostración mediante TAC Helicoidal con reconstrucción "3D"(VR) / Nutcracker`s syndrome: demostration with helicoidal TC with volumetric reconstruction "3D"

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    J.I., Martínez-Salamanca García; F., Herranz Amo; I., Gordillo Gutiérrez; J.M., Díez Cordero; D., Subirá Ríos; I., Castaño González; M., Moralejo Gárate; R., Cabello Benavente; C., Hernández Fernández.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome o fenómeno de Nutcracker o Cascanueces se define como la compresión de la vena renal izquierda a su paso por la pinza u horquilla vascular formada por la aorta y la mesentérica superior. Su diagnóstico es poco frecuente, tanto por su baja frecuencia como por la dificultad de sospecharlo [...] ante hallazgos tan frecuentes como el dolor lumbar o la hematuria. Presentamos el caso de una paciente en la cual pudimos demostrar dicha patología mediante el apoyo diagnóstico del TAC helicoidal con reconstrucción volumétrica o "3D" (VR). Abstract in english The nutcracker's syndrome or phenomenom is defined as the left renal vein compression between the aorta and the superior mesenteric artery. Diagnosis is uncommon, not only due to its low frequency but for the dificulty to be suspected in usual findings as lumbar pain or hematuria. We present the cas [...] e of a patient to whom we were able to show mentioned pathology with the helicoidal TC with volumetric reconstruction "3D" (VR).

  4. Clinically feasible reconstruction of 3D whole-body PET/CT data using blurred anatomical labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of utilizing aligned anatomical information from CT images to locally adjust image smoothness during the reconstruction of three-dimensional (3D) whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) data. The ability of whole-body PET imaging to detect malignant neoplasms is becoming widely recognized. Potentially useful, however, is the role of whole-body PET in quantitative estimation of tracer uptake. The utility of PET in oncology is often limited by the high level of statistical noise in the images. Reduction in noise can be obtained by incorporating a priori image smoothness information from correlated anatomical information during the reconstruction of PET data. A combined PET/CT scanner allows the acquisition of accurately aligned PET and x-ray CT whole-body data. We use the Fourier rebinning algorithm (FORE) to accurately convert the 3D PET data to two-dimensional (2D) data to accelerate the image reconstruction process. The 2D datasets are reconstructed with successive over-relaxation of a penalized weighted least squares (PWLS) objective function to model the statistics of the acquisition, data corrections, and rebinning. A 3D voxel label model is presented that incorporates the anatomical information via the penalty weights of the PWLS objective function. This combination of FORE + PWLS + labels was developed as it allows for both reconstruction of 3D whole-body data sets in clinically feasible times and also the inclusion of anatomical information in such a way that convergence can be guaranteed. Since mismatches between anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) data are unavoidable in practice, the labels are 'blurred' to reflect the uncertainty associated with the anatomical information. Simulated and experimental results show the potential advantage of incorporating anatomical information by using blurred labels to calculate the penalty weights. We conclude that while the effect of this method on detection tasks is complicated and unclear, there is an improvement on the estimation task. (author)

  5. 3D Indoor Building Environment Reconstruction using calibration of Range finder Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamali, Ali; Anton, François; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel; Gold, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, municipalities intend to have 3D city models for facility management, disaster management and architectural planning. 3D data acquisition can be done by laser scanning for indoor environment which is a costly and time consuming process. Currently, for indoor surveying, Electronic Distance Measurement (EDM) and Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) are mostly used. In this paper, several techniques for indoor 3D building data acquisition have been investigated. For reducing the time and cost ...

  6. A study of a soft computing based method for 3D scenario reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Viejo Hernando, Diego; García Rodríguez, José; Cazorla Quevedo, Miguel Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Several recent works deal with 3D data in mobile robotic problems, e.g., mapping. Data comes from any kind of sensor (time of flight, Kinect or 3D lasers) that provide a huge amount of unorganized 3D data. In this paper we detail an efficient approach to build complete 3D models using a soft computing method, the Growing Neural Gas (GNG). As neural models deal easily with noise, imprecision, uncertainty or partial data, GNG provides better results than other approaches. The GNG obtained is th...

  7. Holographic microscopy reconstruction in both object and image half spaces with undistorted 3D grid

    CERN Document Server

    Verrier, Nicolas; Tessier, Gilles; Gross, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a holographic microscopy reconstruction method, which propagates the hologram, in the object half space, in the vicinity of the object. The calibration yields reconstructions with an undistorted reconstruction grid i.e. with orthogonal x, y and z axis and constant pixels pitch. The method is validated with an USAF target imaged by a x60 microscope objective, whose holograms are recorded and reconstructed for different USAF locations along the longitudinal axis:-75 to +75 {\\mu}m. Since the reconstruction numerical phase mask, the reference phase curvature and MO form an afocal device, the reconstruction can be interpreted as occurring equivalently in the object or in image half space.

  8. The parallel processing system for fast 3D-CT image reconstruction by circular shifting float memory architecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computerized Tomography (CT) is expected to become an inevitable diagnostic technique in the future. However, the long time required to reconstruct an image has been one of the major drawbacks associated with this technique. Parallel process is one of the best way to solve this problem. This paper gives the architecture, hardware and software design of PIRS-4 (4-processor Parallel Image Reconstruction System), which is a parallel processing system for fast 3D-CT image reconstruction by circular shifting float memory architecture. It includes the structure and components of the system, the design of crossbar switch and details of control model, the description of RPBP image reconstruction, the choice of OS (Operate System) and language, the principle of imitating EMS, direct memory R/W of float and programming in the protect model. Finally, the test results are given

  9. Stationary chest tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Tucker, Andrew W.; Lee, Yueh Z.; Heath, Michael D.; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Chest tomosynthesis is a low-dose, quasi-3D imaging modality that has been demonstrated to improve the detection sensitivity for small lung nodules, compared to 2D chest radiography. The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility and system requirements of stationary chest tomosynthesis (s-DCT) using a spatially distributed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, where the projection images are collected by electronically activating individual x-ray focal spots in the source array without mechanical motion of the x-ray source, detector, or the patient. A bench-top system was constructed using an existing CNT field emission source array and a flat panel detector. The tube output, beam quality, focal spot size, system in-plane and in-depth resolution were characterized. Tomosynthesis slices of an anthropomorphic chest phantom were reconstructed for image quality assessment. All 75 CNT sources in the source array were shown to operate reliably at 80?kVp and 5?mA tube current. Source-to-source consistency in the tube current and focal spot size was observed. The incident air kerma reading per mAs was measured as 74.47?uGy?mAs-1 at 100?cm. The first half value layer of the beam was 3?mm aluminum. An average focal spot size of 2.5? × ?0.5?mm was measured. The system MTF was measured to be 1.7?cycles?mm-1 along the scanning direction, and 3.4?cycles?mm-1 perpendicular to the scanning direction. As the angular coverage of 11.6°-34°, the full width at half maximum of the artifact spread function improved greatly from 9.5 to 5.2?mm. The reconstructed tomosynthesis slices clearly show airways and pulmonary vascular structures in the anthropomorphic lung phantom. The results show the CNT source array is capable of generating sufficient dose for chest tomosynthesis imaging. The results obtained so far suggest an s-DCT using a distributed CNT x-ray source array is feasible.

  10. A user-friendly nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction platform based on LabVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Hao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zhi-Li; Gao, Kun; Wu, Zhao; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography at the nanometer scale (nano-CT) offers a wide range of applications in scientific and industrial areas. Here we describe a reliable, user-friendly, and fast software package based on LabVIEW that may allow us to perform all procedures after the acquisition of raw projection images in order to obtain the inner structure of the investigated sample. A suitable image alignment process to address misalignment problems among image series due to mechanical manufacturing errors, thermal expansion, and other external factors has been considered, together with a novel fast parallel beam 3D reconstruction procedure that was developed ad hoc to perform the tomographic reconstruction. We have obtained remarkably improved reconstruction results at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility after the image calibration, the fundamental role of this image alignment procedure was confirmed, which minimizes the unwanted blurs and additional streaking artifacts that are always present in reconstructed slices. Moreover, this nano-CT image alignment and its associated 3D reconstruction procedure are fully based on LabVIEW routines, significantly reducing the data post-processing cycle, thus making the activity of the users faster and easier during experimental runs.

