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Sample records for 3d ct images

  1. Helical CT scanner - 3D imaging and CT fluoroscopy

    It has been over twenty years since the introduction of X-ray CT. In recent years, the topic of helical scanning has dominated the area of technical development. With helical scanning now being used routinely, the traditional concept of the X-ray CT as a device for obtaining axial images of the body in slices has given way to that of one for obtaining images in volumes. For instance, the ability of helical scanning to acquire sequential images in the direction of the body axis makes it ideal for creating three dimensional (3-D) images, and has in fact led to the use of 3-D images in clinical practice. In addition, with helical scanning, imaging of organs such as the liver or lung can be performed in several tens of seconds, as opposed to a few minutes that it used to take. This has resulted not only in reduced time for the patient to spend under constraint for imaging but also to changes in diagnostic methods. The question, 'Would it be possible to perform reconstruction while scanning and to see resulting images in real time ?' is another issue which has been taken up, and it has been answered by CT Fluoroscopy. It makes it possible to see CT images in real time during sequential scanning, and from this development, applications such as CT-guided biopsy and CT-navigated surgery has been investigated and have been realized. Other possibilities to create a whole new series of diagnostic methods and results. (author)

  2. 3D Interpolation Method for CT Images of the Lung

    Noriaki Asada

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D image can be reconstructed from numerous CT images of the lung. The procedure reconstructs a solid from multiple cross section images, which are collected during pulsation of the heart. Thus the motion of the heart is a special factor that must be taken into consideration during reconstruction. The lung exhibits a repeating transformation synchronized to the beating of the heart as an elastic body. There are discontinuities among neighboring CT images due to the beating of the heart, if no special techniques are used in taking CT images. The 3-D heart image is reconstructed from numerous CT images in which both the heart and the lung are taken. Although the outline shape of the reconstructed 3-D heart is quite unnatural, the envelope of the 3-D unnatural heart is fit to the shape of the standard heart. The envelopes of the lung in the CT images are calculated after the section images of the best fitting standard heart are located at the same positions of the CT images. Thus the CT images are geometrically transformed to the optimal CT images fitting best to the standard heart. Since correct transformation of images is required, an Area oriented interpolation method proposed by us is used for interpolation of transformed images. An attempt to reconstruct a 3-D lung image by a series of such operations without discontinuity is shown. Additionally, the same geometrical transformation method to the original projection images is proposed as a more advanced method.

  3. 3D imaging of aortic aneurysma using spiral CT

    The use of 3D reconstructions (3D display technique and maximum intensity projection) in spiral CT for diagnostic evaluation of aortic aneurysma is explained. The data available showing 12 aneurysma of the abdominal and thoracic aorta (10 cases of aneurysma verum, 2 cases of aneurysma dissecans) were selected for verification of the value of 3D images in comparison to transversal displays of the CT. The 3D reconstructions of the spiral CT, other than the projection angiography, give insight into the vessel from various points of view. Such information is helpful for quickly gathering a picture of the volume and contours of a pathological process in the vessel. 3D post-processing of data is advisable if the comparison of tomograms and projection images produces findings of nuclear definition which need clarification prior to surgery. (orig.)

  4. Super pipe lining system for 3-D CT imaging

    A new idea for 3-D CT image reconstruction system is introduced. For the network has very important improvement in recently years, it realizes that network computing replace the traditional serial system processing. CT system's works are carried in a multi-level fashion, it will make the tedious works processed by many computers linked by local network in the same time. So greatly improve the reconstruction speed

  5. 3D CT Imaging Method for Measuring Temporal Bone Aeration

    Objective: 3D volume reconstruction of CT images can be used to measure temporal bene aeration. This study evaluates the technique with respect to reproducibility and acquisition parameters. Material and methods: Helical CT images acquired from patients with radiographically normal temporal bones using standard clinical protocols were retrospectively analyzed. 3D image reconstruction was performed to measure the volume of air within the temporal bone. The appropriate threshold values for air were determined from reconstruction of a phantom with a known air volume imaged using the same clinical protocols. The appropriate air threshold values were applied to the clinical material. Results: Air volume was measured according to an acquisition algorithm. The average volume in the temporal bone CT group was 5.56 ml, compared to 5.19 ml in the head CT group (p = 0.59). The correlation coefficient between examiners was > 0.92. There was a wide range of aeration volumes among individual ears (0.76-18.84 ml); however, paired temporal bones differed by an average of just 1.11 ml. Conclusions: The method of volume measurement from 3D reconstruction reported here is widely available, easy to perform and produces consistent results among examiners. Application of the technique to archival CT data is possible using corrections for air segmentation thresholds according to acquisition parameters

  6. Image Reconstruction from 2D stack of MRI/CT to 3D using Shapelets

    Arathi T; Latha Parameswaran

    2014-01-01

    Image reconstruction is an active research field, due to the increasing need for geometric 3D models in movie industry, games, virtual environments and in medical fields. 3D image reconstruction aims to arrive at the 3D model of an object, from its 2D images taken at different viewing angles. Medical images are multimodal, which includes MRI, CT scan image, PET and SPECT images. Of these, MRI and CT scan images of an organ when taken, is available as a stack of 2D images, taken at different a...

  7. Image Reconstruction from 2D stack of MRI/CT to 3D using Shapelets

    Arathi T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Image reconstruction is an active research field, due to the increasing need for geometric 3D models in movie industry, games, virtual environments and in medical fields. 3D image reconstruction aims to arrive at the 3D model of an object, from its 2D images taken at different viewing angles. Medical images are multimodal, which includes MRI, CT scan image, PET and SPECT images. Of these, MRI and CT scan images of an organ when taken, is available as a stack of 2D images, taken at different angles. This 2D stack of images is used to get a 3D view of the organ of interest, to aid doctors in easier diagnosis. Existing 3D reconstruction techniques are voxel based techniques, which tries to reconstruct the 3D view based on the intensity value stored at each voxel location. These techniques don’t make use of the shape/depth information available in the 2D image stack. In this work, a 3D reconstruction technique for MRI/CT 2D image stack, based on Shapelets has been proposed. Here, the shape/depth information available in each 2D image in the image stack is manipulated to get a 3D reconstruction, which gives a more accurate 3D view of the organ of interest. Experimental results exhibit the efficiency of this proposed technique.

  8. Algorithm of pulmonary emphysema extraction using low dose thoracic 3D CT images

    Saita, S.; Kubo, M.; Kawata, Y.; Niki, N.; Nakano, Y.; Omatsu, H.; Tominaga, K.; Eguchi, K.; Moriyama, N.

    2006-03-01

    Recently, due to aging and smoking, emphysema patients are increasing. The restoration of alveolus which was destroyed by emphysema is not possible, thus early detection of emphysema is desired. We describe a quantitative algorithm for extracting emphysematous lesions and quantitatively evaluate their distribution patterns using low dose thoracic 3-D CT images. The algorithm identified lung anatomies, and extracted low attenuation area (LAA) as emphysematous lesion candidates. Applying the algorithm to 100 thoracic 3-D CT images and then by follow-up 3-D CT images, we demonstrate its potential effectiveness to assist radiologists and physicians to quantitatively evaluate the emphysematous lesions distribution and their evolution in time interval changes.

  9. Algorithm of pulmonary emphysema extraction using thoracic 3D CT images

    Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Tominaga, Keigo; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    Recently, due to aging and smoking, emphysema patients are increasing. The restoration of alveolus which was destroyed by emphysema is not possible, thus early detection of emphysema is desired. We describe a quantitative algorithm for extracting emphysematous lesions and quantitatively evaluate their distribution patterns using low dose thoracic 3-D CT images. The algorithm identified lung anatomies, and extracted low attenuation area (LAA) as emphysematous lesion candidates. Applying the algorithm to thoracic 3-D CT images and then by follow-up 3-D CT images, we demonstrate its potential effectiveness to assist radiologists and physicians to quantitatively evaluate the emphysematous lesions distribution and their evolution in time interval changes.

  10. Medical image analysis of 3D CT images based on extensions of Haralick texture features

    Tesař, Ludvík; Shimizu, A.; Smutek, D.; Kobatake, H.; Nawano, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 6 (2008), s. 513-520. ISSN 0895-6111 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET101050403; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : image segmentation * Gaussian mixture model * 3D image analysis Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.192, year: 2008 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2008/AS/tesar-medical image analysis of 3d ct image s based on extensions of haralick texture features.pdf

  11. Preparing diagnostic 3D images for image registration with planning CT images

    Purpose: Pre-radiotherapy (pre-RT) tomographic images acquired for diagnostic purposes often contain important tumor and/or normal tissue information which is poorly defined or absent in planning CT images. Our two years of clinical experience has shown that computer-assisted 3D registration of pre-RT images with planning CT images often plays an indispensable role in accurate treatment volume definition. Often the only available format of the diagnostic images is film from which the original 3D digital data must be reconstructed. In addition, any digital data, whether reconstructed or not, must be put into a form suitable for incorporation into the treatment planning system. The purpose of this investigation was to identify all problems that must be overcome before this data is suitable for clinical use. Materials and Methods: In the past two years we have 3D-reconstructed 300 diagnostic images from film and digital sources. As a problem was discovered we built a software tool to correct it. In time we collected a large set of such tools and found that they must be applied in a specific order to achieve the correct reconstruction. Finally, a toolkit (ediScan) was built that made all these tools available in the proper manner via a pleasant yet efficient mouse-based user interface. Results: Problems we discovered included different magnifications, shifted display centers, non-parallel image planes, image planes not perpendicular to the long axis of the table-top (shearing), irregularly spaced scans, non contiguous scan volumes, multiple slices per film, different orientations for slice axes (e.g. left-right reversal), slices printed at window settings corresponding to tissues of interest for diagnostic purposes, and printing artifacts. We have learned that the specific steps to correct these problems, in order of application, are: Also, we found that fast feedback and large image capacity (at least 2000 x 2000 12-bit pixels) are essential for practical application

  12. The diagnostic value of 3D spiral CT imaging of cholangiopancreatic ducts on obstructive jaundice

    Linquan Wu; Xiangbao Yin; Qingshan Wang; Bohua Wu; Xiao Li; Huaqun Fu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis of diseases of biliary tract. Recently, three dimensions (3D) spiral CT imaging has been used in surgical diseases gradually. This study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic value of 3D spiral CT imaging of cholangiopancreatic ducts on obstructive jaundice. Methods: Thirty patients with obstructive jaundice had received B-mode ultrasonography, CT, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and 3D spiral CT imaging of cholangiopancreatic ducts preoperatively. Then the diagnose accordance rate of these examinational methods were compared after operations. Results: The diagnose accordance rate of 3D spiral CT imaging of cholangiopancreatic ducts was higher than those of B-mode ultraso-nography, CT, or single PTC or ERCP, which showed clear images of bile duct tree and pathological changes. As to malignant obstructive jaundice, this examinational technique could clearly display the adjacent relationship between tumor and liver tissue, biliary ducts, blood vessels, and intrahepatic metastases. Conclusion: 3D spiral CT imaging of cholangiopancreatic ducts has significant value for obstructive diseases of biliary ducts, which provides effective evidence for the feasibility of tumor-resection and surgical options.

  13. MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED 3D NON-RIGID REGISTRATION OF CT/MR ABDOMEN IMAGES

    2001-01-01

    A mutual information based 3D non-rigid registration approach was proposed for the registration of deformable CT/MR body abdomen images. The Parzen Windows Density Estimation (PWDE) method is adopted to calculate the mutual information between the two modals of CT and MRI abdomen images. By maximizing MI between the CT and MR volume images, the overlapping part of them reaches the biggest, which means that the two body images of CT and MR matches best to each other. Visible Human Project (VHP) Male abdomen CT and MRI Data are used as experimental data sets. The experimental results indicate that this approach of non-rigid 3D registration of CT/MR body abdominal images can be achieved effectively and automatically, without any prior processing procedures such as segmentation and feature extraction, but has a main drawback of very long computation time. Key words: medical image registration; multi-modality; mutual information; non-rigid; Parzen window density estimation

  14. 3D-CT imaging processing for qualitative and quantitative analysis of maxillofacial cysts and tumors

    The objective of this study was to evaluate spiral-computed tomography (3D-CT) images of 20 patients presenting with cysts and tumors in the maxillofacial complex, in order to compare the surface and volume techniques of image rendering. The qualitative and quantitative appraisal indicated that the volume technique allowed a more precise and accurate observation than the surface method. On the average, the measurements obtained by means of the 3D volume-rendering technique were 6.28% higher than those obtained by means of the surface method. The sensitivity of the 3D surface technique was lower than that of the 3D volume technique for all conditions stipulated in the diagnosis and evaluation of lesions. We concluded that the 3D-CT volume rendering technique was more reproducible and sensitive than the 3D-CT surface method, in the diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of maxillofacial lesions, especially those with intra-osseous involvement. (author)

  15. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    Matsuyama, Shigeo; Hamada, Naoki; Ishii, Keizo; Nozawa, Yuichiro; Ohkura, Satoru; Terakawa, Atsuki; Hatori, Yoshinobu; Fujiki, Kota; Fujiwara, Mitsuhiro; Toyama, Sho

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research.

  16. In vivo 3D PIXE-micron-CT imaging of Drosophila melanogaster using a contrast agent

    In this study, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) in vivo imaging system for imaging small insects with micrometer resolution. The 3D CT imaging system, referred to as 3D PIXE-micron-CT (PIXEμCT), uses characteristic X-rays produced by ion microbeam bombardment of a metal target. PIXEμCT was used to observe the body organs and internal structure of a living Drosophila melanogaster. Although the organs of the thorax were clearly imaged, the digestive organs in the abdominal cavity could not be clearly discerned initially, with the exception of the rectum and the Malpighian tubule. To enhance the abdominal images, a barium sulfate powder radiocontrast agent was added. For the first time, 3D images of the ventriculus of a living D. melanogaster were obtained. Our results showed that PIXEμCT can provide in vivo 3D-CT images that reflect correctly the structure of individual living organs, which is expected to be very useful in biological research

  17. Accurate localization of intracavitary brachytherapy applicators from 3D CT imaging studies

    Purpose: To present an accurate method to identify the positions and orientations of intracavitary (ICT) brachytherapy applicators imaged in 3D CT scans, in support of Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations, enabling accurate dose modeling in the presence of applicator shielding and interapplicator attenuation. Materials and methods: The method consists of finding the transformation that maximizes the coincidence between the known 3D shapes of each applicator component (colpostats and tandem) with the volume defined by contours of the corresponding surface on each CT slice. We use this technique to localize Fletcher-Suit CT-compatible applicators for three cervix cancer patients using post-implant CT examinations (3 mm slice thickness and separation). Dose distributions in 1-to-1 registration with the underlying CT anatomy are derived from 3D Monte Carlo photon-transport simulations incorporating each applicator's internal geometry (source encapsulation, high-density shields, and applicator body) oriented in relation to the dose matrix according to the measured localization transformations. The precision and accuracy of our localization method are assessed using CT scans, in which the positions and orientations of dense rods and spheres (in a precision-machined phantom) were measured at various orientations relative to the gantry. Results: Using this method, we register 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations directly onto post insertion patient CT studies. Using CT studies of a precisely machined phantom, the absolute accuracy of the method was found to be ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.3 mm in the axial direction while its precision was ±0.2 mm in plane, and ±0.2 mm axially. Conclusion: We have developed a novel, and accurate technique to localize intracavitary brachytherapy applicators in 3D CT imaging studies, which supports 3D dose planning involving detailed 3D Monte Carlo dose calculations, modeling source positions, shielding and interapplicator shielding

  18. 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging of the lumbar spine

    The objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of MRI/CT fusion in demonstrating lumbar nerve root compromise. We combined 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) imaging of bone with 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of neural architecture (cauda equina and nerve roots) for two patients using VirtualPlace software. Although the pathological condition of nerve roots could not be assessed using MRI, myelography or CT myelography, 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging enabled unambiguous, 3-D confirmation of the pathological state and courses of nerve roots, both inside and outside the foraminal arch, as well as thickening of the ligamentum flavum and the locations, forms and numbers of dorsal root ganglia. Positional relationships between intervertebral discs or bony spurs and nerve roots could also be depicted. Use of 3-D MRI/CT fusion imaging for the lumbar vertebral region successfully revealed the relationship between bone construction (bones, intervertebral joints, and intervertebral disks) and neural architecture (cauda equina and nerve roots) on a single film, three-dimensionally and in color. Such images may be useful in elucidating complex neurological conditions such as degenerative lumbar scoliosis(DLS), as well as in diagnosis and the planning of minimally invasive surgery. (orig.)

  19. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Xing Zhao; Jing-jing Hu; Peng Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs) has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed...

  20. 3-D segmentation algorithm of small lung nodules in spiral CT images

    Diciotti S; Picozzi G; Falchini M; Mascalchi M; Villari N; Valli G

    2008-01-01

    Abstract—Computed tomography (CT) is the most sensitive imaging technique for detecting lung nodules, and is now being evaluated as a screening tool for lung cancer in several large samples studies all over the world. In this report, we describe a semiautomaticmethod for 3-D segmentation of lung nodules in CT images for subsequent volume assessment. The distinguishing features of our algorithm are the following. 1) The user interaction process. It allows the introduction ...

  1. [3D Super-resolution Reconstruction and Visualization of Pulmonary Nodules from CT Image].

    Wang, Bing; Fan, Xing; Yang, Ying; Tian, Xuedong; Gu, Lixu

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to propose an algorithm for three-dimensional projection onto convex sets (3D POCS) to achieve super resolution reconstruction of 3D lung computer tomography (CT) images, and to introduce multi-resolution mixed display mode to make 3D visualization of pulmonary nodules. Firstly, we built the low resolution 3D images which have spatial displacement in sub pixel level between each other and generate the reference image. Then, we mapped the low resolution images into the high resolution reference image using 3D motion estimation and revised the reference image based on the consistency constraint convex sets to reconstruct the 3D high resolution images iteratively. Finally, we displayed the different resolution images simultaneously. We then estimated the performance of provided method on 5 image sets and compared them with those of 3 interpolation reconstruction methods. The experiments showed that the performance of 3D POCS algorithm was better than that of 3 interpolation reconstruction methods in two aspects, i.e., subjective and objective aspects, and mixed display mode is suitable to the 3D visualization of high resolution of pulmonary nodules. PMID:26710449

  2. Recovering 3D tumor locations from 2D bioluminescence images and registration with CT images

    Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Menon, Lata G.; Mayer-Kuckuk, Philipp; Bertino, Joseph R.; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel and efficient algorithm for reconstructing the 3D locations of tumor sites from a set of 2D bioluminescence images which are taken by a same camera but after continually rotating the object by a small angle. Our approach requires a much simpler set up than those using multiple cameras, and the algorithmic steps in our framework are efficient and robust enough to facilitate its use in analyzing the repeated imaging of a same animal transplanted with gene marked cells. In order to visualize in 3D the structure of the tumor, we also co-register the BLI-reconstructed crude structure with detailed anatomical structure extracted from high-resolution microCT on a single platform. We present our method using both phantom studies and real studies on small animals.

  3. Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method

    Guerrero, Thomas [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Zhang, Geoffrey [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Huang Tzungchi [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Lin Kaping [Department of Electrical Engineering, Chung-Yuan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2004-09-07

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an automated method for intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from breath-hold computed tomography (BH CT) imaging using the three-dimensional optical flow method (3D OFM). A modified 3D OFM algorithm provided 3D displacement vectors for each voxel which were used to map tumour voxels on expiration BH CT onto inspiration BH CT images. A thoracic phantom and simulated expiration/inspiration BH CT pairs were used for validation. The 3D OFM was applied to the measured inspiration and expiration BH CT images from one lung cancer and one oesophageal cancer patient. The resulting displacements were plotted in histogram format and analysed to provide insight regarding the tumour motion. The phantom tumour displacement was measured as 1.20 and 2.40 cm with full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) for the distribution of displacement estimates of 0.008 and 0.006 cm, respectively. The maximum error of any single voxel's motion estimate was 1.1 mm along the z-dimension or approximately one-third of the z-dimension voxel size. The simulated BH CT pairs revealed an rms error of less than 0.25 mm. The displacement of the oesophageal tumours was nonuniform and up to 1.4 cm, this was a new finding. A lung tumour maximum displacement of 2.4 cm was found in the case evaluated. In conclusion, 3D OFM provided an accurate estimation of intrathoracic tumour motion, with estimated errors less than the voxel dimension in a simulated motion phantom study. Surprisingly, oesophageal tumour motion was large and nonuniform, with greatest motion occurring at the gastro-oesophageal junction.

  4. Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method

    Guerrero, Thomas; Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an automated method for intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from breath-hold computed tomography (BH CT) imaging using the three-dimensional optical flow method (3D OFM). A modified 3D OFM algorithm provided 3D displacement vectors for each voxel which were used to map tumour voxels on expiration BH CT onto inspiration BH CT images. A thoracic phantom and simulated expiration/inspiration BH CT pairs were used for validation. The 3D OFM was applied to the measured inspiration and expiration BH CT images from one lung cancer and one oesophageal cancer patient. The resulting displacements were plotted in histogram format and analysed to provide insight regarding the tumour motion. The phantom tumour displacement was measured as 1.20 and 2.40 cm with full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) for the distribution of displacement estimates of 0.008 and 0.006 cm, respectively. The maximum error of any single voxel's motion estimate was 1.1 mm along the z-dimension or approximately one-third of the z-dimension voxel size. The simulated BH CT pairs revealed an rms error of less than 0.25 mm. The displacement of the oesophageal tumours was nonuniform and up to 1.4 cm, this was a new finding. A lung tumour maximum displacement of 2.4 cm was found in the case evaluated. In conclusion, 3D OFM provided an accurate estimation of intrathoracic tumour motion, with estimated errors less than the voxel dimension in a simulated motion phantom study. Surprisingly, oesophageal tumour motion was large and nonuniform, with greatest motion occurring at the gastro-oesophageal junction. Presented at The IASTED Second International Conference on Biomedical Engineering (BioMED 2004), Innsbruck, Austria, 16-18 February 2004.

  5. Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an automated method for intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from breath-hold computed tomography (BH CT) imaging using the three-dimensional optical flow method (3D OFM). A modified 3D OFM algorithm provided 3D displacement vectors for each voxel which were used to map tumour voxels on expiration BH CT onto inspiration BH CT images. A thoracic phantom and simulated expiration/inspiration BH CT pairs were used for validation. The 3D OFM was applied to the measured inspiration and expiration BH CT images from one lung cancer and one oesophageal cancer patient. The resulting displacements were plotted in histogram format and analysed to provide insight regarding the tumour motion. The phantom tumour displacement was measured as 1.20 and 2.40 cm with full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) for the distribution of displacement estimates of 0.008 and 0.006 cm, respectively. The maximum error of any single voxel's motion estimate was 1.1 mm along the z-dimension or approximately one-third of the z-dimension voxel size. The simulated BH CT pairs revealed an rms error of less than 0.25 mm. The displacement of the oesophageal tumours was nonuniform and up to 1.4 cm, this was a new finding. A lung tumour maximum displacement of 2.4 cm was found in the case evaluated. In conclusion, 3D OFM provided an accurate estimation of intrathoracic tumour motion, with estimated errors less than the voxel dimension in a simulated motion phantom study. Surprisingly, oesophageal tumour motion was large and nonuniform, with greatest motion occurring at the gastro-oesophageal junction

  6. Parametric modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D CT and MR spine images

    Accurate and objective evaluation of vertebral deformations is of significant importance in clinical diagnostics and therapy of pathological conditions affecting the spine. Although modern clinical practice is focused on three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques, the established methods for evaluation of vertebral deformations are limited to measuring deformations in two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images. In this paper, we propose a method for quantitative description of vertebral body deformations by efficient modelling and segmentation of vertebral bodies in 3D. The deformations are evaluated from the parameters of a 3D superquadric model, which is initialized as an elliptical cylinder and then gradually deformed by introducing transformations that yield a more detailed representation of the vertebral body shape. After modelling the vertebral body shape with 25 clinically meaningful parameters and the vertebral body pose with six rigid body parameters, the 3D model is aligned to the observed vertebral body in the 3D image. The performance of the method was evaluated on 75 vertebrae from CT and 75 vertebrae from T2-weighted MR spine images, extracted from the thoracolumbar part of normal and pathological spines. The results show that the proposed method can be used for 3D segmentation of vertebral bodies in CT and MR images, as the proposed 3D model is able to describe both normal and pathological vertebral body deformations. The method may therefore be used for initialization of whole vertebra segmentation or for quantitative measurement of vertebral body deformations.

  7. Improving low-dose cardiac CT images using 3D sparse representation based processing

    Shi, Luyao; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has been widely used in diagnoses of coronary artery diseases due to the continuously improving temporal and spatial resolution. When helical CT with a lower pitch scanning mode is used, the effective radiation dose can be significant when compared to other radiological exams. Many methods have been developed to reduce radiation dose in coronary CT exams including high pitch scans using dual source CT scanners and step-and-shot scanning mode for both single source and dual source CT scanners. Additionally, software methods have also been proposed to reduce noise in the reconstructed CT images and thus offering the opportunity to reduce radiation dose while maintaining the desired diagnostic performance of a certain imaging task. In this paper, we propose that low-dose scans should be considered in order to avoid the harm from accumulating unnecessary X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. Accordingly, in this paper, a 3D dictionary representation based image processing method is proposed to reduce CT image noise. Information on both spatial and temporal structure continuity is utilized in sparse representation to improve the performance of the image processing method. Clinical cases were used to validate the proposed method.

  8. Object data mining and analysis on 3D images of high precision industrial CT

    There are some areas of interest on 3D images of the high precision industrial CT, such as defects caused during the production process. In order to take a close analysis of these areas, the image processing software Amira was used on the data of a particular work piece sample to do defects segmentation and display, defects measurement. evaluation and documentation. A data set obtained by scanning a vise sample using the lab CT system was analyzed and the results turn out to be fairly good. (authors)

  9. Inner images of the human body with a 3D CT scanner

    This article deals with not only CT-endoscopy (CTES) technique but also various imaging and processing techniques of 3D CT. CTES images, which were obtained from 137 patients with suspected cardiovascular disorder or disease of other tubular organs, were reconstructed using a newly developed volumetric scanner with a slip-ring system. Among the 137 patients, 107 (78%) were successfully diagnosed by CTES. For cardiovascular region, dissecting aneurysm was detected in 27/32, aortitis in 9/9, and intra-arterial thrombosis in 5/6. Various imaging and processing techniques, including CT number conversion technique, multi-threshold range imaging, 'open-window' and 'virtual operation', and long segmental arteriogram by intravenous contrast injection, are displayed in futures. In conclusion, CTES might become a safe and minimally invasive means for observing the inner surface of the tubular organs, particularly of the aorta, without the need of fiberscopic manipulation. (N.K.)

  10. Quantification and visualization of alveolar bone resorption from 3D dental CT images

    Nagao, Jiro; Mori, Kensaku; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Suenaga, Yasuhito [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya (Japan); Yamada, Shohzoh; Naitoh, Munetaka [Aichi-Gakuin University, School of Dentistry, Nagoya (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose A computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for quantifying and visualizing alveolar bone resorption caused by periodontitis was developed based on three-dimensional (3D) image processing of dental CT images. Methods The proposed system enables visualization and quantification of resorption of alveolar bone surrounding and between the roots of teeth. It has the following functions: (1) vertical measurement of the depth of resorption surrounding the tooth in 3D images, avoiding physical obstruction; (2) quantification of the amount of resorption in the furcation area; and (3) visualization of quantification results by pseudo-color maps, graphs, and motion pictures. The resorption measurement accuracy in the area surrounding teeth was evaluated by comparing with dentist's recognition on five real patient CT images, giving average absolute difference of 0.87 mm. An artificial image with mathematical truth was also used for measurement evaluation. Results The average absolute difference was 0.36 and 0.10 mm for surrounding and furcation areas, respectively. The system provides an intuitive presentation of the measurement results. Conclusion Computer aided diagnosis of 3D dental CT scans is feasible and the technique is a promising new tool for the quantitative evaluation of periodontal bone loss. (orig.)

  11. Improving Low-dose Cardiac CT Images based on 3D Sparse Representation

    Shi, Luyao; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Yin, Xindao; Shu, Huazhong; Luo, Limin; Coatrieux, Jean-Louis

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is a reliable and accurate tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases and is also frequently used in surgery guidance. Low-dose scans should be considered in order to alleviate the harm to patients caused by X-ray radiation. However, low dose CT (LDCT) images tend to be degraded by quantum noise and streak artifacts. In order to improve the cardiac LDCT image quality, a 3D sparse representation-based processing (3D SR) is proposed by exploiting the sparsity and regularity of 3D anatomical features in CCT. The proposed method was evaluated by a clinical study of 14 patients. The performance of the proposed method was compared to the 2D spares representation-based processing (2D SR) and the state-of-the-art noise reduction algorithm BM4D. The visual assessment, quantitative assessment and qualitative assessment results show that the proposed approach can lead to effective noise/artifact suppression and detail preservation. Compared to the other two tested methods, 3D SR method can obtain results with image quality most close to the reference standard dose CT (SDCT) images.

  12. 3D automatic liver segmentation using feature-constrained Mahalanobis distance in CT images.

    Salman Al-Shaikhli, Saif Dawood; Yang, Michael Ying; Rosenhahn, Bodo

    2016-08-01

    Automatic 3D liver segmentation is a fundamental step in the liver disease diagnosis and surgery planning. This paper presents a novel fully automatic algorithm for 3D liver segmentation in clinical 3D computed tomography (CT) images. Based on image features, we propose a new Mahalanobis distance cost function using an active shape model (ASM). We call our method MD-ASM. Unlike the standard active shape model (ST-ASM), the proposed method introduces a new feature-constrained Mahalanobis distance cost function to measure the distance between the generated shape during the iterative step and the mean shape model. The proposed Mahalanobis distance function is learned from a public database of liver segmentation challenge (MICCAI-SLiver07). As a refinement step, we propose the use of a 3D graph-cut segmentation. Foreground and background labels are automatically selected using texture features of the learned Mahalanobis distance. Quantitatively, the proposed method is evaluated using two clinical 3D CT scan databases (MICCAI-SLiver07 and MIDAS). The evaluation of the MICCAI-SLiver07 database is obtained by the challenge organizers using five different metric scores. The experimental results demonstrate the availability of the proposed method by achieving an accurate liver segmentation compared to the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26501155

  13. High-resolution 3D micro-CT imaging of breast microcalcifications: a preliminary analysis

    Detection of microcalcifications on mammograms indicates the presence of breast lesion, and the shapes of the microcalcifications as seen by conventional mammography correlates with the probability of malignancy. This preliminary study evaluated the 3D shape of breast microcalcifications using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and compared the findings with those obtained using anatomopathological analysis. The study analyzed breast biopsy samples from 11 women with findings of suspicious microcalcifications on routine mammograms. The samples were imaged using a micro-CT (SkyScan 1076) at a resolution of 35 μm. Images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection and analyzed in 3D using surface rendering. The samples were subsequently analyzed by the pathology service. Reconstructed 3D images were compared with the corresponding histological slices. Anatomopathological analysis showed that 5 of 11 patients had ductal breast carcinoma in situ. One patient was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma. Individual object analysis was performed on 597 microcalcifications. Malignant microcalcifications tended to be thinner and to have a smaller volume and surface area, while their surface area-to-volume ratio was greater than that of benign microcalcifications. The structure model index values were the same for malignant and benign microcalcifications. This is the first study to use micro-CT for quantitative 3D analysis of microcalcifications. This high-resolution imaging technique will be valuable for gaining a greater understanding of the morphologic characteristics of malignant and benign microcalcifications. The presence of many small microcalcifications can be an indication of malignancy. For the larger microcalcifications, 3D parameters confirmed the more irregular shape of malignant microcalcifications

  14. Detection of tibial condylar fractures using 3D imaging with a mobile image amplifier (Siemens ISO-C-3D): Comparison with plain films and spiral CT

    Purpose: To analyze a prototype mobile C-arm 3D image amplifier in the detection and classification of experimental tibial condylar fractures with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Method: Human knee specimens (n=22) with tibial condylar fractures were examined with a prototype C-arm (ISO-C-3D, Siemens AG), plain films (CR) and spiral CT (CT). The motorized C-arm provides fluoroscopic images during a 190 orbital rotation computing a 119 mm data cube. From these 3D data sets MP reconstructions were obtained. All images were evaluated by four independent readers for the detection and assessment of fracture lines. All fractures were classified according to the Mueller AO classification. To confirm the results, the specimens were finally surgically dissected. Results: 97% of the tibial condylar fractures were easily seen and correctly classified according to the Mueller AO classification on MP reconstruction of the ISO-C-3D. There is no significant difference between ISO-C and CT in detection and correct classification of fractures, but ISO-CD-3D is significant by better than CR. (orig.)

  15. 3D elemental distribution images by XRF{mu}CT at LNLS-Brazil

    Pereira, G.R.; Rocha, H.S.; Calza, C. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (LIN), COPPE, UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anjos, M.J. [Physics Institute, UERJ (Brazil); Lima, I. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (LIN), COPPE, UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); University Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy, UERJ (Brazil); Perez, C.A. [Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (Brazil); Lopes, R.T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory (LIN), COPPE, UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    An X-ray Transmission Microtomography (CT) system combined with an X-ray Fluorescence Microtomography (XRF{mu}CT) system was implemented in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The main objective of this work is to determine the elemental distribution in biological samples (breast, prostate and lung samples) in order to verify the concentration of some elements correlated with characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by the transmission CT. The experiments were performed at the X-Ray Fluorescence beamline (D09B-XRF) of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas, Brazil. A quasi-monochromatic beam produced by a multilayer monochromator was used as an incident beam. The sample was placed on a high precision goniometer and translation stages that allow its rotation as well as translation perpendicular to the beam. The fluorescence photons were collected with an energy dispersive HPGe detector placed at 90{sup o} to the incident beam, while transmitted photons were detected with a fast Na(Tl) scintillation counter placed behind the sample on the beam direction. The CT images were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm and the XRF{mu}CT were reconstructed using a filtered back-projection algorithm with absorption corrections. The 3D images were reconstructed using the 3D-DOCTOR software.

  16. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  17. HOSVD-Based 3D Active Appearance Model: Segmentation of Lung Fields in CT Images.

    Wang, Qingzhu; Kang, Wanjun; Hu, Haihui; Wang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    An Active Appearance Model (AAM) is a computer vision model which can be used to effectively segment lung fields in CT images. However, the fitting result is often inadequate when the lungs are affected by high-density pathologies. To overcome this problem, we propose a Higher-order Singular Value Decomposition (HOSVD)-based Three-dimensional (3D) AAM. An evaluation was performed on 310 diseased lungs form the Lung Image Database Consortium Image Collection. Other contemporary AAMs operate directly on patterns represented by vectors, i.e., before applying the AAM to a 3D lung volume,it has to be vectorized first into a vector pattern by some technique like concatenation. However, some implicit structural or local contextual information may be lost in this transformation. According to the nature of the 3D lung volume, HOSVD is introduced to represent and process the lung in tensor space. Our method can not only directly operate on the original 3D tensor patterns, but also efficiently reduce the computer memory usage. The evaluation resulted in an average Dice coefficient of 97.0 % ± 0.59 %, a mean absolute surface distance error of 1.0403 ± 0.5716 mm, a mean border positioning errors of 0.9187 ± 0.5381 pixel, and a Hausdorff Distance of 20.4064 ± 4.3855, respectively. Experimental results showed that our methods delivered significant and better segmentation results, compared with the three other model-based lung segmentation approaches, namely 3D Snake, 3D ASM and 3D AAM. PMID:27277277

  18. Automated detection system for pulmonary emphysema on 3D chest CT images

    Hara, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iwano, Shingo; Itoh, Shigeki; Fujita, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2004-05-01

    An automatic extraction of pulmonary emphysema area on 3-D chest CT images was performed using an adaptive thresholding technique. We proposed a method to estimate the ratio of the emphysema area to the whole lung volume. We employed 32 cases (15 normal and 17 abnormal) which had been already diagnosed by radiologists prior to the study. The ratio in all the normal cases was less than 0.02, and in abnormal cases, it ranged from 0.01 to 0.26. The effectiveness of our approach was confirmed through the results of the present study.

  19. Integration of 3D anatomical data obtained by CT imaging and 3D optical scanning for computer aided implant surgery

    Paoli Alessandro

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A precise placement of dental implants is a crucial step to optimize both prosthetic aspects and functional constraints. In this context, the use of virtual guiding systems has been recognized as a fundamental tool to control the ideal implant position. In particular, complex periodontal surgeries can be performed using preoperative planning based on CT data. The critical point of the procedure relies on the lack of accuracy in transferring CT planning information to surgical field through custom-made stereo-lithographic surgical guides. Methods In this work, a novel methodology is proposed for monitoring loss of accuracy in transferring CT dental information into periodontal surgical field. The methodology is based on integrating 3D data of anatomical (impression and cast and preoperative (radiographic template models, obtained by both CT and optical scanning processes. Results A clinical case, relative to a fully edentulous jaw patient, has been used as test case to assess the accuracy of the various steps concurring in manufacturing surgical guides. In particular, a surgical guide has been designed to place implants in the bone structure of the patient. The analysis of the results has allowed the clinician to monitor all the errors, which have been occurring step by step manufacturing the physical templates. Conclusions The use of an optical scanner, which has a higher resolution and accuracy than CT scanning, has demonstrated to be a valid support to control the precision of the various physical models adopted and to point out possible error sources. A case study regarding a fully edentulous patient has confirmed the feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  20. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  1. Study of CT-based positron range correction in high resolution 3D PET imaging

    Cal-Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jacobo@nuclear.fis.ucm.es [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Herraiz, J.L. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Espana, S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Vicente, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Herranz, E. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Desco, M. [Unidad de Medicina y Cirugia Experimental, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Maranon, Madrid (Spain); Vaquero, J.J. [Dpto. de Bioingenieria e Ingenieria Espacial, Universidad Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Udias, J.M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Dpto. Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-08-21

    Positron range limits the spatial resolution of PET images and has a different effect for different isotopes and positron propagation materials. Therefore it is important to consider it during image reconstruction, in order to obtain optimal image quality. Positron range distributions for most common isotopes used in PET in different materials were computed using the Monte Carlo simulations with PeneloPET. The range profiles were introduced into the 3D OSEM image reconstruction software FIRST and employed to blur the image either in the forward projection or in the forward and backward projection. The blurring introduced takes into account the different materials in which the positron propagates. Information on these materials may be obtained, for instance, from a segmentation of a CT image. The results of introducing positron blurring in both forward and backward projection operations was compared to using it only during forward projection. Further, the effect of different shapes of positron range profile in the quality of the reconstructed images with positron range correction was studied. For high positron energy isotopes, the reconstructed images show significant improvement in spatial resolution when positron range is taken into account during reconstruction, compared to reconstructions without positron range modeling.

  2. Usefulness of US-CT 3D dual imaging for the planning and monitoring of hepatocellular carcinoma treatment using HIFU

    Purpose: We evaluated the safety and usefulness of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) assisted by ultrasound-computed tomography three-dimensional (US-CT 3D) dual imaging for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Materials and methods: HIFU ablation was performed in 13 patients with small HCC (≤3 lesions, ≤3 cm in diameter). The HIFU system (Chongqing Haifu Tech) was used under ultrasound guidance. By transferring the sagittal or axial plane of the 3D US and the CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction images were displayed in a manner resembling conventional monitor US to assist the HIFU treatment. Results: Overall, 69% (9/13) of the patients in whom good visualization using B-mode sonography could not be obtained because of the influence of multi-reflections, rib shadows, and unclear tumor margins were successfully treated under the guidance of US-CT 3D dual imaging. In 5 of the 13 patients, multi-reflections were responsible for the poor visualization. In 2 cases, the tumor was poorly visualized because of a rib shadow. In one case, the margin of the tumor was too unclear to be detected using ultrasography. The 3D US images obtained as part of the US-CT 3D dual imaging had a high resolution and were useful for examining the area of HCC invasion and for determining the extent of the ablation area. The CT images, which are not influenced by bone shadows or multi-reflections, were useful for detecting the tumors and for visualizing the presence of the intestines in the sonication zone. HIFU treatments were successfully performed in all the patients with the assistance of US-CT 3D dual imaging. Conclusion: US-CT 3D dual imaging is useful for HIFU treatment for HCC, compensating for the occasionally poor visualization provided by US monitor.

  3. Quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D: application to CT images of normal spine

    The purpose of this study is to present a framework for quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D. In order to study the properties of such complex 3D structures, we propose two descriptors that capture the characteristics of spinal curvature in 3D. The descriptors are the geometric curvature (GC) and curvature angle (CA), which are independent of the orientation and size of spine anatomy. We demonstrate the two descriptors that characterize the spinal curvature in 3D on 30 computed tomography (CT) images of normal spine and on a scoliotic spine. The descriptors are determined from 3D vertebral body lines, which are obtained by two different methods. The first method is based on the least-squares technique that approximates the manually identified vertebra centroids, while the second method searches for vertebra centroids in an automated optimization scheme, based on computer-assisted image analysis. Polynomial functions of the fourth and fifth degree were used for the description of normal and scoliotic spinal curvature in 3D, respectively. The mean distance to vertebra centroids was 1.1 mm (±0.6 mm) for the first and 2.1 mm (±1.4 mm) for the second method. The distributions of GC and CA values were obtained along the 30 images of normal spine at each vertebral level and show that maximal thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TJ) and maximal lumbar lordosis (LL) on average occur at T3/T4, T12/L1 and L4/L5, respectively. The main advantage of GC and CA is that the measurements are independent of the orientation and size of the spine, thus allowing objective intra- and inter-subject comparisons. The positions of maximal TK, TJ and maximal LL can be easily identified by observing the GC and CA distributions at different vertebral levels. The obtained courses of the GC and CA for the scoliotic spine were compared to the distributions of GC and CA for the normal spines. The significant difference in values indicates that the descriptors of GC and CA

  4. Quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D: application to CT images of normal spine

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Trzaska 25, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: tomaz.vrtovec@fe.uni-lj.si, E-mail: bostjan.likar@fe.uni-lj.si, E-mail: franjo.pernus@fe.uni-lj.si

    2008-04-07

    The purpose of this study is to present a framework for quantitative analysis of spinal curvature in 3D. In order to study the properties of such complex 3D structures, we propose two descriptors that capture the characteristics of spinal curvature in 3D. The descriptors are the geometric curvature (GC) and curvature angle (CA), which are independent of the orientation and size of spine anatomy. We demonstrate the two descriptors that characterize the spinal curvature in 3D on 30 computed tomography (CT) images of normal spine and on a scoliotic spine. The descriptors are determined from 3D vertebral body lines, which are obtained by two different methods. The first method is based on the least-squares technique that approximates the manually identified vertebra centroids, while the second method searches for vertebra centroids in an automated optimization scheme, based on computer-assisted image analysis. Polynomial functions of the fourth and fifth degree were used for the description of normal and scoliotic spinal curvature in 3D, respectively. The mean distance to vertebra centroids was 1.1 mm ({+-}0.6 mm) for the first and 2.1 mm ({+-}1.4 mm) for the second method. The distributions of GC and CA values were obtained along the 30 images of normal spine at each vertebral level and show that maximal thoracic kyphosis (TK), thoracolumbar junction (TJ) and maximal lumbar lordosis (LL) on average occur at T3/T4, T12/L1 and L4/L5, respectively. The main advantage of GC and CA is that the measurements are independent of the orientation and size of the spine, thus allowing objective intra- and inter-subject comparisons. The positions of maximal TK, TJ and maximal LL can be easily identified by observing the GC and CA distributions at different vertebral levels. The obtained courses of the GC and CA for the scoliotic spine were compared to the distributions of GC and CA for the normal spines. The significant difference in values indicates that the descriptors of GC and

  5. Clinical significance of creative 3D-image fusion across multimodalities [PET + CT + MR] based on characteristic coregistration

    Objective: To investigate a registration approach for 2-dimension (2D) based on characteristic localization to achieve 3-dimension (3D) fusion from images of PET, CT and MR one by one. Method: A cubic oriented scheme of“9-point and 3-plane” for co-registration design was verified to be geometrically practical. After acquisiting DICOM data of PET/CT/MR (directed by radiotracer 18F-FDG etc.), through 3D reconstruction and virtual dissection, human internal feature points were sorted to combine with preselected external feature points for matching process. By following the procedure of feature extraction and image mapping, “picking points to form planes” and “picking planes for segmentation” were executed. Eventually, image fusion was implemented at real-time workstation mimics based on auto-fuse techniques so called “information exchange” and “signal overlay”. Result: The 2D and 3D images fused across modalities of [CT + MR], [PET + MR], [PET + CT] and [PET + CT + MR] were tested on data of patients suffered from tumors. Complementary 2D/3D images simultaneously presenting metabolic activities and anatomic structures were created with detectable-rate of 70%, 56%, 54% (or 98%) and 44% with no significant difference for each in statistics. Conclusion: Currently, based on the condition that there is no complete hybrid detector integrated of triple-module [PET + CT + MR] internationally, this sort of multiple modality fusion is doubtlessly an essential complement for the existing function of single modality imaging.

  6. Registration of 2D x-ray images to 3D MRI by generating pseudo-CT data

    van der Bom, M. J.; Pluim, J. P. W.; Gounis, M. J.; van de Kraats, E. B.; Sprinkhuizen, S. M.; Timmer, J.; Homan, R.; Bartels, L. W.

    2011-02-01

    Spatial and soft tissue information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can be very valuable during image-guided procedures, where usually only real-time two-dimensional (2D) x-ray images are available. Registration of 2D x-ray images to three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, acquired prior to the procedure, can provide optimal information to guide the procedure. However, registering x-ray images to MRI data is not a trivial task because of their fundamental difference in tissue contrast. This paper presents a technique that generates pseudo-computed tomography (CT) data from multi-spectral MRI acquisitions which is sufficiently similar to real CT data to enable registration of x-ray to MRI with comparable accuracy as registration of x-ray to CT. The method is based on a k-nearest-neighbors (kNN)-regression strategy which labels voxels of MRI data with CT Hounsfield Units. The regression method uses multi-spectral MRI intensities and intensity gradients as features to discriminate between various tissue types. The efficacy of using pseudo-CT data for registration of x-ray to MRI was tested on ex vivo animal data. 2D-3D registration experiments using CT and pseudo-CT data of multiple subjects were performed with a commonly used 2D-3D registration algorithm. On average, the median target registration error for registration of two x-ray images to MRI data was approximately 1 mm larger than for x-ray to CT registration. The authors have shown that pseudo-CT data generated from multi-spectral MRI facilitate registration of MRI to x-ray images. From the experiments it could be concluded that the accuracy achieved was comparable to that of registering x-ray images to CT data.

  7. 3D dose distribution from co registered images (SPECT-CT) using MCNPX

    The rapid development of image processing systems has made possible the mapping of not only the distribution of activity (SPECT, PET), but also the density (CT, NRM) in the organ or tissue of the patient. There is evidence that the coregistration and image fusion of different modalities leads to greater diagnostic accuracy. To treat cancer is necessary to know the dose to the tumor and organs at risk. At present the Monte Carlo method is more accurate dosimetric method. The determination of the dose distribution is a tool for the development of systems planning treatments for cancer patients. One of the biggest obstacles in the development of improved methods for more accurate estimate of the absorbed dose in cancer therapy has been the difficulty of obtaining the 3D distribution of dose from medical imaging patient multimodal specific. A boot strapper (Milian and Gual, 2004) as an interface between SPECT and MCNP code was developed to determine the specific patient dose distribution. The aim of this is to determine the absorbed dose distribution in tumors from the acquired images coregistered SPECT TAC studies by Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The results of this study will serve as input to the planning system in nuclear medicine treatments. (author)

  8. Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction Using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D improves chest CT image quality and reduces radiation exposure.

    Tsuneo Yamashiro

    Full Text Available To assess the advantages of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction using Three Dimensional Processing (AIDR3D for image quality improvement and dose reduction for chest computed tomography (CT.Institutional Review Boards approved this study and informed consent was obtained. Eighty-eight subjects underwent chest CT at five institutions using identical scanners and protocols. During a single visit, each subject was scanned using different tube currents: 240, 120, and 60 mA. Scan data were converted to images using AIDR3D and a conventional reconstruction mode (without AIDR3D. Using a 5-point scale from 1 (non-diagnostic to 5 (excellent, three blinded observers independently evaluated image quality for three lung zones, four patterns of lung disease (nodule/mass, emphysema, bronchiolitis, and diffuse lung disease, and three mediastinal measurements (small structure visibility, streak artifacts, and shoulder artifacts. Differences in these scores were assessed by Scheffe's test.At each tube current, scans using AIDR3D had higher scores than those without AIDR3D, which were significant for lung zones (p<0.0001 and all mediastinal measurements (p<0.01. For lung diseases, significant improvements with AIDR3D were frequently observed at 120 and 60 mA. Scans with AIDR3D at 120 mA had significantly higher scores than those without AIDR3D at 240 mA for lung zones and mediastinal streak artifacts (p<0.0001, and slightly higher or equal scores for all other measurements. Scans with AIDR3D at 60 mA were also judged superior or equivalent to those without AIDR3D at 120 mA.For chest CT, AIDR3D provides better image quality and can reduce radiation exposure by 50%.

  9. Measurement of spiculation index in 3D for solitary pulmonary nodules in volumetric lung CT images

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Alam, Naved; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper a differential geometry based method is proposed for calculating surface speculation of solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) in 3D from lung CT images. Spiculation present in SPN is an important shape feature to assist radiologist for measurement of malignancy. Performance of Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) system depends on the accurate estimation of feature like spiculation. In the proposed method, the peak of the spicules is identified using the property of Gaussian and mean curvature calculated at each surface point on segmented SPN. Once the peak point for a particular SPN is identified, the nearest valley points for the corresponding peak point are determined. The area of cross-section of the best fitted plane passing through the valley points is the base of that spicule. The solid angle subtended by the base of spicule at peak point and the distance of peak point from nodule base are taken as the measures of spiculation. The speculation index (SI) for a particular SPN is the weighted combination of all the spicules present in that SPN. The proposed method is validated on 95 SPN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database. It has achieved 87.4% accuracy in calculating quantified spiculation index compared to the spiculation index provided by radiologists in IDRI database.

  10. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  self-calibration (p  self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible, such as complex non-circular CBCT orbits and systems with irreproducible source-detector trajectory.

  11. 3D movement correction of CT brain perfusion image data of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Head movement during CT brain perfusion (CTP) acquisition can deteriorate the accuracy of CTP analysis. Most CTP software packages can only correct in-plane movement and are limited to small ranges. The purpose of this study is to validate a novel 3D correction method for head movement during CTP acquisition. Thirty-five CTP datasets that were classified as defective due to head movement were included in this study. All CTP time frames were registered with non-contrast CT data using a 3D rigid registration method. Location and appearance of ischemic area in summary maps derived from original and registered CTP datasets were qualitative compared with follow-up non-contrast CT. A quality score (QS) of 0 to 3 was used to express the degree of agreement. Furthermore, experts compared the quality of both summary maps and assigned the improvement score (IS) of the CTP analysis, ranging from -2 (much worse) to 2 (much better). Summary maps generated from corrected CTP significantly agreed better with appearance of infarct on follow-up CT with mean QS 2.3 versus mean QS 1.8 for summary maps from original CTP (P = 0.024). In comparison to original CTP data, correction resulted in a quality improvement with average IS 0.8: 17 % worsened (IS = -2, -1), 20 % remained unchanged (IS = 0), and 63 % improved (IS = +1, +2). The proposed 3D movement correction improves the summary map quality for CTP datasets with severe head movement. (orig.)

  12. 3D movement correction of CT brain perfusion image data of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Fahmi, Fahmi [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Sumatera Utara, Department of Electrical Engineering, Medan (Indonesia); Marquering, Henk A.; Streekstra, Geert J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borst, Jordi; Beenen, Ludo F.M.; Majoie, Charles B.L. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niesten, Joris M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); VanBavel, Ed [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the DUST study

    2014-06-15

    Head movement during CT brain perfusion (CTP) acquisition can deteriorate the accuracy of CTP analysis. Most CTP software packages can only correct in-plane movement and are limited to small ranges. The purpose of this study is to validate a novel 3D correction method for head movement during CTP acquisition. Thirty-five CTP datasets that were classified as defective due to head movement were included in this study. All CTP time frames were registered with non-contrast CT data using a 3D rigid registration method. Location and appearance of ischemic area in summary maps derived from original and registered CTP datasets were qualitative compared with follow-up non-contrast CT. A quality score (QS) of 0 to 3 was used to express the degree of agreement. Furthermore, experts compared the quality of both summary maps and assigned the improvement score (IS) of the CTP analysis, ranging from -2 (much worse) to 2 (much better). Summary maps generated from corrected CTP significantly agreed better with appearance of infarct on follow-up CT with mean QS 2.3 versus mean QS 1.8 for summary maps from original CTP (P = 0.024). In comparison to original CTP data, correction resulted in a quality improvement with average IS 0.8: 17 % worsened (IS = -2, -1), 20 % remained unchanged (IS = 0), and 63 % improved (IS = +1, +2). The proposed 3D movement correction improves the summary map quality for CTP datasets with severe head movement. (orig.)

  13. 3D texture analysis of solitary pulmonary nodules using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT images

    Dhara, Ashis Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we have investigated a new approach for texture features extraction using co-occurrence matrix from volumetric lung CT image. Traditionally texture analysis is performed in 2D and is suitable for images collected from 2D imaging modality. The use of 3D imaging modalities provide the scope of texture analysis from 3D object and 3D texture feature are more realistic to represent 3D object. In this work, Haralick's texture features are extended in 3D and computed from volumetric data considering 26 neighbors. The optimal texture features to characterize the internal structure of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules (SPN) are selected based on area under curve (AUC) values of ROC curve and p values from 2-tailed Student's t-test. The selected texture feature in 3D to represent SPN can be used in efficient Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) design plays an important role in fast and accurate lung cancer screening. The reduced number of input features to the CAD system will decrease the computational time and classification errors caused by irrelevant features. In the present work, SPN are classified from Ground Glass Nodule (GGN) using Artificial Neural Network (ANN) classifier considering top five 3D texture features and top five 2D texture features separately. The classification is performed on 92 SPN and 25 GGN from Imaging Database Resources Initiative (IDRI) public database and classification accuracy using 3D texture features and 2D texture features provide 97.17% and 89.1% respectively.

  14. A LabVIEW based user-friendly nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction platform

    Wang, Shenghao; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Wu, Zhao; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    X-ray nanometer computed tomography (nano-CT) offers applications and opportunities in many scientific researches and industrial areas. Here we present a user-friendly and fast LabVIEW based package running, after acquisition of the raw projection images, a procedure to obtain the inner structure of the sample under analysis. At first, a reliable image alignment procedure fixes possible misalignments among image series due to mechanical errors, thermal expansion and other external contributions, then a novel fast parallel beam 3D reconstruction performs the tomographic reconstruction. The remarkable improved reconstruction after the image calibration confirms the fundamental role of the image alignment procedure. It minimizes blurring and additional streaking artifacts present in a reconstructed slice that cause loss of information and faked structures in the observed material. The nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction LabVIEW package significantly reducing the data process, makes faster and easier th...

  15. Algorithm of pulmonary emphysema extraction using thoracic 3-D CT images

    Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Nakano, Yasutaka; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Tominaga, Keigo; Eguchi, Kenji; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-03-01

    Emphysema patients have the tendency to increase due to aging and smoking. Emphysematous disease destroys alveolus and to repair is impossible, thus early detection is essential. CT value of lung tissue decreases due to the destruction of lung structure. This CT value becomes lower than the normal lung- low density absorption region or referred to as Low Attenuation Area (LAA). So far, the conventional way of extracting LAA by simple thresholding has been proposed. However, the CT value of CT image fluctuates due to the measurement conditions, with various bias components such as inspiration, expiration and congestion. It is therefore necessary to consider these bias components in the extraction of LAA. We removed these bias components and we proposed LAA extraction algorithm. This algorithm has been applied to the phantom image. Then, by using the low dose CT(normal: 30 cases, obstructive lung disease: 26 cases), we extracted early stage LAA and quantitatively analyzed lung lobes using lung structure.

  16. Multi-modality fusion of CT, 3D ultrasound, and tracked strain images for breast irradiation planning

    Foroughi, Pezhman; Csoma, Csaba; Rivaz, Hassan; Fichtinger, Gabor; Zellars, Richard; Hager, Gregory; Boctor, Emad

    2009-02-01

    Breast irradiation significantly reduces the risk of recurrence of cancer. There is growing evidence suggesting that irradiation of only the involved area of the breast, partial breast irradiation (PBI), is as effective as whole breast irradiation. Benefits of PBI include shortened treatment time, and perhaps fewer side effects as less tissue is treated. However, these benefits cannot be realized without precise and accurate localization of the lumpectomy cavity. Several studies have shown that accurate delineation of the cavity in CT scans is very challenging and the delineated volumes differ dramatically over time and among users. In this paper, we propose utilizing 3D ultrasound (3D-US) and tracked strain images as complementary modalities to reduce uncertainties associated with current CT planning workflow. We present the early version of an integrated system that fuses 3D-US and real-time strain images. For the first time, we employ tracking information to reduce the noise in calculation of strain image by choosing the properly compressed frames and to position the strain image within the ultrasound volume. Using this system, we provide the tools to retrieve additional information from 3D-US and strain image alongside the CT scan. We have preliminarily evaluated our proposed system in a step-by-step fashion using a breast phantom and clinical experiments.

  17. Realtime Virtual 3D Image of Kidney Using Pre-Operative CT Image for Geometry and Realtime US-Image for Tracking

    Ärleryd, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis a method is presented to provide a 3D visualization of the human kidney and surrounding tissue during kidney surgery. The method takes advantage of the high detail of 3D X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and the high time resolution of Ultrasonography (US). By extracting the geometry from a single preoperative CT scan and animating the kidney by tracking its position in real time US images, a 3D visualization of the surgical volume can be created. The first part of the project con...

