WorldWideScience

Sample records for 3d datasets comparison

  1. Comparison of global 3-D aviation emissions datasets

    S. C. Olsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aviation emissions are unique from other transportation emissions, e.g., from road transportation and shipping, in that they occur at higher altitudes as well as at the surface. Aviation emissions of carbon dioxide, soot, and water vapor have direct radiative impacts on the Earth's climate system while emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide (CO, and hydrocarbons (HC impact air quality and climate through their effects on ozone, methane, and clouds. The most accurate estimates of the impact of aviation on air quality and climate utilize three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and gridded four dimensional (space and time aviation emissions datasets. We compare five available aviation emissions datasets currently and historically used to evaluate the impact of aviation on climate and air quality: NASA-Boeing 1992, NASA-Boeing 1999, QUANTIFY 2000, Aero2k 2002, and AEDT 2006 and aviation fuel usage estimates from the International Energy Agency. Roughly 90% of all aviation emissions are in the Northern Hemisphere and nearly 60% of all fuelburn and NOx emissions occur at cruise altitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. While these datasets were created by independent methods and are thus not strictly suitable for analyzing trends they suggest that commercial aviation fuelburn and NOx emissions increased over the last two decades while HC emissions likely decreased and CO emissions did not change significantly. The bottom-up estimates compared here are consistently lower than International Energy Agency fuelburn statistics although the gap is significantly smaller in the more recent datasets. Overall the emissions distributions are quite similar for fuelburn and NOx with regional peaks over the populated land masses of North America, Europe, and East Asia. For CO and HC there are relatively larger differences. There are however some distinct differences in the altitude distribution

  2. Comparison of global 3-D aviation emissions datasets

    S. C. Olsen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aviation emissions are unique from other transportation emissions, e.g., from road transportation and shipping, in that they occur at higher altitudes as well as at the surface. Aviation emissions of carbon dioxide, soot, and water vapor have direct radiative impacts on the Earth's climate system while emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulfur oxides, carbon monoxide (CO, and hydrocarbons (HC impact air quality and climate through their effects on ozone, methane, and clouds. The most accurate estimates of the impact of aviation on air quality and climate utilize three-dimensional chemistry-climate models and gridded four dimensional (space and time aviation emissions datasets. We compare five available aviation emissions datasets currently and historically used to evaluate the impact of aviation on climate and air quality: NASA-Boeing 1992, NASA-Boeing 1999, QUANTIFY 2000, Aero2k 2002, and AEDT 2006 and aviation fuel usage estimates from the International Energy Agency. Roughly 90% of all aviation emissions are in the Northern Hemisphere and nearly 60% of all fuelburn and NOx emissions occur at cruise altitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. While these datasets were created by independent methods and are thus not strictly suitable for analyzing trends they suggest that commercial aviation fuelburn and NOx emissions increased over the last two decades while HC emissions likely decreased and CO emissions did not change significantly. The bottom-up estimates compared here are consistently lower than International Energy Agency fuelburn statistics although the gap is significantly lower in the more recent datasets. Overall the emissions distributions are quite similar for fuelburn and NOx while for CO and HC there are relatively larger differences. There are however some distinct differences in the altitude distribution of emissions in certain regions for the Aero2k dataset.

  3. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset.

    Tafti, Ahmad P; Kirkpatrick, Andrew B; Holz, Jessica D; Owen, Heather A; Yu, Zeyun

    2016-03-01

    The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples. PMID:26779561

  4. Lifting Object Detection Datasets into 3D.

    Carreira, Joao; Vicente, Sara; Agapito, Lourdes; Batista, Jorge

    2016-07-01

    While data has certainly taken the center stage in computer vision in recent years, it can still be difficult to obtain in certain scenarios. In particular, acquiring ground truth 3D shapes of objects pictured in 2D images remains a challenging feat and this has hampered progress in recognition-based object reconstruction from a single image. Here we propose to bypass previous solutions such as 3D scanning or manual design, that scale poorly, and instead populate object category detection datasets semi-automatically with dense, per-object 3D reconstructions, bootstrapped from:(i) class labels, (ii) ground truth figure-ground segmentations and (iii) a small set of keypoint annotations. Our proposed algorithm first estimates camera viewpoint using rigid structure-from-motion and then reconstructs object shapes by optimizing over visual hull proposals guided by loose within-class shape similarity assumptions. The visual hull sampling process attempts to intersect an object's projection cone with the cones of minimal subsets of other similar objects among those pictured from certain vantage points. We show that our method is able to produce convincing per-object 3D reconstructions and to accurately estimate cameras viewpoints on one of the most challenging existing object-category detection datasets, PASCAL VOC. We hope that our results will re-stimulate interest on joint object recognition and 3D reconstruction from a single image. PMID:27295458

  5. Comparing multiple 3D magnetotelluric inversions of the same dataset

    Walter, C.; Jones, A. G.

    2013-12-01

    The Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ) hosts the majority of the geothermal systems in New Zealand and is a valuable source for power generation and tourism. It is important for the sustainable exploitation of this area to fully understand the processes and structures in the TVZ. As part of the 'Hotter and Deeper' project of the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology (FRST), a dataset of 200 broadband magnetotelluric (MT) stations has been collected in the TVZ of New Zealand in 2009 and 2010. Combined with a smaller dataset from Reporoa, a total of 230 stations are available for 3D inversion to image the deeper structures of the TVZ. For the study presented in this paper, multiple 3D inversions of this dataset using different control parameters have been undertaken to study the influence of the choice of parameters on the inversion result. The parameters that have been varied include; the type of responses used in the inversion, the use of topography and bathymetry, and varying vertical grid spacings. All inversions commenced with a uniform half-space so that there was no preconceived structures to begin with. The results show that the main structures in the model are robust in that they are independent of the choice of parameters and become introduced in every inversion. The only differences are in the shape and exact location of the structures, which vary between the models. Furthermore, different ways to get a measure for the differences between models have been explored.

  6. The interactive presentation of 3D information obtained from reconstructed datasets and 3D placement of single histological sections with the 3D portable document format

    B.A. de Boer; A.T. Soufan; J. Hagoort; T.J. Mohun; M.J.B. van den Hoff; A. Hasman; F.P.J.M. Voorbraak; A.F.M. Moorman; J.M. Ruijter

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of the results of anatomical and embryological studies relies heavily on proper visualization of complex morphogenetic processes and patterns of gene expression in a three-dimensional (3D) context. However, reconstruction of complete 3D datasets is time consuming and often researchers

  7. The interactive presentation of 3D information obtained from reconstructed datasets and 3D placement of single histological sections with the 3D portable document format

    de Boer, B. A.; Soufan, A. T.; Hagoort, J.; Mohun, T. J.; van den Hoff, M. J. B.; Hasman, A.; Voorbraak, F. P. J. M.; Moorman, A. F. M.; Ruijter, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of the results of anatomical and embryological studies relies heavily on proper visualization of complex morphogenetic processes and patterns of gene expression in a three-dimensional (3D) context. However, reconstruction of complete 3D datasets is time consuming and often researchers study only a few sections. To help in understanding the resulting 2D data we developed a program (TRACTS) that places such arbitrary histological sections into a high-resolution 3D model of the de...

  8. Ultrafast superpixel segmentation of large 3D medical datasets

    Leblond, Antoine; Kauffmann, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Even with recent hardware improvements, superpixel segmentation of large 3D medical images at interactive speed (cohesive, the fast Thread Group Shared Memory can be used and reused through a Gauss-Seidel like acceleration. The work unit partitioning scheme will however vary on odd- and even-numbered iterations to reduce convergence barriers. Synchronization will be ensured by an 8-step 3D variant of the traditional Red Black Ordering scheme. An attack model and early termination will also be described and implemented as additional acceleration techniques. Using our hybrid framework and typical operating parameters, we were able to compute the superpixels of a high-resolution 512x512x512 aortic angioCT scan in 283 ms using a AMD R9 290X GPU. We achieved a 22.3X speed-up factor compared to the published reference GPU implementation.

  9. Comparison of 2D and 3D gamma analyses

    Pulliam, Kiley B.; Huang, Jessie Y.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Followill, David; Kry, Stephen F., E-mail: sfkry@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Bosca, Ryan [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); O’Daniel, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: As clinics begin to use 3D metrics for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance, it must be noted that these metrics will often produce results different from those produced by their 2D counterparts. 3D and 2D gamma analyses would be expected to produce different values, in part because of the different search space available. In the present investigation, the authors compared the results of 2D and 3D gamma analysis (where both datasets were generated in the same manner) for clinical treatment plans. Methods: Fifty IMRT plans were selected from the authors’ clinical database, and recalculated using Monte Carlo. Treatment planning system-calculated (“evaluated dose distributions”) and Monte Carlo-recalculated (“reference dose distributions”) dose distributions were compared using 2D and 3D gamma analysis. This analysis was performed using a variety of dose-difference (5%, 3%, 2%, and 1%) and distance-to-agreement (5, 3, 2, and 1 mm) acceptance criteria, low-dose thresholds (5%, 10%, and 15% of the prescription dose), and data grid sizes (1.0, 1.5, and 3.0 mm). Each comparison was evaluated to determine the average 2D and 3D gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of pixels passing gamma. Results: The average gamma, lower 95th percentile gamma value, and percentage of passing pixels for each acceptance criterion demonstrated better agreement for 3D than for 2D analysis for every plan comparison. The average difference in the percentage of passing pixels between the 2D and 3D analyses with no low-dose threshold ranged from 0.9% to 2.1%. Similarly, using a low-dose threshold resulted in a difference between the mean 2D and 3D results, ranging from 0.8% to 1.5%. The authors observed no appreciable differences in gamma with changes in the data density (constant difference: 0.8% for 2D vs 3D). Conclusions: The authors found that 3D gamma analysis resulted in up to 2.9% more pixels passing than 2D analysis. It must

  10. Comparing GPU Implementations of Bilateral and Anisotropic Diffusion Filters for 3D Biomedical Datasets

    Howison, Mark

    2010-05-06

    We compare the performance of hand-tuned CUDA implementations of bilateral and anisotropic diffusion filters for denoising 3D MRI datasets. Our tests sweep comparable parameters for the two filters and measure total runtime, memory bandwidth, computational throughput, and mean squared errors relative to a noiseless reference dataset.

  11. Atlas Toolkit: Fast registration of 3D morphological datasets in the absence of landmarks.

    Grocott, Timothy; Thomas, Paul; Münsterberg, Andrea E

    2016-01-01

    Image registration is a gateway technology for Developmental Systems Biology, enabling computational analysis of related datasets within a shared coordinate system. Many registration tools rely on landmarks to ensure that datasets are correctly aligned; yet suitable landmarks are not present in many datasets. Atlas Toolkit is a Fiji/ImageJ plugin collection offering elastic group-wise registration of 3D morphological datasets, guided by segmentation of the interesting morphology. We demonstrate the method by combinatorial mapping of cell signalling events in the developing eyes of chick embryos, and use the integrated datasets to predictively enumerate Gene Regulatory Network states. PMID:26864723

  12. Efficient segmentation of 3D fluoroscopic datasets from mobile C-arm

    Styner, Martin A.; Talib, Haydar; Singh, Digvijay; Nolte, Lutz-Peter

    2004-05-01

    The emerging mobile fluoroscopic 3D technology linked with a navigation system combines the advantages of CT-based and C-arm-based navigation. The intra-operative, automatic segmentation of 3D fluoroscopy datasets enables the combined visualization of surgical instruments and anatomical structures for enhanced planning, surgical eye-navigation and landmark digitization. We performed a thorough evaluation of several segmentation algorithms using a large set of data from different anatomical regions and man-made phantom objects. The analyzed segmentation methods include automatic thresholding, morphological operations, an adapted region growing method and an implicit 3D geodesic snake method. In regard to computational efficiency, all methods performed within acceptable limits on a standard Desktop PC (30sec-5min). In general, the best results were obtained with datasets from long bones, followed by extremities. The segmentations of spine, pelvis and shoulder datasets were generally of poorer quality. As expected, the threshold-based methods produced the worst results. The combined thresholding and morphological operations methods were considered appropriate for a smaller set of clean images. The region growing method performed generally much better in regard to computational efficiency and segmentation correctness, especially for datasets of joints, and lumbar and cervical spine regions. The less efficient implicit snake method was able to additionally remove wrongly segmented skin tissue regions. This study presents a step towards efficient intra-operative segmentation of 3D fluoroscopy datasets, but there is room for improvement. Next, we plan to study model-based approaches for datasets from the knee and hip joint region, which would be thenceforth applied to all anatomical regions in our continuing development of an ideal segmentation procedure for 3D fluoroscopic images.

  13. 3D Printing of CT Dataset: Validation of an Open Source and Consumer-Available Workflow.

    Bortolotto, Chandra; Eshja, Esmeralda; Peroni, Caterina; Orlandi, Matteo A; Bizzotto, Nicola; Poggi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The broad availability of cheap three-dimensional (3D) printing equipment has raised the need for a thorough analysis on its effects on clinical accuracy. Our aim is to determine whether the accuracy of 3D printing process is affected by the use of a low-budget workflow based on open source software and consumer's commercially available 3D printers. A group of test objects was scanned with a 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in order to build their 3D copies. CT datasets were elaborated using a software chain based on three free and open source software. Objects were printed out with a commercially available 3D printer. Both the 3D copies and the test objects were measured using a digital professional caliper. Overall, the objects' mean absolute difference between test objects and 3D copies is 0.23 mm and the mean relative difference amounts to 0.55 %. Our results demonstrate that the accuracy of 3D printing process remains high despite the use of a low-budget workflow. PMID:26175139

  14. Thingi10K: A Dataset of 10,000 3D-Printing Models

    Qingnan ZHOU; Jacobson, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Empirically validating new 3D-printing related algorithms and implementations requires testing data representative of inputs encountered \\emph{in the wild}. An ideal benchmarking dataset should not only draw from the same distribution of shapes people print in terms of class (e.g., toys, mechanisms, jewelry), representation type (e.g., triangle soup meshes) and complexity (e.g., number of facets), but should also capture problems and artifacts endemic to 3D printing models (e.g., self-interse...

  15. Computational Graph Model for 3D Cells Tracking in Zebra Fish Datasets

    Zhang, Lelin; Xiong, Hongkai; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2007-11-01

    This paper leads to a novel technique for tracking and identification of zebra-fish cells in 3D image sequences, extending graph-based multi-objects tracking algorithm to 3D applications. As raised in previous work of 2D graph-based method, separated cells are modeled as vertices that connected by edges. Then the tracking work is simplified to that of vertices matching between graphs generated from consecutive frames. Graph-based tracking is composed of three steps: graph generation, initial source vertices selection and graph saturation. To satisfy demands in this work separated cell records are segmented from original datasets using 3D level-set algorithms. Besides, advancements are achieved in each of the step including graph regulations, multi restrictions on source vertices and enhanced flow quantifications. Those strategies make a good compensation for graph-based multi-objects tracking method in 2D space. Experiments are carried out in 3D datasets sampled from zebra fish, results of which shows that this enhanced method could be potentially applied to tracking of objects with diverse features.

  16. MR neurography with multiplanar reconstruction of 3D MRI datasets: an anatomical study and clinical applications

    Freund, Wolfgang; Aschoff, Andrik J.; Stuber, Gregor; Schmitz, Bernd [University Hospitals Ulm, Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany); Brinkmann, Alexander; Wagner, Florian; Dinse, Alexander [University Hospitals Ulm, Department of Anesthesiology, Ulm (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Extracranial MR neurography has so far mainly been used with 2D datasets. We investigated the use of 3D datasets for peripheral neurography of the sciatic nerve. A total of 40 thighs (20 healthy volunteers) were examined with a coronally oriented magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequence with isotropic voxels of 1 x 1 x 1 mm and a field of view of 500 mm. Anatomical landmarks were palpated and marked with MRI markers. After MR scanning, the sciatic nerve was identified by two readers independently in the resulting 3D dataset. In every volunteer, the sciatic nerve could be identified bilaterally over the whole length of the thigh, even in areas of close contact to isointense muscles. The landmark of the greater trochanter was falsely palpated by 2.2 cm, and the knee joint by 1 cm. The mean distance between the bifurcation of the sciatic nerve and the knee-joint gap was 6 cm ({+-}1.8 cm). The mean results of the two readers differed by 1-6%. With the described method of MR neurography, the sciatic nerve was depicted reliably and objectively in great anatomical detail over the whole length of the thigh. Important anatomical information can be obtained. The clinical applications of MR neurography for the brachial plexus and lumbosacral plexus/sciatic nerve are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Improved 3D density modelling of the Central Andes from combining terrestrial datasets with satellite based datasets

    Schaller, Theresa; Sobiesiak, Monika; Götze, Hans-Jürgen; Ebbing, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    As horizontal gravity gradients are proxies for large stresses, the uniquely high gravity gradients of the South American continental margin seem to be indicative for the frequently occurring large earthquakes at this plate boundary. It has been observed that these earthquakes can break repeatedly the same respective segment but can also combine to form M>9 earthquakes at the end of longer seismic cycles. A large seismic gap left behind by the 1877 M~9 earthquake existed in the northernmost part of Chile. This gap has partially been ruptured in the Mw 7.7 2007 Tocopilla earthquake and the Mw 8.2 2014 Pisagua earthquake. The nature of this seismological segmentation and the distribution of energy release in an earthquake is part of ongoing research. It can be assumed that both features are related to thickness variations of high density bodies located in the continental crust of the coastal area. These batholiths produce a clear maximum in the gravity signal. Those maxima also show a good spatial correlation with seismic asperity structures and seismological segment boundaries. Understanding of the tectonic situation can be improved through 3D forward density modelling of the gravity field. Problems arise in areas with less ground measurements. Especially in the high Andes severe gaps exist due to the inaccessibility of some regions. Also the transition zone between on and offshore date data displays significant problems, particularly since this is the area that is most interesting in terms of seismic hazard. We modelled the continental and oceanic crust and upper mantle using different gravity datasets. The first one includes terrestrial data measured at a station spacing of 5 km or less along all passable roads combined with satellite altimetry data offshore. The second data set is the newly released EIGEN-6C4 which combines the latest satellite data with ground measurements. The spherical harmonics maximum degree of EIGEN-6C4 is 2190 which corresponds to a

  18. Remote web-based 3D visualization of hydrological forecasting datasets.

    van Meersbergen, Maarten; Drost, Niels; Blower, Jon; Griffiths, Guy; Hut, Rolf; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    As the possibilities for larger and more detailed simulations of geoscientific data expand, the need for smart solutions in data visualization grow as well. Large volumes of data should be quickly accessible from anywhere in the world without the need for transferring the simulation results. We aim to provide tools for both processing and the handling of these large datasets. As an example, the eWaterCycle project (www.ewatercycle.org) aims to provide a running 14-day ensemble forecast to predict water related stress around the globe. The large volumes of simulation results with uncertainty data that are generated through ensemble hydrological predictions provide a challenge for existing visualization solutions. One possible solution for this challenge lies in the use of web-enabled technology for visualization and analysis of these datasets. Web-based visualization provides an additional benefit in that it eliminates the need for any software installation and configuration and allows for the easy communication of research results between collaborating research parties. Providing interactive tools for the exploration of these datasets will not only help in the analysis of the data by researchers, it can also aid in the dissemination of the research results to the general public. In Vienna, we will present a working open source solution for remote visualization of large volumes of global geospatial data based on the proven open-source 3D web visualization software package Cesium (cesiumjs.org), the ncWMS software package provided by the Reading e-Science Centre and the WebGL and NetCDF standards.

  19. 3D reconstruction software comparison for short sequences

    Strupczewski, Adam; Czupryński, BłaŻej

    2014-11-01

    Large scale multiview reconstruction is recently a very popular area of research. There are many open source tools that can be downloaded and run on a personal computer. However, there are few, if any, comparisons between all the available software in terms of accuracy on small datasets that a single user can create. The typical datasets for testing of the software are archeological sites or cities, comprising thousands of images. This paper presents a comparison of currently available open source multiview reconstruction software for small datasets. It also compares the open source solutions with a simple structure from motion pipeline developed by the authors from scratch with the use of OpenCV and Eigen libraries.

  20. Integrating airborne LiDAR dataset and photographic images towards the construction of 3D building model

    A 3D building model of man-made objects is an important tool for various applications such as urban planning, flood mapping and telecommunication. The reconstruction of 3D building models remains difficult. No universal algorithms exist that can extract all objects in an image successfully. At present, advances in remote sensing such as airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology have changed the conventional method of topographic mapping and increased the interest of these valued datasets towards 3D building model construction. Airborne LiDAR has proven accordingly that it can provide three dimensional (3D) information of the Earth surface with high accuracy. In this study, with the availability of open source software such as Sketch Up, LiDAR datasets and photographic images could be integrated towards the construction of a 3D building model. In order to realize the work an area comprising residential areas situated at Putrajaya in the Klang Valley region, Malaysia, covering an area of two square kilometer was chosen. The accuracy of the derived 3D building model is assessed quantitatively. It is found that the difference between the vertical height (z) of the 3D building models derived from LiDAR dataset and ground survey is approximately ± 0.09 centimeter (cm). For the horizontal component (RMSExy), the accuracy estimates derived for the 3D building models were ± 0.31m. The result also shows that the qualitative assessment of the 3D building models constructed seems feasible for the depiction in the standard of LOD 3 (Level of details)

  1. Integrating airborne LiDAR dataset and photographic images towards the construction of 3D building model

    Idris, R.; Latif, Z. A.; Hamid, J. R. A.; Jaafar, J.; Ahmad, M. Y.

    2014-02-01

    A 3D building model of man-made objects is an important tool for various applications such as urban planning, flood mapping and telecommunication. The reconstruction of 3D building models remains difficult. No universal algorithms exist that can extract all objects in an image successfully. At present, advances in remote sensing such as airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology have changed the conventional method of topographic mapping and increased the interest of these valued datasets towards 3D building model construction. Airborne LiDAR has proven accordingly that it can provide three dimensional (3D) information of the Earth surface with high accuracy. In this study, with the availability of open source software such as Sketch Up, LiDAR datasets and photographic images could be integrated towards the construction of a 3D building model. In order to realize the work an area comprising residential areas situated at Putrajaya in the Klang Valley region, Malaysia, covering an area of two square kilometer was chosen. The accuracy of the derived 3D building model is assessed quantitatively. It is found that the difference between the vertical height (z) of the 3D building models derived from LiDAR dataset and ground survey is approximately ± 0.09 centimeter (cm). For the horizontal component (RMSExy), the accuracy estimates derived for the 3D building models were ± 0.31m. The result also shows that the qualitative assessment of the 3D building models constructed seems feasible for the depiction in the standard of LOD 3 (Level of details).

  2. Dosimetric impact of different CT datasets for stereotactic treatment planning using 3D conformal radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Oechsner, Markus; Odersky, Leonhard; Berndt, Johannes; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Wilkens, Jan Jakob; DUMA, MARCIANA NONA

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) by using four differently generated CT datasets for dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung and liver tumors. Additionally, dose differences between 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans calculated on these CT datasets were determined. Methods Twenty SBRT patients, ten lung cases and ten liver cases, ...

  3. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  4. HS3D, A Dataset of Homo Sapiens Splice Regions, and its Extraction Procedure from a Major Public Database

    Pollastro, Pasquale; Rampone, Salvatore

    The aim of this work is to describe a cleaning procedure of GenBank data, producing material to train and to assess the prediction accuracy of computational approaches for gene characterization. A procedure (GenBank2HS3D) has been defined, producing a dataset (HS3D - Homo Sapiens Splice Sites Dataset) of Homo Sapiens Splice regions extracted from GenBank (Rel.123 at this time). It selects, from the complete GenBank Primate Division, entries of Human Nuclear DNA according with several assessed criteria; then it extracts exons and introns from these entries (actually 4523 + 3802). Donor and acceptor sites are then extracted as windows of 140 nucleotides around each splice site (3799 + 3799). After discarding windows not including canonical GT-AG junctions (65 + 74), including insufficient data (not enough material for a 140 nucleotide window) (686 + 589), including not AGCT bases (29 + 30), and redundant (218 + 226), the remaining windows (2796 + 2880) are reported in the dataset. Finally, windows of false splice sites are selected by searching canonical GT-AG pairs in not splicing positions (271 937 + 332 296). The false sites in a range +/- 60 from a true splice site are marked as proximal. HS3D, release 1.2 at this time, is available at the Web server of the University of Sannio: http://www.sci.unisannio.it/docenti/rampone/.

  5. Summary of work on shock wave feature extraction in 3-D datasets

    Hesselink, Lambertus (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A method for extracting and visualizing shock waves from three dimensional data-sets is discussed. Issues concerning computation time, robustness to numerical perturbations, and noise introduction are considered and compared with other methods. Finally, results using this method are discussed.

  6. Automatic 3d Building Reconstruction from a Dense Image Matching Dataset

    McClune, Andrew P.; Mills, Jon P.; Miller, Pauline E.; Holland, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last 20 years the demand for three dimensional (3D) building models has resulted in a vast amount of research being conducted in attempts to automate the extraction and reconstruction of models from airborne sensors. Recent results have shown that current methods tend to favour planar fitting procedures from lidar data, which are able to successfully reconstruct simple roof structures automatically but fail to reconstruct more complex structures or roofs with small artefacts. Current methods have also not fully explored the potential of recent developments in digital photogrammetry. Large format digital aerial cameras can now capture imagery with increased overlap and a higher spatial resolution, increasing the number of pixel correspondences between images. Every pixel in each stereo pair can also now be matched using per-pixel algorithms, which has given rise to the approach known as dense image matching. This paper presents an approach to 3D building reconstruction to try and overcome some of the limitations of planar fitting procedures. Roof vertices, extracted from true-orthophotos using edge detection, are refined and converted to roof corner points. By determining the connection between extracted corner points, a roof plane can be defined as a closed-cycle of points. Presented results demonstrate the potential of this method for the reconstruction of complex 3D building models at CityGML LoD2 specification.

  7. A 3-D mixed-reality system for stereoscopic visualization of medical dataset.

    Ferrari, Vincenzo; Megali, Giuseppe; Troia, Elena; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Mosca, Franco

    2009-11-01

    We developed a simple, light, and cheap 3-D visualization device based on mixed reality that can be used by physicians to see preoperative radiological exams in a natural way. The system allows the user to see stereoscopic "augmented images," which are created by mixing 3-D virtual models of anatomies obtained by processing preoperative volumetric radiological images (computed tomography or MRI) with real patient live images, grabbed by means of cameras. The interface of the system consists of a head-mounted display equipped with two high-definition cameras. Cameras are mounted in correspondence of the user's eyes and allow one to grab live images of the patient with the same point of view of the user. The system does not use any external tracker to detect movements of the user or the patient. The movements of the user's head and the alignment of virtual patient with the real one are done using machine vision methods applied on pairs of live images. Experimental results, concerning frame rate and alignment precision between virtual and real patient, demonstrate that machine vision methods used for localization are appropriate for the specific application and that systems based on stereoscopic mixed reality are feasible and can be proficiently adopted in clinical practice. PMID:19651551

  8. 3D Inversion of a Self-Potential Dataset for Contaminant Detection and Mapping

    Minsley, B. J.; Sogade, J.; Briggs, V.; Lambert, M.; Reppert, P.; Coles, D.; Morgan, F.; Rossabi, J.; Riha, B.; Shi, W.

    2003-12-01

    Due to the complicated nature of subsurface contaminant migration, it is difficult to determine the spatial extent and severity of contamination, which can provide essential information for efficient remediation efforts. Self-potential (SP) geophysics is employed to provide a minimally invasive, fast, and inexpensive method for remote in-situ detection and three-dimensional mapping of subsurface DNAPL (Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid) in conjunction with inverse methods. The self-potential method is commonly used to detect a variety of phenomena that are typically related to thermoelectric, electrochemical, or electrokinetic coupling processes. Surface self-potential surveys have been documented to show anomalies over areas known to be contaminated, but interpretation of these datasets is often mostly qualitative, and can be plagued with problems of non-uniqueness. In this study, oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions, one of the mechanisms associated with the attenuation of chemicals released into the environment, provide an electrochemical source for the SP signal. Electrochemical potentials associated with subsurface zones of redox activity are analogous to localized 'batteries' buried within native earth materials, and produce an electric field that is remotely detected using electrodes placed at the surface and in nearby boreholes. Three-dimensional inversion of the self-potential data incorporating resistivity information is the necessary step in characterizing the source parameters, which are directly related to the redox activity, and therefore to the contaminant itself. Surface and borehole SP data are collected in order to help constrain the solution in depth, and resistivity information is taken from an induced polarization survey performed over the same area during this field excursion. Inversion results are correlated with contaminant concentration data sampled from a series of ground-truth boreholes within the region of interest.

  9. Fast multi-core based multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets

    Pielot Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solving bioinformatics tasks often requires extensive computational power. Recent trends in processor architecture combine multiple cores into a single chip to improve overall performance. The Cell Broadband Engine (CBE, a heterogeneous multi-core processor, provides power-efficient and cost-effective high-performance computing. One application area is image analysis and visualisation, in particular registration of 2D cross-sections into 3D image datasets. Such techniques can be used to put different image modalities into spatial correspondence, for example, 2D images of histological cuts into morphological 3D frameworks. Results We evaluate the CBE-driven PlayStation 3 as a high performance, cost-effective computing platform by adapting a multimodal alignment procedure to several characteristic hardware properties. The optimisations are based on partitioning, vectorisation, branch reducing and loop unrolling techniques with special attention to 32-bit multiplies and limited local storage on the computing units. We show how a typical image analysis and visualisation problem, the multimodal registration of 2D cross-sections and 3D datasets, benefits from the multi-core based implementation of the alignment algorithm. We discuss several CBE-based optimisation methods and compare our results to standard solutions. More information and the source code are available from http://cbe.ipk-gatersleben.de. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the CBE processor in a PlayStation 3 accelerates computational intensive multimodal registration, which is of great importance in biological/medical image processing. The PlayStation 3 as a low cost CBE-based platform offers an efficient option to conventional hardware to solve computational problems in image processing and bioinformatics.

  10. Preliminary comparison of 3D synthetic aperture imaging with Explososcan

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Hansen, Jens Munk; Ferin, Guillaume; Dufait, Remi; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Explososcan is the 'gold standard' for real-time 3D medical ultrasound imaging. In this paper, 3D synthetic aperture imaging is compared to Explososcan by simulation of 3D point spread functions. The simulations mimic a 32x32 element prototype transducer. The transducer mimicked is a dense matrix phased array with a pitch of 300 μm, made by Vermon. For both imaging techniques, 289 emissions are used to image a volume spanning 60 in both the azimuth and elevation direction and 150mm in depth. ...

  11. 3D granulometry: grain-scale shape and size distribution from point cloud dataset of river environments

    Steer, Philippe; Lague, Dimitri; Gourdon, Aurélie; Croissant, Thomas; Crave, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The grain-scale morphology of river sediments and their size distribution are important factors controlling the efficiency of fluvial erosion and transport. In turn, constraining the spatial evolution of these two metrics offer deep insights on the dynamics of river erosion and sediment transport from hillslopes to the sea. However, the size distribution of river sediments is generally assessed using statistically-biased field measurements and determining the grain-scale shape of river sediments remains a real challenge in geomorphology. Here we determine, with new methodological approaches based on the segmentation and geomorphological fitting of 3D point cloud dataset, the size distribution and grain-scale shape of sediments located in river environments. Point cloud segmentation is performed using either machine-learning algorithms or geometrical criterion, such as local plan fitting or curvature analysis. Once the grains are individualized into several sub-clouds, each grain-scale morphology is determined using a 3D geometrical fitting algorithm applied on the sub-cloud. If different geometrical models can be conceived and tested, only ellipsoidal models were used in this study. A phase of results checking is then performed to remove grains showing a best-fitting model with a low level of confidence. The main benefits of this automatic method are that it provides 1) an un-biased estimate of grain-size distribution on a large range of scales, from centimeter to tens of meters; 2) access to a very large number of data, only limited by the number of grains in the point-cloud dataset; 3) access to the 3D morphology of grains, in turn allowing to develop new metrics characterizing the size and shape of grains. The main limit of this method is that it is only able to detect grains with a characteristic size greater than the resolution of the point cloud. This new 3D granulometric method is then applied to river terraces both in the Poerua catchment in New-Zealand and

  12. Preliminary comparison of 3D synthetic aperture imaging with Explososcan

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Hansen, Jens Munk; Ferin, Guillaume;

    2012-01-01

    Explososcan is the 'gold standard' for real-time 3D medical ultrasound imaging. In this paper, 3D synthetic aperture imaging is compared to Explososcan by simulation of 3D point spread functions. The simulations mimic a 32x32 element prototype transducer. The transducer mimicked is a dense matrix...... phased array with a pitch of 300 μm, made by Vermon. For both imaging techniques, 289 emissions are used to image a volume spanning 60 in both the azimuth and elevation direction and 150mm in depth. This results for both techniques in a frame rate of 18 Hz. The implemented synthetic aperture technique...... cystic resolution, which expresses the ability to detect anechoic cysts in a uniform scattering media, at all depths except at Explososcan's focus point. Synthetic aperture reduced the cyst radius, R20dB, at 90mm depth by 48%. Synthetic aperture imaging was shown to reduce the number of transmit channels...