  11. GPU acceleration of 3D forward and backward projection using separable footprints for X-ray CT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iterative 3D image reconstruction methods can improve image quality over conventional filtered back projection (FBP) in X-ray computed tomography. However, high computational costs deter the routine use of iterative reconstruction clinically. The separable footprint method for forward and back-projection simplifies the integrals over a detector cell in a way that is quite accurate and also has a relatively efficient CPU implementation. In this project, we implemented the separable footprints method for both forward and backward projection on a graphics processing unit (GPU) with NVDIA's parallel computing architecture (CUDA). This paper describes our GPU kernels for the separable footprint method and simulation results. (orig.)

  12. Minimum slice spacing required to reconstruct 3D shape for serial sections of breast tissue for comparison with medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Sara; Eiben, Bjoern; Mertzanidou, Thomy; Hipwell, John; Hermsen, Meyke; van der Laak, Jeroen; Pinder, Sarah; Bult, Peter; Hawkes, David

    2015-03-01

    There is currently an increasing interest in combining the information obtained from radiology and histology with the intent of gaining a better understanding of how different tumour morphologies can lead to distinctive radiological signs which might predict overall treatment outcome. Relating information at different resolution scales is challenging. Reconstructing 3D volumes from histology images could be the key to interpreting and relating the radiological image signal to tissue microstructure. The goal of this study is to determine the minimum sampling (maximum spacing between histological sections through a fixed surgical specimen) required to create a 3D reconstruction of the specimen to a specific tolerance. We present initial results for one lumpectomy specimen case where 33 consecutive histology slides were acquired.

  13. Reconstructing 3D profiles of flux distribution in array of unshunted Josephson junctions from 2D scanning SQUID microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using a specially designed algorithm (based on utilizing the so-called Hierarchical Data Format), we report on successful reconstruction of 3D profiles of local flux distribution within artificially prepared arrays of unshunted Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson junctions from 2D surface images obtained via the scanning SQUID microscope. The analysis of the obtained results suggest that for large sweep areas, the local flux distribution significantly deviates from the conventional picture and exhibits a more complicated avalanche-type behavior with a prominent dendritic structure. -- Highlights: ? The penetration of external magnetic field into an array of Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson junctions is studied. ? Using Scanning SQUID Microscope, 2D images of local flux distribution within array are obtained. ? Using specially designed pattern recognition algorithm, 3D flux profiles are reconstructed from 2D images.

  14. The Interior Analysis and 3-D Reconstruction of Internally-Mixed Light-Absorbing Atmospheric Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conny, J. M.; Collins, S. M.; Anderson, I.; Herzing, A.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-containing atmospheric particles may either absorb solar or outgoing long-wave radiation or scatter solar radiation, and thus, affect Earth’s radiative balance in multiple ways. Light-absorbing carbon that is common in urban air particles such as industrial coke dust, road dust, and diesel soot, often exists in the same particle with other phases that contain, for example, aluminum, calcium, iron, and sulfur. While the optical properties of atmospheric particles in general depend on overall particle size and shape, the inhomogeneity of chemical phases within internally-mixed particles may also greatly affect particle optical properties. In this study, a series of microscopic approaches were used to identify individual light-absorbing coarse-mode particles and to assess their interior structure and composition. Particle samples were collected in 2004 from one of the U.S. EPA’s Los Angeles Particulate Matter Supersites, and were likely affected substantially by road dust and construction dust. First, bright-field and dark-field light microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used to distinguish predominantly light-absorbing carbonaceous particles from other particle types such as mineral dust, sea salt, and brake wear. Second, high-resolution SEM-EDX elemental mapping of individual carbonaceous particles was used to select particles with additional elemental phases that exhibited spatial inhomogeneity. Third, focused ion-beam SEM (FIB-SEM) with EDX was used to slice through selected particles to expose interior surfaces and to determine the spatial distribution of element phases throughout the particles. Fourth, study of the interior phases of a particle was augmented by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a thin section of the particle prepared by FIB-SEM. Here, electron energy loss spectroscopy with TEM was used to study chemical bonding in the carbonaceous phase. Finally, automated serial slicing and imaging in the FIB-SEM generated a stack of secondary electron images of the particles’ interior surfaces that allowed for the 3-D reconstruction of the particles, a process known as FIB tomography. Interior surface of light-absorbing carbonaceous particle from FIB-SEM analysis.

  15. 3-D reconstruction of the spine from biplanar radiographs based on contour matching using the Hough transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Lv, Liang; Shi, Xinling; Wang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Fei; Zhang, Yufeng; Li, Hongjian

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a method for three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of the spine from biplanar radiographs. The approach was based on vertebral contour matching for estimating vertebral orientations and locations. Vertebral primitives were initially positioned under constraint of the 3-D spine midline, which was estimated from manually identified control points. Vertebral orientations and locations were automatically adjusted by matching projections of 3-D primitives with vertebral edges on biplanar radiographs based on the generalized Hough transform technique with a deformation tolerant matching strategy. We used graphics processing unit to accelerate reconstruction. Accuracy and precision were evaluated using radiographs from 15 scoliotic patients and a spine model in 24 poses. On in vivo radiographs, accuracy was within 2.8° for orientation and 2.4 mm for location; precision was within 2.3° for orientation and 2.1 mm for location. results were slightly better on model radiographs than on in vivo radiographs but without significance (p>0.05). The duration for user intervention was less than 2 min, and the computation time was within 3 min. Results indicated the method's reliability. It is a promising tool to determine 3-D spinal geometry with acceptable user interaction. PMID:23412567

  16. Quantitative analysis of 3D stent reconstruction from a limited number of views in cardiac rotational angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrenot, Béatrice; Vaillant, Régis; Prost, Rémy; Finet, Gérard; Douek, Philippe; Peyrin, Françoise

    2007-03-01

    Percutaneous coronary angioplasty consists in conducting a guidewire carrying a balloon and a stent through the lesion and deploying the stent by balloon inflation. A stent is a small 3D complex mesh hardly visible in X-ray images : the control of stent deployment is difficult although it is important to avoid post intervention complications. In a previous work, we proposed a method to reconstruct 3D stent images from a set of 2D cone-beam projections acquired in rotational acquisition mode. The process involves a motion compensation procedure based on the position of two markers located on the guidewire in the 2D radiographic sequence. Under the hypothesis that the stent and markers motions are identical, the method was shown to generate a negligible error. If this hypothesis is not fulfilled, a solution could be to use only the images where motion is weakest, at the detriment of having a limiter number of views. In this paper, we propose a simulation based study of the impact of a limited number of views in our context. The chain image involved in the acquisition of X-ray sequences is first modeled to simulate realistic noisy projections of stent animated by a motion close to cardiac motion. Then, the 3D stent images are reconstructed using the proposed motion compensation method from gated projections. Two gating strategies are examined to select projection in the sequences. A quantitative analysis is carried out to assess reconstruction quality as a function of noise and acquisition strategy.

  17. 3D reconstruction with single image pairs and structured light projection for short-term ultra-high-speed applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräuer-Burchardt, Christian; Heist, Stefan; Dietrich, Patrick; Kühmstedt, Peter; Notni, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    A new approach for a 3D reconstruction algorithm using a single pair of a stereo-camera setup and a structured light projection based on spatial correlation is introduced. In comparison to existing methods using sequences of temporally consecutive images, sufficient 3D-reconstruction quality is achieved, even in the case of ultra-high-speed cameras. This is obtained by iterative application of correspondence finding and filtering operators. The calculation effort of the evaluation, filling, filtering, and outlier removing operators is relative high and may prevent a permanent application of the algorithm to high-resolution long-term recordings. The favored application scenario of the new method is the rough 3D reconstruction and motion tracking of quickly moving objects in short-term processes (few seconds), e.g. in the analysis of crash-test situations. Here, the complete recorded image sequence can be analyzed off-line which allows an afterwards optimization of the parameters. An advantage of the new technique regarding high-speed applications is that fixed single patterns instead of pattern sequences can be used for moving objects and hence no synchronization between projection and cameras is necessary.