  18. 3D visualisation of the middle ear and adjacent structures using reconstructed multi-slice CT datasets, correlating 3D images and virtual endoscopy to the 2D cross-sectional images

    The 3D imaging of the middle ear facilitates better understanding of the patient's anatomy. Cross-sectional slices, however, often allow a more accurate evaluation of anatomical structures, as some detail may be lost through post-processing. In order to demonstrate the advantages of combining both approaches, we performed computed tomography (CT) imaging in two normal and 15 different pathological cases, and the 3D models were correlated to the cross-sectional CT slices. Reconstructed CT datasets were acquired by multi-slice CT. Post-processing was performed using the in-house software ''3D Slicer'', applying thresholding and manual segmentation. 3D models of the individual anatomical structures were generated and displayed in different colours. The display of relevant anatomical and pathological structures was evaluated in the greyscale 2D slices, 3D images, and the 2D slices showing the segmented 2D anatomy in different colours for each structure. Correlating 2D slices to the 3D models and virtual endoscopy helps to combine the advantages of each method. As generating 3D models can be extremely time-consuming, this approach can be a clinically applicable way of gaining a 3D understanding of the patient's anatomy by using models as a reference. Furthermore, it can help radiologists and otolaryngologists evaluating the 2D slices by adding the correct 3D information that would otherwise have to be mentally integrated. The method can be applied to radiological diagnosis, surgical planning, and especially, to teaching. (orig.)

  19. Computer-aided interactive surgical simulation for craniofacial anomalies based on 3-D surface reconstruction CT images

    We developed a computer-aided interactive surgical simulation system for craniofacial anomalies based on three-dimensional (3-D) surface reconstruction CT imaging. This system has four functions: 1) 3-D surface reconstruction display with an accelerated projection method; 2) Surgical simulation to cut, move, rotate, and reverse bone-blocks over the reference 3-D image on the CRT screen; 3) 3-D display of the simulated image in arbitrary views; and 4) Prediction of postoperative skin surface features displayed as 3-D images in arbitrary views. Retrospective surgical simulation has been performed on three patients who underwent the fronto-orbital advancement procedures for brachycephaly and two who underwent the reconstructive procedure for scaphocephaly. The predicted configurations of the cranium and skin surface were well simulated when compared to the postoperative images in 3-D arbitrary views. In practical use, this software might be used for an on-line system connected to a large scale general-purpose computer. (author)

  20. 3D electron density imaging using single scattered x rays with application to breast CT and mammographic screening

    van Uytven, Eric Peter

    Screening mammography is the current standard in detecting breast cancer. However, its fundamental disadvantage is that it projects a 3D object into a 2D image. Small lesions are difficult to detect when superimposed over layers of normal tissue. Commercial Computed Tomography (CT) produces a true 3D image yet has a limited role in mammography due to relatively low resolution and contrast. With the intent of enhancing mammography and breast CT, we have developed an algorithm which can produce 3D electron density images using a single projection. Imaging an object with x rays produces a characteristic scattered photon spectrum at the detector plane. A known incident beam spectrum, beam shape, and arbitrary 3D matrix of electron density values enable a theoretical scattered photon distribution to be calculated. An iterative minimization algorithm is used to make changes to the electron density voxel matrix to reduce regular differences between the theoretical and the experimentally measured distributions. The object is characterized by the converged electron density image. This technique has been validated in simulation using data produced by the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system. At both mammographic and CT energies, a scanning polychromatic pencil beam was used to image breast tissue phantoms containing lesion-like inhomogeneities. The resulting Monte Carlo data is processed using a Nelder-Mead iterative algorithm (MATLAB) to produce the 3D matrix of electron density values. Resulting images have confirmed the ability of the algorithm to detect various 1x1x2.5 mm3 lesions with calcification content as low as 0.5% (p<0.005) at a dose comparable to mammography.

  1. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki, E-mail: fukuhiro1962@hotmail.com [International HIFU Center, Sanmu Medical Center Hospital, Naruto 167, Sanbu-shi, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Sakamoto, Akio [International HIFU Center, Sanmu Medical Center Hospital, Naruto 167, Sanbu-shi, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Otsuka, Masayuki; Togawa, Akira; Miyazaki, Masaru [Department of General Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 260-0856 (Japan); Yamagata, Hitoshi [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara 324-0036 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths.

  2. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths

  3. Rigid 2D/3D slice-to-volume registration and its application on fluoroscopic CT images

    Registration of single slices from FluoroCT, CineMR, or interventional magnetic resonance imaging to three dimensional (3D) volumes is a special aspect of the two-dimensional (2D)/3D registration problem. Rather than digitally rendered radiographs (DRR), single 2D slice images obtained during interventional procedures are compared to oblique reformatted slices from a high resolution 3D scan. Due to the lack of perspective information and the different imaging geometry, convergence behavior differs significantly from 2D/3D registration applications comparing DRR images with conventional x-ray images. We have implemented a number of merit functions and local and global optimization algorithms for slice-to-volume registration of computed tomography (CT) and FluoroCT images. These methods were tested on phantom images derived from clinical scans for liver biopsies. Our results indicate that good registration accuracy in the range of 0.5 degree sign and 1.0 mm is achievable using simple cross correlation and repeated application of local optimization algorithms. Typically, a registration took approximately 1 min on a standard personal computer. Other merit functions such as pattern intensity or normalized mutual information did not perform as well as cross correlation in this initial evaluation. Furthermore, it appears as if the use of global optimization algorithms such as simulated annealing does not improve reliability or accuracy of the registration process. These findings were also confirmed in a preliminary registration study on five clinical scans. These experiments have, however, shown that a strict breath-hold protocol is inevitable when using rigid registration techniques for lesion localization in image-guided biopsy retrieval. Finally, further possible applications of slice-to-volume registration are discussed

  4. Rigid Registration of Freehand 3D Ultrasound and CT-Scan Kidney Images

    Leroy, A; Payan, Y; Troccaz, J; Leroy, Antoine; Mozer, Pierre; Payan, Yohan; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a method to register a preoperative CT volume to a sparse set of intraoperative US slices. In the context of percutaneous renal puncture, the aim is to transfer a planning information to an intraoperative coordinate system. The spatial position of the US slices is measured by localizing a calibrated probe. Our method consists in optimizing a rigid 6 degree of freedom (DOF) transform by evaluating at each step the similarity between the set of US images and the CT volume. The images have been preprocessed in order to increase the relationship between CT and US pixels. Correlation Ratio turned out to be the most accurate and appropriate similarity measure to be used in a Powell-Brent minimization scheme. Results are compared to a standard rigid point-to-point registration involving segmentation, and discussed.

  5. Evaluation of patellar cartilage surface lesions: comparison of CT arthrography and fat-suppressed FLASH 3D MR imaging

    Daenen, B.R.; Ferrara, M.A.; Marcelis, S.; Dondelinger, R.F. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of fat-suppressed fast low-angle shot (FLASH) 3D MR imaging in the detection of patellar cartilage surface lesions in comparison with CT arthrography. Fifty patients, with or without symptoms of chondromalacia, were prospectively examined by CT arthrography and fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo MR imaging. All MR examinations were evaluated by three observers, two of them reaching a consensus interpretation. The lesions were graded according to their morphology and their extent. The CT arthrography was considered as the reference examination. For both sets of observers, the final diagnosis of chondromalacia was obtained in 92.5 %. The specificity was 60 % on a patient-by-patient basis. Fissures were missed in 83 and 60 %, respectively, but were isolated findings only in 2.5 % of the cases. Considering ulcers involving more than 50 % of the cartilage thickness, 65 and 88 %, respectively, were recognized. Fat-suppressed FLASH 3D is an adequate pulse sequence for the detection of patellar cartilage ulcers. It can be applied on a routine clinical basis, but it does not show as many fissures as CT arthrography and is less precise for grading of lesions. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 21 refs.

  6. 2D and 3D CT imaging correlated to rigid endoscopy in complex laryngo-tracheal stenoses

    The aim of this study was to compare 2D and 3D CT imaging in the pre- and postoperative evaluation of complex benign laryngestracheal airway stenoses with rigid endoscopy, considered as the gold standard. Six patients (aged 5-72 years) with a total of nine complex laryngo-tracheal stenoses underwent non-contrast helical CT scans (slice thickness 3 mm, pitch 1.3, reconstruction interval 1.5 mm) before and after surgical resection. With prototype software, virtual endoscopy (VE) post-processing algorithms were applied to the imaging data sets. The VE and multiplanar 2D findings were compared with rigid endoscopy, considered as standard of reference. All nine stenoses were correctly identified on 3D images and their anatomical locations correctly assessed on 2D reconstructions. Artifacts were met when patients were unable to suspend their breath, leading to one false-positive result. Two-dimensional images and 3D VE of tracheal stenoses proved to be efficient and complementary to the rigid endoscopy, permitting a reliable endoluminal 3D view and evaluation of the surrounding anatomical structures. (orig.)

  7. 2D and 3D CT imaging correlated to rigid endoscopy in complex laryngo-tracheal stenoses

    Gluecker, T.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Duvoisin, B. [CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Lang, F.; Bessler, S.; Monnier, P. [Dept. of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, CHUV Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2D and 3D CT imaging in the pre- and postoperative evaluation of complex benign laryngestracheal airway stenoses with rigid endoscopy, considered as the gold standard. Six patients (aged 5-72 years) with a total of nine complex laryngo-tracheal stenoses underwent non-contrast helical CT scans (slice thickness 3 mm, pitch 1.3, reconstruction interval 1.5 mm) before and after surgical resection. With prototype software, virtual endoscopy (VE) post-processing algorithms were applied to the imaging data sets. The VE and multiplanar 2D findings were compared with rigid endoscopy, considered as standard of reference. All nine stenoses were correctly identified on 3D images and their anatomical locations correctly assessed on 2D reconstructions. Artifacts were met when patients were unable to suspend their breath, leading to one false-positive result. Two-dimensional images and 3D VE of tracheal stenoses proved to be efficient and complementary to the rigid endoscopy, permitting a reliable endoluminal 3D view and evaluation of the surrounding anatomical structures. (orig.)

  8. Bone canalicular network segmentation in 3D nano-CT images through geodesic voting and image tessellation

    Recent studies emphasized the role of the bone lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) in the understanding of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. However, suitable methods to investigate this structure are lacking. The aim of this paper is to introduce a methodology to segment the LCN from three-dimensional (3D) synchrotron radiation nano-CT images. Segmentation of such structures is challenging due to several factors such as limited contrast and signal-to-noise ratio, partial volume effects and huge number of data that needs to be processed, which restrains user interaction. We use an approach based on minimum-cost paths and geodesic voting, for which we propose a fully automatic initialization scheme based on a tessellation of the image domain. The centroids of pre-segmented lacunæ are used as Voronoi-tessellation seeds and as start-points of a fast-marching front propagation, whereas the end-points are distributed in the vicinity of each Voronoi-region boundary. This initialization scheme was devised to cope with complex biological structures involving cells interconnected by multiple thread-like, branching processes, while the seminal geodesic-voting method only copes with tree-like structures. Our method has been assessed quantitatively on phantom data and qualitatively on real datasets, demonstrating its feasibility. To the best of our knowledge, presented 3D renderings of lacunæ interconnected by their canaliculi were achieved for the first time. (paper)

  9. Bone canalicular network segmentation in 3D nano-CT images through geodesic voting and image tessellation

    Zuluaga, Maria A.; Orkisz, Maciej; Dong, Pei; Pacureanu, Alexandra; Gouttenoire, Pierre-Jean; Peyrin, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies emphasized the role of the bone lacuno-canalicular network (LCN) in the understanding of bone diseases such as osteoporosis. However, suitable methods to investigate this structure are lacking. The aim of this paper is to introduce a methodology to segment the LCN from three-dimensional (3D) synchrotron radiation nano-CT images. Segmentation of such structures is challenging due to several factors such as limited contrast and signal-to-noise ratio, partial volume effects and huge number of data that needs to be processed, which restrains user interaction. We use an approach based on minimum-cost paths and geodesic voting, for which we propose a fully automatic initialization scheme based on a tessellation of the image domain. The centroids of pre-segmented lacunæ are used as Voronoi-tessellation seeds and as start-points of a fast-marching front propagation, whereas the end-points are distributed in the vicinity of each Voronoi-region boundary. This initialization scheme was devised to cope with complex biological structures involving cells interconnected by multiple thread-like, branching processes, while the seminal geodesic-voting method only copes with tree-like structures. Our method has been assessed quantitatively on phantom data and qualitatively on real datasets, demonstrating its feasibility. To the best of our knowledge, presented 3D renderings of lacunæ interconnected by their canaliculi were achieved for the first time.

  10. Twin robotic x-ray system for 2D radiographic and 3D cone-beam CT imaging

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Steinbrener, Jan; Jerebko, Anna K.; Voigt, Johannes M.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we provide an initial characterization of a novel twin robotic X-ray system. This system is equipped with two motor-driven telescopic arms carrying X-ray tube and flat-panel detector, respectively. 2D radiographs and fluoroscopic image sequences can be obtained from different viewing angles. Projection data for 3D cone-beam CT reconstruction can be acquired during simultaneous movement of the arms along dedicated scanning trajectories. We provide an initial evaluation of the 3D image quality based on phantom scans and clinical images. Furthermore, initial evaluation of patient dose is conducted. The results show that the system delivers high image quality for a range of medical applications. In particular, high spatial resolution enables adequate visualization of bone structures. This system allows 3D X-ray scanning of patients in standing and weight-bearing position. It could enable new 2D/3D imaging workflows in musculoskeletal imaging and improve diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders.

  11. MUTUAL INFORMATION BASED 3D NON-RIGID REGISTRATION OF CT/MR ABDOMEN IMAGES

    HU; Hai-bo(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Maintz J B, Viergever M A. A survey of medical image registration[J]. Medical Image Analysis, 1998, 3(1):1~37.[2]Collignon A. Automated multi-modality image registration based on information theory[J]. Computational Imaging and vision, 1995, 3:263~274.[3]Eberl S, Braun M. Intra-and inter-modality registration of functional and anatomical clinical images[A]. Pham B, et al. eds. New Approaches in Medical Image Analysis, SPIE 3747[C].[s.l.]:[s.n.], 1999. 102~114.[4]Lau Y H, Braun M, Hutton B F. Non-rigid 3D image registration using regionally constrained matching and the correlation ratio[A]. Pernus F, et al.eds. Biomedical Image Registration, Proc Int Workshop[C]. Bled, Slovenia, 1999. 137~148.[5]Wells Ⅲ W M, Viola P, Atsumi H, et al. Multi-modal volume registration by maximization of mutual information[J]. Medical Image Analysis, 1996, 1(1):35~51.[6]Feldmar J, Ayache N. Rigid, affine and locally affine registration of free-form surfaces[J]. Int J of Computer Vision, 1996, 23(3):97~104.

  12. The quality of reconstructed 3D images in multidetector-row helical CT: experimental study involving scan parameters

    To determine which multidetector-row helical CT scanning technique provides the best-quality reconstructed 3D images, and to assess differences in image quality according to the levels of the scanning parameters used. Four objects with different surfaces and contours were scanned using multidetector-row helical CT at three detector-row collimations (1.25, 2.50, 5.00 mm), two pitches (3.0, 6.0), and three different degrees of overlap between the reconstructed slices (0%, 25%, 50%). Reconstructed 3D images of the resulting 72 sets of data were produced using volumetric rendering. The 72 images were graded on a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best) for each of four rating criteria, giving a mean score for each criterion and an overall mean score. Statistical analysis was used to assess differences in image quality according to scanning parameter levels. The mean score for each rating criterion, and the overall mean score, varied significantly according to the scanning parameter levels used. With regard to detector-row collimation and pitch, all levels of scanning parameters gave rise to significant differences, while in the degree of overlap of reconstructed slices, there were significant differences between overlap of 0% and of 50% in all levels of scanning parameters, and between overlap of 25% and of 50% in overall accuracy and overall mean score. Among the 18 scanning sequences, the highest score (4.94) was achieved with 1.25 mm detector-row collimation, 3.0 pitch, and 50% overlap between reconstructed slices. Comparison of the quality of reconstructed 3D images obtained using multidetector-row helical CT and various scanning techniques indicated that the 1.25 mm, 3.0, 50% scanning sequence was best. Quality improved as detector-row collimation decreased; as pitch was reduced from 6.0 to 3.0; and as overlap between reconstructed slices increased

  13. Crack detection of 3D industrial CT image%三维工业CT图像裂纹面检测

    许会洋; 曾理; 刘玲慧

    2011-01-01

    3D ICT image which contains cracks can be obtained by scanning. Exacting the cracks from CT image is of great significance to analyze its property and ensure the security of the workpiece. An efficient detection can be obtained by using the 3D C-V model, but the rate of 3D C-V model's evolution is slow. This paper researched a method combining 3D wavelet transform with 3D C-V model to improve the speed of crack detection. In the numerical experiment, both 3D C-V model and the method proposed could exact the crack defect from the ICT image. The result shows that the proposed method is effective and the speed of crack detection is improved about one point five times. The detection result is convenient for next data analysis.%利用工业CT扫描工件可得到包含工件内部裂纹的三维CT图像,而将裂纹面从CT图像中提取出来是对裂纹属性进行分析的关键,对确保工件可靠性具有重要的意义.针对直接3D C-V模型提取裂纹面速度慢的特点,研究了三维小波与C-V模型相结合的图像分割方法,提高裂纹图像分割速度.实验结果表明,与直接3DC-V模型相比,该方法可将三维C-V模型提取裂纹的速度提高大约1.5倍,为后续裂纹分析打下基础.

  14. 3D-CT imaging using characteristic X-rays and visible lights produced by ion micro-beam bombardment

    Ishii, K.; Matsuyama, S.; Yamazaki, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Momose, G.; Kikuchi, Y.; Terakawa, A.; Galster, W.

    2006-08-01

    We improved the spatial resolution of a 3D-CT imaging system consisting of a micro-beam and an X-ray CCD camera of 1 mega pixels (Hamamatsu photonics C8800X), whose element size is 8 μm × 8 μm providing an image size of 8 mm × 8 mm. A small ant of ∼6 mm body length was placed in a small tube, rotated by a stepping motor, and a spatial resolution of 4 μm for X-ray micron-CT using characteristic Ti-K-X-rays (4.558 keV) produced by 3 MeV proton micro-beams was obtained. We applied the X-ray micron-CT to a small ant's head and obtained the fine structures of the head's interior. Because the CCD is sensitive to visible light, we also examined the capability of light micron-CT using visible red light from an Al2O3(Cr) ruby scintillator and applied the micron-CT to a small red tick. Though the red tick is highly transparent to Ti-K-X-rays, visible red light does not penetrate through the red tick. The most serious problem was dispersion of lights due to Thomson scattering resulting in obscure projection images.

  15. A user-friendly nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction platform based on LabVIEW

    Wang, Sheng-Hao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zhi-Li; Gao, Kun; Wu, Zhao; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography at the nanometer scale (nano-CT) offers a wide range of applications in scientific and industrial areas. Here we describe a reliable, user-friendly, and fast software package based on LabVIEW that may allow us to perform all procedures after the acquisition of raw projection images in order to obtain the inner structure of the investigated sample. A suitable image alignment process to address misalignment problems among image series due to mechanical manufacturing errors, thermal expansion, and other external factors has been considered, together with a novel fast parallel beam 3D reconstruction procedure that was developed ad hoc to perform the tomographic reconstruction. We have obtained remarkably improved reconstruction results at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility after the image calibration, the fundamental role of this image alignment procedure was confirmed, which minimizes the unwanted blurs and additional streaking artifacts that are always present in reconstructed slices. Moreover, this nano-CT image alignment and its associated 3D reconstruction procedure are fully based on LabVIEW routines, significantly reducing the data post-processing cycle, thus making the activity of the users faster and easier during experimental runs.

  16. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  17. Efficient and robust 3D CT image reconstruction based on total generalized variation regularization using the alternating direction method.

    Chen, Jianlin; Wang, Linyuan; Yan, Bin; Zhang, Hanming; Cheng, Genyang

    2015-01-01

    Iterative reconstruction algorithms for computed tomography (CT) through total variation regularization based on piecewise constant assumption can produce accurate, robust, and stable results. Nonetheless, this approach is often subject to staircase artefacts and the loss of fine details. To overcome these shortcomings, we introduce a family of novel image regularization penalties called total generalized variation (TGV) for the effective production of high-quality images from incomplete or noisy projection data for 3D reconstruction. We propose a new, fast alternating direction minimization algorithm to solve CT image reconstruction problems through TGV regularization. Based on the theory of sparse-view image reconstruction and the framework of augmented Lagrange function method, the TGV regularization term has been introduced in the computed tomography and is transformed into three independent variables of the optimization problem by introducing auxiliary variables. This new algorithm applies a local linearization and proximity technique to make the FFT-based calculation of the analytical solutions in the frequency domain feasible, thereby significantly reducing the complexity of the algorithm. Experiments with various 3D datasets corresponding to incomplete projection data demonstrate the advantage of our proposed algorithm in terms of preserving fine details and overcoming the staircase effect. The computation cost also suggests that the proposed algorithm is applicable to and is effective for CBCT imaging. Theoretical and technical optimization should be investigated carefully in terms of both computation efficiency and high resolution of this algorithm in application-oriented research. PMID:26756406

  18. FEA Based on 3D Micro-CT Images of Mesoporous Engineered Hydrogels

    L. Siad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this computational study was to propose a rapid procedure in obtaining an estimation of elastic moduli of solid phases of porous natural-polymeric biomaterials used for bone tissue engineering. This procedure was based on the comparison of experimental results to finite element (FE responses of parallelepiped so-called representative volume elements (rev of the material at hand. To address this issue a series of quasi-static unconfined compression tests were designed and performed on three prepared cylindrical biopolymer samples. Subsequently, a computed tomography scan was performed on fabricated specimens and two 3D images were reconstructed. Various parallelepiped revs of different sizes and located at distinct places within both constructs were isolated and then analyzed under unconfined compressive loads using FE modelling. In this preliminary study, for the sake of simplicity, the dried biopolymer solid is assumed to be linear elastic.

  19. Initial study of 3D perfused blood volume imaging using 64-detector CT in hyperacute cerebral infarction

    Objective: To evaluate the value of three dimensional CT whole brain perfused blood volume (3D-PBV) based on CTA row data in hyperacute cerebral infarction. Methods: 38 patients with stroke within 12 hours performed plain CT and CTA scans. 3D software Neuro PBV was applied to process the CTA row data and 3D-PBV of brain was obtained. MR examinations were performed within 2 hours after CT scans. The numbers of ischemic lesions on plain CT, 3D-PBV and MRI-DWI were recorded. The volumes of ischemic lesions on 3D-PBV and MR -DWI were measured. Results: In 38 patients, the number of infarct lesion detected by MRI-DWI, PBV, and plain CT was 45, 41, and 16 respectively. Kappa test showed a substantial agreement (κ=0.78) between 3D-PBV and MRI-DWI in detecting ischemic lesions. The detectability of plain CT showed fair or slight agreements to 3D-PBV and MR-DWI (κ=0.24, 0.18, respectively). The lesion volumes did not differ on 3D-PBV and MR-DWI (t=7.249, P>0.05). Conclusion: 3D-PBV combined with CTA can detect ischemic lesion and evaluate perfusion. It had important value in diagnosing hyperacute cerebral infarction. (authors)

  20. 3D segmentation of liver, kidneys and spleen from CT images

    The clinicians often need to segment the abdominal organs for radiotherapy planning. Manual segmentation of these organs is very time-consuming, therefore automated methods are desired. We developed a semi-automatic segmentation method to outline liver, spleen and kidneys. It works on CT images without contrast intake that are acquired with a routine clinical protocol. From an initial surface around a user defined seed point, the segmentation of the organ is obtained by an active surface algorithm. Pre- and post-processing steps are used to adapt the general method for specific organs. The evaluation results show that the accuracy of our method is about 90%, which can be further improved with little manual editing, and that the precision is slightly higher than that of manual contouring. Our method is accurate, precise and fast enough to use in the clinical practice. (orig.)

  1. Estimation of vocal fold plane in 3D CT images for diagnosis of vocal fold abnormalities.

    Hewavitharanage, Sajini; Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Thyagarajan, Dominic; Lau, Ken; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2015-01-01

    Vocal folds are the key body structures that are responsible for phonation and regulating air movement into and out of lungs. Various vocal fold disorders may seriously impact the quality of life. When diagnosing vocal fold disorders, CT of the neck is the commonly used imaging method. However, vocal folds do not align with the normal axial plane of a neck and the plane containing vocal cords and arytenoids does vary during phonation. It is therefore important to generate an algorithm for detecting the actual plane containing vocal folds. In this paper, we propose a method to automatically estimate the vocal fold plane using vertebral column and anterior commissure localization. Gray-level thresholding, connected component analysis, rule based segmentation and unsupervised k-means clustering were used in the proposed algorithm. The anterior commissure segmentation method achieved an accuracy of 85%, a good estimate of the expert assessment. PMID:26736949

  2. Studies on image quality, high contrast resolution and dose for the axial skeleton and limbs with a new, dedicated CT system (ISO-C-3D)

    Purpose: Evaluation of 3D-CT imaging of the axial skeleton and different joints of the lower and upper extremities with a new dedicated CT system (ISO-C-3D) based on a mobile isocentric C-arm image amplifier. Material and Methods: 27 cadaveric specimes of different joints of the lower and upper extremities and of the spinal column were examined with 3D-CT imaging (ISO-C-3d). All images were evaluated by 3 radiologists for image quality using a semiquantitative score (score value 1: poor quality; score value 4: excellent quality). In addition, dose measurements and measurements of high contrast resolution were performed in comparison to conventional and low-dose spiral CT using a high contrast phantom (Catphan, Phantom Laboratories). Results: Adequate image quality (mean score values 3-4) could be achieved with an applied dose comparable to low-dose CT in smaller joints such as wrist, elbow, ankle and knee. A remarkably inferior image quality resulted in imaging of the hip, lumbar and thoracic spine (mean score values 2-3) in spite of almost doubling the dose (dose increased by 85 percent). The image quality of shoulder examinations was insufficient (mean score value 1). Phantom studies showed a high-contrast resolution comparable to helical CT in the xy-axis (9 lp/cm). Conclusion: Preliminary results show, that image quality of C-arm-based CT-imaging (ISO-C-3D) seems to be adequate in smaller joints. ISO-C-3D images of the hip and axial skeleton show a decreased image quality, which does not seem to be sufficient for diagnosing subtle fractures. (orig.)

  3. Ligation of the internal maxillary artery for intractable epistaxis. 3D imaging of internal maxillary artery using helical CT scan

    Sever posterior epistaxis is one of the serious clinical problems. Nasal bleeding usually occurs in the anterior septal region, where it can be seen easily and controlled with topical cautery or localized packing. When the bleeding occurs in the posterior nose, it becomes a more serious problem. Many methods have been used to control posterior epistaxis. Some of these are electrocautery, posterior nasal packing, vascular ligation and therapeutic percutaneous embolization. Between 1997 and 2000, nineteen patients were admitted to our hospital because of intractable epistaxis. There were 16 male and 3 female patients whose average age was 55 years. Ten of 19 patients were hypertensive, and none of these had undergoing treatment. Five of 19 patients received maxillary artery ligation. Clinical applications of 3D imaging of the internal maxillary artery using helical CT scan were done for 5 patients. These images were helpful for planning of ligation of the internal maxillary artery. (author)

  4. Realization methods of 3D visualization in industrial monolayer CT

    3D visualization plays an important role in industrial CT inspection system.Taking 3D-imaging methods in other fields as references, the paper introduces three feasible imaging algorithms, contour connecting method, marching cubes (MC), and an improved marching cubes method basing on distance function. Compare of these methods are also given in this paper. It is of importance for the development of 3D visualization in air container and luggage CT inspection systems. (authors)

  5. A new efficient 2D combined with 3D CAD system for solitary pulmonary nodule detection in CT images

    Xing Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer has become one of the leading causes of death in the world. Clear evidence shows that early discovery, early diagnosis and early treatment of lung cancer can significantly increase the chance of survival for patients. Lung Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD is a potential method to accomplish a range of quantitative tasks such as early cancer and disease detection. Many computer-aided diagnosis (CAD methods, including 2D and 3D approaches, have been proposed for solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs. However, the detection and diagnosis of SPNs remain challenging in many clinical circumstances. One goal of this work is to develop a two-stage approach that combines the simplicity of 2D and the accuracy of 3D methods. The experimental results show statistically significant differences between the diagnostic accuracy of 2D and 3Dmethods. The results also show that with a very minor drop in diagnostic performance the two-stage approach can significantly reduce the number of nodules needed to be processed by the 3D method, streamlining the computational demand. Finally, all malignant nodules were detected and a very low false-positive detection rate was achieved. The automated extraction of the lung in CT images is the most crucial step in a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD system. In this paper we describe a method, consisting of appropriate techniques, for the automated identification of the pulmonary volume. The performance is evaluated as a fully automated computerized method for the detection of lung nodules in computed tomography (CT scans in the identification of lung cancers that may be missed during visual interpretation.

  6. Unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter for improvement of 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region

    We evaluated the usefulness of the unsharp masking technique as a preprocessing filter to improve 3D-CT images of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. The effect of the unsharp masking technique with several combinations of mask size and weighting factor on image resolution was investigated using a spatial frequency phantom made of bone-equivalent material. The 3D-CT images were obtained with scans perpendicular to and parallel to the phantom plates. The contrast transfer function (CTF) and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of each spatial frequency component were measured. The FWHM was expressed as a ratio against the actual thickness of phantom plate. The effect on pseudoforamina was assessed using sliced CT images obtained in clinical bony 3D-CT examinations. The effect of the unsharp masking technique on image quality was also visually evaluated using five clinical fracture cases. CTFs did not change. FWHM ratios of original 3D-CT images were smaller than 1.0, regardless of the scanning direction. Those in scans perpendicular to the phantom plates were not changed by the unsharp masking technique. Those in parallel scanning were increased by mask size and weighting factor. The area of pseudoforamina decreased with increases in mask size and weighting factor. The combination of mask size 3 x 3 pixels and weighting factor 5 was optimal. Visual evaluation indicated that preprocessing with the unsharp masking technique improved the image quality of the 3D-CT images. The unsharp masking technique is useful as a preprocessing filter to improve the 3D-CT image of bony structure in the maxillofacial region. (author)

  7. A fast rigid-registration method of inferior limb X-ray image and 3D CT images for TKA surgery

    Ito, Fumihito; O. D. A, Prima; Uwano, Ikuko; Ito, Kenzo

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast rigid-registration method of inferior limb X-ray films (two-dimensional Computed Radiography (CR) images) and three-dimensional Computed Tomography (CT) images for Total Knee Arthroplasty (TKA) surgery planning. The position of the each bone, such as femur and tibia (shin bone), in X-ray film and 3D CT images is slightly different, and we must pay attention how to use the two different images, since X-ray film image is captured in the standing position, and 3D CT is captured in decubitus (face up) position, respectively. Though the conventional registration mainly uses cross-correlation function between two images,and utilizes optimization techniques, it takes enormous calculation time and it is difficult to use it in interactive operations. In order to solve these problems, we calculate the center line (bone axis) of femur and tibia (shin bone) automatically, and we use them as initial positions for the registration. We evaluate our registration method by using three patient's image data, and we compare our proposed method and a conventional registration, which uses down-hill simplex algorithm. The down-hill simplex method is an optimization algorithm that requires only function evaluations, and doesn't need the calculation of derivatives. Our registration method is more effective than the downhill simplex method in computational time and the stable convergence. We have developed the implant simulation system on a personal computer, in order to support the surgeon in a preoperative planning of TKA. Our registration method is implemented in the simulation system, and user can manipulate 2D/3D translucent templates of implant components on X-ray film and 3D CT images.

  8. Morphological image processing operators. Reduction of partial volume effects to improve 3D visualization based on CT data

    Aim: The quality of segmentation and three-dimensional reconstruction of anatomical structures in tomographic slices is often impaired by disturbances due to partial volume effects (PVE). The potential for artefact reduction by use of the morphological image processing operators (MO) erosion and dilation is investigated. Results: For all patients under review, the artefacts caused by PVE were significantly reduced by erosion (lung: Mean SBRpre=1.67, SBRpost=4.83; brain: SBRpre=1.06, SBRpost=1.29) even with only a small number of iterations. Region dilation was applied to integrate further structures (e.g. at tumor borders) into a configurable neighbourhood for segmentation and quantitative analysis. Conclusions: The MO represent an efficient approach for the reduction of PVE artefacts in 3D-CT reconstructions and allow optimised visualization of individual objects. (orig./AJ)

  9. Three-dimensional image technology in forensic anthropology: Assessing the validity of biological profiles derived from CT-3D images of the skeleton

    Garcia de Leon Valenzuela, Maria Julia

    This project explores the reliability of building a biological profile for an unknown individual based on three-dimensional (3D) images of the individual's skeleton. 3D imaging technology has been widely researched for medical and engineering applications, and it is increasingly being used as a tool for anthropological inquiry. While the question of whether a biological profile can be derived from 3D images of a skeleton with the same accuracy as achieved when using dry bones has been explored, bigger sample sizes, a standardized scanning protocol and more interobserver error data are needed before 3D methods can become widely and confidently used in forensic anthropology. 3D images of Computed Tomography (CT) scans were obtained from 130 innominate bones from Boston University's skeletal collection (School of Medicine). For each bone, both 3D images and original bones were assessed using the Phenice and Suchey-Brooks methods. Statistical analysis was used to determine the agreement between 3D image assessment versus traditional assessment. A pool of six individuals with varying experience in the field of forensic anthropology scored a subsample (n = 20) to explore interobserver error. While a high agreement was found for age and sex estimation for specimens scored by the author, the interobserver study shows that observers found it difficult to apply standard methods to 3D images. Higher levels of experience did not result in higher agreement between observers, as would be expected. Thus, a need for training in 3D visualization before applying anthropological methods to 3D bones is suggested. Future research should explore interobserver error using a larger sample size in order to test the hypothesis that training in 3D visualization will result in a higher agreement between scores. The need for the development of a standard scanning protocol focusing on the optimization of 3D image resolution is highlighted. Applications for this research include the possibility

  10. 3D images of human hair using X-ray CT method with age

    Recently interest of the aging effects has been increased in Japanese society but it is still not known much about what happens on the aged hairs. The hair-density measurement revealed that the density of human hair decreases with age, which caused by the follow-out of proteins and peptides from the hairs. According to the results of hair investigation between 20 and 50 years women, effluences of protein and peptide become increasing with the age and the degree of the cosmetic treatment. Further studies based on the X-ray CT show that quantity of voids in hair increases with age, which is thought at the origin of the density decrease. (author)

  11. Use of 3D imaging in CT of the acute trauma patient: impact of a PACS-based software package.

    Soto, Jorge A; Lucey, Brain C; Stuhlfaut, Joshua W; Varghese, Jose C

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of a picture archiving and communication systems (PACS)-based software package on the requests for 3D reconstructions of multidetector CT (MDCT) data sets in the emergency radiology of a level 1 trauma center, we reviewed the number and type of physician requests for 3D reconstructions of MDCT data sets for patients admitted after sustaining multiple trauma, during a 12-month period (January 2003-December 2003). During the first 5 months of the study, 3D reconstructions were performed in dedicated workstations located separately from the emergency radiology CT interpretation area. During the last 7 months of the study, reconstructions were performed online by the attending radiologist or resident on duty, using a software package directly incorporated into the PACS workstations. The mean monthly number of 3D reconstructions requested during the two time periods was compared using Student's t test. The monthly mean +/- SD of 3D reconstructions performed before and after 3D software incorporation into the PACS was 34+/-7 (95% CI, 10-58) and 132+/-31 (95% CI, 111-153), respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p<0.0001). In the multiple trauma patient, implementation of PACS-integrated software increases utilization of 3D reconstructions of MDCT data sets. PMID:16028324

  12. Inter-plane artifact suppression in tomosynthesis using 3D CT image data

    Kim Jae G; Jin Seung O; Cho Min H; Lee Soo Y

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Despite its superb lateral resolution, flat-panel-detector (FPD) based tomosynthesis suffers from low contrast and inter-plane artifacts caused by incomplete cancellation of the projection components stemming from outside the focal plane. The incomplete cancellation of the projection components, mostly due to the limited scan angle in the conventional tomosynthesis scan geometry, often makes the image contrast too low to differentiate the malignant tissues from the backgro...

  13. Sectional depiction of the pelvic floor by CT, MR imaging and sheet plastination: computer-aided correlation and 3D model

    Beyersdorff, D.; Taupitz, M.; Hamm, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany); Schiemann, T. [Inst. for Mathematics and Computer Science in Medicine, University of Hamburg (Germany); Kooijman, H. [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany); Nicolas, V. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Kliniken Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    The structures of the pelvic floor are clinically important but difficult to assess. To facilitate the understanding of the complicated pelvic floor anatomy on sectional images obtained by CT and MR imaging, and to make the representation more vivid, a computer-aided 3D model was created from a male and a female torso to develop a teaching tool. A male and a female cadaver torso were investigated by means of CT, MR imaging, and serial-section sheet plastination. A 3D reconstruction of the pelvic floor and adjacent structures was performed by fusion of CT and MR imaging data sets with sheet plastination sections. Corresponding sections from all three methods could be compared and visualized in their 3D context. Sheet plastination allows distinction of connective tissue, muscles, and pelvic organs down to a microscopic level. In combination with CT, MR imaging, and sheet plastination a 3D model of the pelvic floor offers a better understanding of the complex pelvic anatomy. This knowledge may be applied in the diagnostic imaging of urinary incontinence or prolapse and prior to prostate surgery. (orig.)

  14. Sectional depiction of the pelvic floor by CT, MR imaging and sheet plastination: computer-aided correlation and 3D model

    The structures of the pelvic floor are clinically important but difficult to assess. To facilitate the understanding of the complicated pelvic floor anatomy on sectional images obtained by CT and MR imaging, and to make the representation more vivid, a computer-aided 3D model was created from a male and a female torso to develop a teaching tool. A male and a female cadaver torso were investigated by means of CT, MR imaging, and serial-section sheet plastination. A 3D reconstruction of the pelvic floor and adjacent structures was performed by fusion of CT and MR imaging data sets with sheet plastination sections. Corresponding sections from all three methods could be compared and visualized in their 3D context. Sheet plastination allows distinction of connective tissue, muscles, and pelvic organs down to a microscopic level. In combination with CT, MR imaging, and sheet plastination a 3D model of the pelvic floor offers a better understanding of the complex pelvic anatomy. This knowledge may be applied in the diagnostic imaging of urinary incontinence or prolapse and prior to prostate surgery. (orig.)

  15. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  16. Automatic registration between 3D intra-operative ultrasound and pre-operative CT images of the liver based on robust edge matching

    The registration of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) image with a computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance image is beneficial in various clinical applications such as diagnosis and image-guided intervention of the liver. However, conventional methods usually require a time-consuming and inconvenient manual process for pre-alignment, and the success of this process strongly depends on the proper selection of initial transformation parameters. In this paper, we present an automatic feature-based affine registration procedure of 3D intra-operative US and pre-operative CT images of the liver. In the registration procedure, we first segment vessel lumens and the liver surface from a 3D B-mode US image. We then automatically estimate an initial registration transformation by using the proposed edge matching algorithm. The algorithm finds the most likely correspondences between the vessel centerlines of both images in a non-iterative manner based on a modified Viterbi algorithm. Finally, the registration is iteratively refined on the basis of the global affine transformation by jointly using the vessel and liver surface information. The proposed registration algorithm is validated on synthesized datasets and 20 clinical datasets, through both qualitative and quantitative evaluations. Experimental results show that automatic registration can be successfully achieved between 3D B-mode US and CT images even with a large initial misalignment.

  17. The analysis of CT and 3D-VRCT images in highly elderly patients with congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema

    In 20 elderly patients with congestive heart failure, the pulmonary/mediastinal findings of MPR images with 3D volume rendering (VR) CT were reviewed. Diffuse ground-glass areas and/or consolidation were observed along the bronchovascular bundle and dorsal dependent areas. Vascular enlargement of pulmonary vessels and interlobular septal thickenings were also observed The increased attenuation with a gravitaional anteroposterior (ventrodorsal) gradient was more apparent on sagittal reconstructed image than conventional axial images. 3DVR CT can demonstrate the inter-and intralobular septal lines predominating not only in the anterior portions of the middle and lingular lobe, but also the apical and lung base areas. (author)

  18. Morphometric measurement of the patella on 3D model reconstructed from CT scan images for the southern Chinese population

    Shang Peng; Zhang Linan; Hou Zengtao; Bai Xueling; Ye Xin; Xu Zhaobin; Huang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to racial differences in the morphology of the knee joint and due to most prostheses available in the market being designed using measurements from Caucasians,the objective of this study was to provide the morphometric data of the patella for the southern Chinese population for total knee arthroplasty (TKA),patellar resurfacing,and prostheses design.Methods The CT slices of the knee joint were obtained from both knees of 40 Chinese volunteers (20 females,20 males,and age from 20-25 years) by performing a computer tomographic scan.A 3D model was reconstructed by Mimics software based on the computed tomography images.Six metrical characteristics were measured by digital ruler.Statistical analysis was performed with the SPSS statistical program.Results The mean,standard deviation and P values of measurements and ratios were calculated using SPSS.All dimensions showed a significant gender difference with P<0.05,but the six variables of the left and right knees had no statistical significance with P>0.05.In addition,we studied the relationship between six couples (H-W,H-T,H-HAF,W-T,W-HAF,T-HAF) of the four variables (H:height,W:width,T:thickness and HAF:height of articulating facet) that were measured,which showed a significant correlation.Conclusions Examination of the southern Chinese population revealed that males have larger patellae than women.In both genders,comparing data between left and right knees shows no statistically significant difference.Compared with Westerners in previous studies,the patella in our study was thin and small.There was a good linear regression correlation between measurements of the patella.The indirect measurement method on 3D models makes it easy to obtain anatomical data,and the results can provide a region and gender specific database for morphometric measurements of the oatella,and can be helpful for designing implants suited for southern Chinese patients.

  19. Application of CT 3D reconstruction in diagnosing atlantoaxial subluxation

    段少银; 林清池; 庞瑞麟

    2004-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate and compare the diagnostic value in atlantoaxial subluxation by CT three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction.Methods:3D reconstruction fimdings of 41 patients with atlantoaxiai subluxation were retrospectively analyzed, and comparisons were made among images of transverse section, multiplanar reformorting (MPR), surface shade display (SSD), maximum intensity project (MIP), and volume rendering (VR). Results:Of 41 patients with atlantoaxial subluxation, 31 belonged to rotary dislocation, 5 antedislocation, and 5 hind dislocation. All the cases showed the dislocated joint panel of atlantoaxial articulation.Fifteen cases showed deviation of the odontoid process and 8 cases widened distance between the dens and anterior arch of the atlas. The dislocated joint panel of atlantoaxial articulation was more clearly seen with SSD-3D imaging than any other methods. Conclusions:Atlantoaxial subluxation can well be diagnosed by CT 3D reconstruction, in which SSD-3D imaging is optimal.

  20. Regularization Designs for Uniform Spatial Resolution and Noise Properties in Statistical Image Reconstruction for 3D X-ray CT

    Cho, Jang Hwan; Fessler, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Statistical image reconstruction methods for X-ray computed tomography (CT) provide improved spatial resolution and noise properties over conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction, along with other potential advantages such as reduced patient dose and artifacts. Conventional regularized image reconstruction leads to spatially variant spatial resolution and noise characteristics because of interactions between the system models and the regularization. Previous regularization d...

  1. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  2. Accuracy and inter-observer variability of 3D versus 4D cone-beam CT based image-guidance in SBRT for lung tumors

    Sweeney Reinhart A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyze the accuracy and inter-observer variability of image-guidance (IG using 3D or 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT technology in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors. Materials and methods Twenty-one consecutive patients treated with image-guided SBRT for primary and secondary lung tumors were basis for this study. A respiration correlated 4D-CT and planning contours served as reference for all IG techniques. Three IG techniques were performed independently by three radiation oncologists (ROs and three radiotherapy technicians (RTTs. Image-guidance using respiration correlated 4D-CBCT (IG-4D with automatic registration of the planning 4D-CT and the verification 4D-CBCT was considered gold-standard. Results were compared with two IG techniques using 3D-CBCT: 1 manual registration of the planning internal target volume (ITV contour and the motion blurred tumor in the 3D-CBCT (IG-ITV; 2 automatic registration of the planning reference CT image and the verification 3D-CBCT (IG-3D. Image quality of 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT images was scored on a scale of 1–3, with 1 being best and 3 being worst quality for visual verification of the IGRT results. Results Image quality was scored significantly worse for 3D-CBCT compared to 4D-CBCT: the worst score of 3 was given in 19 % and 7.1 % observations, respectively. Significant differences in target localization were observed between 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT based IG: compared to the reference of IG-4D, tumor positions differed by 1.9 mm ± 0.9 mm (3D vector on average using IG-ITV and by 3.6 mm ± 3.2 mm using IG-3D; results of IG-ITV were significantly closer to the reference IG-4D compared to IG-3D. Differences between the 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT techniques increased significantly with larger motion amplitude of the tumor; analogously, differences increased with worse 3D-CBCT image quality scores. Inter-observer variability was largest in SI direction and was

  3. A user-friendly nano-CT image alignment and 3D reconstruction platform based on LabVIEW

    Wang, Shenghao; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Zhili; Gao, Kun; Wu, Zhao; Zhu, Peiping; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography at the nanometer scale (nano-CT) offers a wide range of applications in scientific and industrial areas. Here we describe a reliable, user-friendly and fast software package based on LabVIEW that may allow to perform all procedures after the acquisition of raw projection images in order to obtain the inner structure of the investigated sample. A suitable image alignment process to address misalignment problems among image series due to mechanical manufacturing errors...

  4. 3D-CT imaging processing for qualitative and quantitative analysis of maxillofacial cysts and tumors Processamento de imagens em 3D-TC para análise qualitativa e quantitativa de cistos e tumores maxilo-faciais

    Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso Cavalcanti

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate spiral-computed tomography (3D-CT images of 20 patients presenting with cysts and tumors in the maxillofacial complex, in order to compare the surface and volume techniques of image rendering. The qualitative and quantitative appraisal indicated that the volume technique allowed a more precise and accurate observation than the surface method. On the average, the measurements obtained by means of the 3D volume-rendering technique were 6.28% higher than those obtained by means of the surface method. The sensitivity of the 3D surface technique was lower than that of the 3D volume technique for all conditions stipulated in the diagnosis and evaluation of lesions. We concluded that the 3D-CT volume rendering technique was more reproducible and sensitive than the 3D-CT surface method, in the diagnosis, treatment planning and evaluation of maxillofacial lesions, especially those with intra-osseous involvement.O presente trabalho consiste em um estudo associativo e comparativo entre as técnicas de superfície e volume para a reconstrução de imagens em três dimensões (3D utilizando tomografia computadorizada (TC. Foram realizadas tomografias computadorizadas em espiral de 20 pacientes com cistos e tumores do complexo maxilo-facial para análise qualitativa e quantitativa, utilizando métodos de superfície e de volume em 3D. A comparação interexaminadores apresentou erro padrão percentual menos elevado para a técnica de volume (1,94% que para a técnica de superfície (4,38%, indicando a maior reprodutibilidade do primeiro método. As medidas obtidas pela técnica de volume foram em média 6,28% mais elevadas que as medidas obtidas pela técnica de superfície. A técnica de volume apresentou sensibilidade mais elevada que a técnica de superfície na identificação das lesões do complexo maxilo-facial. A técnica de volume em 3D-TC, utilizando a metodologia da computação gráfica, apresentou maior

  5. Validation of 3D motion tracking of pulmonary lesions using CT fluoroscopy images for robotically assisted lung biopsy

    Xu, Sheng; Fichtinger, Gabor; Taylor, Russell H.; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2005-04-01

    As recently proposed in our previous work, the two-dimensional CT fluoroscopy image series can be used to track the three-dimensional motion of a pulmonary lesion. The assumption is that the lung tissue is locally rigid, so that the real-time CT fluoroscopy image can be combined with a preoperative CT volume to infer the position of the lesion when the lesion is not in the CT fluoroscopy imaging plane. In this paper, we validate the basic properties of our tracking algorithm using a synthetic four-dimensional lung dataset. The motion tracking result is compared to the ground truth of the four-dimensional dataset. The optimal parameter configurations of the algorithm are discussed. The robustness and accuracy of the tracking algorithm are presented. The error analysis shows that the local rigidity error is the principle component of the tracking error. The error increases as the lesion moves away from the image region being registered. Using the synthetic four-dimensional lung data, the average tracking error over a complete respiratory cycle is 0.8 mm for target lesions inside the lung. As a result, the motion tracking algorithm can potentially alleviate the effect of respiratory motion in CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy.

  6. Hybrid Image Visualization Tool for 3D integration of CT coronary anatomy and quantitative myocardial perfusion PET

    Marinelli, Martina; Positano, Vincenzo; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Marcheschi, Paolo; Todiere, Giancarlo; Esposito, Natalia; Puzzuoli, Stefano; L’Abbate, Giuseppe A.; Marraccini, Paolo; Neglia, Danilo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Multimodal cardiac imaging by CTA and quantitative PET enables acquisition of patient-specific coronary anatomy and absolute myocardial perfusion at rest and during stress. In the clinical setting, integration of this information is performed visually or using coronary arteries distribution models. We developed a new tool for CTA and quantitative PET integrated 3D visualization, exploiting XML and DICOM clinical standards. Methods: The Hybrid Image Tool (HIT) developed in the present...

  7. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Vali-Asr Hospital, Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sen, A [University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Parach, A [Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kalantari, F [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  8. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  9. Heterodyne 3D ghost imaging

    Yang, Xu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Xu, Lu; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three dimensional (3D) ghost imaging measures range of target based on pulse fight time measurement method. Due to the limit of data acquisition system sampling rate, range resolution of the conventional 3D ghost imaging is usually low. In order to take off the effect of sampling rate to range resolution of 3D ghost imaging, a heterodyne 3D ghost imaging (HGI) system is presented in this study. The source of HGI is a continuous wave laser instead of pulse laser. Temporal correlation and spatial correlation of light are both utilized to obtain the range image of target. Through theory analysis and numerical simulations, it is demonstrated that HGI can obtain high range resolution image with low sampling rate.

  10. 3-D CT for cardiovascular treatment planning

    Wildermuth, S.; Leschka, S.; Duru, F.; Alkadhi, H. [Inst. for Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-11-15

    The recently developed 64-slice CT scanner together with the use of 2-D and 3-D reconstructions can aid the cardiovascular surgeon and interventional radiologist in visualizing exact geometric relationships to plan and execute complex procedures via minimally invasive or standard approaches.Cardiac 64-slice CT considerably benefits from the high temporal and spatial resolution allowing the reliable depiction of small coronary segments. Similarly, abdominal vascular 64-slice CT became possible within short examination times and allowing an optimal arterial contrast bolus exploitation. We demonstrate four representative cardiac and abdominal examples using the new 64-slice CT technology which reveal the impact of the new scanner generation for cardiovascular treatment planning. (orig.)

  11. Usefulness of reconstructed 3D-CT for magerl technique

    It is obviously important to determine safe screwing in transarticular atlanto-axial fixation by the Magerl technique by evaluating the morphological features of the screw passing route. In the present study, we investigated the availability of reconstructed 3D-CT to prevent vertebral artery injury in this technique. Thirty patients underwent reconstructed 3D-CT prior to the operation to determine whether safe screw fixation by the Magerl technique, imaging coronal, and sagittal reconstruction CT were possible. As a result, safe screwing was found to be impossible in four cases, of which two therefore underwent Brooks's method and the other two cases O-C2 fusion. Twenty-six cases who were compatible with Magerl's method had no neuro-vascular complications. We concluded that reconstructed 3D-CT is useful for determining safe screw fixation by the Magerl technique. (author)

  12. MicroCT for comparative morphology: simple staining methods allow high-contrast 3D imaging of diverse non-mineralized animal tissues

    Metscher Brian D

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative, functional, and developmental studies of animal morphology require accurate visualization of three-dimensional structures, but few widely applicable methods exist for non-destructive whole-volume imaging of animal tissues. Quantitative studies in particular require accurately aligned and calibrated volume images of animal structures. X-ray microtomography (microCT has the potential to produce quantitative 3D images of small biological samples, but its widespread use for non-mineralized tissues has been limited by the low x-ray contrast of soft tissues. Although osmium staining and a few other techniques have been used for contrast enhancement, generally useful methods for microCT imaging for comparative morphology are still lacking. Results Several very simple and versatile staining methods are presented for microCT imaging of animal soft tissues, along with advice on tissue fixation and sample preparation. The stains, based on inorganic iodine and phosphotungstic acid, are easier to handle and much less toxic than osmium, and they produce high-contrast x-ray images of a wide variety of soft tissues. The breadth of possible applications is illustrated with a few microCT images of model and non-model animals, including volume and section images of vertebrates, embryos, insects, and other invertebrates. Each image dataset contains x-ray absorbance values for every point in the imaged volume, and objects as small as individual muscle fibers and single blood cells can be resolved in their original locations and orientations within the sample. Conclusion With very simple contrast staining, microCT imaging can produce quantitative, high-resolution, high-contrast volume images of animal soft tissues, without destroying the specimens and with possibilities of combining with other preparation and imaging methods. Such images are expected to be useful in comparative, developmental, functional, and quantitative studies of

  13. Intensity-Based Registration of Freehand 3D Ultrasound and CT-scan Images of the Kidney

    Leroy, Antoine; Payan, Yohan; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method to register a pre-operative Computed-Tomography (CT) volume to a sparse set of intra-operative Ultra-Sound (US) slices. In the context of percutaneous renal puncture, the aim is to transfer planning information to an intra-operative coordinate system. The spatial position of the US slices is measured by optically localizing a calibrated probe. Assuming the reproducibility of kidney motion during breathing, and no deformation of the organ, the method consists in optimizing a rigid 6 Degree Of Freedom (DOF) transform by evaluating at each step the similarity between the set of US images and the CT volume. The correlation between CT and US images being naturally rather poor, the images have been preprocessed in order to increase their similarity. Among the similarity measures formerly studied in the context of medical image registration, Correlation Ratio (CR) turned out to be one of the most accurate and appropriate, particularly with the chosen non-derivative minimization scheme, n...

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of fetal skeletal dysplasia with 3D CT

    Miyazaki, Osamu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Seatagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Sago, Haruhiko; Hayashi, Satoshi [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Perinatal Medicine and Maternal Care, Seatagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Kosaki, Rika [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Strategic Medicine, Division of Clinical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Seatagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    Clinical use of 3D CT for fetal skeletal malformations is controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of fetal 3D CT using three protocols with different radiation doses and through comparing findings between fetal CT and conventional postnatal radiographic skeletal survey. Seventeen fetuses underwent CT for suspected skeletal dysplasia. A relay of three CT protocols with stepwise dose-reduction were used over the study period. The concordance between the CT diagnosis and the final diagnosis was assessed. Ninety-three radiological findings identifiable on radiographs were compared with CT. Fetal CT provided the correct diagnosis in all 17 fetuses, the detectability rate of cardinal findings was 93.5 %. In 59 % of the fetuses an US-based diagnosis was changed prenatally due to CT findings. The estimated fetal radiation dose in the final protocol was 3.4 mSv (50 %) of the initial protocol, and this dose reduction did not result in degraded image quality. The capability of fetal CT to delineate the skeleton was almost the same as that of postnatal skeletal survey. The perinatal management was altered due to these more specific CT findings, which aided in counseling and in the management of the pregnancy. (orig.)

  15. 3D Reconstruction in Spiral Multislice CT Scans

    M. Ghafouri

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: The rapid development of spiral (helical computed tomography (CT has resulted in exciting new applications for CT. One of these applications, three-dimensional (3D CT with volume ren-dering, is now a major area of clinical and academic interest. One of the greatest advantages of spiral CT with 3D volume rendering is that it provides all the necessary information in a single radiologic study (and there-fore at the lowest possible price in cases that previously required two or more studies. Three-dimensional vol-ume rendering generates clinically accurate and immediately available images from the full CT data set with-out extensive editing. It allows the radiologist and clinician to address specific questions concerning patient care by interactively exploring different aspects of the data set. Three-dimensional images integrate a series of axial CT sections into a form that is often easier to interpret than the sections themselves and can be made to appear similar to other more familiar images such as catheter angiograms. The data are organized into a 3D matrix of volume elements (voxels. The screen of the computer monitor is a 2D-surface composed of discrete picture elements (pixels. Presenting what is stored in memory (ie, floating within the monitor on a 2D-screen is a challenge, but it is the very problem that 3D reconstruc-tion software has creatively solved. Voxel selection is usually accomplished by projecting lines (rays through the data set that correspond to the pixel matrix of the desired 2D image. Differences in the images produced with various 3D rendering techniques are the result of variations in how voxels are selected and weighted. In this article, I compare 3D volume rendering of spiral CT data with other rendering techniques (shaded surface display, maximum intensity projection and present a brief history of 3D volume rendering and discuss the im-plementation of this promising technology in terms of

  16. Development of multi organ segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT images using likelihood atlas of organ existence and graph cut

    In this paper, we propose a multi organ segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT images using likelihood atlas of organ existence and a graph cut. Recently, segmentation methods based on graph cut are proposed as segmentation methods using cost-minimization techniques. In our method, we extract multi organs automatically using a multilabel graph cut. This method reduces miss extraction of other organs. First, we extract multi organs roughly by a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation from likelihood atlas and input images. We give foreground and background seeds for each organ simultaneously using a rough extraction result, then we minimize multi organ costs using a multilabel graph cut to obtain accurate extraction result. We apply this method to 41 cases of abdominal CT images and evaluate the results by a leave-one-out method. Jaccard indices were 88.8% for liver, 81.1% for spleen, 45.4% for pancreas, and 63.9% for kidney, respectively. (author)

  17. 3D multidetector CT angiographic evaluation of intralobular bronchopulmonary sequestration

    Marwah Ruchira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intralobar pulmonary sequestration with special emphasis on computed tomography (CT angiography in determining the arterial supply and venous drainage, thus providing a detailed knowledge of the vasculature, which is of vital importance in surgery. The 3D volume rendering technique and maximum intensity projection images provide the vascular road map for the surgeon.