  13. Transient simulations in WWER-1000-comparison between DYN3D-ATHLET and DYN3D-RELAP5

    Simulations of a real transient of an operating WWER-1000 power plant have been performed using DYN3D-ATHLET (Gru95) and DYN3D-RELAP5 (Koy01) code systems in the frame of activities aimed at a validation of the neutronic / thermal-hydraulic coupled codes. The transient initiated by a main coolant pump switching off, when three of the four main coolant pumps of the plant are in operation (scenario of the VALCO project) is chosen for the simulation. The same models of the plant (except the core nodalization) but two different libraries of macroscopic cross-sections have been used in compared calculations. Additionally, the compared code systems are based on the different / external and internal / coupling techniques. This paper contains a brief description of the coupled codes and the plant model as well as a comparison between the results from simulations (Authors)

  14. 3D visualisation of the middle ear and adjacent structures using reconstructed multi-slice CT datasets, correlating 3D images and virtual endoscopy to the 2D cross-sectional images

    The 3D imaging of the middle ear facilitates better understanding of the patient's anatomy. Cross-sectional slices, however, often allow a more accurate evaluation of anatomical structures, as some detail may be lost through post-processing. In order to demonstrate the advantages of combining both approaches, we performed computed tomography (CT) imaging in two normal and 15 different pathological cases, and the 3D models were correlated to the cross-sectional CT slices. Reconstructed CT datasets were acquired by multi-slice CT. Post-processing was performed using the in-house software ''3D Slicer'', applying thresholding and manual segmentation. 3D models of the individual anatomical structures were generated and displayed in different colours. The display of relevant anatomical and pathological structures was evaluated in the greyscale 2D slices, 3D images, and the 2D slices showing the segmented 2D anatomy in different colours for each structure. Correlating 2D slices to the 3D models and virtual endoscopy helps to combine the advantages of each method. As generating 3D models can be extremely time-consuming, this approach can be a clinically applicable way of gaining a 3D understanding of the patient's anatomy by using models as a reference. Furthermore, it can help radiologists and otolaryngologists evaluating the 2D slices by adding the correct 3D information that would otherwise have to be mentally integrated. The method can be applied to radiological diagnosis, surgical planning, and especially, to teaching. (orig.)

  15. Volcanic Ash Cloud Properties: Comparison Between MODIS Satellite Retrievals and FALL3D Transport Model

    Corradini, S.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; Merucci, L.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione CNT, Roma, Italia; Folch, A.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione OV, Napoli, Italia

    2011-01-01

    The moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a multispectral satellite instrument operating from the visible to thermal infrared spectral range. FALL3D is a 3-D time-dependent Eulerian model for the transport and deposition of volcanic particles. In this letter, quantitative comparison between the volcanic cloud ash mass and optical depth retrieved by MODIS and modeled by FALL3D has been performed. Three MODIS images collected on October 28, 29, and 30 on Mt. Etna volcano duri...

  16. 3D modelling of the Austroalpine-Penninic collisional wedge of the NW Alps: dataset management and preliminary results

    Monopoli, Bruno; Bistacchi, Andrea; Bertolo, Davide; Dal Piaz, Giovanni; Gouffon, Yves; Massironi, Matteo; Sartori, Mario; Vittorio Dal Piaz, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    We know since the beginning of the 20th century, thanks to mapping and structural studies by the Italian Regio Servizio Geologico (Franchi et al., 1908) and Argand's work (1909; 1911; 1916), that the Austroalpine-Penninic collisional wedge of the NW Alps is spectacularly exposed across the Aosta Valley and Valais ranges (Italy and Switzerland). In the 150th anniversary of the first ascent to Ruskin's "most noble cliff in Europe" - the Cervino/Matterhorn (Whymper, July 14th 1865), first described in a geological profile by Giordano (1869) and in a detailed map by Gerlach (1869; 1871), we have seen the conclusion of very detailed mapping projects carried out in the last years over the two regions, with collaborative efforts across the Italy-Switzerland border, constellated by 4000 m-high peaks. These projects have pictured with an unprecedented detail (up to 1:10.000 scale) the geology of this complex region, resulting from pre-Alpine events, Alpine subduction- and collision-related ductile deformations, and finally late-Alpine brittle deformations from the Oligocene to the Present. Based on this dataset, we use up-to-date technology and software to undertake a 3D modelling study aimed at: i) reconstructing the 3D geometry of the principal tectonic units, ii) detecting and unravelling problems and incongruences in the 2D geometrical models, iii) modelling the kinematics of the Oligocene and Miocene brittle fault network using 2D and 3D balancing and palinspastic restoration techniques. In this contribution we mainly discuss the prerequisites of the project. Common geomodelling paradigms (mainly developed for the hydrocarbon industry) cannot be applied in this project due to (i) the little scale, (ii) the source of the data - fieldwork, and (iii) the polyphase ductile and brittle deformations in the metamorphic nappe stack. Our goals at the moment are to model the post-metamorphic fault network and the boundaries of the principal tectonic units, which will be

  17. Multi-sourced, 3D geometric characterization of volcanogenic karst features: Integrating lidar, sonar, and geophysical datasets (Invited)

    Sharp, J. M.; Gary, M. O.; Reyes, R.; Halihan, T.; Fairfield, N.; Stone, W. C.

    2009-12-01

    Karstic aquifers can form very complex hydrogeological systems and 3-D mapping has been difficult, but Lidar, phased array sonar, and improved earth resistivity techniques show promise in this and in linking metadata to models. Zacatón, perhaps the Earth’s deepest cenote, has a sub-aquatic void space exceeding 7.5 x 106 cubic m3. It is the focus of this study which has created detailed 3D maps of the system. These maps include data from above and beneath the the water table and within the rock matrix to document the extent of the immense karst features and to interpret the geologic processes that formed them. Phase 1 used high resolution (20 mm) Lidar scanning of surficial features of four large cenotes. Scan locations, selected to achieve full feature coverage once registered, were established atop surface benchmarks with UTM coordinates established using GPS and Total Stations. The combined datasets form a geo-registered mesh of surface features down to water level in the cenotes. Phase 2 conducted subsurface imaging using Earth Resistivity Imaging (ERI) geophysics. ERI identified void spaces isolated from open flow conduits. A unique travertine morphology exists in which some cenotes are dry or contain shallow lakes with flat travertine floors; some water-filled cenotes have flat floors without the cone of collapse material; and some have collapse cones. We hypothesize that the floors may have large water-filled voids beneath them. Three separate flat travertine caps were imaged: 1) La Pilita, which is partially open, exposing cap structure over a deep water-filled shaft; 2) Poza Seca, which is dry and vegetated; and 3) Tule, which contains a shallow (cenote Verde. La Pilita ERI, verified by SCUBA, documented the existence of large water-filled void zones ERI at Poza Seca showed a thin cap overlying a conductive zone extending to at least 25 m depth beneath the cap with no lower boundary of this zone evident. Verde ERI indicate a deep water-filled cavity

  18. Automatic detection of lung nodules in CT datasets based on stable 3D mass-spring models.

    Cascio, D; Magro, R; Fauci, F; Iacomi, M; Raso, G

    2012-11-01

    ; furthermore, a neural network is applied to reduce the false positives (FPs) after a double-threshold cut. The system performance was tested on a set of 84 scans made available by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) annotated by four expert radiologists. The detection rate of the system is 97% with 6.1 FPs/CT. A reduction to 2.5 FPs/CT is achieved at 88% sensitivity. We presented a new 3D segmentation technique for lung nodules in CT datasets, using deformable MSMs. The result is a efficient segmentation process able to converge, identifying the shape of the generic ROI, after a few iterations. Our suitable results show that the use of the 3D AC model and the feature analysis based FPs reduction process constitutes an accurate approach to the segmentation and the classification of lung nodules. PMID:23020972

  19. Face Recognition using 3D Facial Shape and Color Map Information: Comparison and Combination

    Godil, Afzal; Grother, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of 3D surface geometry for face recognition and compare it to one based on color map information. The 3D surface and color map data are from the CAESAR anthropometric database. We find that the recognition performance is not very different between 3D surface and color map information using a principal component analysis algorithm. We also discuss the different techniques for the combination of the 3D surface and color map information for multi-modal recognition by using different fusion approaches and show that there is significant improvement in results. The effectiveness of various techniques is compared and evaluated on a dataset with 200 subjects in two different positions.

  20. Prospective comparison of 3D FIESTA versus fat-suppressed 3D SPGR MRI in evaluating knee cartilage lesions

    Aim: To prospectively compare the accuracy of three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D FIESTA) sequences with that of fat-suppressed three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled (3D SPGR) in the diagnosis of knee articular cartilage lesions, using arthroscopy as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Fifty-eight knees in 54 patients (age range 21-82 years; mean 36 years) were prospectively evaluated by using sagittal 3D FIESTA and sagittal fat-suppressed 3D SPGR sequences. Articular cartilage lesions were graded on MRI and during arthroscopy with a modified Noyes scoring system. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were assessed. Interobserver agreement was determined with κ statistics. Results: The performance of 3D FIESTA sequences (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 80, 94, and 92%, respectively, for reader 1 and 76, 94, and 90%, respectively, for reader 2) was similar to that of fat-suppressed 3D SPGR sequences (sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 82, 92, and 90%, respectively, for reader 1 and 82, 90, and 88%, respectively, for reader 2) in the detection of knee articular cartilage lesions. The interobserver agreement varied from fair to good to excellent (kappa values from 0.43-0.83). Conclusion: 3D FIESTA has good diagnostic performance, comparable with fat-suppressed 3D SPGR in evaluating knee cartilage lesions, and it can be incorporated into routine knee MRI protocols due to the short acquisition time.

  1. Assessing 3D scan quality through paired-comparisons psychophysics test

    Thorn, Jacob; Pizarro, Rodrigo; Spanlang, Bernhard; Bermell-Garcia, Pablo; Gonzalez-Franco, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Consumer 3D scanners and depth cameras are increasingly being used to generate content and avatars for Virtual Reality (VR) environments and avoid the inconveniences of hand modeling; however, it is sometimes difficult to evaluate quantitatively the mesh quality at which 3D scans should be exported, and whether the object perception might be affected by its shading. We propose using a paired-comparisons test based on psychophysics of perception to do that evaluation. As psychophysics is not s...

  2. Analysis and Comparison of a Detailed Land Cover Dataset versus the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) in Blacksburg, Virginia

    White, Claire McKenzie

    2011-01-01

    While many studies have completed accuracy assessments on the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD), little research has utilized a detailed digitized land cover dataset, like that available for the Town of Blacksburg, for this comparison. This study aims to evaluate the information available from a detailed land cover dataset and compare it with the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) at a localized scale. More specifically, it utilizes the detailed land cover dataset for the Town of Blacksbur...

  3. Generation of high quality multi-view confocal 3D datasets of zebrafish larval brains suitable for analysis using Virtual Brain Explorer (ViBE-Z) software

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Meta Rath, Roland Nitschke, Alida Filippi, Olaf Ronneberger & Wolfgang Driever ### Abstract In this protocol we describe a method to produce multi-view confocal 3D datasets suitable to be processed by the Virtual Brain Explorer (ViBE-Z) software. The method is optimized for Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos and larvae from one to five days post fertilization, but may be used also for other small biological objects. Zebrafish larvae are stained using either fluorescent in si...

  4. Comparison of 2D and 3D Gamma calculations for an IMRT QA phantom

    Gamma index pass rates were evaluated for an anthropomorphic phantom using both 2D and 3D calculations. The phantom was irradiated with the traditional dosimetry insert loaded with radiochromic film and TLD, and then with a 3D dosimetry insert. A comparison with the calculated dose distribution showed that both the PRESAGE® dosimeter and the film and TLD system agreed with the plan to within 5% using 2D gamma index criteria. The 3D gamma index showed a slightly higher pass rate than the 2D gamma index at 3%/3mm, and comparable pass rates using more generous constraints. The acceptable number of pixels passing the tighter constraints (3%/3mm) might be dependent upon the choice between a 2D calculation versus a 3D calculation

  5. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 ± 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 ± 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 ± 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 ± 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 ± 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 ± 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 ± 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask systems with 3D

  6. A dimensional comparison between embedded 3D-printed and silicon microchannels

    The subject of this paper is the dimensional characterization of embedded microchannel arrays created using contemporary 3D-printing fabrication techniques. Conventional microchannel arrays, fabricated using deep reactive ion etching techniques (DRIE) and wet-etching (KOH), are used as a benchmark for comparison. Rectangular and trapezoidal cross-sectional shapes were investigated. The channel arrays were 3D-printed in vertical and horizontal directions, to examine the influence of print orientation on channel characteristics. The 3D-printed channels were benchmarked against Silicon channels in terms of the following dimensional characteristics: cross-sectional area (CSA), perimeter, and surface profiles. The 3D-printed microchannel arrays demonstrated variances in CSA of 6.6-20% with the vertical printing approach yielding greater dimensional conformity than the horizontal approach. The measured CSA and perimeter of the vertical channels were smaller than the nominal dimensions, while the horizontal channels were larger in both CSA and perimeter due to additional side-wall roughness present throughout the channel length. This side-wall roughness caused significant shape distortion. Surface profile measurements revealed that the base wall roughness was approximately the resolution of current 3D-printers. A spatial periodicity was found along the channel length which appeared at different frequencies for each channel array. This paper concludes that vertical 3D-printing is superior to the horizontal printing approach, in terms of both dimensional fidelity and shape conformity and can be applied in microfluidic device applications.

  7. Comparison of S3D Display Technology on Image Quality and Viewing Experiences: Active-Shutter 3d TV vs. Passive-Polarized 3DTV

    Yu-Chi Tai, PhD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stereoscopic 3D TV systems convey depth perception to the viewer by delivering to each eye separately filtered images that represent two slightly different perspectives. Currently two primary technologies are used in S3D televisions: Active shutter systems, which use alternate frame sequencing to deliver a full-frame image to one eye at a time at a fast refresh rate, and Passive polarized systems, which superimpose the two half-frame left-eye and right-eye images at the same time through different polarizing filters. Methods: We compare visual performance in discerning details and perceiving depth, as well as the comfort and perceived display quality in viewing an S3D movie. Results: Our results show that, in presenting details of small targets and in showing low-contrast stimuli, the Active system was significantly better than the Passive in 2D mode, but there was no significant difference between them in 3D mode. Subjects performed better on Passive than Active in 3D mode on a task requiring small vergence changes and quick re-acquisition of stereopsis – a skill related to vergence efficiency while viewing S3D displays. When viewing movies in 3D mode, there was no difference in symptoms of discomfort between Active and Passive systems. When the two systems were put side by side with selected 3D-movie scenes, all of the subjective measures of perceived display quality in 3D mode favored the Passive system, and 10 of 14 comparisons were statistically significant. The Passive system was rated significantly better for sense of immersion, motion smoothness, clarity, color, and 5 categories related to the glasses. Conclusion: Overall, participants felt that it was easier to look at the Passive system for a longer period than the Active system, and the Passive display was selected as the preferred display by 75% (p = 0.0000211 of the subjects.

  8. Validation and Comparison of 2D and 3D Codes for Nearshore Motion of Long Waves Using Benchmark Problems

    Velioǧlu, Deniz; Cevdet Yalçıner, Ahmet; Zaytsev, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    Tsunamis are huge waves with long wave periods and wave lengths that can cause great devastation and loss of life when they strike a coast. The interest in experimental and numerical modeling of tsunami propagation and inundation increased considerably after the 2011 Great East Japan earthquake. In this study, two numerical codes, FLOW 3D and NAMI DANCE, that analyze tsunami propagation and inundation patterns are considered. Flow 3D simulates linear and nonlinear propagating surface waves as well as long waves by solving three-dimensional Navier-Stokes (3D-NS) equations. NAMI DANCE uses finite difference computational method to solve 2D depth-averaged linear and nonlinear forms of shallow water equations (NSWE) in long wave problems, specifically tsunamis. In order to validate these two codes and analyze the differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations, two benchmark problems are applied. One benchmark problem investigates the runup of long waves over a complex 3D beach. The experimental setup is a 1:400 scale model of Monai Valley located on the west coast of Okushiri Island, Japan. Other benchmark problem is discussed in 2015 National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Annual meeting in Portland, USA. It is a field dataset, recording the Japan 2011 tsunami in Hilo Harbor, Hawaii. The computed water surface elevation and velocity data are compared with the measured data. The comparisons showed that both codes are in fairly good agreement with each other and benchmark data. The differences between 3D-NS and 2D depth-averaged NSWE equations are highlighted. All results are presented with discussions and comparisons. Acknowledgements: Partial support by Japan-Turkey Joint Research Project by JICA on earthquakes and tsunamis in Marmara Region (JICA SATREPS - MarDiM Project), 603839 ASTARTE Project of EU, UDAP-C-12-14 project of AFAD Turkey, 108Y227, 113M556 and 213M534 projects of TUBITAK Turkey, RAPSODI (CONCERT_Dis-021) of CONCERT

  9. Comparison of 3D TOF-MRA and 3D CE-MRA at 3 T for imaging of intracranial aneurysms

    Cirillo, Mario, E-mail: mario.cirillo@unina2.it [Department of Medical, Surgical, Neurological, Metabolic and Aging Sciences – 2nd University of Naples (Italy); Scomazzoni, Francesco [Department of Neuroradiology, Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Cirillo, Luigi [IRCCS – Institute of Neurological Sciences, Bologna (Italy); Cadioli, Marcello; Simionato, Franco; Iadanza, Antonella [Department of Neuroradiology, Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Kirchin, Miles [Worldwide Medical and Regulatory Affairs, Bracco Imaging SpA, Milan (Italy); Righi, Claudio; Anzalone, Nicoletta [Department of Neuroradiology, Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To compare 3 T elliptical-centric CE MRA with 3 T TOF MRA for the detection and characterization of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs), by using digital subtracted angiography (DSA) as reference. Materials and methods: Twenty-nine patients (12 male, 17 female; mean age: 62 years) with 41 aneurysms (34 saccular, 7 fusiform; mean diameter: 8.85 mm [range 2.0–26.4 mm]) were evaluated with MRA at 3 T each underwent 3D TOF-MRA examination without contrast and then a 3D contrast-enhanced (CE-MRA) examination with 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight gadobenate dimeglumine and k-space elliptic mapping (Contrast ENhanced Timing Robust Angiography [CENTRA]). Both TOF and CE-MRA images were used to evaluate morphologic features that impact the risk of rupture and the selection of a treatment. Almost half (20/41) of UIAs were located in the internal carotid artery, 7 in the anterior communicating artery, 9 in the middle cerebral artery and 4 in the vertebro-basilar arterial system. All patients also underwent DSA before or after the MR examination. Results: The CE-MRA results were in all cases consistent with the DSA dataset. No differences were noted between 3D TOF-MRA and CE-MRA concerning the detection and location of the 41 aneurysms or visualization of the parental artery. Differences were apparent concerning the visualization of morphologic features, especially for large aneurysms (>13 mm). An irregular sac shape was demonstrated for 21 aneurysms on CE-MRA but only 13/21 aneurysms on 3D TOF-MRA. Likewise, CE-MRA permitted visualization of an aneurismal neck and calculation of the sac/neck ratio for all 34 aneurysms with a neck demonstrated at DSA. Conversely, a neck was visible for only 24/34 aneurysms at 3D TOF-MRA. 3D CE-MRA detected 15 aneurysms with branches originating from the sac and/or neck, whereas branches were recognized in only 12/15 aneurysms at 3D TOF-MRA. Conclusion: For evaluation of intracranial aneurysms at 3 T, 3D CE-MRA is superior to 3D TOF

  10. Comparison of 3D Synthetic Aperture Imaging and Explososcan using Phantom Measurements

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Férin, Guillaume; Dufait, Rémi;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, initial 3D ultrasound measurements from a 1024 channel system are presented. Measurements of 3D Synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) and Explososcan are presented and compared. Explososcan is the ’gold standard’ for real-time 3D medical ultrasound imaging. SAI is compared to Explososcan...... by using tissue and wire phantom measurements. The measurements are carried out using a 1024 element 2D transducer and the 1024 channel experimental ultrasound scanner SARUS. To make a fair comparison, the two imaging techniques use the same number of active channels, the same number of emissions per...... frame, and they emit the same amount of energy per frame. The measurements were performed with parameters similar to standard cardiac imaging, with 256 emissions to image a volume spanning 90×90 and 150mm in depth. This results in a frame rate of 20 Hz. The number of active channels is set to 316 from...

  11. Normal-mode function representation of global 3-D datasets: an open-access software for atmospheric research community

    Žagar, N.; Kasahara, A.; Terasaki, K.; Tribbia, J.; Tanaka, H.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents new software for the analysis of global dynamical fields in (re)analyses, weather forecasts and climate models. A new diagnostic tool, developed within the MODES project, allows one to diagnose properties of balanced and inertio-gravity (IG) circulation across many scales. In particular, the IG spectrum, which has only recently become observable, can be studied simultaneously in the mass field and wind field and considering the whole model depth in contrary to majority of studies. The paper presentation includes the theory of normal-mode function expansion, technical details of the Fortran 90 code, examples of namelists which control the software execution and outputs of the software application on the reanalysis dataset ERA Interim. The applied libraries and default compiler are from the open-source domain. A limited understanding of Fortran suffices for the successful implementation of the software. The presented application of the software to the ERA Interim dataset show some features of the large-scale circulation after it has been split into the balanced and IG components. The global energy distribution is dominated by the balanced energy with IG modes making less than 10% of the total wave energy. However, on subsynoptic scales IG energy dominates and it is associated with the main features of tropical variability on all scales. The presented energy distribution and features of the zonally-averaged and equatorial circulation provide a reference for the validation of climate models.

  12. 3D-QSAR modelling dataset of bioflavonoids for predicting the potential modulatory effect on P-glycoprotein activity.

    Wongrattanakamon, Pathomwat; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Nimmanpipug, Piyarat; Jiranusornkul, Supat

    2016-12-01

    The data is obtained from exploring the modulatory activities of bioflavonoids on P-glycoprotein function by ligand-based approaches. Multivariate Linear-QSAR models for predicting the induced/inhibitory activities of the flavonoids were created. Molecular descriptors were initially used as independent variables and a dependent variable was expressed as pFAR. The variables were then used in MLR analysis by stepwise regression calculation to build the linear QSAR data. The entire dataset consisted of 23 bioflavonoids was used as a training set. Regarding the obtained MLR QSAR model, R of 0.963, R (2)=0.927, [Formula: see text], SEE=0.197, F=33.849 and q (2)=0.927 were achieved. The true predictabilities of QSAR model were justified by evaluation with the external dataset (Table 4). The pFARs of representative flavonoids were predicted by MLR QSAR modelling. The data showed that internal and external validations may generate the same conclusion. PMID:27626051

  13. 3D flame topography obtained by tomographic chemiluminescence with direct comparison to planar Mie scattering measurements.

    Xu, Wenjiang; Wickersham, A J; Wu, Yue; He, Fan; Ma, Lin

    2015-03-20

    This work reports the measurements of 3D flame topography using tomographic chemiluminescence and its validation by direct comparison against planar Mie scattering measurements. Tomographic measurements of the 3D topography of various well-controlled laboratory flames were performed using projections measured by seven cameras, and a simultaneous Mie scattering measurement was performed to measure a 2D cross section of the 3D flame topography. The tomographic measurements were based on chemiluminescence emissions from the flame, and the Mie scattering measurements were based on micrometer-size oil droplets seeded into the flow. The flame topography derived from the 3D tomographic and the Mie scattering measurement was then directly compared. The results show that the flame topography obtained from tomographic chemiluminescence and the Mie measurement agreed qualitatively (i.e., both methods yielded the same profile of the flame fronts), but a quantitative difference on the order of millimeters was observed between these two methods. These results are expected to be useful for understanding the capabilities and limitations of the 3D tomographic and Mie scattering techniques in combustion diagnostics. PMID:25968497

  14. Comparison and validation of gridded precipitation datasets for Spain

    Quintana-Seguí, Pere; Turco, Marco; Míguez-Macho, Gonzalo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, two gridded precipitation datasets are compared and validated in Spain: the recently developed SAFRAN dataset and the Spain02 dataset. These are validated using rain gauges and they are also compared to the low resolution ERA-Interim reanalysis. The SAFRAN precipitation dataset has been recently produced, using the SAFRAN meteorological analysis, which is extensively used in France (Durand et al. 1993, 1999; Quintana-Seguí et al. 2008; Vidal et al., 2010) and which has recently been applied to Spain (Quintana-Seguí et al., 2015). SAFRAN uses an optimal interpolation (OI) algorithm and uses all available rain gauges from the Spanish State Meteorological Agency (Agencia Estatal de Meteorología, AEMET). The product has a spatial resolution of 5 km and it spans from September 1979 to August 2014. This dataset has been produced mainly to be used in large scale hydrological applications. Spain02 (Herrera et al. 2012, 2015) is another high quality precipitation dataset for Spain based on a dense network of quality-controlled stations and it has different versions at different resolutions. In this study we used the version with a resolution of 0.11°. The product spans from 1971 to 2010. Spain02 is well tested and widely used, mainly, but not exclusively, for RCM model validation and statistical downscliang. ERA-Interim is a well known global reanalysis with a spatial resolution of ˜79 km. It has been included in the comparison because it is a widely used product for continental and global scale studies and also in smaller scale studies in data poor countries. Thus, its comparison with higher resolution products of a data rich country, such as Spain, allows us to quantify the errors made when using such datasets for national scale studies, in line with some of the objectives of the EU-FP7 eartH2Observe project. The comparison shows that SAFRAN and Spain02 perform similarly, even though their underlying principles are different. Both products are largely

  15. The next chapter in experimental petrology: Metamorphic dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum captured in 3D microtomographic time series datasets

    Bedford, John; Fusseis, Florian; Leclere, Henry; Wheeler, John; Faulkner, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Nucleation and growth of new minerals in response to disequilibrium is the most fundamental metamorphic process. However, our current kinetic models of metamorphic reactions are largely based on inference from fossil mineral assemblages, rather than from direct observation. The experimental investigation of metamorphism has also been limited, typically to concealed vessels that restrict the possibility of direct microstructural monitoring. Here we present one of the first time series datasets that captures a metamorphic reaction, dehydration of polycrystalline gypsum to form hemihydrate, in a series of three dimensional x-ray microtomographic datasets. We achieved this by installing an x-ray transparent hydrothermal cell (Fusseis et al., 2014, J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 251-253) in the microtomography beamline 2BM at the Advanced Photon Source (USA). In the cell, we heated a millimetre-sized sample of Volterra Alabaster to 388 K while applying an effective pressure of 5 MPa. Using hard x-rays that penetrate the pressure vessel, we imaged the specimen 40 times while it reacted for approximately 10 hours. Each microtomographic dataset was acquired in 300 seconds without interrupting the reaction. Our absorption microtomographic data have a voxel size of 1.3 μm, which suffices to analyse the reaction progress in 4D. Gypsum can clearly be distinguished from hemihydrate and pores, which form due to the large negative solid volume change. On the resolved scale, the first hemihydrate needles appear after about 2 hours. Our data allow tracking of individual needles throughout the entire experiment. We quantified their growth rates by measuring their circumference. While individual grains grow at different rates, they all start slowly during the initial nucleation stage, then accelerate and grow steadily between about 200 and 400 minutes before reaction rate decelerates again. Hemihydrate needles are surrounded by porous haloes, which grow with the needles, link up and

  16. 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF AN UNDERWATER ARCHAELOGICAL SITE: COMPARISON BETWEEN LOW COST CAMERAS

    A. Capra

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction with a metric content of a submerged area, where objects and structures of archaeological interest are found, could play an important role in the research and study activities and even in the digitization of the cultural heritage. The reconstruction of 3D object, of interest for archaeologists, constitutes a starting point in the classification and description of object in digital format and for successive fruition by user after delivering through several media. The starting point is a metric evaluation of the site obtained with photogrammetric surveying and appropriate 3D restitution. The authors have been applying the underwater photogrammetric technique since several years using underwater digital cameras and, in this paper, digital low cost cameras (off-the-shelf. Results of tests made on submerged objects with three cameras are presented: © Canon Power Shot G12, © Intova Sport HD e © GoPro HERO 2. The experimentation had the goal to evaluate the precision in self-calibration procedures, essential for multimedia underwater photogrammetry, and to analyze the quality of 3D restitution. Precisions obtained in the calibration and orientation procedures was assessed by using three cameras, and an homogeneous set control points. Data were processed with © Agisoft Photoscan. Successively, 3D models were created and the comparison of the models derived from the use of different cameras was performed. Different potentialities of the used cameras are reported in the discussion section. The 3D restitution of objects and structures was integrated with sea bottom floor morphology in order to achieve a comprehensive description of the site. A possible methodology of survey and representation of submerged objects is therefore illustrated, considering an automatic and a semi-automatic approach.

  17. Development and comparison of projection and image space 3D nodule insertion techniques

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and compare two methods of inserting computerized virtual lesions into CT datasets. 24 physical (synthetic) nodules of three sizes and four morphologies were inserted into an anthropomorphic chest phantom (LUNGMAN, KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was scanned (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) with and without nodules present, and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) at 0.6 mm slice thickness using a standard thoracic CT protocol at multiple dose settings. Virtual 3D CAD models based on the physical nodules were virtually inserted (accounting for the system MTF) into the nodule-free CT data using two techniques. These techniques include projection-based and image-based insertion. Nodule volumes were estimated using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.). Differences were tested using paired t-tests and R2 goodness of fit between the virtually and physically inserted nodules. Both insertion techniques resulted in nodule volumes very similar to the real nodules (<3% difference) and in most cases the differences were not statistically significant. Also, R2 values were all <0.97 for both insertion techniques. These data imply that these techniques can confidently be used as a means of inserting virtual nodules in CT datasets. These techniques can be instrumental in building hybrid CT datasets composed of patient images with virtually inserted nodules.

  18. Comparison of 3D orientation distribution functions measured with confocal microscopy and diffusion MRI.

    Schilling, Kurt; Janve, Vaibhav; Gao, Yurui; Stepniewska, Iwona; Landman, Bennett A; Anderson, Adam W

    2016-04-01

    The ability of diffusion MRI (dMRI) fiber tractography to non-invasively map three-dimensional (3D) anatomical networks in the human brain has made it a valuable tool in both clinical and research settings. However, there are many assumptions inherent to any tractography algorithm that can limit the accuracy of the reconstructed fiber tracts. Among them is the assumption that the diffusion-weighted images accurately reflect the underlying fiber orientation distribution (FOD) in the MRI voxel. Consequently, validating dMRI's ability to assess the underlying fiber orientation in each voxel is critical for its use as a biomedical tool. Here, using post-mortem histology and confocal microscopy, we present a method to perform histological validation of orientation functions in 3D, which has previously been limited to two-dimensional analysis of tissue sections. We demonstrate the ability to extract the 3D FOD from confocal z-stacks, and quantify the agreement between the MRI estimates of orientation information obtained using constrained spherical deconvolution (CSD) and the true geometry of the fibers. We find an orientation error of approximately 6° in voxels containing nearly parallel fibers, and 10-11° in crossing fiber regions, and note that CSD was unable to resolve fibers crossing at angles below 60° in our dataset. This is the first time that the 3D white matter orientation distribution is calculated from histology and compared to dMRI. Thus, this technique serves as a gold standard for dMRI validation studies - providing the ability to determine the extent to which the dMRI signal is consistent with the histological FOD, and to establish how well different dMRI models can predict the ground truth FOD. PMID:26804781

  19. Performance comparison of zeroth order nodal expansion methods in 3D rectangular geometry

    Highlights: ► The resulting system of nodal equations is more amenable to efficient numerical solution. ► Numerical results reveal that the accuracies of all methods are adequate. ► Point methods have less error in comparison to ACNEM and AFNEM schemes. ► A significant decrease in execution times for average methods is observed. - Abstract: This work presents a study on the performance comparison of zeroth order nodal expansion methods, NEM. A computer code based on zeroth order nodal expansion methods, ZONEM-3D, is developed for the steady state diffusion equation calculation using nodal expansion family methods including average current, average flux, point current and point flux in 3D cubic geometry. The aim of this work is to determine the relative merits of four variants in terms of accuracy per computing time expended. To speed up the solution schemes, we implemented the fission source weighting in the power method procedure. The influence and capability of the accelerating technique are investigated by considering the execution time through solving some test cases. Four popular test problems, BIBLIS-2D, ZION-2D PWR reactor benchmark, LMW LWR-3D and IAEA-3D benchmark, are used to assess the performance comparison of the methods. Overall, numerical results demonstrate although the accuracies of all methods are adequate but point methods are the most accurate of four variants on considered problems and have relatively higher accuracy than average methods by using coarse meshes. In contrast, execution time of average methods is less than point methods because of having less computational efforts. Also we find current methods have less execution time relative to flux methods. For surveying the influence of considered acceleration method, several fission source weightings are considered and investigated.

  20. 3-D Waveguide Effects of Topographical Structural Variation on Full Waveform Propagation: 3-D Finite Difference Modeling Comparisons with Field Data From Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona

    Anderson, T. S.; Miller, R.; Greenfield, R.; Fisk, D.

    2002-12-01

    The propagation of seismic waves through regions of complex topography is not thoroughly understood. Surface waves, are of particular interest, as they are large in amplitude and can characterize the source depth, magnitude, and frequency content. The amplitude and frequency content of seismic waves that propagate in regions with large topographical variations are affected by both the scattering and blockage of the wave energy. The ability to predict the 3-d scattering due to topography will improve the understanding of both regional scale surface wave magnitudes, and refine surface wave discriminants as well as at the local scale (Smart Weapons Test Range, Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The result of the KGS characterization study is a high-resolution 3-d model that is used in our seismic simulations. The velocities Vs, Vp are calculated by tomography and refraction, attenuation coefficients estimated from the surface wave and from p-waves and are provided in a model with attributes resolved in 3-d to 0.5 meters. In the present work, we present comparisons of synthetic data with seismic data collected at the Smart Weapons Test Range to benchmark the accuracy achieved in simulating 3-d wave propagation in the vicinity of a topographical anomaly (trench). Synthetic seismograms are generated using a 3-d 8th order staggered grid visco-elastic finite difference code that accounts for topography. The geologic model is based on the Yuma site characterization. The size of these calculations required use of the DoD High Performance Computers and parallelized code. Results are compared with field data. Preliminary results show an excellent match with field data using the 3-d fdtd technique.