  18. 3D computer tomography for measurement of femoral position in acl reconstruction

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Tiago Lazzaretti, Fernandes; Nuno Miguel Morais Fonseca, Martins; Felipe de Andrade, Watai; Cyro, Albuquerque Neto; André, Pedrinelli; Arnaldo José, Hernandez.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To validate intra- and inter-class correlation coefficients of a transparent 3D-TC protocol and investigate relationships between different axial rotations. Methods: [...] Twenty unilateral knee TCs (iSite - Philips) were evaluated by means of a transparent 3D-TC OsiriX Imaging Software (v.3.9.4), 3D MPR protocol. Mathematical model of femoral tunnel projections acquired on vertical and horizontal rotations from -20 to +20 degrees. Height (h'/H) and length (t'/T) of tunnel projections have been analyzed by the Bernard and Hertel's method. Statistics: power of study=80%, ICC, ANOVA, p

  19. 3-D reconstructions of the early-November 2004 CDAW geomagnetic storms: analysis of Ooty IPS speed and density data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Bisi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Interplanetary scintillation (IPS remote-sensing observations provide a view of the solar wind covering a wide range of heliographic latitudes and heliocentric distances from the Sun between ~0.1 AU and 3.0 AU. Such observations are used to study the development of solar coronal transients and the solar wind while propagating out through interplanetary space. They can also be used to measure the inner-heliospheric response to the passage of coronal mass ejections (CMEs and co-rotating heliospheric structures. IPS observations can, in general, provide a speed estimate of the heliospheric material crossing the observing line of site; some radio antennas/arrays can also provide a radio scintillation level. We use a three-dimensional (3-D reconstruction technique which obtains perspective views from outward-flowing solar wind and co-rotating structure as observed from Earth by iteratively fitting a kinematic solar wind model to these data. Using this 3-D modelling technique, we are able to reconstruct the velocity and density of CMEs as they travel through interplanetary space. For the time-dependent model used here with IPS data taken from the Ootacamund (Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT in India, the digital resolution of the tomography is 10° by 10° in both latitude and longitude with a half-day time cadence. Typically however, the resolutions range from 10° to 20° in latitude and longitude, with a half- to one-day time cadence for IPS data dependant upon how much data are used as input to the tomography. We compare reconstructed structures during early-November 2004 with in-situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft orbiting the Sun-Earth L1-Point to validate the 3-D tomographic reconstruction results and comment on how these improve upon prior reconstructions.

  20. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs.

  1. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo; Lee, Jae Young; Hwang, Eui Jin; Hwang, In Pyeong; Woo, Sung Min; Lee, Chang Joo; Park, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs.

  2. Reliability of trunk shape measurements based on 3-D surface reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Pazos, Valérie; Cheriet, Farida; Danserau, Jean; Ronsky, Janet; Zernicke, Ronald F.; Labelle, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the reliability of 3-D trunk surface measurements for the characterization of external asymmetry associated with scoliosis. Repeated trunk surface acquisitions using the Inspeck system (Inspeck Inc., Montreal, Canada), with two different postures A (anatomical position) and B (‘‘clavicle’’ position), were obtained from patients attending a scoliosis clinic. For each acquisition, a 3-D model of the patient’s trunk was built and a series of measurements was computed...

  3. Reconstruction of 3D Human Facial Images Using Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Eyad Elyan; Hassan Ugail

    2007-01-01

    One of the challenging problems in geometric modeling and computer graphics is the construction of realistic human facial geometry. Such geometry are essential for a wide range of applications, such as 3D face recognition, virtual reality applications, facial expression simulation and computer based plastic surgery application. This paper addresses a method for the construction of 3D geometry of human faces based on the use of Elliptic Partial Differential Equations (PDE). Here the geometry c...

  4. Dynamic 3D Scene Depth Reconstruction via Optical Flow Field Rectification

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, You; Liu, Qiong; Ji, Rongrong; GAO, YUE

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a depth propagation scheme based on optical flow field rectification towards more accurate depth reconstruction. In depth reconstruction, the occlusions and low-textural regions easily result in optical flow field errors, which lead ambiguous depth value or holes without depth in the obtained depth map. In this work, a scheme is proposed to improve the precision of depth propagation and the quality of depth reconstruction for dynamic scene. The proposed scheme first ...

  5. A full 3-D reconstruction of the entire porcine coronary vasculature

    OpenAIRE

    Kaimovitz, Benjamin; Lanir, Yoram; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reconstructed the entire coronary arterial tree of the porcine heart down to the first segment of capillaries. Here, we extend the vascular model through the capillary bed and the entire coronary venous system. The reconstruction was based on comprehensive morphometric data previously measured in the porcine heart. The reconstruction was formulated as a large-scale optimization process, subject to both global constraints relating to the location of the larger veins and to l...

  6. 3-D reconstruction of phase grating via digital micro-holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital micro-holography technique, a combination of digital holography with microscopy, can be used to measure and analyse the micro-structure and status information of samples when the digital hologram registered is reconstructed numerically by some numerical methods based on the principle of scalar diffraction or coherent image. By summarizing the development of digital micro-holography, Fresnel approximation reconstruction algorithm and two-wavelength technique are introduced to study the three dimensional phase reconstruction of phase grating. Experimental results show good agreement with true parameters of phase grating. It also analyses the aberration of the image reconstructed by Fresnel approximation approach and two-wavelength technique

  7. Implementation of High-Resolution Pinhole SPECT 3D Image Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to achieve high-resolution pinhole SPECT image reconstruction, a novel lookup table (LUT) method was implemented in the ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm including an effective compensation of the pinhole response. A standard Jaszczak phantom was used to evaluate the reconstruction algorithm. The results show that the OSEM algorithm with the LUT method can significantly reduce the CPU time and the usage of memory, and provide significant improvement of the spatial resolution of the reconstructed image. In conclusion, the LUT method with pinhole response corrections in LUT is an effective approach to implement OSEM algorithm for high-resolution pinhole SPECT image reconstruction. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of scatter effects on image quality for breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis uses a limited number (typically 10-20) of low-dose x-ray projections to produce a pseudo-three-dimensional volume tomographic reconstruction of the breast. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effect of scattered radiation on the image quality for breast tomosynthesis. In a simulation, scatter point spread functions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation method were convolved over the breast projection to estimate the distribution of scatter for each angle of tomosynthesis projection. The results demonstrate that in the absence of scatter reduction techniques, images will be affected by cupping artifacts, and there will be reduced accuracy of attenuation values inferred from the reconstructed images. The effect of x-ray scatter on the contrast, noise, and lesion signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) in tomosynthesis reconstruction was measured as a function of the tumor size. When a with-scatter reconstruction was compared to one without scatter for a 5 cm compressed breast, the following results were observed. The contrast in the reconstructed central slice image of a tumorlike mass (14 mm in diameter) was reduced by 30%, the voxel value (inferred attenuation coefficient) was reduced by 28%, and the SDNR fell by 60%. The authors have quantified the degree to which scatter degrades the image quality over a wide range of parameters relevant to breast tomosynthesis, including x-ray beam energy, breast thickness, breast diameter, and breast composition. They also demonstrate, though, that even without a scatter rejection device, the contrast and SDNR in the reconstructed tomosynthesis slice are higher than those of conventional mammographic projection images acquired with a grid at an equivalent total exposure.

  9. Research on 3D-CT image reconstruction algorithm based on flat panel detector projection data pre-procession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-area a-Si X-ray flat panel detector (FPD) is becoming more and more popular in the field of industry transmission radiation imaging. FDK-type three dimensional computed tomography (3D- CT) with circular orbit based on FPD can execute inspection rapidly, but its imaging quality can not reach that of 2D-CT. In order to make the best of the speed advantage of 3DCT and improve the quality of the reconstructed image, at the same time reduce tile noise, the research object of this paper is 2a projection data from FPD, and we propose projection pre-procession method that the projection data was filtered twice in high-frequency and low-frequency respectively, then add the two reconstructed images to make the high quality reconstructed image. The result of algorithm simulation showed the image quality improved and the system noise reduced apparently. (authors)

  10. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 5123 to 81923 voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and Ht (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume "Shepp and Logan" in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  11. Reconstruction for Time-Domain In Vivo EPR 3D Multigradient Oximetric Imaging—A Parallel Processing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Dharmaraj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional Oximetric Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging using the Single Point Imaging modality generates unpaired spin density and oxygen images that can readily distinguish between normal and tumor tissues in small animals. It is also possible with fast imaging to track the changes in tissue oxygenation in response to the oxygen content in the breathing air. However, this involves dealing with gigabytes of data for each 3D oximetric imaging experiment involving digital band pass filtering and background noise subtraction, followed by 3D Fourier reconstruction. This process is rather slow in a conventional uniprocessor system. This paper presents a parallelization framework using OpenMP runtime support and parallel MATLAB to execute such computationally intensive programs. The Intel compiler is used to develop a parallel C++ code based on OpenMP. The code is executed on four Dual-Core AMD Opteron shared memory processors, to reduce the computational burden of the filtration task significantly. The results show that the parallel code for filtration has achieved a speed up factor of 46.66 as against the equivalent serial MATLAB code. In addition, a parallel MATLAB code has been developed to perform 3D Fourier reconstruction. Speedup factors of 4.57 and 4.25 have been achieved during the reconstruction process and oximetry computation, for a data set with 23×23×23 gradient steps. The execution time has been computed for both the serial and parallel implementations using different dimensions of the data and presented for comparison. The reported system has been designed to be easily accessible even from low-cost personal computers through local internet (NIHnet. The experimental results demonstrate that the parallel computing provides a source of high computational power to obtain biophysical parameters from 3D EPR oximetric imaging, almost in real-time.