  18. Images of the middle and inner ear using limited-cone-beam 3D X-ray CT (Ortho-CT)

    To report the high quality images of middle and inner ear obtained using limited-cone-beam three-dimensional x-ray CT (Ortho-CT) developed by authors. We have developed and reported about principle and images of Ortho-CT. This system is small three-dimensional X-ray CT which is remodeled from the multi-functional tomographic machine for dental use (ScanoraTM, Soredex Co., Helsinki, Finland). The patient who is examined can sit down on the chair of the system and his head is fixed. X-ray sensor used is 4 inches imaging intensifier (I.I.). The size of X-ray beam is 32 mm high and 40 mm width at rotational center. The exposure conditions are consisted of 85 kVp, 10 mA, adder filter 1 mm Cu and 3 mm Al. The exposure time is 17 seconds. The 512 projection images from 360 degree are recorded on the personal computer (Pentium II 333 MHz Intel, USA). CT images are reconstructed from the projection images. The reconstruction time is about 7 minutes using personal computer system (Pentium III 550 MHz, Intel, USA). The voxel is ortho-cubic figure (each side of size: 0.136 mm). The figure of imaging area is cylinder type (32 mm high, 38 mm diameter). In this study, the middle and inner ear of a volunteer (61-years-old male) was examined with this system to evaluate its performance. The images obtained were very high quality. Therefore the images of the auditory ossicles and inner ear can be very useful for the diagnosis of small bone destruction by the pathosis. We developed limited-cone-beam three-dimensional x-ray CT. The images of inner ear and auditory ossicles were shown with a very high quality using this system. The system is expected to be applied for clinical use to the diagnosis of the ear disease. (author)

  19. 3D Imager and Method for 3D imaging

    Kumar, P.; Staszewski, R.; Charbon, E.

    2013-01-01

    3D imager comprising at least one pixel, each pixel comprising a photodetectorfor detecting photon incidence and a time-to-digital converter system configured for referencing said photon incidence to a reference clock, and further comprising a reference clock generator provided for generating the re

  20. Automatic Segmentation of Colon in 3D CT Images and Removal of Opacified Fluid Using Cascade Feed Forward Neural Network

    K. Gayathri Devi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Colon segmentation is an essential step in the development of computer-aided diagnosis systems based on computed tomography (CT images. The requirement for the detection of the polyps which lie on the walls of the colon is much needed in the field of medical imaging for diagnosis of colorectal cancer. Methods. The proposed work is focused on designing an efficient automatic colon segmentation algorithm from abdominal slices consisting of colons, partial volume effect, bowels, and lungs. The challenge lies in determining the exact colon enhanced with partial volume effect of the slice. In this work, adaptive thresholding technique is proposed for the segmentation of air packets, machine learning based cascade feed forward neural network enhanced with boundary detection algorithms are used which differentiate the segments of the lung and the fluids which are sediment at the side wall of colon and by rejecting bowels based on the slice difference removal method. The proposed neural network method is trained with Bayesian regulation algorithm to determine the partial volume effect. Results. Experiment was conducted on CT database images which results in 98% accuracy and minimal error rate. Conclusions. The main contribution of this work is the exploitation of neural network algorithm for removal of opacified fluid to attain desired colon segmentation result.

  1. TU-F-12A-05: Sensitivity of Textural Features to 3D Vs. 4D FDG-PET/CT Imaging in NSCLC Patients

    Purpose: Neighborhood Gray-level difference matrices (NGLDM) based texture parameters extracted from conventional (3D) 18F-FDG PET scans in patients with NSCLC have been previously shown to associate with response to chemoradiation and poorer patient outcome. However, the change in these parameters when utilizing respiratory-correlated (4D) FDG-PET scans has not yet been characterized for NSCLC. The Objectives: of this study was to assess the extent to which NGLDM-based texture parameters on 4D PET images vary with reference to values derived from 3D scans in NSCLC. Methods: Eight patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. 4D PET scans were reconstructed with OSEM-IR in 5 respiratory phase-binned images and corresponding CT data of each phase were employed for attenuation correction. NGLDM-based texture features, consisting of coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity and strength, were evaluated for gross tumor volumes defined on 3D/4D PET scans by radiation oncologists. Variation of the obtained texture parameters over the respiratory cycle were examined with respect to values extracted from 3D scans. Results: Differences between texture parameters derived from 4D scans at different respiratory phases and those extracted from 3D scans ranged from −30% to 13% for coarseness, −12% to 40% for contrast, −5% to 50% for busyness, −7% to 38% for complexity, and −43% to 20% for strength. Furthermore, no evident correlations were observed between respiratory phase and 4D scan texture parameters. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that NGLDM-based texture parameters varied considerably based on choice of 3D PET and 4D PET reconstruction of NSCLC patient images, indicating that standardized image acquisition and analysis protocols need to be established for clinical studies, especially multicenter clinical trials, intending to validate prognostic values of texture features for NSCLC

  2. Diagnostic Importance of 3D CT Images in Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Multiple Skeletal Anomalies: A Case Report

    Yuksel, Murvet [Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University, Radiology Dept. (Turkey); Karabiber, Hamza [Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Pediatrics Dept. (Turkey); Yuksel, K. Zafer [Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Neuroradiology Dept (Turkey); Parmaksiz, Gonul [Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University Pediatrics Dept. (Turkey)

    2005-07-01

    We present here the case of a 12-year-old boy who had Klippel-Feil syndrome with renal, cardiac and multiple skeletal anomalies, and we show the relevent three-dimensional computed tomography images. Our patient had a triple renal pelvis, mitral valve prolapsus, multiple cervical vertebrae fusions, cervical ribs, hypoplasia of the right thumb, spina bifida of L5, lumbalization at the right side of S1 and a sacral curved defect. In this study, we discuss the atypical clinical features and the diagnostic value of three-dimensional CT for evaluating the skeletal anomalies of the Klippel-Feil syndrome cases.

  3. Diagnostic Importance of 3D CT Images in Klippel-Feil Syndrome with Multiple Skeletal Anomalies: A Case Report

    We present here the case of a 12-year-old boy who had Klippel-Feil syndrome with renal, cardiac and multiple skeletal anomalies, and we show the relevent three-dimensional computed tomography images. Our patient had a triple renal pelvis, mitral valve prolapsus, multiple cervical vertebrae fusions, cervical ribs, hypoplasia of the right thumb, spina bifida of L5, lumbalization at the right side of S1 and a sacral curved defect. In this study, we discuss the atypical clinical features and the diagnostic value of three-dimensional CT for evaluating the skeletal anomalies of the Klippel-Feil syndrome cases

  4. Application of 3D-myelo-CT for lumbar disease

    Taira, Gaku; Endo, Kenji; Karasawa, Haruhiro; Urawa, Yasuhito; Ito, Koichi; Ichimaru, Katsuji [Tokyo Medical Coll., Ami, Ibaraki (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital; Miura, Yukio

    1997-03-01

    Helical CTs for lumbar disk hernia (LDH) and for lumbar canal stenosis (LCS) were compared with ordinary imaging diagnosis. Subjects were 10 cases of LDH and of LCS, who were 24-71 (mean 58.7) years old. The apparatus was Siemens Somatom Plus 4 and its 3D-program soft was used for reconstruction. The ordinary myelography was performed with a non-ionic contrasting medium and 60 min later, helical CT was carried out with conditions of 140 kV, 204 mA, slice thickness 3 mm, bed speed 3 mm/sec and reconstruction 1.5 mm. MRI was done on sagittal, axial and coronary sections and 3D-MRI was reconstructed from the coronary ones with the maximum intensity projection procedure. The 3D-myelo-CT images were compared with those by myelography, 2D-MRI and 3D-MRI in diagnostic rate of impaired nerve root, anatomical relationships between dura tube and bony factors and imaging rate of redundant nerve root. Exclusions of dura tube and of nerve root were found observable in 3D-myelo-CT, which was useful for surgery simulation and for explaining to patients. (K.H.)

  5. Application of 3D-myelo-CT for lumbar disease

    Helical CTs for lumbar disk hernia (LDH) and for lumbar canal stenosis (LCS) were compared with ordinary imaging diagnosis. Subjects were 10 cases of LDH and of LCS, who were 24-71 (mean 58.7) years old. The apparatus was Siemens Somatom Plus 4 and its 3D-program soft was used for reconstruction. The ordinary myelography was performed with a non-ionic contrasting medium and 60 min later, helical CT was carried out with conditions of 140 kV, 204 mA, slice thickness 3 mm, bed speed 3 mm/sec and reconstruction 1.5 mm. MRI was done on sagittal, axial and coronary sections and 3D-MRI was reconstructed from the coronary ones with the maximum intensity projection procedure. The 3D-myelo-CT images were compared with those by myelography, 2D-MRI and 3D-MRI in diagnostic rate of impaired nerve root, anatomical relationships between dura tube and bony factors and imaging rate of redundant nerve root. Exclusions of dura tube and of nerve root were found observable in 3D-myelo-CT, which was useful for surgery simulation and for explaining to patients. (K.H.)

  6. A stochastic approach for automatic registration and fusion of left atrial electroanatomic maps with 3D CT anatomical images

    The integration of electroanatomic maps with highly resolved computed tomography cardiac images plays an important role in the successful planning of the ablation procedure of arrhythmias. In this paper, we present and validate a fully-automated strategy for the registration and fusion of sparse, atrial endocardial electroanatomic maps (CARTO maps) with detailed left atrial (LA) anatomical reconstructions segmented from a pre-procedural MDCT scan. Registration is accomplished by a parameterized geometric transformation of the CARTO points and by a stochastic search of the best parameter set which minimizes the misalignment between transformed CARTO points and the LA surface. The subsequent fusion of electrophysiological information on the registered CT atrium is obtained through radial basis function interpolation. The algorithm is validated by simulation and by real data from 14 patients referred to CT imaging prior to the ablation procedure. Results are presented, which show the validity of the algorithmic scheme as well as the accuracy and reproducibility of the integration process. The obtained results encourage the application of the integration method in post-intervention ablation assessment and basic AF research and suggest the development for real-time applications in catheter guiding during ablation intervention

  7. A fast experimental beam hardening correction method for accurate bone mineral measurements in 3D μCT imaging system.

    Koubar, Khodor; Bekaert, Virgile; Brasse, David; Laquerriere, Patrice

    2015-06-01

    Bone mineral density plays an important role in the determination of bone strength and fracture risks. Consequently, it is very important to obtain accurate bone mineral density measurements. The microcomputerized tomography system provides 3D information about the architectural properties of bone. Quantitative analysis accuracy is decreased by the presence of artefacts in the reconstructed images, mainly due to beam hardening artefacts (such as cupping artefacts). In this paper, we introduced a new beam hardening correction method based on a postreconstruction technique performed with the use of off-line water and bone linearization curves experimentally calculated aiming to take into account the nonhomogeneity in the scanned animal. In order to evaluate the mass correction rate, calibration line has been carried out to convert the reconstructed linear attenuation coefficient into bone masses. The presented correction method was then applied on a multimaterial cylindrical phantom and on mouse skeleton images. Mass correction rate up to 18% between uncorrected and corrected images were obtained as well as a remarkable improvement of a calculated mouse femur mass has been noticed. Results were also compared to those obtained when using the simple water linearization technique which does not take into account the nonhomogeneity in the object. PMID:25818096

  8. 3D-imaging of selective laser melting defects in a Co–Cr–Mo alloy by synchrotron radiation micro-CT

    Microstructure defects set the mechanical property limits for solid Co–Cr–Mo alloy prepared by selective laser melting (SLM). Previous studies were mainly based on 2D SEM images and thus not able to provide information of the 3D morphologies of the complex defects. In this paper, the remaining porosities in Co–Cr–Mo alloy parts prepared by selective laser melting were presented in relation to the laser processing parameters. In order to understand the defect forming mechanism, accurate 3D images of defects inside SLM fabricated Co–Cr–Mo samples were provided by synchrotron radiation micro-CT imaging of 300 μm thick slices cut from a 10 mm cube. With 3D reconstructed images distinctive morphologies of SLM defects spanning across the consolidated powder layers were generated. The faults can be classified as single layer or multi-layers defects. The accidental single layer defects form as gaps between adjacent laser melt tracks or melt track discontinuousness caused by inherent fluid instability under various disturbances. The first formed single layer defect generates often a multi-layer defect spanning for 2–3 subsequent powder layers. By stabilizing the melt pool flow and by reducing the surface roughness through adjusting processing parameters it appears possible to reduce the defect concentrations

  9. 3D vector flow imaging

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... conventional methods can estimate only the axial component. Several approaches for 3D vector velocity estimation have been suggested, but none of these methods have so far produced convincing in vivo results nor have they been adopted by commercial manufacturers. The basis for this project is the Transverse...... on the TO fields are suggested. They can be used to optimize the TO method. In the third part, a TO method for 3D vector velocity estimation is proposed. It employs a 2D phased array transducer and decouples the velocity estimation into three velocity components, which are estimated simultaneously based on 5...

  10. In situ investigation of the 3D mechanical microstructure at nanoscale: nano-CT imaging method of local small region in large scale sample.

    Dong, Bo; Xu, Feng; Hu, Xiao-fang; Qu, Hong-yan; Kang, Dan; Xiao, Ti-qiao

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the local micro-/nanoscale region in a large scale sample, an image reconstruction method for nanometer computed tomography (nano-CT) was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, wavelets were used to localize the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm because of its space-frequency localization property. After the implementation of the algorithm, two simulation local reconstruction experiments were performed to confirm its effectiveness. Three evaluation criteria were used in the experiments to judge the quality of the reconstructed images. The experimental results showed that the algorithm proposed in this paper performed best because (1) the quality of its results had improved 20%-30% compared to the results of FBP and 10%-30% compared to the results of another wavelet algorithm; (2) the new algorithm was stable under different circumstances. Besides, an actual reconstruction experiment was performed using real projection data that had been collected in a CT experiment. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images of the sample were reconstructed. The microstructure of the sample could be clearly observed in the reconstructed images. Since much attention has been directed towards the nano-CT technique to investigate the microstructure of materials, this new wavelet-based local tomography algorithm could be considered as a meaningful effort. PMID:24723829

  11. Development of a Hausdorff distance based 3D quantification technique to evaluate the CT imaging system impact on depiction of lesion morphology

    Sahbaee, Pooyan; Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a 3D quantification technique to assess the impact of imaging system on depiction of lesion morphology. Regional Hausdorff Distance (RHD) was computed from two 3D volumes: virtual mesh models of synthetic nodules or "virtual nodules" and CT images of physical nodules or "physical nodules". The method can be described in following steps. First, the synthetic nodule was inserted into anthropomorphic Kyoto thorax phantom and scanned in a Siemens scanner (Flash). Then, nodule was segmented from the image. Second, in order to match the orientation of the nodule, the digital models of the "virtual" and "physical" nodules were both geometrically translated to the origin. Then, the "physical" was gradually rotated at incremental 10 degrees. Third, the Hausdorff Distance was calculated from each pair of "virtual" and "physical" nodules. The minimum HD value represented the most matching pair. Finally, the 3D RHD map and the distribution of RHD were computed for the matched pair. The technique was scalarized using the FWHM of the RHD distribution. The analysis was conducted for various shapes (spherical, lobular, elliptical, and speculated) of nodules. The calculated FWHM values of RHD distribution for the 8-mm spherical, lobular, elliptical, and speculated "virtual" and "physical" nodules were 0.23, 0.42, 0.33, and 0.49, respectively.

  12. Age Estimation in Living Adults using 3D Volume Rendered CT Images of the Sternal Plastron and Lower Chest.

    Oldrini, Guillaume; Harter, Valentin; Witte, Yannick; Martrille, Laurent; Blum, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation is commonly of interest in a judicial context. In adults, it is less documented than in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate age estimation in adults using CT images of the sternal plastron with volume rendering technique (VRT). The evaluation criteria are derived from known methods used for age estimation and are applicable in living or dead subjects. The VRT images of 456 patients were analyzed. Two radiologists performed age estimation independently from an anterior view of the plastron. Interobserver agreement and correlation coefficients between each reader's classification and real age were calculated. The interobserver agreement was 0.86, and the correlation coefficients between readers classifications and real age classes were 0.60 and 0.65. Spearman correlation coefficients were, respectively, 0.89, 0.67, and 0.71. Analysis of the plastron using VRT allows age estimation in vivo quickly and with results similar than methods such as Iscan, Suchey-Brooks, and radiographs used to estimate the age of death. PMID:27092960

  13. Imaging the Aqueous Humor Outflow Pathway in Human Eyes by Three-dimensional Micro-computed Tomography (3D micro-CT)

    C Hann; M Bentley; A Vercnocke; E Ritman; M Fautsch

    2011-12-31

    The site of outflow resistance leading to elevated intraocular pressure in primary open-angle glaucoma is believed to be located in the region of Schlemm's canal inner wall endothelium, its basement membrane and the adjacent juxtacanalicular tissue. Evidence also suggests collector channels and intrascleral vessels may have a role in intraocular pressure in both normal and glaucoma eyes. Traditional imaging modalities limit the ability to view both proximal and distal portions of the trabecular outflow pathway as a single unit. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of three-dimensional micro-computed tomography (3D micro-CT) as a potential method to view the trabecular outflow pathway. Two normal human eyes were used: one immersion fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and one with anterior chamber perfusion at 10 mmHg followed by perfusion fixation in 4% paraformaldehyde/2% glutaraldehyde. Both eyes were postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide and scanned with 3D micro-CT at 2 {mu}m or 5 {mu}m voxel resolution. In the immersion fixed eye, 24 collector channels were identified with an average orifice size of 27.5 {+-} 5 {mu}m. In comparison, the perfusion fixed eye had 29 collector channels with a mean orifice size of 40.5 {+-} 13 {mu}m. Collector channels were not evenly dispersed around the circumference of the eye. There was no significant difference in the length of Schlemm's canal in the immersed versus the perfused eye (33.2 versus 35.1 mm). Structures, locations and size measurements identified by 3D micro-CT were confirmed by correlative light microscopy. These findings confirm 3D micro-CT can be used effectively for the non-invasive examination of the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm's canal, collector channels and intrascleral vasculature that comprise the distal outflow pathway. This imaging modality will be useful for non-invasive study of the role of the trabecular outflow pathway as a whole unit.

  14. Design, fabrication, and implementation of voxel-based 3D printed textured phantoms for task-based image quality assessment in CT

    Solomon, Justin; Ba, Alexandre; Diao, Andrew; Lo, Joseph; Bier, Elianna; Bochud, François; Gehm, Michael; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    In x-ray computed tomography (CT), task-based image quality studies are typically performed using uniform background phantoms with low-contrast signals. Such studies may have limited clinical relevancy for modern non-linear CT systems due to possible influence of background texture on image quality. The purpose of this study was to design and implement anatomically informed textured phantoms for task-based assessment of low-contrast detection. Liver volumes were segmented from 23 abdominal CT cases. The volumes were characterized in terms of texture features from gray-level co-occurrence and run-length matrices. Using a 3D clustered lumpy background (CLB) model, a fitting technique based on a genetic optimization algorithm was used to find the CLB parameters that were most reflective of the liver textures, accounting for CT system factors of spatial blurring and noise. With the modeled background texture as a guide, a cylinder phantom (165 mm in diameter and 30 mm height) was designed, containing 20 low-contrast spherical signals (6 mm in diameter at targeted contrast levels of ~3.2, 5.2, 7.2, 10, and 14 HU, 4 repeats per signal). The phantom was voxelized and input into a commercial multi-material 3D printer (Object Connex 350), with custom software for voxel-based printing. Using principles of digital half-toning and dithering, the 3D printer was programmed to distribute two base materials (VeroWhite and TangoPlus, nominal voxel size of 42x84x30 microns) to achieve the targeted spatial distribution of x-ray attenuation properties. The phantom was used for task-based image quality assessment of a clinically available iterative reconstruction algorithm (Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction, SAFIRE) using a channelized Hotelling observer paradigm. Images of the textured phantom and a corresponding uniform phantom were acquired at six dose levels and observer model performance was estimated for each condition (5 contrasts x 6 doses x 2 reconstructions x 2

  15. Diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT): an emerging tool for rapid, high-resolution, 3-D imaging of metazoan soft tissues.

    Gignac, Paul M; Kley, Nathan J; Clarke, Julia A; Colbert, Matthew W; Morhardt, Ashley C; Cerio, Donald; Cost, Ian N; Cox, Philip G; Daza, Juan D; Early, Catherine M; Echols, M Scott; Henkelman, R Mark; Herdina, A Nele; Holliday, Casey M; Li, Zhiheng; Mahlow, Kristin; Merchant, Samer; Müller, Johannes; Orsbon, Courtney P; Paluh, Daniel J; Thies, Monte L; Tsai, Henry P; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-06-01

    Morphologists have historically had to rely on destructive procedures to visualize the three-dimensional (3-D) anatomy of animals. More recently, however, non-destructive techniques have come to the forefront. These include X-ray computed tomography (CT), which has been used most commonly to examine the mineralized, hard-tissue anatomy of living and fossil metazoans. One relatively new and potentially transformative aspect of current CT-based research is the use of chemical agents to render visible, and differentiate between, soft-tissue structures in X-ray images. Specifically, iodine has emerged as one of the most widely used of these contrast agents among animal morphologists due to its ease of handling, cost effectiveness, and differential affinities for major types of soft tissues. The rapid adoption of iodine-based contrast agents has resulted in a proliferation of distinct specimen preparations and scanning parameter choices, as well as an increasing variety of imaging hardware and software preferences. Here we provide a critical review of the recent contributions to iodine-based, contrast-enhanced CT research to enable researchers just beginning to employ contrast enhancement to make sense of this complex new landscape of methodologies. We provide a detailed summary of recent case studies, assess factors that govern success at each step of the specimen storage, preparation, and imaging processes, and make recommendations for standardizing both techniques and reporting practices. Finally, we discuss potential cutting-edge applications of diffusible iodine-based contrast-enhanced computed tomography (diceCT) and the issues that must still be overcome to facilitate the broader adoption of diceCT going forward. PMID:26970556

  16. WE-G-18A-04: 3D Dictionary Learning Based Statistical Iterative Reconstruction for Low-Dose Cone Beam CT Imaging

    Purpose: To develop a 3D dictionary learning based statistical reconstruction algorithm on graphic processing units (GPU), to improve the quality of low-dose cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging with high efficiency. Methods: A 3D dictionary containing 256 small volumes (atoms) of 3x3x3 voxels was trained from a high quality volume image. During reconstruction, we utilized a Cholesky decomposition based orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm to find a sparse representation on this dictionary basis of each patch in the reconstructed image, in order to regularize the image quality. To accelerate the time-consuming sparse coding in the 3D case, we implemented our algorithm in a parallel fashion by taking advantage of the tremendous computational power of GPU. Evaluations are performed based on a head-neck patient case. FDK reconstruction with full dataset of 364 projections is used as the reference. We compared the proposed 3D dictionary learning based method with a tight frame (TF) based one using a subset data of 121 projections. The image qualities under different resolutions in z-direction, with or without statistical weighting are also studied. Results: Compared to the TF-based CBCT reconstruction, our experiments indicated that 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction is able to recover finer structures, to remove more streaking artifacts, and is less susceptible to blocky artifacts. It is also observed that statistical reconstruction approach is sensitive to inconsistency between the forward and backward projection operations in parallel computing. Using high a spatial resolution along z direction helps improving the algorithm robustness. Conclusion: 3D dictionary learning based CBCT reconstruction algorithm is able to sense the structural information while suppressing noise, and hence to achieve high quality reconstruction. The GPU realization of the whole algorithm offers a significant efficiency enhancement, making this algorithm more feasible for potential

  17. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... and removes the need to integrate custom made electronics into the probe. A downside of row-column addressing 2-D arrays is the creation of secondary temporal lobes, or ghost echoes, in the point spread function. In the second part of the scientific contributions, row-column addressing of 2-D arrays...... was investigated. An analysis of how the ghost echoes can be attenuated was presented.Attenuating the ghost echoes were shown to be achieved by minimizing the first derivative of the apodization function. In the literature, a circular symmetric apodization function was proposed. A new apodization layout...

  18. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) in cardiac function imaging: threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions to determine the left ventricular ejection fraction in comparison to MRI

    Purpose: To assess MSCT of the heart to determining left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) based on threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions compared to MRI. Methods: Cardiac MSCT was performed in 7 patients. Images were reconstructed during end-systolic and end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle and transformed to 3D volumes to determine end-systolic (ESV) and end-diastolic volume (EDV) by using different lower threshold values: besides fixed lower threshold values, identical for each image sequence, individual lower threshold values dependent on contrast enhancement of the left ventricle were applied. The latter represent the mean value calculated by combining the average CT-density of the myocardium and the contrast-enhanced blood in the left ventricle. The EF derived from ESV and EDV. Results: The best correlation with MR imaging was obtained for ESV and EDV by using the individual lower threshold values for the respective sequence. The correlation coefficient for ESV was 0.95 and for EDV it was 0.93. On average, the ESV was overestimated by 3.72 ml, while the ESD was underestimated by 2.85 ml. The respective standard deviation for the ESV was 14,87 ml, for the EDV it was 26.83 ml. On average, the EF was underestimated by 3.57% with a standard deviation of 9.43% and a correlation coefficient of 0.83 in comparison to MRI. Conclusion: The threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstruction of the left ventricle represents a good method to determine the left ventricular function parameters. Due to the differences in the contrast enhancement, the use of an individual lower threshold value for every image sequence is of particular importance. (orig.)

  19. An automatic approach for 3D registration of CT scans

    Hu, Yang; Saber, Eli; Dianat, Sohail; Vantaram, Sreenath Rao; Abhyankar, Vishwas

    2012-03-01

    CT (Computed tomography) is a widely employed imaging modality in the medical field. Normally, a volume of CT scans is prescribed by a doctor when a specific region of the body (typically neck to groin) is suspected of being abnormal. The doctors are required to make professional diagnoses based upon the obtained datasets. In this paper, we propose an automatic registration algorithm that helps healthcare personnel to automatically align corresponding scans from 'Study' to 'Atlas'. The proposed algorithm is capable of aligning both 'Atlas' and 'Study' into the same resolution through 3D interpolation. After retrieving the scanned slice volume in the 'Study' and the corresponding volume in the original 'Atlas' dataset, a 3D cross correlation method is used to identify and register various body parts.

  20. d3D-CTA (dynamic 3D-CTA) for cerebral infarction using multi-detector row CT (MDCT)

    Since three-dimensional-CT angiography (3D-CTA) can demonstrate occlusion or stenosis of the arteries, it has been employed for the diagnosis of patients with cerebral infarction. However, it does not provide information on the blood-flow dynamics. We therefore developed a new technique, d3D-CTA (dynamic 3D-CTA), that yields 3D images of the vessels and hemodynamics. We assessed whether or not our technique could be applied to patients with cerebral infarction. We subjected 41 patients with cerebral infarction to d3D-CTA (17 lacunar infarctions, 14 cardioembolisms and 10 atherosclerotic infarctions). d3D-CTA was performed using a multi-detector row CT scanner with 64 detectors. Contrast medium was injected at a speed of 6 ml/s (a total volume of 30 ml). The scanning was performed for 30 sec with a scan delay of 5 sec. In all cases, we successfully developed d3D-CTA. The d3D-CTA provided us with information on the vascular structures, hemodynamics and cerebral perfusion. Although our technique, d3D-CTA, has some disadvantages such as a limited scan range (32 mm) and relatively high radiation dose, it does facilitate the acquisition of information on the vascular anatomy, flow dynamics on 3D images and cerebral perfusion. We conclude that d3D-CTA can be applied for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with cerebral infarction. (author)

  1. 3D mapping of water in oolithic limestone at atmospheric and vacuum saturation using X-ray micro-CT differential imaging

    Determining the distribution of fluids in porous sedimentary rocks is of great importance in many geological fields. However, this is not straightforward, especially in the case of complex sedimentary rocks like limestone, where a multidisciplinary approach is often needed to capture its broad, multimodal pore size distribution and complex pore geometries. This paper focuses on the porosity and fluid distribution in two varieties of Massangis limestone, a widely used natural building stone from the southeast part of the Paris basin (France). The Massangis limestone shows locally varying post-depositional alterations, resulting in different types of pore networks and very different water distributions within the limestone. Traditional techniques for characterizing the porosity and pore size distribution are compared with state-of-the-art neutron radiography and X-ray computed microtomography to visualize the distribution of water inside the limestone at different imbibition conditions. X-ray computed microtomography images have the great advantage to non-destructively visualize and analyze the pore space inside of a rock, but are often limited to the larger macropores in the rock due to resolution limitations. In this paper, differential imaging is successfully applied to the X-ray computed microtomography images to obtain sub-resolution information about fluid occupancy and to map the fluid distribution in three dimensions inside the scanned limestone samples. The detailed study of the pore space with differential imaging allows understanding the difference in the water uptake behavior of the limestone, a primary factor that affects the weathering of the rock. - Highlights: • The water distribution in a limestone was visualized in 3D with micro-CT. • Differential imaging allowed to map both macro and microporous zones in the rock. • The 3D study of the pore space clarified the difference in water uptake behavior. • Trapped air is visualized in the moldic

  2. 3D mapping of water in oolithic limestone at atmospheric and vacuum saturation using X-ray micro-CT differential imaging

    Boone, M.A., E-mail: marijn.boone@ugent.be [Department of Geology and Soil Science—UGCT, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Unit Sustainable Materials Management, VITO, Boerentang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Kock, T.; Bultreys, T. [Department of Geology and Soil Science—UGCT, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Schutter, G. [Magnel Laboratory for Concrete Research, Department of Structural Engineering, Ghent University, Technologiepark-Zwijnaarde 904, 9052 Ghent (Belgium); Vontobel, P. [Spallation Neutron Source Division, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Van Hoorebeke, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy—UGCT, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, V. [Department of Geology and Soil Science—UGCT, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-11-15

    Determining the distribution of fluids in porous sedimentary rocks is of great importance in many geological fields. However, this is not straightforward, especially in the case of complex sedimentary rocks like limestone, where a multidisciplinary approach is often needed to capture its broad, multimodal pore size distribution and complex pore geometries. This paper focuses on the porosity and fluid distribution in two varieties of Massangis limestone, a widely used natural building stone from the southeast part of the Paris basin (France). The Massangis limestone shows locally varying post-depositional alterations, resulting in different types of pore networks and very different water distributions within the limestone. Traditional techniques for characterizing the porosity and pore size distribution are compared with state-of-the-art neutron radiography and X-ray computed microtomography to visualize the distribution of water inside the limestone at different imbibition conditions. X-ray computed microtomography images have the great advantage to non-destructively visualize and analyze the pore space inside of a rock, but are often limited to the larger macropores in the rock due to resolution limitations. In this paper, differential imaging is successfully applied to the X-ray computed microtomography images to obtain sub-resolution information about fluid occupancy and to map the fluid distribution in three dimensions inside the scanned limestone samples. The detailed study of the pore space with differential imaging allows understanding the difference in the water uptake behavior of the limestone, a primary factor that affects the weathering of the rock. - Highlights: • The water distribution in a limestone was visualized in 3D with micro-CT. • Differential imaging allowed to map both macro and microporous zones in the rock. • The 3D study of the pore space clarified the difference in water uptake behavior. • Trapped air is visualized in the moldic

  3. 3D Reconstruction in Spiral Multislice CT Scans

    M. Ghafouri

    2005-01-01

    Introduction & Background: The rapid development of spiral (helical) computed tomography (CT) has resulted in exciting new applications for CT. One of these applications, three-dimensional (3D) CT with volume ren-dering, is now a major area of clinical and academic interest. One of the greatest advantages of spiral CT with 3D volume rendering is that it provides all the necessary information in a single radiologic study (and there-fore at the lowest possible price) in cases that previousl...

  4. Intensity-Based Registration of Freehand 3D Ultrasound and CT-scan Images of the Kidney

    LEROY, Antoine; Mozer, Pierre; Payan, Yohan; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method to register a pre-operative Computed-Tomography (CT) volume to a sparse set of intra-operative Ultra-Sound (US) slices. In the context of percutaneous renal puncture, the aim is to transfer planning information to an intra-operative coordinate system. The spatial position of the US slices is measured by optically localizing a calibrated probe. Assuming the reproducibility of kidney motion during breathing, and no deformation of the organ, the method consists in op...

  5. 3D inpatient dose reconstruction from the PET-CT imaging of 90Y microspheres for metastatic cancer to the liver: Feasibility study

    Purpose: The introduction of radioembolization with microspheres represents a significant step forward in the treatment of patients with metastatic disease to the liver. This technique uses semiempirical formulae based on body surface area or liver and target volumes to calculate the required total activity for a given patient. However, this treatment modality lacks extremely important information, which is the three-dimensional (3D) dose delivered by microspheres to different organs after their administration. The absence of this information dramatically limits the clinical efficacy of this modality, specifically the predictive power of the treatment. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop a 3D dose calculation technique that is based on the PET imaging of the infused microspheres.Methods: The Fluka Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the voxel dose kernel for 90Y source with voxel size equal to that of the PET scan. The measured PET activity distribution was converted to total activity distribution for the subsequent convolution with the voxel dose kernel to obtain the 3D dose distribution. In addition, dose-volume histograms were generated to analyze the dose to the tumor and critical structures.Results: The 3D inpatient dose distribution can be reconstructed from the PET data of a patient scanned after the infusion of microspheres. A total of seven patients have been analyzed so far using the proposed reconstruction method. Four patients underwent treatment with SIR-Spheres for liver metastases from colorectal cancer and three patients were treated with Therasphere for hepatocellular cancer. A total of 14 target tumors were contoured on post-treatment PET-CT scans for dosimetric evaluation. Mean prescription activity was 1.7 GBq (range: 0.58–3.8 GBq). The resulting mean maximum measured dose to targets was 167 Gy (range: 71–311 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 70% of target (D70) was 68 Gy (range: 25–155 Gy). Mean minimum dose to 90% of target (D90

  6. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    Rocha Sara dos Santos; Ramos Dalton Luiz de Paula; Cavalcanti Marcelo de Gusmão Paraíso

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using craniometric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering techni...

  7. PC Assisted Anatomical Measurements in 3D Using CT Data

    Hvidtfeldt, Mogens; Pedersen, Steen

    1999-01-01

    To assess facilities and applications of a programme for a PC based CT measurements in 3D of anatomical angelse in the skeleton.......To assess facilities and applications of a programme for a PC based CT measurements in 3D of anatomical angelse in the skeleton....

  8. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm2 applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield

  9. Impacted teeth in the maxilla: usefulness of 3D Dental-CT for preoperative evaluation

    Objective: To compare the shapes of roots of impacted teeth shown in three-dimensional computed tomographic images (3D Dental-computed tomography (CT) images) and plain radiographs and to determine whether 3D Dental-CT images are useful for examination before performing an operation for extraction of a maxillary impacted tooth. Methods and patients: Images obtained from patients who had impacted teeth in the maxilla, including impacted mesial supernumerary teeth in 13 patients, impacted incisors in two patients, impacted canines in 11 patients, impacted premolars in four patients and impacted molars in three patients, were used in this study. In all patients, plain radiographs and 3D Dental-CT images were retrospectively reviewed by an oral radiologist for evidence of root dilaceration before operations to extract the impacted teeth were performed. The findings in the images were compared with intraoperative findings in all cases. Results: The mean specificity and sensitivity of plain radiographs were 95 and 8%, respectively, while those of 3D Dental-CT images were 100 and 77%, respectively. There was a statistically significant (P<0.01) difference between the depiction capabilities of plain radiographs and 3D Dental-CT images with regard to dilacerations of roots of impacted teeth. Discussion and conclusion: CT may enable radiologists to make a quick and accurate diagnosis of tooth impaction. 3D Dental-CT images are useful for determining the root shape of an impacted tooth in the maxilla

  10. The use of 3D-CT-Angiography in the diagnostic procedure of intracranial aneurysms evaluated

    Aalders, Th.; Labisch, C.; Seifert, V.; Zanella, F.E.; Stolke, D. [Univ. Clinic Essen (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    With improving quality of images obtained by 3D-CT-Angiography, this procedure may promise to become a powerful tool in intracranial aneurysm diagnostic. We have evaluated this method comparatively between angiographic and intra-operative findings. Forty-one patients were examined by cerebral angiography and 3D-Angio-CT. Radiological findings were evaluated by neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. Intra-operative findings were documented by video or photography. All angiographically proven aneurysms were also visualized by 3D-Angio-CT. In over sixty percent of cases 3D-Angio-CT showed the aneurysmal anatomy equally well to angiography or presented valuable additional information not obtainable by angiography. In complex aneurysms as well as in aneurysms of the posterior circulation, the additional information offered by 3D-Angio-CT was most valuable. Intra-operative anatomical findings showed a high correlation with 3D-images. In our experience 3D-Angio-CT proved to be a powerful tool in the diagnostic procedure of intracranial aneurysms, either in the acute or non-acute phase. In many cases 3D-images present valuable additional information not otherwise obtainable, especially in complex aneurysms and aneurysms of the posterior circulation. In selected cases neurosurgical therapy can be planned on 3D-images alone. Nontheless conventional cerebral angiography remains the gold standard in diagnostic management of intracranial aneurysms. (author)

  11. An evaluation of three-dimensional surface-reconstruction CT (3D-CT) in children with craniosynostosis

    In this study, 3D-CT images were reconstructed from axial computed tomographic scans using the new software on 10 children with craniosynostosis. The authors discuss the advantages of the 3D-CT imaging technique in the diagnosis and surgical planning for craniosynostosis. The following conclusions may be drawn: 1) The images obtained from the new 3D-CT software are more accurate and realistic than the images previously reported by Vannier and Marsh. Reconstruction artifacts, known as pseudoforamina, have not appeared in the 3D-CT images reconstructed by the new software, and the top axial view of the 3D-CT reveals precisely anatomical details of the intracranial skull base. 2) The use of this new method provides accurate anatomical data which cannot be obtained by means of conventional radiological techniques in living subjects. 3) This technique of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans is most helpful in surgical planning and in the postoperative assessments of surgical results for craniosynostosis. The 3D-CT images allow the surgeon to visualize precisely the abnormalities of the skull to be corrected by the craniofacial surgery. Based on our experience with this study, we would expect that three-dimensional surface reconstruction from CT scans will henceforth be widely used in the planning of craniofacial surgery and in the postoperative follow-up assessment of craniosynostosis or craniofacial anomalies. (J.P.N.)

  12. 3D Chaotic Functions for Image Encryption

    Pawan N. Khade

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the chaotic encryption algorithm based on 3D logistic map, 3D Chebyshev map, and 3D, 2D Arnolds cat map for color image encryption. Here the 2D Arnolds cat map is used for image pixel scrambling and 3D Arnolds cat map is used for R, G, and B component substitution. 3D Chebyshev map is used for key generation and 3D logistic map is used for image scrambling. The use of 3D chaotic functions in the encryption algorithm provide more security by using the, shuffling and substitution to the encrypted image. The Chebyshev map is used for public key encryption and distribution of generated private keys.

  13. 3-D reconstruction and analysis of X-ray micro-CT images by using VoxBlast software. The effect of raloxifene on the lumbar vertebrae in ovariectomized mice

    To evaluate the skeletal efficacy of raloxifene on the osteoporosis in ovariectomized mice model, the sixth lumbar vertebrae was scanned by X-ray micro-CT, and these resulting 8-bit gray-scale images were analyzed by using commercial three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction software (VoxBlastTM Mac, VayTek, Inc., USA). In this paper, it is described how to use VoxBlast software practically for processing sequential datasets from CT scanners. Furthermore, we demonstrate in 3-D visualization that new trabecular bones build compact bridge constructions in the lumbar vertebrae after the treatment with raloxifene. (author)

  14. Clinical evaluation of 3D-CT cholangiography for preoperative examination in laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Kinami, Shinichi; Yao, Tadashi; Kurachi, Madoka; Ishizaki, Yoshio [Inami Public General Hospital, Toyama (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional-computed tomography (3D-CT) cholangiography is a 3D shaded surface display image of the biliary tract obtained by using helical CT after intravenous cholangiography or cholangiography per percutaneous transhepatic cholangio-drainage tube. We investigated whether 3D-CT cholangiography could provide a useful image, for preoperative examination in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Sixty-five patients with biliary diseases were examined by 3D-CT cholangiography. Helical scanning was performed on a Proceed Accell (GE Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI, USA). Three-dimensional images were created using an independent workstation. A clear image of the common bile duct was obtained for all patients (100%) by 3D-CT cholangiography. The gallbladder was well visualized in 54 (93%) and the cystic duct was shown to be opacified in 55 (95%) of the 58 patients with a gallbladder. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed as having gallstones by 3D-CT cholangiography (sensitivity, 72.1%; specificity, 100%; accuracy, 79.3%), while 43 were diagnosed as having cholecystolithiasis by ultrasonography. The advantages of 3D-CT cholangiography were a low level of invasiveness, easily obtained images compared to those obtained with endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), good opacification, and provision of a three-dimensional understanding of the biliary system, especially of the cystic duct. When combined with ultrasonography and routine liver function tests, 3D-CT cholangiography was considered very useful for obtaining information before laparoscopic cholecystectomy. It allowed the omission of ERC in many patients who were considered to have no common bile duct stone, by employment of 3D-CT cholangiography. (author)

  15. Atlas Based Automatic Liver 3D CT Image Segmentation%基于图谱的肝脏CT三维自动分割研究

    刘伟; 贾富仓; 胡庆茂; 王俊

    2011-01-01

    目的 在肝脏外科手术或肝脏病理研究中,计算肝脏体积是重要步骤.由于肝脏外形复杂、临近组织灰度值与之接近等特点,肝脏的自动医学图像分割仍是医学图像处理中的难点之一.方法 本文采用图谱结合3D非刚性配准的方法,同时加入肝脏区域搜索算法,实现了鲁棒性较高的肝脏自动分割程序.首先,利用20套训练图像创建图谱,然后程序自动搜索肝脏区域,最后将图谱与待分割CT图像依次进行仿射配准和B样条配准.配准以后的图谱肝脏轮廓即可表示为目标肝脏分割轮廓,进而计算出肝脏体积.结果 评估结果显示,上述方法在肝脏体积误差方面表现出色,达到77分,但在局部(主要在肝脏尖端)出现较大的误差.结论 该方法分割临床肝脏CT图像具有可行性.%Objective Liver segmentation is an important step for the planning and navigation in liver surgery. Accurate, fast and robust automatic segmentation methods for clinical routine data are urgently needed. Because of the liver- s characteristics, such as the complexity of the external form, the similarity between the intensities of the liver and the tissues around it, automatic segmentation of the liver is one of the difficulties in medical image processing. Methods In this paper, 3D non-rigid registration from a refined atlas to liver CT images is used for segmentation. Firstly, twenty sets of training images are utilized to create an atlas. Then the liver initial region is searched and located automatically. After that threshold filtering is used to enhance the robustness of segmentation. Finally, this atlas is non-rigidly registered to the liver in CT images with affine and B-spline in succession. The registered segmentation of liver- s atlas represented the segmentation of the target liver, and then the liver volume was calculated. Results The evaluation show that the proposed method works well in liver volume error, with the 77 score

  16. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Peter Izak; Milan Smetana; Libor Hargas; Miroslav Hrianka; Pavol Spanik

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  17. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability. (fast track communication)

  18. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner.

    Matheoud, R; Secco, C; Della Monica, P; Leva, L; Sacchetti, G; Inglese, E; Brambilla, M

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (A(c)(,out)) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with (18)F (11 kBq mL(-1)) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (A(c)(,bkg)) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL(-1). The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide A(c)(,out) in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of A(c)(,out) on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, A(c)(,bkg) and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and A(c)(,out) have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated A(c)(,out) activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to A

  19. The effect of activity outside the field of view on image quality for a 3D LSO-based whole body PET/CT scanner

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the influence of outside field of view (FOV) activity concentration (Ac,out) on the noise equivalent count rate (NECR), scatter fraction (SF) and image quality of a 3D LSO whole-body PET/CT scanner. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was the figure of merit used to characterize the image quality of PET scans. A modified International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) phantom was used to obtain SF and counting rates similar to those found in average patients. A scatter phantom was positioned at the end of the modified IEC phantom to simulate an activity that extends beyond the scanner. The modified IEC phantom was filled with 18F (11 kBq mL-1) and the spherical targets, with internal diameter (ID) ranging from 10 to 37 mm, had a target-to-background ratio of 10. PET images were acquired with background activity concentrations into the FOV (Ac,bkg) about 11, 9.2, 6.6, 5.2 and 3.5 kBq mL-1. The emission scan duration (ESD) was set to 1, 2, 3 and 4 min. The tube inside the scatter phantom was filled with activities to provide Ac,out in the whole scatter phantom of zero, half, unity, twofold and fourfold the one of the modified IEC phantom. Plots of CNR versus the various parameters are provided. Multiple linear regression was employed to study the effects of Ac,out on CNR, adjusted for the presence of variables (sphere ID, Ac,bkg and ESD) related to CNR. The presence of outside FOV activity at the same concentration as the one inside the FOV reduces peak NECR of 30%. The increase in SF is marginal (1.2%). CNR diminishes significantly with increasing outside FOV activity, in the range explored. ESD and Ac,out have a similar weight in accounting for CNR variance. Thus, an experimental law that adjusts the scan duration to the outside FOV activity can be devised. Recovery of CNR loss due to an elevated Ac,out activity seems feasible by modulating the ESD in individual bed positions according to Ac,out.

  20. Imagens em 2D e 3D geradas pela TC Cone-Beam e radiografias convencionais: qual a mais confiável? 2D / 3D Cone-Beam CT images or conventional radiography: which is more reliable?

    Carolina Perez Couceiro

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar a confiabilidade de identificação dos pontos visualizados sobre radiografias cefalométricas convencionais e sobre imagens geradas pela Tomografia Computadorizada Cone-Beam em 2D e 3D. MÉTODOS: o material constou de imagens obtidas através do tomógrafo computadorizado Cone-Beam, em norma lateral, em 2D e 3D, impressas em papel fotográfico; e radiografias cefalométricas laterais, realizadas na mesma clínica radiológica e no mesmo dia, de dois pacientes pertencentes aos arquivos do Curso de Especialização em Ortodontia da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF. Dez alunos do Curso de Especialização em Ortodontia da UFF identificaram pontos de referência sobre papel de acetato transparente e foram feitas medições das seguintes variáveis cefalométricas: ANB, FMIA, IMPA, FMA, ângulo interincisal, 1-NA (mm e ¯1-NB (mm. Em seguida, foram calculadas médias aritméticas, desvios-padrão e coeficientes de variância de cada variável para os dois pacientes. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÃO: os valores das medições realizadas a partir de imagens em 3D apresentaram menor dispersão, sugerindo que essas imagens são mais confiáveis quanto à identificação de alguns pontos cefalométricos. Entretanto, como as imagens em 3D impressas utilizadas no presente estudo não permitiram a visualização de pontos intracranianos, torna-se necessário que softwares específicos sejam elaborados para que esse tipo de exame possa se tornar rotineiro na clínica ortodôntica.OBJECTIVE: To compare the reliability of two different methods used for viewing and identifying cephalometric landmarks, i.e., (a using conventional cephalometric radiographs, and (b using 2D and 3D images generated by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography. METHODS: The material consisted of lateral view 2D and 3D images obtained by Cone-Beam Computed Tomography printed on photo paper, and lateral cephalometric radiographs, taken in the same

  1. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128×128×128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  2. Test of 3D CT reconstructions by EM + TV algorithm from undersampled data

    Evseev, Ivan; Ahmann, Francielle; Silva, Hamilton P. da [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR/FB, 85601-970, Caixa Postal 135, Francisco Beltrao - PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana-UTFPR/FB,85601-970,Caixa Postal 135,Francisco Beltrao-PR (Brazil) and Faculdades Pequeno Principe-FPP, Av. Iguacu, 333, Rebou (Brazil); Yevseyeva, Olga [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina - UFSC/ARA, 88900-000, Rua Pedro Joao Pereira, 150, Ararangua - SC (Brazil); Klock, Margio C. L. [Universidade Federal do Parana - UFPR Litoral, 80230-901, Rua Jaguaraiva 512, Caioba, Matinhos - PR (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    Computerized tomography (CT) plays an important role in medical imaging for diagnosis and therapy. However, CT imaging is connected with ionization radiation exposure of patients. Therefore, the dose reduction is an essential issue in CT. In 2011, the Expectation Maximization and Total Variation Based Model for CT Reconstruction (EM+TV) was proposed. This method can reconstruct a better image using less CT projections in comparison with the usual filtered back projection (FBP) technique. Thus, it could significantly reduce the overall dose of radiation in CT. This work reports the results of an independent numerical simulation for cone beam CT geometry with alternative virtual phantoms. As in the original report, the 3D CT images of 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 Multiplication-Sign 128 virtual phantoms were reconstructed. It was not possible to implement phantoms with lager dimensions because of the slowness of code execution even by the CORE i7 CPU.

  3. SU-C-BRB-06: Utilizing 3D Scanner and Printer for Dummy Eye-Shield: Artifact-Free CT Images of Tungsten Eye-Shield for Accurate Dose Calculation

    Park, J; Lee, J [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ye, S [Program in Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a tungsten eye-shield on the dose distribution of a patient. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to extract the dimension and shape of a tungsten eye-shield in the STL format. Scanned data was transferred into a 3D printer. A dummy eye shield was then produced using bio-resin (3D systems, VisiJet M3 Proplast). For a patient with mucinous carcinoma, the planning CT was obtained with the dummy eye-shield placed on the patient’s right eye. Field shaping of 6 MeV was performed using a patient-specific cerrobend block on the 15 x 15 cm{sup 2} applicator. The gantry angle was 330° to cover the planning target volume near by the lens. EGS4/BEAMnrc was commissioned from our measurement data from a Varian 21EX. For the CT-based dose calculation using EGS4/DOSXYZnrc, the CT images were converted to a phantom file through the ctcreate program. The phantom file had the same resolution as the planning CT images. By assigning the CT numbers of the dummy eye-shield region to 17000, the real dose distributions below the tungsten eye-shield were calculated in EGS4/DOSXYZnrc. In the TPS, the CT number of the dummy eye-shield region was assigned to the maximum allowable CT number (3000). Results: As compared to the maximum dose, the MC dose on the right lens or below the eye shield area was less than 2%, while the corresponding RTP calculated dose was an unrealistic value of approximately 50%. Conclusion: Utilizing a 3D scanner and a 3D printer, a dummy eye-shield for electron treatment can be easily produced. The artifact-free CT images were successfully incorporated into the CT-based Monte Carlo simulations. The developed method was useful in predicting the realistic dose distributions around the lens blocked with the tungsten shield.

  4. Postoperative assessment of surgical results using three dimensional surface reconstruction CT (3D-CT) in a craniofacial anomaly

    In 1983, Michael W. Vannier and Jeffrey L. Marsh developed a computer method that reconstructs three dimensional (3D) born and soft tissue surfaces, given a high resolution CT scan-series of the facial skeleton. This method has been applied to craniofacial anomalies, basal encephaloceles, and musculoskeletal anomalies. In this study, a postoperative assessment of the craniofacial surgical results has been accomplished using this 3D-CT in 2 children with craniofacial dysmorphism. The authors discuss the advantages of this 3D-CT imaging method in the postoperative assessments of craniofacial anomalies. Results are detailed in the following listing : 1) a postoperative 3D-CT reveals the anatomical details corrected by the craniofacial surgery more precisely and stereographically than conventional radiological methods ; 2) secondary changes of the cranium after the surgery, such as bony formation in the area of the osteotomy and postoperative asymmetric deformities, are detected early by the 3D-CT imaging technique, and, 3) 3D-CT mid-sagittal and top axial views of the intracranial skull base are most useful in postoperative assessments of the surgical results. Basesd on our experience, we expect that three dimensional surface reconstructions from CT scans will become to be used widely in the postoperative assessments of the surgical results of craniofacial anomalies. (author)

  5. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using cranio metric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) cranio metric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution. (author)

  6. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    Rocha Sara dos Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Computed tomography (CT is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT. The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using craniometric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10 craniometric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution.

  7. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    Rocha, Sara dos Santos [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Odontologia Forense; Ramos, Dalton Luiz de Paula [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. of Odontologia Social; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2003-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using cranio metric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) cranio metric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution. (author)

  8. Comparison of target images obtained by MR angiography and 3D-CT angiography in the region of internal carotid-posterior communicating artery

    With the progress of diagnostic imaging equipment, allows us to obtain cerebral angiogram by Computed tomography (CT) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They are less invasive than conventional angiography and have its own modality-dependent information on the images. Therefore, to determine the indications of CT and MRI for neurovascular disease, we compared the target MIP images by MRI with target SSD images by CT and examined those characteristics in the particular region of internal carotid-posterior communicating (IC-PC) artery. MRA demonstrated blood flow non-invasively without influence of the surrounding bones posterior fossa. But it required several minutes of head fixation. Also, head movement yielded blurring of the images in a few cases. CTA gave us more stereographic informations than MRA so that we could easily differentiate the vascular lesion from normal vascular structure through the threshold processing. However, it is experienced that the dense bones surrounding the IC-PC region interfered reconstruction of vascular images. And high intravenous injection of contrast medium caused a few patients heat sensation or other side effect. Accordingly, both examinations should be used supplementarily, MRA selected for screening of the IC-PC region and the role of CTA is definition and evaluation of vascular lesion after MRA had pointed out the abnormality. (author)

  9. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  10. 3D Reconstruction of NMR Images

    Peter Izak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces experiment of 3D reconstruction NMR images scanned from magnetic resonance device. There are described methods which can be used for 3D reconstruction magnetic resonance images in biomedical application. The main idea is based on marching cubes algorithm. For this task was chosen sophistication method by program Vision Assistant, which is a part of program LabVIEW.

  11. Nano CT visualizing internal 3D structures with submicrometer resolution

    High-resolution Computed Tomography widely expands the spectrum of detectable internal microstructures. The new nanotom is the first 180 kV nanoCT system worldwide which is tailored completely to highest-resolution applications in material science, micro mechanics, electronics, geology etc. The CT results demonstrate the possibility to analyse the 3D-microstructure of material samples with minimal preparation and the exceptional resolution of less than 0.5 microns per voxel. (authors)

  12. Nano CT visualizing internal 3D structures with submicrometer resolution

    Neuser, E.; Suppes, A. [Phoenix X-Ray Systems, Services GmbH, Wunstorf (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    High-resolution Computed Tomography widely expands the spectrum of detectable internal microstructures. The new nanotom is the first 180 kV nanoCT system worldwide which is tailored completely to highest-resolution applications in material science, micro mechanics, electronics, geology etc. The CT results demonstrate the possibility to analyse the 3D-microstructure of material samples with minimal preparation and the exceptional resolution of less than 0.5 microns per voxel. (authors)

  13. 3D Multislice CT Angiography in Post-Aortic Stent Grafting: A Pictorial Essay

    Helical CT angiography has been widely used in both pre- and post-aortic stent grafting and it has been confirmed to be the preferred modality when compared to conventional angiography. The recent development of multislice CT (MSCT) has further enhanced the applications of CT angiography for aortic stent grafting. One of the advantages of MSCT angiography over conventional angiography is that the 3D reconstructions, based on the volumetric CT data, provide additional information during follow-up of aortic stent grafting. While endovascular repair has been increasingly used in clinical practice, the use of 3D MSCT imaging in endovascular repair continues to play an important role. In this pictorial essay, we aimed to discuss the diagnostic performance of 3D MSCT angiography in post aortic stent grafting, including the most commonly used surface shaded display, curvilinear reformation, the maximum intensity projection, volume rendering and virtual endoscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of each 3D reconstruction are also explored

  14. Multiplane 3D superresolution optical fluctuation imaging

    Geissbuehler, Stefan; Godinat, Aurélien; Bocchio, Noelia L; Dubikovskaya, Elena A; Lasser, Theo; Leutenegger, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    By switching fluorophores on and off in either a deterministic or a stochastic manner, superresolution microscopy has enabled the imaging of biological structures at resolutions well beyond the diffraction limit. Superresolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) provides an elegant way of overcoming the diffraction limit in all three spatial dimensions by computing higher-order cumulants of image sequences of blinking fluorophores acquired with a conventional widefield microscope. So far, three-dimensional (3D) SOFI has only been demonstrated by sequential imaging of multiple depth positions. Here we introduce a versatile imaging scheme which allows for the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes. Using 3D cross-cumulants, we show that the depth sampling can be increased. Consequently, the simultaneous acquisition of multiple focal planes reduces the acquisition time and hence the photo-bleaching of fluorescent markers. We demonstrate multiplane 3D SOFI by imaging the mitochondria network in fixed ...

  15. 3D Image Registration Is Critical to Ensure Accurate Detection of Longitudinal Changes in Trabecular Bone Density, Microstructure, and Stiffness Measurements in Rat tibiae by In vivo Micro Computed Tomography (μCT)

    Lan, Shenghui; Luo, Shiming; Huh, Beom Kang; Chandra, Abhishek; Altman, Allison R.; Qin, Ling; Liu, X Sherry

    2013-01-01

    In the recent decade, in vivo μCT scanners have become available to monitor temporal changes in rodent bone in response to diseases and treatments. We investigated short-term and long-term precision of in vivo μCT measurements of trabecular bone density, microstructure and stiffness of rat tibiae and tested whether they can be improved by 3D image registration. Rats in the short-term precision group underwent baseline and follow-up scans within the same day (n=15) and those in the long-term p...

