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Sample records for 3d conformal radiotherapy

  1. Advances in conformal radiotherapy 3-D CRT and IMRT

    It tries on IMRT and 3-D conformal radiotherapy. Advanced imaging, planning and delivery tools such as 3D TPS, ITP and IMRT, allow the creation of highly conformal dose distributions. The treatment is only as good as the ability to know where the target and the sensitive structures are at all times. Margins to the target volume should account for uncertainties in localization, for patient repositioning and immobilization, and for organ motion

  2. Audit of 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning systems

    Background. Treatment planning systems (TPSs) are an essential part of modern radiotherapy equipment where radiation dose distribution and number of Monitor Units (MU) necessary to achieve it are calculated. Therefore, proper commissioning, implementation and application of TPSs are essential to ensure accurate dose delivery to the patient, and to minimize the possibility of accidental exposure. IAEA is supporting national and sub-regional TPS audit activities as a new initiative to improve the quality and safety of radiotherapy in Member States. The audit methodology is based on the outcome of the IAEA coordinated research project E2.40.13 'Development of procedures for quality assurance for dosimetry calculation in radiotherapy'. The pilot runs have been conducted in the Baltic States and Hungarian hospitals. Methodology. The methodology for the audit focuses on the dosimetric aspects of the treatment planning and delivery processes of radiotherapy, for high-energy photon beams. It assesses the important part of the external beam radiotherapy workflow - from patient data acquisition and treatment planning to dose delivery. The audit procedure is based on the use of a CIRS thorax phantom Model 002LFC (Norfolk, VA). The phantom has a body made of plastic water, lung equivalent material and bone equivalent material sections and has 10 holes to hold interchangeable rod inserts for an ionization chamber. The phantom has a set of calibrated electron density reference plugs that enable the verification of the Hounsfield units/electron density (HU/ ED) conversion procedure. Computed tomography (CT) is used to image the phantom and the images are transferred to a TPS where planning and dose calculations take place. The clinical test cases cover a range of basic treatment techniques used in 3D conformal radiotherapy (CRT). The tests are structured so that at first, the dose distributions for single beams are considered, then standard multiple field techniques are used, and

  3. Transition from 2-D radiotherapy to 3-D conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death globally and radiotherapy is currently an essential component in the management of cancer patients, either alone or in combination with surgery or chemotherapy, both for cure or palliation. It is now recognized that safe and effective radiotherapy service needs not only substantial capital investment in radiotherapy equipment and specially designed facilities but also continuous investment in maintenance and upgrading of the equipment to comply with the technical progress, but also in training the staff. The recent IAEA-TECDOC publication 'Setting up a Radiotherapy Programme: Clinical, Medical Physics, Radiation Protection and Safety Aspects' provides general guidelines for designing and implementing radiotherapy services in Member States. Advances in computer technology have enabled the possibility of transitioning from basic 2- dimensional treatment planning and delivery (2-D radiotherapy) to a more sophisticated approach with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-D CRT). Whereas 2-D radiotherapy can be applied with simple equipment, infrastructure and training, transfer to 3-D conformal treatments requires more resources in technology, equipment, staff and training. A novel radiation treatment approach using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) that optimizes the delivery of radiation to irregularly shaped tumour volumes demands even more sophisticated equipment and seamless teamwork, and consequentially more resources, advanced training and more time for treatment planning and verification of dose delivery than 3-D CRT. Whereas 3-D CRT can be considered as a standard, IMRT is still evolving. Due to the increased interest of Member States to the modern application of radiotherapy the IAEA has received a number of requests for guidance coming from radiotherapy departments that wish to upgrade their facilities to 3-D CRT and IMRT through Technical Cooperation programme. These requests are expected to increase

  4. Parotid gland sparing radiotherapy technique using 3-D conformal radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Although using the high energy photon beam with conventional parallel-opposed beams radio-therapy for nasopgaryngeal carcinoma, radiation-induced xerostomia is a troublesome problem for patients. We conducted this study to explore a new parotid gland sparing technique in 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) in an effort to prevent the radiation-induced xerostomia. We performed three different planning for four clinically node-negative nasopharyngeal cancer patients with different location of tumor(intracranial extension, nasal cavity extension, oropharyngeal extension, parapharyngeal extension), and intercompared the plans. Total prescription dose was 70.2 Gy to the isocenter. For plan-A, 2-D parallel opposing fields, a conventional radiotherapy technique, were employed. For plan-B, 2-D parallel opposing fields were used up until 54 Gy and afterwards 3-D non-coplanar beams were used. For plan-C, the new technique, 54Gy was delivered by 3-D conformal 3-port beams (AP and both lateral ports with wedge compensator, shielding both superficial lobes of parotid glands at the AP beam using BEV) from the beginning of the treatment and early spinal cord block (at 36 Gy) was performed. And bilateral posterior necks were treated with electron after 36 Gy. After 54 Gy, non-coplanar beams were used for cone-down plan. We intercompared dose statistics (Dmax, Dmin, Dmean, D95, D05, V95, V05, Volume receiving 46 Gy) and dose volume histograms (DVH) of tumor and normal tissues and NTCP values of parotid glands for the above three plans. For all patients, the new technique (plan-C) was comparable or superior to the other plans in target volume isodose distribution and dose statistics and it has more homogenous target volume coverage. The new technique was most superior to the other plans in parotid glands sparing (volume receiving 46 Gy: 100, 98, 69% for each plan-A, B and C). And it showed the lowest NTCP value of parotid glands in all patients (range of NTCP; 96-100%, 79-99%, 51

  5. Chest wall desmoid tumours treated with definitive radiotherapy: a plan comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy

    Liu, Jia; Ng, Diana; Lee, James; Stalley, Paul; Hong, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Definitive radiotherapy is often used for chest wall desmoid tumours due to size or anatomical location. The delivery of radiotherapy is challenging due to the large size and constraints of normal surrounding structures. We compared the dosimetry of 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) to evaluate the best treatment option. Methods and materials Ten consecutive patients with inoperable chest wall de...

  6. Conventional (2D) Versus Conformal (3D) Techniques in Radiotherapy for Malignant Pediatric Tumors: Dosimetric Perspectives

    Objectives: In pediatric radiotherapy, the enhanced radiosensitivity of the developing tissues combined with the high overall survival, raise the possibility of late complications. The present study aims at comparing two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) planning regarding dose homogeneity within target volume and dose to organs at risk (OARs) to demonstrate the efficacy of 3D in decreasing dose to normal tissue. Material and Methods: Thirty pediatric patients (18 years or less) with different pediatric tumors were planned using 2D and 3D plans. All were CT scanned after proper positioning and immobilization. Structures were contoured; including the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Conformal beams were designed and dose distribution analysis was edited to provide the best dose coverage to the PTV while sparing OARs using dose volume histograms (DVHs) of outlined structures. For the same PTVs conventional plans were created using the conventional simulator data (2-4 coplanar fields). Conventional and 3D plans coverage and distribution were compared using the term of V95% (volume of PTV receiving 95% of the prescribed dose), V107% (volume of PTV receiving 107% of the prescribed dose), and conformity index (CI) (volume receiving 90% of the prescribed dose/PTV). Doses received by OARs were compared in terms of mean dose. In children treated for brain lesions, OAR volume received 90% of the dose (V 90%) and OAR score were calculated. Results: The PTV coverage showed no statistical difference between 2D and 3D radiotherapy in terms of V95% or V107%. However, there was more conformity in 3D planning with CI 1.43 rather than conventional planning with CI 1.86 (p-value <0.001). Regarding OARs, 3D planning shows large gain in healthy tissue sparing. There was no statistical difference in mean dose received by each OAR. However, for brain cases, brain stem mean dose and brain V 90% showed better sparing in 3D planning (brain stem mean dose was

  7. 3D-Conformal Versus Intensity-Modulated Postoperative Radiotherapy of Vaginal Vault: A Dosimetric Comparison

    We evaluated a step-and-shoot IMRT plan in the postoperative irradiation of the vaginal vault compared with equispaced beam arrangements (3-5) 3D-radiotherapy (RT) optimized plans. Twelve patients were included in this analysis. Four plans for each patient were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, homogeneity index (HI), and conformity index (CI): (1) 3 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (2) 4 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (3) 5 equispaced beam arrangement 3D-RT; (4) step-and-shoot IMRT technique. CI showed a good discrimination between the four plans. The mean scores of CI were 0.58 (range: 0.38-0.67) for the 3F-CRT plan, 0.58 (range: 0.41-0.66) for 4F-CRT, 0.62 (range: 0.43-0.68) for 5F-CRT and 0.69 (range: 0.58-0.78) for the IMRT plan. A significant improvement of the conformity was reached by the IMRT plan (p mean, V90%, V95%, V100% was recorded for rectal and bladder irradiation with the IMRT plan. Surprisingly, IMRT supplied a significant dose reduction also for rectum and bladder V30% and V50%. A significant dosimetric advantage of IMRT over 3D-RT in the adjuvant treatment of vaginal vault alone in terms of treatment conformity and rectum and bladder sparing is shown.

  8. Novel 3D conformal technique for treament of choroidal melanoma with external beam photon radiotherapy

    To report a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) technique that utilises a specific eye immobilisation and treatment set-up method as an alternative to stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), for treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma (CM) and report early treatment outcomes of this technique. A contact lens and rod system was designed to provide eye immobilisation and a treatment reference point for 3D-CRT. The technique is described in detail in the body of the paper. A retrospective chart review was conducted to report freedom from local progression (FFLP) and radiation toxicity in a cohort of patients treated with a dose of 50Gy in five fractions. Eleven eligible patients with juxtapapillary CM were treated between 2003 and 2009. The median follow-up was 3.2 years (range 1.2–5.3). The FFLP was 100% (95% confidence interval 71.5–100). The reproducibility of the set-up and eye immobilisation for fractionation was excellent. The mean dose to the planning target volume was 51.4Gy (interquartilic range 51.0–51.9). Normal tissue dose constraints were achieved; however, the quality of the 3D-CRT plan was variable. The highest acute radiation toxicity score was Common Toxicity Criteria version 3 grade 1. Vision outcomes were poor. n this small series, a novel non-stereotactic technique was found to be an accurate method for the treatment of CM with a high rate of freedom from tumour progression, in keeping with the SRT series. The quality of the conformal plan was variable. Investigation of the optimal dose-fractionation schedule to minimise late radiation toxicity without compromise of tumour control is the focus of ongoing clinical research at our centre.