  12. Development of an iterative 3D reconstruction method for the control of heavy-ion oncotherapy with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissertation reports the approach and work for developing and implementing an image space reconstruction method that allows to check the 3D activity distribution and detect possible deviations from irradiation planning data. Other than usual PET scanners, the BASTEI instrument is equipped with two detectors positioned at opposite sides above and below the patient, so that there is enough space for suitable positioning of patient and radiation source. Due to the restricted field of view of the positron camera, the 3D imaging process is subject to displacement-dependent variations, creating bad reconstruction conditions. In addition, the counting rate is lower by two or three orders of magnitude than the usual counting rates of nuclear-medicine PET applications. This is why an iterative 3D algorithm is needed. Two iterative methods known from conventional PET were examined for their suitability and compared with respect to results. The MLEM algorithm proposed by Shepp and Vardi interprets the measured data as a random sample of independent variables of Poisson distributions, to be used for assessing the unknown activity distribution. A disadvantage of this algorithm is the considerable calculation effort required. For minimizing the calculation effort, and in order to make iterative statistical methods applicable to measured 3D data, Daube-Whitherspoon and Muehllehner developed the Iterative Image Space Reconstruction Algorithm, ISRA, derived through modification of the sequence of development steps of the MLEM algorithm. Problem solution with ISRA is based on least square deviation method, other than with the MLEM algorithm which uses the best probability method. (orig./CB)

  13. The quantitative potential for breast tomosynthesis imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, Christina M.; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y. [Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States) and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Due to its limited angular scan range, breast tomosynthesis has lower resolution in the depth direction, which may limit its accuracy in quantifying tissue density. This study assesses the quantitative potential of breast tomosynthesis using relatively simple reconstruction and image processing algorithms. This quantitation could allow improved characterization of lesions as well as image processing to present tomosynthesis images with the familiar appearance of mammography by preserving more low-frequency information. Methods: All studies were based on a Siemens prototype MAMMOMAT Novation TOMO breast tomo system with a 45 deg. total angular span. This investigation was performed using both simulations and empirical measurements. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted using the breast tomosynthesis geometry and tissue-equivalent, uniform, voxelized phantoms with cuboid lesions of varying density embedded within. Empirical studies were then performed using tissue-equivalent plastic phantoms which were imaged on the actual prototype system. The material surrounding the lesions was set to either fat-equivalent or glandular-equivalent plastic. From the simulation experiments, the effects of scatter, lesion depth, and background material density were studied. The empirical experiments studied the effects of lesion depth, background material density, x-ray tube energy, and exposure level. Additionally, the proposed analysis methods were independently evaluated using a commercially available QA breast phantom (CIRS Model 11A). All image reconstruction was performed with a filtered backprojection algorithm. Reconstructed voxel values within each slice were corrected to reduce background nonuniformities. Results: The resulting lesion voxel values varied linearly with known glandular fraction (correlation coefficient R{sup 2}>0.90) under all simulated and empirical conditions, including for the independent tests with the QA phantom. Analysis of variance performed on the fit line parameters revealed statistically significant differences between the two different background materials and between 28 kVp and the remaining energies (26, 30, and 32 kVp) for the dense experimental phantom. However, no significant differences arose between different energies for the fatty phantom, nor for any of the many other combinations of parameters. Conclusions: These strong linear relationships suggest that breast tomosynthesis image voxel values, after being corrected by our outlined methods, are highly positively correlated with true tissue density. This consistent linearity implies that breast tomosynthesis imaging indeed has potential to be quantitative.

  14. [Documentation of course and results of crime scene reconstruction and virtual crime scene reconstruction possibility by means of 3D laser scanning technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowicz, Krzysztof; Zo?na, Ma?gorzata M; Ko?ciuk, Jacek; Dawidowicz, Bartosz

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to present both the possibilities of documenting the course and results of crime scene reconstruction using 3D laser scanning technology and the legal basis for application of this technology in evidence collection. The authors present the advantages of the aforementioned method, such as precision, objectivity, resistance of the measurement parameters to manipulation (comparing to other methods), high imaging resolution, touchless data recording, nondestructive testing, etc. Moreover, trough the analysis of the current legal regulations concerning image recording in criminal proceedings, the authors show 3D laser scanning technology to have a full complete ability to be applied in practice in documentation of the course and results of crime scene reconstruction. PMID:21863738

  15. 3D reconstruction of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: comparison between spatial compound ultrasound models and anatomical models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Bo L.; Fagertun, Jens

    2007-01-01

    This study deals with the creation of 3D models that can work as a tool for discriminating between tissue and background in the development of tissue classification methods. Ten formalin-fixed atherosclerotic carotid plaques removed by endarterectomy were scanned with 3D multi-angle spatial compound ultrasound (US) and subsequently sliced and photographed to produce a 3D anatomical data set. Outlines in the ultrasound data were found by means of active contours and combined into 10 3D ultrasound models. The plaque regions of the anatomical photographs were outlined manually and then combined into 10 3D anatomical models. The volumes of the anatomical models correlated with the volume found by a water displacement method (r = 0.95), except for an offset. The models were compared in three ways. Visual inspection showed quite good agreement between the models. The volumes of the ultrasound models correlated with the volumes of the anatomical models (r = 0.93), again with an offset. Finally, the overlap between the anatomical models and the ultrasound models showed, on average, that the intersection comprised 90%?v?o?l of the anatomical models and 73%?v?o?l of the ultrasound models.

  16. Preclinical, fluorescence and diffuse optical tomography: non-contact instrumentation, modeling and time-resolved 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-DOT) is a new non-invasive imaging technique increasingly used in the clinical and preclinical fields. It yields optical absorption and scattering maps of the explored organs, and related physiological parameters. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-FDOT) is based on the detection of fluorescence photons. It provides spatio-temporal maps of fluorescent probe concentrations and life times, and allows access to metabolic and molecular imaging which is important for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, particularly in oncology. The main goal of this thesis was to reconstruct 3D TR-DOT/TR-FDOT images of small animals using time-resolved optical technology. Data were acquired using optical fibers fixed around the animal without contact with its surface. The work was achieved in four steps: 1)- Setting up an imaging device to record the 3D coordinates of an animal's surface; 2)- Modeling the no-contact approach to solve the forward problem; 3)- Processing of the measured signals taking into account the impulse response of the device; 4)- Implementation of a new image reconstruction method based on a selection of carefully chosen points. As a result, good-quality 3D optical images were obtained owing to reduced cross-talk between absorption and scattering. Moreover, the computation time was cut down, compared to full-time methods using whole temporal profiles. (author)

  17. MDCT angiography with 3D image reconstructions in the evaluation of failing arteriovenous fistulas and grafts in hemodialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulou, Angeliki; Raland, Hans; Magnusson, Anders (Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)), email: angeliki.dimopoulou@akademiska.se; Wikstroem, Bjoern (Dept. of Medical Sciences, Renal Section, Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Arteriovenous fistulas and grafts are the methods of choice for vascular access in renal failure patients in need of hemodialysis. Their major complication, however, is stenosis, which might lead to thrombosis. Purpose. To demonstrate the usefulness of 16-MDCTA with 3D image reconstructions, in long-term hemodialysis patients with dysfunctional arteriovenous fistulas and grafts (AVF and AVG). Material and Methods. During a 17-month period, 31 patients with dysfunctional AVF and AVG (24 AVF and seven AVG) were examined with MDCTA with 3D image postprocessing. Parameters such as comprehension of the anatomy, quality of contrast enhancement, and pathological vascular changes were measured. DSA was then performed in 24 patients. Results. MDCTA illustrated the anatomy of the AVF/AVG and the entire vascular tree to the heart, in a detailed and comprehensive manner in 93.5% of the evaluated segments, and depicted pathology of AVF/AVG or pathology of the associated vasculature. MDCTA demonstrated a total of 38 significant stenoses in 25 patients. DSA verified 37 stenoses in 24 patients and demonstrated two additional stenoses. MDCTA had thus a sensitivity of 95%. All 24 patients were treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with good technical results. Conclusion. MDCTA with 3D reconstructions of dysfunctioning AVFs and AVGs in hemodialysis patients is an accurate and reliable diagnostic method helping customize future intervention