  16. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  17. Method for 3D Rendering Based on Intersection Image Display Which Allows Representation of Internal Structure of 3D objects

    Kohei Arai

    2013-01-01

    Method for 3D rendering based on intersection image display which allows representation of internal structure is proposed. The proposed method is essentially different from the conventional volume rendering based on solid model which allows representation of just surface of the 3D objects. By using afterimage, internal structure can be displayed through exchanging the intersection images with internal structure for the proposed method. Through experiments with CT scan images, the proposed met...

  18. 3D statistical shape models incorporating 3D random forest regression voting for robust CT liver segmentation

    Norajitra, Tobias; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Maier-Hein, Klaus H.

    2015-03-01

    During image segmentation, 3D Statistical Shape Models (SSM) usually conduct a limited search for target landmarks within one-dimensional search profiles perpendicular to the model surface. In addition, landmark appearance is modeled only locally based on linear profiles and weak learners, altogether leading to segmentation errors from landmark ambiguities and limited search coverage. We present a new method for 3D SSM segmentation based on 3D Random Forest Regression Voting. For each surface landmark, a Random Regression Forest is trained that learns a 3D spatial displacement function between the according reference landmark and a set of surrounding sample points, based on an infinite set of non-local randomized 3D Haar-like features. Landmark search is then conducted omni-directionally within 3D search spaces, where voxelwise forest predictions on landmark position contribute to a common voting map which reflects the overall position estimate. Segmentation experiments were conducted on a set of 45 CT volumes of the human liver, of which 40 images were randomly chosen for training and 5 for testing. Without parameter optimization, using a simple candidate selection and a single resolution approach, excellent results were achieved, while faster convergence and better concavity segmentation were observed, altogether underlining the potential of our approach in terms of increased robustness from distinct landmark detection and from better search coverage.

  19. Miniaturized 3D microscope imaging system

    Lan, Yung-Sung; Chang, Chir-Weei; Sung, Hsin-Yueh; Wang, Yen-Chang; Chang, Cheng-Yi

    2015-05-01

    We designed and assembled a portable 3-D miniature microscopic image system with the size of 35x35x105 mm3 . By integrating a microlens array (MLA) into the optical train of a handheld microscope, the biological specimen's image will be captured for ease of use in a single shot. With the light field raw data and program, the focal plane can be changed digitally and the 3-D image can be reconstructed after the image was taken. To localize an object in a 3-D volume, an automated data analysis algorithm to precisely distinguish profundity position is needed. The ability to create focal stacks from a single image allows moving or specimens to be recorded. Applying light field microscope algorithm to these focal stacks, a set of cross sections will be produced, which can be visualized using 3-D rendering. Furthermore, we have developed a series of design rules in order to enhance the pixel using efficiency and reduce the crosstalk between each microlens for obtain good image quality. In this paper, we demonstrate a handheld light field microscope (HLFM) to distinguish two different color fluorescence particles separated by a cover glass in a 600um range, show its focal stacks, and 3-D position.

  20. In Situ Investigation of the 3D Mechanical Microstructure at Nanoscale: Nano-CT Imaging Method of Local Small Region in Large Scale Sample

    Bo Dong; Feng Xu; Xiao-fang Hu; Hong-yan Qu; Dan Kang; Ti-qiao Xiao

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the local micro-/nanoscale region in a large scale sample, an image reconstruction method for nanometer computed tomography (nano-CT) was proposed in this paper. In the algorithm, wavelets were used to localize the filtered-backprojection (FBP) algorithm because of its space-frequency localization property. After the implementation of the algorithm, two simulation local reconstruction experiments were performed to confirm its effectiveness. Three evaluation criteria were used i...

  1. Using cone-beam CT as a low-dose 3D imaging technique for the extremities: initial experience in 50 subjects

    Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Palmer, William E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Thomas, Bijoy J. [Universal College of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Bhairahawa (Nepal); MacMahon, Peter J. [Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin 7 (Ireland)

    2015-06-01

    To prospectively evaluate a dedicated extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanner in cases with and without orthopedic hardware by (1) comparing its imaging duration and image quality to those of radiography and multidetector CT (MDCT) and (2) comparing its radiation dose to that of MDCT. Written informed consent was obtained for all subjects for this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study. Fifty subjects with (1) fracture of small bones, (2) suspected intraarticular fracture, (3) fracture at the site of complex anatomy, or (4) a surgical site difficult to assess with radiography alone were recruited and scanned on an extremity CBCT scanner prior to FDA approval. Same-day radiographs were performed in all subjects. Some subjects also underwent MDCT within 1 month of CBCT. Imaging duration and image quality were compared between CBCT and radiographs. Imaging duration, effective radiation dose, and image quality were compared between CBCT and MDCT. Fifty-one CBCT scans were performed in 50 subjects. Average imaging duration was shorter for CBCT than radiographs (4.5 min vs. 6.6 min, P = 0.001, n = 51) and MDCT (7.6 min vs. 10.9 min, P = 0.01, n = 7). Average estimated effective radiation dose was less for CBCT than MDCT (0.04 mSv vs. 0.13 mSv, P = 0.02, n = 7). CBCT images yielded more diagnostic information than radiographs in 23/51 cases and more diagnostic information than MDCT in 1/7 cases, although radiographs were superior for detecting hardware complications. CBCT performs high-resolution imaging of the extremities using less imaging time than radiographs and MDCT and lower radiation dose than MDCT. (orig.)

  2. Using cone-beam CT as a low-dose 3D imaging technique for the extremities: initial experience in 50 subjects

    To prospectively evaluate a dedicated extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT) scanner in cases with and without orthopedic hardware by (1) comparing its imaging duration and image quality to those of radiography and multidetector CT (MDCT) and (2) comparing its radiation dose to that of MDCT. Written informed consent was obtained for all subjects for this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant study. Fifty subjects with (1) fracture of small bones, (2) suspected intraarticular fracture, (3) fracture at the site of complex anatomy, or (4) a surgical site difficult to assess with radiography alone were recruited and scanned on an extremity CBCT scanner prior to FDA approval. Same-day radiographs were performed in all subjects. Some subjects also underwent MDCT within 1 month of CBCT. Imaging duration and image quality were compared between CBCT and radiographs. Imaging duration, effective radiation dose, and image quality were compared between CBCT and MDCT. Fifty-one CBCT scans were performed in 50 subjects. Average imaging duration was shorter for CBCT than radiographs (4.5 min vs. 6.6 min, P = 0.001, n = 51) and MDCT (7.6 min vs. 10.9 min, P = 0.01, n = 7). Average estimated effective radiation dose was less for CBCT than MDCT (0.04 mSv vs. 0.13 mSv, P = 0.02, n = 7). CBCT images yielded more diagnostic information than radiographs in 23/51 cases and more diagnostic information than MDCT in 1/7 cases, although radiographs were superior for detecting hardware complications. CBCT performs high-resolution imaging of the extremities using less imaging time than radiographs and MDCT and lower radiation dose than MDCT. (orig.)

  3. A quantitative index measured on 99mTc GSA SPECT/CT 3D fused images to evaluate severe fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease

    We compared quantitative indices estimated by use of technetium-99m galactosyl human serum albumin (99mTc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) fused imaging and hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. On the basis of pathological findings we divided 161 patients into non-severe and severe fibrosis groups (n=81 and n=80, respectively). We measured 2 indices by 99mTc-GSA SPECT/CT fused imaging: liver uptake value (LUV) = [radioactivity (whole liver)/radioactivity (injected)] x 100/body surface area, and functional liver index (FLI)=[radioactivity (hepatocytes)/radioactivity (injected)] x 100/liver volume. We compared these indices with biochemical and histopathological results. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that FLI, LUV, liver and heart ROIs at 15 min post-injection (LHL15), and prothrombin time were significant independent predictors of severe fibrosis. On the basis of receiver operating characteristics analysis, the areas under curve values of FLI, LUV, LHL15, and prothrombin time for predicting severe fibrosis were 0.83, 0.73, 0.69, and 0.68, respectively. Using an FLI value of 0.053, it was possible to predict severe fibrosis with 65% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and 76% accuracy. Assessment of functional hepatocytes by use of 99mTc-GSA SPECT/CT fused images is useful for identifying pathological liver fibrosis. (author)

  4. Efficient reconfigurable architectures for 3D medical image compression

    Afandi, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Recently, the more widespread use of three-dimensional (3-D) imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and ultrasound (US) have generated a massive amount of volumetric data. These have provided an impetus to the development of other applications, in particular telemedicine and teleradiology. In thes...

  5. Role of 3-D CT reconstruction of laryngeal mucosal surface in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer

    Nam, Sang Hwa; Park, Jong Yeon; Lee, Young Jun; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Byung Soo; Wang, Soo Guen [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sol, Chang Hyo [Hong-In Total Imaing Diagnostic Clinic, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    CT or MRT is performed in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer. These methods are used in assessment of the deep tissues and cartilage of the larynx, but cannot compete with laryngoscopy in the evaluation of the laryngeal surface. The purpose of this study is to evaluate feasibility and clinical value of the 3-D reconstruction of the mucosal surface in laryngeal cancer. Twenty two patients with laryngeal cancer proved by means of surgical exploration (pathologic) or clinical examinations including laryngoscope, imaging studies and biopsy underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography(CT) and three dimensional(3D) CT reconstruction. The TNM classification of the American Joint Committee on Cancer was used to compare the imaging findings with pathologic or clinical staging. When the extension of primary tumor(T staging) was evaluated, the findings at only transaxial CT and those at pathologic or clinical examination were concordant in 8 of 14 cases(57.1%) of supraglottic tumor, and 3 of 6 cases(50%) of glottic tumor. The overall accuracy of CT with additional 3D-reconstruction was 85.7% for assessment of supraglottic tumor, and 66.6% for glottic tumor. 3D CT reconstruction after transaxial CT may improve outcome in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer and has a potential value in guiding management decisions.

  6. Role of 3-D CT reconstruction of laryngeal mucosal surface in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer

    CT or MRT is performed in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer. These methods are used in assessment of the deep tissues and cartilage of the larynx, but cannot compete with laryngoscopy in the evaluation of the laryngeal surface. The purpose of this study is to evaluate feasibility and clinical value of the 3-D reconstruction of the mucosal surface in laryngeal cancer. Twenty two patients with laryngeal cancer proved by means of surgical exploration (pathologic) or clinical examinations including laryngoscope, imaging studies and biopsy underwent preoperative staging with computed tomography(CT) and three dimensional(3D) CT reconstruction. The TNM classification of the American Joint Committee on Cancer was used to compare the imaging findings with pathologic or clinical staging. When the extension of primary tumor(T staging) was evaluated, the findings at only transaxial CT and those at pathologic or clinical examination were concordant in 8 of 14 cases(57.1%) of supraglottic tumor, and 3 of 6 cases(50%) of glottic tumor. The overall accuracy of CT with additional 3D-reconstruction was 85.7% for assessment of supraglottic tumor, and 66.6% for glottic tumor. 3D CT reconstruction after transaxial CT may improve outcome in preoperative staging of laryngeal cancer and has a potential value in guiding management decisions

  7. ICER-3D Hyperspectral Image Compression Software

    Xie, Hua; Kiely, Aaron; Klimesh, matthew; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2010-01-01

    Software has been developed to implement the ICER-3D algorithm. ICER-3D effects progressive, three-dimensional (3D), wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images. If a compressed data stream is truncated, the progressive nature of the algorithm enables reconstruction of hyperspectral data at fidelity commensurate with the given data volume. The ICER-3D software is capable of providing either lossless or lossy compression, and incorporates an error-containment scheme to limit the effects of data loss during transmission. The compression algorithm, which was derived from the ICER image compression algorithm, includes wavelet-transform, context-modeling, and entropy coding subalgorithms. The 3D wavelet decomposition structure used by ICER-3D exploits correlations in all three dimensions of sets of hyperspectral image data, while facilitating elimination of spectral ringing artifacts, using a technique summarized in "Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Spectral Images" (NPO-41381), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 3 (March 2009), page 7a. Correlation is further exploited by a context-modeling subalgorithm, which exploits spectral dependencies in the wavelet-transformed hyperspectral data, using an algorithm that is summarized in "Context Modeler for Wavelet Compression of Hyperspectral Images" (NPO-43239), which follows this article. An important feature of ICER-3D is a scheme for limiting the adverse effects of loss of data during transmission. In this scheme, as in the similar scheme used by ICER, the spatial-frequency domain is partitioned into rectangular error-containment regions. In ICER-3D, the partitions extend through all the wavelength bands. The data in each partition are compressed independently of those in the other partitions, so that loss or corruption of data from any partition does not affect the other partitions. Furthermore, because compression is progressive within each partition, when data are lost, any data from that partition received

  8. Volume-Rendering-Based Interactive 3D Measurement for Quantitative Analysis of 3D Medical Images

    Yakang Dai; Jian Zheng; Yuetao Yang; Duojie Kuai; Xiaodong Yang

    2013-01-01

    3D medical images are widely used to assist diagnosis and surgical planning in clinical applications, where quantitative measurement of interesting objects in the image is of great importance. Volume rendering is widely used for qualitative visualization of 3D medical images. In this paper, we introduce a volume-rendering-based interactive 3D measurement framework for quantitative analysis of 3D medical images. In the framework, 3D widgets and volume clipping are integrated with volume render...

  9. Acquisition and applications of 3D images

    Sterian, Paul; Mocanu, Elena

    2007-08-01

    The moiré fringes method and their analysis up to medical and entertainment applications are discussed in this paper. We describe the procedure of capturing 3D images with an Inspeck Camera that is a real-time 3D shape acquisition system based on structured light techniques. The method is a high-resolution one. After processing the images, using computer, we can use the data for creating laser fashionable objects by engraving them with a Q-switched Nd:YAG. In medical field we mention the plastic surgery and the replacement of X-Ray especially in pediatric use.

  10. Heat Equation to 3D Image Segmentation

    Nikolay Sirakov

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach, capable of 3D image segmentation and objects' surface reconstruction. The main advantages of the method are: large capture range; quick segmentation of a 3D scene/image to regions; multiple 3D objects reconstruction. The method uses centripetal force and penalty function to segment the entire 3D scene/image to regions containing a single 3D object. Each region is inscribed in a convex, smooth closed surface, which defines a centripetal force. Then the surface is evolved by the geometric heat differential equation toward the force's direction. The penalty function is defined to stop evolvement of those surface patches, whose normal vectors encountered object's surface. On the base of the theoretical model Forward Difference Algorithm was developed and coded by Mathematica. Stability convergence condition, truncation error and calculation complexity of the algorithm are determined. The obtained results, advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed at the end of this paper.

  11. 3D camera tracking from disparity images

    Kim, Kiyoung; Woo, Woontack

    2005-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust camera tracking method that uses disparity images computed from known parameters of 3D camera and multiple epipolar constraints. We assume that baselines between lenses in 3D camera and intrinsic parameters are known. The proposed method reduces camera motion uncertainty encountered during camera tracking. Specifically, we first obtain corresponding feature points between initial lenses using normalized correlation method. In conjunction with matching features, we get disparity images. When the camera moves, the corresponding feature points, obtained from each lens of 3D camera, are robustly tracked via Kanade-Lukas-Tomasi (KLT) tracking algorithm. Secondly, relative pose parameters of each lens are calculated via Essential matrices. Essential matrices are computed from Fundamental matrix calculated using normalized 8-point algorithm with RANSAC scheme. Then, we determine scale factor of translation matrix by d-motion. This is required because the camera motion obtained from Essential matrix is up to scale. Finally, we optimize camera motion using multiple epipolar constraints between lenses and d-motion constraints computed from disparity images. The proposed method can be widely adopted in Augmented Reality (AR) applications, 3D reconstruction using 3D camera, and fine surveillance systems which not only need depth information, but also camera motion parameters in real-time.

  12. Plastinated fetus: 3D CT scan (VRT) evaluation

    Shilpi Tiwari; Nandlal, B; N M Shama Sundar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The intent of this study was to evaluate the effect of plastination on the morphology and structure of stored organs, to find out how much accuracy a plastinated specimen has, and to look into the changes that occurred because of plastination. Materials and Methods: A human fetus of gestational age 24 weeks was plastinated, and 3D CT scan evaluation of the fetus was done. Results: The results showed normal, well-defined, clearly identifiable organs, with no alteration in morp...

  13. C-arm CT-guided 3D navigation of percutaneous interventions; C-Bogen-CT-unterstuetzte 3D-Navigation perkutaner Interventionen

    Becker, H.C.; Meissner, O.; Waggershauser, T. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    So far C-arm CT images were predominantly used for a precise guidance of an endovascular or intra-arterial therapy. A novel combined 3D-navigation C-arm system now also allows cross-sectional and fluoroscopy controlled interventions. Studies have reported about successful CT-image guided navigation with C-arm systems in vertebroplasty. Insertion of the radiofrequency ablation probe is also conceivable for lung and liver tumors that had been labelled with lipiodol. In the future C-arm CT based navigation systems will probably allow simplified and safer complex interventions and simultaneously reduce radiation exposure. (orig.) [German] Bisher wurden CT-Aufnahmen von einem rotierenden C-Bogen-System v. a. fuer die gezielte Unterstuetzung endovaskulaerer und intraarterieller Interventionen verwendet. Mit einer neuen kombinierten 3D-C-Bogen-Navigationseinheit ist es jetzt aber auch moeglich, perkutane Interventionen mit einem C-Bogen-System unter Schichtbild- und fluoroskopischer Kontrolle durchzufuehren. In Studien wird ueber erfolgreiche CT-Bild-gefuehrte Navigationen bei Vertebroplastien mit einem C-Bogen-System berichtet. Vorstellbar ist aber auch das Einbringen von Radiofrequenzsonden in Tumoren von Lunge und Leber, die bereits intraarteriell mit Lipiodol markiert wurden. Voraussichtlich koennen C-Bogen-CT-basierte Navigationssysteme in Zukunft komplexe Interventionen einfacher und sicherer machen und dabei gleichzeitig die Strahlenexposition reduzieren. (orig.)

  14. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    Cambridge : The Electromagnetics Academy, 2010, s. 1043-1046. ISBN 978-1-934142-14-1. [PIERS 2010 Cambridge. Cambridge (US), 05.07.2010-08.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : 3D reconstruction * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  15. Feasibility of 3D harmonic contrast imaging

    Voormolen, M.M.; Bouakaz, A.; Krenning, B.J.; Lancée, C.; Cate, ten F.; Jong, de N.

    2004-01-01

    Improved endocardial border delineation with the application of contrast agents should allow for less complex and faster tracing algorithms for left ventricular volume analysis. We developed a fast rotating phased array transducer for 3D imaging of the heart with harmonic capabilities making it suit

  16. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality

  17. Simulation and experimental studies of three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data based on compressed-sensing theory for potential applications to dental cone-beam CT

    Je, U.K.; Lee, M.S.; Cho, H.S., E-mail: hscho1@yonsei.ac.kr; Hong, D.K.; Park, Y.O.; Park, C.K.; Cho, H.M.; Choi, S.I.; Woo, T.H.

    2015-06-01

    In practical applications of three-dimensional (3D) tomographic imaging, there are often challenges for image reconstruction from insufficient sampling data. In computed tomography (CT), for example, image reconstruction from sparse views and/or limited-angle (<360°) views would enable fast scanning with reduced imaging doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented a reconstruction algorithm based on the compressed-sensing (CS) theory, which exploits the sparseness of the gradient image with substantially high accuracy, for potential applications to low-dose, high-accurate dental cone-beam CT (CBCT). We performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics and also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in insufficient sampling problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images of superior accuracy from insufficient sampling data and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from insufficient data indicate that the CS-based algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  18. Hybrid segmentation framework for 3D medical image analysis

    Chen, Ting; Metaxas, Dimitri N.

    2003-05-01

    Medical image segmentation is the process that defines the region of interest in the image volume. Classical segmentation methods such as region-based methods and boundary-based methods cannot make full use of the information provided by the image. In this paper we proposed a general hybrid framework for 3D medical image segmentation purposes. In our approach we combine the Gibbs Prior model, and the deformable model. First, Gibbs Prior models are applied onto each slice in a 3D medical image volume and the segmentation results are combined to a 3D binary masks of the object. Then we create a deformable mesh based on this 3D binary mask. The deformable model will be lead to the edge features in the volume with the help of image derived external forces. The deformable model segmentation result can be used to update the parameters for Gibbs Prior models. These methods will then work recursively to reach a global segmentation solution. The hybrid segmentation framework has been applied to images with the objective of lung, heart, colon, jaw, tumor, and brain. The experimental data includes MRI (T1, T2, PD), CT, X-ray, Ultra-Sound images. High quality results are achieved with relatively efficient time cost. We also did validation work using expert manual segmentation as the ground truth. The result shows that the hybrid segmentation may have further clinical use.

  19. 3D Membrane Imaging and Porosity Visualization

    Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2016-03-03

    Ultrafiltration asymmetric porous membranes were imaged by two microscopy methods, which allow 3D reconstruction: Focused Ion Beam and Serial Block Face Scanning Electron Microscopy. A new algorithm was proposed to evaluate porosity and average pore size in different layers orthogonal and parallel to the membrane surface. The 3D-reconstruction enabled additionally the visualization of pore interconnectivity in different parts of the membrane. The method was demonstrated for a block copolymer porous membrane and can be extended to other membranes with application in ultrafiltration, supports for forward osmosis, etc, offering a complete view of the transport paths in the membrane.

  20. 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this project has been to implement a software system, that is able to create a 3-D reconstruction from two or more 2-D photographic images made from different positions. The height is determined from the disparity difference of the images. The general purpose of the system is mapping of......, where various methods have been tested in order to optimize the performance. The match results are used in the reconstruction part to establish a 3-D digital representation and finally, different presentation forms are discussed....... treated individually. A detailed treatment of various lens distortions is required, in order to correct for these problems. This subject is included in the acquisition part. In the calibration part, the perspective distortion is removed from the images. Most attention has been paid to the matching problem...

  1. Backhoe 3D "gold standard" image

    Gorham, LeRoy; Naidu, Kiranmai D.; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael A.

    2005-05-01

    ViSUAl-D (VIsual Sar Using ALl Dimensions), a 2004 DARPA/IXO seedling effort, is developing a capability for reliable high confidence ID from standoff ranges. Recent conflicts have demonstrated that the warfighter would greatly benefit from the ability to ID targets beyond visual and electro-optical ranges[1]. Forming optical-quality SAR images while exploiting full polarization, wide angles, and large bandwidth would be key evidence such a capability is achievable. Using data generated by the Xpatch EM scattering code, ViSUAl-D investigates all degrees of freedom available to the radar designer, including 6 GHz bandwidth, full polarization and angle sampling over 2π steradians (upper hemisphere), in order to produce a "literal" image or representation of the target. This effort includes the generation of a "Gold Standard" image that can be produced at X-band utilizing all available target data. This "Gold Standard" image of the backhoe will serve as a test bed for future more relevant military targets and their image development. The seedling team produced a public release data which was released at the 2004 SPIE conference, as well as a 3D "Gold Standard" backhoe image using a 3D image formation algorithm. This paper describes the full backhoe data set, the image formation algorithm, the visualization process and the resulting image.

  2. C-arm CT-guided 3D navigation of percutaneous interventions

    So far C-arm CT images were predominantly used for a precise guidance of an endovascular or intra-arterial therapy. A novel combined 3D-navigation C-arm system now also allows cross-sectional and fluoroscopy controlled interventions. Studies have reported about successful CT-image guided navigation with C-arm systems in vertebroplasty. Insertion of the radiofrequency ablation probe is also conceivable for lung and liver tumors that had been labelled with lipiodol. In the future C-arm CT based navigation systems will probably allow simplified and safer complex interventions and simultaneously reduce radiation exposure. (orig.)

  3. Recent progress in 3-D imaging of sea freight containers

    Fuchs, Theobald; Schön, Tobias; Dittmann, Jonas; Sukowski, Frank; Hanke, Randolf

    2015-03-01

    The inspection of very large objects like sea freight containers with X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is an emerging technology. A complete 3-D CT scan of a see-freight container takes several hours. Of course, this is too slow to apply it to a large number of containers. However, the benefits of a 3-D CT for sealed freight are obvious: detection of potential threats or illicit cargo without being confronted with legal complications or high time consumption and risks for the security personnel during a manual inspection. Recently distinct progress was made in the field of reconstruction of projections with only a relatively low number of angular positions. Instead of today's 500 to 1000 rotational steps, as needed for conventional CT reconstruction techniques, this new class of algorithms provides the potential to reduce the number of projection angles approximately by a factor of 10. The main drawback of these advanced iterative methods is the high consumption for numerical processing. But as computational power is getting steadily cheaper, there will be practical applications of these complex algorithms in a foreseeable future. In this paper, we discuss the properties of iterative image reconstruction algorithms and show results of their application to CT of extremely large objects scanning a sea-freight container. A specific test specimen is used to quantitatively evaluate the image quality in terms of spatial and contrast resolution and depending on different number of projections.

  4. Recent progress in 3-D imaging of sea freight containers

    Fuchs, Theobald, E-mail: theobold.fuchs@iis.fraunhofer.de; Schön, Tobias, E-mail: theobold.fuchs@iis.fraunhofer.de; Sukowski, Frank [Fraunhofer Development Center X-ray Technology EZRT, Flugplatzstr. 75, 90768 Fürth (Germany); Dittmann, Jonas; Hanke, Randolf [Chair of X-ray Microscopy, Institute of Physics and Astronomy, Julius-Maximilian-University Würzburg, Josef-Martin-Weg 63, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2015-03-31

    The inspection of very large objects like sea freight containers with X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is an emerging technology. A complete 3-D CT scan of a see-freight container takes several hours. Of course, this is too slow to apply it to a large number of containers. However, the benefits of a 3-D CT for sealed freight are obvious: detection of potential threats or illicit cargo without being confronted with legal complications or high time consumption and risks for the security personnel during a manual inspection. Recently distinct progress was made in the field of reconstruction of projections with only a relatively low number of angular positions. Instead of today’s 500 to 1000 rotational steps, as needed for conventional CT reconstruction techniques, this new class of algorithms provides the potential to reduce the number of projection angles approximately by a factor of 10. The main drawback of these advanced iterative methods is the high consumption for numerical processing. But as computational power is getting steadily cheaper, there will be practical applications of these complex algorithms in a foreseeable future. In this paper, we discuss the properties of iterative image reconstruction algorithms and show results of their application to CT of extremely large objects scanning a sea-freight container. A specific test specimen is used to quantitatively evaluate the image quality in terms of spatial and contrast resolution and depending on different number of projections.

  5. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  6. 3D IMAGING USING COHERENT SYNCHROTRON RADIATION

    Peter Cloetens

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional imaging is becoming a standard tool for medical, scientific and industrial applications. The use of modem synchrotron radiation sources for monochromatic beam micro-tomography provides several new features. Along with enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and improved spatial resolution, these include the possibility of quantitative measurements, the easy incorporation of special sample environment devices for in-situ experiments, and a simple implementation of phase imaging. These 3D approaches overcome some of the limitations of 2D measurements. They require new tools for image analysis.

  7. The role of 3D Helical CT in the reconstructive treatment of maxillofacial cancers

    Purpose of this work is to investigate the role of Helical CT and the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) imaging for pre-operative planning and follow-up of reconstructive maxillofacial surgery with alloplastic material in neoplastic disease involving this region. From 1996 to 1999 eleven patients were examined with Helical CT and 3D images for planning of maxillofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery for advanced cancer of this anatomically complex region. A 3D-modulated titanium mesh (100%) or micro nets was used to rebuild the anterior surface of maxillary bone and the orbital floor. The mesh was cut to the appropriate size and shape and curved where necessary. Within the residual sinusal cavity a siliconed filling was used surmounting an acrylic prosthesis with dental arch to rebuild the palate. A rehydrated bovine pericardium was affixed and moduled on the borders in two cases only. Three-dimensionally reconstructed CT images were obtained preoperatively and at least 6 months postoperatively in all patients. The images were generated on a computer workstation using the shaded surface display (SSD) software with threshold values ranging 425 to 630 HU, and a more closed window for the imaging of titanium mesh/bone interface in the post surgical follow-up. It was obtained an excellent complete spatial depiction of maxillo facial region both before and after surgery, with no artefacts so important as to affect the 3D reconstruction process and the image quality. Together with the head-neck surgical team it could be worked for preoperative planning through CT scans by different 3D points of view. The 3D reconstructed follow-up scans showed good filling of the defect in the area where the titanium mesh had been used. Then efficacious bone modelling and good biocompatibility of the alloplastic material were seen in all patients, with no inflammatory reactions. Titanium is a well-known material, which is widely used for cranioplasty. It is a radiolucent, non

  8. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks

  9. Practical pseudo-3D registration for large tomographic images

    Liu, Xuan; Laperre, Kjell; Sasov, Alexander

    2014-09-01

    Image registration is a powerful tool in various tomographic applications. Our main focus is on microCT applications in which samples/animals can be scanned multiple times under different conditions or at different time points. For this purpose, a registration tool capable of handling fairly large volumes has been developed, using a novel pseudo-3D method to achieve fast and interactive registration with simultaneous 3D visualization. To reduce computation complexity in 3D registration, we decompose it into several 2D registrations, which are applied to the orthogonal views (transaxial, sagittal and coronal) sequentially and iteratively. After registration in each view, the next view is retrieved with the new transformation matrix for registration. This reduces the computation complexity significantly. For rigid transform, we only need to search for 3 parameters (2 shifts, 1 rotation) in each of the 3 orthogonal views instead of 6 (3 shifts, 3 rotations) for full 3D volume. In addition, the amount of voxels involved is also significantly reduced. For the proposed pseudo-3D method, image-based registration is employed, with Sum of Square Difference (SSD) as the similarity measure. The searching engine is Powell's conjugate direction method. In this paper, only rigid transform is used. However, it can be extended to affine transform by adding scaling and possibly shearing to the transform model. We have noticed that more information can be used in the 2D registration if Maximum Intensity Projections (MIP) or Parallel Projections (PP) is used instead of the orthogonal views. Also, other similarity measures, such as covariance or mutual information, can be easily incorporated. The initial evaluation on microCT data shows very promising results. Two application examples are shown: dental samples before and after treatment and structural changes in materials before and after compression. Evaluation on registration accuracy between pseudo-3D method and true 3D method has

  10. Clinical application of 3D-CT angiography. The usefulness in cases of unruptured cerebral aneurysms

    We studied three-dimensional (3D) images of unruptured aneurysms using JETT (Joining exposure translation) CT scanning with a bolus injection of contrast medium. 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) was performed in sixty cases with a total of 73 unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Sixty-eight of these 73 aneurysms were identified (detectability: 93.2%) by using the shaded surface display. The minimal size of the detected aneurysms was 2 mm in their longest diameter. The common site of the five aneurysms that could not be demonstrated was the internal carotid artery (cavernous portion or ophthalmic segment) and this technique thus requires further investigation. 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) was helpful in demonstrating the complex anatomy of cerebral aneurysms and their surrounding structures. On the 3D-CTA, it was possible to observe the necks of aneurysms from every direction by rotating it freely. This technique will be of value in surgical planning and follow up. Calcifications present in vessels or aneurysmal walls are clearly visualized by using the maximum intensity projection (MIP). Combining a wide variety of 3D display techniques (Shaded surface display, Multiplanar reconstruction, MIP) may become a valuable tool in evaluating cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  11. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  12. Flexydos3D: A new deformable anthropomorphic 3D dosimeter readout with optical CT scanning

    A new deformable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) based dosimeter is proposed that can be cast in an anthropomorphic shape and that can be used for 3D radiation dosimetry of deformable targets. The new material has additional favorable characteristics as it is tissue equivalent for high-energy photons, easy to make and is non-toxic. In combination with dual wavelength optical scanning, it is a powerful dosimeter for dose verification of image gated or organ tracked radiotherapy with moving and deforming targets

  13. Comparison of radiation dose and image quality of Siremobil-IsoC3D with a 16-slice spiral CT for diagnosis and intervention in the human pelvic bone

    Purpose: to compare the image quality of 16-slice computed tomography with the image quality of Siremobil-IsoC3D of the pelvic region and to measure simultaneously the radiation dose before and after implantation of a sacroiliac screw (SI-screw) Materials and methods: the pelvic region of 8 human cadavers was examined in the Siremobil-IsoC3D at five different levels. We used a standard protocol for the 16-slice CT of the complete pelvic region before and after insertion of a pelvic screw, followed by stepwise reduction of the tube current to find the tube current that equalizes the image quality of both modalities. We controlled the image quality by judging important structures such as neuroforamen, nerves, sacroiliacal joint space, intervertebral space, osteophytes, iliopsoas muscle, acetabular surface, fovea centralis, hip joint and os pubis. The image quality was judged by three radiologists and three trauma surgeons using a ranking from 1 to 5. The dose was measured with an endorectally placed NOMEX Dosimeter, to obtain the gonadal dose. Results: the medium score for all viewers of the Siremobil-IsoC3D examinations was between 3 and 4.3. The medium score for all CT-examinations with a tube current of 250 mA was between 1.3 and 2.2. The reduction of tube current down to 80 mA hardly influenced the marks for the analyzed structures. Under 80 mA, bony structures, even after implantation of a SI-screw, were still marked as good, but soft tissue differentiation was getting worse. For the examination of the pelvis, the average dose-length product for the IsoC3D was 41.2 mGy x cm. The medium dose-length product for CT was 389 mGy x cm for 250 mA, 125 mGy x cm for 80 mA and 82 mGy x cm for 60 mA. (orig.)

  14. 3D Model Assisted Image Segmentation

    Jayawardena, Srimal; Hutter, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The problem of segmenting a given image into coherent regions is important in Computer Vision and many industrial applications require segmenting a known object into its components. Examples include identifying individual parts of a component for process control work in a manufacturing plant and identifying parts of a car from a photo for automatic damage detection. Unfortunately most of an object's parts of interest in such applications share the same pixel characteristics, having similar colour and texture. This makes segmenting the object into its components a non-trivial task for conventional image segmentation algorithms. In this paper, we propose a "Model Assisted Segmentation" method to tackle this problem. A 3D model of the object is registered over the given image by optimising a novel gradient based loss function. This registration obtains the full 3D pose from an image of the object. The image can have an arbitrary view of the object and is not limited to a particular set of views. The segmentation...

  15. 3D-imaging using micro-PIXE

    Ishii, K.; Matsuyama, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Oyama, R.; Momose, G.; Ishizaki, A.; Yamazaki, H.; Kikuchi, Y.

    2007-02-01

    We have developed a 3D-imaging system using characteristic X-rays produced by proton micro-beam bombardment. The 3D-imaging system consists of a micro-beam and an X-ray CCD camera of 1 mega pixels (Hamamatsu photonics C8800X), and has a spatial resolution of 4 μm by using characteristic Ti-K-X-rays (4.558 keV) produced by 3 MeV protons of beam spot size of ˜1 μm. We applied this system, namely, a micron-CT to observe the inside of a living small ant's head of ˜1 mm diameter. An ant was inserted into a small polyimide tube the inside diameter and the wall thickness of which are 1000 and 25 μm, respectively, and scanned by the micron-CT. Three dimensional images of the ant's heads were obtained with a spatial resolution of 4 μm. It was found that, in accordance with the strong dependence on atomic number of photo ionization cross-sections, the mandibular gland of ant contains heavier elements, and moreover, the CT-image of living ant anaesthetized by chloroform is quite different from that of a dead ant dipped in formalin.

  16. Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers for 3-D Imaging

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann

    Real-time ultrasound imaging is a widely used technique in medical diagnostics. Recently, ultrasound systems offering real-time imaging in 3-D has emerged. However, the high complexity of the transducer probes and the considerable increase in data to be processed compared to conventional 2-D...... ultrasound imaging results in expensive systems, which limits the more wide-spread use and clinical development of volumetric ultrasound. The main goal of this thesis is to demonstrate new transducer technologies that can achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging without the complexity and cost...... capable of producing 62+62-element row-column addressed CMUT arrays with negligible charging issues. The arrays include an integrated apodization, which reduces the ghost echoes produced by the edge waves in such arrays by 15:8 dB. The acoustical cross-talk is measured on fabricated arrays, showing a 24 d...

  17. A comparison of 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) tissue engineering scaffolds produced with conventional and additive manufacturing techniques by means of quantitative analysis of SR μ-CT images

    Brun, F.; Intranuovo, F.; Mohammadi, S.; Domingos, M.; Favia, P.; Tromba, G.

    2013-07-01

    The technique used to produce a 3D tissue engineering (TE) scaffold is of fundamental importance in order to guarantee its proper morphological characteristics. An accurate assessment of the resulting structural properties is therefore crucial in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the produced scaffold. Synchrotron radiation (SR) computed microtomography (μ-CT) combined with further image analysis seems to be one of the most effective techniques to this aim. However, a quantitative assessment of the morphological parameters directly from the reconstructed images is a non trivial task. This study considers two different poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds fabricated with a conventional technique (Solvent Casting Particulate Leaching, SCPL) and an additive manufacturing (AM) technique (BioCell Printing), respectively. With the first technique it is possible to produce scaffolds with random, non-regular, rounded pore geometry. The AM technique instead is able to produce scaffolds with square-shaped interconnected pores of regular dimension. Therefore, the final morphology of the AM scaffolds can be predicted and the resulting model can be used for the validation of the applied imaging and image analysis protocols. It is here reported a SR μ-CT image analysis approach that is able to effectively and accurately reveal the differences in the pore- and throat-size distributions as well as connectivity of both AM and SCPL scaffolds.

  18. A comparison of 3D poly(ε-caprolactone) tissue engineering scaffolds produced with conventional and additive manufacturing techniques by means of quantitative analysis of SR μ-CT images

    The technique used to produce a 3D tissue engineering (TE) scaffold is of fundamental importance in order to guarantee its proper morphological characteristics. An accurate assessment of the resulting structural properties is therefore crucial in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the produced scaffold. Synchrotron radiation (SR) computed microtomography (μ-CT) combined with further image analysis seems to be one of the most effective techniques to this aim. However, a quantitative assessment of the morphological parameters directly from the reconstructed images is a non trivial task. This study considers two different poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds fabricated with a conventional technique (Solvent Casting Particulate Leaching, SCPL) and an additive manufacturing (AM) technique (BioCell Printing), respectively. With the first technique it is possible to produce scaffolds with random, non-regular, rounded pore geometry. The AM technique instead is able to produce scaffolds with square-shaped interconnected pores of regular dimension. Therefore, the final morphology of the AM scaffolds can be predicted and the resulting model can be used for the validation of the applied imaging and image analysis protocols. It is here reported a SR μ-CT image analysis approach that is able to effectively and accurately reveal the differences in the pore- and throat-size distributions as well as connectivity of both AM and SCPL scaffolds.

  19. The European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-European Institute of Radiotherapy (ESTRO-EIR) report on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance systems: A practical and technical review and guide

    The past decade has provided many technological advances in radiotherapy. The European Institute of Radiotherapy (EIR) was established by the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) to provide current consensus statement with evidence-based and pragmatic guidelines on topics of practical relevance for radiation oncology. This report focuses primarily on 3D CT-based in-room image guidance (3DCT-IGRT) systems. It will provide an overview and current standing of 3DCT-IGRT systems addressing the rationale, objectives, principles, applications, and process pathways, both clinical and technical for treatment delivery and quality assurance. These are reviewed for four categories of solutions; kV CT and kV CBCT (cone-beam CT) as well as MV CT and MV CBCT. It will also provide a framework and checklist to consider the capability and functionality of these systems as well as the resources needed for implementation. Two different but typical clinical cases (tonsillar and prostate cancer) using 3DCT-IGRT are illustrated with workflow processes via feedback questionnaires from several large clinical centres currently utilizing these systems. The feedback from these clinical centres demonstrates a wide variability based on local practices. This report whilst comprehensive is not exhaustive as this area of development remains a very active field for research and development. However, it should serve as a practical guide and framework for all professional groups within the field, focussed on clinicians, physicists and radiation therapy technologists interested in IGRT.

  20. Observation of femoral and tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament by using conventional CT and transparent 3D-CT

    Presented are image data acquisitioned by the volume rendering (VR)-3D-CT and authors' transparent (T)-3D-CT to depict the bone contour, of medial intercondylar ridge (MIR) and posterior intercodylar fossa (PIF) at femoral and tibial insertion, respectively, of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) as those data are helpful for planning the reconstruction surgery of PCL and for confirming the femoral PCL insertion by using the C-arm during operation. Helical scanning is conducted with GE MD-CT (64DAS) to reconstruct VR-3D-CT image with the workstation ZIO's ZIO900M Quadra and T-3D-CT image, by reducing the opacity by pixel exclusion of the intraosseous lumen. MIR is observed in all 70 normal knees tested in VR-3D-CT and the bifurcate ridge, in 15 knees among them. In T-3D-CT image, distance data of the origin of MIR from Blumensaat's line and the angle of MIR and bone axis are calculated and presented. In VR-3D-CT and T-3D-CT images of PIF from 20 knees, actual measures of PIF slope angle (degree), PIF area ratio to joint surface (JS) (%), distance from JS to centers of anterolateral (AL) and posterolateral (PM) slopes (mm), and from medial and lateral JS to PIF posterior border (mm), and distance ratios of PM and AL to medial and lateral tibia, respectively, (%) are calculated and presented. Findings are: MIR originates at 45% distal point of Blumensaat's line; the articular line crosses with PIF at its center in T-3D-CT sagittal plane; centers of tibial AL and PM exist at the middle of frontal plane, and at 1.00 and 5.5 mm, respectively, distal points of JS of sagittal plane. The PIF data are rather comparable to those obtained in cadavers reported in 3 literatures and the present procedure is concluded to be valid. (author)

  1. Performance characteristics of 3D GSO PET/CT scanner (Philips GEMINI PET/CT)

    Philips GEMINI is a newly introduced whole-body GSO PET/CT scanner. In this study, performance of the scanner including spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) was measured utilizing NEMA NU2-2001 standard protocol and compared with performance of LSO, BGO crystal scanner. GEMINI is composed of the Philips ALLEGRO PET and MX8000 D multi-slice CT scanners. The PET scanner has 28 detector segments which have an array of 29 by 22 GSO crystals (4*6*20 mm), covering axial FOV of 18 cm. PET data to measure spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and NECR were acquired in 3D mode according to the NEMA NU2 protocols (coincidence window: 8 ns, energy window : 409∼664 keV). For the measurement of spatial resolution, images were reconstructed with FBP using ramp filter and an iterative reconstruction algorithm, 3D RAMLA. Data for sensitivity measurement were acquired using NEMA sensitivity phantom filled with F-18 solution and surrounded by 1∼5 aluminum sleeves after we confirmed that dead time loss did not exceed 1%. To measure NECR and scatter fraction, 1110 MBq of F-18 solution was injected into a NEMA scatter phantom with a length of 70 cm and dynamic scan with 20-min frame duration was acquired for 7 half-lives. Oblique sinograms were collapsed into transaxial slices using single slice rebinning method, and true to background (scatter + random) ratio for each slice and frame was estimated. Scatter fraction was determined by averaging the true to background ratio of last 3 frames in which the dead time loss was below 1%. Transverse and axial resolutions at 1 cm radius were (1) 5.3 and 6.5 mm (FBP), (2) 5.1 and 5.9 mm (3D RAMLA). Transverse radial, transverse tangential, and axial resolution at 10 cm were (1) 5.7, 5.7, and 7.0 mm (FBP), (2) 5.4, 5.4, and 6.4 mm (3D RAMLA). Attenuation free values of sensitivity were 3,620 counts/sec/MBq at the center of transaxial FOV and 4,324 counts/sec/MBq at 10 cm offset

  2. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 ± 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 ± 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 ± 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 ± 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 ± 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 ± 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 ± 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask systems with 3D

  3. Characterization of a parallel-beam CCD optical-CT apparatus for 3D radiation dosimetry

    Krstajic, Nikola; Doran, Simon J.

    2007-07-01

    3D measurement of optical attenuation is of interest in a variety of fields of biomedical importance, including spectrophotometry, optical projection tomography (OPT) and analysis of 3D radiation dosimeters. Accurate, precise and economical 3D measurements of optical density (OD) are a crucial step in enabling 3D radiation dosimeters to enter wider use in clinics. Polymer gels and Fricke gels, as well as dosimeters not based around gels, have been characterized for 3D dosimetry over the last two decades. A separate problem is the verification of the best readout method. A number of different imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical CT, x-ray CT and ultrasound) have been suggested for the readout of information from 3D dosimeters. To date only MRI and laser-based optical CT have been characterized in detail. This paper describes some initial steps we have taken in establishing charge coupled device (CCD)-based optical CT as a viable alternative to MRI for readout of 3D radiation dosimeters. The main advantage of CCD-based optical CT over traditional laser-based optical CT is a speed increase of at least an order of magnitude, while the simplicity of its architecture would lend itself to cheaper implementation than both MRI and laser-based optical CT if the camera itself were inexpensive enough. Specifically, we study the following aspects of optical metrology, using high quality test targets: (i) calibration and quality of absorbance measurements and the camera requirements for 3D dosimetry; (ii) the modulation transfer function (MTF) of individual projections; (iii) signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the projection and reconstruction domains; (iv) distortion in the projection domain, depth-of-field (DOF) and telecentricity. The principal results for our current apparatus are as follows: (i) SNR of optical absorbance in projections is better than 120:1 for uniform phantoms in absorbance range 0.3 to 1.6 (and better than 200:1 for absorbances 1.0 to

  4. 3D strain measurement in soft tissue: demonstration of a novel inverse finite element model algorithm on MicroCT images of a tissue phantom exposed to negative pressure wound therapy.

    Wilkes, R; Zhao, Y; Cunningham, K; Kieswetter, K; Haridas, B

    2009-07-01

    This study describes a novel system for acquiring the 3D strain field in soft tissue at sub-millimeter spatial resolution during negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Recent research in advanced wound treatment modalities theorizes that microdeformations induced by the application of sub-atmospheric (negative) pressure through V.A.C. GranuFoam Dressing, a reticulated open-cell polyurethane foam (ROCF), is instrumental in regulating the mechanobiology of granulation tissue formation [Saxena, V., Hwang, C.W., Huang, S., Eichbaum, Q., Ingber, D., Orgill, D.P., 2004. Vacuum-assisted closure: Microdeformations of wounds and cell proliferation. Plast. Reconstr. Surg. 114, 1086-1096]. While the clinical response is unequivocal, measurement of deformations at the wound-dressing interface has not been possible due to the inaccessibility of the wound tissue beneath the sealed dressing. Here we describe the development of a bench-test wound model for microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging of deformation induced by NPWT and an algorithm set for quantifying the 3D strain field at sub-millimeter resolution. Microdeformations induced in the tissue phantom revealed average tensile strains of 18%-23% at sub-atmospheric pressures of -50 to -200 mmHg (-6.7 to -26.7 kPa). The compressive strains (22%-24%) and shear strains (20%-23%) correlate with 2D FEM studies of microdeformational wound therapy in the reference cited above. We anticipate that strain signals quantified using this system can then be used in future research aimed at correlating the effects of mechanical loading on the phenotypic expression of dermal fibroblasts in acute and chronic ulcer models. Furthermore, the method developed here can be applied to continuum deformation analysis in other contexts, such as 3D cell culture via confocal microscopy, full scale CT and MRI imaging, and in machine vision. PMID:19627832

  5. 3-D SAR image formation from sparse aperture data using 3-D target grids

    Bhalla, Rajan; Li, Junfei; Ling, Hao

    2005-05-01

    The performance of ATR systems can potentially be improved by using three-dimensional (3-D) SAR images instead of the traditional two-dimensional SAR images or one-dimensional range profiles. 3-D SAR image formation of targets from radar backscattered data collected on wide angle, sparse apertures has been identified by AFRL as fundamental to building an object detection and recognition capability. A set of data has been released as a challenge problem. This paper describes a technique based on the concept of 3-D target grids aimed at the formation of 3-D SAR images of targets from sparse aperture data. The 3-D target grids capture the 3-D spatial and angular scattering properties of the target and serve as matched filters for SAR formation. The results of 3-D SAR formation using the backhoe public release data are presented.

  6. 3D Buildings Extraction from Aerial Images

    Melnikova, O.; Prandi, F.

    2011-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-automatic method for buildings extraction through multiple-view aerial image analysis. The advantage of the used semi-automatic approach is that it allows processing of each building individually finding the parameters of buildings features extraction more precisely for each area. On the early stage the presented technique uses an extraction of line segments that is done only inside of areas specified manually. The rooftop hypothesis is used further to determine a subset of quadrangles, which could form building roofs from a set of extracted lines and corners obtained on the previous stage. After collecting of all potential roof shapes in all images overlaps, the epipolar geometry is applied to find matching between images. This allows to make an accurate selection of building roofs removing false-positive ones and to identify their global 3D coordinates given camera internal parameters and coordinates. The last step of the image matching is based on geometrical constraints in contrast to traditional correlation. The correlation is applied only in some highly restricted areas in order to find coordinates more precisely, in such a way significantly reducing processing time of the algorithm. The algorithm has been tested on a set of Milan's aerial images and shows highly accurate results.

  7. Experience of percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system

    We performed percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system Arcadis Orbic 3D+Stealth Station Navigation System for vertebral fractures expressing instability. From April 2007 to December 2007, we performed percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system on 31 unstable fractures. Progress was good in all cases, indicating that percutaneous vertebroplasty with 3D-CT navigation system is effective for vertebral fractures expressing instability. (author)

  8. Visualization of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction bone tunnels: Reliability of standard radiographs, CT scans, and 3D virtual reality images

    D.E. Meuffels (Duncan); J.W. Potters (Jan Willem); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); C.H. Brown Jr Jr. (Charles); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); M. Reijman (Max)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground and purpose: Non-anatomic bone tunnel placement is the most common cause of a failed ACL reconstruction. Accurate and reproducible methods to visualize and document bone tunnel placement are therefore important. We evaluated the reliability of standard radiographs, CT scans, a

  9. Photogrammetric 3D reconstruction using mobile imaging

    Fritsch, Dieter; Syll, Miguel

    2015-03-01

    In our paper we demonstrate the development of an Android Application (AndroidSfM) for photogrammetric 3D reconstruction that works on smartphones and tablets likewise. The photos are taken with mobile devices, and can thereafter directly be calibrated using standard calibration algorithms of photogrammetry and computer vision, on that device. Due to still limited computing resources on mobile devices, a client-server handshake using Dropbox transfers the photos to the sever to run AndroidSfM for the pose estimation of all photos by Structure-from-Motion and, thereafter, uses the oriented bunch of photos for dense point cloud estimation by dense image matching algorithms. The result is transferred back to the mobile device for visualization and ad-hoc on-screen measurements.

  10. Automatic calibration method of voxel size for cone-beam 3D-CT scanning system

    For a cone-beam three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scanning system, voxel size is an important indicator to guarantee the accuracy of data analysis and feature measurement based on 3D-CT images. Meanwhile, the voxel size changes with the movement of the rotary stage along X-ray direction. In order to realize the automatic calibration of the voxel size, a new and easily-implemented method is proposed. According to this method, several projections of a spherical phantom are captured at different imaging positions and the corresponding voxel size values are calculated by non-linear least-square fitting. Through these interpolation values, a linear equation is obtained that reflects the relationship between the voxel size and the rotary stage translation distance from its nominal zero position. Finally, the linear equation is imported into the calibration module of the 3D-CT scanning system. When the rotary stage is moving along X-ray direction, the accurate value of the voxel size is dynamically exported. The experimental results prove that this method meets the requirements of the actual CT scanning system, and has virtues of easy implementation and high accuracy. (authors)

  11. The quantification of glenoid bone loss in anterior shoulder instability; MR-arthro compared to 3D-CT

    The purpose of this study is to investigate if magnetic resonance imaging with intra-articular contrast (MR-arthro) is as reliable as three-dimensionally reconstructed computed tomography imaging (3D-CT) in quantifying the glenoid bone loss in patients with anterior shoulder instability. Thirty-five patients were included. Sagittal MR-arthro and 3D-CT images of the glenoid surface were obtained pre-operatively. Two observers measured these images twice with OsiriX software in a randomized and blinded way. The intraclass correlations (ICC) of the intra- and inter-observer reliability within one method and an additional Bland-Altman plot for calculating agreement between the two methods were obtained. The joint estimates of the intra-observer reliability, taking into account the data from both observer A and B, for 3D-CT and MR-arthro were good to excellent. The intra-observer reliability was 0.938 (95 % CI: 0.879, 0.968) for 3D-CT and 0.799 (95 % CI: 0.639, 0.837) for MR-arthro. The inter-observer reliability between the two observers within one method (3D-CT or MR-arthro) was moderate to good. 3D-CT: 0.724 (95 % CI: 0.236, 0.886) and MR-arthro: 0.534 (95 % CI: 0.128, 0.762). Comparing both the 3D-CT and MR-arthro method, a Bland-Altman plot showed satisfying differences with the majority of outcomes (89 %) within 1 SD. Good to excellent intra- and moderate to good inter-observer correlations and a satisfying Bland-Altman plot when compared to 3D-CT show tendencies that MR-arthro is reliable and valid for measuring bony defects of the glenoid. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of carotid arteri calcification using 3D-CT angiography

    The aim of this study was to evaluate carotid arteri calcifications using 3D-CT angiography. We performed a retrospective review of 181 patients referred for 64-slice multi-detector row computed tomography. Using curved multiplanar reformation (curved MPR) images of ZIOSOFT M900 QUADRA, we evaluated the distribution of calcifications around the carotid bifurcation. Among the 181 patients, 66 patients (36%) had arterial calcifications. The present study found that almost arterial calcifications localized at the carotid bifurcation. Furthermore, in the group with carotid arterial stenosis, we found arterial calcifications localized not only at the carotid bifurcation, but also at the distal side of internal carotid artery. Curved MPR imaging using 3D-CT angiography is a helpful tool for evaluating calcification of carotid arteries. (author)

  13. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification Aplicabilidade da reconstrução facial em 3D-TC para identificação individual forense

    Sara dos Santos Rocha; Dalton Luiz de Paula Ramos; Marcelo Gusmão Paraíso Cavalcanti

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using craniometric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering techni...

  14. "High-precision, reconstructed 3D model" of skull scanned by conebeam CT: Reproducibility verified using CAD/CAM data.

    Katsumura, Seiko; Sato, Keita; Ikawa, Tomoko; Yamamura, Keiko; Ando, Eriko; Shigeta, Yuko; Ogawa, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanning has recently been introduced into forensic medicine and dentistry. However, the presence of metal restorations in the dentition can adversely affect the quality of three-dimensional reconstruction from CT scans. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the reproducibility of a "high-precision, reconstructed 3D model" obtained from a conebeam CT scan of dentition, a method that might be particularly helpful in forensic medicine. We took conebeam CT and helical CT images of three dry skulls marked with 47 measuring points; reconstructed three-dimensional images; and measured the distances between the points in the 3D images with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) marker. We found that in comparison with the helical CT, conebeam CT is capable of reproducing measurements closer to those obtained from the actual samples. In conclusion, our study indicated that the image-reproduction from a conebeam CT scan was more accurate than that from a helical CT scan. Furthermore, the "high-precision reconstructed 3D model" facilitates reliable visualization of full-sized oral and maxillofacial regions in both helical and conebeam CT scans. PMID:26832374

  15. 3D object-oriented image analysis in 3D geophysical modelling

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.;

    2015-01-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has traditionally been reduced by using a priori information from seismic tomography models. This reduction in the non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation of the 3D subsurface structures (objects......) based on the seismic tomography models and then forward modelling these objects. However, this form of object-based approach has been done without a standardized methodology on how to extract the subsurface structures from the 3D models. In this research, a 3D object-oriented image analysis (3D OOA......) approach was implemented to extract the 3D subsurface structures from geophysical data. The approach was applied on a 3D shear wave seismic tomography model of the central part of the East African Rift System. Subsequently, the extracted 3D objects from the tomography model were reconstructed in the 3D...

  16. Method for 3D Rendering Based on Intersection Image Display Which Allows Representation of Internal Structure of 3D objects

    Kohei Arai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Method for 3D rendering based on intersection image display which allows representation of internal structure is proposed. The proposed method is essentially different from the conventional volume rendering based on solid model which allows representation of just surface of the 3D objects. By using afterimage, internal structure can be displayed through exchanging the intersection images with internal structure for the proposed method. Through experiments with CT scan images, the proposed method is validated. Also one of other applicable areas of the proposed for design of 3D pattern of Large Scale Integrated Circuit: LSI is introduced. Layered patterns of LSI can be displayed and switched by using human eyes only. It is confirmed that the time required for displaying layer pattern and switching the pattern to the other layer by using human eyes only is much faster than that using hands and fingers.

  17. High-Resolution Imaged-Based 3D Reconstruction Combined with X-Ray CT Data Enables Comprehensive Non-Destructive Documentation and Targeted Research of Astromaterials

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Providing web-based data of complex and sensitive astromaterials (including meteorites and lunar samples) in novel formats enhances existing preliminary examination data on these samples and supports targeted sample requests and analyses. We have developed and tested a rigorous protocol for collecting highly detailed imagery of meteorites and complex lunar samples in non-contaminating environments. These data are reduced to create interactive 3D models of the samples. We intend to provide these data as they are acquired on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website at http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/.

  18. Diaphragm dome surface segmentation in CT data sets: a 3D active appearance model approach

    Beichel, Reinhard; Gotschuli, Georg; Sorantin, Erich; Leberl, Franz W.; Sonka, Milan

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge about the location of the diaphragm dome surface, which separates the lungs and the heart from the abdominal cavity, is of vital importance for applications like automated segmentation of adjacent organs (e.g., liver) or functional analysis of the respiratory cycle. We present a new 3D Active Appearance Model (AAM) approach to segmentation of the top layer of the diaphragm dome. The 3D AAM consists of three parts: a 2D closed curve (reference curve), an elevation image and texture layers. The first two parts combined represent 3D shape information and the third part image intensity of the diaphragm dome and the surrounding layers. Differences in height between dome voxels and a reference plane are stored in the elevation image. The reference curve is generated by a parallel projection of the diaphragm dome outline in the axial direction. Landmark point placement is only done on the (2D) reference curve, which can be seen as the bounding curve of the elevation image. Matching is based on a gradient-descent optimization process and uses image intensity appearance around the actual dome shape. Results achieved in 60 computer generated phantom data sets show a high degree of accuracy (positioning error -0.07+/-1.29 mm). Validation using real CT data sets yielded a positioning error of -0.16+/-2.95 mm. Additional training and testing on in-vivo CT image data is ongoing.