  9. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  10. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, not 3D conformal, is the preferred technique for treating locally advanced lung cancer

    Chang, Joe Y.

    2014-01-01

    When used to treat lung cancer, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can deliver higher dose to the targets and spare more critical organs in lung cancer than can 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). However, tumor-motion management and optimized radiotherapy planning based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) scanning are crucial to maximize the benefit of IMRT and to eliminate or minimize potential uncertainties. This article summarizes these strategies and reviews published fin...

  11. Radiation dose-escalation trial for glioblastomas with 3D-conformal radiotherapy

    To investigate the effects of radiation dose-escalation on the treatment outcome, complications and the other prognostic variables for glioblastoma patients treated with 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between Jan 1997 and July 2002, a total of 75 patients with histologically proven diagnosis of glioblastoma were analyzed. The patients who had a Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) of 60 or higher, and received at least 50 Gy of radiation to the tumor bed were eligible. All the patients were divided into two arms; Arm 1, the high-dose group was enrolled prospectively, and Arm 2, the low-dose group served as a retrospective control. Arm 1 patients received 63 ∼ 70 Gy (Median 66 Gy, fraction size 1.8 ∼ 2 Gy) with 3D-conformal radiotherapy, and Arm 2 received 59.4 Gy or less (Median 59.4 Gy, fraction size 1.8 Gy) with 2D-conventional radiotherapy. The Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) was defined by the surgical margin and the residual gross tumor on a contrast enhanced MRI. Surrounding edema was not included in the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) in Arm 1, so as to reduce the risk of late radiation associated complications; whereas as in Arm 2 it was included. The overall survival and progression free survival times were calculated from the data of surgery using the Kaplan-Meier method. The time to progression was measured with serial neurologic examinations and MRI or CT scans after RT completion. Acute and late toxicities were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group neurotoxicity scores. During the relatively short follow up period of 14 months, the median overall survival and progression free survival times were 15 ± 1.65 and 11 ± 0.95 months, respectively. There was a significantly longer survival time for the Arm 1 patients compared to those in Arm 2 (ρ = 0.028). For Arm 1 patients, the median survival and progression free survival times were 21 ± 5.03 and 12 ± 1.59 months, respectively, while for Arm 2 patients they were 14 ± 0.94 and 10 ± 1

  12. Dosimetric impact of different CT datasets for stereotactic treatment planning using 3D conformal radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Oechsner, Markus; Odersky, Leonhard; Berndt, Johannes; Combs, Stephanie Elisabeth; Wilkens, Jan Jakob; DUMA, MARCIANA NONA

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR) by using four differently generated CT datasets for dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung and liver tumors. Additionally, dose differences between 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans calculated on these CT datasets were determined. Methods Twenty SBRT patients, ten lung cases and ten liver cases, ...

  13. The optimisation and inherent limitations of 3D conformal radiotherapy of the prostate

    This presentation starts with implementation details of an inverse planning optimisation algorithm we have developed to optimise radiation beam-weights for radiotherapy treatment plans. The algorithm is based on fast-simulated-annealing, utilising a cost-function containing both linear and quadratic terms. General conclusions concerning the efficacy, usability and practicality of the algorithm will be presented. We have applied the algorithm extensively to the problem of optimising prostate treatment plans. The results of these investigations will be summarised and it will be shown that the algorithm can reproduce, and improve on, the results of an experienced human planner. During our investigations it was found that significant lowering of the dose to that part of the rectum outside the PTV produced only minor changes in normal-tissue-complication-probability (NTCP). This prompted an investigation into the 'overlap effect'; i.e. that conformal radiotherapy of the prostate is inherently limited by the size of the overlap region of the PTV and rectum. The NTCP of the rectum is due almost entirely to the high dose rectal tissue in the overlap region. The results of this investigation will be presented. The conclusion is that until the margin accounting for set-up errors that is added to the CTV can be reduced, or new methods are developed to deliver controlled non-uniform dose to the PTV, conformal therapy of the prostate is inherently limited by the overlap effect

  14. Analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, Proton and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT for Reducing Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Ted C. Ling

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. While neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy has improved outcomes for esophageal cancer patients, surgical complication rates remain high. The most frequent perioperative complications after trimodality therapy were cardiopulmonary in nature. The radiation modality utilized can be a strong mitigating factor of perioperative complications given the location of the esophagus and its proximity to the heart and lungs. The purpose of this study is to make a dosimetric comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT, proton and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with regard to reducing perioperative cardiopulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients. Materials. Ten patients with esophageal cancer treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using proton radiotherapy, IMRT, and 3D-CRT modalities were created for each patient. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and analyzed to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR being evaluated in this study are the heart, lungs, and spinal cord. To determine statistical significance, ANOVA and two-tailed paired t-tests were performed for all data parameters. Results. The proton plans showed decreased dose to various volumes of the heart and lungs in comparison to both the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans. There was no difference between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans in dose delivered to the lung or heart. This finding was seen consistently across the parameters analyzed in this study. Conclusions. In patients receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer, proton plans are technically feasible while achieving adequate coverage with lower doses delivered to the lungs and cardiac structures. This may result in decreased cardiopulmonary toxicity and less morbidity to esophageal cancer patients.

  15. Analysis of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Proton and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for Reducing Perioperative Cardiopulmonary Complications in Esophageal Cancer Patients

    Ling, Ted C.; Slater, Jerry M.; Nookala, Prashanth; Mifflin, Rachel; Grove, Roger; Ly, Anh M.; Patyal, Baldev; Slater, Jerry D.; Yang, Gary Y., E-mail: gyang@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, 11234 Anderson Street, A875, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Background. While neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy has improved outcomes for esophageal cancer patients, surgical complication rates remain high. The most frequent perioperative complications after trimodality therapy were cardiopulmonary in nature. The radiation modality utilized can be a strong mitigating factor of perioperative complications given the location of the esophagus and its proximity to the heart and lungs. The purpose of this study is to make a dosimetric comparison of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), proton and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with regard to reducing perioperative cardiopulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients. Materials. Ten patients with esophageal cancer treated between 2010 and 2013 were evaluated in this study. All patients were simulated with contrast-enhanced CT imaging. Separate treatment plans using proton radiotherapy, IMRT, and 3D-CRT modalities were created for each patient. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and analyzed to compare plans between the three modalities. The organs at risk (OAR) being evaluated in this study are the heart, lungs, and spinal cord. To determine statistical significance, ANOVA and two-tailed paired t-tests were performed for all data parameters. Results. The proton plans showed decreased dose to various volumes of the heart and lungs in comparison to both the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans. There was no difference between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans in dose delivered to the lung or heart. This finding was seen consistently across the parameters analyzed in this study. Conclusions. In patients receiving radiation therapy for esophageal cancer, proton plans are technically feasible while achieving adequate coverage with lower doses delivered to the lungs and cardiac structures. This may result in decreased cardiopulmonary toxicity and less morbidity to esophageal cancer patients.

  16. Hepatic arterial chemoembolization combined with 3D conformal radiotherapy for primary hepatic carcinoma

    Objective: To evaluate transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) combined with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating primary hepatic carcinoma. Methods: TACE together with 3DCRT was performed in 131 patients with primary hepatic carcinoma. TACE was carried out before 3DCRT in 89 cases, or after 3DCRT in 15 cases. In 27 cases TACE was accomplished both before and after 3DCRT. According to the volume and the location of the tumor, 50%-90% isodose encircled the planning target volume, with single dosage of 3-5 Gy and a total of 8-12 fractions. The total radiation dose in tumor margins was 36-50 Gy. Results: The response rate in short term was 83.2%, and the survival rate in one and two years was 85.5% and 52.6% respectively. Conclusion: TACE combined with 3DCRT is an effective and safe therapy for the treatment of primary hepatic carcinoma. (authors)

  17. Comparison of 3D conformal radiotherapy vs. intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of a stomach cancer treatment;Comparacion dosimetrica de radioterapia conformal 3D versus radioterapia de intensidad modulada (IMRT) de un tratamiento de cancer de estomago

    Bernui de V, Maria Giselle; Cardenas, Augusto; Vargas, Carlos [Hospital Nacional Carlos Alberto Seguin Escobedo (ESSALUD), Arequipa (Peru). Servicio de Radioterapia

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the dosimetry in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in a treatment of stomach cancer. For this comparison we selected a patient who underwent subtotal gastrectomy and D2 dissection for a T3N3 adenocarcinoma Mx ECIIIB receiving treatment under the scheme Quimio INT 0116 - in adjuvant radiotherapy. In the treatment plan was contouring the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) and the Planning Target Volume (PTV) was generated from the expansion of 1cm of the CTV, the risky organs contouring were: the liver, kidneys and spinal cord, according to the consensus definition of volumes in gastric cancer. The 3D Conformal Radiotherapy planning is carried out using 6 half beams following the Leong Trevol technique; for the IMRT plan was used 8 fields, the delivery technique is step-and-shoot. In both cases the fields were coplanar, isocentric and the energy used was 18 MV. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), in this case has proved to be a good treatment alternative to the technique of 3D Conformal Radiotherapy; the dose distributions with IMRT have better coverage of PTV and positions of the hot spots, as well as the kidneys volume that received higher doses to 2000 cGy is lower, but the decrease in dose to the kidneys is at the expense of increased dose in other organs like the liver. (author)

  18. Has 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) improved the local tumour control for stage I non-small cell lung cancer?