  18. New methods for the computer-assisted 3-D reconstruction of neurons from confocal image stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Stephan; Evers, Jan Felix; Duch, Carsten; Scholz, Michael; Obermayer, Klaus

    2004-12-01

    Exact geometrical reconstructions of neuronal architecture are indispensable for the investigation of neuronal function. Neuronal shape is important for the wiring of networks, and dendritic architecture strongly affects neuronal integration and firing properties as demonstrated by modeling approaches. Confocal microscopy allows to scan neurons with submicron resolution. However, it is still a tedious task to reconstruct complex dendritic trees with fine structures just above voxel resolution. We present a framework assisting the reconstruction. User time investment is strongly reduced by automatic methods, which fit a skeleton and a surface to the data, while the user can interact and thus keeps full control to ensure a high quality reconstruction. The reconstruction process composes a successive gain of metric parameters. First, a structural description of the neuron is built, including the topology and the exact dendritic lengths and diameters. We use generalized cylinders with circular cross sections. The user provides a rough initialization by marking the branching points. The axes and radii are fitted to the data by minimizing an energy functional, which is regularized by a smoothness constraint. The investigation of proximity to other structures throughout dendritic trees requires a precise surface reconstruction. In order to achieve accuracy of 0.1 microm and below, we additionally implemented a segmentation algorithm based on geodesic active contours that allow for arbitrary cross sections and uses locally adapted thresholds. In summary, this new reconstruction tool saves time and increases quality as compared to other methods, which have previously been applied to real neurons. PMID:15589093

  19. Program Package for Accurate 3D Field Reconstruction from Boundary Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Belov, A V; Filatov, O G; Koscielniak, F; Kukhtin, V V; Lamzin, E A; Semchenkov, A G; Semchenkova, O V; Shatil, N A; Shmider, J; Sychevskii, S E; Teterev, Yu G; Sereda, Yu M

    2002-01-01

    The problem of magnetic field reconstruction inside a sub-region in R^3 from magnetic measurements on the closed boundary of this subregion is considered. Efficiency of the proposed method, algorithm and associated software for precision magnet system is discussed. The results of the software verification, numerical experiments as well as the ones of field reconstruction using boundary measurements in the magnet M1 of the separator COMBAS are given. Requirements to the position accuracy of sensors consistent with the required accuracy of magnetic field reconstruction are defined. Recomendations on magnetic scheme design for field mapping are given.

  20. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to 3-D diffusion tensor image (DTI) reconstruction from multi-slice diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging acquisitions of the moving fetal brain. Motion scatters the slice measurements in the spatial and spherical diffusion domain with respect to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction (AUDiSSAR) that explicitly formulates a process for diffusion direction sensitive DW-slice-to-DTI-volume alignment. This also incorporates image resolution modeling to iteratively deconvolve the effects of the imaging point spread function using the multiple views provided by thick slices acquired in different anatomical planes. The algorithm is implemented using a multi-resolution iterative scheme and multiple real and synthetic data are used to evaluate the performance of the technique. An accuracy experiment using synthetically created motion data of an adult head and an experiment using synthetic motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to current state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations of an orientation distribution function.

  1. A multiscale approach for the reconstruction of the fiber architecture of the human brain based on 3D-PLI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Reckfort

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Structural connectivity of the brain can be conceptionalized as a multiscale organization. The present study is built on 3D-Polarized Light Imaging (3D-PLI, a neuroimaging technique targeting the reconstruction of nerve fiber orientations and therefore contributing to the analysis of brain connectivity. Spatial orientations of the fibers are derived from birefringence measurements of unstained histological sections that are interpreted by means of a voxel-based analysis. This implies that a single fiber orientation vector is obtained for each voxel, which reflects the net effect of all comprised fibers. We have utilized two polarimetric setups providing an object space resolution of 1.3\\,{\\textmu}m/px (microscopic setup and 64\\,{\\textmu}m/px (macroscopic setup to carry out 3D-PLI and retrieve fiber orientations of the same tissue samples, but at complementary voxel sizes (i.e., scales. The present study identifies the main sources which cause a discrepancy of the measured fiber orientations observed when measuring the same sample with the two polarimetric systems. As such sources the differing optical resolutions and diverging retardances of the implemented waveplates were identified. A methodology was implemented that enables the compensation of measured different systems' responses to the same birefringent sample. This opens up new ways to conduct multiscale analysis in brains by means of 3D-PLI and to provide a reliable basis for the transition between different scales of the nerve fiber architecture.

  2. On reliability of 3D reconstructions of thermal plasma jet radiation by inverse Radon transform.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekerešová, Zuzana; Hlína, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Ro?. 56, ?. 2 (2011), s. 171-183. ISSN 0001-7043 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : thermal plasma jet * tomography * image reconstruction Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. Apodization without loss of resolution in the 3-D reconstruction of icosohedral virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauren, Peter D.; Merickel, Michael B.; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.

    1990-07-01

    ICOS is a modular software system for the 3-dimensional reconstruction of icosohedral particles from 2-dimensional projections. Noise in the resulting reconstructions is due to many sources including ringing artifact due to finite sampling of Fourier transforms and is comparable with many of the desired components representing particulate structure. This paper describes a method for reducing ringing artifact without significant loss of resolution. Application of a Blackman window to the original Fourier transforms significantly improves the signal to noise ratio by suppressing ringing artifact but reduces resolution in the fmal reconstruction. Taking a voxel by voxel minimum of the filtered and unfiltered 3-dimensional reconstruction restores the original resolution while retaining the enhanced SNR. 2.

  4. Consequences of random and systematic reconstruction uncertainties in 3D image based brachytherapy in cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Lang, Stefan; Granfeldt, Jørgen; Pötter, Richard; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian; Kirisits, Christian

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of random and systematic applicator reconstruction uncertainties on DVH parameters in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Dose plans were analysed for 20 cervical cancer patients with MRI based brachytherapy. Uncertainty of applicator reconstruction was modelled by translating and rotating the applicator. Changes in DVH parameters per mm of applicator displacement were evaluated for GTV, CTV, bladde...

  5. Automatic segmentation and 3D reconstruction of intravascular ultrasound images for a fast preliminar evaluation of vessel pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Moratal, David; García-Sánchez, Diego Ramón; Bodí, Vicente; Rieta, José Joaquín; Sanchis, Juan Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is used along with X-ray coronary angiography to detect vessel pathologies. Manual analysis of IVUS images is slow and time-consuming and it is not feasible for clinical purposes. A semi-automated method is proposed to generate 3D reconstructions from IVUS video sequences, so that a fast diagnose can be easily done, quantifying plaque length and severity as well as plaque volume of the vessels under study. The methodology described in this work has four steps: a pre-processing of IVUS images, a segmentation of media-adventitia contour, a detection of intima and plaque and a 3D reconstruction of the vessel. Preprocessing is intended to remove noise from the images without blurring the edges. Segmentation of media-adventitia contour is achieved using active contours (snakes). In particular, we use the gradient vector flow (GVF) as external force for the snakes. The detection of lumen border is obtained taking into account gray-level information of the inner part of the previously detected contours. A knowledge-based approach is used to determine which level of gray corresponds statistically to the different regions of interest: intima, plaque and lumen. The catheter region is automatically discarded. An estimate of plaque type is also given. Finally, 3D reconstruction of all detected regions is made. The suitability of this methodology has been verified for the analysis and visualization of plaque length, stenosis severity, automatic detection of the most problematic regions, calculus of plaque volumes and a preliminary estimation of plaque type obtaining for automatic measures of lumen and vessel area an average error smaller than 1mm(2) (equivalent aproximately to 10% of the average measure), for calculus of plaque and lumen volume errors smaller than 0.5mm(3) (equivalent approximately to 20% of the average measure) and for plaque type estimates a mismatch of less than 8% in the analysed frames. PMID:17215103

  6. Validation of PSF-based 3D reconstruction for myocardial blood flow measurements with Rb-82 PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Christensen, Nana Louise; Møller, Lone W.; Aanerud, Joel Fredrik Astrup; Bouchelouche, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Aim:The use of PSF-based 3D reconstruction algorithms (PSF) is desirable in most clinical PET-exams due to their superior image quality. Rb-82 cardiac PET is inherently noisy due to short half-life and prompt gammas and would presumably benefit from PSF. However, the quantitative behavior of PSF is not well validated and problems with both edge-effects and unphysical contrast-recovery have been reported.1 In this study, we compare myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR) obtai...