  19. 3D documentation and visualization of external injury findings by integration of simple photography in CT/MRI data sets (IprojeCT).

    Campana, Lorenzo; Breitbeck, Robert; Bauer-Kreuz, Regula; Buck, Ursula

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of documenting patterned injury using three dimensions and true colour photography without complex 3D surface documentation methods. This method is based on a generated 3D surface model using radiologic slice images (CT) while the colour information is derived from photographs taken with commercially available cameras. The external patterned injuries were documented in 16 cases using digital photography as well as highly precise photogrammetry-supported 3D structured light scanning. The internal findings of these deceased were recorded using CT and MRI. For registration of the internal with the external data, two different types of radiographic markers were used and compared. The 3D surface model generated from CT slice images was linked with the photographs, and thereby digital true-colour 3D models of the patterned injuries could be created (Image projection onto CT/IprojeCT). In addition, these external models were merged with the models of the somatic interior. We demonstrated that 3D documentation and visualization of external injury findings by integration of digital photography in CT/MRI data sets is suitable for the 3D documentation of individual patterned injuries to a body. Nevertheless, this documentation method is not a substitution for photogrammetry and surface scanning, especially when the entire bodily surface is to be recorded in three dimensions including all external findings, and when precise data is required for comparing highly detailed injury features with the injury-inflicting tool. PMID:26496803

  20. 3D interfractional patient position verification using 2D-3D registration of orthogonal images

    Reproducible positioning of the patient during fractionated external beam radiation therapy is imperative to ensure that the delivered dose distribution matches the planned one. In this paper, we expand on a 2D-3D image registration method to verify a patient's setup in three dimensions (rotations and translations) using orthogonal portal images and megavoltage digitally reconstructed radiographs (MDRRs) derived from CT data. The accuracy of 2D-3D registration was improved by employing additional image preprocessing steps and a parabolic fit to interpolate the parameter space of the cost function utilized for registration. Using a humanoid phantom, precision for registration of three-dimensional translations was found to be better than 0.5 mm (1 s.d.) for any axis when no rotations were present. Three-dimensional rotations about any axis were registered with a precision of better than 0.2 deg. (1 s.d.) when no translations were present. Combined rotations and translations of up to 4 deg. and 15 mm were registered with 0.4 deg. and 0.7 mm accuracy for each axis. The influence of setup translations on registration of rotations and vice versa was also investigated and mostly agrees with a simple geometric model. Additionally, the dependence of registration accuracy on three cost functions, angular spacing between MDRRs, pixel size, and field-of-view, was examined. Best results were achieved by mutual information using 0.5 deg. angular spacing and a 10x10 cm2 field-of-view with 140x140 pixels. Approximating patient motion as rigid transformation, the registration method is applied to two treatment plans and the patients' setup errors are determined. Their magnitude was found to be ≤6.1 mm and ≤2.7 deg. for any axis in all of the six fractions measured for each treatment plan

  1. Handbook of 3D machine vision optical metrology and imaging

    Zhang, Song

    2013-01-01

    With the ongoing release of 3D movies and the emergence of 3D TVs, 3D imaging technologies have penetrated our daily lives. Yet choosing from the numerous 3D vision methods available can be frustrating for scientists and engineers, especially without a comprehensive resource to consult. Filling this gap, Handbook of 3D Machine Vision: Optical Metrology and Imaging gives an extensive, in-depth look at the most popular 3D imaging techniques. It focuses on noninvasive, noncontact optical methods (optical metrology and imaging). The handbook begins with the well-studied method of stereo vision and

  2. Progress in 3D imaging and display by integral imaging

    Martinez-Cuenca, R.; Saavedra, G.; Martinez-Corral, M.; Pons, A.; Javidi, B.

    2009-05-01

    Three-dimensionality is currently considered an important added value in imaging devices, and therefore the search for an optimum 3D imaging and display technique is a hot topic that is attracting important research efforts. As main value, 3D monitors should provide the observers with different perspectives of a 3D scene by simply varying the head position. Three-dimensional imaging techniques have the potential to establish a future mass-market in the fields of entertainment and communications. Integral imaging (InI), which can capture true 3D color images, has been seen as the right technology to 3D viewing to audiences of more than one person. Due to the advanced degree of development, InI technology could be ready for commercialization in the coming years. This development is the result of a strong research effort performed along the past few years by many groups. Since Integral Imaging is still an emerging technology, the first aim of the "3D Imaging and Display Laboratory" at the University of Valencia, has been the realization of a thorough study of the principles that govern its operation. Is remarkable that some of these principles have been recognized and characterized by our group. Other contributions of our research have been addressed to overcome some of the classical limitations of InI systems, like the limited depth of field (in pickup and in display), the poor axial and lateral resolution, the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion, the production of 3D images with continuous relief, or the limited range of viewing angles of InI monitors.

  3. 64排螺旋CT在泌尿系三维成像检查中的影响%Effects of 64 slice spiral CT 3D imaging in urinary system

    王强

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of 3D imaging exams after 64-slice spiral CT scan.Methods Conventional thin plain scan and arterial phase,venous phase,delayed phase scans to 50 patients with urinary tract diseases were performed respectively by applicating 64-slice spiral CT,then,the data were transferred to the imaging workstation for MPR,VR and MIP and other 3D reconstruction,ifnally,a comprehensive analysis was made to all image data.Results kidney or ureteral stones in 33 cases,occupying of kidney,ureter or bladder in 8 cases,inflammation in 6 cases,congenital malformations in 2 cases,ureteral clot in 1 case.Conclusion 3D imaging exams after 64-slice spiral CT scan has a reliable value to the diagnosis of urinary tract disease,it can not only get a clear kidneys,ureter and bladder dimensional reconstructed images,but also accurately display the urological global and local ifne structure,shape,extending direction and its relationship with the surrounding tissue.In addition,the image can be made rotation,cutting,ampliifcation and other post-processing.%目的:探讨64排螺旋CT在泌尿系三维成像检查中的临床应用价值。方法抽取来我院就诊的泌尿系疾病患者50例,应用64排螺旋CT分别行常规薄层平扫及动脉期、静脉期、延迟期扫描,并将所得数据传输至影像工作站进行MPR、VR及MIP等三维重建,对其影像资料进行综合分析。结果肾或输尿管结石33例,肾、输尿管或膀胱占位8例,炎症6例,先天性畸形2例,输尿管内血块1例。结论64排螺旋CT三维成像检查不仅能够获得清晰的双肾、输尿管及膀胱的三维重建图像,而且能够准确地显示出泌尿系统整体和局部的细微结构、形状、走形及其与周围组织关系,还可对图像进行旋转、切割、放大等后处理操作,对于临床诊断泌尿系统疾病具有可靠价值。

  4. Automatic Calibration Method of Voxel Size for Cone-beam 3D-CT Scanning System

    Yang, Min; Liu, Yipeng; Men, Fanyong; Li, Xingdong; Liu, Wenli; Wei, Dongbo

    2013-01-01

    For cone-beam three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scanning system, voxel size is an important indicator to guarantee the accuracy of data analysis and feature measurement based on 3D-CT images. Meanwhile, the voxel size changes with the movement of the rotary table along X-ray direction. In order to realize the automatic calibration of the voxel size, a new easily-implemented method is proposed. According to this method, several projections of a spherical phantom are captured at different imaging positions and the corresponding voxel size values are calculated by non-linear least square fitting. Through these interpolation values, a linear equation is obtained, which reflects the relationship between the rotary table displacement distance from its nominal zero position and the voxel size. Finally, the linear equation is imported into the calibration module of the 3D-CT scanning system, and when the rotary table is moving along X-ray direction, the accurate value of the voxel size is dynamically expo...

  5. New developments for 3D CT at high X-ray energy

    CT is well suited both for measurements and for flaw detection in cast metal products which as a rule have a complex shape and internal caverns. Currently available tomographs for 3D scanning of large objects still have shortcomings. Line detectors - normally operated with a 450 kV X-ray source - are slow. Systems with detector panels normally have 225 kV microfocus tubes which provide insufficient power. The microfocus tube cannot be replaced by a 450 kV tube as scattered radiation at higher energies will considerably reduce the image quality of the tomograms. In the context of European research projects during the past few years, Empa developed new methods for faster data acquisition with line detector systems and correction of scattered radiation for CT with conical beams and with panel detectors. The contribution outlines the state of the art and also presents new trends, especially for fast 3D volume scanning with high X-ray energy

  6. Perception of detail in 3D images

    Heyndrickx, I.; Kaptein, R.

    2009-01-01

    A lot of current 3D displays suffer from the fact that their spatial resolution is lower compared to their 2D counterparts. One reason for this is that the multiple views needed to generate 3D are often spatially multiplexed. Besides this, imperfect separation of the left- and right-eye view leads t

  7. 基于MC算法的高质量脊柱CT图像三维重建%HIGH-QUALITY 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF SPINE CT IMAGES BASED ON MC ALGORITHM

    许婉露; 李彬; 田联房

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing 3D model of spine from its CT images for providing intuitive preoperative lesion information can effectively assist the high-difficulty spine deformity corrective surgery.As traditional marching cubes (MC) algorithm has the limitations in roughness on reconstruction surface and topological ambiguity,as well as too many fragments in human spine reconstruction,in this paper we propose an improved MC algorithm which is based on edge-preserving local Gaussian filtering and 3D region growing.The algorithm adopts the edge-preserving filtering to eliminate the noises and enhance the edges,and uses the local Gaussian filtering to smooth the pending reconstruction areas for changing original cube types and reducing the number of ambiguous voxels,these effectively solve the problems of roughness on reconstruction surface and topological ambiguity.The dual-threshold segmentation algorithm based on 3D region growing is applied,which can significantly reduce the number of bone fragments reconstruction.Experimental results demonstrate that the 3D spine model reconstructed on this high-quality reconstruction algorithm can serve well the purpose of medical 3D visualisation.%从脊柱CT图像中重建出脊柱的三维模型以提供直观的术前病灶信息,能够有效辅助高难度的脊柱畸形矫正手术.针对传统MC(Marching Cubes)算法存在的重建表面不平滑、结构拓扑歧义的局限以及人体脊柱重构碎片过多的特点,提出一种基于保边局部高斯滤波与三维区域增长的改进型MC算法.该算法采用保边滤波去噪并增强边缘,局部高斯滤波平滑待重建区域以改变原有体素类型,减少二义性体素对数,有效地解决了重建表面不平滑与结构拓扑歧义问题;采用基于三维区域增长的双阈值分割算法,大大减少碎骨重建的数量.实验证明,采用高质量重建算法重建的脊柱三维模型能够满足医学三维可视化的要求.

  8. Multimodal visualization of 3D enhanced MRI and CT of acoustic schwannoma and related structures

    Kucharski, Tomasz; Kujawinska, Malgorzata; Niemczyk, Kazimierz; Marchel, Andrzej

    2005-09-01

    According to the necessity of supporting vestibular schwannoma surgery, there is a demand to develop a convenient method of medical data visualization. The process of making choice of optimal operating access way has been uncomfortable for a surgeon so far, because there has been a necessity of analyzing two independent 3D images series (CT -bone tissues visible, MRI - soft tissues visible) in the region of ponto-cerebellar angle tumors. The authors propose a solution that will improve this process. The system used is equipped with stereoscopic helmet mounted display. It allows merged CT and MRI data representing tissues in the region of of ponto-cerebellar angle to be visualized in stereoscopic way. The process of data preparation for visualization includes: -automated segmentation algorithms, -different types of 3D images (CT, MRI) fusion. The authors focused on the development of novel algorithms for segmentation of vestibular schwannoma. It is important and difficult task due to different types of tumors and their inhomogeneous character dependent on growth models. The authors propose algorithms based on histogram spectrum and multimodal character of MRI imaging (T1 and T2 modes). However due to a variety of objects the library of algorithms with specific modifications matching to selected types of images is proposed. The applicability and functionality of the algorithms and library was proved on the series of data delivered by Warsaw Central Medical University Hospital.

  9. Performance of a commercial optical CT scanner and polymer gel dosimeters for 3-D dose verification

    Performance analysis of a commercial three-dimensional (3-D) dose mapping system based on optical CT scanning of polymer gels is presented. The system consists of BANGreg3 polymer gels (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), OCTOPUSTM laser CT scanner (MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT), and an in-house developed software for optical CT image reconstruction and 3-D dose distribution comparison between the gel, film measurements and the radiation therapy treatment plans. Various sources of image noise (digitization, electronic, optical, and mechanical) generated by the scanner as well as optical uniformity of the polymer gel are analyzed. The performance of the scanner is further evaluated in terms of the reproducibility of the data acquisition process, the uncertainties at different levels of reconstructed optical density per unit length and the effects of scanning parameters. It is demonstrated that for BANGregistered3 gel phantoms held in cylindrical plastic containers, the relative dose distribution can be reproduced by the scanner with an overall uncertainty of about 3% within approximately 75% of the radius of the container. In regions located closer to the container wall, however, the scanner generates erroneous optical density values that arise from the reflection and refraction of the laser rays at the interface between the gel and the container. The analysis of the accuracy of the polymer gel dosimeter is exemplified by the comparison of the gel/OCT-derived dose distributions with those from film measurements and a commercial treatment planning system (Cadplan, Varian Corporation, Palo Alto, CA) for a 6 cmx6 cm single field of 6 MV x rays and a 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plan. The gel measurements agree with the treatment plans and the film measurements within the '3%-or-2 mm' criterion throughout the usable, artifact-free central region of the gel volume. Discrepancies among the three data sets are analyzed

  10. 3D segmentation of lung CT data with graph-cuts: analysis of parameter sensitivities

    Cha, Jung won; Dunlap, Neal; Wang, Brian; Amini, Amir

    2016-03-01

    Lung boundary image segmentation is important for many tasks including for example in development of radiation treatment plans for subjects with thoracic malignancies. In this paper, we describe a method and parameter settings for accurate 3D lung boundary segmentation based on graph-cuts from X-ray CT data1. Even though previously several researchers have used graph-cuts for image segmentation, to date, no systematic studies have been performed regarding the range of parameter that give accurate results. The energy function in the graph-cuts algorithm requires 3 suitable parameter settings: K, a large constant for assigning seed points, c, the similarity coefficient for n-links, and λ, the terminal coefficient for t-links. We analyzed the parameter sensitivity with four lung data sets from subjects with lung cancer using error metrics. Large values of K created artifacts on segmented images, and relatively much larger value of c than the value of λ influenced the balance between the boundary term and the data term in the energy function, leading to unacceptable segmentation results. For a range of parameter settings, we performed 3D image segmentation, and in each case compared the results with the expert-delineated lung boundaries. We used simple 6-neighborhood systems for n-link in 3D. The 3D image segmentation took 10 minutes for a 512x512x118 ~ 512x512x190 lung CT image volume. Our results indicate that the graph-cuts algorithm was more sensitive to the K and λ parameter settings than to the C parameter and furthermore that amongst the range of parameters tested, K=5 and λ=0.5 yielded good results.

  11. Quantitative 3D Optical Imaging: Applications in Dosimetry and Biophysics

    Thomas, Andrew Stephen

    Optical-CT has been shown to be a potentially useful imaging tool for the two very different spheres of biologists and radiation therapy physicists, but it has yet to live up to that potential. In radiation therapy, researchers have used optical-CT for the readout of 3D dosimeters, but it is yet to be a clinically relevant tool as the technology is too slow to be considered practical. Biologists have used the technique for structural imaging, but have struggled with emission tomography as the reality of photon attenuation for both excitation and emission have made the images quantitatively irrelevant. Dosimetry. The DLOS (Duke Large field of view Optical-CT Scanner) was designed and constructed to make 3D dosimetry utilizing optical-CT a fast and practical tool while maintaining the accuracy of readout of the previous, slower readout technologies. Upon construction/optimization/implementation of several components including a diffuser, band pass filter, registration mount & fluid filtration system the dosimetry system provides high quality data comparable to or exceeding that of commercial products. In addition, a stray light correction algorithm was tested and implemented. The DLOS in combination with the 3D dosimeter it was designed for, PREAGETM, then underwent rigorous commissioning and benchmarking tests validating its performance against gold standard data including a set of 6 irradiations. DLOS commissioning tests resulted in sub-mm isotropic spatial resolution (MTF >0.5 for frequencies of 1.5lp/mm) and a dynamic range of ˜60dB. Flood field uniformity was 10% and stable after 45minutes. Stray light proved to be small, due to telecentricity, but even the residual can be removed through deconvolution. Benchmarking tests showed the mean 3D passing gamma rate (3%, 3mm, 5% dose threshold) over the 6 benchmark data sets was 97.3% +/- 0.6% (range 96%-98%) scans totaling ˜10 minutes, indicating excellent ability to perform 3D dosimetry while improving the speed of

  12. 3D Image Synthesis for B—Reps Objects

    黄正东; 彭群生; 等

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm for generating 3D images of B-reps objects with trimmed surface boundaries.The 3D image is a discrete voxel-map representation within a Cubic Frame Buffer (CFB).The definition of 3D images for curve,surface and solid object are introduced which imply the connectivity and fidelity requirements.Adaptive Forward Differencing matrix (AFD-matrix) for 1D-3D manifolds in 3D space is developed.By setting rules to update the AFD-matrix,the forward difference direction and stepwise can be adjusted.Finally,an efficient algorithm is presented based on the AFD-matrix concept for converting the object in 3D space to 3D image in 3D discrete space.

  13. Automatic 3D-to-2D registration for CT and dual-energy digital radiography for calcification detection

    Chen, Xiang; Gilkeson, Robert C.; Fei, Baowei

    2007-01-01

    We are investigating three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) registration methods for computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy digital radiography (DEDR). CT is an established tool for the detection of cardiac calcification. DEDR could be a cost-effective alternative screening tool. In order to utilize CT as the “gold standard” to evaluate the capability of DEDR images for the detection and localization of calcium, we developed an automatic, intensity-based 3D-to-2D registration method...

  14. 3D spatial resolution and spectral resolution of interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry.

    Obara, Masaki; Yoshimori, Kyu

    2016-04-01

    Recently developed interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry (J. Opt. Soc. Am A18, 765 [2001]1084-7529JOAOD610.1364/JOSAA.18.000765) enables obtainment of the spectral information and 3D spatial information for incoherently illuminated or self-luminous object simultaneously. Using this method, we can obtain multispectral components of complex holograms, which correspond directly to the phase distribution of the wavefronts propagated from the polychromatic object. This paper focuses on the analysis of spectral resolution and 3D spatial resolution in interferometric 3D imaging spectrometry. Our analysis is based on a novel analytical impulse response function defined over four-dimensional space. We found that the experimental results agree well with the theoretical prediction. This work also suggests a new criterion and estimate method regarding 3D spatial resolution of digital holography. PMID:27139648

  15. Assessing 3D tunnel position in ACL reconstruction using a novel single image 3D-2D registration

    Kang, X.; Yau, W. P.; Otake, Y.; Cheung, P. Y. S.; Hu, Y.; Taylor, R. H.

    2012-02-01

    The routinely used procedure for evaluating tunnel positions following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions based on standard X-ray images is known to pose difficulties in terms of obtaining accurate measures, especially in providing three-dimensional tunnel positions. This is largely due to the variability in individual knee joint pose relative to X-ray plates. Accurate results were reported using postoperative CT. However, its extensive usage in clinical routine is hampered by its major requirement of having CT scans of individual patients, which is not available for most ACL reconstructions. These difficulties are addressed through the proposed method, which aligns a knee model to X-ray images using our novel single-image 3D-2D registration method and then estimates the 3D tunnel position. In the proposed method, the alignment is achieved by using a novel contour-based 3D-2D registration method wherein image contours are treated as a set of oriented points. However, instead of using some form of orientation weighting function and multiplying it with a distance function, we formulate the 3D-2D registration as a probability density estimation using a mixture of von Mises-Fisher-Gaussian (vMFG) distributions and solve it through an expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. Compared with the ground-truth established from postoperative CT, our registration method in an experiment using a plastic phantom showed accurate results with errors of (-0.43°+/-1.19°, 0.45°+/-2.17°, 0.23°+/-1.05°) and (0.03+/-0.55, -0.03+/-0.54, -2.73+/-1.64) mm. As for the entry point of the ACL tunnel, one of the key measurements, it was obtained with high accuracy of 0.53+/-0.30 mm distance errors.

  16. 3D automatic exposure control for 64-detector row CT: Radiation dose reduction in chest phantom study

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) for low-dose CT examination in a chest phantom study. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and nodules was scanned with a 64-detector row CT with and without AEC. Performance of 3D AEC included changing targeted standard deviations (SDs) of image noise from scout view. To determine the appropriate targeted SD number for identification, the capability of overall identification with the CT protocol adapted to each of the targeted SDs was compared with that obtained with CT without AEC by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: When targeted SD values equal to or higher than 250 were used, areas under the curve (Azs) of nodule identification with CT protocol using AEC were significantly smaller than that for CT protocol without AEC (p < 0.05). When targeted SD numbers at equal to or more than 180 were adapted, Azs of CT protocol with AEC had significantly smaller than that without AEC (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This phantom study shows 3D AEC is useful for low-dose lung CT examination, and can reduce the radiation dose while maintaining good identification capability and good image quality.

  17. 3D automatic exposure control for 64-detector row CT: Radiation dose reduction in chest phantom study

    Matsumoto, Keiko, E-mail: palm_kei@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Kono, Atsushi [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Inokawa, Hiroyasu [Toshiba Medical Systems, Ohtawara, Tochigi (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Shimokato, Yamanashi (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) for low-dose CT examination in a chest phantom study. Materials and methods: A chest CT phantom including simulated focal ground-glass opacities (GGOs) and nodules was scanned with a 64-detector row CT with and without AEC. Performance of 3D AEC included changing targeted standard deviations (SDs) of image noise from scout view. To determine the appropriate targeted SD number for identification, the capability of overall identification with the CT protocol adapted to each of the targeted SDs was compared with that obtained with CT without AEC by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: When targeted SD values equal to or higher than 250 were used, areas under the curve (Azs) of nodule identification with CT protocol using AEC were significantly smaller than that for CT protocol without AEC (p < 0.05). When targeted SD numbers at equal to or more than 180 were adapted, Azs of CT protocol with AEC had significantly smaller than that without AEC (p < 0.05). Conclusion: This phantom study shows 3D AEC is useful for low-dose lung CT examination, and can reduce the radiation dose while maintaining good identification capability and good image quality.

  18. Automatic 2D-to-3D image conversion using 3D examples from the internet

    Konrad, J.; Brown, G.; Wang, M.; Ishwar, P.; Wu, C.; Mukherjee, D.

    2012-03-01

    The availability of 3D hardware has so far outpaced the production of 3D content. Although to date many methods have been proposed to convert 2D images to 3D stereopairs, the most successful ones involve human operators and, therefore, are time-consuming and costly, while the fully-automatic ones have not yet achieved the same level of quality. This subpar performance is due to the fact that automatic methods usually rely on assumptions about the captured 3D scene that are often violated in practice. In this paper, we explore a radically different approach inspired by our work on saliency detection in images. Instead of relying on a deterministic scene model for the input 2D image, we propose to "learn" the model from a large dictionary of stereopairs, such as YouTube 3D. Our new approach is built upon a key observation and an assumption. The key observation is that among millions of stereopairs available on-line, there likely exist many stereopairs whose 3D content matches that of the 2D input (query). We assume that two stereopairs whose left images are photometrically similar are likely to have similar disparity fields. Our approach first finds a number of on-line stereopairs whose left image is a close photometric match to the 2D query and then extracts depth information from these stereopairs. Since disparities for the selected stereopairs differ due to differences in underlying image content, level of noise, distortions, etc., we combine them by using the median. We apply the resulting median disparity field to the 2D query to obtain the corresponding right image, while handling occlusions and newly-exposed areas in the usual way. We have applied our method in two scenarios. First, we used YouTube 3D videos in search of the most similar frames. Then, we repeated the experiments on a small, but carefully-selected, dictionary of stereopairs closely matching the query. This, to a degree, emulates the results one would expect from the use of an extremely large 3D

  19. Single minimum incision endoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal tumors with preoperative virtual navigation using 3D-CT volume-rendering

    Shioyama Yasukazu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single minimum incision endoscopic surgery (MIES involves the use of a flexible high-definition laparoscope to facilitate open surgery. We reviewed our method of radical nephrectomy for renal tumors, which is single MIES combined with preoperative virtual surgery employing three-dimensional CT images reconstructed by the volume rendering method (3D-CT images in order to safely and appropriately approach the renal hilar vessels. We also assessed the usefulness of 3D-CT images. Methods Radical nephrectomy was done by single MIES via the translumbar approach in 80 consecutive patients. We performed the initial 20 MIES nephrectomies without preoperative 3D-CT images and the subsequent 60 MIES nephrectomies with preoperative 3D-CT images for evaluation of the renal hilar vessels and the relation of each tumor to the surrounding structures. On the basis of the 3D information, preoperative virtual surgery was performed with a computer. Results Single MIES nephrectomy was successful in all patients. In the 60 patients who underwent 3D-CT, the number of renal arteries and veins corresponded exactly with the preoperative 3D-CT data (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These 60 nephrectomies were completed with a shorter operating time and smaller blood loss than the initial 20 nephrectomies. Conclusions Single MIES radical nephrectomy combined with 3D-CT and virtual surgery achieved a shorter operating time and less blood loss, possibly due to safer and easier handling of the renal hilar vessels.

  20. Feasibility of radiation dose reduction using AIDR-3D in dynamic pulmonary CT perfusion

    Aim: To assess the feasibility of radiation dose reduction with adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR-6 3D) reconstruction in dynamic pulmonary CT perfusion. Materials and methods: CTP examinations of 10 patients acquired at 100 kVp/50 mAs were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and AIDR-3D. Artificial noise was added to raw data (pre-reconstruction projection data) to simulate lower tube current scanning. Radiodensity (in Hounsfield units), noise, and perfusion values were compared. Results: There was no significant difference in noise between the full and simulated reduced tube current with AIDR-3D reconstruction (p = 1). There was significantly lower noise in lung tissue with AIDR-3D images when compared to reconstructions without AIDR-3D (p = 0.005) and no significant change in the radiodensity (p = 1; mean difference <6 HU). Mean perfusion values increased significantly at lower tube currents (25 and 12.5 mAs), compared to 50 mAs (p = 0.005). This effect was significantly greater in larger patients compared to thin patients. Conclusion: AIDR-3D produced significantly lower noise images than FBP-based algorithms and maintained consistent noise levels in lung at 12.5 mAs, indicating this algorithm is suitable for reduced dose lung perfusion imaging. Iterative reconstruction allows significant radiation dose reduction of up to fourfold in smaller patients, and up to twofold in the medium/large size patients. The increase in perfusion values at 25% simulated tube currents is attributed to attenuation bias. -- Highlights: •Dynamic CT provides functional data but at the cost of a higher radiation dose. •Doses can be reduced by decreasing tube current but increases image noise. •Significant dose reduction is feasible when images are reconstructed with AIDR-3D. •There is a limit to how low the dose can be reduced

  1. Efficacy of 3D-CT lymphography for sentinel lymph node byopsy in breast cancer

    In this study, three-dimensional computed tomography lymphography (3D-CTLG), a recently developed technique using a contrast medium in sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), was evaluated in terms of efficacy. A mixture of 1-2.5 ml of iopamidol and 0.5 ml of 1% xylocaine was injected subareolarly in 51 patients with operable breast cancer. Within two minutes after the 15-30 sec gentle massage of the injection sites, 1.25 mm-thick cross-sectional CT images of the breast and axilla were taken. These images were reconstructed into 3D images to identify the location, size and number of the sentinel lymph nodes (SLN). All the subjects underwent dye-guided SLNB with a backup axillary dissection. The accuracy of the procedure was evaluated pathologically. In the first ten cases, we failed to obtain stabilized results due to lack of experience with the procedure. In the remaining 15 cases, with increased experience, the identification rate was 100% and the false-negative rate was 0%. The 3D-CTLG, allowing easy and accurate identification of SLN, is an appropriate procedure for visualizing SLN and lymphatic vessels. A concurrent use of the dye-guided method with the 3D-CTLG is useful for SLNB. (author)

  2. Accuracy assessment of 3D bone reconstructions using CT: an intro comparison.

    Lalone, Emily A; Willing, Ryan T; Shannon, Hannah L; King, Graham J W; Johnson, James A

    2015-08-01

    Computed tomography provides high contrast imaging of the joint anatomy and is used routinely to reconstruct 3D models of the osseous and cartilage geometry (CT arthrography) for use in the design of orthopedic implants, for computer assisted surgeries and computational dynamic and structural analysis. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of bone and cartilage surface model reconstructions by comparing reconstructed geometries with bone digitizations obtained using an optical tracking system. Bone surface digitizations obtained in this study determined the ground truth measure for the underlying geometry. We evaluated the use of a commercially available reconstruction technique using clinical CT scanning protocols using the elbow joint as an example of a surface with complex geometry. To assess the accuracies of the reconstructed models (8 fresh frozen cadaveric specimens) against the ground truth bony digitization-as defined by this study-proximity mapping was used to calculate residual error. The overall mean error was less than 0.4 mm in the cortical region and 0.3 mm in the subchondral region of the bone. Similarly creating 3D cartilage surface models from CT scans using air contrast had a mean error of less than 0.3 mm. Results from this study indicate that clinical CT scanning protocols and commonly used and commercially available reconstruction algorithms can create models which accurately represent the true geometry. PMID:26037323

  3. 3-D-CT reconstructions in fractures of the skull base and facial skeleton

    3-D reconstructions of the skull base, temporal bone, and skull fractures were compared to 2-D CT to evaluate the diagnostic value in traumatized patients. 38 patients with 22 fractures of the facial skeleton (orbita, zygomatic, Le Fort), 12 temporal bone, and 4 skull fractures were investigated. Subjective grading was perfomed by two physicians (ENT/RAD) in respect of quality diagnostic validity and estimated clinical impact. The average image validity and quality were graded good. In the temporal bone the average information supplied by 3-D was of inferior value; here, the lack of information regarding the inner ear structures was responsible for the lack of clinical impact. In fractures of the facial skeleton and the skull base of good to very good image quality was seen and clinical relevance was high. 3-D CT is capable of demonstrating fractures, which is of little value in the temporal bone, but of high value in the skull base and the facial skeleton, especially if surfaces are involved or fragments are displaced. (orig.)

  4. 3D Reconstruction of virtual colon structures from colonoscopy images.

    Hong, DongHo; Tavanapong, Wallapak; Wong, Johnny; Oh, JungHwan; de Groen, Piet C

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first fully automated reconstruction technique of 3D virtual colon segments from individual colonoscopy images. It is the basis of new software applications that may offer great benefits for improving quality of care for colonoscopy patients. For example, a 3D map of the areas inspected and uninspected during colonoscopy can be shown on request of the endoscopist during the procedure. The endoscopist may revisit the suggested uninspected areas to reduce the chance of missing polyps that reside in these areas. The percentage of the colon surface seen by the endoscopist can be used as a coarse objective indicator of the quality of the procedure. The derived virtual colon models can be stored for post-procedure training of new endoscopists to teach navigation techniques that result in a higher level of procedure quality. Our technique does not require a prior CT scan of the colon or any global positioning device. Our experiments on endoscopy images of an Olympus synthetic colon model reveal encouraging results with small average reconstruction errors (4.1 mm for the fold depths and 12.1 mm for the fold circumferences). PMID:24225230

  5. A 3D image analysis tool for SPECT imaging

    Kontos, Despina; Wang, Qiang; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Maurer, Alan H.; Knight, Linda C.; Kantor, Steve; Fisher, Robert S.; Simonian, Hrair P.; Parkman, Henry P.

    2005-04-01

    We have developed semi-automated and fully-automated tools for the analysis of 3D single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. The focus is on the efficient boundary delineation of complex 3D structures that enables accurate measurement of their structural and physiologic properties. We employ intensity based thresholding algorithms for interactive and semi-automated analysis. We also explore fuzzy-connectedness concepts for fully automating the segmentation process. We apply the proposed tools to SPECT image data capturing variation of gastric accommodation and emptying. These image analysis tools were developed within the framework of a noninvasive scintigraphic test to measure simultaneously both gastric emptying and gastric volume after ingestion of a solid or a liquid meal. The clinical focus of the particular analysis was to probe associations between gastric accommodation/emptying and functional dyspepsia. Employing the proposed tools, we outline effectively the complex three dimensional gastric boundaries shown in the 3D SPECT images. We also perform accurate volume calculations in order to quantitatively assess the gastric mass variation. This analysis was performed both with the semi-automated and fully-automated tools. The results were validated against manual segmentation performed by a human expert. We believe that the development of an automated segmentation tool for SPECT imaging of the gastric volume variability will allow for other new applications of SPECT imaging where there is a need to evaluate complex organ function or tumor masses.

  6. Deformable 3D-2D registration for CT and its application to low dose tomographic fluoroscopy

    Flach, Barbara; Brehm, Marcus; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Many applications in medical imaging include image registration for matching of images from the same or different modalities. In the case of full data sampling, the respective reconstructed images are usually of such a good image quality that standard deformable volume-to-volume (3D-3D) registration approaches can be applied. But research in temporal-correlated image reconstruction and dose reductions increases the number of cases where rawdata are available from only few projection angles. Here, deteriorated image quality leads to non-acceptable deformable volume-to-volume registration results. Therefore a registration approach is required that is robust against a decreasing number of projections defining the target position. We propose a deformable volume-to-rawdata (3D-2D) registration method that aims at finding a displacement vector field maximizing the alignment of a CT volume and the acquired rawdata based on the sum of squared differences in rawdata domain. The registration is constrained by a regularization term in accordance with a fluid-based diffusion. Both cost function components, the rawdata fidelity and the regularization term, are optimized in an alternating manner. The matching criterion is optimized by a conjugate gradient descent for nonlinear functions, while the regularization is realized by convolution of the vector fields with Gaussian kernels. We validate the proposed method and compare it to the demons algorithm, a well-known 3D-3D registration method. The comparison is done for a range of 4-60 target projections using datasets from low dose tomographic fluoroscopy as an application example. The results show a high correlation to the ground truth target position without introducing artifacts even in the case of very few projections. In particular the matching in the rawdata domain is improved compared to the 3D-3D registration for the investigated range. The proposed volume-to-rawdata registration increases the robustness regarding sparse

  7. Panoramic three-dimensional CT imaging

    Panoramic radiography is a unique projection technique for producing a single image of both maxillary and mandibular arches and many other anatomical structures. To obtain a similar panoramic image without panoramic radiography system, a modified three-dimensional (3D) CT imaging technique was designed. A set of CT slice image data extending from the chin to the orbit was used for 3D reconstruction. The CT machine used in this study was the X-Vision (TOSHIBA, Japan). The helical scan technique was used. The slice thickness of reconstructed image was one or 1.5 mm. The occlusal plane or Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was used as the reference line. The resultant slice image data was stored on a magnetic optical disk and then used to create panoramic 3D-CT images on a Macintosh computer systems (Power Macintosh 8600/250, Apple Computer Inc., USA). To create the panoramic 3D-CT image, the following procedure was designed: Design a curved panoramic 3D-CT imaging layer using the imaging layer and the movement of the x-ray beam in panoramic radiography system as a template; Cut this imaging layer from each slice image, then the trimmed image was transformed to a rectangular layer using the ''still image warping'' special effect in the Elastic Reality special effects system (Elastic Reality Inc., USA); Create panoramic 3D-CT image using the Voxel View (Vital Images Inc., USA) rendering system and volume rendering technique. Although the image quality was primitive, a panoramic view of maxillofacial region was obtained by this technique. (author)

  8. Panoramic three-dimensional CT imaging

    Kawamata, Akitoshi; Fujishita, Masami [Asahi Univ., Hozumi, Gifu (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1998-09-01

    Panoramic radiography is a unique projection technique for producing a single image of both maxillary and mandibular arches and many other anatomical structures. To obtain a similar panoramic image without panoramic radiography system, a modified three-dimensional (3D) CT imaging technique was designed. A set of CT slice image data extending from the chin to the orbit was used for 3D reconstruction. The CT machine used in this study was the X-Vision (TOSHIBA, Japan). The helical scan technique was used. The slice thickness of reconstructed image was one or 1.5 mm. The occlusal plane or Frankfort horizontal (FH) plane was used as the reference line. The resultant slice image data was stored on a magnetic optical disk and then used to create panoramic 3D-CT images on a Macintosh computer systems (Power Macintosh 8600/250, Apple Computer Inc., USA). To create the panoramic 3D-CT image, the following procedure was designed: Design a curved panoramic 3D-CT imaging layer using the imaging layer and the movement of the x-ray beam in panoramic radiography system as a template; Cut this imaging layer from each slice image, then the trimmed image was transformed to a rectangular layer using the ``still image warping`` special effect in the Elastic Reality special effects system (Elastic Reality Inc., USA); Create panoramic 3D-CT image using the Voxel View (Vital Images Inc., USA) rendering system and volume rendering technique. Although the image quality was primitive, a panoramic view of maxillofacial region was obtained by this technique. (author)

  9. 基于X线片与CT的不稳定型骨盆骨折3D分型研究%3D classification of unstable pelvic fractures based on X-ray and CT images

    高金华; 郭晓山; 梁清宇; 黄俊武; 石成弟

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨基于X线片与CT的不稳定型骨盆骨折3D分型,以指导临床实践. 方法 回顾性分析2005年3月至2009年8月收治的51例不稳定型骨盆骨折患者资料,包括X线片、CT二维及三维图片,回顾其手术复位过程,结合骨盆骨折3D数字模型模拟其移位过程进行分类,得出相应的3D模型及移位方式.截取骨盆尸体标本的骨折模型,模仿其移位方式,分别摄片予以对照验证.结果 不稳定型骨盆骨折按其移位方向可以在3D空间内将其分为17型:1D空间移位:上移、外翻、内翻、前旋、后旋,2D空间移位:上移外翻、上移内翻、上移前旋、上移后旋、前旋外翻、前旋内翻、后旋外翻、后旋内翻,3D空间移位:外翻前旋上移、外翻后旋上移、内翻前旋上移、内翻后旋上移.对51例不稳定型骨盆骨折患者影像学资料进行3D分型的可靠性评价:Kappa值平均为0.549,属于中度可信度. 结论 骨盆骨折的3D分型是基于骨盆骨折的Tile分型、Burgess和Young分型及AO分型的一种空间分型,能够较准确地确定骨折的各向移位,可为骨盆骨折的手术复位提供精确指导.%Objective To investigate the feasibility and clinical value of 3D classification of unstable pelvic fractures based on X-ray and CT images.Methods A retrospective view was conducted of all the clinical data of 51 unstable pelvis fractures from March 2005 to August 2009 in our hospital,including their X-rays,two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) CT scans,and their reduction approaches.The displacements and fractures of the 51 patients were respectively simulated in a digital 3D model of the normal pelvis for classification.The digital 3D models of pelvic fractures and displacements obtained were correspondingly recreated and tested in a cadaveric specimen of the normal pelvis.Pictures of the digital 3D models were compared with the corresponding photos of the cadaveric models respectively

  10. Demonstration of caudate lobe bile ducts using 3D-CT cholangiography

    Shinohara, Yasushi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-02-01

    The aim of this study is to make precise analysis of bile ducts of the caudate, lobe using 3D-CT cholangiography. Seventy obstructive jaundiced patients without lesions at the hilar duct level were included in this study. According to Kumon`s study, I divided the caudate lobe into three areas: spiegel lobe (sp), caudate process portion (cp) and paracaval portion (pc), and set the range for these three areas in cholangio CT. In 70 cases, 191 caudate branches were detected and those draining areas and confluence patterns were analysed. 3D-CT cholangiography could be obtained from randomized angles. In set up the 8 angles from 0deg to 330deg in sagittal plane to demonstrate intrahepatic bile ducts and investigate the suitable angles for detecting caudate lobe branches in each drainaing area. Suitable angles for detecting the branches of Sp group (104 branches) were 180deg, 210deg, 150deg and 330deg (detectabilities were 89.4%, 61.5%, 51.0% and 47.1% respectively). Suitable angles for detecting the branches of Pc group (80 branches) were 180deg, 210deg, 150deg, 330deg and 0deg (detectabilities were 91.3%, 65.0%, 57.5%, 48.8% and 41.3% respectively). Suitable angles for detecting the branches of Cp group (67 branches) were 210deg, 180deg, 330deg, 150deg and 0deg (detectabilities were 80.1%, 73.1%, 50.7%, 49.3% and 47.8% respectively). The images from 150deg, 180deg, 210deg were necessary to demonstrate the caudate lobe branches in 3D-CT cholangiography. (author).

  11. Light field display and 3D image reconstruction

    Iwane, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Light field optics and its applications become rather popular in these days. With light field optics or light field thesis, real 3D space can be described in 2D plane as 4D data, which we call as light field data. This process can be divided in two procedures. First, real3D scene is optically reduced with imaging lens. Second, this optically reduced 3D image is encoded into light field data. In later procedure we can say that 3D information is encoded onto a plane as 2D data by lens array plate. This transformation is reversible and acquired light field data can be decoded again into 3D image with the arrayed lens plate. "Refocusing" (focusing image on your favorite point after taking a picture), light-field camera's most popular function, is some kind of sectioning process from encoded 3D data (light field data) to 2D image. In this paper at first I show our actual light field camera and our 3D display using acquired and computer-simulated light field data, on which real 3D image is reconstructed. In second I explain our data processing method whose arithmetic operation is performed not in Fourier domain but in real domain. Then our 3D display system is characterized by a few features; reconstructed image is of finer resolutions than density of arrayed lenses and it is not necessary to adjust lens array plate to flat display on which light field data is displayed.

  12. 3D Imaging with Structured Illumination for Advanced Security Applications

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dagel, Amber Lynn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kast, Brian A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Collin S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) information in a physical security system is a highly useful dis- criminator. The two-dimensional data from an imaging systems fails to provide target dis- tance and three-dimensional motion vector, which can be used to reduce nuisance alarm rates and increase system effectiveness. However, 3D imaging devices designed primarily for use in physical security systems are uncommon. This report discusses an architecture favorable to physical security systems; an inexpensive snapshot 3D imaging system utilizing a simple illumination system. The method of acquiring 3D data, tests to understand illumination de- sign, and software modifications possible to maximize information gathering capability are discussed.

  13. Fully Automatic 3D Reconstruction of Histological Images

    Bagci, Ulas; Bai, Li

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computational framework for 3D volume reconstruction from 2D histological slices using registration algorithms in feature space. To improve the quality of reconstructed 3D volume, first, intensity variations in images are corrected by an intensity standardization process which maps image intensity scale to a standard scale where similar intensities correspond to similar tissues. Second, a subvolume approach is proposed for 3D reconstruction by dividing standardized...

  14. 3D cardiac motion reconstruction from CT data and tagged MRI.

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Mihalef, Viorel; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for left ventricle (LV) endocardium motion reconstruction using high resolution CT data and tagged MRI. High resolution CT data provide anatomic details on the LV endocardial surface, such as the papillary muscle and trabeculae carneae. Tagged MRI provides better time resolution. The combination of these two imaging techniques can give us better understanding on left ventricle motion. The high resolution CT images are segmented with mean shift method and generate the LV endocardium mesh. The meshless deformable model built with high resolution endocardium surface from CT data fit to the tagged MRI of the same phase. 3D deformation of the myocardium is computed with the Lagrangian dynamics and local Laplacian deformation. The segmented inner surface of left ventricle is compared with the heart inner surface picture and show high agreement. The papillary muscles are attached to the inner surface with roots. The free wall of the left ventricle inner surface is covered with trabeculae carneae. The deformation of the heart wall and the papillary muscle in the first half of the cardiac cycle is presented. The motion reconstruction results are very close to the live heart video. PMID:23366825

  15. 3D X-Ray imaging of bone tissue from micro to nano scale and associated inverse problems

    Peyrin, F.; Toma, A; Sixou, B.; Denis, L.; Wang, L.(Universität Bochum, Institut für Experimentalphysik, Bochum, 44780, Germany); WEBER,L; Langer, M. (Marco); Cloetens, P.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging bone tissue from the organ to the cellular level is a major goal in bone research to understand, diagnose and predict bone fragility associated to bone disease such as osteoporosis. In this presentation, we show that X-ray CT is particularly well adapted to image bone in 3D up to the nanometer scale. After recalling the principles of 3D CT, we describe advances in bone CT imaging and the needs in associated inverse problems. Clinical X-ray CT is daily used to image skeletal tissue at ...

  16. 3D augmented reality with integral imaging display

    Shen, Xin; Hua, Hong; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) integral imaging display for augmented reality is presented. By implementing the pseudoscopic-to-orthoscopic conversion method, elemental image arrays with different capturing parameters can be transferred into the identical format for 3D display. With the proposed merging algorithm, a new set of elemental images for augmented reality display is generated. The newly generated elemental images contain both the virtual objects and real world scene with desired depth information and transparency parameters. The experimental results indicate the feasibility of the proposed 3D augmented reality with integral imaging.

  17. Reproducibility of readings of ISO C 3D and CT lumbar pedicle screw scans; Reproduzierbarkeit der Befundung von lumbalen Pedikelschraubenpositionen mit ISO C 3D und CT

    Kluba, T.; Ruehle, T.; Schulze-Boevingloh, A.; Leichtle, C.I.; Niemeyer, T. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen(Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Orthopaedie; Schoenfisch, B. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Biometrie; Schaefer, J.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen(Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2009-05-15

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility of the reading of lumbar pedicle screw scans using a C-arm-based imaging system in comparison to computed tomography. The influence of the technique and the experience of the rater should be determined. Materials and Methods: The lumbar spines of 23 patients were stabilized using 102 pedicle screws. The position of the screws was controlled intraoperatively using an Arcadis Orbic 3D scanner. All scans were evaluated independently by three raters. The position of the implants in reference to the pedicle walls was described. Additionally, another 100 lumbar pedicle screws in 16 patients were evaluated postoperatively with a multirow CT. Kappa according to Fleiss was calculated for the reproducibility of the rater statements. Each rater repeated the analysis of 24 screws to assess the intraobserver variance. Results: The reports of the CT scans showed significantly less variation. The consent of all 3 raters was achieved in 79.4 vs. 65.1 % of cases. The Kappa values were 0.56 and 0.29, respectively. Poor results were obtained especially for the medial pedicle wall (consent 70.0 vs. 50.0 %). The influence of the experience of the rater was not able to be verified. (orig.)

  18. Preliminary comparison of 3D synthetic aperture imaging with Explososcan

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Hansen, Jens Munk; Ferin, Guillaume; Dufait, Remi; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Explososcan is the 'gold standard' for real-time 3D medical ultrasound imaging. In this paper, 3D synthetic aperture imaging is compared to Explososcan by simulation of 3D point spread functions. The simulations mimic a 32x32 element prototype transducer. The transducer mimicked is a dense matrix phased array with a pitch of 300 μm, made by Vermon. For both imaging techniques, 289 emissions are used to image a volume spanning 60 in both the azimuth and elevation direction and 150mm in depth. ...

  19. 3D pulmonary airway color image reconstruction via shape from shading and virtual bronchoscopy imaging techniques

    Suter, Melissa; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    The dependence on macro-optical imaging of the human body in the assessment of possible disease is rapidly increasing concurrent with, and as a direct result of, advancements made in medical imaging technologies. Assessing the pulmonary airways through bronchoscopy is performed extensively in clinical practice however remains highly subjective due to limited visualization techniques and the lack of quantitative analyses. The representation of 3D structures in 2D visualization modes, although providing an insight to the structural content of the scene, may in fact skew the perception of the structural form. We have developed two methods for visualizing the optically derived airway mucosal features whilst preserving the structural scene integrity. Shape from shading (SFS) techniques can be used to extract 3D structural information from 2D optical images. The SFS technique presented addresses many limitations previously encountered in conventional techniques resulting in high-resolution 3D color images. The second method presented to combine both color and structural information relies on combined CT and bronchoscopy imaging modalities. External imaging techniques such as CT provide a means of determining the gross structural anatomy of the pulmonary airways, however lack the important optically derived mucosal color. Virtual bronchoscopy is used to provide a direct link between the CT derived structural anatomy and the macro-optically derived mucosal color. Through utilization of a virtual and true bronchoscopy matching technique we are able to directly extract combined structurally sound 3D color segments of the pulmonary airways. Various pulmonary airway diseases are assessed and the resulting combined color and texture results are presented demonstrating the effectiveness of the presented techniques.

  20. Preliminary examples of 3D vector flow imaging

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev;

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents 3D vector flow images obtained using the 3D Transverse Oscillation (TO) method. The method employs a 2D transducer and estimates the three velocity components simultaneously, which is important for visualizing complex flow patterns. Data are acquired using the experimental...... ultrasound scanner SARUS on a flow rig system with steady flow. The vessel of the flow-rig is centered at a depth of 30 mm, and the flow has an expected 2D circular-symmetric parabolic prole with a peak velocity of 1 m/s. Ten frames of 3D vector flow images are acquired in a cross-sectional plane orthogonal...... acquisition as opposed to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The results demonstrate that the 3D TO method is capable of performing 3D vector flow imaging....

  1. Highway 3D model from image and lidar data

    Chen, Jinfeng; Chu, Henry; Sun, Xiaoduan

    2014-05-01

    We present a new method of highway 3-D model construction developed based on feature extraction in highway images and LIDAR data. We describe the processing road coordinate data that connect the image frames to the coordinates of the elevation data. Image processing methods are used to extract sky, road, and ground regions as well as significant objects (such as signs and building fronts) in the roadside for the 3D model. LIDAR data are interpolated and processed to extract the road lanes as well as other features such as trees, ditches, and elevated objects to form the 3D model. 3D geometry reasoning is used to match the image features to the 3D model. Results from successive frames are integrated to improve the final model.

  2. 3D nonrigid medical image registration using a new information theoretic measure

    Li, Bicao; Yang, Guanyu; Coatrieux, Jean Louis; Li, Baosheng; Shu, Huazhong

    2015-11-01

    This work presents a novel method for the nonrigid registration of medical images based on the Arimoto entropy, a generalization of the Shannon entropy. The proposed method employed the Jensen-Arimoto divergence measure as a similarity metric to measure the statistical dependence between medical images. Free-form deformations were adopted as the transformation model and the Parzen window estimation was applied to compute the probability distributions. A penalty term is incorporated into the objective function to smooth the nonrigid transformation. The goal of registration is to optimize an objective function consisting of a dissimilarity term and a penalty term, which would be minimal when two deformed images are perfectly aligned using the limited memory BFGS optimization method, and thus to get the optimal geometric transformation. To validate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on both simulated 3D brain MR images and real 3D thoracic CT data sets were designed and performed on the open source elastix package. For the simulated experiments, the registration errors of 3D brain MR images with various magnitudes of known deformations and different levels of noise were measured. For the real data tests, four data sets of 4D thoracic CT from four patients were selected to assess the registration performance of the method, including ten 3D CT images for each 4D CT data covering an entire respiration cycle. These results were compared with the normalized cross correlation and the mutual information methods and show a slight but true improvement in registration accuracy.

  3. 3D nonrigid medical image registration using a new information theoretic measure

    This work presents a novel method for the nonrigid registration of medical images based on the Arimoto entropy, a generalization of the Shannon entropy. The proposed method employed the Jensen–Arimoto divergence measure as a similarity metric to measure the statistical dependence between medical images. Free-form deformations were adopted as the transformation model and the Parzen window estimation was applied to compute the probability distributions. A penalty term is incorporated into the objective function to smooth the nonrigid transformation. The goal of registration is to optimize an objective function consisting of a dissimilarity term and a penalty term, which would be minimal when two deformed images are perfectly aligned using the limited memory BFGS optimization method, and thus to get the optimal geometric transformation. To validate the performance of the proposed method, experiments on both simulated 3D brain MR images and real 3D thoracic CT data sets were designed and performed on the open source elastix package. For the simulated experiments, the registration errors of 3D brain MR images with various magnitudes of known deformations and different levels of noise were measured. For the real data tests, four data sets of 4D thoracic CT from four patients were selected to assess the registration performance of the method, including ten 3D CT images for each 4D CT data covering an entire respiration cycle. These results were compared with the normalized cross correlation and the mutual information methods and show a slight but true improvement in registration accuracy. (paper)

  4. Diffractive optical element for creating visual 3D images.

    Goncharsky, Alexander; Goncharsky, Anton; Durlevich, Svyatoslav

    2016-05-01

    A method is proposed to compute and synthesize the microrelief of a diffractive optical element to produce a new visual security feature - the vertical 3D/3D switch effect. The security feature consists in the alternation of two 3D color images when the diffractive element is tilted up/down. Optical security elements that produce the new security feature are synthesized using electron-beam technology. Sample optical security elements are manufactured that produce 3D to 3D visual switch effect when illuminated by white light. Photos and video records of the vertical 3D/3D switch effect of real optical elements are presented. The optical elements developed can be replicated using standard equipment employed for manufacturing security holograms. The new optical security feature is easy to control visually, safely protected against counterfeit, and designed to protect banknotes, documents, ID cards, etc. PMID:27137530

  5. 3-D capacitance density imaging system

    Fasching, G.E.

    1988-03-18

    A three-dimensional capacitance density imaging of a gasified bed or the like in a containment vessel is achieved using a plurality of electrodes provided circumferentially about the bed in levels and along the bed in channels. The electrodes are individually and selectively excited electrically at each level to produce a plurality of current flux field patterns generated in the bed at each level. The current flux field patterns are suitably sensed and a density pattern of the bed at each level determined. By combining the determined density patterns at each level, a three-dimensional density image of the bed is achieved. 7 figs.

  6. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    Paglieroni, D

    2005-02-04

    Locating specific 3D objects in overhead images is an important problem in many remote sensing applications. 3D objects may contain either one connected component or multiple disconnected components. Solutions must accommodate images acquired with diverse sensors at various times of the day, in various seasons of the year, or under various weather conditions. Moreover, the physical manifestation of a 3D object with fixed physical dimensions in an overhead image is highly dependent on object physical dimensions, object position/orientation, image spatial resolution, and imaging geometry (e.g., obliqueness). This paper describes a two-stage computer-assisted approach for locating 3D objects in overhead images. In the matching stage, the computer matches models of 3D objects to overhead images. The strongest degree of match over all object orientations is computed at each pixel. Unambiguous local maxima in the degree of match as a function of pixel location are then found. In the cueing stage, the computer sorts image thumbnails in descending order of figure-of-merit and presents them to human analysts for visual inspection and interpretation. The figure-of-merit associated with an image thumbnail is computed from the degrees of match to a 3D object model associated with unambiguous local maxima that lie within the thumbnail. This form of computer assistance is invaluable when most of the relevant thumbnails are highly ranked, and the amount of inspection time needed is much less for the highly ranked thumbnails than for images as a whole.

  7. 3D-LSI technology for image sensor

    Recently, the development of three-dimensional large-scale integration (3D-LSI) technologies has accelerated and has advanced from the research level or the limited production level to the investigation level, which might lead to mass production. By separating 3D-LSI technology into elementary technologies such as (1) through silicon via (TSV) formation, (2) bump formation, (3) wafer thinning, (4) chip/wafer alignment, and (5) chip/wafer stacking and reconstructing the entire process and structure, many methods to realize 3D-LSI devices can be developed. However, by considering a specific application, the supply chain of base wafers, and the purpose of 3D integration, a few suitable combinations can be identified. In this paper, we focus on the application of 3D-LSI technologies to image sensors. We describe the process and structure of the chip size package (CSP), developed on the basis of current and advanced 3D-LSI technologies, to be used in CMOS image sensors. Using the current LSI technologies, CSPs for 1.3 M, 2 M, and 5 M pixel CMOS image sensors were successfully fabricated without any performance degradation. 3D-LSI devices can be potentially employed in high-performance focal-plane-array image sensors. We propose a high-speed image sensor with an optical fill factor of 100% to be developed using next-generation 3D-LSI technology and fabricated using micro(μ)-bumps and micro(μ)-TSVs.

  8. 3D Reconstruction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Mikulka, J.; Bartušek, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 7 (2010), s. 617-620. ISSN 1931-7360 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0314 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : reconstruction methods * magnetic resonance imaging Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  9. 3D/3D registration of coronary CTA and biplane XA reconstructions for improved image guidance

    Dibildox, Gerardo, E-mail: g.dibildox@erasmusmc.nl; Baka, Nora; Walsum, Theo van [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Punt, Mark; Aben, Jean-Paul [Pie Medical Imaging, 6227 AJ Maastricht (Netherlands); Schultz, Carl [Department of Cardiology, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands); Niessen, Wiro [Quantitative Imaging Group, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft, The Netherlands and Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus Medical Center, 3015 GE Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors aim to improve image guidance during percutaneous coronary interventions of chronic total occlusions (CTO) by providing information obtained from computed tomography angiography (CTA) to the cardiac interventionist. To this end, the authors investigate a method to register a 3D CTA model to biplane reconstructions. Methods: The authors developed a method for registering preoperative coronary CTA with intraoperative biplane x-ray angiography (XA) images via 3D models of the coronary arteries. The models are extracted from the CTA and biplane XA images, and are temporally aligned based on CTA reconstruction phase and XA ECG signals. Rigid spatial alignment is achieved with a robust probabilistic point set registration approach using Gaussian mixture models (GMMs). This approach is extended by including orientation in the Gaussian mixtures and by weighting bifurcation points. The method is evaluated on retrospectively acquired coronary CTA datasets of 23 CTO patients for which biplane XA images are available. Results: The Gaussian mixture model approach achieved a median registration accuracy of 1.7 mm. The extended GMM approach including orientation was not significantly different (P > 0.1) but did improve robustness with regards to the initialization of the 3D models. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the GMM approach can effectively be applied to register CTA to biplane XA images for the purpose of improving image guidance in percutaneous coronary interventions.