    Aims and background: The high local failure rates observed after radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be improved by the use of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT). Materials and methods: The case-records of 113 patients who were treated with curative 3D CRT between 1991 and 1999 were analysed. No elective nodal irradiation was performed, and doses of 60 Gy or more, in once-daily fractions of between 2 and 3 Gy, were prescribed. Results: The median actuarial survival of patients was 20 months, with 1-, 3- and 5-year survival of 71, 25 and 12%, respectively. Local disease progression was the cause of death in 30% of patients, and 22% patients died from distant metastases. Grade 2-3 acute radiation pneumonitis (SWOG) was observed in 6.2% of patients. The median actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) was 27 months, with 85 and 43% of patients free from local progression at 1 and 3 years, respectively. Endobronchial tumour extension significantly influenced LPFS, both on univariate (P=0.023) and multivariate analysis (P=0.023). The median actuarial cause-specific survival (CSS) was 19 months, and the respective 1- and 3-year rates were 72 and 30%. Multivariate analysis showed T2 classification (P=0.017) and the presence of endobronchial tumour extension (P=0.029) to be adverse prognostic factors for CSS. On multivariate analysis, T-stage significantly correlated with distant failure (P=0.005). Conclusions: Local failure rates remain substantial despite the use of 3D CRT for stage I NSCLC. Additional improvements in local control can come about with the use of radiation dose escalation and approaches to address the problem of tumour mobility

  19. Combined error of patient positioning variability and prostate motion uncertainty in 3D conformal radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer

    Purpose: To measure the patient positioning and prostate motion variability and to estimate its influence on the calculated 3D dose distribution in 3D conformal radiotherapy of patients with localized prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patient positioning variability was determined retrospectively by comparing 54 orthogonal simulator films with 125 corresponding portal films from 27 patients. Prostate motion variability was determined by 107 computed tomography (CT) examinations with a CT simulator in 28 patients during radiotherapy. Results: In each observed direction, the patient positioning variability and prostate motion showed a normal distribution. This observation enabled the calculation of a combined error of both components. The standard deviation (1 SD) of the patient positioning error in three directions ranged from 3.1 to 5.4 mm; the prostate motion variability was significantly greater in the anterior-posterior direction (1 SD = 2.8 mm) than in the mediolateral direction (1 SD = 1.4 mm). The 1 SD of the estimated combined error was in the anterior-posterior direction 6.1 mm and in mediolateral direction 3.6 mm. Conclusion: The range of patient positioning variability and prostate motion were statistically predictable under the patient setup conditions used. Dose-volume histograms demonstrating the influence of the combined error of both components on the calculated dose distribution are presented

  20. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5–4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7–14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0–5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8–14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  1. A pilot survey of sexual function and quality of life following 3D conformal radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Purpose: To assess the impact of high dose three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) for prostate cancer on the sexual function-related quality of life of patients and their partners. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 124 consecutive patients (median age 72.3 years) treated with 3D CRT for localized prostate cancer were surveyed and reported being potent prior to treatment. The answers to survey questions assessing the impact of quality of life related to sexual function from these 60 patients and their partners forms the basis for this retrospective analysis. Results: Following 3D CRT, 37 of 60 patients (62%) retained sexual function sufficient for intercourse. Intercourse at least once per month was reduced from 71 to 40%, whereas intercourse less than once per year increased from 12 to 35%. Following treatment, 25% of patients reported that the change in sexual dysfunction negatively affected their relationship or resulted in poor self-esteem. This outcome was associated with impotence following treatment (p < 0.01). Patients who had partners and satisfactory sexual function appeared to be at a higher risk of having a negatively affected relationship or losing self-esteem if they become impotent (p < 0.05). Partners of patients who reported a negatively affected relationship or loss of self-esteem appear to be less likely to return the survey instrument used (p = 0.02). Conclusions: More work is needed to evaluate the impact of radiotherapy and other treatments on the quality of life of patients and their partners to allow adequate informed consent to be given

  2. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  3. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy.

    Bree, Ingrid de; van Hinsberg, Mariëlle G E; van Veelen, Lieneke R

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose ≥60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control. PMID:22459649

  4. High-dose radiotherapy in inoperable nonsmall cell lung cancer: Comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy, dynamic IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Bree, Ingrid de, E-mail: i.de.bree@zrti.nl [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands); Hinsberg, Marieelle G.E. van; Veelen, Lieneke R. van [Zeeuws Radiotherapeutisch Instituut, Vlissingen (Netherlands)

    2012-01-01

    Conformal 3D radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to the preferable high dose is often not achievable because of dose-limiting organs. This reduces the probability of regional tumor control. Therefore, the surplus value of using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques, specifically volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]) and dynamic IMRT (d-IMRT) has been investigated. RA and d-IMRT plans were compared with 3D-CRT treatment plans for 20 patients eligible for concurrent high-dose chemoradiotherapy, in whom a dose of 60 Gy was not achievable. Comparison of dose delivery in the target volume and organs at risk was carried out by evaluating 3D dose distributions and dose-volume histograms. Quality of the dose distribution was assessed using the inhomogeneity and conformity index. For most patients, a higher dose to the target volume can be delivered using RA or d-IMRT; in 15% of the patients a dose {>=}60 Gy was possible. Both IMRT techniques result in a better conformity of the dose (p < 0.001). There are no significant differences in homogeneity of dose in the target volume. IMRT techniques for NSCLC patients allow higher dose to the target volume, thus improving regional tumor control.

  5. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Treatment planning with IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Kristensen, Claus A; Kjaer-Kristoffersen, Flemming; Sapru, Wendy;

    2007-01-01

    significantly improved with IMRT compared to 3D-CRT. One-year loco-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 79%, 72%, and 80%. Two patients have had recurrence in the clinical target volume (CTV) only and seven patients have relapsed in distant organs and/or in head...

  6. Three-year outcomes of a once daily fractionation scheme for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    The aim of this study was to report 3-year outcomes of toxicity, cosmesis, and local control using a once daily fractionation scheme (49.95 Gy in 3.33 Gy once daily fractions) for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between July 2008 and August 2010, women aged ≥40 years with ductal carcinoma in situ or node-negative invasive breast cancer ≤3 cm in diameter, treated with breast-conserving surgery achieving negative margins, were accrued to a prospective study. Women were treated with APBI using 3–5 photon beams, delivering 49.95 Gy over 15 once daily fractions over 3 weeks. Patients were assessed for toxicities, cosmesis, and local control rates before APBI and at specified time points. Thirty-four patients (mean age 60 years) with Tis 0 (n = 9) and T1N0 (n = 25) breast cancer were treated and followed up for an average of 39 months. Only 3% (1/34) patients experienced a grade 3 subcutaneous fibrosis and breast edema and 97% of the patients had good/excellent cosmetic outcome at 3 years. The 3-year rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) was 0% while the rate of contralateral breast events was 6%. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) was 94%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Our novel accelerated partial breast fractionation scheme of 15 once daily fractions of 3.33 Gy (49.95 Gy total) is a remarkably well-tolerated regimen of 3D-CRT-based APBI. A larger cohort of patients is needed to further ascertain the toxicity of this accelerated partial breast regimen

  7. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy: initial clinical experience

    Gatti, M.; Madeddu, A.; Malinverni, G.; Delmastro, E.; Bona, C.; Gabriele, P. [IRCC-Radiotherapy, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Baiotto, B.; Stasi, M. [IRCC-Medical Physics, Candiolo, TO (Italy); Ponzone, R.; Siatis, D. [IRCC-Surgery, Candiolo, TO (Italy)

    2006-11-15

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D-C.R.T. is technically sophisticate but feasible and acute toxicity to date has been minimal. A C.T.V.-to-P.T.V. margin of 10 mm seems to provide coverage for analyzed patients. However, more patients and additional studies will be needed to validate the accuracy of this margin, and longer follow-up will be needed to assess acute and chronic toxicity, tumor control, and cosmetic results. (author)

  8. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy. Effect on outcome and toxicity in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Lambrecht, M.; Nevens, D.; Nuyts, S. [University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-03-15

    Background and purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has rapidly become standard of care in the management of locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In this study, our aim was to retrospectively investigate the effect of the introducing IMRT on outcome and treatment-related toxicity compared to parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Material and methods: A total of 245 patients with stage III and IV HNSCC treated with primary radiotherapy between January 2003 and December 2010 were included in this analysis: 135 patients were treated with 3DCRT, 110 patients with IMRT. Groups were compared for acute and late toxicity, locoregional control (LRC), and overall survival (OS). Oncologic outcomes were estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using a log-rank test. Acute toxicity was analyzed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 and late toxicity was scored using the RTOG/EORTC late toxicity scoring system. Results: Median follow-up was 35 months in the IMRT group and 68 months in the 3DCRT group. No significant differences were found in 3-year LRC and OS rates between the IMRT group and 3DCRT group. Significantly less acute mucositis {>=} grade 3 was observed in the IMRT group (32% vs. 44%, p = 0.03). There was significantly less late xerostomia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group than in the 3DCRT group (23% vs. 68%, p < 0.001). After 24 months, there was less dysphagia {>=} grade 2 in the IMRT group although differences failed to reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The introduction of IMRT in the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced head and neck cancer significantly improved late toxicity without compromising tumor control compared to a parotid-sparing 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. (orig.)