  1. Development of a 3D-based automated firearms evidence comparison system.

    Bachrach, Benjamin

    2002-11-01

    Since the early 1990's, the idea of automated systems for the comparison of microscopic firearms evidence has received considerable attention. The main objective of such systems is to enable the analysis of large amounts of evidence, therefore, transforming the comparison of firearms evidence from an evidence verification tool into a crime-fighting tool. Two such systems have been widely used in United States forensic laboratories: namely, the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS) (1) and DRUGFIRE (2). Both IBIS and DRUGFIRE have in common the fact that their characterization of a specimen is based on a two-dimensional (2D) representation of the specimen's surface. Although these systems have provided satisfactory results in the identification of cartridge cases, their performance in the identification of bullets has not yet met firearms examiner's expectations. This project was motivated by the premise that a better characterizations of the bullet's surface should translate into better performance of automated identification systems. A three-dimensional (3D) characterization of the bullet's surface is proposed as an alternative to a 2D characterization. This paper discusses the development and preliminary results obtained with SciClops, an automated microscopic comparison system based on the use of a 3D characterization of a bullet's surface. PMID:12455646

  2. 3D stereoscopic analysis of a Coronal Mass Ejection and comparison with UV spectroscopic data

    Susino, Roberto; Dolei, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the 2007, May 20 partial-halo Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) has been made using STEREO/EUVI and STEREO/COR1 coronagraphic images. The trajectory and kinematics of the erupting filament have been derived from EUVI image pairs with the "tie-pointing" triangulation technique, while the polarization ratio technique has been applied to COR1 data to determine the average position and depth of the CME front along the line of sight. These 3D geometrical information have been combined for the first time with spectroscopic measurements of the OVI $\\lambda\\lambda$1031.91, 1037.61 \\AA\\ line profiles made with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board SOHO. Comparison between the prominence trajectory extrapolated at the altitude of UVCS observations and the core transit time measured from UVCS data made possible a firm identification of the CME core observed in white light and UV with the prominence plasma expelled during the CME. Results on the 3D structure of the ...

  3. 3D MODELS COMPARISON OF COMPLEX SHELL IN UNDERWATER AND DRY ENVIRONMENTS

    S. Troisi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In marine biology the shape, morphology, texture and dimensions of the shells and organisms like sponges and gorgonians are very important parameters. For example, a particular type of gorgonian grows every year only few millimeters; this estimation was conducted without any measurement instrument but it has been provided after successive observational studies, because this organism is very fragile: the contact could compromise its structure and outliving. Non-contact measurement system has to be used to preserve such organisms: the photogrammetry is a method capable to assure high accuracy without contact. Nevertheless, the achievement of a 3D photogrammetric model of complex object (as gorgonians or particular shells is a challenge in normal environments, either with metric camera or with consumer camera. Indeed, the successful of automatic target-less image orientation and the image matching algorithms is strictly correlated to the object texture properties and of camera calibration quality as well. In the underwater scenario, the environment conditions strongly influence the results quality; in particular, water’s turbidity, the presence of suspension, flare and other optical aberrations decrease the image quality reducing the accuracy and increasing the noise on the 3D model. Furthermore, seawater density variability influences its refraction index and consequently the interior orientation camera parameters. For this reason, the camera calibration has to be performed in the same survey conditions. In this paper, a comparison between the 3D models of a Charonia Tritonis shell are carried out through surveys conducted both in dry and underwater environments.

  4. Comparison of focused ion beam versus nano-scale X-ray computed tomography for resolving 3-D microstructures of porous fuel cell materials

    Wargo, E. A.; Kotaka, T.; Tabuchi, Y.; Kumbur, E. C.

    2013-11-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) have emerged as two popular nanotomography techniques for quantifying the 3-D microstructure of porous materials. The objective of this study is to assess the unique features and limitations of FIB-SEM and nano-CT in capturing the 3-D microstructure and structure-related transport properties of porous fuel cell materials. As a test case, a sample of a micro-porous layer used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells is analyzed to obtain 3-D microstructure datasets using these two nanotomography techniques. For quantitative comparison purposes, several key transport properties are determined for these two datasets, including the porosity, pore connectivity, tortuosity, structural diffusivity coefficient, and chord length (i.e., void size) distributions. The results obtained for both datasets are evaluated against each other and experimental data when available. Additionally, these two techniques are compared qualitatively in terms of the acquired images, image segmentation, and general systems operation. The particular advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are highlighted, along with suggestions for best practice.

  5. Multiresolution comparison of precipitation datasets for large-scale models

    Chun, K. P.; Sapriza Azuri, G.; Davison, B.; DeBeer, C. M.; Wheater, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    Gridded precipitation datasets are crucial for driving large-scale models which are related to weather forecast and climate research. However, the quality of precipitation products is usually validated individually. Comparisons between gridded precipitation products along with ground observations provide another avenue for investigating how the precipitation uncertainty would affect the performance of large-scale models. In this study, using data from a set of precipitation gauges over British Columbia and Alberta, we evaluate several widely used North America gridded products including the Canadian Gridded Precipitation Anomalies (CANGRD), the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis, the Water and Global Change (WATCH) project, the thin plate spline smoothing algorithms (ANUSPLIN) and Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA). Based on verification criteria for various temporal and spatial scales, results provide an assessment of possible applications for various precipitation datasets. For long-term climate variation studies (~100 years), CANGRD, NCEP, WATCH and ANUSPLIN have different comparative advantages in terms of their resolution and accuracy. For synoptic and mesoscale precipitation patterns, CaPA provides appealing performance of spatial coherence. In addition to the products comparison, various downscaling methods are also surveyed to explore new verification and bias-reduction methods for improving gridded precipitation outputs for large-scale models.

  6. Visualising the 3D Structure of Fine-Grained Estuarine Sediments; Preliminary Interpretations of a Novel Dataset Obtained via Volume Electron Microscopy

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Spencer, Kate; Carr, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Accurate measurement of the physical characteristics of sediment are critical to determining sediment transport behaviour and the stability of settled deposits. The properties (e.g. particle size, density, and settling velocity) of coarse-grained sediments (> 63 μm φ) can be easily characterised, hence their behaviour is relatively simple to predict and model. However, due to their small size and tendency to interact with their surrounding medium, the characteristics of fine sediments (laser microscopy (SCLM), conventional optical microscopy (COM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to characterise fine sediments at both the gross (> 1 μm) and sub-micron scale (Droppo et al., 1996). Whilst this technique has proven insightful, the measurement of geometric properties (e.g. the shape of primary particles and their spatial arrangement) can only be achieved by three-dimensional (3D) analysis and the scale of observation for e.g. TEM does not overlap with those techniques used to characterise sediments at larger scales (100s to 1000s microns) (e.g. video analysis). Volume electron microscopy [or focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM)] provides 3D analysis at scales of 10s to 1000s microns and though widely used in cell biology, has not been used to observe sediment. FIB-SEM requires samples that are vacuum stable and a key challenge will be to capture fragile, hydrated sediment samples whilst preserving their structural integrity. The aims of this work are therefore: 1) to modify preparation techniques currently used in cell biology for the stabilization of sedimentary materials; 2) to acquire 3D datasets for both fragile suspended sediments (flocs) and consolidated bed sediments and 3) to interpret the 3D structure of these samples. In order to reduce alteration of the samples caused by dehydration, samples were first 'fixed' in 2.5% glutaraldehyde/2% formaldehyde before embedding in Durcupan, a hydrophobic epoxy resin. Pore water was then

  7. Accurate 3D comparison of complex topography with terrestrial laser scanner: application to the Rangitikei canyon (N-Z)

    Lague, Dimitri; Leroux, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Surveying techniques such as Terrestrial Laser Scanner have recently been used to measure surface changes via 3D point cloud (PC) comparison. Two types of approaches have been pursued: 3D tracking of homologous parts of the surface to compute a displacement field, and distance calculation between two point clouds when homologous parts cannot be defined. This study deals with the second approach, typical of natural surfaces altered by erosion, sedimentation or vegetation between surveys. Current comparison methods are based on a closest point distance or require at least one of the PC to be meshed with severe limitations when surfaces present roughness elements at all scales. We introduce a new algorithm performing a direct comparison of point clouds in 3D. Surface normals are first estimated in 3D at a scale consistent with the local surface roughness. The measurement of the mean change along the normal direction is then performed with an explicit calculation of a confidence interval. Comparison with existing...

  8. TMI-1 MSLB coupled 3-D neutronics/thermal hydraulics analysis: application of RELAP5-3D and comparison with different codes

    A comprehensive analysis of the double ended Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) accident assumed to occur in the Babcock and Wilcox nuclear power plant of Three Miles Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) has been carried out of the University of Pisa in co-operation with the University of Zagreb and the Texas A and M University. The overall activity has been completed within the framework of the participation in the OECD-CSNI/NSC (Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations - Nuclear Science Committee) 'PWR MSLB Benchmark'. Different code versions have been adopted in the analysis. Results from the following codes (or code versions) are described in this paper: RELAP5/MOD3.2.2, beta version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Parcs code; RELAP5/MOD3.2.2, gamma version, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Quabbox code; RELAP5/3D, coupled with the 3-D neutron kinetics Nestle code. Boundary and initial conditions of the system including those relevant to the fuel status, have been supplied by Pensilvania State University that had a co-operation GPU (the utility, owner of TMI) and NRC (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The capability of the control rods to recover the accident has been demonstrated in all the cases as well as the capability of all the codes to predict the time evolution of the assigned transient. However, one stuck control rod caused some 're-criticality' or 'return-to-power' whose magnitude is largely affected by boundary and initial conditions. The comparison among the results obtained by adopting the same thermalhydraulic nodalization and the different 'coupled' code version is discussed in the present document. (author)

  9. Comparison of Failure Modes in 2-D and 3-D Woven Carbon Phenolic Systems

    Rossman, Grant A.; Stackpoole, Mairead; Feldman, Jay; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Braun, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    failure modes because z-fibers in the through-thickness direction provided extra reinforcement to hold material layers together. Therefore, the benefit of using a 3D weave architecture was shown to alleviate failure modes experienced by a 2D laminate sample of similar material composition. In summary this poster reviews the thermal response performance comparisons drawn between a 3D Woven TPS sample and 2D Carbon Phenolic samples after performing rigorous heating experiments in the mARC facility at NASA Ames. Although the mARC Facility is still in its developmental stages, researchers expect similar trends in failure modes observed from large scale arc jet facilities. This work helps demonstrate the viability of 3D Woven TPSs as a new TPS option for future atmospheric entry missions.

  10. Comparison of a quasi-3D analysis and experimental performance for three compact radial turbines

    Simonyi, P. S.; Boyle, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic evaluation of three compact radial turbine builds was performed. Two rotors which were 40-50 percent shorter in axial length than conventional state-of-the-art radial rotors were tested. A single nozzle design was used. One rotor was tested with the nozzle at two stagger angle settings. A second rotor was tested with the nozzle in only the closed down setting. Experimental results were compared to predicted results from a quasi-3D inviscid and boundary layer analysis, called MTSB (Meridl/Tsonic/Blayer). This analysis was used to predict turbine performance. It has previously been calibrated only for axial, not radial, turbomachinery. The predicted and measured efficiencies were compared at the design point for the three turbines. At the design points the analysis overpredicted the efficiency by less than 1.7 points. Comparisons were also made at off-design operating points. The results of these comparisons showed the importance of an accurate clearance model for efficiency predictions and also that there are deficiencies in the incidence loss model used.

  11. Evaluation of failing hemodialysis fistulas with multidetector CT angiography: Comparison of different 3D planes

    Karadeli, E. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Tarhan, N.C. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: caglat@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Ulu, E.M. Kayahan; Tutar, N.U. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Basaran, O. [Department of General Surgery, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey); Coskun, M.; Niron, E.A. [Department of Radiology, Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate failing hemodialysis fistula complications using 16-detector MDCTA, and to assess the accuracies of different 3D planes. Materials and methods: Thirty patients (16 men, 14 women, aged 27-79 years) were referred for hemodialysis access dysfunction. Thirty-one MDCTA exams were done prior to fistulography. For MDCTA, contrast was administered (2 mL/kg at 5 mL/s) via a peripheral vein in the contralateral arm. Axial MIP, coronal MIP, and VRT images were constructed. Venous complications were evaluated on axial source images, on each 3D plane, and on all-planes together. Results were analyzed using McNemar test. Results: Axial MIP, VRT and all-planes evaluations were most sensitive for fistula site detection (93%). Coronal MIP had the highest sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (35%, 96%, and 85%, respectively) for detecting venous stenosis. VRT and all-planes had the highest sensitivity and accuracy for detecting aneurysms (100%). All-planes and axial MIP were most sensitive for detecting venous occlusion (61% and 54%). Comparisons of detection frequencies for each venous pathology between the five categories of MDCTA revealed no significant differences (P > 0.05). MDCTA additionally showed 3 partially thrombosed aneurysms, 4 anastomosis site stenosis and 12 arterial complications. Conclusion: MDCTA overall gives low sensitivity for detection of central vein stenosis and moderate sensitivity for occlusion. For most pathology, all-planes evaluation of MDCTA gives highest sensitivity and accuracy rates when compared to other planes. For venous stenosis and occlusion, MDCTA should be considered when ultrasonography and fistulography are inconclusive. MDCTA is helpful in identifying aneurysms, collaterals, partial venous thromboses and additional arterial, anastomosis site pathologies.

  12. Comparison of 3D interest point detectors and descriptors for point cloud fusion

    Hänsch, R.; T Weber; O. Hellwich

    2014-01-01

    The extraction and description of keypoints as salient image parts has a long tradition within processing and analysis of 2D images. Nowadays, 3D data gains more and more importance. This paper discusses the benefits and limitations of keypoints for the task of fusing multiple 3D point clouds. For this goal, several combinations of 3D keypoint detectors and descriptors are tested. The experiments are based on 3D scenes with varying properties, including 3D scanner data as well as Kin...

  13. Comparison of 3D interest point detectors and descriptors for point cloud fusion

    Hänsch, R.; Weber, T.; Hellwich, O.

    2014-08-01

    The extraction and description of keypoints as salient image parts has a long tradition within processing and analysis of 2D images. Nowadays, 3D data gains more and more importance. This paper discusses the benefits and limitations of keypoints for the task of fusing multiple 3D point clouds. For this goal, several combinations of 3D keypoint detectors and descriptors are tested. The experiments are based on 3D scenes with varying properties, including 3D scanner data as well as Kinect point clouds. The obtained results indicate that the specific method to extract and describe keypoints in 3D data has to be carefully chosen. In many cases the accuracy suffers from a too strong reduction of the available points to keypoints.

  14. Comparison of 2D and 3D GUI Widgets for Stereoscopic Multitouch Setups

    Zilch, David; Bruder, Gerd; Steinicke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the area of interactive entertainment have suggested to combine stereoscopic visualization with multi-touch displays, which has the potential to open up new vistas for natural interaction with interactive three-dimensional (3D) applications. However, the question arises how the user interfaces for system control in such 3D setups should be designed in order to provide an effective user experience. In this article we introduce 3D GUI widgets for interaction with stereosc...

  15. 3D representations of amino acids—applications to protein sequence comparison and classification

    Jie Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid sequence of a protein is the key to understanding its structure and ultimately its function in the cell. This paper addresses the fundamental issue of encoding amino acids in ways that the representation of such a protein sequence facilitates the decoding of its information content. We show that a feature-based representation in a three-dimensional (3D space derived from amino acid substitution matrices provides an adequate representation that can be used for direct comparison of protein sequences based on geometry. We measure the performance of such a representation in the context of the protein structural fold prediction problem. We compare the results of classifying different sets of proteins belonging to distinct structural folds against classifications of the same proteins obtained from sequence alone or directly from structural information. We find that sequence alone performs poorly as a structure classifier. We show in contrast that the use of the three dimensional representation of the sequences significantly improves the classification accuracy. We conclude with a discussion of the current limitations of such a representation and with a description of potential improvements.

  16. Comparison between 3D Supersonic Shear Wave Elastography and Magnetic Resonance Elastography: a preliminary experimental study

    Yue, Jinlong; Tardieu, Marion; Julea, Felicia; Chami, Linda; Lucidarme, Olivier; Maître, Xavier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound Supersonic Shear Wave Elastog-raphy (SSWE) as well as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) allow accessing the mechanical properties of human tissues. SSWE is usually performed using a 2D probe. 3D SSWE is now available but needs to be validated. We compared 3D SSWE with both 2D SSWE and MRE which is inherently 3D on a breast phantom. We found that 3D SSWE is reproducible and provides elasticity estimates comparable to those obtained with the validated 2D SSWE. We also showed that...

  17. 3-D microphysical model studies of Arctic denitrification: comparison with observations

    S. Davies

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of Arctic denitrification using a 3-D chemistry-microphysics transport model are compared with observations for the winters 1994/1995, 1996/1997 and 1999/2000. The model of Denitrification by Lagrangian Particle Sedimentation (DLAPSE couples the full chemical scheme of the 3-D chemical transport model, SLIMCAT, with a nitric acid trihydrate (NAT growth and sedimentation scheme. We use observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS and Improved Limb Atmospheric Sounder (ILAS satellite instruments, the balloon-borne Michelsen Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B, and the in situ NOy instrument on-board the ER-2. As well as directly comparing model results with observations, we also assess the extent to which these observations are able to validate the modelling approach taken. For instance, in 1999/2000 the model captures the temporal development of denitrification observed by the ER-2 from late January into March. However, in this winter the vortex was already highly denitrified by late January so the observations do not provide a strong constraint on the modelled rate of denitrification. The model also reproduces the MLS observations of denitrification in early February 2000. In 1996/1997 the model captures the timing and magnitude of denitrification as observed by ILAS, although the lack of observations north of ~67° N make it difficult to constrain the actual timing of onset. The comparison for this winter does not support previous conclusions that denitrification must be caused by an ice-mediated process. In 1994/1995 the model notably underestimates the magnitude of denitrification observed during a single balloon flight of the MIPAS-B instrument. Agreement between model and MLS HNO3 at 68 hPa in mid-February 1995 was significantly better. Sensitivity tests show that a 1.5 K overall decrease in vortex temperatures or a factor 4 increase in assumed NAT nucleation rates produce the best

  18. Comparison of 3D turbulence measurements using three staring wind lidars and a sonic anemometer

    Mann, Jakob; Cariou, J.-P.; Courtney, Michael;

    2008-01-01

    Three pulsed lidars were used in staring, non-scanning mode, placed so that their beams crossed close to a 3D sonic anemometer. The goal is to compare lidar volume averaged wind measurement with point measurement reference sensors and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing 3D turbulence...

  19. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the carotid artery using 3D time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics. Comparison with real-time fluoroscopic triggered 3D-elliptical centric view ordering

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MR angiography using the 3D time-resolved imaging of contrast kinetics technique (3D-TRICKS) by direct comparison with the fluoroscopic triggered 3D-elliptical centric view ordering (3D-ELLIP) technique. 3D-TRICKS and 3D-ELLIP were directly compared on a 1.5-Tesla MR unit using the same spatial resolution and matrix. In 3D-TRICKS, the central part of the k-space is updated more frequently than the peripheral part of the k-space, which is divided in the slice-encoding direction. The carotid arteries were imaged using 3D-TRICKS and 3D-ELLIP sequentially in 14 patients. Temporal resolution was 12 sec for 3D-ELLIP and 6 sec for 3D-TRICKS. The signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the common carotid artery was measured, and the quality of MIP images was then scored in terms of venous overlap and blurring of vessel contours. No significant difference in mean S/N was seen between the two methods. Significant venous overlap was not seen in any of the patients examined. Moderate blurring of vessel contours was noted on 3D-TRICKS in five patients and on 3D-ELLIP in four patients. Blurring in the slice-encoding direction was slightly more pronounced in 3D-TRICKS. However, qualitative analysis scores showed no significant differences. When the spatial resolution of the two methods was identical, the performance of 3D-TRICKS was found to be comparable in static visualization of the carotid arteries with 3D-ELLIP, although blurring in the slice-encoding direction was slightly more pronounced in 3D-TRICKS. 3D-TRICKS is a more robust technique than 3D-ELLIP, because 3D-ELLIP requires operator-dependent fluoroscopic triggering. Furthermore, 3D-TRICKS can achieve higher temporal resolution. For the spatial resolution employed in this study, 3D-TRICKS may be the method of choice. (author)

  20. Active remote sensing of snow using NMM3D/DMRT and comparison with CLPX II airborne data

    Xu, X.; Liang, D.; Tsang, L.; Andreadis, K.M.; Josberger, E.G.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; Cline, D.W.; Yueh, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    We applied the Numerical Maxwell Model of three-dimensional simulations (NMM3D) in the Dense Media Radiative Theory (DMRT) to calculate backscattering coefficients. The particles' positions are computer-generated and the subsequent Foldy-Lax equations solved numerically. The phase matrix in NMM3D has significant cross-polarization, particularly when the particles are densely packed. The NMM3D model is combined with DMRT in calculating the microwave scattering by dry snow. The NMM3D/DMRT equations are solved by an iterative solution up to the second order in the case of small to moderate optical thickness. The numerical results of NMM3D/DMRT are illustrated and compared with QCA/DMRT. The QCA/DMRT and NMM3D/DMRT results are also applied to compare with data from two specific datasets from the second Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX II) in Alaska and Colorado. The data are obtained at the Ku-band (13.95 GHz) observations using airborne imaging polarimetric scatterometer (POLSCAT). It is shown that the model predictions agree with the field measurements for both co-polarization and cross-polarization. For the Alaska region, the average snow depth and snow density are used as the inputs for DMRT. The grain size, selected from within the range of the ground measurements, is used as a best-fit parameter within the range. For the Colorado region, we use the Variable Infiltration Capacity Model (VIC) to obtain the input snow profiles for NMM3D/DMRT. ?? 2010 IEEE.

  1. Comparison of Eight Different Precipitation Datasets for South America

    Pinto, L. C.; Costa, M. H.; Diniz, L. F.

    2007-05-01

    Long and continuous meteorological data series for large areas are hard to obtain, so several groups have developed climate datasets generated through the combination of models and observed and remote sensing data, including reanalysis products. This study compares eight different precipitation datasets for South America (NCEP/NCAR-2, ERA-40, CMAP, GPCP, CRU, CPTEC, TRMM, Legates and Willmott, Leemans and Cramer). For each dataset, we analyze the four moments of the data distribution (mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis), for latitudinal variation, for the major river basins and for the major vegetation types in the continent, allowing to identify the geographical variations in each dataset. We verified that significant differences exist among the precipitation products.

  2. Review and comparison of temporal- and spatial-phase shift speckle pattern interferometry for 3D deformation measurement

    Xie, Xin; Yang, Lianxiang; Chen, Xu; Xu, Nan; Wang, Yonghong

    2013-10-01

    High accuracy full field three dimensional (3D) deformation measurements have always been an essential problem for the manufacturing, instrument, and aerospace industry. 3D deformations, which can be translated further into 3D strain and stress, are the key parameter for design, manufacturing and quality control. Due to the fast development of the manufacturing industry, especially in the automobile and airspace industry, rapid design and optimization concepts have already widely accepted. These concepts all require the support of rapid, high sensitive and accuracy 3D deformation measurement. Advanced optical methods are gaining widely acceptance for deformation and stain measurement by industry due to the advantages of non-contact, full-field and high measurement sensitivity. Of these methods, Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry (ESPI) is the most sensitive and accurate method for 3D deformation measurement in micro and sub micro-level. ESPI measures deformation by evaluating the phase difference of two recorded speckle interferograms under different loading conditions. Combined with a phase shift technique, ESPI systems can measure the 3D deformation with dozens of nanometer level sensitivity. Cataloged by phase calculation methods, ESPI systems can be divided into temporal phase shift ESPI systems and spatial phase shift ESPI system. This article provides a review and a comparison of temporal and spatial phase shift speckle pattern interferometry for 3D deformation measurement. After an overview of the fundamentals of ESPI theory, temporal phase-shift and spatial phase-shift techniques, 3D deformation measurements by the temporal phase-shift ESPI which is suited well for static measurement and by the spatial phase-shift ESPI which is particularly useful for dynamic measurement will be discussed in detail. Basic theory, brief derivation and different optical layouts for the two systems will be presented. The potentials and limitations of the both ESPI

  3. Sonographic measurement of thyroid gland volume: A comparison of 2D and 3D ultrasound

    Ying, Michael [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: ormying@polyu.edu.hk; Sin Manhong [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Pang, Shuk-fan [Department of Optometry and Radiography, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-11-01

    Aims: This study was undertaken to investigate the inter-observer reproducibility of 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid gland volume. The symmetry of thyroid lobes in healthy subjects was also investigated. Materials and methods: The volume of the left and right lobes of the thyroid gland was measured in 20 healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women) using 2D and 3D ultrasound. On 2D ultrasound, the thyroid lobe volume was calculated by ellipsoid equation (volume = {pi}/6 x craniocaudal x mediolateral x anteroposterior dimensions), whereas 3D ultrasound volumetric measurements were performed with a 3D add-on system. In each subject, the thyroid gland was scanned by two operators to investigate inter-observer variability. Results: There was a moderate agreement between 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid volume (r = 0.77). 3D ultrasound (90%) had a higher inter-observer reproducibility than 2D ultrasound (85%) in the measurements. About 74% of healthy subjects had the right thyroid lobe larger than the left lobe. Conclusion: 3D ultrasound is useful in the measurement of thyroid volume with a higher reproducibility than 2D ultrasound. Asymmetry of thyroid lobes was noted in healthy subjects.

  4. Sonographic measurement of thyroid gland volume: A comparison of 2D and 3D ultrasound

    Aims: This study was undertaken to investigate the inter-observer reproducibility of 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid gland volume. The symmetry of thyroid lobes in healthy subjects was also investigated. Materials and methods: The volume of the left and right lobes of the thyroid gland was measured in 20 healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women) using 2D and 3D ultrasound. On 2D ultrasound, the thyroid lobe volume was calculated by ellipsoid equation (volume = π/6 x craniocaudal x mediolateral x anteroposterior dimensions), whereas 3D ultrasound volumetric measurements were performed with a 3D add-on system. In each subject, the thyroid gland was scanned by two operators to investigate inter-observer variability. Results: There was a moderate agreement between 2D and 3D ultrasound in the measurement of thyroid volume (r = 0.77). 3D ultrasound (90%) had a higher inter-observer reproducibility than 2D ultrasound (85%) in the measurements. About 74% of healthy subjects had the right thyroid lobe larger than the left lobe. Conclusion: 3D ultrasound is useful in the measurement of thyroid volume with a higher reproducibility than 2D ultrasound. Asymmetry of thyroid lobes was noted in healthy subjects

  5. Comparison and functional implications of the 3D architectures of viral tRNA-like structures.

    Hammond, John A; Rambo, Robert P; Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-01

    RNA viruses co-opt the host cell's biological machinery, and their infection strategies often depend on specific structures in the viral genomic RNA. Examples are tRNA-like structures (TLSs), found at the 3' end of certain plant viral RNAs, which can use the cell's aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (AARSs) to drive addition of an amino acid to the 3' end of the viral RNA. TLSs are multifunctional RNAs involved in processes such as viral replication, translation, and viral RNA stability; these functions depend on their fold. Experimental result-based structural models of TLSs have been published. In this study, we further examine these structures using a combination of biophysical and biochemical approaches to explore the three-dimensional (3D) architectures of TLSs from the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV), tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and brome mosaic virus (BMV). We find that despite similar function, these RNAs are biophysically diverse: the TYMV TLS adopts a characteristic tRNA-like L shape, the BMV TLS has a large compact globular domain with several helical extensions, and the TMV TLS aggregates in solution. Both the TYMV and BMV TLS RNAs adopt structures with tight backbone packing and also with dynamic structural elements, suggesting complexities and subtleties that cannot be explained by simple tRNA mimicry. These results confirm some aspects of existing models and also indicate how these models can be improved. The biophysical characteristics of these TLSs show how these multifunctional RNAs might regulate various viral processes, including negative strand synthesis, and also allow comparison with other structured RNAs. PMID:19144910

  6. Visualization of cranial nerves by MR cisternography using 3D FASE. Comparison with 2D FSE

    Asakura, Hirofumi; Nakano, Satoru; Togami, Taro [Kagawa Medical School, Miki (Japan)] (and others)

    2001-03-01

    MR cisternography using 3D FASE was compared with that of 2D FSE in regard to visualization of normal cranial nerves. In a phantom study, contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) of fine structures was better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE. In clinical cases, visualization of trigeminal nerve, abducent nerve, and facial/vestibulo-cochlear nerve were evaluated. Each cranial nerve was visualized better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE, with a significant difference (p<0.05). (author)

  7. Visualization of cranial nerves by MR cisternography using 3D FASE. Comparison with 2D FSE

    MR cisternography using 3D FASE was compared with that of 2D FSE in regard to visualization of normal cranial nerves. In a phantom study, contrast-to-noise ratio (C/N) of fine structures was better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE. In clinical cases, visualization of trigeminal nerve, abducent nerve, and facial/vestibulo-cochlear nerve were evaluated. Each cranial nerve was visualized better in 3D FASE images than in 2D FSE, with a significant difference (p<0.05). (author)

  8. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  9. A comparison of 2D and 3D digital image correlation for a membrane under inflation

    Murienne, Barbara J.; Nguyen, Thao D.

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital image correlation (DIC) is becoming widely used to characterize the behavior of structures undergoing 3D deformations. However, the use of 3D-DIC can be challenging under certain conditions, such as high magnification, and therefore small depth of field, or a highly controlled environment with limited access for two-angled cameras. The purpose of this study is to compare 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC for the same inflation experiment and evaluate whether 2D-DIC can be used when conditions discourage the use of a stereo-vision system. A latex membrane was inflated vertically to 5.41 kPa (reference pressure), then to 7.87 kPa (deformed pressure). A two-camera stereo-vision system acquired top-down images of the membrane, while a single camera system simultaneously recorded images of the membrane in profile. 2D-DIC and 3D-DIC were used to calculate horizontal (in the membrane plane) and vertical (out of the membrane plane) displacements, and meridional strain. Under static conditions, the baseline uncertainty in horizontal displacement and strain were smaller for 3D-DIC than 2D-DIC. However, the opposite was observed for the vertical displacement, for which 2D-DIC had a smaller baseline uncertainty. The baseline absolute error in vertical displacement and strain were similar for both DIC methods, but it was larger for 2D-DIC than 3D-DIC for the horizontal displacement. Under inflation, the variability in the measurements were larger than under static conditions for both DIC methods. 2D-DIC showed a smaller variability in displacements than 3D-DIC, especially for the vertical displacement, but a similar strain uncertainty. The absolute difference in the average displacements and strain between 3D-DIC and 2D-DIC were in the range of the 3D-DIC variability. Those findings suggest that 2D-DIC might be used as an alternative to 3D-DIC to study the inflation response of materials under certain conditions.

  10. Comparison of 2D versus 3D mammography with screening cases: an observer study

    Fernandez, James Reza; Deshpande, Ruchi; Hovanessian-Larsen, Linda; Liu, Brent

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer in women. 2D mammography is a screening tool to aid in the early detection of breast cancer, but has diagnostic limitations of overlapping tissues, especially in dense breasts. 3D mammography has the potential to improve detection outcomes by increasing specificity, and a new 3D screening tool with a 3D display for mammography aims to improve performance and efficiency as compared to 2D mammography. An observer study using human studies collected from was performed to compare traditional 2D mammography with this new 3D mammography technique. A prior study using a mammography phantom revealed no difference in calcification detection, but improved mass detection in 2D as compared to 3D. There was a significant decrease in reading time for masses, calcifications, and normals in 3D compared to 2D, however, as well as more favorable confidence levels in reading normal cases. Data for this current study is currently being obtained, and a full report should be available in the next few weeks.

  11. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ACTIVE AND PASSIVE TECHNIQUES FOR UNDERWATER 3D APPLICATIONS

    G. Bianco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the field of 3D scanning, there is an increasing need for more accurate technologies to acquire 3D models of close range objects. Underwater exploration, for example, is very hard to perform due to the hostile conditions and the bad visibility of the environment. Some application fields, like underwater archaeology, require to recover tridimensional data of objects that cannot be moved from their site or touched in order to avoid possible damages. Photogrammetry is widely used for underwater 3D acquisition, because it requires just one or two digital still or video cameras to acquire a sequence of images taken from different viewpoints. Stereo systems composed by a pair of cameras are often employed on underwater robots (i.e. ROVs, Remotely Operated Vehicles and used by scuba divers, in order to survey archaeological sites, reconstruct complex 3D structures in aquatic environment, estimate in situ the length of marine organisms, etc. The stereo 3D reconstruction is based on the triangulation of corresponding points on the two views. This requires to find in both images common points and to match them (correspondence problem, determining a plane that contains the 3D point on the object. Another 3D technique, frequently used in air acquisition, solves this point-matching problem by projecting structured lighting patterns to codify the acquired scene. The corresponding points are identified associating a binary code in both images. In this work we have tested and compared two whole-field 3D imaging techniques (active and passive based on stereo vision, in underwater environment. A 3D system has been designed, composed by a digital projector and two still cameras mounted in waterproof housing, so that it can perform the various acquisitions without changing the configuration of optical devices. The tests were conducted in a water tank in different turbidity conditions, on objects with different surface properties. In order to simulate a typical

  12. Comparison of optimized 3D-SPACE and 3D-TSE sequences at 1.5T MRCP in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether or not MRCP using a 3D-SPACE sequence allows for better image quality and a higher level of diagnostic confidence than a conventional 3D-TSE sequence at 1.5T regarding the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis in a routine clinical setting. 3D-SPACE and 3D-TSE sequences were performed in 42 consecutive patients with suspected choledocholithiasis undergoing MRCP. Evaluation of image quality and diagnostic confidence was done on the pancreaticobiliary tree which was subdivided into 10 segments. They were scored and statistically evaluated separately for visibility and diagnostic certainty by three radiologists with differing levels of experience on a five-point scale of 1 to 5 and -2 to 2, respectively. Student t-test was performed, and the interobserver agreement was also calculated. Image quality for each segment was significantly better for the 3D-SPACE sequence compared to the 3D-TSE sequence (4.48±0.94 vs. 3.98±1.20; 5-point scale p<0.01). Diagnostic confidence for the reporting radiologist was also significantly better for 3D-SPACE than for 3D-TSE (1.68±0.56 vs. 1.46±0.70; 3-point scale; p<0.01). The interobserver agreement was high in both sequences, 0.62-0.83 and 0.64-0.82, respectively. The optimized 3D-SPACE sequence allows for better image quality in 1.5T MRCP examinations and leads to a higher diagnostic confidence for choledocholithiasis compared to the conventional 3D-TSE sequence.