  10. 3D image fusion and guidance for computer-assisted bronchoscopy

    Higgins, W. E.; Rai, L.; Merritt, S. A.; Lu, K.; Linger, N. T.; Yu, K. C.

    2005-11-01

    The standard procedure for diagnosing lung cancer involves two stages. First, the physician evaluates a high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) computed-tomography (CT) chest image to produce a procedure plan. Next, the physician performs bronchoscopy on the patient, which involves navigating the the bronchoscope through the airways to planned biopsy sites. Unfortunately, the physician has no link between the 3D CT image data and the live video stream provided during bronchoscopy. In addition, these data sources differ greatly in what they physically give, and no true 3D planning tools exist for planning and guiding procedures. This makes it difficult for the physician to translate a CT-based procedure plan to the video domain of the bronchoscope. Thus, the physician must essentially perform biopsy blindly, and the skill levels between different physicians differ greatly. We describe a system that enables direct 3D CT-based procedure planning and provides direct 3D guidance during bronchoscopy. 3D CT-based information on biopsy sites is provided interactively as the physician moves the bronchoscope. Moreover, graphical information through a live fusion of the 3D CT data and bronchoscopic video is provided during the procedure. This information is coupled with a series of computer-graphics tools to give the physician a greatly augmented reality of the patient's interior anatomy during a procedure. Through a series of controlled tests and studies with human lung-cancer patients, we have found that the system not only reduces the variation in skill level between different physicians, but also increases biopsy success rate.

  11. Acoustic 3D imaging of dental structures

    Lewis, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hume, W.R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Douglass, G.D. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Our goals for the first year of this three dimensional electodynamic imaging project was to determine how to combine flexible, individual addressable; preprocessing of array source signals; spectral extrapolation or received signals; acoustic tomography codes; and acoustic propagation modeling code. We investigated flexible, individually addressable acoustic array material to find the best match in power, sensitivity and cost and settled on PVDF sheet arrays and 3-1 composite material.

  12. Reconstruction of High Resolution 3D Objects from Incomplete Images and 3D Information

    Alexander Pacheco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To this day, digital object reconstruction is a quite complex area that requires many techniques and novel approaches, in which high-resolution 3D objects present one of the biggest challenges. There are mainly two different methods that can be used to reconstruct high resolution objects and images: passive methods and active methods. This methods depend on the type of information available as input for modeling 3D objects. The passive methods use information contained in the images and the active methods make use of controlled light sources, such as lasers. The reconstruction of 3D objects is quite complex and there is no unique solution- The use of specific methodologies for the reconstruction of certain objects it’s also very common, such as human faces, molecular structures, etc. This paper proposes a novel hybrid methodology, composed by 10 phases that combine active and passive methods, using images and a laser in order to supplement the missing information and obtain better results in the 3D object reconstruction. Finally, the proposed methodology proved its efficiency in two complex topological complex objects.

  13. A 3D Model Reconstruction Method Using Slice Images

    LI Hong-an; KANG Bao-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at achieving the high accuracy 3D model from slice images, a new model reconstruction method using slice im-ages is proposed. Wanting to extract the outermost contours from slice images, the method of the improved GVF-Snake model with optimized force field and ray method is employed. And then, the 3D model is reconstructed by contour connection using the im-proved shortest diagonal method and judgment function of contour fracture. The results show that the accuracy of reconstruction 3D model is improved.

  14. 3D Motion Parameters Determination Based on Binocular Sequence Images

    2006-01-01

    Exactly capturing three dimensional (3D) motion information of an object is an essential and important task in computer vision, and is also one of the most difficult problems. In this paper, a binocular vision system and a method for determining 3D motion parameters of an object from binocular sequence images are introduced. The main steps include camera calibration, the matching of motion and stereo images, 3D feature point correspondences and resolving the motion parameters. Finally, the experimental results of acquiring the motion parameters of the objects with uniform velocity and acceleration in the straight line based on the real binocular sequence images by the mentioned method are presented.

  15. Morphometrics, 3D Imaging, and Craniofacial Development.

    Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Percival, Christopher J; Green, Rebecca; Young, Nathan M; Mio, Washington; Marcucio, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown how volumetric imaging and morphometrics can add significantly to our understanding of morphogenesis, the developmental basis for variation, and the etiology of structural birth defects. On the other hand, the complex questions and diverse imaging data in developmental biology present morphometrics with more complex challenges than applications in virtually any other field. Meeting these challenges is necessary in order to understand the mechanistic basis for variation in complex morphologies. This chapter reviews the methods and theory that enable the application of modern landmark-based morphometrics to developmental biology and craniofacial development, in particular. We discuss the theoretical foundations of morphometrics as applied to development and review the basic approaches to the quantification of morphology. Focusing on geometric morphometrics, we discuss the principal statistical methods for quantifying and comparing morphological variation and covariation structure within and among groups. Finally, we discuss the future directions for morphometrics in developmental biology that will be required for approaches that enable quantitative integration across the genotype-phenotype map. PMID:26589938

  16. Extent of emphysema estimated by the three dimensional CT (3D-CT) predicts pulmonary dysfunction in patients with COPD

    We assessed the extent of emphysematous area by the 3D-CT in 35 chronic stable patients (age 66.5±8.9 yrs). And we evaluated the data from the total lung volume estimated by the 3D-CT, % low attenuation area below -950 HU (%LAA) and pulmonary function tests (PFT). Total lung volume estimated by 3D-CT was correlated with total lung capacity (TLC) by PFT (r=0.736, p<0.0005). The % LAA correlated with forced expiratory volume (FEV) 1% (r=-0.716, p<0.001). We concluded that the 3D-CT is the excellent method of evaluating the extent of emphysema without effort. (author)

  17. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    Bieniosek, Matthew F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lee, Brian J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 440 Escondido Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Radiology, Physics, Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Dr., Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  18. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  19. Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry Using Fresnel Lenses with Minimal Refractive-Index Matching Fluid.

    Steven Bache

    Full Text Available Telecentric optical computed tomography (optical-CT is a state-of-the-art method for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional dose distributions in radiochromic dosimeters. In this work a prototype telecentric system (DFOS-Duke Fresnel Optical-CT Scanner is evaluated which incorporates two substantial design changes: the use of Fresnel lenses (reducing lens costs from $10-30K t0 $1-3K and the use of a 'solid tank' (which reduces noise, and the volume of refractively matched fluid from 1ltr to 10cc. The efficacy of DFOS was evaluated by direct comparison against commissioned scanners in our lab. Measured dose distributions from all systems were compared against the predicted dose distributions from a commissioned treatment planning system (TPS. Three treatment plans were investigated including a simple four-field box treatment, a multiple small field delivery, and a complex IMRT treatment. Dosimeters were imaged within 2h post irradiation, using consistent scanning techniques (360 projections acquired at 1 degree intervals, reconstruction at 2mm. DFOS efficacy was evaluated through inspection of dose line-profiles, and 2D and 3D dose and gamma maps. DFOS/TPS gamma pass rates with 3%/3mm dose difference/distance-to-agreement criteria ranged from 89.3% to 92.2%, compared to from 95.6% to 99.0% obtained with the commissioned system. The 3D gamma pass rate between the commissioned system and DFOS was 98.2%. The typical noise rates in DFOS reconstructions were up to 3%, compared to under 2% for the commissioned system. In conclusion, while the introduction of a solid tank proved advantageous with regards to cost and convenience, further work is required to improve the image quality and dose reconstruction accuracy of the new DFOS optical-CT system.

  20. Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry Using Fresnel Lenses with Minimal Refractive-Index Matching Fluid.

    Bache, Steven; Malcolm, Javian; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Telecentric optical computed tomography (optical-CT) is a state-of-the-art method for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional dose distributions in radiochromic dosimeters. In this work a prototype telecentric system (DFOS-Duke Fresnel Optical-CT Scanner) is evaluated which incorporates two substantial design changes: the use of Fresnel lenses (reducing lens costs from $10-30K t0 $1-3K) and the use of a 'solid tank' (which reduces noise, and the volume of refractively matched fluid from 1ltr to 10cc). The efficacy of DFOS was evaluated by direct comparison against commissioned scanners in our lab. Measured dose distributions from all systems were compared against the predicted dose distributions from a commissioned treatment planning system (TPS). Three treatment plans were investigated including a simple four-field box treatment, a multiple small field delivery, and a complex IMRT treatment. Dosimeters were imaged within 2h post irradiation, using consistent scanning techniques (360 projections acquired at 1 degree intervals, reconstruction at 2mm). DFOS efficacy was evaluated through inspection of dose line-profiles, and 2D and 3D dose and gamma maps. DFOS/TPS gamma pass rates with 3%/3mm dose difference/distance-to-agreement criteria ranged from 89.3% to 92.2%, compared to from 95.6% to 99.0% obtained with the commissioned system. The 3D gamma pass rate between the commissioned system and DFOS was 98.2%. The typical noise rates in DFOS reconstructions were up to 3%, compared to under 2% for the commissioned system. In conclusion, while the introduction of a solid tank proved advantageous with regards to cost and convenience, further work is required to improve the image quality and dose reconstruction accuracy of the new DFOS optical-CT system. PMID:27019460

  1. Optical-CT 3D Dosimetry Using Fresnel Lenses with Minimal Refractive-Index Matching Fluid

    Bache, Steven; Malcolm, Javian; Adamovics, John; Oldham, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Telecentric optical computed tomography (optical-CT) is a state-of-the-art method for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional dose distributions in radiochromic dosimeters. In this work a prototype telecentric system (DFOS—Duke Fresnel Optical-CT Scanner) is evaluated which incorporates two substantial design changes: the use of Fresnel lenses (reducing lens costs from $10-30K t0 $1-3K) and the use of a ‘solid tank’ (which reduces noise, and the volume of refractively matched fluid from 1ltr to 10cc). The efficacy of DFOS was evaluated by direct comparison against commissioned scanners in our lab. Measured dose distributions from all systems were compared against the predicted dose distributions from a commissioned treatment planning system (TPS). Three treatment plans were investigated including a simple four-field box treatment, a multiple small field delivery, and a complex IMRT treatment. Dosimeters were imaged within 2h post irradiation, using consistent scanning techniques (360 projections acquired at 1 degree intervals, reconstruction at 2mm). DFOS efficacy was evaluated through inspection of dose line-profiles, and 2D and 3D dose and gamma maps. DFOS/TPS gamma pass rates with 3%/3mm dose difference/distance-to-agreement criteria ranged from 89.3% to 92.2%, compared to from 95.6% to 99.0% obtained with the commissioned system. The 3D gamma pass rate between the commissioned system and DFOS was 98.2%. The typical noise rates in DFOS reconstructions were up to 3%, compared to under 2% for the commissioned system. In conclusion, while the introduction of a solid tank proved advantageous with regards to cost and convenience, further work is required to improve the image quality and dose reconstruction accuracy of the new DFOS optical-CT system. PMID:27019460

  2. Age estimation by 3D CT-scans of the Borremose Woman, a Danish bog body

    Villa, Chiara; Møller Rasmussen, Maria; Lynnerup, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Non-invasive estimation of age at death has been carried out by using 3D CT scanning of a bog body discovered in 1948 in a peat bog in Borremose (Denmark). The bog body has been dated to the 8th century BC, in the last part of the Bronze Age. The skeletal structures useful for age estimation have...... been visualized from CT-scans using the Mimics software from Materialise. Extensive manual editing was necessary, as is common with bog bodies, since the bones were severely degraded and the ordinary range of Hounsfield Units (HU), used for clinical work, is not suitable. Only the cranium, the left...... morphology of the ilium (Buckberry & Chamberlain 2002). These three methods resulted in age spans of 27 to 51, 20 to 32 and 25 to 73 years, respectively, as age at death. A recent method specifically adapted for 2D and 3D images (Dedouit et al. 2008) was also applied resulting in an estimated age at death...

  3. Computer-assisted solid lung nodule 3D volumetry on CT : influence of scan mode and iterative reconstruction: a CT phantom study

    Coenen, Adriaan; Honda, Osamu; van der Jagt, Eric J.; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of high-resolution scan mode and iterative reconstruction on lung nodule 3D volumetry. Solid nodules with various sizes (5, 8, 10 and 12 mm) were placed inside a chest phantom. CT images were obtained with various tube currents, scan modes (conventional mode, high-resolution m

  4. Mediastinal fibrosis with pulmonary artery obstruction; diagnosis and investigation with helical CT imaging including 3-dimensional reconstructions; Pulomonalarterienstenose bei aggresiver Mediastinalfibrose; Diagnostik und 3D-Darstellung mittels helikaler CT-Untersuchung

    Kolbe, M. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Helwig, A. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland); Habicht, J.M. [Klinik fuer Herz-Torax-Chirurgie, Universitaetskliniken Basel (Switzerland); Steinbruch, W. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kantonsspital Basel (Switzerland)

    1997-07-01

    An aggressive mediastinal fibrosis was found in a 42-year-old female, suffering from dysphagia, stabbing pain in the chest, and an unclear weight loss. In this case, the rare combination of esophageal involvement, bronchial narrowing, and pulmonary artery obstruction could easily be demonstrated with a barium study and a helical CT examination including three-dimensional reconstructions. (orig.) [Deutsch] Wir stellen den Fall einer 42jaehrigen Patientin vor, welche zur Abklaerung einer zunehmenden Dysphagie, stechender Thoraxschmerzen und eines Gewichtsverlustes hospitalisiert wurde. Mittels klinischer und radiologischer Abklaerung konnte eine aggressive Mediastinalfibrose diagnostiziert werden. Die seltene Kombination einer Oesophaguseinengung mit Pulmonalarterienstenosen sowie einer Bronchuskompression konnte nichtinvasiv mittels Oesophagogramm und helikaler CT-Untersuchung zuverlaessig und schnell dargestellt werden. (orig.)

  5. Automatic 3D-to-2D registration for CT and dual-energy digital radiography for calcification detection

    We are investigating three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) registration methods for computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy digital radiography (DEDR). CT is an established tool for the detection of cardiac calcification. DEDR could be a cost-effective alternative screening tool. In order to utilize CT as the ''gold standard'' to evaluate the capability of DEDR images for the detection and localization of calcium, we developed an automatic, intensity-based 3D-to-2D registration method for 3D CT volumes and 2D DEDR images. To generate digitally reconstructed radiography (DRR) from the CT volumes, we developed several projection algorithms using the fast shear-warp method. In particular, we created a Gaussian-weighted projection for this application. We used normalized mutual information (NMI) as the similarity measurement. Simulated projection images from CT values were fused with the corresponding DEDR images to evaluate the localization of cardiac calcification. The registration method was evaluated by digital phantoms, physical phantoms, and clinical data sets. The results from the digital phantoms show that the success rate is 100% with a translation difference of less than 0.8 mm and a rotation difference of less than 0.2 deg. . For physical phantom images, the registration accuracy is 0.43±0.24 mm. Color overlay and 3D visualization of clinical images show that the two images registered well. The NMI values between the DRR and DEDR images improved from 0.21±0.03 before registration to 0.25±0.03 after registration. Registration errors measured from anatomic markers decreased from 27.6±13.6 mm before registration to 2.5±0.5 mm after registration. Our results show that the automatic 3D-to-2D registration is accurate and robust. This technique can provide a useful tool for correlating DEDR with CT images for screening coronary artery calcification

  6. 3D Riesz-wavelet based Covariance descriptors for texture classification of lung nodule tissue in CT.

    Cirujeda, Pol; Muller, Henning; Rubin, Daniel; Aguilera, Todd A; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian; Binefa, Xavier; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we present a novel technique for characterizing and classifying 3D textured volumes belonging to different lung tissue types in 3D CT images. We build a volume-based 3D descriptor, robust to changes of size, rigid spatial transformations and texture variability, thanks to the integration of Riesz-wavelet features within a Covariance-based descriptor formulation. 3D Riesz features characterize the morphology of tissue density due to their response to changes in intensity in CT images. These features are encoded in a Covariance-based descriptor formulation: this provides a compact and flexible representation thanks to the use of feature variations rather than dense features themselves and adds robustness to spatial changes. Furthermore, the particular symmetric definite positive matrix form of these descriptors causes them to lay in a Riemannian manifold. Thus, descriptors can be compared with analytical measures, and accurate techniques from machine learning and clustering can be adapted to their spatial domain. Additionally we present a classification model following a "Bag of Covariance Descriptors" paradigm in order to distinguish three different nodule tissue types in CT: solid, ground-glass opacity, and healthy lung. The method is evaluated on top of an acquired dataset of 95 patients with manually delineated ground truth by radiation oncology specialists in 3D, and quantitative sensitivity and specificity values are presented. PMID:26738126

  7. Software for 3D diagnostic image reconstruction and analysis

    Recent advances in computer technologies have opened new frontiers in medical diagnostics. Interesting possibilities are the use of three-dimensional (3D) imaging and the combination of images from different modalities. Software prepared in our laboratories devoted to 3D image reconstruction and analysis from computed tomography and ultrasonography is presented. In developing our software it was assumed that it should be applicable in standard medical practice, i.e. it should work effectively with a PC. An additional feature is the possibility of combining 3D images from different modalities. The reconstruction and data processing can be conducted using a standard PC, so low investment costs result in the introduction of advanced and useful diagnostic possibilities. The program was tested on a PC using DICOM data from computed tomography and TIFF files obtained from a 3D ultrasound system. The results of the anthropomorphic phantom and patient data were taken into consideration. A new approach was used to achieve spatial correlation of two independently obtained 3D images. The method relies on the use of four pairs of markers within the regions under consideration. The user selects the markers manually and the computer calculates the transformations necessary for coupling the images. The main software feature is the possibility of 3D image reconstruction from a series of two-dimensional (2D) images. The reconstructed 3D image can be: (1) viewed with the most popular methods of 3D image viewing, (2) filtered and processed to improve image quality, (3) analyzed quantitatively (geometrical measurements), and (4) coupled with another, independently acquired 3D image. The reconstructed and processed 3D image can be stored at every stage of image processing. The overall software performance was good considering the relatively low costs of the hardware used and the huge data sets processed. The program can be freely used and tested (source code and program available at

  8. BM3D Frames and Variational Image Deblurring

    Danielyan, Aram; Egiazarian, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A family of the Block Matching 3-D (BM3D) algorithms for various imaging problems has been recently proposed within the framework of nonlocal patch-wise image modeling [1], [2]. In this paper we construct analysis and synthesis frames, formalizing the BM3D image modeling and use these frames to develop novel iterative deblurring algorithms. We consider two different formulations of the deblurring problem: one given by minimization of the single objective function and another based on the Nash equilibrium balance of two objective functions. The latter results in an algorithm where the denoising and deblurring operations are decoupled. The convergence of the developed algorithms is proved. Simulation experiments show that the decoupled algorithm derived from the Nash equilibrium formulation demonstrates the best numerical and visual results and shows superiority with respect to the state of the art in the field, confirming a valuable potential of BM3D-frames as an advanced image modeling tool.

  9. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    Singh, S. P.; Jain, K.; Mandla, V. R.

    2014-06-01

    3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth's surface and it's related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India). This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can't do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good result. For Large city

  10. 3D Image Modelling and Specific Treatments in Orthodontics Domain

    Dionysis Goularas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a 3D specific dental plaster treatment system for orthodontics. From computer tomography scanner images, we propose first a 3D image modelling and reconstruction method of the Mandible and Maxillary based on an adaptive triangulation allowing management of contours meant for the complex topologies. Secondly, we present two specific treatment methods directly achieved on obtained 3D model allowing the automatic correction for the setting in occlusion of the Mandible and the Maxillary, and the teeth segmentation allowing more specific dental examinations. Finally, these specific treatments are presented via a client/server application with the aim of allowing a telediagnosis and treatment.

  11. Noninvasive CT to Iso-C3D registration for improved intraoperative visualization in computer assisted orthopedic surgery

    Rudolph, Tobias; Ebert, Lars; Kowal, Jens

    2006-03-01

    Supporting surgeons in performing minimally invasive surgeries can be considered as one of the major goals of computer assisted surgery. Excellent intraoperative visualization is a prerequisite to achieve this aim. The Siremobil Iso-C 3D has become a widely used imaging device, which, in combination with a navigation system, enables the surgeon to directly navigate within the acquired 3D image volume without any extra registration steps. However, the image quality is rather low compared to a CT scan and the volume size (approx. 12 cm 3) limits its application. A regularly used alternative in computer assisted orthopedic surgery is to use of a preoperatively acquired CT scan to visualize the operating field. But, the additional registration step, necessary in order to use CT stacks for navigation is quite invasive. Therefore the objective of this work is to develop a noninvasive registration technique. In this article a solution is being proposed that registers a preoperatively acquired CT scan to the intraoperatively acquired Iso-C 3D image volume, thereby registering the CT to the tracked anatomy. The procedure aligns both image volumes by maximizing the mutual information, an algorithm that has already been applied to similar registration problems and demonstrated good results. Furthermore the accuracy of such a registration method was investigated in a clinical setup, integrating a navigated Iso-C 3D in combination with an tracking system. Initial tests based on cadaveric animal bone resulted in an accuracy ranging from 0.63mm to 1.55mm mean error.

  12. Optical 3D watermark based digital image watermarking for telemedicine

    Li, Xiao Wei; Kim, Seok Tae

    2013-12-01

    Region of interest (ROI) of a medical image is an area including important diagnostic information and must be stored without any distortion. This algorithm for application of watermarking technique for non-ROI of the medical image preserving ROI. The paper presents a 3D watermark based medical image watermarking scheme. In this paper, a 3D watermark object is first decomposed into 2D elemental image array (EIA) by a lenslet array, and then the 2D elemental image array data is embedded into the host image. The watermark extraction process is an inverse process of embedding. The extracted EIA through the computational integral imaging reconstruction (CIIR) technique, the 3D watermark can be reconstructed. Because the EIA is composed of a number of elemental images possesses their own perspectives of a 3D watermark object. Even though the embedded watermark data badly damaged, the 3D virtual watermark can be successfully reconstructed. Furthermore, using CAT with various rule number parameters, it is possible to get many channels for embedding. So our method can recover the weak point having only one transform plane in traditional watermarking methods. The effectiveness of the proposed watermarking scheme is demonstrated with the aid of experimental results.

  13. Fully Automatic 3D Reconstruction of Histological Images

    Bagci, Ulas

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computational framework for 3D volume reconstruction from 2D histological slices using registration algorithms in feature space. To improve the quality of reconstructed 3D volume, first, intensity variations in images are corrected by an intensity standardization process which maps image intensity scale to a standard scale where similar intensities correspond to similar tissues. Second, a subvolume approach is proposed for 3D reconstruction by dividing standardized slices into groups. Third, in order to improve the quality of the reconstruction process, an automatic best reference slice selection algorithm is developed based on an iterative assessment of image entropy and mean square error of the registration process. Finally, we demonstrate that the choice of the reference slice has a significant impact on registration quality and subsequent 3D reconstruction.

  14. Non-rigid registration of small animal skeletons from micro-CT using 3D shape context

    Xiao, Di; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Acosta Tamayo, Oscar; Gregoire, Marie Claude; Salvado, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Small animal registration is an important step for molecular image analysis. Skeleton registration from whole-body or only partial micro Computerized Tomography (CT) image is often performed to match individual rats to atlases and templates, for example to identify organs in positron emission tomography (PET). In this paper, we extend the shape context matching technique for 3D surface registration and apply it for rat hind limb skeleton registration from CT images. Using the proposed method, after standard affine iterative closest point (ICP) registration, correspondences between the 3D points from sour and target objects were robustly found and used to deform the limb skeleton surface with thin-plate-spline (TPS). Experiments are described using phantoms and actual rat hind limb skeletons. On animals, mean square errors were decreased by the proposed registration compared to that of its initial alignment. Visually, skeletons were successfully registered even in cases of very different animal poses.

  15. Preliminary comparison of 3D synthetic aperture imaging with Explososcan

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Hansen, Jens Munk; Ferin, Guillaume;

    2012-01-01

    Explososcan is the 'gold standard' for real-time 3D medical ultrasound imaging. In this paper, 3D synthetic aperture imaging is compared to Explososcan by simulation of 3D point spread functions. The simulations mimic a 32x32 element prototype transducer. The transducer mimicked is a dense matrix...... phased array with a pitch of 300 μm, made by Vermon. For both imaging techniques, 289 emissions are used to image a volume spanning 60 in both the azimuth and elevation direction and 150mm in depth. This results for both techniques in a frame rate of 18 Hz. The implemented synthetic aperture technique...... cystic resolution, which expresses the ability to detect anechoic cysts in a uniform scattering media, at all depths except at Explososcan's focus point. Synthetic aperture reduced the cyst radius, R20dB, at 90mm depth by 48%. Synthetic aperture imaging was shown to reduce the number of transmit channels...

  16. Helical CT for emergency patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Diagnosis of cerebral aneurysms with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA)

    Recently, the usefulness of three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) using helical CT has been reported. Although 3D-CTA has been applied for neurosurgical diseases, especially for surgical planning, it has not done for emergency patients because of the long time required for image reconstruction and location of a helical CT scanner. We studied emergency patients with SAH, and compared the 3D-CTA with angiography and surgical findings, using TOSHIBA X vigor. Twenty-two patients with SAH were evaluated. The helical CT was performed for 55 seconds with a bolus injection of 90 ml non-ionic, iodinated contrast medium at a rate of 3 ml/sec with a delay of 20 sec. Angiography was carried out immediately after the helical CT. Eighteen of 22 cases were operated on urgently. We were able to create the 3D-CTA in about 7 minutes, and diagnose aneurysms by the 3D-CTA before angiography. The 3D-CTA was able to demonstrate 30 of 31 aneurysms including 9 unruptured aneurysms. An unruptured internal carotid-posterior communicating artery aneurysm 1.3 mm in diameter and associated with a ruptured aneurysm was not detected by either the 3D-CTA or angiography. On the other hand, an unruptured Acom aneurysm 0.8 mm in diameter and associated with a ruptured aneurysm could be detected by the: 3D-CTA, but not by angiography. The 3D-CTA gave us useful information concerning the anatomical relationship of the aneurysm, its neck and parent artery, and the surrounding branches. There were no complications or side effects associated with the helical CT scan. Although the 3D-CTA requires further development of visualization of small arteries less than 1 mm in diameter, such as perforating arteries, subtraction technique of bony structure, and a method for checking cervical arteries, it is useful for diagnosis of emergency patients with SAH and urgent operations. We believe that an operation might be performed by only the 3D-CTA without the angiography in the near future. (author)

  17. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.:3-D Synthetic Aperture Imaging and Row-column Addressing of 2-D Transducer Arrays

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinic...

  18. Recovering 3D human pose from monocular images

    Agarwal, Ankur; Triggs, Bill

    2006-01-01

    We describe a learning-based method for recovering 3D human body pose from single images and monocular image sequences. Our approach requires neither an explicit body model nor prior labeling of body parts in the image. Instead, it recovers pose by direct nonlinear regression against shape descriptor vectors extracted automatically from image silhouettes. For robustness against local silhouette segmentation errors, silhouette shape is encoded by histogram-of-shape-contexts descriptors. We eva...

  19. 3D ultrasound-CT registration of the liver using combined landmark-intensity information

    An important issue in computer-assisted surgery of the liver is a fast and reliable transfer of preoperative resection plans to the intraoperative situation. One problem is to match the planning data, derived from preoperative CT or MR images, with 3D ultrasound images of the liver, acquired during surgery. As the liver deforms significantly in the intraoperative situation non-rigid registration is necessary. This is a particularly challenging task because pre- and intraoperative image data stem from different modalities and ultrasound images are generally very noisy. One way to overcome these problems is to incorporate prior knowledge into the registration process. We propose a method of combining anatomical landmark information with a fast non-parametric intensity registration approach. Mathematically, this leads to a constrained optimization problem. As distance measure we use the normalized gradient field which allows for multimodal image registration. A qualitative and quantitative validation on clinical liver data sets of three different patients has been performed. We used the distance of dense corresponding points on vessel center lines for quantitative validation. The combined landmark and intensity approach improves the mean and percentage of point distances above 3 mm compared to rigid and thin-plate spline registration based only on landmarks. The proposed algorithm offers the possibility to incorporate additional a priori knowledge - in terms of few landmarks - provided by a human expert into a non-rigid registration process. (orig.)

  20. 3D Medical Image Segmentation Based on Rough Set Theory

    CHEN Shi-hao; TIAN Yun; WANG Yi; HAO Chong-yang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method which uses multiple types of expert knowledge together in 3D medical image segmentation based on rough set theory. The focus of this paper is how to approximate a ROI (region of interest) when there are multiple types of expert knowledge. Based on rough set theory, the image can be split into three regions:positive regions; negative regions; boundary regions. With multiple knowledge we refine ROI as an intersection of all of the expected shapes with single knowledge. At last we show the results of implementing a rough 3D image segmentation and visualization system.

  1. 3D Image Display Courses for Information Media Students.

    Yanaka, Kazuhisa; Yamanouchi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional displays are used extensively in movies and games. These displays are also essential in mixed reality, where virtual and real spaces overlap. Therefore, engineers and creators should be trained to master 3D display technologies. For this reason, the Department of Information Media at the Kanagawa Institute of Technology has launched two 3D image display courses specifically designed for students who aim to become information media engineers and creators. PMID:26960028

  2. A near field 3D radar imaging technique

    Broquetas Ibars, Antoni

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents an algorithm which recovers a 3D reflectivity image of a target from near-field scattering measurements. Spherical wave nearfield illumination is used, in order to avoid a costly compact range installation to produce a plane wave illumination. The system is described and some simulated 3D reconstructions are included. The paper also presents a first experimental validation of this technique. Peer Reviewed

  3. Investigation of the feasability for 3D synthetic aperture imaging

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of implementing real-time synthetic aperture 3D imaging on the experimental system developed at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging using a 2D transducer array. The target array is a fully populated 32 × 32 3 MHz array with a half wavelength pitch. The...

  4. Contributions in compression of 3D medical images and 2D images

    The huge amounts of volumetric data generated by current medical imaging techniques in the context of an increasing demand for long term archiving solutions, as well as the rapid development of distant radiology make the use of compression inevitable. Indeed, if the medical community has sided until now with compression without losses, most of applications suffer from compression ratios which are too low with this kind of compression. In this context, compression with acceptable losses could be the most appropriate answer. So, we propose a new loss coding scheme based on 3D (3 dimensional) Wavelet Transform and Dead Zone Lattice Vector Quantization 3D (DZLVQ) for medical images. Our algorithm has been evaluated on several computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image volumes. The main contribution of this work is the design of a multidimensional dead zone which enables to take into account correlations between neighbouring elementary volumes. At high compression ratios, we show that it can out-perform visually and numerically the best existing methods. These promising results are confirmed on head CT by two medical patricians. The second contribution of this document assesses the effect with-loss image compression on CAD (Computer-Aided Decision) detection performance of solid lung nodules. This work on 120 significant lungs images shows that detection did not suffer until 48:1 compression and still was robust at 96:1. The last contribution consists in the complexity reduction of our compression scheme. The first allocation dedicated to 2D DZLVQ uses an exponential of the rate-distortion (R-D) functions. The second allocation for 2D and 3D medical images is based on block statistical model to estimate the R-D curves. These R-D models are based on the joint distribution of wavelet vectors using a multidimensional mixture of generalized Gaussian (MMGG) densities. (author)

  5. 3D X-ray CT and diffusion measurements to assess tortuosity and constrictivity in a sedimentary rock

    Takahashi, Hiroaki; Seida, Yoshimi; Yui, Mikazu

    2015-01-01

    A high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) image of the interior of the sedimentary rock was obtained by means of nano-focus X-ray computer tomography (X-ray CT). Using computational methods to analyze the 3D microstructure of the rock, we presented the tortuosity and geometrical constrictivity. We also presented results on the tritiated water (HTO) diffusion tests and a mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) test performed on the rock. We have compared these results to understand the dominant...

  6. DATA PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY OF AIRBORNE 3D IMAGE

    2001-01-01

    Airborne 3D image which integrates GPS,attitude measurement unit (AMU),sca nning laser rangefinder (SLR) and spectral scanner has been developed successful ly.The spectral scanner and SLR use the same optical system which ensures laser point to match pixel seamlessly.The distinctive advantage of 3D image is that it can produce geo_referenced images and DSM (digital surface models) images wi thout any ground control points (GCPs).It is no longer necessary to sur vey GCPs and with some softwares the data can be processed and produce digital s urface models (DSM) and geo_referenced images in quasi_real_time,therefore,the efficiency of 3 D image is 10~100 times higher than that of traditional approaches.The process ing procedure involves decomposing and checking the raw data,processing GPS dat a,calculating the positions of laser sample points,producing geo_referenced im age,producing DSM and mosaicing strips.  The principle of 3D image is first introduced in this paper,and then we focus on the fast processing technique and algorithm.The flight tests and processed r esults show that the processing technique is feasible and can meet the requireme nt of quasi_real_time applications.

  7. Automatic Masking for Robust 3D-2D Image Registration in Image-Guided Spine Surgery

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    During spinal neurosurgery, patient-specific information, planning, and annotation such as vertebral labels can be mapped from preoperative 3D CT to intraoperative 2D radiographs via image-based 3D-2D registration. Such registration has been shown to provide a potentially valuable means of decision support in target localization as well as quality assurance of the surgical product. However, robust registration can be challenged by mismatch in image content between the preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs, arising, for example, from anatomical deformation or the presence of surgical tools within the radiograph. In this work, we develop and evaluate methods for automatically mitigating the effect of content mismatch by leveraging the surgical planning data to assign greater weight to anatomical regions known to be reliable for registration and vital to the surgical task while removing problematic regions that are highly deformable or often occluded by surgical tools. We investigated two approaches to assigning variable weight (i.e., "masking") to image content and/or the similarity metric: (1) masking the preoperative 3D CT ("volumetric masking"); and (2) masking within the 2D similarity metric calculation ("projection masking"). The accuracy of registration was evaluated in terms of projection distance error (PDE) in 61 cases selected from an IRB-approved clinical study. The best performing of the masking techniques was found to reduce the rate of gross failure (PDE > 20 mm) from 11.48% to 5.57% in this challenging retrospective data set. These approaches provided robustness to content mismatch and eliminated distinct failure modes of registration. Such improvement was gained without additional workflow and has motivated incorporation of the masking methods within a system under development for prospective clinical studies.

  8. 3D Printing of CT Dataset: Validation of an Open Source and Consumer-Available Workflow.

    Bortolotto, Chandra; Eshja, Esmeralda; Peroni, Caterina; Orlandi, Matteo A; Bizzotto, Nicola; Poggi, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The broad availability of cheap three-dimensional (3D) printing equipment has raised the need for a thorough analysis on its effects on clinical accuracy. Our aim is to determine whether the accuracy of 3D printing process is affected by the use of a low-budget workflow based on open source software and consumer's commercially available 3D printers. A group of test objects was scanned with a 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in order to build their 3D copies. CT datasets were elaborated using a software chain based on three free and open source software. Objects were printed out with a commercially available 3D printer. Both the 3D copies and the test objects were measured using a digital professional caliper. Overall, the objects' mean absolute difference between test objects and 3D copies is 0.23 mm and the mean relative difference amounts to 0.55 %. Our results demonstrate that the accuracy of 3D printing process remains high despite the use of a low-budget workflow. PMID:26175139

  9. MO-C-18A-01: Advances in Model-Based 3D Image Reconstruction

    Chen, G [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pan, X [University Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Stayman, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Samei, E [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Recent years have seen the emergence of CT image reconstruction techniques that exploit physical models of the imaging system, photon statistics, and even the patient to achieve improved 3D image quality and/or reduction of radiation dose. With numerous advantages in comparison to conventional 3D filtered backprojection, such techniques bring a variety of challenges as well, including: a demanding computational load associated with sophisticated forward models and iterative optimization methods; nonlinearity and nonstationarity in image quality characteristics; a complex dependency on multiple free parameters; and the need to understand how best to incorporate prior information (including patient-specific prior images) within the reconstruction process. The advantages, however, are even greater – for example: improved image quality; reduced dose; robustness to noise and artifacts; task-specific reconstruction protocols; suitability to novel CT imaging platforms and noncircular orbits; and incorporation of known characteristics of the imager and patient that are conventionally discarded. This symposium features experts in 3D image reconstruction, image quality assessment, and the translation of such methods to emerging clinical applications. Dr. Chen will address novel methods for the incorporation of prior information in 3D and 4D CT reconstruction techniques. Dr. Pan will show recent advances in optimization-based reconstruction that enable potential reduction of dose and sampling requirements. Dr. Stayman will describe a “task-based imaging” approach that leverages models of the imaging system and patient in combination with a specification of the imaging task to optimize both the acquisition and reconstruction process. Dr. Samei will describe the development of methods for image quality assessment in such nonlinear reconstruction techniques and the use of these methods to characterize and optimize image quality and dose in a spectrum of clinical

  10. 3D Tongue Motion from Tagged and Cine MR Images

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z.; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach su ers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information...

  11. Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition CT scanner realizing 3D dynamic observation with low-dose scanning

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners have been continuously advancing as essential diagnostic imaging equipment for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases, including the three major disease classes of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Through the development of helical CT scanners and multislice CT scanners, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the Aquilion ONE, a CT scanner with a scanning range of up to 160 mm per rotation that can obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of the brain, heart, and other organs in a single rotation. We have now developed the Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition, a next-generation 320-row multislice CT scanner incorporating the latest technologies that achieves a shorter scanning time and significant reduction in dose compared with conventional products. This product with its low-dose scanning technology will contribute to the practical realization of new diagnosis and treatment modalities employing four-dimensional (4D) data based on 3D dynamic observations through continuous rotations. (author)

  12. Reproducibility of readings of ISO C 3D and CT lumbar pedicle screw scans

    Purpose: This study was conducted to evaluate the reproducibility of the reading of lumbar pedicle screw scans using a C-arm-based imaging system in comparison to computed tomography. The influence of the technique and the experience of the rater should be determined. Materials and Methods: The lumbar spines of 23 patients were stabilized using 102 pedicle screws. The position of the screws was controlled intraoperatively using an Arcadis Orbic 3D scanner. All scans were evaluated independently by three raters. The position of the implants in reference to the pedicle walls was described. Additionally, another 100 lumbar pedicle screws in 16 patients were evaluated postoperatively with a multirow CT. Kappa according to Fleiss was calculated for the reproducibility of the rater statements. Each rater repeated the analysis of 24 screws to assess the intraobserver variance. Results: The reports of the CT scans showed significantly less variation. The consent of all 3 raters was achieved in 79.4 vs. 65.1 % of cases. The Kappa values were 0.56 and 0.29, respectively. Poor results were obtained especially for the medial pedicle wall (consent 70.0 vs. 50.0 %). The influence of the experience of the rater was not able to be verified. (orig.)

  13. Intraosseous rotation of the scaphoid: assessment by using a 3D CT model - an anatomic study

    Schmidle, Gernot; Gabl, Markus [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Trauma Surgery, Innsbruck (Austria); Rieger, Michael [Regional Hospital Hall, Department of Radiology, Hall in Tirol (Austria); Klauser, Andrea Sabine; Thauerer, Michael [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Hoermann, Romed [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology-Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess intraosseous rotation as the third dimension of scaphoid anatomy on a 3D CT model using common volume rendering software to impact anatomical reconstruction of scaphoid fractures. CT images of 13 cadaver wrist pairs were acquired. Reference axes for the alignment of distal and proximal scaphoid poles were defined three-dimensionally. Two methods for rotation measurement - the reference axis method (RAM) and the scapho-trapezio-trapezoidal joint method (STTM) - were developed and compared by three independent observers. Rotation measured by the RAM averaged 66.9 ± 7 for the right and 67.2 ± 5.8 for the left wrists. Using the STTM there was a mean rotation of 68.6 ± 6.6 for the right and 68.6 ± 6.8 for the left wrists. The overall results showed a significant variability of the measured values between different specimens (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference between left and right wrists of the same specimen, neither for the RAM (P = 0.268) nor for the STTM (P = 0.774). Repeatability coefficients between the observers were low, indicating good repeatability. The presented methods are practical tools to quantify intraosseous rotation between distal and proximal scaphoid poles using common volume rendering software. For clinical application the opposite side provides the best reference values to assess malrotation in scaphoid fracture cases. (orig.)

  14. Diagnosis of ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms with three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA)

    This study compared the diagnostic value of three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) for ruptured and unruptured cerebral aneurysms with that of MR angiography (MRA) and DSA. Forty-one cases of 11 ruptured and 30 unruptured aneurysms were included in this study. 3D-CTA was performed with a bolus injection of nonionic contrast medium on the SOMATOM PLUS-S scanner and the ProSeed Accell scanner. Three-dimensional images were obtained by both shaded surface reconstruction (SSR) method and maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. The CT values of cisternal clot in cases of ruptured cerebral aneurysms did not exceed 90HU in any cases. The effect of SAH was, therefore, eliminated in the SSR images through a threshold level processing of a CT value of 150HU. All the cerebral aneurysms were visualized by this process. With regard to the detectability of cerebral aneurysms, 3D-CTA was able to demonstrate cerebral aneurysms with diameters of larger than 1 mm as well as giant aneurysms which MRA would sometimes fail to reveal. 3D-CTA was superior to MRA and DSA in making diagnosis of small aneurysms such as those with diameters of less than 3 mm. There was no difference between 3D-CTA and DSA in diagnostic ability for medium-sized aneurysms. With regard to large aneurysms of more than 12 mm in diameter, 3D-CTA was considered to be more useful than MRA and DSA, particularly for planning of operations by its feasibility for marking a simulation. For the operation, three-dimensional images of 3D-CTA provided useful information concerning the shape and anatomical features relating to the aneurysm, particularly the parent arteries and bony structures. The aneurysms located in the vicinity of the cavernous sinus were able to be visualized by 3D image reconstruction with elevation of the threshold level to 250HU. In addition, MIP image was able to visualize the calcification of an arterial wall, which provided useful information for applying clips for aneurysms. (J.P.N.)

  15. AUTOMATIC 3D MAPPING USING MULTIPLE UNCALIBRATED CLOSE RANGE IMAGES

    M. Rafiei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Automatic three-dimensions modeling of the real world is an important research topic in the geomatics and computer vision fields for many years. By development of commercial digital cameras and modern image processing techniques, close range photogrammetry is vastly utilized in many fields such as structure measurements, topographic surveying, architectural and archeological surveying, etc. A non-contact photogrammetry provides methods to determine 3D locations of objects from two-dimensional (2D images. Problem of estimating the locations of 3D points from multiple images, often involves simultaneously estimating both 3D geometry (structure and camera pose (motion, it is commonly known as structure from motion (SfM. In this research a step by step approach to generate the 3D point cloud of a scene is considered. After taking images with a camera, we should detect corresponding points in each two views. Here an efficient SIFT method is used for image matching for large baselines. After that, we must retrieve the camera motion and 3D position of the matched feature points up to a projective transformation (projective reconstruction. Lacking additional information on the camera or the scene makes the parallel lines to be unparalleled. The results of SfM computation are much more useful if a metric reconstruction is obtained. Therefor multiple views Euclidean reconstruction applied and discussed. To refine and achieve the precise 3D points we use more general and useful approach, namely bundle adjustment. At the end two real cases have been considered to reconstruct (an excavation and a tower.

  16. High resolution 3D dosimetry for microbeam radiation therapy using optical CT

    Optical Computed Tomography (CT) is a promising technique for dosimetry of Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), providing high resolution 3D dose maps. Here different MRT irradiation geometries are visualised showing the potential of Optical CT as a tool for future MRT trials. The Peak-to-Valley dose ratio (PVDR) is calculated to be 7 at a depth of 3mm in the radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE®. This is significantly lower than predicted values and possible reasons for this are discussed

  17. A prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    technique was shown to achieve submillimetre and subdegree placement accuracy. Dosimetry protocol investigations emphasize the need to allow gel dosimeters to cool gradually and to be scanned while at room temperature. Preliminary tests show that considerable noise reduction can be achieved with sinogram filtering and by binning image pixels into more clinically relevant grid sizes. Conclusions: This paper describes a new optical CT scanner for 3D radiation dosimetry. Tests demonstrate that it is capable of imaging both absorption-based and scatter-based samples of high opacities. Imaging protocol and gel dosimeter manufacture techniques have been adapted to produce optimal reconstruction results. These optimal results will require suitable filtering and binning techniques for noise reduction purposes.

  18. Practical performance for CT simulator set up and commissioning for 3d radiotherapy

    Full text: We present a summary of the protocol used to commission two GE LightSpeed and One Siemens CT-Sim for 3D radiotherapy in early 2004. The protocol defined was based on AAPM TG-66 and ACPSEM 1997 position paper. Scanning Med-TEC Iso-align Laser Alignment Device for three-D isocentre alignment 1. Couch Movement Accuracy for both manual and scanning movement checked before isocentre alignment, as the reference distance is required for the external isocentre setup. 2. Gantry scan rotation circle vertical and tilted angle alignment checked by overlaying the vertical and horizontal image coordinate lines using the aligned ball-bearings in the phantom to determine the gantry cross plane image vertical accuracy and tilt angle accuracy. 3. Zero scan position determined by scanning the horizontally set Med-Align phantom, and adjusting the phantom position forward and backward to match the image scanning centre. 4. Internal lasers position determined by the position of aligned Med-Align phantom after the scanning centre determined. 5. Couch top to Gantry Perpendicular checked by matching the couch axis in the longitudinal and lateral direction to the position of the laser lines determined according to the CT scanning orientation. 6. Couch Central Axis aligned to ensure the couch travels though the internal isocentre for the full range of longitudinal of movement. 7. External isocentre and laser focus can be determined by moving the couch back a set distance (50cm or 60cm normally) from the internal isocentre. Planning image transfer and DRR image alignment 1. Scanning Centre indicated on the planning image depends on the functionality of the planning system. Some planning systems load the image with the scanning centre at zero position, others load up the image with the absolute distance. 2. Zero Slice position aligned to the centre of the phantom using the external laser. 3. Orientation and Distance were checked by scanning the Iso-align in both vertical and

  19. Statistical skull models from 3D X-ray images

    Berar, M; Bailly, G; Payan, Y; Berar, Maxime; Desvignes, Michel; Payan, Yohan

    2006-01-01

    We present 2 statistical models of the skull and mandible built upon an elastic registration method of 3D meshes. The aim of this work is to relate degrees of freedom of skull anatomy, as static relations are of main interest for anthropology and legal medicine. Statistical models can effectively provide reconstructions together with statistical precision. In our applications, patient-specific meshes of the skull and the mandible are high-density meshes, extracted from 3D CT scans. All our patient-specific meshes are registrated in a subject-shared reference system using our 3D-to-3D elastic matching algorithm. Registration is based upon the minimization of a distance between the high density mesh and a shared low density mesh, defined on the vertexes, in a multi resolution approach. A Principal Component analysis is performed on the normalised registrated data to build a statistical linear model of the skull and mandible shape variation. The accuracy of the reconstruction is under the millimetre in the shape...

  20. DICOM for quantitative imaging research in 3D Slicer

    Fedorov, Andrey; Kikinis, Ron

    2014-01-01

    These are the slides presented by Andrey Fedorov at the 3D Slicer workshop and meeting of the Quantitative Image Informatics for Cancer Research (QIICR) project that took place November 18-19, 2014, at the University of Iowa.

  1. 3D wavefront image formation for NIITEK GPR

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Ton, Tuan; Howard, Pete

    2009-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining (HD) Research and Development Program focuses on developing, testing, demonstrating, and validating new technology for immediate use in humanitarian demining operations around the globe. Beginning in the late 1990's, the U.S. Army Countermine Division funded the development of the NIITEK ground penetrating radar (GPR) for detection of anti-tank (AT) landmines. This work is concerned with signal processing algorithms to suppress sources of artifacts in the NIITEK GPR, and formation of three-dimensional (3D) imagery from the resultant data. We first show that the NIITEK GPR data correspond to a 3D Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) database. An adaptive filtering method is utilized to suppress ground return and self-induced resonance (SIR) signals that are generated by the interaction of the radar-carrying platform and the transmitted radar signal. We examine signal processing methods to improve the fidelity of imagery for this 3D SAR system using pre-processing methods that suppress Doppler aliasing as well as other side lobe leakage artifacts that are introduced by the radar radiation pattern. The algorithm, known as digital spotlighting, imposes a filtering scheme on the azimuth-compressed SAR data, and manipulates the resultant spectral data to achieve a higher PRF to suppress the Doppler aliasing. We also present the 3D version of the Fourier-based wavefront reconstruction, a computationally-efficient and approximation-free SAR imaging method, for image formation with the NIITEK 3D SAR database.

  2. Applications of 3-D reconstruction and 3-D image analysis using computer graphics in surgery of the oral and maxillofacial regions

    Using the 2-D data provided by CT-Tomography and MRI-tomography of oral and maxillofacial diseases (cyst, benign tumor, primary tumor and regional lymphnodes of malignant tumor), 3-D images were reconstructed and spatial analysis was attempted. We report the general concepts. The hardware used consisted of the Hewlett-Packard HP-9000/300, which utilizes a 16-bit CPU. A digitizer was used to construct 3-D images from serial CT-tomography and MRI-tomography images. Output was displayed on a color monitor and photographs. The 3 cases on which we used this technique included a 19-year-old male with plunging ranula, a 50-year-old male with maxillary pleomorphic adenoma, and a 58-year-old male with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus (T3N3M0). As 3-D reconstruction can be done in any arbitrary direction or cross section, it is possible to spatially determine the position of the disease inside the body, its progression, and its relationship with adjacent organs. Through image analysis, it is possible to better understand the volume and surface area of the disease. 3-D image reconstruction is an effective tool in the determination of diagnosis, therapeutic guidelines, and surgical indications, as well as effectiveness of treatment. (author)

  3. Extracting 3D Layout From a Single Image Using Global Image Structures

    Z. Lou; T. Gevers; N. Hu

    2015-01-01

    Extracting the pixel-level 3D layout from a single image is important for different applications, such as object localization, image, and video categorization. Traditionally, the 3D layout is derived by solving a pixel-level classification problem. However, the image-level 3D structure can be very b

  4. Holoscopic 3D image depth estimation and segmentation techniques

    Alazawi, Eman

    2015-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the award of Doctor of Philosophy and was awarded by Brunel University London Today’s 3D imaging techniques offer significant benefits over conventional 2D imaging techniques. The presence of natural depth information in the scene affords the observer an overall improved sense of reality and naturalness. A variety of systems attempting to reach this goal have been designed by many independent research groups, such as stereoscopic and auto-stereoscopic systems....

  5. Analysis of acetabular version in the native hip: comparison between 2D axial CT and 3D CT measurements

    Dandachli, Wael [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Imperial College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom); Ul Islam, Saif; Tippett, Richard; Hall-Craggs, Margaret A.; Witt, Johan D. [University College London Hospitals, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    To compare two-dimensional (2D) axial with three-dimensional (3D) computerized tomography (CT) measurements of acetabular version in native hips. CT scans of 34 hips in 17 consecutive patients being investigated for femoroacetabular impingement were analyzed. Acetabular version was measured using 2D CT at two different axial levels, one cranial (slice 2) and the other at the equator (slice 3). The measurements were repeated after correction for pelvic tilt. The results were compared to the measurements of anatomical version obtained using a 3D CT method that automatically corrects for pelvic tilt. The mean acetabular version using the 3D CT method was 15.7 (SD 6.9 ). The mean version using slice 2 was 9.3 (SD 6.5 ) before correction for pelvic tilt and 15.7 (SD 8.0 ) after the correction. The mean version using slice 3 was 16.4 (SD 4.2 ) before tilt correction and 19.0 (SD 5.0 ) after the correction. In relation to the 3D method, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was 0.58 for the uncorrected and 0.93 for the corrected slice 2 method. For the uncorrected and corrected slice 3 methods, the ICC was 0.64 and 0.89, respectively. The 2D axial methods produced variable results. The results that correlated best with the 3D method were those of the cranial slice (slice 2) after correction for pelvic tilt. Interpretation of 2D axial CT measurements of acetabular version should be done with caution. The level at which the measurement is done and the presence of pelvic tilt appear to be significant factors. (orig.)

  6. An automated 3D reconstruction method of UAV images

    Liu, Jun; Wang, He; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Feng; Sun, Guangtong; Song, Ping

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a novel fully automated 3D reconstruction approach based on low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle system (UAVs) images will be presented, which does not require previous camera calibration or any other external prior knowledge. Dense 3D point clouds are generated by integrating orderly feature extraction, image matching, structure from motion (SfM) and multi-view stereo (MVS) algorithms, overcoming many of the cost, time limitations of rigorous photogrammetry techniques. An image topology analysis strategy is introduced to speed up large scene reconstruction by taking advantage of the flight-control data acquired by UAV. Image topology map can significantly reduce the running time of feature matching by limiting the combination of images. A high-resolution digital surface model of the study area is produced base on UAV point clouds by constructing the triangular irregular network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach is robust and feasible for automatic 3D reconstruction of low-altitude UAV images, and has great potential for the acquisition of spatial information at large scales mapping, especially suitable for rapid response and precise modelling in disaster emergency.

  7. Projective 3D-reconstruction of Uncalibrated Endoscopic Images

    P. Faltin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common medical diagnostic method for urinary bladder cancer is cystoscopy. This inspection of the bladder is performed by a rigid endoscope, which is usually guided close to the bladder wall. This causes a very limited field of view; difficulty of navigation is aggravated by the usage of angled endoscopes. These factors cause difficulties in orientation and visual control. To overcome this problem, the paper presents a method for extracting 3D information from uncalibrated endoscopic image sequences and for reconstructing the scene content. The method uses the SURF-algorithm to extract features from the images and relates the images by advanced matching. To stabilize the matching, the epipolar geometry is extracted for each image pair using a modified RANSAC-algorithm. Afterwards these matched point pairs are used to generate point triplets over three images and to describe the trifocal geometry. The 3D scene points are determined by applying triangulation to the matched image points. Thus, these points are used to generate a projective 3D reconstruction of the scene, and provide the first step for further metric reconstructions.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    Yatagai, Toyohiko; Miura, Ken-ichi; Sando, Yusuke; Itoh, Masahide [University of Tsukba, Institute of Applied Physics, Tennoudai 1-1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan)], E-mail: yatagai@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2008-11-01

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  9. Three-dimensional imaging using computer-generated holograms synthesized from 3-D Fourier spectra

    Computer-generated holograms(CGHs) synthesized from projection images of real existing objects are considered. A series of projection images are recorded both vertically and horizontally with an incoherent light source and a color CCD. According to the principles of computer tomography(CT), the 3-D Fourier spectrum is calculated from several projection images of objects and the Fresnel CGH is synthesized using a part of the 3-D Fourier spectrum. This method has following advantages. At first, no-blur reconstructed images in any direction are obtained owing to two-dimensionally scanning in recording. Secondarily, since not interference fringes but simple projection images of objects are recorded, a coherent light source is not necessary. Moreover, when a color CCD is used in recording, it is easily possible to record and reconstruct colorful objects. Finally, we demonstrate reconstruction of biological objects.

  10. A novel 3D volumetric voxel registration technique for volume-view-guided image registration of multiple imaging modalities

    Purpose: To provide more clinically useful image registration with improved accuracy and reduced time, a novel technique of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric voxel registration of multimodality images is developed. Methods and Materials: This technique can register up to four concurrent images from multimodalities with volume view guidance. Various visualization effects can be applied, facilitating global and internal voxel registration. Fourteen computed tomography/magnetic resonance (CT/MR) image sets and two computed tomography/positron emission tomography (CT/PET) image sets are used. For comparison, an automatic registration technique using maximization of mutual information (MMI) and a three-orthogonal-planar (3P) registration technique are used. Results: Visually sensitive registration criteria for CT/MR and CT/PET have been established, including the homogeneity of color distribution. Based on the registration results of 14 CT/MR images, the 3D voxel technique is in excellent agreement with the automatic MMI technique and is indicatory of a global positioning error (defined as the means and standard deviations of the error distribution) using the 3P pixel technique: 1.8 deg ± 1.2 deg in rotation and 2.0 ± 1.3 (voxel unit) in translation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such positioning error has been addressed. Conclusion: This novel 3D voxel technique establishes volume-view-guided image registration of up to four modalities. It improves registration accuracy with reduced time, compared with the 3P pixel technique. This article suggests that any interactive and automatic registration should be safeguarded using the 3D voxel technique

  11. Application of 3D X-ray CT data sets to finite element analysis

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) is becoming more important as industry drives toward concurrent engineering. A fundamental hindrance to fully exploiting the power of FEM is the human effort required to acquire complex part geometry, particularly as-built geometry, as a FEM mesh. Many Quantitative Non Destructive Evaluation (QNDE) techniques that produce three-dimensional (3D) data sets provide a substantial reduction in the effort required to apply FEM to as-built parts. This paper describes progress at LLNL on the application of 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets to more rapidly produce high-quality FEM meshes of complex, as-built geometries. Issues related to the volume segmentation of the 3D CT data as well as the use of this segmented data to tailor generic hexahedral FEM meshes to part specific geometries are discussed. The application of these techniques to FEM analysis in the medical field is reported here

  12. 3D CT modeling of hepatic vessel architecture and volume calculation in living donated liver transplantation

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a software tool for non-invasive preoperative volumetric assessment of potential donors in living donated liver transplantation (LDLT). Biphasic helical CT was performed in 56 potential donors. Data sets were post-processed using a non-commercial software tool for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualisation of liver segments. Semi-automatic definition of liver margins allowed the segmentation of parenchyma. Hepatic vessels were delineated using a region-growing algorithm with automatically determined thresholds. Volumes and shapes of liver segments were calculated automatically based on individual portal-venous branches. Results were visualised three-dimensionally and statistically compared with conventional volumetry and the intraoperative findings in 27 transplanted cases. Image processing was easy to perform within 23 min. Of the 56 potential donors, 27 were excluded from LDLT because of inappropriate liver parenchyma or vascular architecture. Two recipients were not transplanted due to poor clinical conditions. In the 27 transplanted cases, preoperatively visualised vessels were confirmed, and only one undetected accessory hepatic vein was revealed. Calculated graft volumes were 1110±180 ml for right lobes, 820 ml for the left lobe and 270±30 ml for segments II+III. The calculated volumes and intraoperatively measured graft volumes correlated significantly. No significant differences between the presented automatic volumetry and the conventional volumetry were observed. A novel image processing technique was evaluated which allows a semi-automatic volume calculation and 3D visualisation of the different liver segments. (orig.)