  9. 3-D conformal radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A subgroup analysis of rectoscopic findings prior to radiotherapy and acute/late rectal side effects

    Background and purpose: To identify endoscopic pathological findings prior to radiotherapy and a possible correlation with acute or chronic rectal side effects after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 03/99 and 07/02, a total of 298 patients, who consented in a voluntary rectoscopy prior to radiotherapy were included into the analysis. Patients were treated with a total dose of either 70 or 74 Gy. Pathological rectoscopic findings like hemorrhoids, polyps or diverticula were documented. Acute and late rectal side effects were scored using the EORTC/RTOG score. Results: The most frequent pathological endosopic findings were hemorrhoids (35%), polyps (24%) and diverticula (13%). Rectal toxicity was mostly low to moderate. Grade 0/1 cumulative acute and late rectal side effects were 82 and 84%, grade 2 were 18 and 17%, respectively. We could not identify any correlation between preexisting pathological findings and rectal side effects by statistical analysis. Conclusions: There is no evidence that prostate cancer patients presenting with endoscopic verified pathological findings in the rectal mucosa at diagnosis are at an increased risk to develop rectal side effects when treated with 3D-CRT of the prostatic region

  10. Patterns of failure following high-dose 3-D conformal radiotherapy for high-grade astrocytomas: a quantitative dosimetric study

    Purpose: To analyze the failure patterns for patients with high-grade astrocytomas treated with high-dose conformal radiotherapy (CRT) using a quantitative technique to calculate the dose received by the CT- or MR-defined recurrence volume and to assess whether the final target volume margin used in the present dose escalation study requires redefinition before further escalation. Methods and Materials: Between 4/89 and 10/95, 71 patients with high-grade supratentorial astrocytomas were entered in a phase I/II dose escalation study using 3-D treatment planning and conformal radiotherapy. All patients were treated to either 70 or 80 Gy in conventional daily fractions of 1.8-2.0 Gy. The clinical and planning target volumes (CTV, PTV) consisted of successively smaller volumes with the final PTV defined as the enhancing lesion plus 0.5 cm margin. As of 10/95, 47 patients have CT or MR evidence of disease recurrence/progression. Of the 47 patients, 36 scans obtained at the time of recurrence were entered into the 3-D radiation therapy treatment planning system. After definition of the recurrent tumor volumes, the recurrence scan dataset was registered with the pretreatment CT dataset so that the actual dose received by the recurrent tumor volumes during treatment could be accurately calculated and then analyzed dosimetrically using dose-volume histograms. Recurrences were divided into several categories: 1) 'central', in which 95% or more of the recurrent tumor volume (Vrecur) was within D95, the region treated to high dose (95% of the prescription dose); 2) ''in-field,'' in which 80% or more of Vrecur was within the D95 isodose surface; 3) ''marginal,'' when between 20 and 80% of Vrecur was inside the D95 surface; 4) 'outside', in which less than 20% of Vrecur was inside the D95 surface. Results: In 29 of 36 patients, a solitary lesion was seen on recurrence scans. Of the 29 solitary recurrences, 26 were central, 3 were marginal, and none were outside. Multiple

  11. Volumetric Modulation Arc Radiotherapy With Flattening Filter-Free Beams Compared With Static Gantry IMRT and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Advanced Esophageal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    Purpose: A feasibility study was performed to evaluate RapidArc (RA), and the potential benefit of flattening filter-free beams, on advanced esophageal cancer against intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: The plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT with three to seven and five to seven fixed beams were compared against double-modulated arcs with avoidance sectors to spare the lungs for 10 patients. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. The RA plans were studied for conventional and flattening filter-free (FFF) beams. The objectives for the planning target volume were the volume receiving ≥95% or at most 107% of the prescribed dose of <1% with a dose prescription of 59.4 Gy. For the organs at risk, the lung volume (minus the planning target volume) receiving ≥5 Gy was <60%, that receiving 20 Gy was <20%–30%, and the mean lung dose was <15.0 Gy. The heart volume receiving 45 Gy was <20%, volume receiving 30 Gy was <50%. The spinal dose received by 1% was <45 Gy. The technical delivery parameters for RA were assessed to compare the normal and FFF beam characteristics. Results: RA and IMRT provided equivalent coverage and homogeneity, slightly superior to 3D-CRT. The conformity index was 1.2 ± 0.1 for RA and IMRT and 1.5 ± 0.2 for 3D-CRT. The mean lung dose was 12.2 ± 4.5 for IMRT, 11.3 ± 4.6 for RA, and 10.8 ± 4.4 for RA with FFF beams, 18.2 ± 8.5 for 3D-CRT. The percentage of volume receiving ≥20 Gy ranged from 23.6% ± 9.1% to 21.1% ± 9.7% for IMRT and RA (FFF beams) and 39.2% ± 17.0% for 3D-CRT. The heart and spine objectives were met by all techniques. The monitor units for IMRT and RA were 457 ± 139, 322 ± 20, and 387 ± 40, respectively. RA with FFF beams showed, compared with RA with normal beams, a ∼20% increase in monitor units per Gray, a 90% increase in the average dose rate, and 20% reduction in beam on time (owing to different gantry speeds). Conclusion: RA

  12. A comparison of liver protection among 3-D conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and RapidArc for hepatocellular carcinoma

    The analysis was designed to compare dosimetric parameters among 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and RapidArc (RA) to identify which can achieve the lowest risk of radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Twenty patients with HCC were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and RA were calculated for total dose of 50 Gy/25f. The percentage of the normal liver volume receiving >40, >30, >20, >10, and >5 Gy (V40, V30, V20, V10 and V5) were evaluated to determine liver toxicity. V5, V10, V20, V30 and Dmean of liver were compared as predicting parameters for RILD. Other parameters included the conformal index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and hot spot (V110%) for the planned target volume (PTV) as well as the monitor units (MUs) for plan efficiency, the mean dose (Dmean) for the organs at risk (OARs) and the maximal dose at 1% volume (D1%) for the spinal cord. The Dmean of IMRT was higher than 3DCRT (p = 0.045). For V5, there was a significant difference: RA > IMRT >3DCRT (p <0.05). 3DCRT had a lower V10 and higher V20, V30 values for liver than RA (p <0.05). RA and IMRT achieved significantly better CI and lower V110% values than 3DCRT (p <0.05). RA had better HI, lower MUs and shorter delivery time than 3DCRT or IMRT (p <0.05). For right lobe tumors, RapidArc may have the lowest risk of RILD with the lowest V20 and V30 compared with 3DCRT or IMRT. For diameters of tumors >8 cm in our study, the value of Dmean for 3DCRT was lower than IMRT or RapidArc. This may indicate that 3DCRT is more suitable for larger tumors

  13. Volumetric intensity-modulated Arc (RapidArc therapy for primary hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-D conformal radiotherapy

    Chen Chia-Wen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare the RapidArc plan for primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans using dosimetric analysis. Methods Nine patients with unresectable HCC were enrolled in this study. Dosimetric values for RapidArc, IMRT, and 3DCRT were calculated for total doses of 45~50.4 Gy using 1.8 Gy/day. The parameters included the conformal index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, and hot spot (V107% for the planned target volume (PTV as well as the monitor units (MUs for plan efficiency, the mean dose (Dmean for the organs at risk (OAR and the maximal dose at 1% volume (D1% for the spinal cord. The percentage of the normal liver volume receiving ≥ 40, > 30, > 20, and > 10 Gy (V40 Gy, V30 Gy, V20 Gy, and V10 Gy and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP were also evaluated to determine liver toxicity. Results All three methods achieved comparable homogeneity for the PTV. RapidArc achieved significantly better CI and V107% values than IMRT or 3DCRT (p p mean of the normal liver than did 3DCRT or RapidArc (p = 0.001. 3DCRT had higher V40 Gy and V30 Gy values for the normal liver than did RapidArc or IMRT. Although the V10 Gy to the normal liver was higher with RapidArc (75.8 ± 13.1% than with 3DCRT or IMRT (60.5 ± 10.2% and 57.2 ± 10.0%, respectively; p p = 0.02. Conclusions RapidArc provided favorable tumor coverage compared with IMRT or 3DCRT, but RapidArc is not superior to IMRT in terms of liver protection. Further studies are needed to establish treatment outcome differences between the three approaches.

  14. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    Crowe, Scott B [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kairn, Tanya [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Middlebrook, Nigel; Hill, Brendan; Christie, David R H; Knight, Richard T [Premion, Wesley Medical Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kenny, John [Australian Clinical Dosimetry Services, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Langton, Christian M; Trapp, Jamie V [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT.

  15. Retrospective evaluation of dosimetric quality for prostate carcinomas treated with 3D conformal, intensity modulated and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    This study examines and compares the dosimetric quality of radiotherapy treatment plans for prostate carcinoma across a cohort of 163 patients treated across five centres: 83 treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), 33 treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 47 treated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Treatment plan quality was evaluated in terms of target dose homogeneity and organs at risk (OAR), through the use of a set of dose metrics. These included the mean, maximum and minimum doses; the homogeneity and conformity indices for the target volumes; and a selection of dose coverage values that were relevant to each OAR. Statistical significance was evaluated using two-tailed Welch's T-tests. The Monte Carlo DICOM ToolKit software was adapted to permit the evaluation of dose metrics from DICOM data exported from a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system. The 3DCRT treatment plans offered greater planning target volume dose homogeneity than the other two treatment modalities. The IMRT and VMAT plans offered greater dose reduction in the OAR: with increased compliance with recommended OAR dose constraints, compared to conventional 3DCRT treatments. When compared to each other, IMRT and VMAT did not provide significantly different treatment plan quality for like-sized tumour volumes. This study indicates that IMRT and VMAT have provided similar dosimetric quality, which is superior to the dosimetric quality achieved with 3DCRT

  16. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction

  17. Radiotherapy-induced secondary cancer risk for breast cancer: 3D conformal therapy versus IMRT versus VMAT

    This study evaluated the secondary cancer risk to various organs due to radiation treatment for breast cancer. Organ doses to an anthropomorphic phantom were measured using a photoluminescent dosimeter (PLD) for breast cancer treatment with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Cancer risk based on the measured dose was calculated using the BEIR (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) VII models. The secondary dose per treatment dose (50.4 Gy) to various organs ranged from 0.02 to 0.36 Gy for 3D-CRT, but from 0.07 to 8.48 Gy for IMRT and VMAT, indicating that the latter methods are associated with higher secondary radiation doses than 3D-CRT. The result of the homogeneity index in the breast target shows that the dose homogeneity of 3D-CRT was worse than those of IMRT and VMAT. The organ specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) to the thyroid, contralateral breast and ipsilateral lung per 100 000 population were 0.02, 19.71, and 0.76 respectively for 3D-CRT, much lower than the 0.11, 463.56, and 10.59 respectively for IMRT and the 0.12, 290.32, and 12.28 respectively for VMAT. The overall estimation of LAR indicated that the radiation-induced cancer risk due to breast radiation therapy was lower with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or VMAT. (paper)

  18. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal...

  19. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board–approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months’ follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest

  20. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest

  1. Individualized margins in 3D conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer: analysis of physiological movements and their dosimetric impacts.