  13. Comparison of optimized 3D-SPACE and 3D-TSE sequences at 1.5T MRCP in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis

    Sudholt, P. [University Hospital Marburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Zaehringer, C.; Tyndall, A.; Bongartz, G.; Hohmann, J. [University Hospital Basel (Switzerland). Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Urigo, C. [Ars Medica Clinic, Gravesano-Lugano (Switzerland). Radiology

    2015-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate whether or not MRCP using a 3D-SPACE sequence allows for better image quality and a higher level of diagnostic confidence than a conventional 3D-TSE sequence at 1.5T regarding the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis in a routine clinical setting. 3D-SPACE and 3D-TSE sequences were performed in 42 consecutive patients with suspected choledocholithiasis undergoing MRCP. Evaluation of image quality and diagnostic confidence was done on the pancreaticobiliary tree which was subdivided into 10 segments. They were scored and statistically evaluated separately for visibility and diagnostic certainty by three radiologists with differing levels of experience on a five-point scale of 1 to 5 and -2 to 2, respectively. Student t-test was performed, and the interobserver agreement was also calculated. Image quality for each segment was significantly better for the 3D-SPACE sequence compared to the 3D-TSE sequence (4.48±0.94 vs. 3.98±1.20; 5-point scale p<0.01). Diagnostic confidence for the reporting radiologist was also significantly better for 3D-SPACE than for 3D-TSE (1.68±0.56 vs. 1.46±0.70; 3-point scale; p<0.01). The interobserver agreement was high in both sequences, 0.62-0.83 and 0.64-0.82, respectively. The optimized 3D-SPACE sequence allows for better image quality in 1.5T MRCP examinations and leads to a higher diagnostic confidence for choledocholithiasis compared to the conventional 3D-TSE sequence.

  14. Validation of the BISON 3D Fuel Performance Code: Temperature Comparisons for Concentrically and Eccentrically Located Fuel Pellets

    J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez; R. L. Williamson; S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer

    2013-03-01

    BISON is a modern finite-element based nuclear fuel performance code that has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (USA) since 2009. The code is applicable to both steady and transient fuel behaviour and is used to analyse either 2D axisymmetric or 3D geometries. BISON has been applied to a variety of fuel forms including LWR fuel rods, TRISO-coated fuel particles, and metallic fuel in both rod and plate geometries. Code validation is currently in progress, principally by comparison to instrumented LWR fuel rods. Halden IFA experiments constitute a large percentage of the current BISON validation base. The validation emphasis here is centreline temperatures at the beginning of fuel life, with comparisons made to seven rods from the IFA-431 and 432 assemblies. The principal focus is IFA-431 Rod 4, which included concentric and eccentrically located fuel pellets. This experiment provides an opportunity to explore 3D thermomechanical behaviour and assess the 3D simulation capabilities of BISON. Analysis results agree with experimental results showing lower fuel centreline temperatures for eccentric fuel with the peak temperature shifted from the centreline. The comparison confirms with modern 3D analysis tools that the measured temperature difference between concentric and eccentric pellets is not an artefact and provides a quantitative explanation for the difference.

  15. A Comparison of Radiation Dose Between Standard and 3D Angiography in Congenital Heart Disease

    Manica, João Luiz Langer, E-mail: joca.pesquisa@gmail.com; Borges, Mônica Scott; Medeiros, Rogério Fachel de; Fischer, Leandro dos Santos; Broetto, Gabriel; Rossi, Raul Ivo Filho [Instituto de Cardiologia / Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The use of three-dimensional rotational angiography (3D-RA) to assess patients with congenital heart diseases appears to be a promising technique despite the scarce literature available. The objective of this study was to describe our initial experience with 3D-RA and to compare its radiation dose to that of standard two-dimensional angiography (2D-SA). Between September 2011 and April 2012, 18 patients underwent simultaneous 3D-RA and 2D-SA during diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Radiation dose was assessed using the dose-area-product (DAP). The median patient age and weight were 12.5 years and 47.5 Kg, respectively. The median DAP of each 3D-RA acquisition was 1093µGy.m{sup 2} and 190µGy.m{sup 2} for each 2D-SA acquisition (p<0.01). In patients weighing more than 45Kg (n=7), this difference was attenuated but still significant (1525 µGy.m{sup 2} vs.413µGy.m{sup 2}, p=0.01). No difference was found between one 3D-RA and three 2D-SA (1525µGy.m{sup 2} vs.1238 µGy.m{sup 2}, p = 0.575) in this population. This difference was significantly higher in patients weighing less than 45Kg (n=9) (713µGy.m{sup 2} vs.81µGy.m{sup 2}, P = 0.008), even when comparing one 3D-RA with three 2D-SA (242µGy.m{sup 2}, respectively, p<0.008). 3D-RA was extremely useful for the assessment of conduits of univentricular hearts, tortuous branches of the pulmonary artery, and aorta relative to 2D-SA acquisitions. The radiation dose of 3D-RA used in our institution was higher than those previously reported in the literature and this difference was more evident in children. This type of assessment is of paramount importance when starting to perform 3D-RA.

  16. 3D-Conformal Versus Intensity-Modulated Postoperative Radiotherapy of Vaginal Vault: A Dosimetric Comparison

    We evaluated a step-and-shoot IMRT plan in the postoperative irradiation of the vaginal vault compared with equispaced beam arrangements (3-5) 3D-radiotherapy (RT) optimized plans. Twelve patients were included in this analysis. Four plans for each patient were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, homogeneity index (HI), and conformity index (CI): (1) 3 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (2) 4 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (3) 5 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (4) step-and-shoot IMRT technique. CI showed a good discrimination between the four plans. The mean scores of CI were 0.58 (range: 0.38-0.67) for the 3F-CRT plan, 0.58 (range: 0.41-0.66) for 4F-CRT, 0.62 (range: 0.43-0.68) for 5F-CRT and 0.69 (range: 0.58-0.78) for the IMRT plan. A significant improvement of the conformity was reached by the IMRT plan (p mean, V90%, V95%, V100% was recorded for rectal and bladder irradiation with the IMRT plan. Surprisingly, IMRT supplied a significant dose reduction also for rectum and bladder V30% and V50%. A significant dosimetric advantage of IMRT over 3D-RT in the adjuvant treatment of vaginal vault alone in terms of treatment conformity and rectum and bladder sparing is shown.

  17. Comparison of 3D TOF MRA with Contrast Enhanced MRA in Intracranial Atherosclerotic Occlusive Disease

    We compared diagnostic performance of 3D Time of flight MRA with contrast-enhanced MRA to detect and quantify intracranial atherosclerotic occlusive disease. From April 2007 to December 2009, we enrolled 95 patients with clinically suspected intracranial atherosclerotic steno-occlusive disease who had undergone 3D TOF-MRA and CE MRA at 1.5T or 3T with DSA. Two radiologists analyzed the post-processed images using a maximum intensity projection. Intracranial vessels were categorized as distal internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery or vertebrobasillar artery. We graded the degree of stenosis and assigned subjects to one of three groups: low grade occlusion (50% stenosis using DSA as a reference standard. CE MRA had 94.2% sensitivity, 88.1% specificity, 51% positive predictive value, 99.1% negative predictive value and 88.8% diagnostic accuracy for detecting >50% stenosis; In contrast, 3D TOF-MRA showed 94.2% sensitivity, 91.6.1% specificity, 59.8% positive predictive value, 99.1% negative predictive value and 91.9% diagnostic accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity of CE MRA were not significantly different than sensitivity and specificity of 3D TOF MRA (p >0.05). 3D TOF-MRA provides comparable diagnostic performance with CE-MRA for diagnosis intracranial atherosclerotic disease

  18. Comparison of Tomo-PIV and 3D-PTV for microfluidic flows

    Two 3D-3C velocimetry techniques for micro-scale measurements are compared: tomographic particle image velocimetry (Tomo-PIV) and 3D particle-tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV). Both methods are applied to experimental data from a confined shear-driven liquid droplet over a moving surface. The droplet has 200 μm height and 2 mm diameter. Micro 3D-PTV and Tomo-PIV are used to obtain the tracer particle distribution and the flow velocity field for the same set of images. It is shown that the reconstructed particle distributions are distinctly different, where Tomo-PIV returns a nearly uniform distribution over the height of the volume, as expected, and PTV reveals a clear peak in the particle distribution near the plane of focus. In Tomo-PIV, however, the reconstructed particle peak intensity decreases in proportion to the distance from the plane of focus. Due to the differences in particle distributions, the measured flow velocities are also different. In particular, we observe Tomo-PIV to be in closer agreement with mass conservation. Furthermore, the random noise level is found to increase with distance to the plane of focus at a higher rate for 3D-PTV as compared to Tomo-PIV. Thus, for a given noise threshold value, the latter method can measure reliably over a thicker volume. (paper)

  19. MR Imaging of the Internal Auditory Canal and Inner Ear at 3T: Comparison between 3D Driven Equilibrium and 3D Balanced Fast Field Echo Sequences

    Byun, Jun Soo; Kim, Hyung Jin; Yim, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keon Ha [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lee, Ji Won [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To compare the use of 3D driven equilibrium (DRIVE) imaging with 3D balanced fast field echo (bFFE) imaging in the assessment of the anatomic structures of the internal auditory canal (IAC) and inner ear at 3 Tesla (T). Thirty ears of 15 subjects (7 men and 8 women; age range, 22 71 years; average age, 50 years) without evidence of ear problems were examined on a whole-body 3T MR scanner with both 3D DRIVE and 3D bFFE sequences by using an 8-channel sensitivity encoding (SENSE) head coil. Two neuroradiologists reviewed both MR images with particular attention to the visibility of the anatomic structures, including four branches of the cranial nerves within the IAC, anatomic structures of the cochlea, vestibule, and three semicircular canals. Although both techniques provided images of relatively good quality, the 3D DRIVE sequence was somewhat superior to the 3D bFFE sequence. The discrepancies were more prominent for the basal turn of the cochlea, vestibule, and all semicircular canals, and were thought to be attributed to the presence of greater magnetic susceptibility artifacts inherent to gradient-echo techniques such as bFFE. Because of higher image quality and less susceptibility artifacts, we highly recommend the employment of 3D DRIVE imaging as the MR imaging choice for the IAC and inner ear

  20. Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac imaging on a 3T scanner with parallel RF transmission technique: prospective comparison of 3D-PSIR and 3D-IR

    Schultz, Anthony [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Radiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Nouvel Hopital Civil, Service de Radiologie, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Caspar, Thibault [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Cardiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Schaeffer, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Public Health and Biostatistics Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Labani, Aissam; Jeung, Mi-Young; El Ghannudi, Soraya; Roy, Catherine [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Radiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil, Strasbourg University Hospital, Radiology Department, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Universite de Strasbourg / CNRS, UMR 7357, iCube Laboratory, Illkirch (France)

    2016-06-15

    To qualitatively and quantitatively compare different late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) sequences acquired at 3T with a parallel RF transmission technique. One hundred and sixty participants prospectively enrolled underwent a 3T cardiac MRI with 3 different LGE sequences: 3D Phase-Sensitive Inversion-Recovery (3D-PSIR) acquired 5 minutes after injection, 3D Inversion-Recovery (3D-IR) at 9 minutes and 3D-PSIR at 13 minutes. All LGE-positive patients were qualitatively evaluated both independently and blindly by two radiologists using a 4-level scale, and quantitatively assessed with measurement of contrast-to-noise ratio and LGE maximal surface. Statistical analyses were calculated under a Bayesian paradigm using MCMC methods. Fifty patients (70 % men, 56yo ± 19) exhibited LGE (62 % were post-ischemic, 30 % related to cardiomyopathy and 8 % post-myocarditis). Early and late 3D-PSIR were superior to 3D-IR sequences (global quality, estimated coefficient IR > early-PSIR: -2.37 CI = [-3.46; -1.38], prob(coef > 0) = 0 % and late-PSIR > IR: 3.12 CI = [0.62; 4.41], prob(coef > 0) = 100 %), LGE surface estimated coefficient IR > early-PSIR: -0.09 CI = [-1.11; -0.74], prob(coef > 0) = 0 % and late-PSIR > IR: 0.96 CI = [0.77; 1.15], prob(coef > 0) = 100 %. Probabilities for late PSIR being superior to early PSIR concerning global quality and CNR were over 90 %, regardless of the aetiological subgroup. In 3T cardiac MRI acquired with parallel RF transmission technique, 3D-PSIR is qualitatively and quantitatively superior to 3D-IR. (orig.)

  1. Comparison of a unidirectional panoramic 3D endoluminal interpretation technique to traditional 2D and bidirectional 3D interpretation techniques at CT colonography: preliminary observations

    Lenhart, D.K.; Babb, J.; Bonavita, J.; Kim, D. [Department of Radiology, NYU Medical Center, 560 First Avenue, Suite HW-202, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Bini, E.J. [Department of Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, 560 First Avenue, Suite HW-202, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Megibow, A.J. [Department of Radiology, NYU Medical Center, 560 First Avenue, Suite HW-202, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Macari, M., E-mail: michael.macari@med.nyu.ed [Department of Radiology, NYU Medical Center, 560 First Avenue, Suite HW-202, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Aim: To compare the evaluation times and accuracy of unidirectional panoramic three-dimensional (3D) endoluminal interpretation to traditional two-dimensional (2D) and bidirectional 3D endoluminal techniques. materials and methods: Sixty-nine patients underwent computed tomography colonography (CTC) after bowel cleansing. Forty-five had no polyps and 24 had at least one polyp >=6 mm. Patients underwent same-day colonoscopy with segmental unblinding. Three experienced abdominal radiologists evaluated the data using one of three primary interpretation techniques: (1) 2D; (2) bidirectional 3D; (3) panoramic 3D. Mixed model analysis of variance and logistic regression for correlated data were used to compare techniques with respect to time and sensitivity and specificity. Results: Mean evaluation times were 8.6, 14.6, and 12.1 min, for 2D, 3D, and panoramic, respectively. 2D was faster than either 3D technique (p < 0.0001), and the panoramic technique was faster than bidirectional 3D (p = 0.0139). The overall sensitivity of each technique per polyp and per patient was 68.4 and 76.7% for 2D, 78.9 and 93.3% for 3D; and 78.9 and 86.7% for panoramic 3D. Conclusion: 2D interpretation was the fastest overall, the panoramic technique was significantly faster than the bidirectional with similar sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity for a single reader was significantly lower using the 2D technique. Each reader should select the technique with which they are most successful.

  2. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small (3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  3. A comparison calculation of FLUENT and MARS 3-D for the velocity field in the downcomer annulus

    A comparison calculation of velocity fields for the downcomer annulus of APR1400 has been performed for a conformation of the velocity similarity between MARS 3-D and FLUENT 3-D code results. The air discharge condition is considered to simulate a steam discharge condition during the late reflood phase of the APR1400 LBLOCA for the FLUENT simulation, while the steam discharge condition is considered for the MARS 3-D calculation. The downcomer model is a 1/4.93 length scaled model by the modified linear scaling law. To study the scale effects on the flow distribution, the velocity was varied from 1/1 to 1/4.29 for the model that is scaled down by the modified linear scaling law. It is found that the MARS and FLUENT results have the similar flow fields

  4. Comparison of 3D turbulence measurements using three staring wind lidars and a sonic anemometer

    Mann, Jakob; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Courtney, Michael; Parmentier, Remy; Mikkelsen, Torben; Wagner, Rozenn; Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Sjöholm, Mikael; Enevoldsen, Karen

    2009-01-01

    The goals are to compare lidar volume averaged wind measurement with point measurement reference sensors and to demonstrate the feasibility of performing 3D turbulence measurements with lidars. For that purpose three pulsed lidars were used in staring mode, placed so that their beams crossed close...... to a 3D sonic anemometer mounted at 78 m above the ground. The results show generally very good correlation between the lidar and the sonic times series, except that the variance of the velocity measured by the lidar is attenuated due to spatial filtering. The amount of attenuation can however be...

  5. Preoperative accuracy of selective laser sintering (SLS) in craniofacial 3D modeling. Comparison with patient CT Data

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of craniofacial 3D models produced in the standardized selective laser sintering (SLS) technique from multislice computed tomography (MSCT) data sets in comparison with patient data and to investigate the effect of potential causes of inaccuracies. Materials and methods: 19 models were considered and examined by MSCT. The patient CT data used for 3D modeling was analyzed and compared to the 3D model data. 15 anatomical landmarks were defined and 20 distances were digitally measured. The digital measurements of both CT data sets were compared to manually measured distances of the SLS model. Results: There was not a statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the measurements of the distances concerning all three groups (patient CT data, model CT data, manual measurement of the model). The mean values of the differences were between 0.5455 and -0.3214 mm. Conclusion: We found a high accuracy of SLS 3D models, which is due to a high precision in the modeling process and to the small voxel size of patient CT data achieved by MSCT. Anatomical landmarks in patient and model CT data sets and on the 3D model were able to be accurately reproduced, which is important for preoperative planning. (orig.)

  6. Online 3D terrain visualisation using Unity 3D game engine: A comparison of different contour intervals terrain data draped with UAV images

    Hafiz Mahayudin, Mohd; Che Mat, Ruzinoor

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to discuss on the effectiveness of visualising terrain draped with Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) images generated from different contour intervals using Unity 3D game engine in online environment. The study area that was tested in this project was oil palm plantation at Sintok, Kedah. The contour data used for this study are divided into three different intervals which are 1m, 3m and 5m. ArcGIS software were used to clip the contour data and also UAV images data to be similar size for the overlaying process. The Unity 3D game engine was used as the main platform for developing the system due to its capabilities which can be launch in different platform. The clipped contour data and UAV images data were process and exported into the web format using Unity 3D. Then process continue by publishing it into the web server for comparing the effectiveness of different 3D terrain data (contour data) draped with UAV images. The effectiveness is compared based on the data size, loading time (office and out-of-office hours), response time, visualisation quality, and frame per second (fps). The results were suggest which contour interval is better for developing an effective online 3D terrain visualisation draped with UAV images using Unity 3D game engine. It therefore benefits decision maker and planner related to this field decide on which contour is applicable for their task.

  7. A Comparison of Iterative 2D-3D Pose Estimation Methods for Real-Time Applications

    Grest, Daniel; Krüger, Volker; Petersen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This work compares iterative 2D-3D Pose Estimation methods for use in real-time applications. The compared methods are available for public as C++ code. One method is part of the openCV library, namely POSIT. Because POSIT is not applicable for planar 3Dpoint congurations, we include the planar...

  8. Evaluation of Gastric Volumes: Comparison of 3-D Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Buisman, Wijnand J; Mauritz, Femke A; Westerhuis, Wouter E; Gilja, Odd Helge; van der Zee, David C; van Herwaarden-Lindeboom, Maud Y A

    2016-07-01

    To investigate gastric accommodation, accurate measurements of gastric volumes are necessary. An excellent technique to measure gastric volumes is dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, dynamic MRI is expensive and not always available. A new 3-D ultrasound (US) method using a matrix transducer was developed to measure gastric volumes. In this prospective study, 14 healthy volunteers underwent a dynamic MRI and a 3-D US. Gastric volumes were calculated with intra-gastric liquid content and total gastric volume. Mean postprandial liquid gastric content was 397 ± 96.5 mL. Mean volume difference was 1.0 mL with limits of agreement of -8.9 to 10.9 mL. When gastric air was taken into account, mean total gastric volume was 540 ± 115.4 mL SD. Mean volume difference was 2.3 mL with limits of agreement of -21.1 to 26.4 mL. The matrix 3-D US showed excellent agreement with dynamic MRI. Therefore matrix 3-D US is a reliable alternative to measure gastric volumes. PMID:27067418

  9. Domestic comparison of radiation treatment techniques for breast cancer: 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT

    The purpose of this study is to compare method in the treatment of breast cancer using dose index. And, it is to find the optimized treatment technique to the patient. The phantom filled with tissue-equivalent material were used simulation and treatment as techniques of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT was planned using Eclipse v10. By using HI(homogeneity index), CI(Conformity index), OE (Organ equivalent dose), EAR(Excess Absolute Risk), were assessed for each treatment plans. HI and CI of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT were calculated 16.89, 11.21, 9.55 and 0.59, 0.61, 0.83. The organ average doses of Lt lung, Rt lung, liver, heart, esophagus, cord, Lt breast, trachea and stomach were 0.01 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.36 ∼ 5.01 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 2.49 Gy, 0.14 ∼ 6.92 Gy, 0.03 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.06 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 6.08 Gy, 0.08 ∼ 0.59 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.34 Gy, respectively. The OED, EAR of the IMRT and VMAT show higher than 3D-CRT. As the result of this study, we could confirm being higher dose index(HI, CI) in IMRT and VMAT than 3D-CRT, but doses of around normal organs was higher IMRT, VMAT than 3D-CRT

  10. Comparison: RELAP5-3D systems analysis code and fluent CFD code momentum equation formulations

    Recently the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), in conjunction with Fluent Corporation, have developed a new analysis tool by coupling the Fluent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to the RELAP5-3D advanced thermal-hydraulic analysis code. This tool enables researchers to perform detailed, two- or three-dimensional analyses using Fluent's CFD capability while the boundary conditions required by the Fluent calculation are provided by the balance-of-system model created using RELAP5-3D. Fluent and RELAP5-3D have strengths that complement one another. CFD codes, such as Fluent, are commonly used to analyze the flow behavior in regions of a system where complex flow patterns are expected or present. On the other hand, RELAP5-3D was developed to analyze the behavior of two-phase systems that could be modeled in one-dimension. Empirical relationships were used where first-principle physics were not well developed. Both Fluent and RELAP5-3D are exemplary in their areas of specialization. The differences between Fluent and RELAP5 fundamentally stem from their field equations. This study focuses on the differences between the momentum equation representations in the two codes (the continuity equation formulations are equivalent for single phase flow). First the differences between the momentum equations are summarized. Next the effect of the differences in the momentum equations are examined by comparing the results obtained using both codes to study the same problem, i.e., fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. Finally, conclusions regarding the significance of the differences are given. (author)

  11. Domestic comparison of radiation treatment techniques for breast cancer: 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Lee, Bo Ram; Yoon, Myong Geun [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yusung Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare method in the treatment of breast cancer using dose index. And, it is to find the optimized treatment technique to the patient. The phantom filled with tissue-equivalent material were used simulation and treatment as techniques of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT was planned using Eclipse v10. By using HI(homogeneity index), CI(Conformity index), OE (Organ equivalent dose), EAR(Excess Absolute Risk), were assessed for each treatment plans. HI and CI of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT were calculated 16.89, 11.21, 9.55 and 0.59, 0.61, 0.83. The organ average doses of Lt lung, Rt lung, liver, heart, esophagus, cord, Lt breast, trachea and stomach were 0.01 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.36 ∼ 5.01 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 2.49 Gy, 0.14 ∼ 6.92 Gy, 0.03 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.06 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 6.08 Gy, 0.08 ∼ 0.59 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.34 Gy, respectively. The OED, EAR of the IMRT and VMAT show higher than 3D-CRT. As the result of this study, we could confirm being higher dose index(HI, CI) in IMRT and VMAT than 3D-CRT, but doses of around normal organs was higher IMRT, VMAT than 3D-CRT.

  12. A comparison of 3-D data correlation methods for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is currently used to treat patients who are not good candidates for conventional neurosurgical procedures. For treatments of nonvascular tumor cells, it appears that fractionation offers a radiobiological advantage between tumor and normal tissues. Therefore, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) is preferred because it minimizes normal tissue complications and maximizes local tumor control probability. We have implemented a methodology clinically to perform the noninvasive patient repositioning technique. The 3-D data correlation method for high-precision and multiple fraction stereotactic treatments has been presented. Methods and Materials: Three different optimization algorithms (Hooke and Jeeves optimization, simplex optimization, and simulated annealing optimization) are evaluated to calculate the transformation parameters necessary for FSR. A least-square object function is created to perform the 3-D data matching process. By minimizing the unconstrained object function value the best fit can be approached for the reference 3-D data sets. Simulation shows that these algorithms deliver results that are comparable to the previously published correlation algorithm (singular value decomposition [SVD] method). The advantage for optimization algorithms is easily understood and can be readily implemented by using a personal computer (PC). The mathematical framework provides a tool to calculate the transformation matrix which can be used to adjust patient position for fractionated treatments. Therefore, using these algorithms for a high-precision fractionated treatment is possible without an invasive repeat fixation device and has been implemented clinically. A bite plate system was incorporated to acquire 3-D patient data. With a 3-D digital camera localization device, the patient motion can be followed in real time with the system calibrated to the isocenter. Results: Two types of data sets are utilized to study the

  13. SU-E-T-472: A Multi-Dimensional Measurements Comparison to Analyze a 3D Patient Specific QA Tool

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate a 3D patient specific QA tool using 2D film and 3D Presage dosimetry. Methods: A brain IMRT case was delivered to Delta4, EBT2 film and Presage plastic dosimeter. The film was inserted in the solid water slabs at 7.5cm depth for measurement. The Presage dosimeter was inserted into a head phantom for 3D dose measurement. Delta4's Anatomy software was used to calculate the corresponding dose to the film in solid water slabs and to Presage in the head phantom. The results from Anatomy were compared to both calculated results from Eclipse and measured dose from film and Presage to evaluate its accuracy. Using RIT software, we compared the “Anatomy” dose to the EBT2 film measurement and the film measurement to ECLIPSE calculation. For 3D analysis, DICOM file of “Anatomy” was extracted and imported to CERR software, which was used to compare the Presage dose to both “Anatomy” calculation and ECLIPSE calculation. Gamma criteria of 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm was used for comparison. Results: Gamma passing rates of film vs “Anatomy”, “Anatomy” vs ECLIPSE and film vs ECLIPSE were 82.8%, 70.9% and 87.6% respectively when 3% - 3mm criteria is used. When the criteria is changed to 5% - 5mm, the passing rates became 87.8%, 76.3% and 90.8% respectively. For 3D analysis, Anatomy vs ECLIPSE showed gamma passing rate of 86.4% and 93.3% for 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm respectively. The rate is 77.0% for Presage vs ECLIPSE analysis. The Anatomy vs ECLIPSE were absolute dose comparison. However, film and Presage analysis were relative comparison Conclusion: The results show higher passing rate in 3D than 2D in “Anatomy” software. This could be due to the higher degrees of freedom in 3D than in 2D for gamma analysis

  14. SU-E-T-472: A Multi-Dimensional Measurements Comparison to Analyze a 3D Patient Specific QA Tool

    Ashmeg, S; Jackson, J; Zhang, Y; Oldham, M; Yin, F; Ren, L [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate a 3D patient specific QA tool using 2D film and 3D Presage dosimetry. Methods: A brain IMRT case was delivered to Delta4, EBT2 film and Presage plastic dosimeter. The film was inserted in the solid water slabs at 7.5cm depth for measurement. The Presage dosimeter was inserted into a head phantom for 3D dose measurement. Delta4's Anatomy software was used to calculate the corresponding dose to the film in solid water slabs and to Presage in the head phantom. The results from Anatomy were compared to both calculated results from Eclipse and measured dose from film and Presage to evaluate its accuracy. Using RIT software, we compared the “Anatomy” dose to the EBT2 film measurement and the film measurement to ECLIPSE calculation. For 3D analysis, DICOM file of “Anatomy” was extracted and imported to CERR software, which was used to compare the Presage dose to both “Anatomy” calculation and ECLIPSE calculation. Gamma criteria of 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm was used for comparison. Results: Gamma passing rates of film vs “Anatomy”, “Anatomy” vs ECLIPSE and film vs ECLIPSE were 82.8%, 70.9% and 87.6% respectively when 3% - 3mm criteria is used. When the criteria is changed to 5% - 5mm, the passing rates became 87.8%, 76.3% and 90.8% respectively. For 3D analysis, Anatomy vs ECLIPSE showed gamma passing rate of 86.4% and 93.3% for 3% - 3mm and 5% - 5mm respectively. The rate is 77.0% for Presage vs ECLIPSE analysis. The Anatomy vs ECLIPSE were absolute dose comparison. However, film and Presage analysis were relative comparison Conclusion: The results show higher passing rate in 3D than 2D in “Anatomy” software. This could be due to the higher degrees of freedom in 3D than in 2D for gamma analysis.

  15. Frontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: Comparisons with schizophrenia

    Hennessy, Robin J.; Baldwin, Patrizia A; Browne, David J.; Kinsella, Anthony; Waddington, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Any developmental relationship between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia engenders continuing debate. As the brain and face emerge in embryological intimacy, brain dysmorphogenesis is accompanied by facial dysmorphogenesis. 3D laser surface imaging was used to capture the facial surface of 13 male and 14 female patients with bipolar disorder in comparison with 61 male and 75 female control subjects and with 37 male and 32 female patients with schizophrenia. Surface images were analysed using...

  16. Detection of tibial condylar fractures using 3D imaging with a mobile image amplifier (Siemens ISO-C-3D): Comparison with plain films and spiral CT

    Purpose: To analyze a prototype mobile C-arm 3D image amplifier in the detection and classification of experimental tibial condylar fractures with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Method: Human knee specimens (n=22) with tibial condylar fractures were examined with a prototype C-arm (ISO-C-3D, Siemens AG), plain films (CR) and spiral CT (CT). The motorized C-arm provides fluoroscopic images during a 190 orbital rotation computing a 119 mm data cube. From these 3D data sets MP reconstructions were obtained. All images were evaluated by four independent readers for the detection and assessment of fracture lines. All fractures were classified according to the Mueller AO classification. To confirm the results, the specimens were finally surgically dissected. Results: 97% of the tibial condylar fractures were easily seen and correctly classified according to the Mueller AO classification on MP reconstruction of the ISO-C-3D. There is no significant difference between ISO-C and CT in detection and correct classification of fractures, but ISO-CD-3D is significant by better than CR. (orig.)

  17. Comparison of 3-D Synthetic Aperture Phased-Array Ultrasound Imaging and Parallel Beamforming

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that synthetic apertureimaging (SAI) can be used to achieve real-time 3-D ultra-sound phased-array imaging. It investigates whether SAI in-creases the image quality compared with the parallel beam-forming (PB) technique for real-time 3-D imaging. Data areobtained using both...... simulations and measurements with anultrasound research scanner and a commercially available 3.5-MHz 1024-element 2-D transducer array. To limit the probecable thickness, 256 active elements are used in transmit andreceive for both techniques. The two imaging techniques weredesigned for cardiac imaging, which...... requires sequences de-signed for imaging down to 15cm of depth and a frame rateof at least 20Hz. The imaging quality of the two techniquesis investigated through simulations as a function of depth andangle. SAI improved the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at low steering angles by 35%, and the 20-d...

  18. 3-D NUMERICAL STUDY AND COMPARISON OF ECCENTRIC AND CONCENTRIC ANNULAR-FINNED TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS

    FAROUK TAHROUR; ABDELMOUMENE HAKIM BENMACHICHE; MOUNIR AKSAS; CHERIF BOUGRIOU

    2015-01-01

    The use of 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is proposed to simulate the conjugate conduction-convection of heat transfer problems in eccentric annularfinned tube heat exchangers. The numerical simulation results allow us to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient over fin surfaces, the fin efficiency and the pressure drop. The aim of the present paper is to determine the optimum tube position in the circular fin that maximizes heat dissipation and minimizes pressure drop. In addition, th...

  19. Epileptogenic lesion quantification in MRI using contralateral 3D texture comparisons

    Jiménez del Toro, Oscar Alfonso; Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Vargas Gomez, Maria-Isabel; Müller, Henning; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disorder of the brain that can lead to acute crisis and if possible an intervention can help patients. The exact localization of epileptogenic lesions influences the outcome of epilepsy surgery. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is clinically used for lesion detection and treatment planning, mainly through simple visual analysis. However, visual inspection in MR imaging can be highly subjective and subtle 3D structural abnormalities can be missclassified or not resected completely...