  7. 3D Reconstruction of Phalangeal and Metacarpal Bones of Male Judo Players and Sedentary Men by MDCT Images

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Kalayci

    2008-01-01

    This study has been performed to reveal hand bone peculiarities of elite male judoists by comparing their phalangeal and metacarpal bones with those of sedentary men on the basis of biometric ratio of the bones by means of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) images. For this purpose, the axial images of the right and left hands of 8 elite male judo players (mean age: 22.0 ± 2.9 years, mean weight: 64.0 ± 4.9 kg) and 8 sedentary men (mean age: 26.0...

  8. Strategies to improve 3D whole-body PET image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm is described for three-dimensional whole-body (3DWB) image reconstruction in positron emission tomography. For whole-body applications, improvements to the popular fixed-axial-acceptance-angle technique are achieved by combining axially adjacent projection data available with a long-axis data set. Time-consuming reprojection of unmeasured oblique lines of response is reduced or eliminated by axial overlap of bed positions, while pixel variance and reconstructed axial resolution are made more uniform by the overlap. Improvements in noise and resolution uniformity are accompanied by gains in reconstruction efficiency, and may be optimized against increased acquisition time due to overlapping acquisition segments and reduced axial coverage. An 11-detector-ring overlap improves axial uniformity in coronal images of a long, uniform cylinder from 23% to 8% with uniform axial resolution. Associated with a 37% improvement in reconstruction time is a 34% reduction in axial coverage for four bed positions. A smaller degree of overlap is found to provide the best trade-off between image uniformity, total scan duration, and reconstruction time because of a proportionally greater reduction in reprojected lines of response. Using a sample optimization scheme, we find a three-ring overlap is best for a 60 cm axial field of view and a five-ring overlap for an 80 cm axial field of view. (author)

  9. Low dose scatter correction for digital chest tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inscoe, Christina R.; Wu, Gongting; Shan, Jing; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Digital chest tomosynthesis (DCT) provides superior image quality and depth information for thoracic imaging at relatively low dose, though the presence of strong photon scatter degrades the image quality. In most chest radiography, anti-scatter grids are used. However, the grid also blocks a large fraction of the primary beam photons requiring a significantly higher imaging dose for patients. Previously, we have proposed an efficient low dose scatter correction technique using a primary beam sampling apparatus. We implemented the technique in stationary digital breast tomosynthesis, and found the method to be efficient in correcting patient-specific scatter with only 3% increase in dose. In this paper we reported the feasibility study of applying the same technique to chest tomosynthesis. This investigation was performed utilizing phantom and cadaver subjects. The method involves an initial tomosynthesis scan of the object. A lead plate with an array of holes, or primary sampling apparatus (PSA), was placed above the object. A second tomosynthesis scan was performed to measure the primary (scatter-free) transmission. This PSA data was used with the full-field projections to compute the scatter, which was then interpolated to full-field scatter maps unique to each projection angle. Full-field projection images were scatter corrected prior to reconstruction. Projections and reconstruction slices were evaluated and the correction method was found to be effective at improving image quality and practical for clinical implementation.

  10. Intuitive Terrain Reconstruction Using Height Observation-Based Ground Segmentation and 3D Object Boundary Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Sungdae Sim; Chee Sun Won; Kyhyun Um; Wei Song; Kyungeun Cho

    2012-01-01

    Mobile robot operators must make rapid decisions based on information about the robot’s surrounding environment. This means that terrain modeling and photorealistic visualization are required for the remote operation of mobile robots. We have produced a voxel map and textured mesh from the 2D and 3D datasets collected by a robot’s array of sensors, but some upper parts of objects are beyond the sensors’ measurements and these parts are missing in the terrain reco...

  11. Three-Dimensional Reconstructions Come to Life – Interactive 3D PDF Animations in Functional Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Kamp, Thomas van de; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Vagovi?, Patrik; Baumbach, Tilo; Riedel, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Digital surface mesh models based on segmented datasets have become an integral part of studies on animal anatomy and functional morphology; usually, they are published as static images, movies or as interactive PDF files. We demonstrate the use of animated 3D models embedded in PDF documents, which combine the advantages of both movie and interactivity, based on the example of preserved Trigonopterus weevils. The method is particularly suitable to simulate joints with largely deterministic m...

  12. Automatic 3D building reconstruction from airbornelaser scanning and cadastral data using hough transform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodum, Lars; Overby, Jens; Kjems, Erik; Ilsøe, Peer Møller

    2004-01-01

    Urban environments of modern cities are described digitally in large public databases and datasets of e.g. laser scanning and ortho photos. These data sets are not necessarily linked to each other, except trough their geometry attributes (coordinates), which are mutually displaced and have a low degree of details. However, it is possible to create virtual 3D models of buildings, by processing these data. Roof polygons are generated using airborne laser scanning of 1x1 meter grid and ground plans...

  13. Maximum likelihood reconstruction in fully 3D PET via the SAGE algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAGE and ordered subsets algorithms have been proposed as fast methods to compute penalized maximum likelihood estimates in PET. We have implemented both for use in fully 3D PET and completed a preliminary evaluation. The technique used to compute the transition matrix is fully described. The evaluation suggests that the ordered subsets algorithm converges much faster than SAGE, but that it stops short of the optimal solution

  14. Automatic 3D building reconstruction from airbornelaser scanning and cadastral data using hough transform

    OpenAIRE

    Bodum, Lars; Overby, Jens; Kjems, Erik; Ilsøe, Peer Møller

    2004-01-01

    Urban environments of modern cities are described digitally in large public databases and datasets of e.g. laser scanning and ortho photos. These data sets are not necessarily linked to each other, except trough their geometry attributes (coordinates), which are mutually displaced and have a low degree of details. However, it is possible to create virtual 3D models of buildings, by processing these data. Roof polygons are generated using airborne laser scanning of 1x1 meter grid and ground pl...

  15. Reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    OpenAIRE

    F. Ewald; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2014-01-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or b...

  16. Limited-angle 3-D reconstructions using Fourier transform iterations and Radon transform iterations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of limited-angle reconstruction of space-limited objects using the concepts of allowed cone and missing cone in Fourier space are discussed. The distortion of a point source resulting from setting the Fourier components in the missing cone to zero was calculated mathematically, and its bearing on the convergence of an iteration scheme involving Fourier transforms was analyzed in detail. It was found that the convergence rate is fairly insensitive to the position of the point source within the boundary of the object, apart from an edge effect that tends to enhance some parts of the boundary in reconstructing the object. Another iteration scheme involving Radon transforms was introduced and compared to the Fourier transform method in such areas as root mean square error, stability with respect to noise, and computer reconstruction time. 8 figures, 2 tables

  17. Study on the fast neutron imaging and 3D image reconstruction method with Geant4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting the shielded highly enriched nuclear material by fast neutron is very significant for homeland security. With Gean4-based Monte Carlo simulation program developed by our group, the interaction of 14 MeV fast neutrons with highly enriched nuclear material (Highly enriched Uranium) and ordinary materials (lead, iron, and polyethylene) were simulated and the simulation data were analyzed with ROOT. The three-dimensional images of detected materials were obtained by the position and time data of gamma rays produced by the interaction of 14 MeV fast neutron and these materials. The reconstruction results show that the data of gamma rays can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional imaging of detected materials. Additionally, the relative contrast of reconstructed imaging can be used to distinguish the different materials qualitatively. (authors)

  18. Macromolecular 3D SEM reconstruction strategies: Signal to noise ratio and resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.D., E-mail: jeremydavidwoodward@gmail.com [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Electron Microscope Unit, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Wepf, R.A. [Electron Microscopy (EMEZ), ETH, Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15

    Three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy generates quantitative volumetric structural data from SEM images of macromolecules. This technique provides a quick and easy way to define the quaternary structure and handedness of protein complexes. Here, we apply a variety of preparation and imaging methods to filamentous actin in order to explore the relationship between resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, structural preservation and dataset size. This information can be used to define successful imaging strategies for different applications. - Highlights: • F-actin SEM datasets were collected using 8 different preparation/ imaging techniques. • Datasets were reconstructed by back projection and compared/analyzed • 3DSEM actin reconstructions can be produced with <100 views of the asymmetric unit. • Negatively stained macromolecules can be reconstructed by 3DSEM to ?3 nm resolution.