    Germain, François; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, André

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage. PMID:18262123

  2. Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage

  3. Dosimetric Comparison Between Intensity-Modulated with Coplanar Field and 3D Conformal Radiotherapy with Noncoplanar Field for Postocular Invasion Tumor

    This study presents a dosimetric optimization effort aiming to compare noncoplanar field (NCF) on 3 dimensions conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and coplanar field (CF) on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for postocular invasion tumor. We performed a planning study on the computed tomography data of 8 consecutive patients with localized postocular invasion tumor. Four fields NCF 3D-CRT in the transverse plane with gantry angles of 0-10 deg., 30-45 deg., 240-270 deg., and 310-335 deg. degrees were isocentered at the center of gravity of the target volume. The geometry of the beams was determined by beam's eye view. The same constraints were prepared with between CF IMRT optimization and NCF 3D-CRT treatment. The maximum point doses (D max) for the different optic pathway structures (OPS) with NCF 3D-CRT treatment should differ in no more than 3% from those with the NCF IMRT plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for all targets and organ at risk (OAR) with both treatment techniques. Plans with NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT constraints on target dose in homogeneity were computed, as well as the conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI) in the target volume. The PTV coverage was optimal with both NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plans in the 8 tumor sites. No difference was noted between the two techniques for the average Dmax and Dmin dose. NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT will yield similar results on CI. However, HI was a significant difference between NCF 3D-CRT and CF IMRT plan (p < 0.001). Physical endpoints for target showed the mean target dose to be low in the CF IMRT plan, caused by a large target dose in homogeneity (p < 0.001). The impact of NCF 3D-CRT versus CF IMRT set-up is very slight. NCF3D-CRT is one of the treatment options for postocular invasion tumor. However, constraints for OARs are needed.

  4. Dose distribution and tumor control probability in out-of-field lymph node stations in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of non-small-cell lung cancer: an in silico analysis

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Eschler, Andrea; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Rübe, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background The advent of IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in combination with involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) in inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer results in a decreased incidental dose deposition in elective nodal stations. While incidental nodal irradiation is considered a relevant by-product of 3D-CRT to control microscopic disease this planning study analyzed the impact of IMRT on dosimetric parameters and tumor control probabilities (TCP) in elective nodal stations in di...

  5. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  6. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy; Resposta radiologica e dosimetria em phantom fisico de cabeca e pescoco para radioterapia conformacional 3D

    Thompson, Larissa

    2013-07-01

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  7. A phase II study of localized prostate cancer treated to 75.6 Gy with 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Background and purpose: To prospectively evaluate toxicity, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and biopsy-proven local control for prostate cancer patients treated with 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions using 6-field conformal radiotherapy to prostate alone. Patients and methods: From 1997 to 1999, 140 patients with T1-2NxM0, Gleason score ≤8, and PSA ≤20 ng/ml prostate cancer were assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late toxicity scores. bFFS was determined for 120 patients treated without hormones. Post-treatment prostate biopsies were performed at a median of 3 years and a late toxicity questionnaire was administered at a median of 5 years. Results: Clinically important acute toxicities were gastrointestinal (GI) grade 2: 22% and 3: 0%, and genitourinary (GU) grade 2: 24% and 3: 2%. Late physician-assessed toxicities were GI ≥grade 2: 2%, and GU ≥grade 2: 1%. The 3-year bFFS of patients failure-free before biopsy was 93% (95% CI: 83-100) from a negative biopsy and 22% (95% CI: 0-56) from a positive biopsy (P=0.001). Patients reported significantly more late toxicity than physicians (GI: P=0.003, GU: P<0.001). At 5.0 years median follow-up, cause-specific survival was 98% (95% CI: 96-100), overall survival was 91% (95% CI: 86-97), and bFFS was 55% (95% CI: 45-64). Conclusions: 75.6 Gy caused modest levels of acute and late toxicity. Three-year biopsies predicted subsequent biochemical outcome

  8. Different IMRT solutions vs. 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin’s lymphoma: dosimetric comparison and clinical considerations

    Radiotherapy in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (HL) is currently evolving with new attempts to further reduce radiation volumes to the involved-node concept (Involved Nodes Radiation Therapy, INRT) and with the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Currently, IMRT can be planned and delivered with several techniques, and its role is not completely clear. We designed a planning study on a typical dataset drawn from clinical routine with the aim of comparing different IMRT solutions in terms of plan quality and treatment delivery efficiency. A total of 10 young female patients affected with early stage mediastinal HL and treated with 30 Gy INRT after ABVD-based chemotherapy were selected from our database. Five different treatment techniques were compared: 3D-CRT, VMAT (single arc), B-VMAT (“butterfly”, multiple arcs), Helical Tomotherapy (HT) and Tomodirect (TD). Beam energy was 6 MV, and all IMRT planning solutions were optimized by inverse planning with specific dose-volume constraints on OAR (breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, coronary ostia, heart). Dose-Volume Histograms (DVHs) and Conformity Number (CN) were calculated and then compared, both for target and OAR by a statistical analysis (Wilcoxon’s Test). PTV coverage was reached for all plans (V95% ≥ 95%); highest mean CN were obtained with HT (0.77) and VMAT (0.76). B-VMAT showed intermediate CN mean values (0.67), while the lowest CN were obtained with TD (0.30) and 3D-CRT techniques (0.30). A trend of inverse correlation between higher CN and larger healthy tissues volumes receiving low radiation doses was shown for lungs and breasts. For thyroid gland and heart/coronary ostia, HT, VMAT and B-VMAT techniques allowed a better sparing in terms of both Dmean and volumes receiving intermediate-high doses compared to 3D-CRT and TD. IMRT techniques showed superior target coverage and OAR sparing, with, as an expected consequence, larger volumes of healthy tissues (lungs, breasts) receiving low doses. Among

  9. Comparing morbidity and cancer control after 3D-conformal (70/74 Gy) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (78/82 Gy) for prostate cancer

    Dolezel, Martin [Multiscan Alpha Pardubice Regional Hospital, Oncology Centre, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Department of Oncology, Olomouc (Czech Republic); Odrazka, Karel [Multiscan Alpha Pardubice Regional Hospital, Oncology Centre, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, First Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Charles University in Prague, Third Faculty of Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Zouhar, Milan; Jansa, Jan; Paluska, Petr [University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Vaculikova, Miloslava [Hospital Trutnov, Department of Oncology, Trutnov (Czech Republic); Sefrova, Jana [Hospital Prachatice, Department of Oncology, Prachatice (Czech Republic); Kohlova, Tereza [Proton Therapy Center, Prague (Czech Republic); Vanasek, Jaroslav [Multiscan Alpha Pardubice Regional Hospital, Oncology Centre, Pardubice (Czech Republic); Kovarik, Josef [The Freeman Hospital, Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare toxicity and cancer control between patients with prostate cancer treated using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and those treated using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). A total of 553 patients with prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT 70-74 Gy (3D-CRT 70, 3D-CRT 74) or IMRT 78-82 Gy (IMRT 78, IMRT/SIB 82). Late toxicity was scored according to FC-RTOG/LENT criteria. Biochemical failure was defined using the Phoenix and ASTRO definitions. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 genitourinary toxicity was 26.3 % (3D-CRT 70), 27.2 % (3D-CRT 74), 17.3 % (IMRT 78), and 25.1 % (IMRT/SIB 82) without statistical differences. The 5-year risk of grade 2-4 gastrointestinal toxicity was 19.4 % (3D-CRT 70), 42.1 % (3D-CRT 74), 20.5 % (IMRT 78), and 26.6 % (IMRT/SIB 82). The differences between 3D-CRT 74 and 3D-CRT 70 and between 3D-CRT 74 and IMRT 78 were statistically significant (log rank p = 0.03). The 5-year Phoenix PSA relapse-free survival (PSA-RFS) in low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients treated using 3D-CRT were 89.4, 65.5, and 57.8 %, respectively. Patients treated with IMRT achieved the following results: 90.9, 89.4, and 83.9 %. Clinical relapse-free survival (C-RFS) in patients treated using 3D-CRT vs. IMRT for the aforementioned groups were 94.7 vs. 100 %, 86.8 vs. 98.6 %, and 84.4 vs. 94.5 %. Disease-free survival (DFS) for patients treated using 3D-CRT were 83.1, 70.9, and 71.5 %. The IMRT group reached 95.8, 89.1, and 87.6 %. The PSA-RFS for intermediate- and high-risk patients were statistically significant, while C-RFS and DFS were marginally better. Dose escalation with IMRT was associated with improved cancer control in intermediate- and high-risk patients in comparison with 3D-CRT, without compromising toxicity. (orig.) [German] Es erfolgte ein Vergleich von Toxizitaet und Tumorkontrolle bei Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom nach der Behandlung mit dreidimensionaler konformaler

  10. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: A randomized controlled trial

    Purpose: To compare three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in curative-intent irradiation of head-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods: Previously untreated patients with biopsy-proven squamous carcinoma of oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx (T1-3, N0-2b) were randomly assigned using computer-generated permuted-block design to either 3D-CRT or IMRT, with incidence of physician-rated Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade 2 or worse acute salivary gland toxicity as primary end-point. Results: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients randomly allocated to either 3D-CRT (n = 28 patients) or IMRT (n = 32) were included and analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The proportion [95% confidence intervals (CI)] of patients with RTOG grade 2 or worse acute salivary gland toxicity was significantly lesser in the IMRT arm [19 of 32 patients (59%, 95% CI: 42–75%)] as compared to 3D-CRT [25 of 28 patients (89%, 95% CI: 72–97%; p = 0.009)]. Late xerostomia and subcutaneous fibrosis were also significantly lesser with IMRT. There was significant recovery of salivary function over time in patients treated with IMRT (p-value for trend = 0.0036). At 3-years, there were no significant differences in loco-regional control or survival between the two arms. Conclusion: IMRT significantly reduces the incidence and severity of xerostomia compared to 3D-CRT in curative-intent irradiation of HNSCC.