  20. 2D/1D approximations to the 3D neutron transport equation. II: Numerical comparisons

    In a companion paper [1], (i) several new '2D/1D equations' are introduced as accurate approximations to the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, (ii) the simplest of these approximate equations is systematically discretized, and (iii) a theoretically stable iteration scheme is developed to solve the discrete equations. In this paper, numerical results are presented that confirm the theoretical predictions made in [1]. (authors)

  1. Comparison of 2D and 3D sequences for MRCP. Clinical value of the different techniques

    Magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreaticograpy (MRCP) is a non-invasive imaging modality of the pancreatico-biliary system which plays an increasingly important role in the clinical and diagnostic workup of patients with biliary or pancreatic diseases. The present review is designed to give an overview of the currently available and appropriate sequences, their technical background, as well as new developments and their relevance to the various clinical issues and challenges. The impact of the latest technical innovations, such as integrated parallel imaging techniques and navigator-based respiratory triggering, on the diagnostic capacities of MRCP is discussed. In this context, the individual value of RARE, T2w single shot turbo/fast spin echo (SSFSE) and the recently introduced 3D T2w turbo/fast spin echo sequences (T2w 3D-T/FSE) is reviewed. RARE imaging may be preferred in severely ill patients with limitations in cooperation, SSFSE is particularly effective in differentiating benign and malignant stenosis, and 3D-FSE offers additional advantages in the detection of small biliary concrements. (orig.)

  2. Pediatric craniofacial surgery: comparison of milling and stereolithography for 3D model manufacturing

    To improve the planning for pediatric craniofacial surger, 3D reconstructions of CT image series were performed on a personal computer. For construction of true models of the surgical site, two concepts were pursued. CT image data of six patients were used for model manufacturing by a conventional 2 1/2 axis milling system. The material used was polyurethane foam. Alternatively, in one patient a stereolithography was produced on the basis of the 3D reconstructed CT data. This new manufacturing device uses a photocurable monomer, hardened by a UV-laser. The spatial resolution of the system is about 0.1 mm. 3D-reconstructions were performed on a personal computer. Data were then transferred into a surface oriented structure to control a stereolithographic modeling device. Time for transfer was 70 min. The production of the modelled cranium took a total time of 59 h. Accuracy was found to be much higher in sterolithography than in milled models. The model served for surgical planning. The long time for production was caused by inadequate computer capacities, which are configured for much less complex objects in computer aided design. Furthermore the programs for the machine control are optimized for technical purposes. If theses conditions are improved, stereolithography could be an attractive alternative to milling of medical models. (orig.)

  3. Comprehensive comparison of large-scale tissue expression datasets

    Alberto Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For tissues to carry out their functions, they rely on the right proteins to be present. Several high-throughput technologies have been used to map out which proteins are expressed in which tissues; however, the data have not previously been systematically compared and integrated. We present a comprehensive evaluation of tissue expression data from a variety of experimental techniques and show that these agree surprisingly well with each other and with results from literature curation and text mining. We further found that most datasets support the assumed but not demonstrated distinction between tissue-specific and ubiquitous expression. By developing comparable confidence scores for all types of evidence, we show that it is possible to improve both quality and coverage by combining the datasets. To facilitate use and visualization of our work, we have developed the TISSUES resource (http://tissues.jensenlab.org, which makes all the scored and integrated data available through a single user-friendly web interface.

  4. PPPs for Industry Output: A New Dataset for International Comparisons

    Timmer, Marcel; Ypma, Gerard; van Ark, Bart

    2007-01-01

    International comparisons of output, prices and productivity have been hampered by the unavailability of comprehensive sets of PPPs at the industry level. Existing expenditure PPPs and production PPPs both have their limitations. This paper proposes to use a mix of both for industry level comparisons. On the basis of a supply-use framework, the paper identifies how expenditure prices and output prices are conceptually related. It developscriteria on the basis of which an optimal mix of expend...

  5. Comparison of S3D Display Technology on Image Quality and Viewing Experiences: Active-Shutter 3d TV vs. Passive-Polarized 3DTV

    Yu-Chi Tai, PhD; Leigh Gongaware, BS; Andrew Reder, BS; John Hayes, PhD; James Sheedy, OD, PhD

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stereoscopic 3D TV systems convey depth perception to the viewer by delivering to each eye separately filtered images that represent two slightly different perspectives. Currently two primary technologies are used in S3D televisions: Active shutter systems, which use alternate frame sequencing to deliver a full-frame image to one eye at a time at a fast refresh rate, and Passive polarized systems, which superimpose the two half-frame left-eye and right-eye images at th...

  6. Comparison of Supernovae datasets Constraints on Dark Energy

    Chengwu, Z; Baorong, C; Hongya, L; Chengwu, Zhang; Lixin, Xu; Baorong, Chang; Hongya, Liu

    2007-01-01

    Cosmological measurements suggest that our universe contains a dark energy component. In order to study the dark energy evolution, we constrain a parameterized dark energy equation of state $w(z)=w_0 + w_1 \\frac{z}{1+z}$ using the recent observational datasets: 157 Gold type Ia supernovae and the newly released 182 Gold type Ia supernovae by maximum likelihood method. It is found that the best fit $w(z)$ crosses -1 in the past and the present best fit value of $w(0)<-1$ obtained from 157 Gold type Ia supernovae. The crossing of -1 is not realized and $w_0=-1$ is not ruled out in $1\\sigma$ confidence level for the 182 Gold type Ia supernovae. We also find that the range of parameter $w_0$ is wide even in $1\\sigma$ confidence level and the best fit $w(z)$ is sensitive to the prior of $\\Omega_m$.

  7. Generation and Comparison of Tls and SFM Based 3d Models of Solid Shapes in Hydromechanic Research

    Zhang, R.; Schneider, D.; Strauß, B.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of a current study at the Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Technical Hydromechanics at TU Dresden is to develop a new injection method for quick and economic sealing of dikes or dike bodies, based on a new synthetic material. To validate the technique, an artificial part of a sand dike was built in an experimental hall. The synthetic material was injected, which afterwards spreads in the inside of the dike. After the material was fully solidified, the surrounding sand was removed with an excavator. In this paper, two methods, which applied terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and structure from motion (SfM) respectively, for the acquisition of a 3D point cloud of the remaining shapes are described and compared. Combining with advanced software packages, a triangulated 3D model was generated and subsequently the volume of vertical sections of the shape were calculated. As the calculation of the volume revealed differences between the TLS and the SfM 3D model, a thorough qualitative comparison of the two models will be presented as well as a detailed accuracy assessment. The main influence of the accuracy is caused by generalisation in case of gaps due to occlusions in the 3D point cloud. Therefore, improvements for the data acquisition with TLS and SfM for such kind of objects are suggested in the paper.

  8. GENERATION AND COMPARISON OF TLS AND SFM BASED 3D MODELS OF SOLID SHAPES IN HYDROMECHANIC RESEARCH

    R. Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of a current study at the Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Technical Hydromechanics at TU Dresden is to develop a new injection method for quick and economic sealing of dikes or dike bodies, based on a new synthetic material. To validate the technique, an artificial part of a sand dike was built in an experimental hall. The synthetic material was injected, which afterwards spreads in the inside of the dike. After the material was fully solidified, the surrounding sand was removed with an excavator. In this paper, two methods, which applied terrestrial laser scanning (TLS and structure from motion (SfM respectively, for the acquisition of a 3D point cloud of the remaining shapes are described and compared. Combining with advanced software packages, a triangulated 3D model was generated and subsequently the volume of vertical sections of the shape were calculated. As the calculation of the volume revealed differences between the TLS and the SfM 3D model, a thorough qualitative comparison of the two models will be presented as well as a detailed accuracy assessment. The main influence of the accuracy is caused by generalisation in case of gaps due to occlusions in the 3D point cloud. Therefore, improvements for the data acquisition with TLS and SfM for such kind of objects are suggested in the paper.

  9. A comparison of 3-D data correlation methods for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR)

    Purpose/Objective: Stereotactic Radiosurgery is currently used to treat patients who are not good candidates for conventional neurosurgical procedures. For treatments of nonvascular tumor cells, it appears that fractionation will offer a radiological advantage between tumor and normal tissues. Therefore, Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSR) is preferred because it minimizes normal tissue complications and maximizes local tumor control probability. We have implemented a methodology clinically to perform the non-invasive patient repositioning technique. The 3-D data correlation method for high precision and multiple fraction stereotactic treatments has been presented. Materials and Methods: Three different optimization algorithms (Hooke and Jeeves optimization, Simplex optimization, and Simulated Annealing optimization) are evaluated to calculate the transformation parameters necessary for FSR. These algorithms are based on rigid body transformation in which the patient surfaces are considered as reference. A least-square object function is created to perform the 3-D data matching process. By minimizing the unconstrained object function value the best fit can be approached for the reference 3-D data sets. Simulation shows that these algorithms give results which are comparable to the previously published correlation algorithm (Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method). The advantage is that these algorithms are easily understood and can be readily implemented using a personal computer. The mathematical framework provides a tool to calculate the transformation matrix which can be used to adjust patient position for fractionated treatment. Therefore, using these algorithms for a high precision fractionated treatment is possible without invasive repeat fixation device. A bite plate system was incorporated to acquire 3-D patient data. With 3-D digital camera localization device, the patient motion can be followed in real time with the system calibrated to the

  10. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4 to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4 in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23.000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selected (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. This benchmark shows 2 main points. First, independent replicas are an appropriate method to achieve a fare variance estimation when dominance ratio is near 1. Secondly, the diffusion operator with 2 energy groups gives satisfactory results compared to TRIPOLI-4 even with a highly heterogeneous neutron flux map and an harder spectrum

  11. Modeling 3-D flow in the mantle wedge with complex slab geometries: Comparisons with seismic anisotropy

    Kincaid, C. R.; MacDougall, J. G.; Druken, K. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding patterns in plate scale mantle flow in subduction zones is key to models of thermal structure, dehydration reactions, volatile distributions and magma generation and transport in convergent margins. Different patterns of flow in the mantle wedge can generate distinct signatures in seismological observables. Observed shear wave fast polarization directions in several subduction zones are inconsistent with predictions of simple 2-D wedge corner flow. Geochemical signatures in a number of subduction zones also indicate 3-D flow and entrainment patterns in the wedge. We report on a series of laboratory experiments on subduction driven flow to characterize spatial and temporal variability in 3-D patterns in flow and shear-induced finite strain. Cases focus on how rollback subduction, along-strike dip changes in subducting plates and evolving gaps or tears in subduction zones control temporal-spatial patterns in 3-D wedge flow. Models utilize a glucose working fluid with a temperature dependent viscosity to represent the upper 2000 km of the mantle. Subducting lithosphere is modeled with two rubber-reinforced continuous belts. Belts pass around trench and upper/lower mantle rollers. The deeper rollers can move laterally to allow for time varying dip angle. Each belt has independent speed control and dip adjustment, allowing for along-strike changes in convergence rate and the evolution of slab gaps. Rollback is modeled using a translation system to produce either uniform and asymmetric lateral trench motion. Neutral density finite strain markers are distributed throughout the fluid and used as proxies for tracking the evolution of anisotropy through space and time in the evolving flow fields. Particle image velocimetry methods are also used to track time varying 3-D velocity fields for directly calculating anisotropy patterns. Results show that complex plate motions (rollback, steepening) and morphologies (gaps) in convergent margins produce flows with

  12. A comparison of 3-D model predictions of Mars' oxygen corona with early MAVEN IUVS observations

    Lee, Yuni; Combi, Michael R.; Tenishev, Valeriy; Bougher, Stephen W.; Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas M.; McClintock, William E.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2015-11-01

    We have compared our 3-D hot O corona model predictions with the OI 130.4 nm emission detected by Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph/Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (IUVS/MAVEN) based completely on our best pre-MAVEN understanding of the 3-D structure of the thermosphere and ionosphere. The model was simulated appropriately for the observational conditions. In addition to dissociative recombination (DR) of O2+, DR of CO2+ is also considered as an important hot O source. The model predictions showed excellent agreement with the transition altitude, the observed altitude variation of density, and the spatial variation of the corona with respect to the Mars-Sun geometry. While previous models predicted escape rates covering a range of nearly 100, the brightness of the modeled hot O densities is a factor of ~1.5 lower than the observations. We discuss possible changes to the model that could come from further analysis of MAVEN measurements and that might close the gap between the modeled and observed brightness.

  13. Comparison of User Performance with Interactive and Static 3d Visualization - Pilot Study

    Herman, L.; Stachoň, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Interactive 3D visualizations of spatial data are currently available and popular through various applications such as Google Earth, ArcScene, etc. Several scientific studies have focused on user performance with 3D visualization, but static perspective views are used as stimuli in most of the studies. The main objective of this paper is to try to identify potential differences in user performance with static perspective views and interactive visualizations. This research is an exploratory study. An experiment was designed as a between-subject study and a customized testing tool based on open web technologies was used for the experiment. The testing set consists of an initial questionnaire, a training task and four experimental tasks. Selection of the highest point and determination of visibility from the top of a mountain were used as the experimental tasks. Speed and accuracy of each task performance of participants were recorded. The movement and actions in the virtual environment were also recorded within the interactive variant. The results show that participants deal with the tasks faster when using static visualization. The average error rate was also higher in the static variant. The findings from this pilot study will be used for further testing, especially for formulating of hypotheses and designing of subsequent experiments.

  14. Accuracy assessment of 3D bone reconstructions using CT: an intro comparison.

    Lalone, Emily A; Willing, Ryan T; Shannon, Hannah L; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography provides high contrast imaging of the joint anatomy and is used routinely to reconstruct 3D models of the osseous and cartilage geometry (CT arthrography) for use in the design of orthopedic implants, for computer assisted surgeries and computational dynamic and structural analysis. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of bone and cartilage surface model reconstructions by comparing reconstructed geometries with bone digitizations obtained using an optical tracking system. Bone surface digitizations obtained in this study determined the ground truth measure for the underlying geometry. We evaluated the use of a commercially available reconstruction technique using clinical CT scanning protocols using the elbow joint as an example of a surface with complex geometry. To assess the accuracies of the reconstructed models (8 fresh frozen cadaveric specimens) against the ground truth bony digitization-as defined by this study-proximity mapping was used to calculate residual error. The overall mean error was less than 0.4 mm in the cortical region and 0.3 mm in the subchondral region of the bone. Similarly creating 3D cartilage surface models from CT scans using air contrast had a mean error of less than 0.3 mm. Results from this study indicate that clinical CT scanning protocols and commonly used and commercially available reconstruction algorithms can create models which accurately represent the true geometry. PMID:26037323

  15. PIV measurement of the flow field in a domestic refrigerator model: Comparison with 3D simulations

    Ben Amara, S.; Laguerre, O.; Flick, D. [UMR Genie Industriel Alimentaire (Cemagref-AgroParisTech-INRA) - Cemagref, Parc de Tourvoie, BP 44, 92185 Antony Cedex (France); Charrier-Mojtabi, M.-C.; Lartigue, B. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Laboratoire PHASE, E.A. 3208, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2008-12-15

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) measurements of flow field due to natural convection in a parallelepipedic enclosure representing a domestic refrigerator model (scale 1) have been undertaken in order to determine the thickness of the hydrodynamic boundary layers and to study the flow motions depending on the boundary conditions applied on the vertical walls. One of the vertical walls is maintained at a negative and constant temperature either on the totality or on one part of its surface: this wall acts as the evaporator. The other walls are in contact with external air at constant temperature. The velocity measurements have been made in the symmetry plane of the enclosure. Unsteady recirculations have been observed at the bottom of the cavity. The influence of both the temperature and the dimension of the cold wall has been studied. Numerical simulations using CFD software (Fluent) have been then performed. In the numerical model, we assumed that the temperature of the evaporator is constant while an uniform global heat transfer coefficient has been used to describe the heat exchange with the external air at constant temperature. We considered laminar 3D flows and took into account the heat transfer by radiation between the different walls of the cavity. The results obtained with the 3D numerical simulations are in quite good agreement with the experimental airflow measurements using the PIV technique. (author)

  16. Comparison of different 3D navigation systems by a clinical "user".

    Cartellieri, M; Kremser, J; Vorbeck, F

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional navigation systems are routinely used in endoscopic skull base surgery, neurosurgery, maxillo-facial and endoscopic sinus surgery. Their precision can, however, change in the course of one experiment. We have compared five different 3D navigation systems and discuss here possible reasons for the limits of system precision. A plexiglass cube on which test points were marked served as a test-model. Two well-trained system users measured the distances between the test points in each of the five systems. The results were compared with reference data provided by the NUMEREX device at the Technical University of Vienna. The accuracy data shown by all these 3D navigation systems ranged from 0.0 mm to 6.67 mm. The accuracy data of a system calculated in advance did not always correspond with the system precision on the screen. The system precision in the center of the cube was higher than on its surface, which made us conclude that the angle between the tracker system and the pointing device touching the test point may be critical for system precision. Applying an automatic registration step did not result in greater system precision. Slice thickness and the angle of the pointing device seem to be responsible for system precision. PMID:11271433

  17. Magnetotelluric 3-D inversion—a review of two successful workshops on forward and inversion code testing and comparison

    Miensopust, Marion P.; Queralt, Pilar; Jones, Alan G.; 3D MT modellers

    2013-06-01

    Over the last half decade the need for, and importance of, three-dimensional (3-D) modelling of magnetotelluric (MT) data have increased dramatically and various 3-D forward and inversion codes are in use and some have become commonly available. Comparison of forward responses and inversion results is an important step for code testing and validation prior to `production' use. The various codes use different mathematical approximations to the problem (finite differences, finite elements or integral equations), various orientations of the coordinate system, different sign conventions for the time dependence and various inversion strategies. Additionally, the obtained results are dependent on data analysis, selection and correction as well as on the chosen mesh, inversion parameters and regularization adopted, and therefore, a careful and knowledge-based use of the codes is essential. In 2008 and 2011, during two workshops at the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies over 40 people from academia (scientists and students) and industry from around the world met to discuss 3-D MT inversion. These workshops brought together a mix of code writers as well as code users to assess the current status of 3-D modelling, to compare the results of different codes, and to discuss and think about future improvements and new aims in 3-D modelling. To test the numerical forward solutions, two 3-D models were designed to compare the responses obtained by different codes and/or users. Furthermore, inversion results of these two data sets and two additional data sets obtained from unknown models (secret models) were also compared. In this manuscript the test models and data sets are described (supplementary files are available) and comparisons of the results are shown. Details regarding the used data, forward and inversion parameters as well as computational power are summarized for each case, and the main discussion points of the workshops are reviewed. In general, the responses

  18. Comparison of radiographs, axial CT, 2D and 3D reconstruction in unstable operated vertebral lesions

    During a period of 16 months about 70 patients suffering from an unstable spinel injury were operated in the surgical department of our clinic. In 50 of these patients it was possible to correlate the results of preoperative radiography and CT with the operative findings. Several cases of distraction instability in the dorsal column had not been recognised in the preoperative evaluation. Therefore the rationale of this study was the question as to whether modern CT technology can help to avoid such wrong diagnoses. For that purpose radiographs, axial CT-scans of 2 mm thickness or less, sagittal and coronal 2D and (in 35 cases) 3D reconstructions were re-evaluated step by step by a specifically trained radiologist without knowing the operative findings. 15 additional lesions out of 28 were demonstrated and specifically classified as distraction instabilities of the dorsal column using the improved CT technology. (orig.)

  19. Comparison between the 3D numerical simulation and experiment of the bubble near different boundaries

    ZHANG AMan; YAO XiongLiang; LI Jia; GUO Jun

    2008-01-01

    Based on the potential flow theory,the vortex ring is introduced to simulate the toroidal bubble,and the boundary element method is applied to simulate the evo-lution of the bubble.Elastic-plasticity of structure being taken into account,the interaction between the bubble and the elastic-plastic structure is computed by combining the boundary element method (BEM) and the finite element method (FEM),and a corresponding 3D computing program is developed.This program is used to simulate the three-dimensional bubble dynamics in free field,near wall and near the elastic-plastic structure,and the numerical results are compared with the existing experimental results.The error is within 10%.The effects of different boundaries upon the bubble dynamics are presented by studying the bubble dy-namics near different boundaries.

  20. Comparison between the 3D numerical simulation and experiment of the bubble near different boundaries

    2008-01-01

    Based on the potential flow theory, the vortex ring is introduced to simulate the toroidal bubble, and the boundary element method is applied to simulate the evo- lution of the bubble. Elastic-plasticity of structure being taken into account, the interaction between the bubble and the elastic-plastic structure is computed by combining the boundary element method (BEM) and the finite element method (FEM), and a corresponding 3D computing program is developed. This program is used to simulate the three-dimensional bubble dynamics in free field, near wall and near the elastic-plastic structure, and the numerical results are compared with the existing experimental results. The error is within 10%. The effects of different boundaries upon the bubble dynamics are presented by studying the bubble dy- namics near different boundaries.

  1. Modeling of Neuronal Growth In Vitro: Comparison of Simulation Tools NETMORPH and CX3D

    Aćimović J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We simulate the growth of neuronal networks using the two recently published tools, NETMORPH and CX3D. The goals of the work are (1 to examine and compare the simulation tools, (2 to construct a model of growth of neocortical cultures, and (3 to characterize the changes in network connectivity during growth, using standard graph theoretic methods. Parameters for the neocortical culture are chosen after consulting both the experimental and the computational work presented in the literature. The first (three weeks in culture are known to be a time of development of extensive dendritic and axonal arbors and establishment of synaptic connections between the neurons. We simulate the growth of networks from day 1 to day 21. It is shown that for the properly selected parameters, the simulators can reproduce the experimentally obtained connectivity. The selected graph theoretic methods can capture the structural changes during growth.

  2. Deriving 3d Point Clouds from Terrestrial Photographs - Comparison of Different Sensors and Software

    Niederheiser, Robert; Mokroš, Martin; Lange, Julia; Petschko, Helene; Prasicek, Günther; Oude Elberink, Sander

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry nowadays offers a reasonably cheap, intuitive and effective approach to 3D-modelling. However, the important choice, which sensor and which software to use is not straight forward and needs consideration as the choice will have effects on the resulting 3D point cloud and its derivatives. We compare five different sensors as well as four different state-of-the-art software packages for a single application, the modelling of a vegetated rock face. The five sensors represent different resolutions, sensor sizes and price segments of the cameras. The software packages used are: (1) Agisoft PhotoScan Pro (1.16), (2) Pix4D (2.0.89), (3) a combination of Visual SFM (V0.5.22) and SURE (1.2.0.286), and (4) MicMac (1.0). We took photos of a vegetated rock face from identical positions with all sensors. Then we compared the results of the different software packages regarding the ease of the workflow, visual appeal, similarity and quality of the point cloud. While PhotoScan and Pix4D offer the user-friendliest workflows, they are also "black-box" programmes giving only little insight into their processing. Unsatisfying results may only be changed by modifying settings within a module. The combined workflow of Visual SFM, SURE and CloudCompare is just as simple but requires more user interaction. MicMac turned out to be the most challenging software as it is less user-friendly. However, MicMac offers the most possibilities to influence the processing workflow. The resulting point-clouds of PhotoScan and MicMac are the most appealing.

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D wavelet features for TLE lateralization

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Elisevich, Kost; Patel, Suresh

    2004-04-01

    Intensity and volume features of the hippocampus from MR images of the brain are known to be useful in detecting the abnormality and consequently candidacy of the hippocampus for temporal lobe epilepsy surgery. However, currently, intracranial EEG exams are required to determine the abnormal hippocampus. These exams are lengthy, painful and costly. The aim of this study is to evaluate texture characteristics of the hippocampi from MR images to help physicians determine the candidate hippocampus for surgery. We studied the MR images of 20 epileptic patients. Intracranial EEG results as well as surgery outcome were used as gold standard. The hippocampi were manually segmented by an expert from T1-weighted MR images. Then the segmented regions were mapped on the corresponding FLAIR images for texture analysis. We calculate the average energy features from 2D wavelet transform of each slice of hippocampus as well as the energy features produced by 3D wavelet transform of the whole hippocampus volume. The 2D wavelet transform is calculated both from the original slices as well as from the slices perpendicular to the principal axis of the hippocampus. In order to calculate the 3D wavelet transform we first rotate each hippocampus to fit it in a rectangular prism and then fill the empty area by extrapolating the intensity values. We combine the resulting features with volume feature and compare their ability to distinguish between normal and abnormal hippocampi using linear classifier and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm. Experimental results show that the texture features can correctly classify the hippocampi.

  4. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures.

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-10-30

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D-a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool-designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  5. Evaluation of patellar cartilage surface lesions: comparison of CT arthrography and fat-suppressed FLASH 3D MR imaging

    Daenen, B.R.; Ferrara, M.A.; Marcelis, S.; Dondelinger, R.F. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of fat-suppressed fast low-angle shot (FLASH) 3D MR imaging in the detection of patellar cartilage surface lesions in comparison with CT arthrography. Fifty patients, with or without symptoms of chondromalacia, were prospectively examined by CT arthrography and fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo MR imaging. All MR examinations were evaluated by three observers, two of them reaching a consensus interpretation. The lesions were graded according to their morphology and their extent. The CT arthrography was considered as the reference examination. For both sets of observers, the final diagnosis of chondromalacia was obtained in 92.5 %. The specificity was 60 % on a patient-by-patient basis. Fissures were missed in 83 and 60 %, respectively, but were isolated findings only in 2.5 % of the cases. Considering ulcers involving more than 50 % of the cartilage thickness, 65 and 88 %, respectively, were recognized. Fat-suppressed FLASH 3D is an adequate pulse sequence for the detection of patellar cartilage ulcers. It can be applied on a routine clinical basis, but it does not show as many fissures as CT arthrography and is less precise for grading of lesions. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 21 refs.

  6. Numerical Calculations of 3-D High-Lift Flows and Comparison with Experiment

    Compton, William B, III

    2015-01-01

    Solutions were obtained with the Navier-Stokes CFD code TLNS3D to predict the flow about the NASA Trapezoidal Wing, a high-lift wing composed of three elements: the main-wing element, a deployed leading-edge slat, and a deployed trailing-edge flap. Turbulence was modeled by the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation turbulence model. One case with massive separation was repeated using Menter's two-equation SST (Menter's Shear Stress Transport) k-omega turbulence model in an attempt to improve the agreement with experiment. The investigation was conducted at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, and at angles of attack ranging from 10.004 degrees to 34.858 degrees. The Reynolds number based on the mean aerodynamic chord of the wing was 4.3 x 10 (sup 6). Compared to experiment, the numerical procedure predicted the surface pressures very well at angles of attack in the linear range of the lift. However, computed maximum lift was 5% low. Drag was mainly under predicted. The procedure correctly predicted several well-known trends and features of high-lift flows, such as off-body separation. The two turbulence models yielded significantly different solutions for the repeated case.

  7. Reliability of 3D laser-based anthropometry and comparison with classical anthropometry.

    Kuehnapfel, Andreas; Ahnert, Peter; Loeffler, Markus; Broda, Anja; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Anthropometric quantities are widely used in epidemiologic research as possible confounders, risk factors, or outcomes. 3D laser-based body scans (BS) allow evaluation of dozens of quantities in short time with minimal physical contact between observers and probands. The aim of this study was to compare BS with classical manual anthropometric (CA) assessments with respect to feasibility, reliability, and validity. We performed a study on 108 individuals with multiple measurements of BS and CA to estimate intra- and inter-rater reliabilities for both. We suggested BS equivalents of CA measurements and determined validity of BS considering CA the gold standard. Throughout the study, the overall concordance correlation coefficient (OCCC) was chosen as indicator of agreement. BS was slightly more time consuming but better accepted than CA. For CA, OCCCs for intra- and inter-rater reliability were greater than 0.8 for all nine quantities studied. For BS, 9 of 154 quantities showed reliabilities below 0.7. BS proxies for CA measurements showed good agreement (minimum OCCC > 0.77) after offset correction. Thigh length showed higher reliability in BS while upper arm length showed higher reliability in CA. Except for these issues, reliabilities of CA measurements and their BS equivalents were comparable. PMID:27225483

  8. 3D-Gd-DTPA MR angiography of cerebral blood vessels: A comparison with conventional 3D-MR subtraction angiography

    Subtraction angiography based on 3D fast imaging techniques using rephasing and dephasing gradient pulses is widely used, resulting in angiograms which closely correlate with DSA. Similar angiograms can be obtained with 3D-gradient echo techniques before and after the administration of Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA (0.1-0.2 mmol/kg) followed by image subtraction. As Gd-DTPA does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier, brain imaging is not altering by the contrast agent. Both techniques were compared in patients wihout vascular disease, venous sinus thrombosis, AV malformation and aneurysm. With both techniques the cerebro-vascular system was imaged favoring the venous system because of the more constant flow velocity and the lack of ECG synchronization. Gd-DTPA offers the advantage of the higher signal-to-noise ratio and is hampered by background superposition due to Gd-DTPA enhancement in non brain tissue. With both techniques vessels down to 1 mm can be imaged. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of steroid substrates and inhibitors of P-glycoprotein by 3D-QSAR analysis

    Li, Yan; Wang, Yong-Hua; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Shu-Wei; Liu, Chang-Hou; Yang, Sheng-Li

    2005-01-01

    Steroid derivatives show a complex interaction with P-glycoprotein (Pgp). To determine the essential structural requirements of a series of structurally related and functionally diverse steroids for Pgp-mediated transport or inhibition, a three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship study was performed by comparative similarity index analysis modeling. Twelve models have been explored to well correlate the physiochemical features with their biological functions with Pgp on basis of substrate and inhibitor datasets, in which the best predictive model for substrate gave cross-validated q2=0.720, non-cross-validated r2=0.998, standard error of estimate SEE=0.012, F=257.955, and the best predictive model for inhibitor gave q2=0.536, r2=0.950, SEE=1.761 and F=45.800. The predictive ability of all models was validated by a set of compounds that were not included in the training set. The physiochemical similarities and differences of steroids as Pgp substrate and inhibitor, respectively, were analyzed to be helpful in developing new steroid-like compounds.

  10. A Performance Review of 3D TOF Vision Systems in Comparison to Stereo Vision Systems

    Hussmann, Stephan; Ringbeck, Thorsten; Hagebeuker, Bianca

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we compared conventional stereo vision systems with time-of-flight vision system and highlighted the advantages and disadvantages of both systems. The new PMD technology represents a TOF vision system with many advantages in comparison to conventional stereo vision systems especially in the automotive industry. The equations needed for the design of such a system are derived and demonstrate the simplicity of the

  11. Comparison of fast 3D simulation and actinic inspection for EUV masks with buries defects

    Clifford, C. H.; Wiraatmadja, S.; Chan, T. T.; Neureuther, A. R.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I.; Liang, T.

    2009-02-23

    Aerial images for isolated defects and the interactions of defects with features are compared between the Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the fast EUV simulation program RADICAL. Comparisons between AIT images from August 2007 and RADICAL simulations are used to extract aberrations. At this time astigmatism was the dominant aberration with a value of 0.55 waves RMS. Significant improvements in the imaging performance of the AIT were made between August 2007 and December 2008. A good match will be shown between the most recent AIT images and RADICAL simulations without aberrations. These comparisons will demonstrate that a large defect, in this case 7nm tall on the surface, is still printable even if it is centered under the absorber line. These comparisons also suggest that the minimum defect size is between 1.5nm and 0.8nm surface height because a 1.5nm defect was printable but a 0.8nm was not. Finally, the image of a buried defect near an absorber line through focus will demonstrate an inversion in the effect of the defect from a protrusion of the dark line into the space to a protrusion of the space into the line.

  12. Origin of extracted negative ions by 3D PIC-MCC modeling. Surface vs Volume comparison

    The development of a high performance negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in the construction of Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) of the future fusion reactor ITER. NI source should deliver 40 A of H-(or D-), which is a technical and scientific challenge, and requires a deeper understanding of the underlying physics of the source and its magnetic filter. The present knowledge of the ion extraction mechanism from the negative ion source is limited and concerns magnetized plasma sheaths used to avoid electrons being co-extracted from the plasma together with the NI. Moreover, due to the asymmetry induced by the ITER crossed magnetic configuration used to filter the electrons, any realistic study of this problem must consider the three spatial dimensions. To address this problem, a 3D Particles-in-Cell electrostatic collisional code was developed, specifically designed for this system. Binary collisions between the particles are introduced using Monte Carlo Collision scheme. The complex orthogonal magnetic field that is applied to deflect electrons is also taken into account. This code, called ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction), was used to investigate the plasma properties and the transport of the charged particles close to a typical extraction aperture [1]. This contribution focuses on the limits for the extracted NI current from both, plasma volume and aperture wall. Results of production, destruction, and transport of H- in the extraction region are presented. The extraction efficiency of H- from the volume is compared to the one of H- coming from the wall.

  13. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  14. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID

    Andreas Parr

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF Radiofrequency Identification (RFID setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements.

  15. Comparison of Phase-Based 3D Near-Field Source Localization Techniques for UHF RFID.

    Parr, Andreas; Miesen, Robert; Vossiek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present multiple techniques for phase-based narrowband backscatter tag localization in three-dimensional space with planar antenna arrays or synthetic apertures. Beamformer and MUSIC localization algorithms, known from near-field source localization and direction-of-arrival estimation, are applied to the 3D backscatter scenario and their performance in terms of localization accuracy is evaluated. We discuss the impact of different transceiver modes known from the literature, which evaluate different send and receive antenna path combinations for a single localization, as in multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. Furthermore, we propose a new Singledimensional-MIMO (S-MIMO) transceiver mode, which is especially suited for use with mobile robot systems. Monte-Carlo simulations based on a realistic multipath error model ensure spatial correlation of the simulated signals, and serve to critically appraise the accuracies of the different localization approaches. A synthetic uniform rectangular array created by a robotic arm is used to evaluate selected localization techniques. We use an Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) setup to compare measurements with the theory and simulation. The results show how a mean localization accuracy of less than 30 cm can be reached in an indoor environment. Further simulations demonstrate how the distance between aperture and tag affects the localization accuracy and how the size and grid spacing of the rectangular array need to be adapted to improve the localization accuracy down to orders of magnitude in the centimeter range, and to maximize array efficiency in terms of localization accuracy per number of elements. PMID:27347976

  16. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    Mul, Frits F M de; George, Nibu A; Qiu Qingjun; Rakhorst, Gerhard; Schutte, Harm K [Department of Biomedical Engineering BMSA, Faculty of Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen UMCG, University of Groningen, PO Box 196, 9700 AD Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: ffm@demul.net

    2009-07-07

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents-for the first time-a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  17. Depth-kymography of vocal fold vibrations: part II. Simulations and direct comparisons with 3D profile measurements

    We report novel direct quantitative comparisons between 3D profiling measurements and simulations of human vocal fold vibrations. Until now, in human vocal folds research, only imaging in a horizontal plane was possible. However, for the investigation of several diseases, depth information is needed, especially when the two folds act differently, e.g. in the case of tumour growth. Recently, with our novel depth-kymographic laryngoscope, we obtained calibrated data about the horizontal and vertical positions of the visible surface of the vibrating vocal folds. In order to find relations with physical parameters such as elasticity and damping constants, we numerically simulated the horizontal and vertical positions and movements of the human vocal folds while vibrating and investigated the effect of varying several parameters on the characteristics of the phonation: the masses and their dimensions, the respective forces and pressures, and the details of the vocal tract compartments. Direct one-to-one comparison with measured 3D positions presents-for the first time-a direct means of validation of these calculations. This may start a new field in vocal folds research.