  13. 1024 pixels single photon imaging array for 3D ranging

    Bellisai, S.; Guerrieri, F.; Tisa, S.; Zappa, F.; Tosi, A.; Giudice, A.

    2011-01-01

    Three dimensions (3D) acquisition systems are driving applications in many research field. Nowadays 3D acquiring systems are used in a lot of applications, such as cinema industry or in automotive (for active security systems). Depending on the application, systems present different features, for example color sensitivity, bi-dimensional image resolution, distance measurement accuracy and acquisition frame rate. The system we developed acquires 3D movie using indirect Time of Flight (iTOF), starting from phase delay measurement of a sinusoidally modulated light. The system acquires live movie with a frame rate up to 50frame/s in a range distance between 10 cm up to 7.5 m.

  14. 2D-3D Registration of CT Vertebra Volume to Fluoroscopy Projection: A Calibration Model Assessment

    P. Bifulco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study extends a previous research concerning intervertebral motion registration by means of 2D dynamic fluoroscopy to obtain a more comprehensive 3D description of vertebral kinematics. The problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of a vertebra from its 2D X-ray fluoroscopy projection is addressed. 2D-3D registration is obtained maximising a measure of similarity between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (obtained from the CT volume and real fluoroscopic projection. X-ray energy correction was performed. To assess the method a calibration model was realised a sheep dry vertebra was rigidly fixed to a frame of reference including metallic markers. Accurate measurement of 3D orientation was obtained via single-camera calibration of the markers and held as true 3D vertebra position; then, vertebra 3D pose was estimated and results compared. Error analysis revealed accuracy of the order of 0.1 degree for the rotation angles of about 1 mm for displacements parallel to the fluoroscopic plane, and of order of 10 mm for the orthogonal displacement.

  15. 3D Medical Image Interpolation Based on Parametric Cubic Convolution

    2007-01-01

    In the process of display, manipulation and analysis of biomedical image data, they usually need to be converted to data of isotropic discretization through the process of interpolation, while the cubic convolution interpolation is widely used due to its good tradeoff between computational cost and accuracy. In this paper, we present a whole concept for the 3D medical image interpolation based on cubic convolution, and the six methods, with the different sharp control parameter, which are formulated in details. Furthermore, we also give an objective comparison for these methods using data sets with the different slice spacing. Each slice in these data sets is estimated by each interpolation method and compared with the original slice using three measures: mean-squared difference, number of sites of disagreement, and largest difference. According to the experimental results, we present a recommendation for 3D medical images under the different situations in the end.

  16. 3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal neutrino telescope

    A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 m square; acoustic pulses were 'linear sweep-spread signals'-multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10→22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with an accuracy of ∼0.2 m (along the beam) and ∼1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km3-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

  17. 3D acoustic imaging applied to the Baikal neutrino telescope

    Kebkal, K.G. [EvoLogics GmbH, Blumenstrasse 49, 10243 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: kebkal@evologics.de; Bannasch, R.; Kebkal, O.G. [EvoLogics GmbH, Blumenstrasse 49, 10243 Berlin (Germany); Panfilov, A.I. [Institute for Nuclear Research, 60th October Anniversary pr. 7a, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Wischnewski, R. [DESY, Platanenallee 6, 15735 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-04-11

    A hydro-acoustic imaging system was tested in a pilot study on distant localization of elements of the Baikal underwater neutrino telescope. For this innovative approach, based on broad band acoustic echo signals and strictly avoiding any active acoustic elements on the telescope, the imaging system was temporarily installed just below the ice surface, while the telescope stayed in its standard position at 1100 m depth. The system comprised an antenna with four acoustic projectors positioned at the corners of a 50 m square; acoustic pulses were 'linear sweep-spread signals'-multiple-modulated wide-band signals (10{yields}22 kHz) of 51.2 s duration. Three large objects (two string buoys and the central electronics module) were localized by the 3D acoustic imaging, with an accuracy of {approx}0.2 m (along the beam) and {approx}1.0 m (transverse). We discuss signal forms and parameters necessary for improved 3D acoustic imaging of the telescope, and suggest a layout of a possible stationary bottom based 3D imaging setup. The presented technique may be of interest for neutrino telescopes of km{sup 3}-scale and beyond, as a flexible temporary or as a stationary tool to localize basic telescope elements, while these are completely passive.

  18. Carotid artery stenosis: reproducibility of automated 3D CT angiography analysis method

    The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility and anatomical accuracy of automated 3D CT angiography analysis software in the evaluation of carotid artery stenosis with reference to rotational DSA (rDSA). Seventy-two vessels in 36 patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis were evaluated by 3D CT angiography and conventional DSA (cDSA). Thirty-one patients also underwent rotational 3D DSA (rDSA). Multislice CT was performed with bolus tracking and slice thickness of 1.5 mm (1-mm collimation, table feed 5 mm/s) and reconstruction interval of 1.0 mm. Two observers independently performed the stenosis measurements on 3D CTA and on MPR rDSA according to the NASCET criteria. The first measurements on CTA utilized an analysis program with automatic stenosis recognition and quantitation. In the subsequent measurements, manual corrections were applied when necessary. Interfering factors for stenosis quantitation, such as calcifications, ulcerations, and adjacent vessels, were registered. Intraobserver and interobserver correlation for CTA were 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. (p<0.001). The interobserver correlation between two observers for MPR rDSA was 0.90 (p<0.001). The intertechnique correlation between CTA and rDSA was 0.69 (p<0.001) using automated measurements but increased to 0.81 (p<0.001) with the manually corrected measurements. Automated stenosis recognition achieved a markedly poorer correlation with MPR rDSA in carotids with interfering factors than those in cases where there were no such factors. Automated 3D CT angiography analysis methods are highly reproducible. Manually corrected measurements facilitated avoidance of the interfering factors, such as ulcerations, calcifications, and adjacent vessels, and thus increased anatomical accuracy of arterial delineation by automated CT angiography with reference to MPR rDSA. (orig.)

  19. Large distance 3D imaging of hidden objects

    Rozban, Daniel; Aharon Akram, Avihai; Kopeika, N. S.; Abramovich, A.; Levanon, Assaf

    2014-06-01

    Imaging systems in millimeter waves are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is low compared to that of infrared and optical rays. The lack of an inexpensive room temperature detector makes it difficult to give a suitable real time implement for the above applications. A 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA of plasma based detectors) using heterodyne detection. The intensity at each pixel in the GDD FPA yields the usual 2D image. The value of the I-F frequency yields the range information at each pixel. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of inexpensive detectors. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  20. 3D Image Reconstruction from Compton camera data

    Kuchment, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address analytically and numerically the inversion of the integral transform (\\emph{cone} or \\emph{Compton} transform) that maps a function on $\\mathbb{R}^3$ to its integrals over conical surfaces. It arises in a variety of imaging techniques, e.g. in astronomy, optical imaging, and homeland security imaging, especially when the so called Compton cameras are involved. Several inversion formulas are developed and implemented numerically in $3D$ (the much simpler $2D$ case was considered in a previous publication).

  1. Computer assisted determination of acetabular cup orientation using 2D-3D image registration

    2D-3D image-based registration methods have been developed to measure acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These methods require registration of both the prosthesis and the CT images to 2D radiographs and compute implant position with respect to a reference. The application of these methods is limited in clinical practice due to two limitations: (1) the requirement of a computer-aided design (CAD) model of the prosthesis, which may be unavailable due to the proprietary concerns of the manufacturer, and (2) the requirement of either multiple radiographs or radiograph-specific calibration, usually unavailable for retrospective studies. In this paper, we propose a new method to address these limitations. A new formulation for determination of post-operative cup orientation, which couples a radiographic measurement with 2D-3D image matching, was developed. In our formulation, the radiographic measurement can be obtained with known methods so that the challenge lies in the 2D-3D image matching. To solve this problem, a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining a landmark-to-ray 2D-3D alignment with a robust intensity-based 2D-3D registration was used. The hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme allows computing both the post-operative cup orientation with respect to an anatomical reference and the pelvic tilt and rotation with respect to the X-ray imaging table/plate. The method was validated using 2D adult cadaver hips. Using the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme, our method showed a mean accuracy of 1.0 ± 0.7 (range from 0.1 to 2.0 ) for inclination and 1.7 ± 1.2 (range from 0.0 to 3.9 ) for anteversion, taking the measurements from post-operative CT images as ground truths. Our new solution formulation and the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme facilitate estimation of post-operative cup orientation and measurement of pelvic tilt and rotation. (orig.)

  2. Computer assisted determination of acetabular cup orientation using 2D-3D image registration

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan [University of Bern, Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-15

    2D-3D image-based registration methods have been developed to measure acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These methods require registration of both the prosthesis and the CT images to 2D radiographs and compute implant position with respect to a reference. The application of these methods is limited in clinical practice due to two limitations: (1) the requirement of a computer-aided design (CAD) model of the prosthesis, which may be unavailable due to the proprietary concerns of the manufacturer, and (2) the requirement of either multiple radiographs or radiograph-specific calibration, usually unavailable for retrospective studies. In this paper, we propose a new method to address these limitations. A new formulation for determination of post-operative cup orientation, which couples a radiographic measurement with 2D-3D image matching, was developed. In our formulation, the radiographic measurement can be obtained with known methods so that the challenge lies in the 2D-3D image matching. To solve this problem, a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining a landmark-to-ray 2D-3D alignment with a robust intensity-based 2D-3D registration was used. The hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme allows computing both the post-operative cup orientation with respect to an anatomical reference and the pelvic tilt and rotation with respect to the X-ray imaging table/plate. The method was validated using 2D adult cadaver hips. Using the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme, our method showed a mean accuracy of 1.0 {+-} 0.7 (range from 0.1 to 2.0 ) for inclination and 1.7 {+-} 1.2 (range from 0.0 to 3.9 ) for anteversion, taking the measurements from post-operative CT images as ground truths. Our new solution formulation and the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme facilitate estimation of post-operative cup orientation and measurement of pelvic tilt and rotation. (orig.)

  3. Combining different modalities for 3D imaging of biological objects

    A resolution enhanced NaI(Tl)-scintillator micro-SPECT device using pinhole collimator geometry has been built and tested with small animals. This device was constructed based on a depth-of-interaction measurement using a thick scintillator crystal and a position sensitive PMT to measure depth-dependent scintillator light profiles. Such a measurement eliminates the parallax error that degrades the high spatial resolution required for small animal imaging. This novel technique for 3D gamma-ray detection was incorporated into the micro-SPECT device and tested with a 57Co source and 98mTc-MDP injected in mice body. To further enhance the investigating power of the tomographic imaging different imaging modalities can be combined. In particular, as proposed and shown, the optical imaging permits a 3D reconstruction of the animal's skin surface thus improving visualization and making possible depth-dependent corrections, necessary for bioluminescence 3D reconstruction in biological objects. This structural information can provide even more detail if the x-ray tomography is used as presented in the paper

  4. Combining Different Modalities for 3D Imaging of Biological Objects

    Tsyganov, E; Kulkarni, P; Mason, R; Parkey, R; Seliuonine, S; Shay, J; Soesbe, T; Zhezher, V; Zinchenko, A I

    2005-01-01

    A resolution enhanced NaI(Tl)-scintillator micro-SPECT device using pinhole collimator geometry has been built and tested with small animals. This device was constructed based on a depth-of-interaction measurement using a thick scintillator crystal and a position sensitive PMT to measure depth-dependent scintillator light profiles. Such a measurement eliminates the parallax error that degrades the high spatial resolution required for small animal imaging. This novel technique for 3D gamma-ray detection was incorporated into the micro-SPECT device and tested with a $^{57}$Co source and $^{98m}$Tc-MDP injected in mice body. To further enhance the investigating power of the tomographic imaging different imaging modalities can be combined. In particular, as proposed and shown in this paper, the optical imaging permits a 3D reconstruction of the animal's skin surface thus improving visualization and making possible depth-dependent corrections, necessary for bioluminescence 3D reconstruction in biological objects. ...

  5. Development and validation of a CT-3D rotational angiography registration method for AVM radiosurgery

    In this paper a novel technique is proposed and validated for radiosurgery treatment planning of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The technique was developed for frameless radiosurgery by means of the CyberKnife, a nonisocentric, linac-based system which allows highly conformed isodose surfaces to be obtained, while also being valid for other treatment strategies. The technique is based on registration between computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA). Tests were initially performed on the effectiveness of the correction method for distortion offered by the angiographic system. These results determined the registration technique that was ultimately chosen. For CT-3DRA registration, a twelve-parameter affine transformation was selected, based on a mutual information maximization algorithm. The robustness of the algorithm was tested by attempting to register data sets increasingly distant from each other, both in translation and rotation. Registration accuracy was estimated by means of the 'full circle consistency test'. A registration quality index (expressed in millimeters) based on these results was also defined. A hybrid subtraction between CT and 3DRA is proposed in order to improve 3D reconstruction. Preprocessing improved the ability of the algorithm to find an acceptable solution to the registration process. The robustness tests showed that data sets must be manually prealigned within approximately 15 mm and 20 deg. with respect to all three directions simultaneously. Results of the consistency test showed agreement between the quality index and registration accuracy stated by visual inspection in 20 good and 10 artificially worsened registration processes. The quality index showed values smaller than the maximum voxel size (mean 0.8 mm compared to 2 mm) for all successful registrations, while it resulted in much greater values (mean 20 mm) for unsuccessful registrations. Once registered, the two data sets can be used for

  6. SPECT/CT and coincidence detection-PET/CT for 3D localization of metastases and sentinel nodes in patients with a rapid lymphatic draining - a case report

    Aim: A sentinel node examination was performed on the suspicion of recurrence in a patient with a 18 months earlier surgically excised malignant melanoma located on the scalp. At planar imaging, rapid lymphatic draining made it impossible to identify the sentinel node(s) to be excised surgically and therefore a combined SPECT/CT and a coincidence detection-PET/CT (CoDe-PET/CT) with 18FDG was performed. Materials and Methods: 20 MBq of 99mTc-nanocollid was administered by several injections around the scar. Fifteen minutes later, frontal and lateral planar images were acquired with a conventional gammacamera. A follow-up SPECT examination was performed the next day utilizing the remaining 99mTc-nanocolloid activity and a combined SPECT/CoDe-PET/CT camera (MilleniumVG Hawkeye, General Electric). Following the SPECT/CT scan, 400 MBq 18F-FDG was i.v. administered to the patient. One and half hour later, a CoDe-PET/CT was performed in order to enable 3D localisation of possible malignant metastatic nodes. Transverse CT-sections from both scans were selected at the same axial level in order to reveal a correspondence between the SPECT and the CoDe-PET examinations. Results: The first sentinel node examination visualized a series of lymphatic nodes, running between the auditory meatus and fossa supraclavicularis of the left neck region. The SPECT/CT examination performed the next day showed remaining activity in the same series of nodes as in the first examination. The combined CoDe-PET/CT images visualised a strong and well localised 18F-FDG uptake posterior in the left neck region. By means of the CT images obtained with both CoDe-PET and SPECT, the high FDG uptake could be accurately localized to the position of one of the lymphatic nodes at the sentinel node examination. This node was later histologically verified as a metastases from malignant melanoma. The CT images gave the correct anatomical survey that facilitated the subsequent surgery. Conclusions: A general

  7. Decreased 3D observer variation with matched CT-MRI, for target delineation in Nasopharynx cancer

    To determine the variation in target delineation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the impact of measures to minimize this variation. For ten nasopharyngeal cancer patients, ten observers each delineated the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the CTV elective. After 3D analysis of the delineated volumes, a second delineation was performed. This implied improved delineation instructions, a combined delineation on CT and co-registered MRI, forced use of sagittal reconstructions, and an on-line anatomical atlas. Both for the CTV and the CTV elective delineations, the 3D SD decreased from Phase 1 to Phase 2, from 4.4 to 3.3 mm for the CTV and from 5.9 to 4.9 mm for the elective. There was an increase agreement, where the observers intended to delineate the same structure, from 36 to 64 surface % (p = 0.003) for the CTV and from 17 to 59% (p = 0.004) for the elective. The largest variations were at the caudal border of the delineations but these were smaller when an observer utilized the sagittal window. Hence, the use of sagittal side windows was enforced in the second phase and resulted in a decreased standard deviation for this area from 7.7 to 3.3 mm (p = 0.001) for the CTV and 7.9 to 5.6 mm (p = 0.03) for the CTV elective. Attempts to decrease the variation need to be tailored to the specific causes of the variation. Use of delineation instructions multimodality imaging, the use of sagittal windows and an on-line atlas result in a higher agreement on the intended target

  8. Decreased 3D observer variation with matched CT-MRI, for target delineation in Nasopharynx cancer

    Kaanders Johannes HAM

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To determine the variation in target delineation of nasopharyngeal carcinoma and the impact of measures to minimize this variation. Materials and methods For ten nasopharyngeal cancer patients, ten observers each delineated the Clinical Target Volume (CTV and the CTV elective. After 3D analysis of the delineated volumes, a second delineation was performed. This implied improved delineation instructions, a combined delineation on CT and co-registered MRI, forced use of sagittal reconstructions, and an on-line anatomical atlas. Results Both for the CTV and the CTV elective delineations, the 3D SD decreased from Phase 1 to Phase 2, from 4.4 to 3.3 mm for the CTV and from 5.9 to 4.9 mm for the elective. There was an increase agreement, where the observers intended to delineate the same structure, from 36 to 64 surface % (p = 0.003 for the CTV and from 17 to 59% (p = 0.004 for the elective. The largest variations were at the caudal border of the delineations but these were smaller when an observer utilized the sagittal window. Hence, the use of sagittal side windows was enforced in the second phase and resulted in a decreased standard deviation for this area from 7.7 to 3.3 mm (p = 0.001 for the CTV and 7.9 to 5.6 mm (p = 0.03 for the CTV elective. Discussion Attempts to decrease the variation need to be tailored to the specific causes of the variation. Use of delineation instructions multimodality imaging, the use of sagittal windows and an on-line atlas result in a higher agreement on the intended target.

  9. A questionnaire-based survey on 3D image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer in Japan. Advances and obstacles

    The purpose of this study is to survey the current patterns of practice, and barriers to implementation, of 3D image-guided brachytherapy (3D-IGBT) for cervical cancer in Japan. A 30-item questionnaire was sent to 171 Japanese facilities where high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices were available in 2012. In total, 135 responses were returned for analysis. Fifty-one facilities had acquired some sort of 3D imaging modality with applicator insertion, and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used in 51 and 3 of the facilities, respectively. For actual treatment planning, X-ray films, CT and MRI were used in 113, 20 and 2 facilities, respectively. Among 43 facilities where X-ray films and CT or MRI were acquired with an applicator, 29 still used X-ray films for actual treatment planning, mainly because of limited time and/or staffing. In a follow-up survey 2.5 years later, respondents included 38 facilities that originally used X-ray films alone but had indicated plans to adopt 3D-IGBT. Of these, 21 had indeed adopted CT imaging with applicator insertion. In conclusion, 3D-IGBT (mainly CT) was implemented in 22 facilities (16%) and will be installed in 72 (53%) facilities in the future. Limited time and staffing were major impediments. (author)

  10. A questionnaire-based survey on 3D image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer in Japan: advances and obstacles.

    Ohno, Tatsuya; Toita, Takafumi; Tsujino, Kayoko; Uchida, Nobue; Hatano, Kazuo; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Ishikura, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to survey the current patterns of practice, and barriers to implementation, of 3D image-guided brachytherapy (3D-IGBT) for cervical cancer in Japan. A 30-item questionnaire was sent to 171 Japanese facilities where high-dose-rate brachytherapy devices were available in 2012. In total, 135 responses were returned for analysis. Fifty-one facilities had acquired some sort of 3D imaging modality with applicator insertion, and computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used in 51 and 3 of the facilities, respectively. For actual treatment planning, X-ray films, CT and MRI were used in 113, 20 and 2 facilities, respectively. Among 43 facilities where X-ray films and CT or MRI were acquired with an applicator, 29 still used X-ray films for actual treatment planning, mainly because of limited time and/or staffing. In a follow-up survey 2.5 years later, respondents included 38 facilities that originally used X-ray films alone but had indicated plans to adopt 3D-IGBT. Of these, 21 had indeed adopted CT imaging with applicator insertion. In conclusion, 3D-IGBT (mainly CT) was implemented in 22 facilities (16%) and will be installed in 72 (53%) facilities in the future. Limited time and staffing were major impediments. PMID:26265660

  11. Traversing and labeling interconnected vascular tree structures from 3D medical images

    O'Dell, Walter G.; Govindarajan, Sindhuja Tirumalai; Salgia, Ankit; Hegde, Satyanarayan; Prabhakaran, Sreekala; Finol, Ender A.; White, R. James

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Detailed characterization of pulmonary vascular anatomy has important applications for the diagnosis and management of a variety of vascular diseases. Prior efforts have emphasized using vessel segmentation to gather information on the number or branches, number of bifurcations, and branch length and volume, but accurate traversal of the vessel tree to identify and repair erroneous interconnections between adjacent branches and neighboring tree structures has not been carefully considered. In this study, we endeavor to develop and implement a successful approach to distinguishing and characterizing individual vascular trees from among a complex intermingling of trees. Methods: We developed strategies and parameters in which the algorithm identifies and repairs false branch inter-tree and intra-tree connections to traverse complicated vessel trees. A series of two-dimensional (2D) virtual datasets with a variety of interconnections were constructed for development, testing, and validation. To demonstrate the approach, a series of real 3D computed tomography (CT) lung datasets were obtained, including that of an anthropomorphic chest phantom; an adult human chest CT; a pediatric patient chest CT; and a micro-CT of an excised rat lung preparation. Results: Our method was correct in all 2D virtual test datasets. For each real 3D CT dataset, the resulting simulated vessel tree structures faithfully depicted the vessel tree structures that were originally extracted from the corresponding lung CT scans. Conclusion: We have developed a comprehensive strategy for traversing and labeling interconnected vascular trees and successfully implemented its application to pulmonary vessels observed using 3D CT images of the chest.

  12. 3D Extension of Haralick Texture Features for Medical Image Analysis

    Tesař, Ludvík; Smutek, D.; Shimizu, A.; Kobatake, H.

    Zurich : ACTA Press, 2007, s. 350-355. ISBN 978-0-88986-646-1. [IASTED International Conference on Signal Processing, Pattern Recognition, and Applications 2007 /4./. Innsbruck (AT), 14.02.2007-16.02.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET101050403; GA MŠk 1M0572 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Haralick texture features * 3D image analysis * image segmentation * CT image s * Gaussian mixture * model-based decision-making * EM algorithm Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  13. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology

  14. Computer-aided diagnosis of pulmonary nodules on CT scans: Segmentation and classification using 3D active contours

    We are developing a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to classify malignant and benign lung nodules found on CT scans. A fully automated system was designed to segment the nodule from its surrounding structured background in a local volume of interest (VOI) and to extract image features for classification. Image segmentation was performed with a three-dimensional (3D) active contour (AC) method. A data set of 96 lung nodules (44 malignant, 52 benign) from 58 patients was used in this study. The 3D AC model is based on two-dimensional AC with the addition of three new energy components to take advantage of 3D information: (1) 3D gradient, which guides the active contour to seek the object surface (2) 3D curvature, which imposes a smoothness constraint in the z direction, and (3) mask energy, which penalizes contours that grow beyond the pleura or thoracic wall. The search for the best energy weights in the 3D AC model was guided by a simplex optimization method. Morphological and gray-level features were extracted from the segmented nodule. The rubber band straightening transform (RBST) was applied to the shell of voxels surrounding the nodule. Texture features based on run-length statistics were extracted from the RBST image. A linear discriminant analysis classifier with stepwise feature selection was designed using a second simplex optimization to select the most effective features. Leave-one-case-out resampling was used to train and test the CAD system. The system achieved a test area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az) of 0.83±0.04. Our preliminary results indicate that use of the 3D AC model and the 3D texture features surrounding the nodule is a promising approach to the segmentation and classification of lung nodules with CAD. The segmentation performance of the 3D AC model trained with our data set was evaluated with 23 nodules available in the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The lung nodule volumes segmented by the 3D AC

  15. Factors Affecting Dimensional Accuracy of 3-D Printed Anatomical Structures Derived from CT Data.

    Ogden, Kent M; Aslan, Can; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Soman, Pranav

    2015-12-01

    Additive manufacturing and bio-printing, with the potential for direct fabrication of complex patient-specific anatomies derived from medical scan data, are having an ever-increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Anatomic structures are typically derived from CT or MRI scans, and there are multiple steps in the model derivation process that influence the geometric accuracy of the printed constructs. In this work, we compare the dimensional accuracy of 3-D printed constructs of an L1 vertebra derived from CT data for an ex vivo cadaver T-L spine with the original vertebra. Processing of segmented structures using binary median filters and various surface extraction algorithms is evaluated for the effect on model dimensions. We investigate the effects of changing CT reconstruction kernels by scanning simple geometric objects and measuring the impact on the derived model dimensions. We also investigate if there are significant differences between physical and virtual model measurements. The 3-D models were printed using a commercial 3-D printer, the Replicator 2 (MakerBot, Brooklyn, NY) using polylactic acid (PLA) filament. We found that changing parameters during the scan reconstruction, segmentation, filtering, and surface extraction steps will have an effect on the dimensions of the final model. These effects need to be quantified for specific situations that rely on the accuracy of 3-D printed models used in medicine or tissue engineering applications. PMID:25982877

  16. 3D Imaging of a Cavity Vacuum under Dissipation

    Lee, Moonjoo; Seo, Wontaek; Hong, Hyun-Gue; Song, Younghoon; Dasari, Ramachandra R; An, Kyungwon

    2013-01-01

    P. A. M. Dirac first introduced zero-point electromagnetic fields in order to explain the origin of atomic spontaneous emission. Since then, it has long been debated how the zero-point vacuum field is affected by dissipation. Here we report 3D imaging of vacuum fluctuations in a high-Q cavity and rms amplitude measurements of the vacuum field. The 3D imaging was done by the position-dependent emission of single atoms, resulting in dissipation-free rms amplitude of 0.97 +- 0.03 V/cm. The actual rms amplitude of the vacuum field at the antinode was independently determined from the onset of single-atom lasing at 0.86 +- 0.08 V/cm. Within our experimental accuracy and precision, the difference was noticeable, but it is not significant enough to disprove zero-point energy conservation.

  17. 3D RECONSTRUCTION FROM MULTI-VIEW MEDICAL X-RAY IMAGES – REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF EXISTING METHODS

    S. Hosseinian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The 3D concept is extremely important in clinical studies of human body. Accurate 3D models of bony structures are currently required in clinical routine for diagnosis, patient follow-up, surgical planning, computer assisted surgery and biomechanical applications. However, 3D conventional medical imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have serious limitations such as using in non-weight-bearing positions, costs and high radiation dose(for CT. Therefore, 3D reconstruction methods from biplanar X-ray images have been taken into consideration as reliable alternative methods in order to achieve accurate 3D models with low dose radiation in weight-bearing positions. Different methods have been offered for 3D reconstruction from X-ray images using photogrammetry which should be assessed. In this paper, after demonstrating the principles of 3D reconstruction from X-ray images, different existing methods of 3D reconstruction of bony structures from radiographs are classified and evaluated with various metrics and their advantages and disadvantages are mentioned. Finally, a comparison has been done on the presented methods with respect to several metrics such as accuracy, reconstruction time and their applications. With regards to the research, each method has several advantages and disadvantages which should be considered for a specific application.

  18. Automated Recognition of 3D Features in GPIR Images

    Park, Han; Stough, Timothy; Fijany, Amir

    2007-01-01

    A method of automated recognition of three-dimensional (3D) features in images generated by ground-penetrating imaging radar (GPIR) is undergoing development. GPIR 3D images can be analyzed to detect and identify such subsurface features as pipes and other utility conduits. Until now, much of the analysis of GPIR images has been performed manually by expert operators who must visually identify and track each feature. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for more efficient and accurate analysis by means of algorithms that can automatically identify and track subsurface features, with minimal supervision by human operators. In this method, data from multiple sources (for example, data on different features extracted by different algorithms) are fused together for identifying subsurface objects. The algorithms of this method can be classified in several different ways. In one classification, the algorithms fall into three classes: (1) image-processing algorithms, (2) feature- extraction algorithms, and (3) a multiaxis data-fusion/pattern-recognition algorithm that includes a combination of machine-learning, pattern-recognition, and object-linking algorithms. The image-processing class includes preprocessing algorithms for reducing noise and enhancing target features for pattern recognition. The feature-extraction algorithms operate on preprocessed data to extract such specific features in images as two-dimensional (2D) slices of a pipe. Then the multiaxis data-fusion/ pattern-recognition algorithm identifies, classifies, and reconstructs 3D objects from the extracted features. In this process, multiple 2D features extracted by use of different algorithms and representing views along different directions are used to identify and reconstruct 3D objects. In object linking, which is an essential part of this process, features identified in successive 2D slices and located within a threshold radius of identical features in adjacent slices are linked in a

  19. 3D imaging of semiconductor components by discrete laminography

    Batenburg, Joost; Palenstijn, W.J.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray laminography is a powerful technique for quality control of semiconductor components. Despite the advantages of nondestructive 3D imaging over 2D techniques based on sectioning, the acquisition time is still a major obstacle for practical use of the technique. In this paper, we consider the application of Discrete Tomography to laminography data, which can potentially reduce the scanning time while still maintaining a high reconstruction quality. By incorporating prior knowledge in the ...

  20. Improvements in quality and quantification of 3D PET images

    Rapisarda,

    2012-01-01

    The spatial resolution of Positron Emission Tomography is conditioned by several physical factors, which can be taken into account by using a global Point Spread Function (PSF). In this thesis a spatially variant (radially asymmetric) PSF implementation in the image space of a 3D Ordered Subsets Expectation Maximization (OSEM) algorithm is proposed. Two different scanners were considered, without and with Time Of Flight (TOF) capability. The PSF was derived by fitting some experimental...

  1. 3D VSP imaging in the Deepwater GOM

    Hornby, B. E.

    2005-05-01

    Seismic imaging challenges in the Deepwater GOM include surface and sediment related multiples and issues arising from complicated salt bodies. Frequently, wells encounter geologic complexity not resolved on conventional surface seismic section. To help address these challenges BP has been acquiring 3D VSP (Vertical Seismic Profile) surveys in the Deepwater GOM. The procedure involves placing an array of seismic sensors in the borehole and acquiring a 3D seismic dataset with a surface seismic gunboat that fires airguns in a spiral pattern around the wellbore. Placing the seismic geophones in the borehole provides a higher resolution and more accurate image near the borehole, as well as other advantages relating to the unique position of the sensors relative to complex structures. Technical objectives are to complement surface seismic with improved resolution (~2X seismic), better high dip structure definition (e.g. salt flanks) and to fill in "imaging holes" in complex sub-salt plays where surface seismic is blind. Business drivers for this effort are to reduce risk in well placement, improved reserve calculation and understanding compartmentalization and stratigraphic variation. To date, BP has acquired 3D VSP surveys in ten wells in the DW GOM. The initial results are encouraging and show both improved resolution and structural images in complex sub-salt plays where the surface seismic is blind. In conjunction with this effort BP has influenced both contractor borehole seismic tool design and developed methods to enable the 3D VSP surveys to be conducted offline thereby avoiding the high daily rig costs associated with a Deepwater drilling rig.

  2. Renal Tumor Cryoablation Planning. The Efficiency of Simulation on Reconstructed 3D CT Scan

    Ciprian Valerian LUCAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nephron-sparing surgical techniques risks are related to tumor relationships with adjacent anatomic structures. Complexity of the renal anatomy drives the interest to develop tools for 3D reconstruction and surgery simulation. The aim of the article was to assess the simulation on reconstructed 3D CT scan used for planning the cryoablation. Material & Method: A prospective randomized study was performed between Jan. 2007 and July 2009 on 27 patients who underwent retroperitoneoscopic T1a renal tumors cryoablation (RC. All patients were assessed preoperatively by CT scan, also used for 3D volume rendering. In the Gr.A, the patients underwent surgery planning by simulation on 3D CT scan. In the Gr.B., patients underwent standard RC. The two groups were compared in terms of surgical time, bleeding, postoperative drainage, analgesics requirement, hospital stay, time to socio-professional reintegration. Results: Fourteen patients underwent preoperative cryoablation planning (Gr.A and 13 patients underwent standard CR (Gr.B. All parameters analyzed were shorter in the Gr.A. On multivariate logistic regression, only shortens of the surgical time (138.79±5.51 min. in Gr.A. vs. 140.92±5.54 min in Gr.B. and bleeding (164.29±60.22 mL in Gr.A. vs. 215.38±100.80 mL in Gr.B. achieved statistical significance (p<0.05. The number of cryoneedles assessed by simulation had a 92.52% accuracy when compared with those effectively used. Conclusions: Simulation of the cryoablation using reconstructed 3D CT scan improves the surgical results. The application used for simulation was able to accurately assess the number of cryoneedles required for tumor ablation, their direction and approach.

  3. Small metal soft tissue foreign body extraction by using 3D CT guidance: A reliable method

    Tao, Kai, E-mail: davidtaothree@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu, Sen, E-mail: hubeixusen@163.com [Department of Radiology, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, 83 Wenhua Steet, Shenhe District, Shenyang 110016, Liaoning Province (China); Liu, Xiao-yan, E-mail: kk-lxy@sohu.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Liang, Jiu-long, E-mail: liangjiulong@sohu.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qiu, Tao, E-mail: anthonyqueen@vip.sina.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Tan, Jia-nan, E-mail: tanjianan@sina.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Che, Jian-hua, E-mail: chejianhua@163.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, Zi-hua, E-mail: rockstar520@163.com [Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, PLA, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To introduce a useful and accurate technique for the locating and removal of small metal foreign bodies in the soft tissues. Methods: Eight patients presented with suspected small metal foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Under local anesthesia, 3-6 pieces of 5 ml syringe needles or 1 ml syringe needles were induced through three different planes around the entry point of the foreign bodies. Using these finders, the small metal FBs were confirmed under 3D CT guidance. Based on the CT findings, the soft tissues were dissected along the path of the closest needle and the FBs were easily found and removed according to the relation with the closest needle finder. Results: Eight metal foreign bodies (3 slices, 3 nails, 1 fish hook, 1 needlepoint) were successfully removed under 3D CT guidance in all patients. The procedures took between 35 min and 50 min and the operation times took between 15 min and 25 min. No complications arose after the treatment. Conclusion: 3D CT-guided technique is a good alternative for the removal of small metal foreign body retained in the soft tissues as it is relatively accurate, reliable, quick, carries a low risk of complications and can be a first-choice procedure for the extraction of small metal foreign body.

  4. Small metal soft tissue foreign body extraction by using 3D CT guidance: A reliable method

    Objective: To introduce a useful and accurate technique for the locating and removal of small metal foreign bodies in the soft tissues. Methods: Eight patients presented with suspected small metal foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Under local anesthesia, 3–6 pieces of 5 ml syringe needles or 1 ml syringe needles were induced through three different planes around the entry point of the foreign bodies. Using these finders, the small metal FBs were confirmed under 3D CT guidance. Based on the CT findings, the soft tissues were dissected along the path of the closest needle and the FBs were easily found and removed according to the relation with the closest needle finder. Results: Eight metal foreign bodies (3 slices, 3 nails, 1 fish hook, 1 needlepoint) were successfully removed under 3D CT guidance in all patients. The procedures took between 35 min and 50 min and the operation times took between 15 min and 25 min. No complications arose after the treatment. Conclusion: 3D CT-guided technique is a good alternative for the removal of small metal foreign body retained in the soft tissues as it is relatively accurate, reliable, quick, carries a low risk of complications and can be a first-choice procedure for the extraction of small metal foreign body.

  5. Discrete Method of Images for 3D Radio Propagation Modeling

    Novak, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Discretization by rasterization is introduced into the method of images (MI) in the context of 3D deterministic radio propagation modeling as a way to exploit spatial coherence of electromagnetic propagation for fine-grained parallelism. Traditional algebraic treatment of bounding regions and surfaces is replaced by computer graphics rendering of 3D reflections and double refractions while building the image tree. The visibility of reception points and surfaces is also resolved by shader programs. The proposed rasterization is shown to be of comparable run time to that of the fundamentally parallel shooting and bouncing rays. The rasterization does not affect the signal evaluation backtracking step, thus preserving its advantage over the brute force ray-tracing methods in terms of accuracy. Moreover, the rendering resolution may be scaled back for a given level of scenario detail with only marginal impact on the image tree size. This allows selection of scene optimized execution parameters for faster execution, giving the method a competitive edge. The proposed variant of MI can be run on any GPU that supports real-time 3D graphics.

  6. 3D reconstruction of multiple stained histology images

    Yi Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Three dimensional (3D tissue reconstructions from the histology images with different stains allows the spatial alignment of structural and functional elements highlighted by different stains for quantitative study of many physiological and pathological phenomena. This has significant potential to improve the understanding of the growth patterns and the spatial arrangement of diseased cells, and enhance the study of biomechanical behavior of the tissue structures towards better treatments (e.g. tissue-engineering applications. Methods: This paper evaluates three strategies for 3D reconstruction from sets of two dimensional (2D histological sections with different stains, by combining methods of 2D multi-stain registration and 3D volumetric reconstruction from same stain sections. Setting and Design: The different strategies have been evaluated on two liver specimens (80 sections in total stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E, Sirius Red, and Cytokeratin (CK 7. Results and Conclusion: A strategy of using multi-stain registration to align images of a second stain to a volume reconstructed by same-stain registration results in the lowest overall error, although an interlaced image registration approach may be more robust to poor section quality.

  7. 3D tongue motion from tagged and cine MR images.

    Xing, Fangxu; Woo, Jonghye; Murano, Emi Z; Lee, Junghoon; Stone, Maureen; Prince, Jerry L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the deformation of the tongue during human speech is important for head and neck surgeons and speech and language scientists. Tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can be used to image 2D motion, and data from multiple image planes can be combined via post-processing to yield estimates of 3D motion. However, lacking boundary information, this approach suffers from inaccurate estimates near the tongue surface. This paper describes a method that combines two sources of information to yield improved estimation of 3D tongue motion. The method uses the harmonic phase (HARP) algorithm to extract motion from tags and diffeomorphic demons to provide surface deformation. It then uses an incompressible deformation estimation algorithm to incorporate both sources of displacement information to form an estimate of the 3D whole tongue motion. Experimental results show that use of combined information improves motion estimation near the tongue surface, a problem that has previously been reported as problematic in HARP analysis, while preserving accurate internal motion estimates. Results on both normal and abnormal tongue motions are shown. PMID:24505742

  8. Precise 3D dimensional metrology using high-resolution x-ray computed tomography (μCT)

    Brunke, Oliver; Santillan, Javier; Suppes, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade computed tomography (CT) with conventional x-ray sources has evolved from an imaging method in medicine to a well established technology for industrial applications in fields such as material science, light metals and plastics processing, microelectronics and geology. By using modern microfocus and nanofocus X-ray tubes, parts can be scanned with sub-micrometer resolutions. Currently, micro-CT is a technology increasingly used for metrology applications in the automotive industry. CT offers big advantages compared with conventional tactile or optical coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). This is of greater importance if complex parts with hidden or difficult accessible surfaces have to be measured. In these cases, CT offers the advantage of a high density of measurement points and a non-destructive and fast capturing of the sample's complete geometry. When using this growing technology the question arises how precise a μCT based CMM can measure as compared to conventional and established methods for coordinate measurements. For characterizing the metrological capabilities of a tactile or optical CMM, internationally standardized parameters like length measurement error and probing error are defined and used. To increase the acceptance of CT as a metrological method, our work seeks to clarify the definition and usage of parameters used in the field of metrology as these apply to CT. In this paper, an overview of the process chain in CT based metrology will be given and metrological characteristics will be described. For the potential user of CT as 3D metrology tool it is important to show the measurement accuracy and repeatability on realistic samples. Following a discussion of CT metrology techniques, two samples are discussed. The first compares a measured CT Data set to CAD data using CMM data as a standard for comparison of results. The second data second realistic data set will compare the results of applying both the CMM method of

  9. Measurement of normal size of styloid process with 3D reconstrction CT

    Seon, Young Seok; Lee, Kyoung Rok; Choi, Ji He; Kim, Sun Su; Kim, Se Jong; Park, Byong Lan; Kim, Byoung Geun [Kwangju Christian Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-01

    To measure the normal size of the styloid process using 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction CT We retrospectively analyzed 3D reconstruction images obtained after coronal and axial CT scanning of the temporal bone or neck of 115 patients. The length and shape of both sides of the styloid process, the location of its tip, and calcification of the stylohyoid ligament were retrospectively analysed. The mean length of the styloid process was 26.6 ({+-}7.9)mm on the right side, and 26.4 ({+-}8.3)mm on the left, a statistically insignificant difference (p=0.694). Its mean length was 26.2 ({+-}8.5) mm in men and 26.7 ({+-}7.2) mm in women, a statically in significant difference (p=0.733). As for variation with age, mean length tended to increase until the third decade, but not beyond. Segmental type (104/230, 45.2%) and fragmental type (73/230, 31.7 %) were more commonly seen in shape of styloid process, and tapering tip of styloid process (156/230, 67.9%) is more commonly seen than clubbing tip of it (74/230, 32.1%). The process was angulated in six cases (2.6%); its tip was more frequently located between the internal and external carotid artery (211 cases, 91.7%) than more medially (19 cases, 8.3%). In the former location, the length of the process was 26.2({+-} 7.2) mm, and in the latter, 37.0 ({+-}6.0)mm. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.000). Calcification had occurred in 33 cases (14.3%). The length of a normal styloid process was 18-32 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between its two sides, or between the sexes. Length tended to increase until the third decade, but not beyond. Predominantly the tip was located between the internal and external carotid artery, though the process was longer when its tip was located medially.

  10. Measurement of normal size of styloid process with 3D reconstrction CT

    To measure the normal size of the styloid process using 3D (three-dimensional) reconstruction CT We retrospectively analyzed 3D reconstruction images obtained after coronal and axial CT scanning of the temporal bone or neck of 115 patients. The length and shape of both sides of the styloid process, the location of its tip, and calcification of the stylohyoid ligament were retrospectively analysed. The mean length of the styloid process was 26.6 (±7.9)mm on the right side, and 26.4 (±8.3)mm on the left, a statistically insignificant difference (p=0.694). Its mean length was 26.2 (±8.5) mm in men and 26.7 (±7.2) mm in women, a statically in significant difference (p=0.733). As for variation with age, mean length tended to increase until the third decade, but not beyond. Segmental type (104/230, 45.2%) and fragmental type (73/230, 31.7 %) were more commonly seen in shape of styloid process, and tapering tip of styloid process (156/230, 67.9%) is more commonly seen than clubbing tip of it (74/230, 32.1%). The process was angulated in six cases (2.6%); its tip was more frequently located between the internal and external carotid artery (211 cases, 91.7%) than more medially (19 cases, 8.3%). In the former location, the length of the process was 26.2(± 7.2) mm, and in the latter, 37.0 (±6.0)mm. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.000). Calcification had occurred in 33 cases (14.3%). The length of a normal styloid process was 18-32 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between its two sides, or between the sexes. Length tended to increase until the third decade, but not beyond. Predominantly the tip was located between the internal and external carotid artery, though the process was longer when its tip was located medially

  11. Comparison of radiographs, axial CT, 2D and 3D reconstruction in unstable operated vertebral lesions

    During a period of 16 months about 70 patients suffering from an unstable spinel injury were operated in the surgical department of our clinic. In 50 of these patients it was possible to correlate the results of preoperative radiography and CT with the operative findings. Several cases of distraction instability in the dorsal column had not been recognised in the preoperative evaluation. Therefore the rationale of this study was the question as to whether modern CT technology can help to avoid such wrong diagnoses. For that purpose radiographs, axial CT-scans of 2 mm thickness or less, sagittal and coronal 2D and (in 35 cases) 3D reconstructions were re-evaluated step by step by a specifically trained radiologist without knowing the operative findings. 15 additional lesions out of 28 were demonstrated and specifically classified as distraction instabilities of the dorsal column using the improved CT technology. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of pharyngeal volume and compliance of OSAHS patients using 3D CT and volume measurement

    The intrinsic properties such as baseline caliber and compliance of the upper airway are thought to be important in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS).The author attempted using imaging methods to evaluate both baseline caliber and compliance in normal individuals and OSAHS patients, and to localize the obstructive sites in OSAHS patients. Critical closing pressure (Pcrit) and minimally effective therapeutical pressure (Peff) were measured and computed tomography (CT) scan of pharynx was performed during wakefulness and drug-induced sleep with Pcrit, 0 cm H2O and Peff being given through a nose mask system. 7 normal individuals (age, 32.2±6.5 y's and body mass index, 23.6±5.4 kg/m2) and 13 OSAHS patients (age, 33.3±6.4 y's and body mass index, 25.9±6.0 kg/m2) were studied. 3D images of pharyngeal airway were reconstructed, and volume of each subdivision of pharynx was measured. Volume, average area and compliance of each subdivision were compared between the two groups. On an air-mode view of 3D image, the outline of pharynx was shown as transparent tubal structure, on which the narrowing collapse of airway at any level or any direction can be easily identified. Anatomy of pharynx could be easily understood on the virtual endoscopic mode. During wakefulness, the average area of the upper (1.20±0.26 cm2 vs. 1.57±0.17 cm2, P2 vs. 2.58±0.27 cm2, P2 vs. 1.45±0.18 cm2, P2 vs. 2.44±0.26 cm2). The compliance of the middle part (0.28±0.15/cmH2O vs. 0.13±0.07/cmH2O, P<0.05) of pharynx was significantly higher in OSAHS patients than in normal individuals. The data suggested that OSAHS patients have a narrower and more collapsible pharynx compared to the normal subjects. The method of the present study is valid to evaluate both morphology and function of the upper airway. (author)

  13. Influence of the Alveolar Cleft Type on Preoperative Estimation Using 3D CT Assessment for Alveolar Cleft

    Hang Suk Choi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The bone graft for the alveolar cleft has been accepted as one of the essentialtreatments for cleft lip patients. Precise preoperative measurement of the architecture andsize of the bone defect in alveolar cleft has been considered helpful for increasing the successrate of bone grafting because those features may vary with the cleft type. Recently, somestudies have reported on the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D computed tomography(CT assessment of alveolar bone defect; however, no study on the possible implication of thecleft type on the difference between the presumed and actual value has been conducted yet.We aimed to evaluate the clinical predictability of such measurement using 3D CT assessmentaccording to the cleft type.Methods The study consisted of 47 pediatric patients. The subjects were divided according tothe cleft type. CT was performed before the graft operation and assessed using image analysissoftware. The statistical significance of the difference between the preoperative estimationand intraoperative measurement was analyzed.Results The difference between the preoperative and intraoperative values were -0.1±0.3cm3 (P=0.084. There was no significant intergroup difference, but the groups with a cleftpalate showed a significant difference of -0.2±0.3 cm3 (P<0.05.Conclusions Assessment of the alveolar cleft volume using 3D CT scan data and image analysissoftware can help in selecting the optimal graft procedure and extracting the correct volumeof cancellous bone for grafting. Considering the cleft type, it would be helpful to extract anadditional volume of 0.2 cm3 in the presence of a cleft palate.

  14. WE-D-18A-05: Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms From Patient Images and a Commercial 3D Printer

    Purpose: To assess image quality and radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT imaging, physical phantoms having realistic background textures and lesions are highly desirable. The purpose of this work was to construct a liver phantom with realistic background and lesions using patient CT images and a 3D printer. Methods: Patient CT images containing liver lesions were segmented into liver tissue, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software (Mimics, Materialise, Belgium). Stereolithography (STL) files of each segmented object were created and imported to a 3D printer (Object350 Connex, Stratasys, MN). After test scans were performed to map the eight available printing materials into CT numbers, printing materials were assigned to each object and a physical liver phantom printed. The printed phantom was scanned on a clinical CT scanner and resulting images were compared with the original patient CT images. Results: The eight available materials used to print the liver phantom had CT number ranging from 62 to 117 HU. In scans of the liver phantom, the liver lesions and veins represented in the STL files were all visible. Although the absolute value of the CT number in the background liver material (approx. 85 HU) was higher than in patients (approx. 40 HU), the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative of the low contrast values needed for optimization tasks. Future work will investigate materials with contrast sufficient to emulate contrast-enhanced arteries. Conclusion: Realistic liver phantoms can be constructed from patient CT images using a commercial 3D printer. This technique may provide phantoms able to determine the effect of radiation dose reduction and noise reduction techniques on the ability to detect subtle liver lesions in the context of realistic background textures

  15. WE-D-18A-05: Construction of Realistic Liver Phantoms From Patient Images and a Commercial 3D Printer

    Leng, S; Vrieze, T; Kuhlmann, J; Yu, L; Matsumoto, J; Morris, J; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess image quality and radiation dose reduction in abdominal CT imaging, physical phantoms having realistic background textures and lesions are highly desirable. The purpose of this work was to construct a liver phantom with realistic background and lesions using patient CT images and a 3D printer. Methods: Patient CT images containing liver lesions were segmented into liver tissue, contrast-enhanced vessels, and liver lesions using commercial software (Mimics, Materialise, Belgium). Stereolithography (STL) files of each segmented object were created and imported to a 3D printer (Object350 Connex, Stratasys, MN). After test scans were performed to map the eight available printing materials into CT numbers, printing materials were assigned to each object and a physical liver phantom printed. The printed phantom was scanned on a clinical CT scanner and resulting images were compared with the original patient CT images. Results: The eight available materials used to print the liver phantom had CT number ranging from 62 to 117 HU. In scans of the liver phantom, the liver lesions and veins represented in the STL files were all visible. Although the absolute value of the CT number in the background liver material (approx. 85 HU) was higher than in patients (approx. 40 HU), the difference in CT numbers between lesions and background were representative of the low contrast values needed for optimization tasks. Future work will investigate materials with contrast sufficient to emulate contrast-enhanced arteries. Conclusion: Realistic liver phantoms can be constructed from patient CT images using a commercial 3D printer. This technique may provide phantoms able to determine the effect of radiation dose reduction and noise reduction techniques on the ability to detect subtle liver lesions in the context of realistic background textures.

  16. The effect of CT dose on glenohumeral joint congruency measurements using 3D reconstructed patient-specific bone models

    The study of joint congruency at the glenohumeral joint of the shoulder using computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of joint surfaces is an area of significant clinical interest. However, ionizing radiation delivered to patients during CT examinations is much higher than other types of radiological imaging. The shoulder represents a significant challenge for this modality as it is adjacent to the thyroid gland and breast tissue. The objective of this study was to determine the optimal CT scanning techniques that would minimize radiation dose while accurately quantifying joint congruency of the shoulder. The results suggest that only one-tenth of the standard applied total current (mA) and a pitch ratio of 1.375:1 was necessary to produce joint congruency values consistent with that of the higher dose scans. Using the CT scanning techniques examined in this study, the effective dose applied to the shoulder to quantify joint congruency was reduced by 88.9% compared to standard clinical CT imaging techniques.

  17. Automatic structural matching of 3D image data

    Ponomarev, Svjatoslav; Lutsiv, Vadim; Malyshev, Igor

    2015-10-01

    A new image matching technique is described. It is implemented as an object-independent hierarchical structural juxtaposition algorithm based on an alphabet of simple object-independent contour structural elements. The structural matching applied implements an optimized method of walking through a truncated tree of all possible juxtapositions of two sets of structural elements. The algorithm was initially developed for dealing with 2D images such as the aerospace photographs, and it turned out to be sufficiently robust and reliable for matching successfully the pictures of natural landscapes taken in differing seasons from differing aspect angles by differing sensors (the visible optical, IR, and SAR pictures, as well as the depth maps and geographical vector-type maps). At present (in the reported version), the algorithm is enhanced based on additional use of information on third spatial coordinates of observed points of object surfaces. Thus, it is now capable of matching the images of 3D scenes in the tasks of automatic navigation of extremely low flying unmanned vehicles or autonomous terrestrial robots. The basic principles of 3D structural description and matching of images are described, and the examples of image matching are presented.

  18. 3D analysis of micro-deformation in VHCF-loaded nodular cast iron by μCT

    Fischer, G., E-mail: gottfried.fischer@lqw.mb.uni-dortmund.de [RIF e.V. Institut für Forschung und Transfer, Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Str. 20, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany); Nellesen, J., E-mail: Jens.Nellesen@rif-ev.de [RIF e.V. Institut für Forschung und Transfer, Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Str. 20, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany); Anar, N.B., E-mail: nadeembabar.anar@tu-dortmund.de [RIF e.V. Institut für Forschung und Transfer, Joseph-von-Fraunhofer-Str. 20, D-44227 Dortmund (Germany); Ehrig, K., E-mail: Karsten.Ehrig@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Riesemeier, H., E-mail: Heinrich.Riesemeier@bam.de [BAM Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Tillmann, W., E-mail: Wolfgang.Tillmann@udo.edu [Technische Universität Dortmund, Fakultät Maschinenbau, Lehrstuhl für Werkstofftechnologie, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2013-08-10

    The impact of very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) load conditions on the microstructure of specimens consisting of nodular cast iron is analyzed by means of micro-computed tomography (μCT) utilizing both monochromatic synchrotron radiation and polychromatic X-ray tube radiation. Using 3D μCT, the microstructure in the region of the smallest cross-sections of shouldered round specimens is imaged in different stages of the VHCF loading. By digital image correlation (DIC) of these tomograms strain fields are analyzed three-dimensionally. Strain levels in the range of a few percent were detected. It is proven that a localization of strain allows to predict the site of the crack which precedes and induces the macroscopic failure of the specimens.

  19. 3D analysis of micro-deformation in VHCF-loaded nodular cast iron by μCT

    The impact of very high cycle fatigue (VHCF) load conditions on the microstructure of specimens consisting of nodular cast iron is analyzed by means of micro-computed tomography (μCT) utilizing both monochromatic synchrotron radiation and polychromatic X-ray tube radiation. Using 3D μCT, the microstructure in the region of the smallest cross-sections of shouldered round specimens is imaged in different stages of the VHCF loading. By digital image correlation (DIC) of these tomograms strain fields are analyzed three-dimensionally. Strain levels in the range of a few percent were detected. It is proven that a localization of strain allows to predict the site of the crack which precedes and induces the macroscopic failure of the specimens

  20. Underwater 3d Modeling: Image Enhancement and Point Cloud Filtering

    Sarakinou, I.; Papadimitriou, K.; Georgoula, O.; Patias, P.

    2016-06-01

    This paper examines the results of image enhancement and point cloud filtering on the visual and geometric quality of 3D models for the representation of underwater features. Specifically it evaluates the combination of effects from the manual editing of images' radiometry (captured at shallow depths) and the selection of parameters for point cloud definition and mesh building (processed in 3D modeling software). Such datasets, are usually collected by divers, handled by scientists and used for geovisualization purposes. In the presented study, have been created 3D models from three sets of images (seafloor, part of a wreck and a small boat's wreck) captured at three different depths (3.5m, 10m and 14m respectively). Four models have been created from the first dataset (seafloor) in order to evaluate the results from the application of image enhancement techniques and point cloud filtering. The main process for this preliminary study included a) the definition of parameters for the point cloud filtering and the creation of a reference model, b) the radiometric editing of images, followed by the creation of three improved models and c) the assessment of results by comparing the visual and the geometric quality of improved models versus the reference one. Finally, the selected technique is tested on two other data sets in order to examine its appropriateness for different depths (at 10m and 14m) and different objects (part of a wreck and a small boat's wreck) in the context of an ongoing research in the Laboratory of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.

  1. Towards magnetic 3D x-ray imaging

    Fischer, Peter; Streubel, R.; Im, M.-Y.; Parkinson, D.; Hong, J.-I.; Schmidt, O. G.; Makarov, D.

    2014-03-01

    Mesoscale phenomena in magnetism will add essential parameters to improve speed, size and energy efficiency of spin driven devices. Multidimensional visualization techniques will be crucial to achieve mesoscience goals. Magnetic tomography is of large interest to understand e.g. interfaces in magnetic multilayers, the inner structure of magnetic nanocrystals, nanowires or the functionality of artificial 3D magnetic nanostructures. We have developed tomographic capabilities with magnetic full-field soft X-ray microscopy combining X-MCD as element specific magnetic contrast mechanism, high spatial and temporal resolution due to the Fresnel zone plate optics. At beamline 6.1.2 at the ALS (Berkeley CA) a new rotation stage allows recording an angular series (up to 360 deg) of high precision 2D projection images. Applying state-of-the-art reconstruction algorithms it is possible to retrieve the full 3D structure. We will present results on prototypic rolled-up Ni and Co/Pt tubes and glass capillaries coated with magnetic films and compare to other 3D imaging approaches e.g. in electron microscopy. Supported by BES MSD DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-05-CH11231 and ERC under the EU FP7 program (grant agreement No. 306277).