  11. Dose distribution and tumor control probability in out-of-field lymph node stations in intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) of non-small-cell lung cancer: an in silico analysis

    The advent of IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in combination with involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) in inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer results in a decreased incidental dose deposition in elective nodal stations. While incidental nodal irradiation is considered a relevant by-product of 3D-CRT to control microscopic disease this planning study analyzed the impact of IMRT on dosimetric parameters and tumor control probabilities (TCP) in elective nodal stations in direct comparison with 3D-CRT. The retrospective planning study was performed on 41 patients with NSCLC (stages II-III). The CTV was defined as the primary tumor (GTV + 3 mm) and all FDG-PET-positive lymph node stations. As to the PTV (CTV + 7 mm), both an IMRT plan and a 3D-CRT plan were established. Plans were escalated until the pre-defined dose-constraints of normal tissues (spinal cord, lung, esophagus and heart) were reached. Additionally, IMRT plans were normalized to the total dose of the corresponding 3D-CRT. For two groups of out-of-field mediastinal node stations (all lymph node stations not included in the CTV (LNall-el) and those directly adjacent to the CTV (LNadj-el)) the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and the TCP (for microscopic disease a D50 of 36.5 Gy was assumed) for the treatment with IMRT vs 3D-CRT were calculated. In comparison, a significantly higher total dose for the PTV could be achieved with the IMRT planning as opposed to conventional 3D-CRT planning (74.3 Gy vs 70.1 Gy; p = 0.03). In identical total reference doses, the EUD of LNadj-el is significantly lower with IMRT than with 3D-CRT (40.4 Gy vs. 44.2 Gy. P = 0.05) and a significant reduction of TCP with IMRT vs 3D-CRT was demonstrated for LNall-el and LNadj-el (12.6 % vs. 14.8 %; and 23.6 % vs 27.3 %, respectively). In comparison with 3D-CRT, IMRT comes along with a decreased EUD in out-of-field lymph node stations. This translates into a statistically significant decrease in TCP-values. Yet, the combination

  12. Prospective study on the dose distribution to the acoustic structures during postoperative 3D conformal radiotherapy for parotid tumors. Dosimetric and audiometric aspects

    To analyze dose distribution in the hearing organ and to evaluate the dose effect on the hearing thresholds in patients treated with post-parotidectomy 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). A total of 17 patients received post-parotidectomy 3D-CRT (median dose: 63 Gy). The audiometric evaluation comprised pure tone audiometry and tympanometry performed before radiotherapy (RT) and 3, 6, and 24 months after RT. The ear structures were delineated on planning computer tomography scans. Mean and maximum doses were calculated and dose-volume histograms were plotted. Before RT, the median baseline audiometric thresholds were normal. At 3 months post-RT, 3 patients were diagnosed as having middle ear underpressure and/or effusion that resolved completely by 6 months. During 2-year follow-up, none of the ears showed perceptive hearing loss at speech frequencies. The mean doses at ipsilateral external auditory canal, mastoids cells, tympanic case, Eustachian tube, semicircular canals, and cochlea were 44.8 Gy, 39.0 Gy, 30.9 Gy, 33.0 Gy, 19.6 Gy, and 19.2 Gy, respectively. The doses to the contralateral ear were negligible, except for the Eustachian tube (up to 28.2 Gy). Post-parotidectomy 3D-CRT is associated with relatively low doses to the ear and the surrounding structures. Post-RT audiometry did not show any permanent (neither conductive nor perceptive) hearing impairment. Only in 3 patients were there signs of transient unilateral dysfunction of the Eustachian tube observed during the first few months after RT. Longer follow-up and larger patient series are warranted to confirm these preliminary findings. (orig.)

  13. Prospective study on the dose distribution to the acoustic structures during postoperative 3D conformal radiotherapy for parotid tumors. Dosimetric and audiometric aspects

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Division of Radiotherapy; Milan Univ. (Italy). Faculty of Medicine; Rondi, Elena [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Division of Medical Physics; Zarowski, Andrzej [Univ. Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, St. Augustinus Hospital, Antwerp (BE)] (and others)

    2011-06-15

    To analyze dose distribution in the hearing organ and to evaluate the dose effect on the hearing thresholds in patients treated with post-parotidectomy 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). A total of 17 patients received post-parotidectomy 3D-CRT (median dose: 63 Gy). The audiometric evaluation comprised pure tone audiometry and tympanometry performed before radiotherapy (RT) and 3, 6, and 24 months after RT. The ear structures were delineated on planning computer tomography scans. Mean and maximum doses were calculated and dose-volume histograms were plotted. Before RT, the median baseline audiometric thresholds were normal. At 3 months post-RT, 3 patients were diagnosed as having middle ear underpressure and/or effusion that resolved completely by 6 months. During 2-year follow-up, none of the ears showed perceptive hearing loss at speech frequencies. The mean doses at ipsilateral external auditory canal, mastoids cells, tympanic case, Eustachian tube, semicircular canals, and cochlea were 44.8 Gy, 39.0 Gy, 30.9 Gy, 33.0 Gy, 19.6 Gy, and 19.2 Gy, respectively. The doses to the contralateral ear were negligible, except for the Eustachian tube (up to 28.2 Gy). Post-parotidectomy 3D-CRT is associated with relatively low doses to the ear and the surrounding structures. Post-RT audiometry did not show any permanent (neither conductive nor perceptive) hearing impairment. Only in 3 patients were there signs of transient unilateral dysfunction of the Eustachian tube observed during the first few months after RT. Longer follow-up and larger patient series are warranted to confirm these preliminary findings. (orig.)

  14. IMRT vs. 2D-radiotherapy or 3D-conformal radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Survival outcome in a Korean multi-institutional retrospective study (KROG 11-06)

    We compared treatment outcomes of two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In total, 1237 patients with cT1-4N0-3M0 NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, 350, 390, and 497 were treated with 2D-RT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. 3D-CRT and IMRT showed better 5-year overall survival (OS) rates (73.6 and 76.7 %, respectively) than did 2D-RT (5-year OS of 59.7 %, all p < 0.001). In T3-4 subgroup, IMRT was associated with a significantly better 5-year OS than was 2D-RT (70.7 vs. 50.4 %, respectively; p ≤ 0.001) and 3D-CRT (70.7 vs. 57.8 %, respectively; p = 0.011); however, the difference between the 2D-RT and 3D-CRT groups did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.063). In multivariate analyses of all patients, IMRT was a predictive factor for OS when compared with 2D-RT or 3D-CRT, as was 3D-CRT when compared with 2D-RT. Our study showed that 3D-CRT and IMRT were associated with a better local progression-free survival and OS than was 2D-RT in NPC. IMRT was significantly superior in terms of OS for advanced primary tumors (T3-4). (orig.)

  15. Risk of isolated nodal failure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques - A retrospective analysis

    Purpose. To estimate retrospectively the rate of isolated nodal failures (INF) in NSCLC patients treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Materials/methods. One hundred and eighty-five patients with I-IIIB stage treated with 3D-CRT in consecutive clinical trials differing in an extent of the ENI were analyzed. According to the extent of the ENI, two groups were distinguished: extended (n=124) and limited (n=61) ENI. INF was defined as regional nodal failure occurring without local progression. Cumulative Incidence of INF (CIINF) was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to prognostic factors. Results. With a median follow up of 30 months, the two-year actuarial overall survival was 35%. The two-year CIINF rate was 12%. There were 16 (9%) INF, eight (6%) for extended and eight (13%) for limited ENI. In the univariate analysis bulky mediastinal disease (BMD), left side, higher N stage, and partial response to RT had a significant negative impact on the CIINF. BMD was the only independent predictor of the risk of incidence of the INF (p=0.001). Conclusions. INF is more likely to occur in case of more advanced nodal status

  16. Risk of isolated nodal failure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques - A retrospective analysis

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, M. Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Warsaw (Poland))

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To estimate retrospectively the rate of isolated nodal failures (INF) in NSCLC patients treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Materials/methods. One hundred and eighty-five patients with I-IIIB stage treated with 3D-CRT in consecutive clinical trials differing in an extent of the ENI were analyzed. According to the extent of the ENI, two groups were distinguished: extended (n=124) and limited (n=61) ENI. INF was defined as regional nodal failure occurring without local progression. Cumulative Incidence of INF (CIINF) was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to prognostic factors. Results. With a median follow up of 30 months, the two-year actuarial overall survival was 35%. The two-year CIINF rate was 12%. There were 16 (9%) INF, eight (6%) for extended and eight (13%) for limited ENI. In the univariate analysis bulky mediastinal disease (BMD), left side, higher N stage, and partial response to RT had a significant negative impact on the CIINF. BMD was the only independent predictor of the risk of incidence of the INF (p=0.001). Conclusions. INF is more likely to occur in case of more advanced nodal status

  17. Patterns of failure following 3-D conformal dose escalation radiotherapy for high grade astrocytomas - a quantitative dosimetric study

    Purpose: It is well known that the predominate pattern of failure of high grade astrocytomas is local recurrence. Using 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) high dose radiation can be delivered to a more precisely defined target while sparing normal tissue. However, if smaller target volumes are used to reduce morbidity, the risk for marginal misses may increase. The purpose of this study is to analyze the patterns of failure of high grade astrocytomas following high dose 3DCRT using a novel quantitative technique to calculate the dose received by the radiographically defined recurrence. Materials and Methods: From (4(89)) to (10(95)), 71 patients with supratentorial high grade astrocytomas have been entered in a dose escalation study. All patients were treated using 3DCRT to 70 - 80 Gy in conventional daily fractionation of 1.8 - 2.0 Gy. The clinical target volumes (CTV) consisted of successive cone downs with the final CTV defined as the enhancing lesion plus 0.5 cm margin. As of (10(95)), 45 patients have radiographic evidence of disease recurrence/progression. This is defined as 25% increase in the sum of products of measurable lesion over the smallest sum observed, reappearance of any lesion which had previously disappeared, or appearance of any new lesion. Of the 45 patients, 28 have recurrent scans (CT or MRI) that can be entered into our planning system and registered onto the treatment planning scans. Once the recurrent tumors were defined, dose volume histograms (DVHs) of the recurrent tumors were generated so that the dose delivered to the recurrent tumor volume from previous irradiation could be calculated. The recurrences were divided into 3 categories: 1) in-field recurrence, if ≥95% of the recurrence volume received ≥95% of the final prescribed dose, 2) marginal recurrence, if 26% - 94% of the recurrence volume received ≥95% of the final prescribed dose, and 3) distant recurrence, if ≤25% of the recurrence volume received ≥95% of