  18. Frontonasal dysmorphology in bipolar disorder by 3D laser surface imaging and geometric morphometrics: comparisons with schizophrenia.

    Hennessy, Robin J

    2010-09-01

    Any developmental relationship between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia engenders continuing debate. As the brain and face emerge in embryological intimacy, brain dysmorphogenesis is accompanied by facial dysmorphogenesis. 3D laser surface imaging was used to capture the facial surface of 13 male and 14 female patients with bipolar disorder in comparison with 61 male and 75 female control subjects and with 37 male and 32 female patients with schizophrenia. Surface images were analysed using geometric morphometrics and 3D visualisations to identify domains of facial shape that distinguish bipolar patients from controls and bipolar patients from those with schizophrenia. Both male and female bipolar patients evidenced significant facial dysmorphology: common to male and female patients was overall facial widening, increased width of nose, narrowing of mouth and upward displacement of the chin; dysmorphology differed between male and female patients for nose length, lip thickness and tragion height. There were few morphological differences in comparison with schizophrenia patients. That dysmorphology of the frontonasal prominences and related facial regions in bipolar disorder is more similar to than different from that found in schizophrenia indicates some common dysmorphogenesis. Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia might reflect similar insult(s) acting over slightly differing time-frames or slightly differing insult(s) acting over a similar time-frame.

  19. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of wrist MRI at 3.0T - Comparison between isotropic 3D turbo spin echo and isotropic 3D fast field echo and 2D turbo spin echo

    Jung, Jee Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungang Univ. Hospital, School of Medicine, Chungang Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Young Cheol [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ. (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: ycyoon@skku.edu; Jung, Jin Young [Dept. of Radiology, Saint Paul' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong-Keun [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been applied to various joints. However, comparison for image quality between isotropic 3D MRI and two-dimensional (2D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence of the wrist at a 3T MR system has not been investigated. Purpose: To compare the image quality of isotropic 3D MRI including TSE intermediate-weighted (VISTA) sequence and fast field echo (FFE) sequence with 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequence of the wrist joint at 3.0 T. Material and Methods: MRI was performed in 10 wrists of 10 healthy volunteers with isotropic 3D sequences (VISTA and FFE) and 2D TSE intermediate-weighted sequences at 3.0 T. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was obtained by imaging phantom and noise-only image. Contrast ratios (CRs) were calculated between fluid and cartilage, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and the scapholunate ligament. Two radiologists independently assessed the visibility of TFCC, carpal ligaments, cartilage, tendons and nerves with a four-point grading scale. Statistical analysis to compare CRs (one way ANOVA with a Tukey test) and grades of visibility (Kruskal-Wallis test) between three sequences and those for inter-observer agreement (kappa analysis) were performed. Results: The SNR of 2D TSE (46.26) was higher than those of VISTA (23.34) and 3D FFE (19.41). CRs were superior in 2D TSE than VISTA (P = 0.02) for fluid-cartilage and in 2D TSE than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for fluid-TFCC. The visibility was best in 2D TSE (P < 0.01) for TFCC and in VISTA (P = 0.01) for scapholunate ligament. The visibility was better in 2D TSE and 3D FFE (P 0.04) for cartilage and in VISTA than 3D FFE (P < 0.01) for TFCC. The inter-observer agreement for the visibility of anatomic structures was moderate or substantial. Conclusion: Image quality of 2D TSE was superior to isotropic 3D MR imaging for cartilage, and TFCC. 3D FFE has better visibility for cartilage than VISTA and VISTA has superior visibility for

  20. Improvement of space-time kinetics capability in the SNATCH solver and comparison to KIN3D/PARTISN results

    Efforts are going on both at the CEA Cadarache and at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) to develop an efficient and robust three-dimensional neutron kinetics solver to be employed as a new neutronic tool for simulating severe accident transients with the SIMMER code. To this aim, the SNATCH space-time kinetics has been recently extended and coupled with the SIMMER code in a multiple-channel approach. On the other hand, the PARTISN code was coupled to KIN3D, a time-dependent model for neutron kinetics of the ERANOS code system and applied to transient analyses. In this paper, the recent SNATCH extensions are introduced and a comparison to the KIN3D/PARTISN code is provided. SNATCH implementation of the Improved Quasi-Static Method (IQM) relies on a special treatment in which Point Kinetics (PK) parameters are computed for each micro time step by assuming a linear variation of the flux shape over a shape time step. This procedure provides a better coupling between the PK parameters and material perturbations. A new formulation for the reactivity computation is implemented in SNATCH, as the original formulation does not account for reactivity variation for source-induced transients. Comparative results show that, overall, SNATCH neutron kinetics results are coherent with KIN3D/PARTISN for a fast transient induced by a source-jerk in a three-dimensional subcritical system driven by an external source. It is also found that reactivity variations are more correctly assessed by the new formulation on reactivity. (author)

  1. 3-D contextual Bayesian classifiers

    Larsen, Rasmus

    distribution for the pixel values as well as a prior distribution for the configuration of class variables within the cross that is made of a pixel and its four nearest neighbours. We will extend these algorithms to 3-D, i.e. we will specify a simultaneous Gaussian distribution for a pixel and its 6 nearest 3......-D neighbours, and generalise the class variable configuration distributions within the 3-D cross given in 2-D algorithms. The new 3-D algorithms are tested on a synthetic 3-D multivariate dataset....

  2. A Kalman filter and 3dVAR inter-comparison with NCEP's new operational forecasting system

    Fukumori, I.; Behringer, D.; Wang, O.; Wang, J.

    2008-12-01

    The ECCO Kalman filter is adapted to the Modular Ocean Model (MOM4) employed in the latest operational ocean analyses of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The ocean state estimates of the Kalman filter are compared with those of NCEP's 3dVAR method to assess the relative impact of the different approaches on analyzing and forecasting seasonal-to-interannual climate variability. The ECCO filter employs partitioned, reduced-state, and time-asymptotic approximations of the model state error covariance matrix associated with inaccuracies in atmospheric wind forcing. The filter assimilates temporal anomalies of satellite sea level and in situ temperature profile measurements over the world's oceans. New advancements are devised in filter implementation including use of adjoint codes and improvements in spatial interpolation around land masses and in estimating effects of vertical heaving motion. The next operational model of NCEP is based on MOM4 and employs a tripolar grid that spans the entire globe including the Arctic Ocean with a nominal 0.5-degree grid with 40 vertical levels. A 3dVAR method is employed to assimilate temperature and synthetic salinity profiles. The salinity profiles are constructed from the temperature profiles and a local TS relationship. The model error variances are assumed to be proportional to the local temperature and salinity gradients and are computed from the most recent 5-day model average. Utilizing identical models, the inter-comparison provides a unique assessment of the two assimilation methods independent of potential differences in models that are used. The two ocean state estimates will be compared with respect to various observations. Circulation indexes will be analyzed such as strengths of subtropical cells, meridional overturning circulation, and integrated upper ocean heat content changes. The assimilations' impact on subsequent variability of the ocean

  3. Comparison of the Application of Web 3D Technology%Web 3D技术的应用比较

    黄伟峰

    2014-01-01

    Web 3D技术有多种,都有适用的场合,介绍了有代表性的几种Web 3D技术;Vrml、Cortona、WireFusion、EON、Virtools、Quest3D、Flash 3D和Unity 3D,比较了它们各自的特点和应用。%There are variety technology of Web 3D, and everyone has applicable occasion. Introduces several representative Web 3D technology;Such as Vrml, Cortona, WireFusion, EON, Virtools, Quest3D, Flash 3D and Unity 3D. It Compared their char⁃acteristic and application.

  4. NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates: 3-D Characterization and Comparison of Vegetation Structure in a Tropical Premontane Wet Forest

    Washington-Allen, R. A.; Davis, K.; Falkowski, T.; Tarbox, B.; Delgado, A.; March, R.; Moore, G. W.; Tjoelker, M.; Gonzalez, E.; Houser, C.

    2011-12-01

    30-m diameter plots at 4-cm spacing, 270° vertical, and 360° horizontal, generating a >100 million point cloud per site at ±2-mm range accuracy. Registration within 2-mm RMSE yielded a 3-D virtual environment per site where tree measurements were made manually. Comparisons showed that GPR may be masked by high soil moisture. DBH error measures ranged from ± 0.6 to 5.18 % and height was 0.26 to 20.19 % for carbon farm to primary forest. The height comparison indicated that the laser clinometer consistently underestimated tree heights, particularly on the primary forest site where trees were over 35-m.

  5. Inter-comparison of drought indicators derived from multiple precipitation datasets in Africa

    Naumann, Gustavo; Dutra, Emanuel; Barbosa, Paulo; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the potential of implementing different drought indicators to improve drought monitoring capabilities at continental scale. Several global and continental datasets based on re-analysis, gridded observation, and remote sensing data were tested. At regional level the capabilities of each indicator and dataset on five regions on the African continent (Oum er-rbia, Blue Nile, Upper Niger, Limpopo and the Great Horn of Africa) were compared. The five precipitation datasets used were the ERA - Interim reanalysis (0.5°x0.5° resolution from 1979 to 2010), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite monthly rainfall product 3B43 (0.25°x0.25° resolution from 1998 to 2010), the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) gridded precipitation dataset V.5 (1°x1° resolution from 1901 to 2010), the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Global Monthly Merged Precipitation Analyses (2.5°x2.5° resolution from 1979 to 2010), and the Climate Prediction Center Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP, 2.5°x2.5° resolution from 1979 to 2010). The set of indicators proposed included Standardized Precipitation index (SPI), Standardized Precipitation-Evaporation Index (SPEI), Standardized Run-off index (SRI), Soil Moisture Anomalies (SMA). A comparison of the annual cycle and monthly precipitation time series shows a general agreement in the timing of the peaks including the Great Horn of Africa where there are two rainy seasons. The main differences are observed thus in the ability to represent the magnitude of the wet seasons and extremes. Moreover, for the areas that are under drought, all the datasets agree with the certain time of onset and recovery but there are sometimes disagreements on the area affected. The agreement between datasets depends on the threshold selected to define the drought conditions. The comparison between SPI estimations suggest that the main sources of uncertainties (due by lack of ground information

  6. SU-E-T-538: Lung SBRT Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformal and RapidArc Planning

    Purpose: Dose distributions of RapidArc Plan can be quite different from standard 3D conformal radiation therapy. SBRT plans can be optimized with high conformity or mimic the 3D conformal treatment planning with very high dose in the center of the tumor. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformal plan; flattened beam and FFF beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Methods: Five lung cancer patients treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. All the patients were CT scanned with 4DCT to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. The PTV coverage was optimized by two groups of objective function: one with high conformity, another mimicking 3D conformal dose distribution with high dose in the center of PTV. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using four full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. Results: All the RapidArc plans with flattened beam and FFF beam had similar results for the PTV and OARs. For the high conformity optimization group, The DVH of PTV exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV compared to the 3D non-coplanar plan. However, for the group mimicking the 3D conformal target dose distribution, although the PTV is very similar to the 3D conformal plan, the ITV coverage is better than 3D conformal plan. Conclusion: Due to excellent clinical experiences of 3D conformal SBRT treatment, the Rapid Arc optimization mimicking 3D conformal planning may be suggested for clinical use

  7. In-house quality check of external beam plans using 3D treatment planning systems - a DVH comparison.

    Kumar, Ayyalasomayajula Anil; Akula, Roopa Rani; Ayyangar, Komanduri; P, Krishna Reddy; Vuppu, Srinivas; Narayana, P V Lakshmi; Rao, A Durga Prasada

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach towards the quality assurance of external beam plans using in-house-developed DICOM import and export software in a clinical setup. The new approach is different from what is currently used in most clinics, viz., only MU and point dose are verified. The DICOM-RT software generates ASCII files to import/export structure sets, treatment beam data, and dose-volume histo-grams (DVH) from one treatment planning system (TPS) to the other. An efficient and reliable 3D planning system, ROPS, was used for verifying the accuracy of treatment plans and treatment plan parameters. With the use of this new approach, treatment plans planned using Varian Eclipse planning system were exported to ROPS planning system. Important treatment and dosimetrical data, such as the beam setup accuracy, target dose coverage, and dose to critical structures, were also quantitatively verified using DVH comparisons. Two external beam plans with diverse photon energies were selected to test the new approach. The satisfactory results show that the new approach is feasible, easy to use, and can be used as an adjunct test for patient treatment quality check. PMID:27167271

  8. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  9. Comparison of 3D representations depicting micro folds: overlapping imagery vs. time-of-flight laser scanner

    Vaiopoulos, Aristidis D.; Georgopoulos, Andreas; Lozios, Stylianos G.

    2012-10-01

    A relatively new field of interest, which continuously gains grounds nowadays, is digital 3D modeling. However, the methodologies, the accuracy and the time and effort required to produce a high quality 3D model have been changing drastically the last few years. Whereas in the early days of digital 3D modeling, 3D models were only accessible to computer experts in animation, working many hours in expensive sophisticated software, today 3D modeling has become reasonably fast and convenient. On top of that, with online 3D modeling software, such as 123D Catch, nearly everyone can produce 3D models with minimum effort and at no cost. The only requirement is panoramic overlapping images, of the (still) objects the user wishes to model. This approach however, has limitations in the accuracy of the model. An objective of the study is to examine these limitations by assessing the accuracy of this 3D modeling methodology, with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). Therefore, the scope of this study is to present and compare 3D models, produced with two different methods: 1) Traditional TLS method with the instrument ScanStation 2 by Leica and 2) Panoramic overlapping images obtained with DSLR camera and processed with 123D Catch free software. The main objective of the study is to evaluate advantages and disadvantages of the two 3D model producing methodologies. The area represented with the 3D models, features multi-scale folding in a cipollino marble formation. The most interesting part and most challenging to capture accurately, is an outcrop which includes vertically orientated micro folds. These micro folds have dimensions of a few centimeters while a relatively strong relief is evident between them (perhaps due to different material composition). The area of interest is located in Mt. Hymittos, Greece.

  10. Improved 1D model for calculating hydraulic properties in meandering rivers: Comparisons with measurements and 3D numerical simulations

    Haji Mohammadi, M.; Kang, S.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-known that meander bends impose local losses of energy to the flow in rivers. These local losses should be added together with friction loss to get the total loss of energy. In this work, we strive to develop a framework that considers the effect of bends in meandering rivers for one-dimensional (1-D) homogenous equations of flow. Our objective is to develop a simple, yet physically sound, and efficient model for carrying out engineering computations of flow through meander bends. We consider several approaches for calculating 1-D hydraulic properties of meandering rivers such as friction factor and Manning coefficient. The method of Kasper et al. (2005), which is based on channel top width, aspect ratio and radius of curvature, is adopted for further calculations. In this method, a correction is implemented in terms of local energy loss, due to helical motion and secondary currents of fluid particles driven by centrifugal force, in meanders. To validate the model, several test cases are simulated and the computed results are compared with the reported data in the literature in terms of water surface elevation, shear velocity, etc. For all cases the computed results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. 3-D RANS turbulent flow simulations are also carried out, using the method of Kang et al. (Adv. In Water Res., vol. 34, 2011), for different geometrical parameters of Kinoshita Rivers to determine the spatial distribution of shear stress on river bed and banks, which is the key factor in scour/deposition patterns. The 3-D solutions are then cross-sectionally averaged and compared with the respective solutions from the 1-D model. The comparisons show that the improved 1D model, which incorporates the effect of local bend loss, captures key flow parameters with reasonable accuracy. Our results also underscore the range of validity and limitations of 1D models for meander bend simulations. This work was supported by NSF Grants (as part of

  11. Comparison of 3D and 2D FSE T2-weighted MRI in the diagnosis of deep pelvic endometriosis: Preliminary results

    Aim: To evaluate image quality and diagnostic accuracy of two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the evaluation of deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Materials and methods: One hundred and ten consecutive patients with suspicion of endometriosis were recruited at two institutions over a 5-month period. Twenty-three women underwent surgery, 18 had DIE at histology. Two readers independently evaluated 3D and 2D MRI for image quality and diagnosis of DIE. Descriptive analysis, chi-square test for categorical or nominal variables, McNemar test for comparison between 3D and 2D T2-weighted MRI, and weighted “statistics” for intra- and interobserver agreement were used for statistical analysis. Results: Both readers found that 3D yielded significantly lower image quality than 2D MRI (p < 0.0001). Acquisition time for 3D was significantly shorter than 2D MRI (p < 0.01). 3D offered similar accuracy to diagnose DIE compared to 2D MRI. For all locations of endometriosis, a high or variable intra-observer agreement was observed for reader 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusions: Despite a lower overall image quality, 3D provides significant time saving and similar accuracy than multiplanar 2D MRI in the diagnosis of specific DIE locations.

  12. A 3-D Contextual Classifier

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1997-01-01

    . This includes the specification of a Gaussian distribution for the pixel values as well as a prior distribution for the configuration of class variables within the cross that is m ade of a pixel and its four nearest neighbours. We will extend this algorithm to 3-D, i.e. we will specify a simultaneous Gaussian...... distr ibution for a pixel and its 6 nearest 3-D neighbours, and generalise the class variable configuration distribution within the 3-D cross. The algorithm is tested on a synthetic 3-D multivariate dataset....

  13. Comparison of different coupling CFD–STH approaches for pre-test analysis of a TALL-3D experiment

    Papukchiev, Angel, E-mail: angel.papukchiev@grs.de [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching n. Munich (Germany); Jeltsov, Marti; Kööp, Kaspar; Kudinov, Pavel [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Lerchl, Georg [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Garching n. Munich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Thermal-hydraulic system codes and CFD tools are coupled. • Pre-test calculations for the TALL-3D facility are performed. • Complex flow and heat transfer phenomena are modeled. • Comparative analyses have been performed. - Abstract: The system thermal-hydraulic (STH) code ATHLET was coupled with the commercial 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package ANSYS CFX to improve ATHLET simulation capabilities for flows with pronounced 3D phenomena such as flow mixing and thermal stratification. Within the FP7 European project THINS (Thermal Hydraulics of Innovative Nuclear Systems), validation activities for coupled thermal-hydraulic codes are being carried out. The TALL-3D experimental facility, operated by KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, is designed for thermal-hydraulic experiments with lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) coolant at natural and forced circulation conditions. GRS carried out pre-test simulations with ATHLET–ANSYS CFX for the TALL-3D experiment T01, while KTH scientists perform these analyses with the coupled code RELAP5/STAR CCM+. In the experiment T01 the main circulation pump is stopped, which leads to interesting thermal-hydraulic transient with local 3D phenomena. In this paper, the TALL-3D behavior during T01 is analyzed and the results of the coupled pre-test calculations, performed by GRS (ATHLET–ANSYS CFX) and KTH (RELAP5/STAR CCM+) are directly compared.

  14. 3D Simulations of Plasma Filaments in the Scrape Off Layer: A Comparison with Models of Reduced Dimensionality

    Easy, Luke; Omotani, John; Dudson, Benjamin; Havlíčková, Eva; Tamain, Patrick; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders H

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents simulations of isolated 3D filaments in a slab geometry obtained using a 3D reduced fluid code. First, systematic scans were performed to investigate how the dynamics of a filament are affected by its amplitude, perpendicular size and parallel extent. The perpendicular size of the filament was found to have a strong influence on its motions, as it determined the relative importance of parallel currents to polarisation and viscous currents, whilst drift-wave instabilities were observed if the initial amplitude of the blob was increased sufficiently. Next, the 3D simulations were compared to 2D simulations using different parallel closures; namely, the sheath dissipation closure, which neglects parallel gradients, and the vorticity advection closure, which neglects the influence of parallel currents. The vorticity advection closure was found to not replicate the 3D perpendicular dynamics and overestimated the initial radial acceleration of all the filaments studied. In contrast, a more satis...

  15. A new protein binding pocket similarity measure based on comparison of 3D atom clouds: application to ligand prediction

    Hoffmann, Brice; Zaslavskiy, Mikhail; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Stoven, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Prediction of ligands for proteins of known 3D structure is important to understand structure-function relationship, predict molecular function, or design new drugs.\\\\ Results: We explore a new approach for ligand prediction in which binding pockets are represented by atom clouds. Each target pocket is compared to an ensemble of pockets of known ligands. Pockets are aligned in 3D space with further use of convolution kernels between clouds of points. Performance of the new method ...

  16. Experimental comparison of 2D and 3D technology mediated paramedic-physician collaboration in remote emergency medical situations

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maurin, Hanna; Cairns, Bruce;

    2006-01-01

    We are investigating the potential of 3D telepresence technology to support collaboration among geographically separated medical personnel in trauma emergency care situations. 3D telepresence technology has the potential to provide richer visual information than current 2D video conferencing...... techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. We conducted an experimental evaluation, simulating an emergency medical situation and examining the interaction between the attending paramedic and...

  17. Comparison of 2D and 3D navigation techniques for percutaneous screw insertion into the scaphoid: results of an experimental cadaver study.

    Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Nüchtern, Jakob V; Briem, Daniel; Klink, Thorsten; Rueger, Johannes M; Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Navigation in hand surgery is still in the process of development. Initial studies have demonstrated the feasibility of 2D and 3D navigation for the palmar approach in scaphoid fractures, but a comparison of the possibilities of 2D and 3D navigation for the dorsal approach is still lacking. The aim of the present work was to test navigation for the dorsal approach in the scaphoid using cadaver bones. After development of a special radiolucent resting splint for the dorsal approach, we performed 2D- and 3D-navigated scaphoid osteosynthesis in 12 fresh-frozen cadaver forearms using a headless compression screw (Synthes). The operation time, radiation time, number of trials for screw insertion, and screw positions were analyzed. In six 2D-navigated screw osteosyntheses, we found two false positions with an average radiation time of 5 ± 2 seconds. Using 3D navigation, we detected one false position. A false position indicates divergence from the ideal line of the axis of the scaphoid but without penetration of the cortex. The initial scan clearly increased overall radiation time in the 3D-navigated group, and for both navigation procedures operating time was longer than in our clinical experience without navigation. Nonetheless, 2D and 3D navigation for non-dislocated scaphoid fractures is feasible, and navigation might reduce the risk of choosing an incorrect screw length, thereby possibly avoiding injury to the subtending cortex. The 3D navigation is more difficult to interpret than 2D fluoroscopic navigation but shows greater precision. Overall, navigation is costly, and the moderate advantages it offers for osteosynthesis of scaphoid fractures must be considered critically in comparisons with conventional operating techniques. PMID:21991920

  18. 三种人体数据集的腓骨瓣三维可视化应用研究%Application of 3D visnalization models of fibular flap developed by three human digital datasets

    豆勇刚; 余斌; 钟梅; 金丹; 黎健伟; 张元智; 裴国献

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究三种人体数据集的腓骨瓣三维可视化应用. 方法 ①健康自愿者2人,经肘静脉注射造影剂,使用64排多层螺旋CT进行双下肢扫描,观察腓动脉及其分支分布及彼此间的吻合情况,将下肢二维灰度.DICOM格式图像以三维体数据的形式输入计算机,应用Amira4.1软件对腓动脉及腓骨的结构进行三维重建并立体显示.②取新鲜捐献尸体1具,采用改良的明胶-氧化铅灌注术经腹主动脉灌注,灌注后对双下肢行连续螺旋CT扫描,观察腓动脉及其分支的分布情况.利用Amira4.1软件对腓动脉及其分支结构进行三维重建并立体显示.③应用"虚拟中国人"(VCH)男性3号数据集,在薄层断面图像上观察小腿主要解剖结构,应用Amira4.1软件对小腿主要结构进行计算机三维重建并立体显示. 结果 运用Amira4.1图像处理软件,在三维表面重建的图像中可清晰地观察到外科腓骨瓣各解剖结构的形态,特别是腓动脉的分支情况和体表的投影得到很好的显示.利用软件的Movie Maker模板创建电影文件,将其制作为电影,画面清晰流畅,可直观、立体地显示形态特征. 结论 三种数据集重建的图像可以提供正常腓骨瓣三维动态解剖,对腓骨瓣的临床试验、基础研究、临床训练和手术规划具有重要应用价值.%Objective To explore application of the 3D visualization models of fibular flap developed by 3 human digital datasets. Methods First, 2 adult volunteers underwent contrast-enhance CT angiography of lower limbs using a 64-row multi-slice spiral CT after injection of Ultravist (3.5ml/s) through the median cubital vein. The 2D images from the scanning in DICOM format were transformed into three-dimensional data by computer. The structures of fibular flap were observed and digital visualization models of fibular flap were established by three-dimensional computerixed reconstruction out of these data using Amira 4. 1

  19. Comparison of accuracy and time-efficiency of CT colonography between conventional and panoramic 3D interpretation methods: An anthropomorphic phantom study

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the conventional three-dimensional (3D) interpretation method with the panoramic 3D method with regard to accuracy and time-efficiency in the detection of colonic polyps, using pig colonic phantoms as the standard of reference. Materials and methods: One-hundred and sixty-two polyps were created in 18 pig colonic phantoms. CT colonography was performed with a 64-row detector CT scanner. Two-week interval reviews for the CTC image dataset with both the conventional and the panoramic 3D interpretation method were independently performed by three radiologists. The sensitivities of both methods were compared with the McNemar test. The mean interpretation time for each interpretation method was also assessed and compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Compared with the conventional 3D method (0.96 for reader 1, 0.89 for reader 2, and 0.97 for reader 3), the panoramic method revealed comparable sensitivities (0.91 for reader 1, 0.86 for reader 2, and 0.93 for reader 3) (p > 0.05). Interpretation time was significantly shorter with the panoramic method (115.1 ± 32.7 s for reader 1, 229.7 ± 72.2 s for reader 2, and 282.6 ± 113.7 s for reader 3) than with the conventional method (218.9 ± 59.9 s for reader 1, 379.4 ± 117.0 s for reader 2, and 458.7 ± 149.4 s for reader 3) for all readers (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Compared with the conventional 3D interpretation method, the panoramic 3D interpretation method shows improved time-efficiency and comparable sensitivity in the detection of colonic polyps.

  20. Comparison between 3D dynamics filter technique, field-in-field, electronic compensator in breast cancer; Comparacao entre tecnica 3D com filtro dinamico, field-in-field e compensacao eletronica para cancer de mama

    Trindade, Cassia; Silva, Leonardo P.; Martins, Lais P.; Garcia, Paulo L.; Santos, Maira R.; Bastista, Delano V.S.; Vieira, Anna Myrian M.T.L.; Rocha, Igor M., E-mail: cassiatr@gmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    The radiotherapy has been used in a wild scale in breast cancer treatment. With this high demand, new technologies have been developed to improve the dose distribution in the target while reducing the dose delivered in critical organs. In this study, performed with one clinical case, three planning were done for comparison: 3D technique with dynamic filter, 3D with field-in-field technique (forward-planned IMRT) and 3D technique using electronic compensator (ECOMP). The planning were done with a 6MV photon beam using the Eclipse software, version 8.6 (Varian Medical Systems). The PTV was drawn covering the whole breast and the critical organs were: the lung on the irradiated side, the heart, the contralateral breast and the anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The planning using the compensator technique permitted more homogeneous dose distribution in the target volume. The V20 value of the lung on the irradiated side was 8,3% for the electronic compensator technique, 8,9% for the field-in-field technique and 8,2% for the dynamic filter technique. For the heart the dose range was 15.7 - 139.9 cGy, 16.3 - 148.4 cGy for the dynamic filter technique and 19.6 - 157.0 cGy for the field-in-field technique. The dose gradient was 11% with compensator electronic, 15% dynamic filter technique and 13% with field-in-field. The application of electronic technique in breast cancer treatment allows better dose distribution while reduces dose in critical organs, but in the same time requires a quality assurance. (author)

  1. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  2. Comparison and evaluation of datasets for off-angle iris recognition

    Kurtuncu, Osman M.; Cerme, Gamze N.; Karakaya, Mahmut

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigated the publicly available iris recognition datasets and their data capture procedures in order to determine if they are suitable for the stand-off iris recognition research. Majority of the iris recognition datasets include only frontal iris images. Even if a few datasets include off-angle iris images, the frontal and off-angle iris images are not captured at the same time. The comparison of the frontal and off-angle iris images shows not only differences in the gaze angle but also change in pupil dilation and accommodation as well. In order to isolate the effect of the gaze angle from other challenging issues including dilation and accommodation, the frontal and off-angle iris images are supposed to be captured at the same time by using two different cameras. Therefore, we developed an iris image acquisition platform by using two cameras in this work where one camera captures frontal iris image and the other one captures iris images from off-angle. Based on the comparison of Hamming distance between frontal and off-angle iris images captured with the two-camera- setup and one-camera-setup, we observed that Hamming distance in two-camera-setup is less than one-camera-setup ranging from 0.05 to 0.001. These results show that in order to have accurate results in the off-angle iris recognition research, two-camera-setup is necessary in order to distinguish the challenging issues from each other.

  3. Dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal, IMRT, and V-MAT techniques for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI)

    Qiu, Jian-Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chang, Zheng; Horton, Janet K.; Wu, Qing-Rong Jackie; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang, E-mail: fangfang.yin@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose is to dosimetrically compare the following 3 delivery techniques: 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (V-MAT) in the treatment of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Overall, 16 patients with T1/2N0 breast cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (multiple, noncoplanar photon fields) on the RTOG 0413 partial-breast trial. These cases were subsequently replanned using static gantry IMRT and V-MAT technology to understand dosimetric differences among these 3 techniques. Several dosimetric parameters were used in plan quality evaluation, including dose conformity index (CI) and dose-volume histogram analysis of normal tissue coverage. Quality assurance studies including gamma analysis were performed to compare the measured and calculated dose distributions. The IMRT and V-MAT plans gave more conformal target dose distributions than the 3D-CRT plans (p < 0.05 in CI). The volume of ipsilateral breast receiving 5 and 10 Gy was significantly less using the V-MAT technique than with either 3D-CRT or IMRT (p < 0.05). The maximum lung dose and the ipsilateral lung volume receiving 10 (V{sub 10}) or 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly less with both V-MAT and IMRT (p < 0.05). The IMRT technique was superior to 3D-CRT and V-MAT of low dose distributions in ipsilateral lung (p < 0.05 in V{sub 5} and D{sub 5}). The total mean monitor units (MUs) for V-MAT (621.0 ± 111.9) were 12.2% less than those for 3D-CRT (707.3 ± 130.9) and 46.5% less than those for IMRT (1161.4 ± 315.6) (p < 0.05). The average machine delivery time was 1.5 ± 0.2 minutes for the V-MAT plans, 7.0 ± 1.6 minutes for the 3D-CRT plans, and 11.5 ± 1.9 minutes for the IMRT plans, demonstrating much less delivery time for V-MAT. Based on this preliminary study, V-MAT and IMRT techniques offer improved dose conformity as compared with 3D-CRT techniques without increasing dose to the ipsilateral lung. In

  4. Comparison of 3D point clouds produced by LIDAR and UAV photoscan in the Rochefort cave (Belgium)

    Watlet, Arnaud; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Kaufmann, Olivier; Le Mouelic, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Amongst today's techniques that are able to produce 3D point clouds, LIDAR and UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) photogrammetry are probably the most commonly used. Both methods have their own advantages and limitations. LIDAR scans create high resolution and high precision 3D point clouds, but such methods are generally costly, especially for sporadic surveys. Compared to LIDAR, UAV (e.g. drones) are cheap and flexible to use in different kind of environments. Moreover, the photogrammetric processing workflow of digital images taken with UAV becomes easier with the rise of many affordable software packages (e.g. Agisoft, PhotoModeler3D, VisualSFM). We present here a challenging study made at the Rochefort Cave Laboratory (South Belgium) comprising surface and underground surveys. The site is located in the Belgian Variscan fold-and-thrust belt, a region that shows many karstic networks within Devonian limestone units. A LIDAR scan has been acquired in the main chamber of the cave (~ 15000 m³) to spatialize 3D point cloud of its inner walls and infer geological beds and structures. Even if the use of LIDAR instrument was not really comfortable in such caving environment, the collected data showed a remarkable precision according to few control points geometry. We also decided to perform another challenging survey of the same cave chamber by modelling a 3D point cloud using photogrammetry of a set of DSLR camera pictures taken from the ground and UAV pictures. The aim was to compare both techniques in terms of (i) implementation of data acquisition and processing, (ii) quality of resulting 3D points clouds (points density, field vs cloud recovery and points precision), (iii) their application for geological purposes. Through Rochefort case study, main conclusions are that LIDAR technique provides higher density point clouds with slightly higher precision than photogrammetry method. However, 3D data modeled by photogrammetry provide visible light spectral information

  5. Comparison of radiotherapy dosimetry for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on electron density calibration

    Kartutik, K.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate calculation of dose distribution affected by inhomogeneity tissue is required in radiotherapy planning. This study was performed to determine the ratio between radiotherapy planning using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on a calibrated curve of CT-number in the lung for different target's shape in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and spinal cord for SBRT. Calibration curves of CT-number were generated under measurement basis and introduced into TPS, then planning was performed for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT with 7, and 15 radiation fields. Afterwards, planning evaluation was performed by comparing the DVH curve, HI, and CI. 3D-CRT and IMRT produced the lowest HI at calibration curve of CIRS 002LFC with the value 0.24 and 10. Whereas SBRT produced the lowest HI on a linear calibration curve with a value of 0.361. The highest CI in IMRT and SBRT technique achieved using a linear calibration curve was 0.97 and 1.77 respectively. For 3D-CRT, the highest CI was obtained by using calibration curve of CIRS 062M with the value of 0.45. From the results of CI and HI, it is concluded that the calibration curve of CT-number does not significantly differ with Schneider's calibrated curve, and inverse planning gives a better result than forward planning.