  19. Macromolecular 3D SEM reconstruction strategies: Signal to noise ratio and resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional scanning electron microscopy generates quantitative volumetric structural data from SEM images of macromolecules. This technique provides a quick and easy way to define the quaternary structure and handedness of protein complexes. Here, we apply a variety of preparation and imaging methods to filamentous actin in order to explore the relationship between resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, structural preservation and dataset size. This information can be used to define successful imaging strategies for different applications. - Highlights: • F-actin SEM datasets were collected using 8 different preparation/ imaging techniques. • Datasets were reconstructed by back projection and compared/analyzed • 3DSEM actin reconstructions can be produced with <100 views of the asymmetric unit. • Negatively stained macromolecules can be reconstructed by 3DSEM to ?3 nm resolution

  20. Future capabilities of CME polarimetric 3D reconstructions with the METIS instrument: A numerical test

    CERN Document Server

    Pagano, Paolo; Mackay, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the 3D structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is crucial for understanding the nature and origin of solar eruptions. To derive information on the 3D structure of CMEs from white-light (total and polarized brightness) images, the polarization ratio technique is widely used. The soon-to-be-launched METIS coronagraph on board Solar Orbiter will use this technique to produce new polarimetric images. We determine the accuracy at which the position of the centre of mass, direction and speed of propagation, and the column density of the CME can be determined along the line of sight. We perform a 3D MHD simulation of a flux rope ejection where a CME is produced. From the simulation we (i) synthesize the corresponding METIS white-light (total and polarized brightness) images and (ii) apply the polarization ratio technique to these synthesized images and compare the results with the known density distribution from the MHD simulation. We find that the polarization ratio technique reproduces with high a...

  1. Surface reconstructions of foetal brain abnormalities using ultrafast steady state 3D acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MRI of the foetal brain in utero is performed in routine clinical practice using sequences that produce two-dimensional (2D) images. Recent developments in image post-processing have allowed the construction of three-dimensional (3D) volume data sets from 2D images acquired in different anatomical planes, but these have limitations due to the unpredictable nature of foetal movement. These limitations have been overcome by development of several different advanced computer techniques, which require specialist knowledge, software, and processing methods, which are rarely available in routine clinical settings. Our aim was to develop a technique that can be used in routine clinical situations without the need for custom-developed or expensive software by utilizing MRI sequences that can produce a 3D data set in “ultrafast” timescales. The 3D dataset, combined with versatile image post-processing and visualization techniques, has resulted in the production of high-resolution images of foetal brain surfaces in utero. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate our methods and early results by way of a pictorial review illustrating a range of developmental brain disease in utero

  2. Validation of 3D EM Reconstructions: The Phantom in the Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Bernard Heymann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Validation is a necessity to trust the structures solved by electron microscopy by single particle techniques. The impressive achievements in single particle reconstruction fuel its expansion beyond a small community of image processing experts. This poses the risk of inappropriate data processing with dubious results. Nowhere is it more clearly illustrated than in the recovery of a reference density map from pure noise aligned to that map—a phantom in the noise. Appropriate use of existing validating methods such as resolution-limited alignment and the processing of independent data sets (“gold standard” avoid this pitfall. However, these methods can be undermined by biases introduced in various subtle ways. How can we test that a map is a coherent structure present in the images selected from the micrographs? In stead of viewing the phantom emerging from noise as a cautionary tale, it should be used as a defining baseline. Any map is always recoverable from noise images, provided a sufficient number of images are aligned and used in reconstruction. However, with smaller numbers of images, the expected coherence in the real particle images should yield better reconstructions than equivalent numbers of noise or background images, even without masking or imposing resolution limits as potential biases. The validation test proposed is therefore a simple alignment of a limited number of micrograph and noise images against the final reconstruction as reference, demonstrating that the micrograph images yield a better reconstruction. I examine synthetic cases to relate the resolution of a reconstruction to the alignment error as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio. I also administered the test to real cases of publicly available data. Adopting such a test can aid the microscopist in assessing the usefulness of the micrographs taken before committing to lengthy processing with questionable outcomes.

  3. 3D visualisation of the middle ear and adjacent structures using reconstructed multi-slice CT datasets, correlating 3D images and virtual endoscopy to the 2D cross-sectional images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3D imaging of the middle ear facilitates better understanding of the patient's anatomy. Cross-sectional slices, however, often allow a more accurate evaluation of anatomical structures, as some detail may be lost through post-processing. In order to demonstrate the advantages of combining both approaches, we performed computed tomography (CT) imaging in two normal and 15 different pathological cases, and the 3D models were correlated to the cross-sectional CT slices. Reconstructed CT datasets were acquired by multi-slice CT. Post-processing was performed using the in-house software ''3D Slicer'', applying thresholding and manual segmentation. 3D models of the individual anatomical structures were generated and displayed in different colours. The display of relevant anatomical and pathological structures was evaluated in the greyscale 2D slices, 3D images, and the 2D slices showing the segmented 2D anatomy in different colours for each structure. Correlating 2D slices to the 3D models and virtual endoscopy helps to combine the advantages of each method. As generating 3D models can be extremely time-consuming, this approach can be a clinically applicable way of gaining a 3D understanding of the patient's anatomy by using models as a reference. Furthermore, it can help radiologists and otolaryngologists evaluating the 2D slices by adding the correct 3D information that would otherwise have to be mentally integrated. The method can be applied to radiological diagnosis, surgical planning, and especially, to teaching. (orig.)

  4. Efficient, symmetry-driven SIMD access patterns for 3D PET image reconstruction applicable for CPUs and GPUs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheins, J.J.; Garcia Lucio, L.F.; Herzog, H.; Shah, N.J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-4)

    2011-07-01

    Fully 3D PET image reconstruction still remains a challenging computational task due to the tremendous number of registered Lines-of-Response. Typically, billions of geometrical weights have to be repeatedly calculated and evaluated for iterative algorithms. In this context, the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET REconstruction Software TOolkit) provides accurate geometrical weighting schemes for the forward projection and backward projection, e.g. Volume-of-Intersection, while using all measured LORs separately. PRESTO exploits redundancies to realise a strongly compressed, memory-resident system matrix. Consequently, the needed time to calculate matrix weights no longer influences the reconstruction time. Very high compression factors (>300) are achieved by using unconventional non-cartesian voxel patterns. However, in the original implementation the addressing of matrix weights, projection values and voxel values happens in disfavoured memory access patterns. This causes severe computational inefficiencies due to the limited memory bandwidth using CPUs. In this work, the image data and projection data in memory as well as the order of mathematical operations have been completely re-organised to provide an optimal merit for the Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) approach. This reorganisation is directly driven by the induced symmetries of PRESTO. A global speedup factor of 15 for has been achieved for the CPU-based implementation while obtaining identical results. In addition, a GPU-based implementation using CUDA on Nvidia TESLA C1060/S1070 hardware provides another speed up factor of 4 compared to single core CPU processing. (orig.)

  5. Efficient, symmetry-driven SIMD access patterns for 3D PET image reconstruction applicable for CPUs and GPUs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully 3D PET image reconstruction still remains a challenging computational task due to the tremendous number of registered Lines-of-Response. Typically, billions of geometrical weights have to be repeatedly calculated and evaluated for iterative algorithms. In this context, the reconstruction software PRESTO (PET REconstruction Software TOolkit) provides accurate geometrical weighting schemes for the forward projection and backward projection, e.g. Volume-of-Intersection, while using all measured LORs separately. PRESTO exploits redundancies to realise a strongly compressed, memory-resident system matrix. Consequently, the needed time to calculate matrix weights no longer influences the reconstruction time. Very high compression factors (>300) are achieved by using unconventional non-cartesian voxel patterns. However, in the original implementation the addressing of matrix weights, projection values and voxel values happens in disfavoured memory access patterns. This causes severe computational inefficiencies due to the limited memory bandwidth using CPUs. In this work, the image data and projection data in memory as well as the order of mathematical operations have been completely re-organised to provide an optimal merit for the Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) approach. This reorganisation is directly driven by the induced symmetries of PRESTO. A global speedup factor of 15 for has been achieved for the CPU-based implementation while obtaining identical results. In addition, a GPU-based implementation using CUDA on Nvidia TESLA C1060/S1070 hardware provides another speed up factor of 4 compared to single core CPU processing. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of corrective reconstruction methods using a 3D cardiac-torso phantom and bull's-eye plots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the investigation was to study the effectiveness of the corrective reconstruction methods in cardiac SPECT using a realistic phantom and to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the reconstructed images using bull's-eye plots. A 3D mathematical phantom which realistically models the anatomical structures of the cardiac-torso region of patients was used. The phantom allows simulation of both the attenuation distribution and the uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in different organs. Also, the phantom can be easily modified to simulate different genders and variations in patient anatomy. Two-dimensional projection data were generated from the phantom and included the effects of attenuation and detector response blurring. The reconstruction methods used in the study included the conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) with no attenuation compensation, and the first-order Chang algorithm, an iterative filtered backprojection algorithm (IFBP), the weighted least square conjugate gradient algorithm and the ML-EM algorithm with non-uniform attenuation compensation. The transaxial reconstructed images were rearranged into short-axis slices from which bull's-eye plots of the count density distribution in the myocardium were generated