  18. Tracking the dynamic seroma cavity using fiducial markers in patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiotherapy

    Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie [Division of Surgical Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Chen Sining [Department of Biostatistics, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ/School of Public Health, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to perform an analysis of the changes in the dynamic seroma cavity based on fiducial markers in early stage breast cancer patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods: A prospective, single arm trial was designed to investigate the utility of gold fiducial markers in image guided APBI using 3D-CRT. At the time of lumpectomy, four to six suture-type gold fiducial markers were sutured to the walls of the cavity. Patients were treated with a fractionation scheme consisting of 15 fractions with a fractional dose of 333 cGy. Treatment design and planning followed NSABP/RTOG B-39 guidelines. During radiation treatment, daily kV imaging was performed and the markers were localized and tracked. The change in distance between fiducial markers was analyzed based on the planning CT and daily kV images. Results: Thirty-four patients were simulated at an average of 28 days after surgery, and started the treatment on an average of 39 days after surgery. The average intermarker distance (AiMD) between fiducial markers was strongly correlated to seroma volume. The average reduction in AiMD was 19.1% (range 0.0%-41.4%) and 10.8% (range 0.0%-35.6%) for all the patients between simulation and completion of radiotherapy, and between simulation and beginning of radiotherapy, respectively. The change of AiMD fits an exponential function with a half-life of seroma shrinkage. The average half-life for seroma shrinkage was 15 days. After accounting for the reduction which started to occur after surgery through CT simulation and treatment, radiation was found to have minimal impact on the distance change over the treatment course. Conclusions: Using the marker distance change as a surrogate for seroma volume, it appears that the seroma cavity experiences an exponential reduction in size. The change in seroma size has implications in the size of

  19. Comparison of toxicity after IMRT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy for patients with pancreatic cancer – A systematic review

    Summary: IMRT has been suggested to reduce treatment-related toxicity in pancreatic cancer. We attempted to identify all IMRT-studies indexed in PubMed/Medline, comparing them with recent 3D-CRT trials. The predominant treatment-related toxicities, namely nausea/vomiting, diarrhoea and late GI toxicity, are significantly reduced with IMRT while there was no apparent difference for outcome measures

  20. Factors of influence on acute skin toxicity of breast cancer patients treated with standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after breast conserving surgery (BCS)

    Standard 3D-CRT after BCS may cause skin toxicity with a wide range of intensity including acute effects like erythema or late effects. In order to reduce these side effects it is mandatory to identify potential factors of influence in breast cancer patients undergoing standard three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) of the breast and modern systemic therapy. Between 2006 and 2010 a total of 211 breast cancer patients (median age 52,4 years, range 24–77) after BCS consecutively treated in our institution with 3D-CRT (50 Gy whole breast photon radiotherapy followed by 16 Gy electron boost to the tumorbed) were evaluated with special focus on documented skin toxicity at the end of the 50 Gy-course. Standardized photodocumentation of the treated breast was done in each patient lying on the linac table with arms elevated. Skin toxicity was documented according to the common toxicity criteria (CTC)-score. Potential influencing factors were classified in three groups: patient-specific (smoking, age, breast size, body mass index = BMI, allergies), tumor-specific (tumorsize) and treatment-specific factors (antihormonal therapy with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors, chemotherapy). Uni- and multivariate statistical analyses were done using IBM SPSS version 19. After 50 Gy 3D-CRT to the whole breast 28.9% of all 211 patients had no erythema, 62.2% showed erythema grade 1 (G1) and 8.5% erythema grade 2. None of the patients had grade 3/4 (G3/4) erythema. In univariate analyses a significant influence or trend on the development of acute skin toxicities (erythema G0 versus G1 versus G2) was observed for larger breast volumes (p=0,004), smoking during radiation therapy (p=0,064) and absence of allergies (p=0,014) as well as larger tumorsize (p=0,009) and antihormonal therapy (p=0.005). Neither patient age, BMI nor choice of chemotherapy showed any significant effect on higher grade toxicity. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with higher grade

  1. Comparison of 2D and 3D algorithms for adding a margin to the gross tumor volume in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer

    Purpose: To evaluate the adequacy of tumor volume coverage using a three dimensional (3D) margin growing algorithm compared to a two dimensional (2D) margin growing algorithm in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two gross tumor volumes (GTV) were segmented in each of ten patients with localized prostate cancer: prostate gland only (PO) and prostate with seminal vesicles (PSV). A margin of 10 mm was applied to these two groups (PO and PSV) using both the 2D and 3D margin growing algorithms. The true planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the region delineated by the 3D algorithm. Adequacy of geometric coverage of the GTV with the two algorithms was examined throughout the target volume. Discrepancies between the two margin methods were measured in the transaxial plane. Results: The 2D algorithm underestimated the PTV by 17% (range 12-20) in the PO group and by 20% (range 13-28) for the PSV group when compared to the 3D algorithm. For both the PO and PSV groups, the inferior coverage of the PTV was consistently underestimated by the 2D margin algorithm when compared to the 3D margins with a mean radial distance of 4.8 mm (range 0-10). In the central region of the prostate gland, the anterior, posterior, and lateral PTV borders were underestimated with the 2D margin in both the PO and PSV groups by a mean of 3.6 mm (range 0-9), 2.1 mm (range 0-8), and 1.8 (range 0-9) respectively. The PTV coverage of the PO group superiorly was radially underestimated by 4.5mm (range 0-14) when comparing the 2D margins to the 3D margins. For the PSV group, the junction region between the prostate and the seminal vesicles was underestimated by the 2D margin by a mean transaxial distance of 18.1 mm in the anterior PTV border (range 4-30), 7.2 mm posteriorly (range 0-20), and 3.7 mm laterally (range 0-14). The superior region of the seminal vesicles in the PSV group was also consistently underestimated with a radial discrepancy of 3.3 mm

  2. Comparison of 2D and 3D algorithms for adding a margin to the gross tumor volume in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer

    Purpose: To evaluate the adequacy of tumor volume coverage using a three-dimensional (3D) margin-growing algorithm compared to a two-dimensional (2D) margin-growing algorithm in the conformal radiotherapy planning of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two gross tumor volumes (GTV) were segmented in each of 10 patients with localized prostate cancer; prostate gland only (PO) and prostate with seminal vesicles (PSV). A predetermined margin of 10 mm was applied to these two groups (PO and PSV) using both 2D and 3D margin-growing algorithms. The 2D algorithm added a transaxial margin to each GTV slice, whereas the 3D algorithm added a volumetric margin all around the GTV. The true planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the region delineated by the 3D algorithm. The adequacy of geometric coverage of the GTV by the two algorithms was examined in a series of transaxial planes throughout the target volume. Results: The 2D margin-growing algorithm underestimated the PTV by 17% (range 12-20) in the PO group and by 20% (range 13-28) for the PSV group when compared to the 3D-margin algorithm. For the PO group, the mean transaxial difference between the 2D and 3D algorithm was 3.8 mm inferiorly (range 0-20), 1.8 mm centrally (range 0-9), and 4.4 mm superiorly (range 0-22). Considering all of these regions, the mean discrepancy anteriorly was 5.1 mm (range 0-22), posteriorly 2.2 (range 0-20), right border 2.8 mm (range 0-14), and left border 3.1 mm (range 0-12). For the PSV group, the mean discrepancy in the inferior region was 3.8 mm (range 0-20), central region of the prostate was 1.8 mm ( range 0-9), the junction region of the prostate and the seminal vesicles was 5.5 mm (range 0-30), and the superior region of the seminal vesicles was 4.2 mm (range 0-55). When the different borders were considered in the PSV group, the mean discrepancies for the anterior, posterior, right, and left borders were 6.4 mm (range 0-55), 2.5 mm (range 0-20), 2.6 mm (range 0-14), and 3

  3. Impact of inter- and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors on PTV margins. Different alignment techniques in 3D conformal prostate cancer radiotherapy

    Langsenlehner, T.; Doeller, C.; Winkler, P.; Kapp, K.S. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; Galle, G. [Graz Medical Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Urology

    2013-04-15

    The aim of this work was to analyze interfraction and intrafraction deviations and residual set-up errors (RSE) after online repositioning to determine PTV margins for 3 different alignment techniques in prostate cancer radiotherapy. The present prospective study included 44 prostate cancer patients with implanted fiducials treated with three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy. Daily localization was based on skin marks followed by marker detection using kilovoltage (kV) imaging and subsequent patient repositioning. Additionally, in-treatment megavoltage (MV) images were obtained for each treatment field. In an off-line analysis of 7,273 images, interfraction prostate motion, RSE after marker-based prostate localization, prostate position during each treatment session, and the effect of treatment time on intrafraction deviations were analyzed to evaluate PTV margins. Margins accounting for interfraction deviation, RSE and intrafraction motion were 14.1, 12.9, and 15.1 mm in anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right (LR) direction for skin mark alignment and 9.6, 8.7, and 2.6 mm for bony structure alignment, respectively. Alignment to implanted markers required margins of 4.6, 2.8, and 2.5 mm. As margins to account for intrafraction motion increased with treatment prolongation PTV margins could be reduced to 3.9, 2.6, and 2.4 mm if treatment time was {<=} 4 min. With daily online correction and repositioning based on implanted fiducials, a significant reduction of PTV margins can be achieved. The use of an optimized workflow with faster treatment techniques such as volumetric modulated arc techniques (VMAT) could allow for a further decrease. (orig.)