  6. COMPARISON OF FATIGUE AND CREEP BEHAVIOR BETWEEN 2D AND 3D-C/SiC COMPOSITES

    D. Han; S.R. Qiao; M. Li; J.T. Hou; X.J. Wu

    2004-01-01

    The differences of tension-tension fatigue and tensile creep characters of 2D-C/SiCand 3D-C/SiC composites have been scrutinized to meet the engineering needs. Experiments of tension-tension fatigue and tensile creep are carried out under vacuum high temperature condition. All of the high temperature fatigue curves are flat; the fatigue curves of the 2D-C/SiC are flatter and even parallel to the horizontal axis. While the tension-tension fatigue limit of the 3D-C/SiC is higher than that of the 2D-C/SiC, the fiber pullout length of the fatigue fracture surface of the 3D-C/SiC is longer than that of the 2D-C/SiC, and fracture morphology of the 3D-C/SiC is rougher, and pullout length of the fiber tows is longer. At the same time the 3D-C/SiC has higher tensile creep resistance. The tensile curve and the tensile creep curve of both materials consist of a series of flat step. These phenomena can be explained by the non-continuity of the damage.

  7. Accuracy assessment of the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Dataset, and comparison with other large-area elevation datasets: SRTM and ASTER

    Gesch, Dean B.; Oimoen, Michael J.; Evans, Gayla A.

    2014-01-01

    The National Elevation Dataset (NED) is the primary elevation data product produced and distributed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The NED provides seamless raster elevation data of the conterminous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, U.S. island territories, Mexico, and Canada. The NED is derived from diverse source datasets that are processed to a specification with consistent resolutions, coordinate system, elevation units, and horizontal and vertical datums. The NED serves as the elevation layer of The National Map, and it provides basic elevation information for earth science studies and mapping applications in the United States and most of North America. An important part of supporting scientific and operational use of the NED is provision of thorough dataset documentation including data quality and accuracy metrics. The focus of this report is on the vertical accuracy of the NED and on comparison of the NED with other similar large-area elevation datasets, namely data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER).

  8. Comparison of 3D MRI with high sampling efficiency and 2D multiplanar MRI for contouring in cervix cancer brachytherapy

    MRI sequences with short scanning times may improve accessibility of image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) of cervix cancer. We assessed the value of 3D MRI for contouring by comparing it to 2D multi-planar MRI. In 14 patients, 2D and 3D pelvic MRI were obtained at IGABT. High risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) was delineated by 2 experienced radiation oncologists, using the conventional (2D MRI-based) and test (3D MRI-based) approach. The value of 3D MRI for contouring was evaluated by using the inter-approach and inter-observer analysis of volumetric and topographic contouring uncertainties. To assess the magnitude of deviation from the conventional approach when using the test approach, the inter-approach analysis of contouring uncertainties was carried out for both observers. In addition, to assess reliability of 3D MRI for contouring, the impact of contouring approach on the magnitude of inter-observer delineation uncertainties was analysed. No approach- or observer - specific differences in HR CTV sizes, volume overlap, or distances between contours were identified. When averaged over all delineated slices, the distances between contours in the inter-approach analysis were 2.6 (Standard deviation (SD) 0.4) mm and 2.8 (0.7) mm for observers 1 and 2, respectively. The magnitude of topographic and volumetric inter-observer contouring uncertainties, as obtained on the conventional approach, was maintained on the test approach. This variation was comparable to the inter-approach uncertainties with distances between contours of 3.1 (SD 0.8) and 3.0 (SD 0.7) mm on conventional and test approach, respectively. Variation was most pronounced at caudal HR CTV levels in both approaches and observers. 3D MRI could potentially replace multiplanar 2D MRI in cervix cancer IGABT, shortening the overall MRI scanning time and facilitating the contouring process, thus making this treatment method more widely employed

  9. Comparison of 3D and 4D Monte Carlo optimization in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Chan, Mark K.H. [Tuen Mun Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Hong Kong (S.A.R) (China); Werner, Rene [The University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Computational Neuroscience, Hamburg (Germany); Ayadi, Miriam [Leon Berard Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Blanck, Oliver [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    To investigate the adequacy of three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo (MC) optimization (3DMCO) and the potential of four-dimensional (4D) dose renormalization (4DMC{sub renorm}) and optimization (4DMCO) for CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. For 20 lung tumors, 3DMCO and 4DMCO plans were generated with planning target volume (PTV{sub 5} {sub mm}) = gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 5 mm, assuming 3 mm for tracking errors (PTV{sub 3} {sub mm}) and 2 mm for residual organ deformations. Three fractions of 60 Gy were prescribed to ≥ 95 % of the PTV{sub 5} {sub mm}. Each 3DMCO plan was recalculated by 4D MC dose calculation (4DMC{sub recal}) to assess the dosimetric impact of organ deformations. The 4DMC{sub recal} plans were renormalized (4DMC{sub renorm}) to 95 % dose coverage of the PTV{sub 5} {sub mm} for comparisons with the 4DMCO plans. A 3DMCO plan was considered adequate if the 4DMC{sub recal} plan showed ≥ 95 % of the PTV{sub 3} {sub mm} receiving 60 Gy and doses to other organs at risk (OARs) were below the limits. In seven lesions, 3DMCO was inadequate, providing < 95 % dose coverage to the PTV{sub 3} {sub mm}. Comparison of 4DMC{sub recal} and 3DMCO plans showed that organ deformations resulted in lower OAR doses. Renormalizing the 4DMC{sub recal} plans could produce OAR doses higher than the tolerances in some 4DMC{sub renorm} plans. Dose conformity of the 4DMC{sub renorm} plans was inferior to that of the 3DMCO and 4DMCO plans. The 4DMCO plans did not always achieve OAR dose reductions compared to 3DMCO and 4DMC{sub renorm} plans. This study indicates that 3DMCO with 2 mm margins for organ deformations may be inadequate for Cyberknife-based lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Renormalizing the 4DMC{sub recal} plans could produce degraded dose conformity and increased OAR doses; 4DMCO can resolve this problem. (orig.) [German] Untersucht wurde die Angemessenheit einer dreidimensionalen (3-D) Monte

  10. Comparison of OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D for neutral atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Cavar, Dalibor; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.; Martinez, Benjamin, Jr; Zahle, Frederik; Berg, Jacob; Kelly, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The flow solvers OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D are compared in the case of neutral atmospheric flow over terrain using the test cases of Askervein and Bolund hills. Both solvers are run using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes k– turbulence model. One of the main modeling differences between the two solvers is the wall-function approach. The Open-FOAM v.1.7.1 uses a Nikuradse’s sand roughness model, while EllipSys3D uses a model based on the atmosphericroughness length. It is found th...

  11. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment. Comparison of Version 4.3.4i on Linux and Windows

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.3i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  12. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment: Comparison of Version 4.2.1i on Linux and Windows

    Paul D. Bayless

    2014-06-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.2i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  13. Description of premixing with the MC3D code including molten jet behavior modeling. Comparison with FARO experimental results

    Berthoud, G.; Crecy, F. de; Meignen, R.; Valette, M. [CEA-G, DRN/DTP/SMTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    1998-01-01

    The premixing phase of a molten fuel-coolant interaction is studied by the way of mechanistic multidimensional calculation. Beside water and steam, corium droplet flow and continuous corium jet flow are calculated independent. The 4-field MC3D code and a detailed hot jet fragmentation model are presented. MC3D calculations are compared to the FARO L14 experiment results and are found to give satisfactory results; heat transfer and jet fragmentation models are still to be improved to predict better final debris size values. (author)

  14. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  15. Comparison of 3-D finite element model of ashlar masonry with 2-D numerical models of ashlar masonry

    Beran, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    3-D state of stress in heterogeneous ashlar masonry can be also computed by several suitable chosen 2-D numerical models of ashlar masonry. The results obtained from 2-D numerical models well correspond to the results obtained from 3-D numerical model. The character of thermal stress is the same. While using 2-D models the computational time is reduced more than hundredfold and therefore this method could be used for computation of thermal stresses during long time periods with 10 000 of steps.

  16. RELAP5-3D Developmental Assessment. Comparison of Version 4.3.4i on Linux and Windows

    Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Figures have been generated comparing the parameters used in the developmental assessment of the RELAP5-3D code, version 4.3i, compiled on Linux and Windows platforms. The figures, which are the same as those used in Volume III of the RELAP5-3D code manual, compare calculations using the semi-implicit solution scheme with available experiment data. These figures provide a quick, visual indication of how the code predictions differ between the Linux and Windows versions.

  17. SU-E-T-77: Comparison of 2D and 3D Gamma Analysis in Patient-Specific QA for Prostate VMAT Plans

    Clemente, F; Perez, C [Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific QA procedures for IMRT and VMAT are traditionally performed by comparing TPS calculations with measured single point values and plane dose distributions by means of gamma analysis. New QA devices permit us to calculate 3D dose distributions on patient anatomy as redundant secondary check and reconstruct it from measurements taken with 2D and 3D detector arrays. 3D dose calculations allow us to perform DVH-based comparisons with clinical relevance, as well as 3D gamma analysis. One of these systems (Compass, IBA Dosimetry) combines traditional 2D with new anatomical-based 3D gamma analysis. This work shows the ability of this system by comparing 2D and 3D gamma analysis in pre-treatment QA for several VMAT prostate plans. Methods: Compass is capable of calculating dose as secondary check from DICOM TPS data and reconstructing it from measurements taken by a 2D ion chamber array (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry). Both 2D and 3D gamma tests are available to compare calculated and reconstructed dose in Compass with TPS RT Dose. Results: 15 VMAT prostate plans have been measured with Compass. Dose is reconstructed with Compass for these plans. 2D gamma comparisons can be done for any plane from dose matrix. Mean gamma passing rates for isocenter planes (axial, coronal, sagittal) are (99.7±0.2)%, (99.9±0.1)%, (99.9±0.1)% for reconstructed dose planes. 3D mean gamma passing rates are (98.5±1.7)% for PTVs, (99.1±1.5)% for rectum, (100.0±0.0)% for bladder, (99.6±0.7)% for femoral heads and (98.1±4.1)% for penile bulb. Conclusion: Compass is a powerful tool to perform a complete pre-treatment QA analysis, from 2D techniques to 3D DVH-based techniques with clinical relevance. All reported values for VMAT prostate plans are in good agreement with TPS values. This system permits us to ensure the accuracy in the delivery of VMAT treatments completing a full patient-specific QA program.

  18. On the comparison of visual discomfort generated by S3D and 2D content based on eye-tracking features

    Iatsun, Iana; Larabi, Mohamed-Chaker; Fernandez-Maloigne, Christine

    2014-03-01

    The changing of TV systems from 2D to 3D mode is the next expected step in the telecommunication world. Some works have already been done to perform this progress technically, but interaction of the third dimension with humans is not yet clear. Previously, it was found that any increased load of visual system can create visual fatigue, like prolonged TV watching, computer work or video gaming. But watching S3D can cause another nature of visual fatigue, since all S3D technologies creates illusion of the third dimension based on characteristics of binocular vision. In this work we propose to evaluate and compare the visual fatigue from watching 2D and S3D content. This work shows the difference in accumulation of visual fatigue and its assessment for two types of content. In order to perform this comparison eye-tracking experiments using six commercially available movies were conducted. Healthy naive participants took part into the test and gave their answers feeling the subjective evaluation. It was found that watching stereo 3D content induce stronger feeling of visual fatigue than conventional 2D, and the nature of video has an important effect on its increase. Visual characteristics obtained by using eye-tracking were investigated regarding their relation with visual fatigue.

  19. Comparison and Extension of Existing 3D Propagation Models with Real-World Effects Based on Ray-tracing

    Kifle, Dereje W.; Gimenez, Lucas Chavarria; Wegmann, Bernhard;

    2014-01-01

    far, by changing antenna beam orientation like antenna tilting or when users are distributed in the third dimension (height) in multi-floor scenarios. Ray tracing based generated propagation maps that show the realistic propagation effect are used as 3D real world reference for investigation and model...

  20. Analysis of acetabular version in the native hip: comparison between 2D axial CT and 3D CT measurements

    Dandachli, Wael [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Imperial College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Ul Islam, Saif; Tippett, Richard; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A.; Witt, Johan D. [University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    To compare two-dimensional (2D) axial with three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) measurements of acetabular version in native hips. CT scans of 34 hips in 17 consecutive patients being investigated for femoroacetabular impingement were analyzed. Acetabular version was measured using 2D CT at two different axial levels, one cranial (slice 2) and the other at the equator (slice 3). The measurements were repeated after correction for pelvic tilt. The results were compared to the measurements of anatomical version obtained using a 3D CT method that automatically corrects for pelvic tilt. The mean acetabular version using the 3D CT method was 15.7 (SD 6.9 ). The mean version using slice 2 was 9.3 (SD 6.5 ) before correction for pelvic tilt and 15.7 (SD 8.0 ) after the correction. The mean version using slice 3 was 16.4 (SD 4.2 ) before tilt correction and 19.0 (SD 5.0 ) after the correction. In relation to the 3D method, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.58 for the uncorrected and 0.93 for the corrected slice 2 method. For the uncorrected and corrected slice 3 methods, the ICC was 0.64 and 0.89, respectively. The 2D axial methods produced variable results. The results that correlated best with the 3D method were those of the cranial slice (slice 2) after correction for pelvic tilt. Interpretation of 2D axial CT measurements of acetabular version should be done with caution. The level at which the measurement is done and the presence of pelvic tilt appear to be significant factors. (orig.)

  1. A comparison of multi-scale 3D X-ray tomographic inspection techniques for assessing carbon fibre composite impact damage

    Bull, D. J.; Helfen, L.; Sinclair, I.; Spearing, S.M.; Baumbach, T.

    2013-01-01

    Tomographic imaging using both laboratory sources and synchrotron radiation (SR) was performed to achieve a multi-scale damage assessment of carbon fibre composites subjected to impact damage, allowing various internal damage modes to be studied in three-dimensions. The focus of this study is the comparison of different tomographic methods, identifying their capabilities and limitations, and their use in a complementary manner for creating an overall 3D damage assessment at both macroscopic a...

  2. A New Global fAPAR and LAI Dataset Derived from Optimal Albedo Estimates: Comparison with MODIS Products

    Mathias Disney

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the first comparison between new fAPAR and LAI products derived from the GlobAlbedo dataset and the widely-used MODIS fAPAR and LAI products. The GlobAlbedo-derived products are produced using a 1D two-stream radiative transfer (RT scheme designed explicitly for global parameter retrieval from albedo, with consistency between RT model assumptions and observations, as well as with typical large-scale land surface model RT schemes. The approach does not require biome-specific structural assumptions (e.g., cover, clumping, understory, unlike more detailed 3D RT model approaches. GlobAlbedo-derived values of fAPAR and LAI are compared with MODIS values over 2002–2011 at multiple flux tower sites within selected biomes, over 1200 × 1200 km regions and globally. GlobAlbedo-derived fAPAR and LAI values are temporally more stable than the MODIS values due to the smoothness of the underlying albedo, derived via optimal estimation (assimilation using an a priori estimate of albedo derived from an albedo “climatology” (composited multi-year albedo observations. Parameters agree closely in timing but with GlobAlbedo values consistently lower than MODIS, particularly for LAI. Larger differences occur in winter (when values are lower and in the Southern hemisphere. Globally, we find that: GlobAlbedo-derived fAPAR is ~0.9–1.01 × MODIS fAPAR with an intercept of ~0.03; GlobAlbedo-derived LAI is ~0.6 × MODIS LAI with an intercept of ~0.2. Differences arise due to the RT model assumptions underlying the products, meaning care is required in interpreting either set of values, particularly when comparing to fine-scale ground-based estimates. We present global transformations between GlobAlbedo-derived and MODIS products.

  3. Comparison of OpenFOAM and EllipSys3D for neutral atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    Cavar, Dalibor; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Bechmann, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    been tested and compared to the results of OpenFOAM v.1.7.1 and EllipSys3D. The numerical results obtained using the same wall-modeling approach in both EllipSys3D and Open-FOAM v.2.1.1 proved to be almost identical. Two meshing strategies are investigated using HypGrid and SnappyHexMesh. The...... performance of Open-FOAM on SnappyHexMesh-based low-aspect-ratio unstructured meshes is found to be almost an order of magnitude faster than on HypGrid-based structured and high-aspect-ratio meshes. However, proper control of boundary layer resolution is found to be very difficult when the SnappyHexMesh tool...

  4. 3D surface measurement for medical application--technical comparison of two established industrial surface scanning systems.

    Schwenzer-Zimmerer, K; Haberstok, J; Kovacs, L; Boerner, B I; Schwenzer, N; Juergens, P; Zeihofer, H F; Holberg, C

    2008-02-01

    In 3D mapping of flexible surfaces (e.g. human faces) measurement errors due to movement or positioning occur. Aggravated by equipment- or researcher-caused mistakes considerable deviations can result. Therefore first the appliances' precision handling and reliability in clinical environment must be established. Aim of this study was to investigate accuracy and precision of two contact-free 3D measurement systems (white light vs. laser). Standard specimens of known diameter for sphere deviation, touch deviation and plane deviation were tested. Both systems are appropriate for medical application acquiring solid data (accuracy at 0.2 s measuring time. The laser system is superior concerning robustness, while accuracy is poorer and input time (1.5-2.5 s) longer. Due to the clinical demand the white-light system is superior in a laboratory environment, while the laser system is easier to handle under non-laboratory conditions. PMID:18333407

  5. Evaluation of the User Strategy on 2d and 3d City Maps Based on Novel Scanpath Comparison Method and Graph Visualization

    Dolezalova, J.; Popelka, S.

    2016-06-01

    The paper is dealing with scanpath comparison of eye-tracking data recorded during case study focused on the evaluation of 2D and 3D city maps. The experiment contained screenshots from three map portals. Two types of maps were used - standard map and 3D visualization. Respondents' task was to find particular point symbol on the map as fast as possible. Scanpath comparison is one group of the eye-tracking data analyses methods used for revealing the strategy of the respondents. In cartographic studies, the most commonly used application for scanpath comparison is eyePatterns that output is hierarchical clustering and a tree graph representing the relationships between analysed sequences. During an analysis of the algorithm generating a tree graph, it was found that the outputs do not correspond to the reality. We proceeded to the creation of a new tool called ScanGraph. This tool uses visualization of cliques in simple graphs and is freely available at www.eyetracking.upol.cz/scangraph. Results of the study proved the functionality of the tool and its suitability for analyses of different strategies of map readers. Based on the results of the tool, similar scanpaths were selected, and groups of respondents with similar strategies were identified. With this knowledge, it is possible to analyse the relationship between belonging to the group with similar strategy and data gathered from the questionnaire (age, sex, cartographic knowledge, etc.) or type of stimuli (2D, 3D map).

  6. Evaluation of the User Strategy on 2d and 3d City Maps Based on Novel Scanpath Comparison Method and Graph Visualization

    Dolezalova, J.; Popelka, S.

    2016-06-01

    The paper is dealing with scanpath comparison of eye-tracking data recorded during case study focused on the evaluation of 2D and 3D city maps. The experiment contained screenshots from three map portals. Two types of maps were used - standard map and 3D visualization. Respondents' task was to find particular point symbol on the map as fast as possible. Scanpath comparison is one group of the eye-tracking data analyses methods used for revealing the strategy of the respondents. In cartographic studies, the most commonly used application for scanpath comparison is eyePatterns that output is hierarchical clustering and a tree graph representing the relationships between analysed sequences. During an analysis of the algorithm generating a tree graph, it was found that the outputs do not correspond to the reality. We proceeded to the creation of a new tool called ScanGraph. This tool uses visualization of cliques in simple graphs and is freely available at www.eyetracking.upol.cz/scangraph"target="_blank">www.eyetracking.upol.cz/scangraph. Results of the study proved the functionality of the tool and its suitability for analyses of different strategies of map readers. Based on the results of the tool, similar scanpaths were selected, and groups of respondents with similar strategies were identified. With this knowledge, it is possible to analyse the relationship between belonging to the group with similar strategy and data gathered from the questionnaire (age, sex, cartographic knowledge, etc.) or type of stimuli (2D, 3D map).

  7. Comparison of toxicity after IMRT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy for patients with pancreatic cancer – A systematic review

    Summary: IMRT has been suggested to reduce treatment-related toxicity in pancreatic cancer. We attempted to identify all IMRT-studies indexed in PubMed/Medline, comparing them with recent 3D-CRT trials. The predominant treatment-related toxicities, namely nausea/vomiting, diarrhoea and late GI toxicity, are significantly reduced with IMRT while there was no apparent difference for outcome measures

  8. Analysis of slicing-tools for fused deposition modeling 3D-printers and comparison of different printers

    Bugdayci, Halil; Grunert, Jonas; Keller, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    The term 3D printer refers to machines capable of additive manufacturing, which means creating objects by sequential layering. Additive manufactured objects can be used in the whole product life cycle, from rapid prototyping through small series production up to full production. In addition to the hardware itself it is necessary to use tools and applications like "slicing tools", post-production adjustments, process models and testing and verifying scenarios. With slicing tools it is poss...

  9. Comparison of the accuracy and precision of prostate localization with 2D-2D and 3D images

    Logadottir, Ashildur; Korreman, Stine; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Positional uncertainties related to the set-up of the prostate, using internal markers and either 2D–2D or 3D images, were studied. Set-up using direct prostate localization on CBCT scans is compared to set-up using internal markers. Material and methods 20 patients with...... prostate cancer were enrolled in the study. After each daily session, a set of 2D–2D and 3D images were acquired. The images isocenter was compared to reference images isocenter. For the set-up error analysis the systematic error, μ, and the set-up uncertainties, Σ and σ, were determined for the......, were comparable. The correlation between the two methods was better for translational shifts of the isocenter than for rotational shifts. Conclusions The study shows that the precision of the 2D–2D set-up is equivalent to the precision of the 3D images. It also shows that the soft-tissue based set...

  10. MR enteroclysis protocol optimization: comparison between 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous gadolinium injection and true FISP sequences

    Gourtsoyiannis, N.; Papanikolaou, N.; Grammatikakis, J.; Maris, T.; Prassopoulos, P. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to introduce the true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence for MR enteroclysis and compare it with the already used T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. Twenty-one patients underwent both MR and conventional enteroclysis. The MR enteroclysis examination was performed after administration of an iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter and the following sequences were included: (a) true FISP; and (b) 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous injection of 20 mg Buscopan or 1 mg glucagon and 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium chelates. The true FISP sequence provided images with significantly fewer motion artifacts, whereas 3D FLASH was less sensitive to susceptibility and chemical shift artifacts. The homogeneity of endoluminal opacification, wall conspicuity, and distention of the small bowel were very good to excellent and the two sequences presented no statistically significant differences here. True FISP provided significantly better overall image quality than did 3D FLASH. The true FISP sequence can provide good anatomic demonstration of the small bowel on T2-like images and could be combined with T1-weighted FLASH images for an integrated protocol of MR enteroclysis. (orig.)

  11. MR enteroclysis protocol optimization: comparison between 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous gadolinium injection and true FISP sequences

    The aim of this study was to introduce the true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) sequence for MR enteroclysis and compare it with the already used T1-weighted fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence. Twenty-one patients underwent both MR and conventional enteroclysis. The MR enteroclysis examination was performed after administration of an iso-osmotic water solution through a nasojejunal catheter and the following sequences were included: (a) true FISP; and (b) 3D FLASH with fat saturation after intravenous injection of 20 mg Buscopan or 1 mg glucagon and 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium chelates. The true FISP sequence provided images with significantly fewer motion artifacts, whereas 3D FLASH was less sensitive to susceptibility and chemical shift artifacts. The homogeneity of endoluminal opacification, wall conspicuity, and distention of the small bowel were very good to excellent and the two sequences presented no statistically significant differences here. True FISP provided significantly better overall image quality than did 3D FLASH. The true FISP sequence can provide good anatomic demonstration of the small bowel on T2-like images and could be combined with T1-weighted FLASH images for an integrated protocol of MR enteroclysis. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of 3D cube FLAIR with 2D FLAIR for multiple sclerosis imaging at 3 tesla

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3 D) MRI sequences allow improved spatial resolution with good signal and contrast properties as well as multiplanar reconstruction. We sought to compare Cube, a 3 D FLAIR sequence, to a standard 2 D FLAIR sequence in multiple sclerosis (MS) imaging. Materials and Methods: Examinations were performed in the clinical routine on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. 12 patients with definite MS were included. Lesions with MS-typical properties on the images of Cube FLAIR and 2 D FLAIR sequences were counted and allocated to different brain regions. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Results: With 384 the overall number of lesions found with Cube FLAIR was significantly higher than with 2 D FLAIR (N = 221). The difference was mostly accounted for by supratentorial lesions (N = 372 vs. N = 216) while the infratentorial lesion counts were low in both sequences. SNRs and CNRs were significantly higher in CUBE FLAIR with the exception of the CNR of lesion to gray matter, which was not significantly different. Conclusion: Cube FLAIR showed a higher sensitivity for MS lesions compared to a 2 D FLAIR sequence. 3 D FLAIR might replace 2 D FLAIR sequences in MS imaging in the future. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of 3D cube FLAIR with 2D FLAIR for multiple sclerosis imaging at 3 tesla

    Patzig, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Fesl, G. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Burke, M. [GE Healthcare, Solingen (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3 D) MRI sequences allow improved spatial resolution with good signal and contrast properties as well as multiplanar reconstruction. We sought to compare Cube, a 3 D FLAIR sequence, to a standard 2 D FLAIR sequence in multiple sclerosis (MS) imaging. Materials and Methods: Examinations were performed in the clinical routine on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. 12 patients with definite MS were included. Lesions with MS-typical properties on the images of Cube FLAIR and 2 D FLAIR sequences were counted and allocated to different brain regions. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Results: With 384 the overall number of lesions found with Cube FLAIR was significantly higher than with 2 D FLAIR (N = 221). The difference was mostly accounted for by supratentorial lesions (N = 372 vs. N = 216) while the infratentorial lesion counts were low in both sequences. SNRs and CNRs were significantly higher in CUBE FLAIR with the exception of the CNR of lesion to gray matter, which was not significantly different. Conclusion: Cube FLAIR showed a higher sensitivity for MS lesions compared to a 2 D FLAIR sequence. 3 D FLAIR might replace 2 D FLAIR sequences in MS imaging in the future. (orig.)

  14. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  15. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  16. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Bree, Ingrid de, E-mail: i.de.bree@zrti.nl [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands); Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  17. Clinical implication of parameteroptimized 3D-FISP MR angiography (MRA) in children with aortic coarctation: comparison with catheter angiography

    Purpose: To implement parameter-optimized 3D-FISP MR angiography (MRA) with interleaved double-slab excitation and to compare the result with catheter angiography in children with aortic coarctation. Materials and Methods: Eighteen children aged 2-15 years (mean 9.1 years) underwent MR imaging on a 1.5 T body scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens, Germany). All patients had undergone correlative catheter angiography. T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) images (TR 600 ms, TE 17 ms, flip 160 , slice thickness 2-4 mm) were obtained in axial and parasagittal orientation, followed by an optimized 3D-FISP MR angiography in a sagittal plane (TR 12.5 ms, TE 5.5 ms, flip 22 , matrix 256 x 256, slice thickness 1.25 mm). All children were sedated but on spontaneous breathing. Image quality was graded by two experienced reviewers using a 4-point scoring system. Source images and reformatted maximum intensity projections (MIP) were analyzed for blood-tissue contrast as well as size and focal stenoses of the aortic arch. Results: Aortic coarctation was found in 13 of 18 patients, using the 3D-FISP MRA. A high correlation value (r=0.96) was found compared to catheter angiography. Image quality was high in 94% with well defined blood-tissue contrast in all cases. The sensitivity of flow and breathing motion was low. Examination time was about 15 minutes depending on volume of interest and heart rate. Diagnostic accuracy has shown improvement using a combined analysis of source and MIP images. The mentioned technique has provided an excellent display of thoracic vasculature. (orig.)

  18. The Correlation Between the GFR and the Renal Dimensions in Glomerulopathy Patients: Comparison of 2D and 3D Ultrasound

    We wanted to determine the correlation between the renal length as measured on two dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US) and the renal parenchymal volume as measured with a new three-dimensional (3D) volume probe ultrasound system. We also wanted to determine the correlation between the renal length or renal parenchymal volume and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in patients with glomerulopathy. From July 2007 to December 2007, 26 patients who were pathologically confirmed to have glomerulopathy by biopsy were enrolled. Renal length was measured with 2D US and the renal parenchymal volume was measured with 3D US just prior to biopsy. The GFR was obtained from the electronic medical records. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to analyze the correlation between the renal length and the renal parenchymal volume, the correlation between the renal length and the GFR and the correlation between the renal parenchymal volume and the GFR. The renal length and the renal parenchymal volume showed strong positive correlation (r = 0.850, p = 0.0001). The correlation coefficient between the renal length and the GFR was 0.623 (p = 0.0007) and the correlation coefficient between the renal volume and the GFR was 0.590 (p = 0.0015). Both the renal length and renal parenchymal volume showed apparently positive correlations with the GFR in glomerulopathy patients. The renal length showed strong positive correlations with the renal parenchymal volume. Both the renal length and the renal parenchymal volume showed apparently positive correlations with the GFR in glomerulopathy patients. In glomerulopathy patients, the renal dimensions measured by ultrasound can reflect the status of the GFR, and the measurement of the 2D renal length could be sufficient for follow up. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of 3D US for assessing patients with renal disease

  19. Comparison of Different 2D and 3D-QSAR Methods on Activity Prediction of Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Asadpour-Zeynali, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Histamine H3 receptor subtype has been the target of several recent drug development programs. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods are used to predict the pharmaceutically relevant properties of drug candidates whenever it is applicable. The aim of this study was to compare the predictive powers of three different QSAR techniques, namely, multiple linear regression (MLR), artificial neural network (ANN), and HASL as a 3D QSAR method, in predicting the receptor binding affinities of arylbenzofuran histamine H3 receptor antagonists. Genetic algorithm coupled partial least square as well as stepwise multiple regression methods were used to select a number of calculated molecular descriptors to be used in MLR and ANN-based QSAR studies. Using the leave-group-out cross-validation technique, the performances of the MLR and ANN methods were evaluated. The calculated values for the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), ranging from 2.9 to 3.6, and standard deviation of error of prediction (SDEP), ranging from 0.31 to 0.36, for both MLR and ANN methods were statistically comparable, indicating that both methods perform equally well in predicting the binding affinities of the studied compounds toward the H3 receptors. On the other hand, the results from 3D-QSAR studies using HASL method were not as good as those obtained by 2D methods. It can be concluded that simple traditional approaches such as MLR method can be as reliable as those of more advanced and sophisticated methods like ANN and 3D-QSAR analyses. PMID:25317190

  20. Comparison of different approaches of estimating effective dose from reported exposure data in 3D imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Hansson, Jonny; Bâth, Magnus

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging with interventional fluoroscopy systems is today a common examination. The examination includes acquisition of two-dimensional projection images, used to reconstruct section images of the patient. The aim of the present study was to investigate the difference in resulting effective dose obtained using different levels of complexity in calculations of effective doses from these examinations. In the study the Siemens Artis Zeego interventional fluoroscopy system (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany) was used. Images of anthropomorphic chest and pelvis phantoms were acquired. The exposure values obtained were used to calculate the resulting effective doses from the examinations, using the computer software PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland). The dose calculations were performed using three different methods: 1. using individual exposure values for each projection image, 2. using the mean tube voltage and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over the projection images, and 3. using the mean kV and the total DAP value, evenly distributed over smaller selection of projection images. The results revealed that the difference in resulting effective dose between the first two methods was smaller than 5%. When only a selection of projection images were used in the dose calculations the difference increased to over 10%. Given the uncertainties associated with the effective dose concept, the results indicate that dose calculations based on average exposure values distributed over a smaller selection of projection angles can provide reasonably accurate estimations of the radiation doses from 3D imaging using interventional fluoroscopy systems.