  7. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 5123 to 81923 voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and Ht (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections

  8. Optimization of number and signal to noise ratio radiographs for defects 3D reconstruction in industrial control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among numerous techniques for non-destructive evaluation (NOE), X-rays systems are well suited to inspect inner objects. Acquiring several radiographs of inspected objects under different points of view enables to recover a three dimensional structural information. In this NOE application, a tomographic testing is considered. This work deals with two tomographic testing optimizations in order to improve the characterization of defects that may occur into metallic welds. The first one consists in the optimization of the acquisition strategy. Because tomographic testing is made on-line, the total duration for image acquisition is fixed, limiting the number of available views. Hence, for a given acquisition duration, it is possible either to acquire a very limited number of radiographs with a good signal to noise ratio in each single acquisition or a larger number of radiographs with a limited signal to noise ratio. The second one consists in optimizing the 3D reconstruction algorithms from a limited number of cone-beam projections. To manage the lack of data, we first used algebraic reconstruction algorithms such as ART or regularized ICM. In terms of acquisition strategy optimization, an increase of the number of projections was proved to be valuable. Taking into account specific prior knowledge such as support constraint or physical noise model in attenuation images also improved reconstruction quality. Then, a new regularized region based reconstruction approach was developed. Defects to reconstruct are binary (lack of material in a homogeneous object). As a consequence, they are entirely described by their shapes. Because the number of defects to recover is unknown and is totally arbitrary, a level set formulation allowing handling topological changes was used. Results obtained with a regularized level-set reconstruction algorithm are optimistic in the proposed context. (author)

  9. Bayesian 3D X-ray computed tomography image reconstruction with a scaled Gaussian mixture prior model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li; Gac, Nicolas; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali [Laboratoire des Signaux et Systèmes 3, Rue Joliot-Curie 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2015-01-13

    In order to improve quality of 3D X-ray tomography reconstruction for Non Destructive Testing (NDT), we investigate in this paper hierarchical Bayesian methods. In NDT, useful prior information on the volume like the limited number of materials or the presence of homogeneous area can be included in the iterative reconstruction algorithms. In hierarchical Bayesian methods, not only the volume is estimated thanks to the prior model of the volume but also the hyper parameters of this prior. This additional complexity in the reconstruction methods when applied to large volumes (from 512{sup 3} to 8192{sup 3} voxels) results in an increasing computational cost. To reduce it, the hierarchical Bayesian methods investigated in this paper lead to an algorithm acceleration by Variational Bayesian Approximation (VBA) [1] and hardware acceleration thanks to projection and back-projection operators paralleled on many core processors like GPU [2]. In this paper, we will consider a Student-t prior on the gradient of the image implemented in a hierarchical way [3, 4, 1]. Operators H (forward or projection) and H{sup t} (adjoint or back-projection) implanted in multi-GPU [2] have been used in this study. Different methods will be evalued on synthetic volume 'Shepp and Logan' in terms of quality and time of reconstruction. We used several simple regularizations of order 1 and order 2. Other prior models also exists [5]. Sometimes for a discrete image, we can do the segmentation and reconstruction at the same time, then the reconstruction can be done with less projections.

  10. 3D Reconstruction of Thermal Plasma Jet Radiation by Inverse Radon Transformation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sekerešová, Zuzana; Hlína, Jan; Šonský, Ji?í

    Greifswald : Leibniz Institute, 2010, s. 552-555. ISBN 0-9539105-4-7. [International Conference on Gas Discharges and their Applications /18./. Greifswald (DE), 05.09.2010-10.09.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20570509 Keywords : thermal plasma * inverse Radon transformation * three-dimensional reconstruction Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  11. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a open-quotes true 3D screenclose quotes. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches

  12. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.T.C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  13. 3-D multitissue reconstruction of a petrosal durosarcoma for pre-operative planning of craniotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The case of a female patient with safe diagnosis of a petrosal durosarcoma is chosen to show that the data obtained by spiral CT can be processed to deliver the full scale of information required by the neurosurgeon, such as the 3-D imaging of the tumor, its situation with reference to the bone, the large arterial vessels, and the venous blood conduits. The spiral CT is shown to be a modality that can compete with arterial angiography in terms of information value and cost-benefit analysis. (orig./MG)

  14. Without gaps - 3D photo-reconstruction of gully headcuts by combined utilisation of UAV and close-range photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöcker, Claudia; Karrasch, Pierre; Eltner, Anette

    2015-04-01

    Gully erosion is a worldwide phenomenon causing permanent degradation of fertile land. Especially in the Mediterranean, gullies contribute to high soil loss rates which necessitate multi-temporal and high resolution monitoring. Gullies naturally exhibit complex surface morphologies and hence are difficult to measure. Images acquired airborne or terrestrial are possible data sources for digital gully modelling due to availing of photogrammetric methods to achieve 3D models. In this regard unmanned airborne vehicles (UAVs) allow for low cost, flexible and frequent areal gully monitoring, but exhibit limitations as a result of the birds-eye view - i.e. at steep sidewalls and overhanging areas. Terrestrial images offer advantages at local assessments and can be obtained spontaneously as needed. However, images acquired from ground are not able to ensure areal coverage. To integrate the advantages of both data sources and to overcome the above mentioned limitations, this study introduces a methodological approach of combined utilisation of nadir UAV data and oblique terrestrial images for 3D photo reconstruction. Two gully headcuts in Andalusia (Spain) are analysed to confirm the suitability of the synergetic data usage. The results show that the UAV model of the gully, generated from images from flying heights of 15 m, implies inconsistency of data at slope gradients of 50 to 60 °. To eliminate these gaps additional terrestrial images can be integrated, which are geo-referenced solely using information of the already calculated 3D model and orthophoto from the UAV images. Referencing errors of the terrestrial point clouds are fixed by applying fine registration. The final merged digital gully model reveals a resolution of 0.5 cm and an accuracy of 1 cm. Concluding, high density point clouds based on the fusion of UAV and terrestrial image data show a significant improvement of 3D photo-reconstruction of two gully headcuts compared to detached processing of single data sources. This allows for new insights into gully morphology because comprehensive gully models can be calculated with high spatial resolution and at frequent intervals, which enables multi-temporal monitoring and 3D volume change computations.

  15. Spatial decomposition of molecular ions within 3D atom probe reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods for separating the constituent atoms of molecular ions within atom probe tomography reconstructions are presented. The Gaussian Separation Method efficiently deconvolutes molecular ions containing two constituent atoms and is tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental HSLA steel dataset containing NbN. The Delaunay Separation Method extends separation to larger complex ions and is also tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental GaAs dataset containing many large (>3 atoms) complex ions. First nearest neighbour (1NN) distributions and images of the reconstruction before and after the separations are used to show the effect of the algorithms and their validity and practicality are also discussed. - Highlights: ? The need to deconvolute molecular ions within atom probe data is discussed. ? Two algorithms to separate the constituent atoms of molecular ions are proposed. ? The algorithms developed are tested on simulated and experimental data. ? Nearest neighbour distributions are used to highlight the improvements

  16. Spatial decomposition of molecular ions within 3D atom probe reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Andrew [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Moody, Michael P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX13PH, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gault, Baptiste [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ont. L8S4L8 (Canada); Ceguerra, Anna V. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Xie, Kelvin Y. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Du, Sichao [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P., E-mail: simon.ringer@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, Madsen Building F09, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Two methods for separating the constituent atoms of molecular ions within atom probe tomography reconstructions are presented. The Gaussian Separation Method efficiently deconvolutes molecular ions containing two constituent atoms and is tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental HSLA steel dataset containing NbN. The Delaunay Separation Method extends separation to larger complex ions and is also tested on simulated data before being applied to an experimental GaAs dataset containing many large (>3 atoms) complex ions. First nearest neighbour (1NN) distributions and images of the reconstruction before and after the separations are used to show the effect of the algorithms and their validity and practicality are also discussed. - Highlights: ? The need to deconvolute molecular ions within atom probe data is discussed. ? Two algorithms to separate the constituent atoms of molecular ions are proposed. ? The algorithms developed are tested on simulated and experimental data. ? Nearest