  2. CT image of thymoma

    Morioka, Nobuo; Shudo, Yuji; Jahana, Masanobu; Matsuki, Tsutomu; Kotani, Kazuhiko (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1983-10-01

    Computor tomographic images of 11 patients who had had thymectomy for myasthenia gravis or thymoma were studied retrospectively. Of those 11 patients, malignant thymoma and benign condition including normal thymus were 6 and 5 respectively. On CT, calcification and lobulation with irregular margin seem to be reliable findings of malignancy. Defect or abscence of fatty plane and non-homogenous density are ancillary.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension CT imaging

    Full text: The right heart catheterization is the gold standard in the diagnosis and determines the severity of pulmonary hypertension. The significant technical progress of noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods significantly improves the pixel density and spatial resolution in the study of cardiovascular structures, thus changes their role and place in the overall diagnostic plan. Learning points: What is the etiology, clinical manifestation and general pathophysiological disorders in pulmonary hypertension. What are the established diagnostic methods in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension. What is the recommended protocol for CT scanning for patients with clinically suspected or documented pulmonary hypertension. What are the important diagnostic findings in CT scan of a patient with pulmonary hypertension. Discussion: The prospect of instantaneous complex - anatomical and functional cardiopulmonary and vascular diagnostics seems extremely attractive. The contrast enhanced multislice computed (CT ) and magnetic resonance imaging are very suitable methods for imaging the structures of the right heart, with the possibility of obtaining multiple projections and three-dimensional imaging reconstructions . There are specific morphological features that, if carefully analyzed, provide diagnostic information. Thus, it is possible to avoid or at least reduce the frequency of use of invasive diagnostic cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: This review focuses on the use of contrast-enhanced CT for comprehensive evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension and presents the observed characteristic changes in the chest, lung parenchyma , the structures of the right half of the heart and pulmonary vessels

  4. Large Scale 3D Image Reconstruction in Optical Interferometry

    Schutz, Antony; Mary, David; Thiébaut, Eric; Soulez, Ferréol

    2015-01-01

    Astronomical optical interferometers (OI) sample the Fourier transform of the intensity distribution of a source at the observation wavelength. Because of rapid atmospheric perturbations, the phases of the complex Fourier samples (visibilities) cannot be directly exploited , and instead linear relationships between the phases are used (phase closures and differential phases). Consequently, specific image reconstruction methods have been devised in the last few decades. Modern polychromatic OI instruments are now paving the way to multiwavelength imaging. This paper presents the derivation of a spatio-spectral ("3D") image reconstruction algorithm called PAINTER (Polychromatic opticAl INTErferometric Reconstruction software). The algorithm is able to solve large scale problems. It relies on an iterative process, which alternates estimation of polychromatic images and of complex visibilities. The complex visibilities are not only estimated from squared moduli and closure phases, but also from differential phase...

  5. Phase Sensitive Cueing for 3D Objects in Overhead Images

    Paglieroni, D W; Eppler, W G; Poland, D N

    2005-02-18

    A 3D solid model-aided object cueing method that matches phase angles of directional derivative vectors at image pixels to phase angles of vectors normal to projected model edges is described. It is intended for finding specific types of objects at arbitrary position and orientation in overhead images, independent of spatial resolution, obliqueness, acquisition conditions, and type of imaging sensor. It is shown that the phase similarity measure can be efficiently evaluated over all combinations of model position and orientation using the FFT. The highest degree of similarity over all model orientations is captured in a match surface of similarity values vs. model position. Unambiguous peaks in this surface are sorted in descending order of similarity value, and the small image thumbnails that contain them are presented to human analysts for inspection in sorted order.

  6. Autonomous Planetary 3-D Reconstruction From Satellite Images

    Denver, Troelz

    1999-01-01

    A common task for many deep space missions is autonomous generation of 3-D representations of planetary surfaces onboard unmanned spacecrafts. The basic problem for this class of missions is, that the closed loop time is far too long. The closed loop time is defined as the time from when a human...... of seconds to a few minutes, the closed loop time effectively precludes active human control.The only way to circumvent this problem is to build an artificial feature extractor operating autonomously onboard the spacecraft.Different artificial feature extractors are presented and their efficiency...... is discussed.Based on such features, 3-D representations may be compiled from two or more 2-D satellite images. The main purposes of such a mapping system are extraction of landing sites, objects of scientific interest and general planetary surveying. All data processing is performed autonomously onboard...

  7. The precision of liver volume measurement using 99mTc-GSA SPECT. Compared with liver volume measurement using 3D-CT

    Exact measurement of liver volume using Tc-99m-GSA SPECT is very important for the grading of liver atrophy and the assessment of postoperative reserve hepatic function. In this study, we assess the liver volume measurement accuracy of Tc-99m-GSA SPECT by liver phantom and the clinical usefulness comparing with that of 3D-CT. On the precision of liver volume measurement, liver phantom and six subjects were examined using both of 3D-CT image on helical CT (ProSeed, GEMS) and Tc-99m-GSA SPECT volume (Starcam 3000XRT, GEMS). Experiments with liver phantoms were performed with a multi-component model and various cut-off levels. Furthermore, comparison of clinical liver volume measurement on both SPECT and 3D-CT was studied. The optimal cut-off level of SPECT was determined at 34% on liver phantom examination. And, the clinical data on hepatic volume using SPECT well correlated with those using 3D-CT. It is summarized that Tc-99m-GSA SPECT was used to assess the postoperative reserve hepatic function and to evaluate the accuracy of liver volume measurement comparing with the liver volume by 3D-CT. (author)

  8. Assessment of angiogenesis in osseointegration of a silica-collagen biomaterial using 3D-nano-CT.

    Alt, Volker; Kögelmaier, Daniela Vera; Lips, Katrin S; Witt, Vera; Pacholke, Sabine; Heiss, Christian; Kampschulte, Marian; Heinemann, Sascha; Hanke, Thomas; Thormann, Ulrich; Schnettler, Reinhard; Langheinrich, Alexander C

    2011-10-01

    Bony integration of biomaterials is a complex process in which angiogenesis plays a crucial role. We evaluated micro- and nano-CT imaging to demonstrate and quantify neovascularization in bony integration of a biomaterial and to give an image based estimation for the needed resolution for imaging angiogenesis in an animal model of femora defect healing. In 8 rats 5mm full-size defects were created at the left femur that was filled with silica-collagen bone substitute material and internally fixed with plate osteosynthesis. After 6 weeks the femora were infused in situ with Microfil, harvested and scanned for micro-CT (9 μm)(3) and nano-CT (3 μm)(3) imaging. Using those 3D images, the newly formed blood vessels in the area of the biomaterial were assessed and the total vascular volume fraction, the volume of the bone substitute material and the volume of the bone defect were quantitatively characterized. Results were complemented by histology. Differences were statistically assessed using (ANOVA). High-resolution nano-CT demonstrated new blood vessel formation surrounding the biomaterial in all animals at capillary level. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the newly formed blood vessels surrounding the bone substitute material. The mean vascular volume fraction (VVF) around the implant was calculated to be 3.01 ± 0.4%. The VVF was inversely correlated with the volume of the bone substitute material (r=0.8) but not with the dimension of the fracture zone (r=0.3). Nano-CT imaging is feasible for quantitative analysis of angiogenesis during bony integration of biomaterials and a promising tool in this context for the future. PMID:21723963

  9. Fully automatic plaque segmentation in 3-D carotid ultrasound images.

    Cheng, Jieyu; Li, He; Xiao, Feng; Fenster, Aaron; Zhang, Xuming; He, Xiaoling; Li, Ling; Ding, Mingyue

    2013-12-01

    Automatic segmentation of the carotid plaques from ultrasound images has been shown to be an important task for monitoring progression and regression of carotid atherosclerosis. Considering the complex structure and heterogeneity of plaques, a fully automatic segmentation method based on media-adventitia and lumen-intima boundary priors is proposed. This method combines image intensity with structure information in both initialization and a level-set evolution process. Algorithm accuracy was examined on the common carotid artery part of 26 3-D carotid ultrasound images (34 plaques ranging in volume from 2.5 to 456 mm(3)) by comparing the results of our algorithm with manual segmentations of two experts. Evaluation results indicated that the algorithm yielded total plaque volume (TPV) differences of -5.3 ± 12.7 and -8.5 ± 13.8 mm(3) and absolute TPV differences of 9.9 ± 9.5 and 11.8 ± 11.1 mm(3). Moreover, high correlation coefficients in generating TPV (0.993 and 0.992) between algorithm results and both sets of manual results were obtained. The automatic method provides a reliable way to segment carotid plaque in 3-D ultrasound images and can be used in clinical practice to estimate plaque measurements for management of carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:24063959

  10. Lymph node imaging by ultrarapid 3D angiography

    Purpose: A report on observations of lymph node images obtained by gadolinium-enhanced 3D MR angiography (MRA). Methods: Ultrarapid MRA (TR, TE, FA - 5 or 6.4 ms, 1.9 or 2.8 ms, 30-40 degrees) with 0.2 mmol/kg BW Gd-DTPA and 20 ml physiological saline. Start after completion of injection. Single series of the pelvis-thigh as well as head-neck regions by use of a phased array coil with a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision or a 1.0 T Magnetom Harmony (Siemens, Erlangen). We report on lymph node imaging in 4 patients, 2 of whom exhibited benign changes and 2 further metastases. In 1 patient with extensive lymph node metastases of a malignant melanoma, color-Doppler sonography as color-flow angiography (CFA) was used as a comparative method. Results: Lymph node imaging by contrast medium-enhanced ultrarapid 3D MRA apparently resulted from their vessels. Thus, arterially-supplied metastases and inflammatory enlarged lymph nodes were well visualized while those with a.v. shunts or poor vascular supply in tumor necroses were poorly imaged. Conclusions: Further investigations are required with regard to the visualization of lymph nodes in other parts of the body as well as a possible differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. (orig.)

  11. 3D visualization design and implementation in 60Co container CT inspection system

    60Co γ-ray container inspection system (TC-Scan), developed at Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University, is installed at the customs for air-cargo or mega-object inspection against smuggling and prohibited objects. With the development of computer science and technology, 3D visualization technology applied to CT inspection system becomes a hotspot. In this paper, a volume rendering visualization system is designed and implemented for TC-Scan, based on ray-casting algorithm. In order to keep flexibility and compatibility for further development, the 3D rendering subsystem is independent from acquisition and reconstruction subsystems. Final rendering results demonstrate legible and distinct 3D vision for container inspection, which improves inspection validity. (authors)

  12. Ice shelf melt rates and 3D imaging

    Lewis, Cameron Scott

    Ice shelves are sensitive indicators of climate change and play a critical role in the stability of ice sheets and oceanic currents. Basal melting of ice shelves plays an important role in both the mass balance of the ice sheet and the global climate system. Airborne- and satellite based remote sensing systems can perform thickness measurements of ice shelves. Time separated repeat flight tracks over ice shelves of interest generate data sets that can be used to derive basal melt rates using traditional glaciological techniques. Many previous melt rate studies have relied on surface elevation data gathered by airborne- and satellite based altimeters. These systems infer melt rates by assuming hydrostatic equilibrium, an assumption that may not be accurate, especially near an ice shelf's grounding line. Moderate bandwidth, VHF, ice penetrating radar has been used to measure ice shelf profiles with relatively coarse resolution. This study presents the application of an ultra wide bandwidth (UWB), UHF, ice penetrating radar to obtain finer resolution data on the ice shelves. These data reveal significant details about the basal interface, including the locations and depth of bottom crevasses and deviations from hydrostatic equilibrium. While our single channel radar provides new insight into ice shelf structure, it only images a small swatch of the shelf, which is assumed to be an average of the total shelf behavior. This study takes an additional step by investigating the application of a 3D imaging technique to a data set collected using a ground based multi channel version of the UWB radar. The intent is to show that the UWB radar could be capable of providing a wider swath 3D image of an ice shelf. The 3D images can then be used to obtain a more complete estimate of the bottom melt rates of ice shelves.

  13. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems. PMID:26855205

  14. Improving 3D Wavelet-Based Compression of Hyperspectral Images

    Klimesh, Matthew; Kiely, Aaron; Xie, Hua; Aranki, Nazeeh

    2009-01-01

    Two methods of increasing the effectiveness of three-dimensional (3D) wavelet-based compression of hyperspectral images have been developed. (As used here, images signifies both images and digital data representing images.) The methods are oriented toward reducing or eliminating detrimental effects of a phenomenon, referred to as spectral ringing, that is described below. In 3D wavelet-based compression, an image is represented by a multiresolution wavelet decomposition consisting of several subbands obtained by applying wavelet transforms in the two spatial dimensions corresponding to the two spatial coordinate axes of the image plane, and by applying wavelet transforms in the spectral dimension. Spectral ringing is named after the more familiar spatial ringing (spurious spatial oscillations) that can be seen parallel to and near edges in ordinary images reconstructed from compressed data. These ringing phenomena are attributable to effects of quantization. In hyperspectral data, the individual spectral bands play the role of edges, causing spurious oscillations to occur in the spectral dimension. In the absence of such corrective measures as the present two methods, spectral ringing can manifest itself as systematic biases in some reconstructed spectral bands and can reduce the effectiveness of compression of spatially-low-pass subbands. One of the two methods is denoted mean subtraction. The basic idea of this method is to subtract mean values from spatial planes of spatially low-pass subbands prior to encoding, because (a) such spatial planes often have mean values that are far from zero and (b) zero-mean data are better suited for compression by methods that are effective for subbands of two-dimensional (2D) images. In this method, after the 3D wavelet decomposition is performed, mean values are computed for and subtracted from each spatial plane of each spatially-low-pass subband. The resulting data are converted to sign-magnitude form and compressed in a

  15. Auto-masked 2D/3D image registration and its validation with clinical cone-beam computed tomography

    Image-guided alignment procedures in radiotherapy aim at minimizing discrepancies between the planned and the real patient setup. For that purpose, we developed a 2D/3D approach which rigidly registers a computed tomography (CT) with two x-rays by maximizing the agreement in pixel intensity between the x-rays and the corresponding reconstructed radiographs from the CT. Moreover, the algorithm selects regions of interest (masks) in the x-rays based on 3D segmentations from the pre-planning stage. For validation, orthogonal x-ray pairs from different viewing directions of 80 pelvic cone-beam CT (CBCT) raw data sets were used. The 2D/3D results were compared to corresponding standard 3D/3D CBCT-to-CT alignments. Outcome over 8400 2D/3D experiments showed that parametric errors in root mean square were <0.18° (rotations) and <0.73 mm (translations), respectively, using rank correlation as intensity metric. This corresponds to a mean target registration error, related to the voxels of the lesser pelvis, of <2 mm in 94.1% of the cases. From the results we conclude that 2D/3D registration based on sequentially acquired orthogonal x-rays of the pelvis is a viable alternative to CBCT-based approaches if rigid alignment on bony anatomy is sufficient, no volumetric intra-interventional data set is required and the expected error range fits the individual treatment prescription. (paper)

  16. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a open-quotes true 3D screenclose quotes. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches

  17. Post-processing methods of rendering and visualizing 3-D reconstructed tomographic images

    Wong, S.T.C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the computer processing techniques of tomographic images, after they have been generated by imaging scanners, for volume visualization. Volume visualization is concerned with the representation, manipulation, and rendering of volumetric data. Since the first digital images were produced from computed tomography (CT) scanners in the mid 1970s, applications of visualization in medicine have expanded dramatically. Today, three-dimensional (3D) medical visualization has expanded from using CT data, the first inherently digital source of 3D medical data, to using data from various medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance scanners, positron emission scanners, digital ultrasound, electronic and confocal microscopy, and other medical imaging modalities. We have advanced from rendering anatomy to aid diagnosis and visualize complex anatomic structures to planning and assisting surgery and radiation treatment. New, more accurate and cost-effective procedures for clinical services and biomedical research have become possible by integrating computer graphics technology with medical images. This trend is particularly noticeable in current market-driven health care environment. For example, interventional imaging, image-guided surgery, and stereotactic and visualization techniques are now stemming into surgical practice. In this presentation, we discuss only computer-display-based approaches of volumetric medical visualization. That is, we assume that the display device available is two-dimensional (2D) in nature and all analysis of multidimensional image data is to be carried out via the 2D screen of the device. There are technologies such as holography and virtual reality that do provide a {open_quotes}true 3D screen{close_quotes}. To confine the scope, this presentation will not discuss such approaches.

  18. Development and comparison of projection and image space 3D nodule insertion techniques

    Robins, Marthony; Solomon, Justin; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to develop and compare two methods of inserting computerized virtual lesions into CT datasets. 24 physical (synthetic) nodules of three sizes and four morphologies were inserted into an anthropomorphic chest phantom (LUNGMAN, KYOTO KAGAKU). The phantom was scanned (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare) with and without nodules present, and images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) at 0.6 mm slice thickness using a standard thoracic CT protocol at multiple dose settings. Virtual 3D CAD models based on the physical nodules were virtually inserted (accounting for the system MTF) into the nodule-free CT data using two techniques. These techniques include projection-based and image-based insertion. Nodule volumes were estimated using a commercial segmentation tool (iNtuition, TeraRecon, Inc.). Differences were tested using paired t-tests and R2 goodness of fit between the virtually and physically inserted nodules. Both insertion techniques resulted in nodule volumes very similar to the real nodules (<3% difference) and in most cases the differences were not statistically significant. Also, R2 values were all <0.97 for both insertion techniques. These data imply that these techniques can confidently be used as a means of inserting virtual nodules in CT datasets. These techniques can be instrumental in building hybrid CT datasets composed of patient images with virtually inserted nodules.

  19. Influence of CT/MRI Fusion Image on Target Volume and 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Brain Metastasis%CT/MRI诊断影像融合对非小细胞肺癌脑转移瘤靶区及三维适形治疗影响

    杨金山; 魏永兵; 侯超; 李静; 朱瑞霞

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较CT图像和CT/MRI融合图像来源的肺癌脑转移肿瘤靶区,评价CT/MRI融合靶区容积应用于三维适形放射治疗时,对治疗剂量的影响。方法:将20例非小细胞肺癌脑转移患者的增强CT和MRI扫描的图像传送至图像处理工作站,在CT和CT/MRI融合图像上分别勾画GTV和周围重要的器官。每个病例分别在CT图像和CT/MRI融合图像都做1个三维适形放射治疗计划。肿瘤的处方剂量为60 Gy,比较2个治疗计划中肿瘤靶区的95%容积(D95)受照平均剂量、周围正常组织的5%容积(D5)受照平均剂量。结果:CT/MRI融合图像上的肿瘤靶区平均比CT上的肿瘤靶区大21.32%。用CT上勾画的靶区有一部分肿瘤处于低剂量区,CT/MRI融合图像上的靶区D95剂量分布较好,但在周围重要器官的剂量分布较高。结论:CT/MRI融合图像有助于靶区的确定,在三维适形放射治疗计划上的肿瘤靶区剂量分布足够,能提高靶区勾画的准确性,更利于精确放疗的实施。%Objective:To compare the CT images and CT/MRI images fusion sources of lung cancer with brain metastasis tumor target,and to evaluae the effects of dose for treatment on target volume CT/MRI fusion for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Method:The enhancement CT and MRI scan image of 20 patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer was transfer to image processing workstation,GTV and surrounding vital organs on CT and CT/MRI images fusion was delineated respectively. A three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plan was done in CT images and CT/MRI fusion images of ach case. Tumor prescription dose was 60 Gy. Compared the average dose of the 95%volume(D95)tumor target,the average dose of the 5%of the normal tissue around of the two treatment plans. Result:The tumor targets of the CT/MRI images fusion was greater than those of the CT tumor targets on average 21.32%. A part of the tumor was

  20. Automatic Intensity-based 3D-to-2D Registration of CT Volume and Dual-energy Digital Radiography for the Detection of Cardiac Calcification

    Chen, Xiang; Gilkeson, Robert; Fei, Baowei

    2013-01-01

    We are investigating three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D) registration methods for computed tomography (CT) and dual-energy digital radiography (DR) for the detection of coronary artery calcification. CT is an established tool for the diagnosis of coronary artery diseases (CADs). Dual-energy digital radiography could be a cost-effective alternative for screening coronary artery calcification. In order to utilize CT as the “gold standard” to evaluate the ability of DR images for the detection and localization of calcium, we developed an automatic intensity-based 3D-to-2D registration method for 3D CT volumes and 2D DR images. To generate digital rendering radiographs (DRR) from the CT volumes, we developed three projection methods, i.e. Gaussian-weighted projection, threshold-based projection, and average-based projection. We tested normalized cross correlation (NCC) and normalized mutual information (NMI) as similarity measurement. We used the Downhill Simplex method as the search strategy. Simulated projection images from CT were fused with the corresponding DR images to evaluate the localization of cardiac calcification. The registration method was evaluated by digital phantoms, physical phantoms, and clinical data sets. The results from the digital phantoms show that the success rate is 100% with mean errors of less 0.8 mm and 0.2 degree for both NCC and NMI. The registration accuracy of the physical phantoms is 0.34 ± 0.27 mm. Color overlay and 3D visualization of the clinical data show that the two images are registered well. This is consistent with the improvement of the NMI values from 0.20 ± 0.03 to 0.25 ± 0.03 after registration. The automatic 3D-to-2D registration method is accurate and robust and may provide a useful tool to evaluate the dual-energy DR images for the detection of coronary artery calcification. PMID:24386527

  1. 3D IMAGING OF INDIVIDUAL PARTICLES: A REVIEW

    Eric Pirard

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, impressive progress has been made in digital imaging and in particular in three dimensional visualisation and analysis of objects. This paper reviews the most recent literature on three dimensional imaging with a special attention to particulate systems analysis. After an introduction recalling some important concepts in spatial sampling and digital imaging, the paper reviews a series of techniques with a clear distinction between the surfometric and volumetric principles. The literature review is as broad as possible covering materials science as well as biology while keeping an eye on emerging technologies in optics and physics. The paper should be of interest to any scientist trying to picture particles in 3D with the best possible resolution for accurate size and shape estimation. Though techniques are adequate for nanoscopic and microscopic particles, no special size limit has been considered while compiling the review.

  2. Utilization of multiple frequencies in 3D nonlinear microwave imaging

    Jensen, Peter Damsgaard; Rubæk, Tonny; Mohr, Johan Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The use of multiple frequencies in a nonlinear microwave algorithm is considered. Using multiple frequencies allows for obtaining the improved resolution available at the higher frequencies while retaining the regularizing effects of the lower frequencies. However, a number of different challenge...... at lower frequencies are used as starting guesses for reconstructions at higher frequencies. The performance is illustrated using simulated 2-D data and data obtained with the 3-D DTU microwave imaging system....... arise when using data from multiple frequencies for imaging of biological targets. In this paper, the performance of a multi-frequency algorithm, in which measurement data from several different frequencies are used at once, is compared with a stepped-frequency algorithm, in which images reconstructed...

  3. Development of 3D microwave imaging reflectometry in LHD (invited).

    Nagayama, Y; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Hamada, Y; Kogi, Y; Mase, A; Tsuchiya, H; Tsuji-Iio, S; Yamaguchi, S

    2012-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) microwave imaging reflectometry has been developed in the large helical device to visualize fluctuating reflection surface which is caused by the density fluctuations. The plasma is illuminated by the probe wave with four frequencies, which correspond to four radial positions. The imaging optics makes the image of cut-off surface onto the 2D (7 × 7 channels) horn antenna mixer arrays. Multi-channel receivers have been also developed using micro-strip-line technology to handle many channels at reasonable cost. This system is first applied to observe the edge harmonic oscillation (EHO), which is an MHD mode with many harmonics that appears in the edge plasma. A narrow structure along field lines is observed during EHO. PMID:23126965

  4. 3D segmentation of medical images using a fast multistage hybrid algorithm

    In this paper, we propose a fast multistage hybrid algorithm for 3D segmentation of medical images. We first employ a morphological recursive erosion operation to reduce the connectivity between the object to be segmented and its neighborhood; then the fast marching method is used to greatly accelerate the initial propagation of a surface front from the user defined seed structure to a surface close to the desired boundary; a morphological reconstruction method then operates on this surface to achieve an initial segmentation result; and finally morphological recursive dilation is employed to recover any structure lost in the first stage of the algorithm. This approach is tested on 60 CT or MRI images of the brain, heart and urinary system, to demonstrate the robustness of this technique across a variety of imaging modalities and organ systems. The algorithm is also validated against datasets for which ''truth'' is known. These measurements revealed that the algorithm achieved a mean ''similarity index'' of 0.966 across the three organ systems. The execution time for this algorithm, when run on a 550 MHz Dual PIII-based PC runningWindows NT, and extracting the cortex from brain MRIs, the cardiac surface from dynamic CT, and the kidneys from 3D CT, was 38, 46 and 23 s, respectively. (orig.)

  5. Effective classification of 3D image data using partitioning methods

    Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Pokrajac, Dragoljub; Lazarevic, Aleksandar; Obradovic, Zoran

    2002-03-01

    We propose partitioning-based methods to facilitate the classification of 3-D binary image data sets of regions of interest (ROIs) with highly non-uniform distributions. The first method is based on recursive dynamic partitioning of a 3-D volume into a number of 3-D hyper-rectangles. For each hyper-rectangle, we consider, as a potential attribute, the number of voxels (volume elements) that belong to ROIs. A hyper-rectangle is partitioned only if the corresponding attribute does not have high discriminative power, determined by statistical tests, but it is still sufficiently large for further splitting. The final discriminative hyper-rectangles form new attributes that are further employed in neural network classification models. The second method is based on maximum likelihood employing non-spatial (k-means) and spatial DBSCAN clustering algorithms to estimate the parameters of the underlying distributions. The proposed methods were experimentally evaluated on mixtures of Gaussian distributions, on realistic lesion-deficit data generated by a simulator conforming to a clinical study, and on synthetic fractal data. Both proposed methods have provided good classification on Gaussian mixtures and on realistic data. However, the experimental results on fractal data indicated that the clustering-based methods were only slightly better than random guess, while the recursive partitioning provided significantly better classification accuracy.

  6. Multi Length Scale Imaging of Flocculated Estuarine Sediments; Insights into their Complex 3D Structure

    Wheatland, Jonathan; Bushby, Andy; Droppo, Ian; Carr, Simon; Spencer, Kate

    2015-04-01

    Suspended estuarine sediments form flocs that are compositionally complex, fragile and irregularly shaped. The fate and transport of suspended particulate matter (SPM) is determined by the size, shape, density, porosity and stability of these flocs and prediction of SPM transport requires accurate measurements of these three-dimensional (3D) physical properties. However, the multi-scaled nature of flocs in addition to their fragility makes their characterisation in 3D problematic. Correlative microscopy is a strategy involving the spatial registration of information collected at different scales using several imaging modalities. Previously, conventional optical microscopy (COM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have enabled 2-dimensional (2D) floc characterisation at the gross (> 1 µm) and sub-micron scales respectively. Whilst this has proven insightful there remains a critical spatial and dimensional gap preventing the accurate measurement of geometric properties and an understanding of how structures at different scales are related. Within life sciences volumetric imaging techniques such as 3D micro-computed tomography (3D µCT) and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy [FIB-SEM (or FIB-tomography)] have been combined to characterise materials at the centimetre to micron scale. Combining these techniques with TEM enables an advanced correlative study, allowing material properties across multiple spatial and dimensional scales to be visualised. The aims of this study are; 1) to formulate an advanced correlative imaging strategy combining 3D µCT, FIB-tomography and TEM; 2) to acquire 3D datasets; 3) to produce a model allowing their co-visualisation; 4) to interpret 3D floc structure. To reduce the chance of structural alterations during analysis samples were first 'fixed' in 2.5% glutaraldehyde/2% formaldehyde before being embedding in Durcupan resin. Intermediate steps were implemented to improve contrast and remove pore water, achieved by the

  7. Ultra-realistic 3-D imaging based on colour holography

    Bjelkhagen, H. I.

    2013-02-01

    A review of recent progress in colour holography is provided with new applications. Colour holography recording techniques in silver-halide emulsions are discussed. Both analogue, mainly Denisyuk colour holograms, and digitally-printed colour holograms are described and their recent improvements. An alternative to silver-halide materials are the panchromatic photopolymer materials such as the DuPont and Bayer photopolymers which are covered. The light sources used to illuminate the recorded holograms are very important to obtain ultra-realistic 3-D images. In particular the new light sources based on RGB LEDs are described. They show improved image quality over today's commonly used halogen lights. Recent work in colour holography by holographers and companies in different countries around the world are included. To record and display ultra-realistic 3-D images with perfect colour rendering are highly dependent on the correct recording technique using the optimal recording laser wavelengths, the availability of improved panchromatic recording materials and combined with new display light sources.

  8. Image-Based 3D Face Modeling System

    Vladimir Vezhnevets

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an automatic system for 3D face modeling using frontal and profile images taken by an ordinary digital camera. The system consists of four subsystems including frontal feature detection, profile feature detection, shape deformation, and texture generation modules. The frontal and profile feature detection modules automatically extract the facial parts such as the eye, nose, mouth, and ear. The shape deformation module utilizes the detected features to deform the generic head mesh model such that the deformed model coincides with the detected features. A texture is created by combining the facial textures augmented from the input images and the synthesized texture and mapped onto the deformed generic head model. This paper provides a practical system for 3D face modeling, which is highly automated by aggregating, customizing, and optimizing a bunch of individual computer vision algorithms. The experimental results show a highly automated process of modeling, which is sufficiently robust to various imaging conditions. The whole model creation including all the optional manual corrections takes only 2∼3 minutes.

  9. Extracting 3D layout from a single image using global image structures.

    Lou, Zhongyu; Gevers, Theo; Hu, Ninghang

    2015-10-01

    Extracting the pixel-level 3D layout from a single image is important for different applications, such as object localization, image, and video categorization. Traditionally, the 3D layout is derived by solving a pixel-level classification problem. However, the image-level 3D structure can be very beneficial for extracting pixel-level 3D layout since it implies the way how pixels in the image are organized. In this paper, we propose an approach that first predicts the global image structure, and then we use the global structure for fine-grained pixel-level 3D layout extraction. In particular, image features are extracted based on multiple layout templates. We then learn a discriminative model for classifying the global layout at the image-level. Using latent variables, we implicitly model the sublevel semantics of the image, which enrich the expressiveness of our model. After the image-level structure is obtained, it is used as the prior knowledge to infer pixel-wise 3D layout. Experiments show that the results of our model outperform the state-of-the-art methods by 11.7% for 3D structure classification. Moreover, we show that employing the 3D structure prior information yields accurate 3D scene layout segmentation. PMID:25966478

  10. 3D imaging of neutron tracks using confocal microscopy

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Flowers, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Neutron detection and neutron flux assessment are important aspects in monitoring nuclear energy production. Neutron flux measurements can also provide information on potential biological damage from exposure. In addition to the applications for neutron measurement in nuclear energy, neutron detection has been proposed as a method of enhancing neutrino detectors and cosmic ray flux has also been assessed using ground-level neutron detectors. Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (or SSNTDs) have been used extensively to examine cosmic rays, long-lived radioactive elements, radon concentrations in buildings and the age of geological samples. Passive SSNTDs consisting of a CR-39 plastic are commonly used to measure radon because they respond to incident charged particles such as alpha particles from radon gas in air. They have a large dynamic range and a linear flux response. We have previously applied confocal microscopy to obtain 3D images of alpha particle tracks in SSNTDs from radon track monitoring (1). As a charged particle traverses through the polymer it creates an ionisation trail along its path. The trail or track is normally enhanced by chemical etching to better expose radiation damage, as the damaged area is more sensitive to the etchant than the bulk material. Particle tracks in CR-39 are usually assessed using 2D optical microscopy. In this study 6 detectors were examined using an Olympus OLS4100 LEXT 3D laser scanning confocal microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan). The detectors had been etched for 2 hours 50 minutes at 85 °C in 6.25M NaOH. Post etch the plastics had been treated with a 10 minute immersion in a 2% acetic acid stop bath, followed by rinsing in deionised water. The detectors examined had been irradiated with a 2mSv neutron dose from an Am(Be) neutron source (producing roughly 20 tracks per mm2). We were able to successfully acquire 3D images of neutron tracks in the detectors studied. The range of track diameter observed was between 4

  11. Role of combined DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w whole-body MRI in tumor staging: Comparison with PET-CT

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic performance of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) by diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in malignant tumor detection and the potential diagnostic advantages in generating fused DWIBS/3D-contrast enhanced T1w (3D-CE-T1w) images. Methods: 45 cancer patients underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT and WB-MRI for staging purpose. Fused DWIBS/3D-CE T1w images were generated off-line. 3D-CE-T1w, DWIBS images alone and fused with 3D-CE T1w were compared by two readers groups for detection of primary diseases and local/distant metastases. Diagnostic performance between the three WB-MRI data sets was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Imaging exams and histopathological results were used as standard of references. Results: Areas under the ROC curves of DWIBS vs. 3D-CE-T1w vs. both sequences in fused fashion were 0.97, 0.978, and 1.00, respectively. The diagnostic performance in tumor detection of fused DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w images were statistically superior to DWIBS (p < 0.001) and 3D-CE-T1w (p ≤ 0.002); while the difference between DWIBS and 3D-CE-T1w did not show statistical significance difference. Detection rates of malignancy did not differ between WB-MRI with DWIBS and 18F-FDG PET-CT. Conclusion: WB-MRI with DWIBS is to be considered as alternative tool to conventional whole-body methods for tumor staging and during follow-up in cancer patients.

  12. Role of combined DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w whole-body MRI in tumor staging: Comparison with PET-CT

    Manenti, Guglielmo, E-mail: guggi@tiscali.it [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University ' Tor Vergata' , PTV Foundation - Policlinic ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Ciccio, Carmelo, E-mail: carmeciccio@libero.it [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University ' Tor Vergata' , PTV Foundation - Policlinic ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Squillaci, Ettore, E-mail: ettoresquillaci@tiscali.it [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University ' Tor Vergata' , PTV Foundation - Policlinic ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.it [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Via Elio Chianesi 53, 00144 Rome (Italy); Calabria, Ferdinando, E-mail: ferdinandocalabria@hotmail.it [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University ' Tor Vergata' , PTV Foundation - Policlinic ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); Danieli, Roberta, E-mail: roberta.danieli@ptvonline.it [Department of Diagnostic and Molecular Imaging, Interventional Radiology and Radiotherapy, University ' Tor Vergata' , PTV Foundation - Policlinic ' Tor Vergata' , Viale Oxford 81, 00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: To assess the diagnostic performance of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) by diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) in malignant tumor detection and the potential diagnostic advantages in generating fused DWIBS/3D-contrast enhanced T1w (3D-CE-T1w) images. Methods: 45 cancer patients underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT and WB-MRI for staging purpose. Fused DWIBS/3D-CE T1w images were generated off-line. 3D-CE-T1w, DWIBS images alone and fused with 3D-CE T1w were compared by two readers groups for detection of primary diseases and local/distant metastases. Diagnostic performance between the three WB-MRI data sets was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Imaging exams and histopathological results were used as standard of references. Results: Areas under the ROC curves of DWIBS vs. 3D-CE-T1w vs. both sequences in fused fashion were 0.97, 0.978, and 1.00, respectively. The diagnostic performance in tumor detection of fused DWIBS/3D-CE-T1w images were statistically superior to DWIBS (p < 0.001) and 3D-CE-T1w (p {<=} 0.002); while the difference between DWIBS and 3D-CE-T1w did not show statistical significance difference. Detection rates of malignancy did not differ between WB-MRI with DWIBS and 18F-FDG PET-CT. Conclusion: WB-MRI with DWIBS is to be considered as alternative tool to conventional whole-body methods for tumor staging and during follow-up in cancer patients.

  13. A new approach of building 3D visualization framework for multimodal medical images display and computed assisted diagnosis

    Li, Zhenwei; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    As more and more CT/MR studies are scanning with larger volume of data sets, more and more radiologists and clinician would like using PACS WS to display and manipulate these larger data sets of images with 3D rendering features. In this paper, we proposed a design method and implantation strategy to develop 3D image display component not only with normal 3D display functions but also with multi-modal medical image fusion as well as compute-assisted diagnosis of coronary heart diseases. The 3D component has been integrated into the PACS display workstation of Shanghai Huadong Hospital, and the clinical practice showed that it is easy for radiologists and physicians to use these 3D functions such as multi-modalities' (e.g. CT, MRI, PET, SPECT) visualization, registration and fusion, and the lesion quantitative measurements. The users were satisfying with the rendering speeds and quality of 3D reconstruction. The advantages of the component include low requirements for computer hardware, easy integration, reliable performance and comfortable application experience. With this system, the radiologists and the clinicians can manipulate with 3D images easily, and use the advanced visualization tools to facilitate their work with a PACS display workstation at any time.

  14. 3D-CT angiography in high-grade aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    We analyzed the role of 3D-CT angiography (3D-CTA) in the management of high-grade patients with severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) who were classified as Grade 5 by the Hunt-Kosnik grading system. From February 1995 to January 1997, 86 out of 92 patients with SAH were studied using 3D-CTA. There were 30 Grade 5 SAH patients (32.6%) including 5 patients who arrived in cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA). There were 13 men and 17 women, ranging in age from 46 to 89 years. Two-thirds were older than age 65 years. All patients underwent CT scan and were diagnosed with SAH. Excluding 5 CPA patients and one other patient, the remaining 24 patients successfully underwent 3D-CTA. As a result, ruptured aneurysms responsible for the SAH were clearly delineated in 19 patients (79.2%), and their anatomical relationships to the surrounding vessels were easily assessed. There were 8 patients with ICA aneurysms, 5 with MCA aneurysms, 2 with ACoA aneurysms, 2 with VA aneurysms, 1 with distal ACA aneurysm and 1 with distal PICA aneurysm. Intracranial vessels were not seen in 4 patients, 3 of whom had huge intracerebral hematomas associated with severe SAH. Proximal clipping was performed in a 46-years-old man with dissecting VA aneurysm. He later gained consciousness and became a surgical candidate. A 62-years-old woman underwent coil embolization for the large ICPC aneurysm after the level of her consciousness improved slightly following ventricular drainage. In conclusion, 3D-CTA can be performed safely and has a high detection rate of ruptured aneurysm even in patients with severe SAH. The results from these studies may gain further insight into epidemiology of SAH and ruptured aneurysms. (author)

  15. 3D medical image segmentation based on a continuous modelling of the volume

    Several medical imaging/techniques, including Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provide 3D information of the human body by means of a stack of parallel cross-sectional images. But a more sophisticated edge detection step has to be performed when the object under study is not well defined by its characteristic density or when an analytical knowledge of the surface of the object is useful for later processings. A new method for medical image segmentation has been developed: it uses the stability and differentiability properties of a continuous modelling of the 3D data. The idea is to build a system of Ordinary Differential Equations which the stable manifold is the surface of the object we are looking for. This technique has been applied to classical edge detection operators: threshold following, laplacian, gradient maximum in its direction. It can be used in 2D as well as in 3D and has been extended to seek particular points of the surface, such as local extrema. The major advantages of this method are as follows: the segmentation and boundary following steps are performed simultaneously, an analytical representation of the surface is obtained straightforwardly and complex objects in which branching problems may occur can be described automatically. Simulations on noisy synthetic images have induced a quantization step to test the sensitiveness to noise of our method with respect to each operator, and to study the influence of all the parameters. Last, this method has been applied to numerous real clinical exams: skull or femur images provided by CT, MR images of a cerebral tumor and of the ventricular system. These results show the reliability and the efficiency of this new method of segmentation

  16. New solutions and applications of 3D computer tomography image processing

    Effenberger, Ira; Kroll, Julia; Verl, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    As nowadays the industry aims at fast and high quality product development and manufacturing processes a modern and efficient quality inspection is essential. Compared to conventional measurement technologies, industrial computer tomography (CT) is a non-destructive technology for 3D-image data acquisition which helps to overcome their disadvantages by offering the possibility to scan complex parts with all outer and inner geometric features. In this paper new and optimized methods for 3D image processing, including innovative ways of surface reconstruction and automatic geometric feature detection of complex components, are presented, especially our work of developing smart online data processing and data handling methods, with an integrated intelligent online mesh reduction. Hereby the processing of huge and high resolution data sets is guaranteed. Besides, new approaches for surface reconstruction and segmentation based on statistical methods are demonstrated. On the extracted 3D point cloud or surface triangulation automated and precise algorithms for geometric inspection are deployed. All algorithms are applied to different real data sets generated by computer tomography in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new tools. Since CT is an emerging technology for non-destructive testing and inspection more and more industrial application fields will use and profit from this new technology.

  17. 3D electrical tomographic imaging using vertical arrays of electrodes

    Murphy, S. C.; Stanley, S. J.; Rhodes, D.; York, T. A.

    2006-11-01

    Linear arrays of electrodes in conjunction with electrical impedance tomography have been used to spatially interrogate industrial processes that have only limited access for sensor placement. This paper explores the compromises that are to be expected when using a small number of vertically positioned linear arrays to facilitate 3D imaging using electrical tomography. A configuration with three arrays is found to give reasonable results when compared with a 'conventional' arrangement of circumferential electrodes. A single array yields highly localized sensitivity that struggles to image the whole space. Strategies have been tested on a small-scale version of a sludge settling application that is of relevance to the industrial sponsor. A new electrode excitation strategy, referred to here as 'planar cross drive', is found to give superior results to an extended version of the adjacent electrodes technique due to the improved uniformity of the sensitivity across the domain. Recommendations are suggested for parameters to inform the scale-up to industrial vessels.

  18. 2D image classification for 3D anatomy localization: employing deep convolutional neural networks

    de Vos, Bob D.; Wolterink, Jelmer M.; de Jong, Pim A.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Localization of anatomical regions of interest (ROIs) is a preprocessing step in many medical image analysis tasks. While trivial for humans, it is complex for automatic methods. Classic machine learning approaches require the challenge of hand crafting features to describe differences between ROIs and background. Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) alleviate this by automatically finding hierarchical feature representations from raw images. We employ this trait to detect anatomical ROIs in 2D image slices in order to localize them in 3D. In 100 low-dose non-contrast enhanced non-ECG synchronized screening chest CT scans, a reference standard was defined by manually delineating rectangular bounding boxes around three anatomical ROIs -- heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta. Every anatomical ROI was automatically identified using a combination of three CNNs, each analyzing one orthogonal image plane. While single CNNs predicted presence or absence of a specific ROI in the given plane, the combination of their results provided a 3D bounding box around it. Classification performance of each CNN, expressed in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was >=0.988. Additionally, the performance of ROI localization was evaluated. Median Dice scores for automatically determined bounding boxes around the heart, aortic arch, and descending aorta were 0.89, 0.70, and 0.85 respectively. The results demonstrate that accurate automatic 3D localization of anatomical structures by CNN-based 2D image classification is feasible.

  19. Mono- and multistatic polarimetric sparse aperture 3D SAR imaging

    DeGraaf, Stuart; Twigg, Charles; Phillips, Louis

    2008-04-01

    SAR imaging at low center frequencies (UHF and L-band) offers advantages over imaging at more conventional (X-band) frequencies, including foliage penetration for target detection and scene segmentation based on polarimetric coherency. However, bandwidths typically available at these center frequencies are small, affording poor resolution. By exploiting extreme spatial diversity (partial hemispheric k-space coverage) and nonlinear bandwidth extrapolation/interpolation methods such as Least-Squares SuperResolution (LSSR) and Least-Squares CLEAN (LSCLEAN), one can achieve resolutions that are commensurate with the carrier frequency (λ/4) rather than the bandwidth (c/2B). Furthermore, extreme angle diversity affords complete coverage of a target's backscatter, and a correspondingly more literal image. To realize these benefits, however, one must image the scene in 3-D; otherwise layover-induced misregistration compromises the coherent summation that yields improved resolution. Practically, one is limited to very sparse elevation apertures, i.e. a small number of circular passes. Here we demonstrate that both LSSR and LSCLEAN can reduce considerably the sidelobe and alias artifacts caused by these sparse elevation apertures. Further, we illustrate how a hypothetical multi-static geometry consisting of six vertical real-aperture receive apertures, combined with a single circular transmit aperture provide effective, though sparse and unusual, 3-D k-space support. Forward scattering captured by this geometry reveals horizontal scattering surfaces that are missed in monostatic backscattering geometries. This paper illustrates results based on LucernHammer UHF and L-band mono- and multi-static simulations of a backhoe.

  20. X-Ray Nanofocus CT: Visualising Of Internal 3D-Structures With Submicrometer Resolution

    Weinekoetter, Christian

    2008-09-01

    High-resolution X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) allows the visualization and failure analysis of the internal micro structure of objects—even if they have complicated 3D-structures where 2D X-ray microscopy would give unclear information. During the past several years, computed tomography has progressed to higher resolution and quicker reconstruction of the 3D-volume. Most recently it even allows a three-dimensional look into the inside of materials with submicron resolution. With the use of nanofocus® tube technology, nanoCT®-systems are pushing forward into application fields that were exclusive to high cost and rare available synchrotron techniques. The study was performed with the new nanotom, a very compact laboratory system which allows the analysis of samples up to 120 mm in diameter and weighing up to 1 kg with exceptional voxel-resolution down to nanoCT-examinations e.g. of synthetic materials, metals, ceramics, composite materials, mineral and organic samples. There are a few physical effects influencing the CT quality, such as beam-hardening within the sample or ring-artefacts, which can not be completely avoided. To optimize the quality of high resolution 3D volumes, the nanotom® includes a variety of effective software tools to reduce ring-artefacts and correct beam hardenings or drift effects which occurred during data acquisition. The resulting CT volume data set can be displayed in various ways, for example by virtual slicing and sectional views in any direction of the volume. By the fact that this requires only a mouse click, this technique will substitute destructive mechanical slicing and cutting in many applications. The initial CT results obtained with the nanotom® demonstrate that it is now possible to analyze the three-dimensional micro structure of materials and small objects with submicrometer resolution. Any internal difference in material, density or porosity within a sample can be visualized and data like distances can be measured

  1. Accuracy and reliability of measurements obtained from computed tomography 3D volume rendered images.

    Stull, Kyra E; Tise, Meredith L; Ali, Zabiullah; Fowler, David R

    2014-05-01

    Forensic pathologists commonly use computed tomography (CT) images to assist in determining the cause and manner of death as well as for mass disaster operations. Even though the design of the CT machine does not inherently produce distortion, most techniques within anthropology rely on metric variables, thus concern exists regarding the accuracy of CT images reflecting an object's true dimensions. Numerous researchers have attempted to validate the use of CT images, however the comparisons have only been conducted on limited elements and/or comparisons were between measurements taken from a dry element and measurements taken from the 3D-CT image of the same dry element. A full-body CT scan was performed prior to autopsy at the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for the State of Maryland. Following autopsy, the remains were processed to remove all soft tissues and the skeletal elements were subject to an additional CT scan. Percent differences and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the accuracy between osteometric variables obtained from the dry skeletal elements and from CT images with and without soft tissues. An additional seven crania were scanned, measured by three observers, and the reliability was evaluated by technical error of measurement (TEM) and relative technical error of measurement (%TEM). Average percent differences between the measurements obtained from the three data sources ranged from 1.4% to 2.9%. Bland-Altman plots illustrated the two sets of measurements were generally within 2mm for each comparison between data sources. Intra-observer TEM and %TEM for three observers and all craniometric variables ranged between 0.46mm and 0.77mm and 0.56% and 1.06%, respectively. The three-way inter-observer TEM and %TEM for craniometric variables was 2.6mm and 2.26%, respectively. Variables that yielded high error rates were orbital height, orbital breadth, inter-orbital breadth and parietal chord. Overall, minimal differences were found among the

  2. Experience of percutaneous pedicle screw insertion system SEXTANT with intra-operative 3D-CT navigation system

    From 2007, we have performed spinal instrumental surgery, using an intra-operative 3D-CT navigation system to treat cervical or upper thoracic lesions. With this 3D-CT navigation system, implanation of the percutaneous pedicle screw and rod was started recently as minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). When using SEXTANT system, the 3D-CT navigation enables us to perform lumbar instrumental surgery more safely. We report our experience on this treatment, in terms of the surgery technique and problems. (author)

  3. 3D CT Image-Guided Parallel Mechanism-Assisted Femur Fracture Reduction%3维CT图像导航的并联机构辅助股骨复位方法

    龚敏丽; 徐颖; 唐佩福; 胡磊; 杜海龙; 吕振天; 姚腾洲

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, the clinical femur fracture reduction surgery is imperfect and often results in misalignment and high intraoperative radiation exposures.To solve the problem, a method for fracture reduction based on preoperative CT image and 6 degrees of freedom parallel mechanism which is fixed to unhealthy femur is proposed.Based on the body's symmetry principle, the method uses contralateral femur as a standard to guide the reduction of femoral shaft fractures.By twelve markers on the implementing machine,the computer can calculate the length of pole in the virtual space in real time.Finally, animal bones experiments show the effectiveness of the approach.%临床上传统股骨复位手术存在复位精确度不高、辐射量大等不足.针对以上不足,提出一种基于术前CT图像引导,由固定于股骨患侧上的6自由度并联机构辅助股骨复位的方法.该方法基于人体的对称性原理,用患者健侧股骨镜像作为标准,指导患侧股骨复位:通过执行机构上的12个标记点,在虚拟空间中实时标记执行机构上每根杆的长度.动物骨实验验证了此复位方法的有效性.

  4. The stylohyoid chain: CT imaging

    Uysal Ramadan, Selma, E-mail: uysalselma@yahoo.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Goekharman, Dilek, E-mail: gokharman@ttnet.net.t [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kosar, Pinar, E-mail: pkosar@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kacar, Mahmut, E-mail: mkacar1961@gamil.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey); Kosar, Ugur, E-mail: ugurkosar@hotmail.co [Department of Radiology, Ankara Training and Research Hospital, Ankara 06590 (Turkey)

    2010-09-15

    We aimed in this report to discuss the embryology, anatomy, theories of ossification and symptoms, clinical presentation, and diagnosis of the stylohyoid chain (SHC) variations, together with the role of radiographs, computed tomography (CT) and three-dimensional (3D)-CT in showing these variations. Because CT/3D-CT additionally facilitates visualization of the entire SHC with different axes, it is the most valuable method for establishing the relationship between the SHC and the surrounding tissue. SHC variation can be discovered during CT performed for indications other than ossified SHC. It is important to diagnose whether or not the SHC is ossified, since one of the treatment procedures in ossified SHC is total excision. If the clinician and radiologist are aware of these variations observed in the SHC, patients with vague symptoms may be spared unnecessary investigations and may be properly diagnosed earlier.

  5. Integral Imaging Based 3-D Image Encryption Algorithm Combined with Cellular Automata

    Li, X. W.; Kim, D. H.; Cho, S. J.; Kim, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical encryption method is proposed in this paper to achieve 3-D image encryption. This proposed encryption algorithm combines the use of computational integral imaging (CII) and linear-complemented maximum- length cellular automata (LC-MLCA) to encrypt a 3D image. In the encryption process, the 2-D elemental image array (EIA) recorded by light rays of the 3-D image are mapped inversely through the lenslet array according the ray tracing theory. Next, the 2-D EIA is encrypted by LC-...

  6. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE™ dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans. (note)

  7. Phantom investigation of 3D motion-dependent volume aliasing during CT simulation for radiation therapy planning

    To quantify volumetric and positional aliasing during non-gated fast- and slow-scan acquisition CT in the presence of 3D target motion. Single-slice fast, single-slice slow, and multi-slice fast scan helical CTs were acquired of dynamic spherical targets (1 and 3.15 cm in diameter), embedded in an anthropomorphic phantom. 3D target motions typical of clinically observed tumor motion parameters were investigated. Motion excursions included ± 5, ± 10, and ± 15 mm displacements in the S-I direction synchronized with constant displacements of ± 5 and ± 2 mm in the A-P and lateral directions, respectively. For each target, scan technique, and motion excursion, eight different initial motion-to-scan phase relationships were investigated. An anticipated general trend of target volume overestimation was observed. The mean percentage overestimation of the true physical target volume typically increased with target motion amplitude and decreasing target diameter. Slow-scan percentage overestimations were larger, and better approximated the time-averaged motion envelope, as opposed to fast-scans. Motion induced centroid misrepresentation was greater in the S-I direction for fast-scan techniques, and transaxial direction for the slow-scan technique. Overestimation is fairly uniform for slice widths < 5 mm, beyond which there is gross overestimation. Non-gated CT imaging of targets describing clinically relevant, 3D motion results in aliased overestimation of the target volume and misrepresentation of centroid location, with little or no correlation between the physical target geometry and the CT-generated target geometry. Slow-scan techniques are a practical method for characterizing time-averaged target position. Fast-scan techniques provide a more reliable, albeit still distorted, target margin

  8. Fast 3-d tomographic microwave imaging for breast cancer detection.

    Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M; Meaney, Paul M; Kaufman, Peter A; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-08-01

    Microwave breast imaging (using electromagnetic waves of frequencies around 1 GHz) has mostly remained at the research level for the past decade, gaining little clinical acceptance. The major hurdles limiting patient use are both at the hardware level (challenges in collecting accurate and noncorrupted data) and software level (often plagued by unrealistic reconstruction times in the tens of hours). In this paper we report improvements that address both issues. First, the hardware is able to measure signals down to levels compatible with sub-centimeter image resolution while keeping an exam time under 2 min. Second, the software overcomes the enormous time burden and produces similarly accurate images in less than 20 min. The combination of the new hardware and software allows us to produce and report here the first clinical 3-D microwave tomographic images of the breast. Two clinical examples are selected out of 400+ exams conducted at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH). The first example demonstrates the potential usefulness of our system for breast cancer screening while the second example focuses on therapy monitoring. PMID:22562726

  9. Fast 3D subsurface imaging with stepped-frequency GPR

    Masarik, Matthew P.; Burns, Joseph; Thelen, Brian T.; Sutter, Lena

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates an algorithm for forming 3D images of the subsurface using stepped-frequency GPR data. The algorithm is specifically designed for a handheld GPR and therefore accounts for the irregular sampling pattern in the data and the spatially-variant air-ground interface by estimating an effective "ground-plane" and then registering the data to the plane. The algorithm efficiently solves the 4th-order polynomial for the Snell reflection points using a fully vectorized iterative scheme. The forward operator is implemented efficiently using an accelerated nonuniform FFT (Greengard and Lee, 2004); the adjoint operator is implemented efficiently using an interpolation step coupled with an upsampled FFT. The imaging is done as a linearized version of the full inverse problem, which is regularized using a sparsity constraint to reduce sidelobes and therefore improve image localization. Applying an appropriate sparsity constraint, the algorithm is able to eliminate most the surrounding clutter and sidelobes, while still rendering valuable image properties such as shape and size. The algorithm is applied to simulated data, controlled experimental data (made available by Dr. Waymond Scott, Georgia Institute of Technology), and government-provided data with irregular sampling and air-ground interface.

  10. 3D Chemical and Elemental Imaging by STXM Spectrotomography

    Spectrotomography based on the scanning transmission x-ray microscope (STXM) at the 10ID-1 spectromicroscopy beamline of the Canadian Light Source was used to study two selected unicellular microorganisms. Spatial distributions of sulphur globules, calcium, protein, and polysaccharide in sulphur-metabolizing bacteria (Allochromatium vinosum) were determined at the S 2p, C 1s, and Ca 2p edges. 3D chemical mapping showed that the sulphur globules are located inside the bacteria with a strong spatial correlation with calcium ions (it is most probably calcium carbonate from the medium; however, with STXM the distribution and localization in the cell can be made visible, which is very interesting for a biologist) and polysaccharide-rich polymers, suggesting an influence of the organic components on the formation of the sulphur and calcium deposits. A second study investigated copper accumulating in yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) treated with copper sulphate. 3D elemental imaging at the Cu 2p edge showed that Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I) on the yeast cell wall. A novel needle-like wet cell sample holder for STXM spectrotomography studies of fully hydrated samples is discussed.

  11. Is 3D-CT reformation using free software applicable to diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles?

    Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the agreement of computed tomography (CT imaging using 3D reformations (3DR with shaded surface display (SSD and maximum intensity projection (MIP in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, and compared findings with multiplanar reformation (MPR images, used as the criterion standard. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Axial CT images of 44 temporomandibular joints (TMJs of 22 patients with RA were used. Images were recorded in DICOM format and assessed using free software (ImageJ. Each sample had its 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP results compared in pairs with the MPR results. RESULTS: Slight agreement (k = 0.0374 was found in almost all comparisons. The level of agreement showed that 3DR-SSD and 3DR-MIP yielded a number of false-negative results that was statistically significant when compared with MPR. CONCLUSIONS: 3DR-SSD or 3DR-MIP should only be used as adjuvant techniques to MPR in the diagnosis of bone changes in mandibular condyles.

  12. 3D imaging of semiconductor components by discrete laminography

    X-ray laminography is a powerful technique for quality control of semiconductor components. Despite the advantages of nondestructive 3D imaging over 2D techniques based on sectioning, the acquisition time is still a major obstacle for practical use of the technique. In this paper, we consider the application of Discrete Tomography to laminography data, which can potentially reduce the scanning time while still maintaining a high reconstruction quality. By incorporating prior knowledge in the reconstruction algorithm about the materials present in the scanned object, far more accurate reconstructions can be obtained from the same measured data compared to classical reconstruction methods. We present a series of simulation experiments that illustrate the potential of the approach

  13. 3D imaging of semiconductor components by discrete laminography

    Batenburg, K. J.; Palenstijn, W. J.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-06-01

    X-ray laminography is a powerful technique for quality control of semiconductor components. Despite the advantages of nondestructive 3D imaging over 2D techniques based on sectioning, the acquisition time is still a major obstacle for practical use of the technique. In this paper, we consider the application of Discrete Tomography to laminography data, which can potentially reduce the scanning time while still maintaining a high reconstruction quality. By incorporating prior knowledge in the reconstruction algorithm about the materials present in the scanned object, far more accurate reconstructions can be obtained from the same measured data compared to classical reconstruction methods. We present a series of simulation experiments that illustrate the potential of the approach.

  14. 3-D MR imaging of ectopia vasa deferentia

    Goenka, Ajit Harishkumar; Parihar, Mohan; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Radiology, New Delhi (India); Bhatnagar, Veereshwar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Department of Paediatric Surgery, New Delhi (India)

    2009-11-15

    Ectopia vasa deferentia is a complex anomaly characterized by abnormal termination of the urethral end of the vas deferens into the urinary tract due to an incompletel