  1. Comparison between the ideal reference dose level and the actual reference dose level from clinical 3D radiotherapy treatment plans

    Purpose: Retrospective study of 3D clinical treatment plans based on radiobiological considerations in the choice of the reference dose level from tumor dose-volume histograms. Methods and materials: When a radiation oncologist evaluates the 3D dose distribution calculated by a treatment planning system, a decision must be made on the percentage dose level at which the prescribed dose should be delivered. Much effort is dedicated to deliver a dose as uniform as possible to the tumor volume. However due to the presence of critical organs, the result may be a rather inhomogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor volume. In this study we use a formulation of tumor control probability (TCP) based on the linear quadratic model and on a parameter, the F factor. The F factor allows one to write TCP, from the heterogeneous dose distribution (TCP{(εj,Dj)}), as a function of TCP under condition of homogeneous irradiation of tumor volume (V) with dose D (TCP(V,D)). We used the expression of the F factor to calculate the 'ideal' percentage dose level (iDLr) to be used as reference level for the prescribed dose D delivery, so as to render TCP{(εj,Dj)} equal to TCP(V,D). The 3D dose distributions of 53 clinical treatment plans were re-evaluated to derive the iDLr and to compare it with the one (DtpL) to which the dose was actually administered. Results: For the majority of prostate treatments, we observed a low overdosing following the choice of a DtpL lower than the iDLr. While for the breast and head-and-neck treatments, the method showed that in many cases we underdosed choosing a DtpL greater than the iDLr. The maximum difference between the iDLr and the DtpL was -3.24% for one of the head-and-neck treatments. Conclusions: Using the TCP model, the probability of tumor control is compromised following an incorrect choice of DtpL; so we conclude that the application of the F factor is an effective tool and clinical aid to derive the optimal reference dose level from

  2. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    Michalski, Andrea [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Central Coast Cancer Centre, Gosford Hospital, Gosford, New South Wales (Australia); Atyeo, John, E-mail: john.atyeo@sydney.edu.au [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Cox, Jennifer [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Rinks, Marianne [Department of Health Science (MRS), The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Radiation Oncology, Cancer Services, Illawarra Shoalhaven Local Health District, Wollongong, New South Wales (Australia); Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D{sub 98%} > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D{sub 98%} > 95% and D{sub 2%} < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (Breast{sub SIB}) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTV{sub boost} {sub eval} (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and Breast{sub SIB} (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D

  3. A dosimetric comparison of 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy with an SIB for large and small breast volumes

    Radiation therapy to the breast is a complex task, with many different techniques that can be employed to ensure adequate dose target coverage while minimizing doses to the organs at risk. This study compares the dose planning outcomes of 3 radiation treatment modalities, 3 dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and static tomotherapy, for left-sided whole-breast radiation treatment with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Overall, 20 patients with left-sided breast cancer were separated into 2 cohorts, small and large, based on breast volume. Dose plans were produced for each patient using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and static tomotherapy. All patients were prescribed a dose of 45 Gy in 20 fractions to the breast with an SIB of 56 Gy in 20 fractions to the tumor bed and normalized so that D98% > 95% of the prescription dose. Dosimetric comparisons were made between the 3 modalities and the interaction of patient size. All 3 modalities offered adequate planning target volume (PTV) coverage with D98% > 95% and D2% < 107%. Static tomotherapy offered significantly improved (p = 0.006) dose homogeneity to the PTVboost eval (0.079 ± 0.011) and breast minus the SIB volume (BreastSIB) (p < 0.001, 0.15 ± 0.03) compared with the PTVboost eval (0.085 ± 0.008, 0.088 ± 0.12) and BreastSIB (0.22 ± 0.05, 0.23 ± 0.03) for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively. Static tomotherapy also offered statistically significant reductions (p < 0.001) in doses to the ipsilateral lung mean dose of 6.79 ± 2.11 Gy compared with 7.75 ± 2.54 Gy and 8.29 ± 2.76 Gy for IMRT and 3D-CRT, respectively, and significantly (p < 0.001) reduced heart doses (mean = 2.83 ± 1.26 Gy) compared to both IMRT and 3D-CRT (mean = 3.70 ± 1.44 Gy and 3.91 ± 1.58 Gy). Static tomotherapy is the dosimetrically superior modality for the whole breast with an SIB compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT in both PTV dose conformity and reduction of mean

  4. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3D climate model

    Wordsworth, Robin D; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Forget, Francois; Head, James W

    2015-01-01

    We use a 3D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (~0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadr...

  5. Plasma response measurements of external magnetic perturbations using electron cyclotron emission and comparisons to 3D ideal MHD equilibrium

    Willensdorfer, M; Strumberger, E; Suttrop, W; Vanovac, B; Brida, D; Cavedon, M; Classen, I; Dunne, M; Fietz, S; Fischer, R; Kirk, A; Laggner, F M; Liu, Y Q; Odstrcil, T; Ryan, D A; Viezzer, E; Zohm, H; Luhmann, I C

    2016-01-01

    The plasma response from an external n = 2 magnetic perturbation field in ASDEX Upgrade has been measured using mainly electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics and a rigid rotating field. To interpret ECE and ECE-imaging (ECE-I) measurements accurately, forward modeling of the radiation transport has been combined with ray tracing. The measured data is compared to synthetic ECE data generated from a 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium calculated by VMEC. The measured amplitudes of the helical displacement in the midplane are in reasonable agreement with the one from the synthetic VMEC diagnostics. Both exceed the vacuum field calculations and indicate the presence of an amplified kink response at the edge. Although the calculated magnetic structure of this edge kink peaks at poloidal mode numbers larger than the resonant components |m| > |nq|, the displacement measured by ECE-I is almost resonant |m| ~ |nq|. This is expected from ideal MHD in the proximity of rational surfaces. VMEC and MARS-...

  6. Comparison of 3D point clouds obtained by photogrammetric UAVs and TLS to determine the attitude of dolerite outcrops discontinuities.

    Duarte, João; Gonçalves, Gil; Duarte, Diogo; Figueiredo, Fernando; Mira, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Photogrammetric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS) are two emerging technologies that allows the production of dense 3D point clouds of the sensed topographic surfaces. Although image-based stereo-photogrammetric point clouds could not, in general, compete on geometric quality over TLS point clouds, fully automated mapping solutions based on ultra-light UAVs (or drones) have recently become commercially available at very reasonable accuracy and cost for engineering and geological applications. The purpose of this paper is to compare the two point clouds generated by these two technologies, in order to automatize the manual process tasks commonly used to detect and represent the attitude of discontinuities (Stereographic projection: Schmidt net - Equal area). To avoid the difficulties of access and guarantee the data survey security conditions, this fundamental step in all geological/geotechnical studies, applied to the extractive industry and engineering works, has to be replaced by a more expeditious and reliable methodology. This methodology will allow, in a more actuated clear way, give answers to the needs of evaluation of rock masses, by mapping the structures present, which will reduce considerably the associated risks (investment, structures dimensioning, security, etc.). A case study of a dolerite outcrop locate in the center of Portugal (the dolerite outcrop is situated in the volcanic complex of Serra de Todo-o-Mundo, Casais Gaiola, intruded in Jurassic sandstones) will be used to assess this methodology. The results obtained show that the 3D point cloud produced by the Photogrammetric UAV platform has the appropriate geometric quality for extracting the parameters that define the discontinuities of the dolerite outcrops. Although, they are comparable to the manual extracted parameters, their quality is inferior to parameters extracted from the TLS point cloud.

  7. Comparison of climate datasets for lumped hydrological modeling over the continental United States

    Essou, Gilles R. C.; Arsenault, Richard; Brissette, François P.

    2016-06-01

    Climate data measured by weather stations are crucially important and regularly used in hydrologic modeling. However, they are not always available due to the low spatial density and short record history of many station networks. To overcome these limitations, gridded datasets have become increasingly available. They have excellent continuous spatial coverage and no missing data. However, these datasets are usually interpolated using station data, with little new information besides elevation. Furthermore, minimal validation has been done on most of these datasets. This study compares three such datasets covering the continental United States to evaluate their differences and their impact on lumped hydrological modeling. Three daily time step gridded datasets with resolutions varying between 0.25° and 1 km were used in this study - Santa-Clara, Daymet and CPC. The hydrological modeling evaluation of these datasets was performed over 424 basins from the MOPEX database. Results show that there are significant differences between the datasets, even though they were essentially all interpolated from almost the same climate databases. Despite those differences, the hydrological model used in this study was able to perform equally well after a specific calibration to each dataset. While there were a few exceptions, by and large, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency metrics obtained in validation were not statistically different from one database to the other for most basins. It appears that there are no reasons to favor one dataset versus another for lumped hydrological modeling, and that these datasets perform just as well as using the original station data.

  8. Stationary versus non-stationary (13)C-MFA: a comparison using a consistent dataset.

    Noack, Stephan; Nöh, Katharina; Moch, Matthias; Oldiges, Marco; Wiechert, Wolfgang

    2011-07-10

    Besides the well-established (13)C-metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) which characterizes a cell's fluxome in a metabolic and isotopic stationary state a current area of research is isotopically non-stationary MFA. Non-stationary (13)C-MFA uses short-time isotopic transient data instead of long-time isotopic equilibrium data and thus is capable to resolve fluxes within much shorter labeling experiments. However, a comparison of both methods with data from one single experiment has not been made so far. In order to create a consistent database for directly comparing both methods a (13)C-labeling experiment in a fed-batch cultivation with a Corynebacterium glutamicum lysine producer was carried out. During the experiment the substrate glucose was switched from unlabeled to a specifically labeled glucose mixture which was immediately traced by fast sampling and metabolite quenching. The time course of labeling enrichments in intracellular metabolites until isotopic stationarity was monitored by LC-MS/MS. The resulting dataset was evaluated using the classical as well as the isotopic non-stationary MFA approach. The results show that not only the obtained relative data, i.e. intracellular flux distributions, but also the more informative quantitative fluxome data significantly depend on the combination of the measurements and the underlying modeling approach used for data integration. Taking further criteria on the experimental and computational part into consideration, the current limitations of both methods are demonstrated and possible pitfalls are concluded. PMID:20638432

  9. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  10. Comparative proteomic analyses of two reovirus T3D subtypes and comparison to T1L identifies multiple novel proteins in key cellular pathogenic pathways.

    Berard, Alicia R; Severini, Alberto; Coombs, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Viruses induce changes in the host to facilitate replication and evade the immune response. These changes are reflected by the host's proteome, including differences in protein abundance. Focusing on up and down regulated proteins after a virus infects the cell will lead to a characterization of the host response to infection, and may give insight into how viruses modulate proteins to evade host defense responses. We previously used SILAC to examine host proteomic changes in protein abundance in HEK293 cells infected with reovirus type 1, strain Lang (T1L). For the present study, we extended this analysis by determining cell protein alterations induced by two different reovirus subtypes, a less pathogenic type 3 Dearing (T3D(F)) isolate, and a more pathogenic isolate named T3D(C) that is presently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer oncolytic agent. This comparison of host proteome regulation showed that T3D(C) had a more marked effect on DNA replication proteins, recombination and repair, as well as immunological, apoptotic, and survival cell functions. We also identified several proteins not previously identified in any virus infection; branched chain amino-acid transaminase 2 (BCAT), paternally expressed 10 (PEG10), target of myb1 (TOM1), histone cluster 2 H4b (HIST2H4B) and tubulin beta 4B (TUBB4B). PMID:25900405

  11. Comparison of neutron fluxes obtained by 2-D and 3-D geometry with different shielding libraries in biological shield of the TRIGA MARK II reactor

    Neutron fluxes in different spatial locations in biological shield are obtained with TORT code (TORT-Three Dimensional Oak Ridge Discrete Ordinates Neutron/Photon Transport Code). Libraries used with TORT code were BUGLE-96 library (coupled library with 47 neutron groups and 20 gamma groups) and VITAMIN-B6 library (coupled library with 199 neutron groups and 42 gamma groups). BUGLE-96 library is derived from VITAMIN-B6 library. 2-D and 3-D models for homogeneous type of problem (without inserted beam port 4) and problem with asymmetry (non-homogeneous problem; inserted beam port 4, filled with different materials) were of interest for neutron flux calculation. The main purpose is to verify the possibility for using 2-D approximation model instead of large 3-D model in some calculations. Another purpose of this paper was to compare neutron spectral constants obtained from neutron fluxes (3-D model) determined with smaller BUGLE-96 library with new constants obtained from fluxes calculated with bigger VITAMIN-B6 library. These neutron spectral constants are used in isotopic calculation with SCALE code package (ORIGEN-S). In past only neutron spectral constants determined by neutron fluxes from BUGLE-96 library were used. Experimental results used for isotopic composition comparison are available from irradiation experiment with selected type of concrete and other materials in beam port 4 (irradiation channel 4) in TRIGA Mark II reactor. These experimental results were used as a benchmark in this paper. (author)

  12. Uav-Based Acquisition of 3d Point Cloud - a Comparison of a Low-Cost Laser Scanner and Sfm-Tools

    Mader, D.; Blaskow, R.; Westfeld, P.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    The Project ADFEX (Adaptive Federative 3D Exploration of Multi Robot System) pursues the goal to develop a time- and cost-efficient system for exploration and monitoring task of unknown areas or buildings. A fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with appropriate sensors (laser scanner, RGB camera, near infrared camera, thermal camera) were designed and built. A typical operational scenario may include the exploration of the object or area of investigation by an UAV equipped with a laser scanning range finder to generate a rough point cloud in real time to provide an overview of the object on a ground station as well as an obstacle map. The data about the object enables the path planning for the robot fleet. Subsequently, the object will be captured by a RGB camera mounted on the second flying robot for the generation of a dense and accurate 3D point cloud by using of structure from motion techniques. In addition, the detailed image data serves as basis for a visual damage detection on the investigated building. This paper focuses on our experience with use of a low-cost light-weight Hokuyo laser scanner onboard an UAV. The hardware components for laser scanner based 3D point cloud acquisition are discussed, problems are demonstrated and analyzed, and a quantitative analysis of the accuracy potential is shown as well as in comparison with structure from motion-tools presented.

  13. A Sensory 3D Map of the Odor Description Space Derived from a Comparison of Numeric Odor Profile Databases.

    Zarzo, Manuel

    2015-06-01

    Many authors have proposed different schemes of odor classification, which are useful to aid the complex task of describing smells. However, reaching a consensus on a particular classification seems difficult because our psychophysical space of odor description is a continuum and is not clustered into well-defined categories. An alternative approach is to describe the perceptual space of odors as a low-dimensional coordinate system. This idea was first proposed by Crocker and Henderson in 1927, who suggested using numeric profiles based on 4 dimensions: "fragrant," "acid," "burnt," and "caprylic." In the present work, the odor profiles of 144 aroma chemicals were compared by means of statistical regression with comparable numeric odor profiles obtained from 2 databases, enabling a plausible interpretation of the 4 dimensions. Based on the results and taking into account comparable 2D sensory maps of odor descriptors from the literature, a 3D sensory map (odor cube) has been drawn up to improve understanding of the similarities and dissimilarities of the odor descriptors most frequently used in fragrance chemistry. PMID:25847969

  14. Radionuclide Transport and Uptake in Coastal Aquatic Ecosystems: A Comparison of a 3D Dynamic Model and a Compartment Model

    In safety assessments of underground radioactive waste repositories, understanding radionuclide fate in ecosystems is necessary to determine the impacts of potential releases. Here, the reliability of two mechanistic models (the compartmental K-model and the 3D dynamic D-model) in describing the fate of radionuclides released into a Baltic Sea bay is tested. Both are based on ecosystem models that simulate the cycling of organic matter (carbon). Radionuclide transfer is linked to adsorption and flows of carbon in food chains. Accumulation of Th-230, Cs-135, and Ni-59 in biological compartments was comparable between the models and site measurements despite differences in temporal resolution, biological state variables, and partition coefficients. Both models provided confidence limits for their modeled concentration ratios, an improvement over models that only estimate means. The D-model enables estimates at high spatio-temporal resolution. The K-model, being coarser but faster, allows estimates centuries ahead. Future developments could integrate the two models to take advantage of their respective strengths

  15. ASTRID: A 3D Eulerian software for subcooled boiling modelling - comparison with experimental results in tubes and annuli

    Briere, E.; Larrauri, D.; Olive, J. [Electricite de France, Chatou (France)

    1995-09-01

    For about four years, Electricite de France has been developing a 3-D computer code for the Eulerian simulation of two-phase flows. This code, named ASTRID, is based on the six-equation two-fluid model. Boiling water flows, such as those encountered in nuclear reactors, are among the main applications of ASTRID. In order to provide ASTRID with closure laws and boundary conditions suitable for boiling flows, a boiling model has been developed by EDF and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse. In the fluid, the heat and mass transfer between a bubble and the liquid is being modelled. At the heating wall, the incipient boiling point is determined according to Hsu`s criterion and the boiling heat flux is split into three additive terms: a convective term, a quenching term and a vaporisation term. This model uses several correlations. EDF`s program in boiling two-phase flows also includes experimental studies, some of which are performed in collaboration with other laboratories. Refrigerant subcooled boiling both in tubular (DEBORA experiment, CEN Grenoble) and in annular geometry (Arizona State University Experiment) have been computed with ASTRID. The simulations show the satisfactory results already obtained on void fraction and liquid temperature. Ways of improvement of the model are drawn especially on the dynamical part.

  16. Comparison of 3D Adaptive Remeshing Strategies for Finite Element Simulations of Electromagnetic Heating of Gold Nanoparticles

    Fadhil Mezghani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of metallic nanoparticles are well known, but the study of their thermal behavior is in its infancy. However the local heating of surrounding medium, induced by illuminated nanostructures, opens the way to new sensors and devices. Consequently the accurate calculation of the electromagnetically induced heating of nanostructures is of interest. The proposed multiphysics problem cannot be directly solved with the classical refinement method of Comsol Multiphysics and a 3D adaptive remeshing process based on an a posteriori error estimator is used. In this paper the efficiency of three remeshing strategies for solving the multiphysics problem is compared. The first strategy uses independent remeshing for each physical quantity to reach a given accuracy. The second strategy only controls the accuracy on temperature. The third strategy uses a linear combination of the two normalized targets (the electric field intensity and the temperature. The analysis of the performance of each strategy is based on the convergence of the remeshing process in terms of number of elements. The efficiency of each strategy is also characterized by the number of computation iterations, the number of elements, the CPU time, and the RAM required to achieve a given target accuracy.

  17. 3D filling simulation of micro- and nanostructures in comparison to iso- and variothermal injection moulding trials

    Rytka, C.; Lungershausen, J.; Kristiansen, P. M.; Neyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    Flow simulations can cut down both costs and time for the development of injection moulded polymer parts with functional surfaces used in life science and optical applications. We simulated the polymer melt flow into 3D micro- and nanostructures with Moldflow and Comsol and compared the results to real iso- and variothermal injection moulding trials below, at and above the transition temperature of the polymer. By adjusting the heat transfer coefficient and the transition temperature in the simulation it was possible to achieve good correlation with experimental findings at different processing conditions (mould temperature, injection velocity) for two polymers, namely polymethylmethacrylate and amorphous polyamide. The macroscopic model can be scaled down in volume and number of elements to save computational time for microstructure simulation and to enable first and foremost the nanostructure simulation, as long as local boundary conditions such as flow front speed are transferred correctly. The heat transfer boundary condition used in Moldflow was further evaluated in Comsol. Results showed that the heat transfer coefficient needs to be increased compared to macroscopic moulding in order to represent interfacial polymer/mould effects correctly. The transition temperature is most important in the packing phase for variothermal injection moulding.

  18. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ragona, Riccardo; Piva, Cristina; Scafa, Davide; Fiandra, Christian [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Fusella, Marco; Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Medical Physics, AOU Città della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, Torino (Italy); Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LAR{sub VMAT}-to-LAR{sub 3D-CRT}) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by

  19. Optimized Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Versus 3D-CRT for Early Stage Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma Without Axillary Involvement: A Comparison of Second Cancers and Heart Disease Risk

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risks of second cancers and cardiovascular diseases associated with an optimized volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning solution in a selected cohort of stage I/II Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients treated with either involved-node or involved-site radiation therapy in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Thirty-eight patients (13 males and 25 females) were included. Disease extent was mediastinum alone (n=8, 21.1%); mediastinum plus unilateral neck (n=19, 50%); mediastinum plus bilateral neck (n=11, 29.9%). Prescription dose was 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Only 5 patients had mediastinal bulky disease at diagnosis (13.1%). Anteroposterior 3D-CRT was compared with a multiarc optimized VMAT solution. Lung, breast, and thyroid cancer risks were estimated by calculating a lifetime attributable risk (LAR), with a LAR ratio (LARVMAT-to-LAR3D-CRT) as a comparative measure. Cardiac toxicity risks were estimated by calculating absolute excess risk (AER). Results: The LAR ratio favored 3D-CRT for lung cancer induction risk in mediastinal alone (P=.004) and mediastinal plus unilateral neck (P=.02) presentations. LAR ratio for breast cancer was lower for VMAT in mediastinal plus bilateral neck presentations (P=.02), without differences for other sites. For thyroid cancer, no significant differences were observed, regardless of anatomical presentation. A significantly lower AER of cardiac (P=.038) and valvular diseases (P<.0001) was observed for VMAT regardless of disease extent. Conclusions: In a cohort of patients with favorable characteristics in terms of disease extent at diagnosis (large prevalence of nonbulky presentations without axillary involvement), optimized VMAT reduced heart disease risk with comparable risks of thyroid and breast cancer, with an increase in lung cancer induction probability. The results are however strongly influenced by the different

  20. Velocity Measurement in Carotid Artery: Quantitative Comparison of Time-Resolved 3D Phase-Contrast MRI and Image-based Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Sarrami-Foroushani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding hemodynamic environment in vessels is important for realizing the mechanisms leading to vascular pathologies. Objectives Three-dimensional velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation is visualized using TR 3D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (TR 3D PC MRI and computational fluid dynamics (CFD. This study aimed to present a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the velocity vector field obtained by each technique. Subjects and Methods MR imaging was performed on a 30-year old male normal subject. TR 3D PC MRI was performed on a 3 T scanner to measure velocity in carotid bifurcation. 3D anatomical model for CFD was created using images obtained from time-of-flight MR angiography. Velocity vector field in carotid bifurcation was predicted using CFD and PC MRI techniques. A statistical analysis was performed to assess the agreement between the two methods. Results Although the main flow patterns were the same for the both techniques, CFD showed a greater resolution in mapping the secondary and circulating flows. Overall root mean square (RMS errors for all the corresponding data points in PC MRI and CFD were 14.27% in peak systole and 12.91% in end diastole relative to maximum velocity measured at each cardiac phase. Bland-Altman plots showed a very good agreement between the two techniques. However, this study was not aimed to validate any of methods, instead, the consistency was assessed to accentuate the similarities and differences between Time-resolved PC MRI and CFD. Conclusion Both techniques provided quantitatively consistent results of in vivo velocity vector fields in right internal carotid artery (RCA. PC MRI represented a good estimation of main flow patterns inside the vasculature, which seems to be acceptable for clinical use. However, limitations of each technique should be considered while interpreting results.

  1. Different IMRT solutions vs. 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: dosimetric comparison and clinical considerations

    Radiotherapy in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL) is currently evolving with new attempts to further reduce radiation volumes to the involved-node concept (Involved Nodes Radiation Therapy, INRT) and with the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Currently, IMRT can be planned and delivered with several techniques, and its role is not completely clear. We designed a planning study on a typical dataset drawn from clinical routine with the aim of comparing different IMRT solutions in terms of plan quality and treatment delivery efficiency. A total of 10 young female patients affected with early stage mediastinal HL and treated with 30 Gy INRT after ABVD-based chemotherapy were selected from our database. Five different treatment techniques were compared: 3D-CRT, VMAT (single arc), B-VMAT (“butterfly”, multiple arcs), Helical Tomotherapy (HT) and Tomodirect (TD). Beam energy was 6 MV, and all IMRT planning solutions were optimized by inverse planning with specific dose-volume constraints on OAR (breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, coronary ostia, heart). Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) and Conformity Number (CN) were calculated and then compared, both for target and OAR by a statistical analysis (Wilcoxon’s Test). PTV coverage was reached for all plans (V95% ≥ 95%); highest mean CN were obtained with HT (0.77) and VMAT (0.76). B-VMAT showed intermediate CN mean values (0.67), while the lowest CN were obtained with TD (0.30) and 3D-CRT techniques (0.30). A trend of inverse correlation between higher CN and larger healthy tissues volumes receiving low radiation doses was shown for lungs and breasts. For thyroid gland and heart/coronary ostia, HT, VMAT and B-VMAT techniques allowed a better sparing in terms of both Dmean and volumes receiving intermediate-high doses compared to 3D-CRT and TD. IMRT techniques showed superior target coverage and OAR sparing, with, as an expected consequence, larger volumes of healthy tissues (lungs, breasts) receiving low doses. Among

  2. Direct comparisons of 2D and 3D dental microwear proxies in extant herbivorous and carnivorous mammals.

    DeSantis, Larisa R G; Scott, Jessica R; Schubert, Blaine W; Donohue, Shelly L; McCray, Brian M; Van Stolk, Courtney A; Winburn, Amanda A; Greshko, Michael A; O'Hara, Mackie C

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of dental microwear is commonly used by paleontologists and anthropologists to clarify the diets of extinct species, including herbivorous and carnivorous mammals. Currently, there are numerous methods employed to quantify dental microwear, varying in the types of microscopes used, magnifications, and the characterization of wear in both two dimensions and three dimensions. Results from dental microwear studies utilizing different methods are not directly comparable and human quantification of wear features (e.g., pits and scratches) introduces interobserver error, with higher error being produced by less experienced individuals. Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA), which analyzes microwear features in three dimensions, alleviates some of the problems surrounding two-dimensional microwear methods by reducing observer bias. Here, we assess the accuracy and comparability within and between 2D and 3D dental microwear analyses in herbivorous and carnivorous mammals at the same magnification. Specifically, we compare observer-generated 2D microwear data from photosimulations of the identical scanned areas of DMTA in extant African bovids and carnivorans using a scanning white light confocal microscope at 100x magnification. Using this magnification, dental microwear features quantified in 2D were able to separate grazing and frugivorous bovids using scratch frequency; however, DMTA variables were better able to discriminate between disparate dietary niches in both carnivorous and herbivorous mammals. Further, results demonstrate significant interobserver differences in 2D microwear data, with the microwear index remaining the least variable between experienced observers, consistent with prior research. Overall, our results highlight the importance of reducing observer error and analyzing dental microwear in three dimensions in order to consistently interpret diets accurately. PMID:23936506

  3. Direct comparisons of 2D and 3D dental microwear proxies in extant herbivorous and carnivorous mammals.

    Larisa R G DeSantis

    Full Text Available The analysis of dental microwear is commonly used by paleontologists and anthropologists to clarify the diets of extinct species, including herbivorous and carnivorous mammals. Currently, there are numerous methods employed to quantify dental microwear, varying in the types of microscopes used, magnifications, and the characterization of wear in both two dimensions and three dimensions. Results from dental microwear studies utilizing different methods are not directly comparable and human quantification of wear features (e.g., pits and scratches introduces interobserver error, with higher error being produced by less experienced individuals. Dental microwear texture analysis (DMTA, which analyzes microwear features in three dimensions, alleviates some of the problems surrounding two-dimensional microwear methods by reducing observer bias. Here, we assess the accuracy and comparability within and between 2D and 3D dental microwear analyses in herbivorous and carnivorous mammals at the same magnification. Specifically, we compare observer-generated 2D microwear data from photosimulations of the identical scanned areas of DMTA in extant African bovids and carnivorans using a scanning white light confocal microscope at 100x magnification. Using this magnification, dental microwear features quantified in 2D were able to separate grazing and frugivorous bovids using scratch frequency; however, DMTA variables were better able to discriminate between disparate dietary niches in both carnivorous and herbivorous mammals. Further, results demonstrate significant interobserver differences in 2D microwear data, with the microwear index remaining the least variable between experienced observers, consistent with prior research. Overall, our results highlight the importance of reducing observer error and analyzing dental microwear in three dimensions in order to consistently interpret diets accurately.

  4. Size-based emphysema cluster analysis on low attenuation area in 3D volumetric CT: comparison with pulmonary functional test

    Lee, Minho; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Sang Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Oh, Sang Young

    2015-03-01

    To quantify low attenuation area (LAA) of emphysematous regions according to cluster size in 3D volumetric CT data of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and to compare these indices with their pulmonary functional test (PFT). Sixty patients with COPD were scanned by a more than 16-multi detector row CT scanner (Siemens Sensation 16 and 64) within 0.75mm collimation. Based on these LAA masks, a length scale analysis to estimate each emphysema LAA's size was performed as follows. At first, Gaussian low pass filter from 30mm to 1mm kernel size with 1mm interval on the mask was performed from large to small size, iteratively. Centroid voxels resistant to the each filter were selected and dilated by the size of the kernel, which was regarded as the specific size emphysema mask. The slopes of area and number of size based LAA (slope of semi-log plot) were analyzed and compared with PFT. PFT parameters including DLco, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC were significantly (all p-value< 0.002) correlated with the slopes (r-values; -0.73, 0.54, 0.69, respectively) and EI (r-values; -0.84, -0.60, -0.68, respectively). In addition, the D independently contributed regression for FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (adjust R sq. of regression study: EI only, 0.70, 0.45; EI and D, 0.71, 0.51, respectively). By the size based LAA segmentation and analysis, we evaluated the Ds of area, number, and distribution of size based LAA, which would be independent factors for predictor of PFT parameters.

  5. Comparison of "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios for early Mars in a 3-D climate model

    Wordsworth, Robin D.; Kerber, Laura; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Forget, Francois; Head, James W.

    2015-06-01

    We use a 3-D general circulation model to compare the primitive Martian hydrological cycle in "warm and wet" and "cold and icy" scenarios. In the warm and wet scenario, an anomalously high solar flux or intense greenhouse warming artificially added to the climate model are required to maintain warm conditions and an ice-free northern ocean. Precipitation shows strong surface variations, with high rates around Hellas basin and west of Tharsis but low rates around Margaritifer Sinus (where the observed valley network drainage density is nonetheless high). In the cold and icy scenario, snow migration is a function of both obliquity and surface pressure, and limited episodic melting is possible through combinations of seasonal, volcanic, and impact forcing. At surface pressures above those required to avoid atmospheric collapse (˜0.5 bar) and moderate to high obliquity, snow is transported to the equatorial highland regions where the concentration of valley networks is highest. Snow accumulation in the Aeolis quadrangle is high, indicating an ice-free northern ocean is not required to supply water to Gale crater. At lower surface pressures and obliquities, both H2O and CO2 are trapped as ice at the poles and the equatorial regions become extremely dry. The valley network distribution is positively correlated with snow accumulation produced by the cold and icy simulation at 41.8° obliquity but uncorrelated with precipitation produced by the warm and wet simulation. Because our simulations make specific predictions for precipitation patterns under different climate scenarios, they motivate future targeted geological studies.

  6. Simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for 3-D ionosphere tomography in comparison to other algebraic methods

    Gerzen, T.; Minkwitz, D.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy and availability of satellite-based applications like GNSS positioning and remote sensing crucially depends on the knowledge of the ionospheric electron density distribution. The tomography of the ionosphere is one of the major tools to provide link specific ionospheric corrections as well as to study and monitor physical processes in the ionosphere. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous multiplicative column-normalized method (SMART) for electron density reconstruction. Further, SMART+ is developed by combining SMART with a successive correction method. In this way, a balancing between the measurements of intersected and not intersected voxels is realised. The methods are compared with the well-known algebraic reconstruction techniques ART and SART. All the four methods are applied to reconstruct the 3-D electron density distribution by ingestion of ground-based GNSS TEC data into the NeQuick model. The comparative case study is implemented over Europe during two periods of the year 2011 covering quiet to disturbed ionospheric conditions. In particular, the performance of the methods is compared in terms of the convergence behaviour and the capability to reproduce sTEC and electron density profiles. For this purpose, independent sTEC data of four IGS stations and electron density profiles of four ionosonde stations are taken as reference. The results indicate that SMART significantly reduces the number of iterations necessary to achieve a predefined accuracy level. Further, SMART+ decreases the median of the absolute sTEC error up to 15, 22, 46 and 67 % compared to SMART, SART, ART and NeQuick respectively.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: comparison of 2D T2-weighted turbo spin echo, 2D T2*weighted gradient-recalled echo and 3D T2-weighted variable flip-angle turbo spin echo sequences

    To compare an isotropic three-dimensional (3D) high-resolution T2-weighted (w) MR sequence and its reformations with conventional sequences for imaging of the cervical spine. Fifteen volunteers were examined at 1.5 T using sagittal and axial 3D T2-w, sagittal and axial 2D T2w, and axial 2D T2*w MR sequences. Axial reformations of the sagittal 3D dataset were generated (3D MPR T2w). Signal-to-noise and image homogeneity were evaluated in a phantom and in vivo. Visibility of ten anatomical structures of the cervical spine was evaluated. Artifacts were assessed. For statistical analysis, Cohen's kappa, Wilcoxon matched pairs, and t-testing were utilized. There were no significant differences in homogeneity between the sequences. Sagittal 3D T2w enabled better delineation of nerve roots, neural foramina, and intraforaminal structures compared to sagittal 2D T2w. Axial 3D T2w and axial 3D MPR T2w resulted in superior visibility of most anatomical structures compared to axial 2D T2w and comparable results to 2D T2*w concerning the spinal cord, nerve roots, intraforaminal structures, and fat. Artifacts were most pronounced in axial 2D T2w and axial 3D T2w. Acquisition of a 3D T2w data set is feasible in the cervical spine with superior delineation of anatomical structures compared to 2D sequences. (orig.)

  8. 3D video

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  9. 3D Animation Essentials

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  10. Comparison of ATF and TJ-II stellarator equilibria as computed by the 3-D VMEC and PIES codes

    A comparison is made of results from the PIES code, which determines the equilibrium properties of three-dimensional toroidal configurations by direct integration along the magnetic field lines, with those from the VMEC code, which uses an energy minimization in a flux representation to determine the equilibrium configuration, for two devices: the ATF stellarator at Oak Ridge and the TJ-11 heliac which is being built in Madrid. The results obtained from the two codes are in good agreement, providing additional validation for the codes