  4. Phase Ⅰ/Ⅱ study of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin chemotherapy in combination with concurrent 3-D conformal radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    XU Feng; WANG Jin; SHEN Yali; ZHANG Hong; ZHOU Qinghua

    2006-01-01

    Background and objective Recent studies have showed that combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy might result in better outcome for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study is to determine the maximal tolerance dose (MTD) and efficacy of full-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin when given concurrently with 3-dimentional radiation therapy (3D-RT) for locally advanced NSCLC. Methods Oxaliplatin was administered at a fixed dose of 130 mg/m2, and gemcitabine was administered at a starting dose of 800 mg/m2 with an incremental dose gradient of 200 mg/m2 for 3 dose levels. MTD was defined as the immediate dose level lower than the dose at which dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) occurred in more than one-third of the patients. The chemotherapy was administered at 3-week cycle. The RT was given as 3-D conformal manner at a single daily dose of 2 Gy for 5 days per week. Results Twenty-two patients were evaluable and distributed to three different dose levels: 6 at level 1, 8 at level 2 and 8 at level 3. Pulmonary toxicity, esophageal and hematologic toxicity were the main DLT. Grade Ⅲ acute pulmonary toxicity occurred in one patient each at level 2 and level 3, both with V20>20%, and grade Ⅲ esophagitis in two patients at level 3. The MTD of gemcitabine in this study was 1000 mg/m2. The overall response rate was 75.0% (9/12). The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 70.0% and 30.5% respectively. The median time to progression was 8.7 months (range 5--11.8 months). Conclusion With reduced radiation volume, gemcitabine of 1000 mg/m2 in combination with oxaliplatin of 130 mg/m2 was effective and could be safely administered for NSCLC.

  5. IMRT vs. 2D-radiotherapy or 3D-conformal radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Survival outcome in a Korean multi-institutional retrospective study (KROG 11-06)

    Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Geol; Keum, Ki Chang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Sil [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Paldal-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    We compared treatment outcomes of two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In total, 1237 patients with cT1-4N0-3M0 NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, 350, 390, and 497 were treated with 2D-RT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. 3D-CRT and IMRT showed better 5-year overall survival (OS) rates (73.6 and 76.7 %, respectively) than did 2D-RT (5-year OS of 59.7 %, all p < 0.001). In T3-4 subgroup, IMRT was associated with a significantly better 5-year OS than was 2D-RT (70.7 vs. 50.4 %, respectively; p ≤ 0.001) and 3D-CRT (70.7 vs. 57.8 %, respectively; p = 0.011); however, the difference between the 2D-RT and 3D-CRT groups did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.063). In multivariate analyses of all patients, IMRT was a predictive factor for OS when compared with 2D-RT or 3D-CRT, as was 3D-CRT when compared with 2D-RT. Our study showed that 3D-CRT and IMRT were associated with a better local progression-free survival and OS than was 2D-RT in NPC. IMRT was significantly superior in terms of OS for advanced primary tumors (T3-4). (orig.) [German] Wir verglichen die Behandlungsergebnisse von zweidimensionaler Strahlentherapie (2D-RT), dreidimensionaler konformer Strahlentherapie (3D-CRT) und intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Nasopharynxkarzinom (NPC). Insgesamt 1237 Patienten mit NPC im Stadium cT1-4/N0-3/M0 wurden rueckwirkend analysiert. Von diesen wurden jeweils 350, 390 und 497 mit 2D-RT, 3D-CRT und IMRT behandelt. 3D-CRT und IMRT zeigten eine bessere 5-Jahres-Gesamtueberlebensrate (5y-OS; jeweils 73,6 und 76,7%) als 2D-RT (59,7%; alle p < 0,001). In der Untergruppe T3-4 war die IMRT mit einer erheblich besseren 5y-OS verbunden als 2D-RT (jeweils 70,7 vs. 50,4%; p ≤ 0,001) und 3D-CRT (jeweils 70,7 vs. 57,8%; p = 0,011); jedoch gab es keinen Unterschied zwischen den Gruppen 2D

  6. Irradiation of head-and-neck tumors with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Comparison between two IMRT techniques with 3D conformal irradiation

    For 12 patients with inoperable head-neck carcinoma that were treated with 3D conformal irradiation techniques additional irradiation plans using IMRT were developed. It was shown that the IMRT techniques are superior to the 3D conformal technique. The new rapid arc technique is unclear with respect to the critical organs (parotid glands, spinal canal and mandibles) but is significantly advantageous for the other normal tissue with respect to conformity (steeper dose gradients) and thus radiation dose reduction. The resulting lower irradiation time and the reduced radiation exposure being important for the treatment economy and patients' comfort should favor the more planning intensive rapid arc technique.

  7. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1); 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV) (method 2); 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3); and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4). The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy) and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy) were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03); method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006)). Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02). Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy) and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3

  8. Comparison of rectal volume definition techniques and their influence on rectal toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy: a dose-volume analysis

    Yavuz Melek

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the impact of four different rectum contouring techniques and rectal toxicities in patients with treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT. Methods Clinical and dosimetric data were evaluated for 94 patients who received a total dose 3DCRT of 70 Gy, and rectal doses were compared in four different rectal contouring techniques: the prostate-containing CT sections (method 1; 1 cm above and below the planning target volume (PTV (method 2; 110 mm starting from the anal verge (method 3; and from the anal verge to the sigmoid flexure (method 4. The percentage of rectal volume receiving RT doses (30–70 Gy and minimum, mean rectal doses were assessed. Results Median age was 69 years. Percentage of rectal volume receiving high doses (≥ 70 Gy were higher with the techniques that contoured smaller rectal volumes. In methods 2 and 3, the percentage of rectal volume receiving ≥ 70 Gy was significantly higher in patients with than without rectal bleeding (method 2: 30.8% vs. 22.5%, respectively (p = 0.03; method 3: 26.9% vs. 18.1%, respectively (p = 0.006. Mean rectal dose was significant predictor of rectal bleeding only in method 3 (48.8 Gy in patients with bleeding vs. 44.4 Gy in patients without bleeding; p = 0.02. Conclusion Different techniques of rectal contouring significantly influence the calculation of radiation doses to the rectum and the prediction of rectal toxicity. Rectal volume receiving higher doses (≥ 70 Gy and mean rectal doses may significantly predict rectal bleeding for techniques contouring larger rectal volumes, as was in method 3.

  9. PubChem3D: Conformer generation

    Bolton Evan E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PubChem, an open archive for the biological activities of small molecules, provides search and analysis tools to assist users in locating desired information. Many of these tools focus on the notion of chemical structure similarity at some level. PubChem3D enables similarity of chemical structure 3-D conformers to augment the existing similarity of 2-D chemical structure graphs. It is also desirable to relate theoretical 3-D descriptions of chemical structures to experimental biological activity. As such, it is important to be assured that the theoretical conformer models can reproduce experimentally determined bioactive conformations. In the present study, we investigate the effects of three primary conformer generation parameters (the fragment sampling rate, the energy window size, and force field variant upon the accuracy of theoretical conformer models, and determined optimal settings for PubChem3D conformer model generation and conformer sampling. Results Using the software package OMEGA from OpenEye Scientific Software, Inc., theoretical 3-D conformer models were generated for 25,972 small-molecule ligands, whose 3-D structures were experimentally determined. Different values for primary conformer generation parameters were systematically tested to find optimal settings. Employing a greater fragment sampling rate than the default did not improve the accuracy of the theoretical conformer model ensembles. An ever increasing energy window did increase the overall average accuracy, with rapid convergence observed at 10 kcal/mol and 15 kcal/mol for model building and torsion search, respectively; however, subsequent study showed that an energy threshold of 25 kcal/mol for torsion search resulted in slightly improved results for larger and more flexible structures. Exclusion of coulomb terms from the 94s variant of the Merck molecular force field (MMFF94s in the torsion search stage gave more accurate conformer models at

  10. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  11. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D105% and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT

  12. 中上段食管癌3D-CRT与IMRT肺损伤剂量学的对比研究%Dosimetric Comparison of Intensity-modulated Radiotherapy Versus 3D Conformal Radiotherapy in Treatment of Cancer of Upper/Mid Esophagus

    张莉; 罗辉

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compared 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)-induced and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-induced pulmonary injury by using 3D treatment planning system,and to explore the optimum treatment strategy for upper/mid esophageal carcinoma.Methods Eight patients with upper/mid esophageal carcinoma were selected in this study. Four different radiotherapy plans were developed for each patient,including 5-field 3D-CRT(CRT5),7-field 3D-CRT(CRT7), 5-field IMRT (IMRT5) and 7-field IMRT (IMRT7). The planning target volume (PTV) received at least 95% of the prescription dose. The mean lung dose (MLD),V5,V10,V20 and V30 were evaluated using dose volume histogram(DVH). All statistics were analyzed using the SPSS version 11.5 software. Results CRT5 plan reduced lung V10 compared with CRT7 (P=0. 006), but V5, V20, V30 and MLD were not different between the two plans(P>0. 008 3). There were no significant differences in lung parameters between IMRT5 and IMRT7.Compared with IMRT plans, V20, V30 and MLD were increased by 3D-CRT, while V5 was decreased by 3D-CRT(P<0. 0083). Conclusion Compared with 3D-CRT, IMRT can reduce the MLD,V20 and V30 to achieve lung sparing in treatment of upper/mid esophageal carcinoma.There were no significant differences in the protection of lung tissues between 5-field and 7-field techniques for both 3D-CRT and IMRT plans.%目的 应用三维适形放疗(3D-CRT)计划比较中上段食管鳞癌3D-CRT和调强放疗(IMRT)的放射性肺损伤情况从而探讨理想的治疗计划模式.方法 8例患者每例分别设计4个放疗计划(CRT-5 、CRT-7、IMRT-5及 IMRT-7),规定PTV至少达到95%处方剂量前提下用DVH评价每个计划的V5 、V10 、V20 、V30及肺 MLD.采用SPSS 11.5软件包进行数据统计与分析.结果 采用3D-CRT技术时,5野的V10优于7野(P=0.006);5野与7野的肺Mean、肺V5、V20、V30(P>0.0083)之间无统计学意义;采用IMRT技术时,5野与7野之间各参数的对

  13. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  14. Conformal radiotherapy: a glossary

    Most of the concepts and terms related to conformal radiotherapy were produced by English-speaking authors and eventually validated by international groups of experts, whose working language was also English. Therefore, a significant part of this literature is poorly accessible to the French-speaking radiation oncology community. The present paper gathers the 'official' definitions already published in French, along with propositions for the remaining terms which should be submitted to a more formal and representative validation process. (author)

  15. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy; Estimacion del dano en organos inducido por neutrones en radioterapia conformada en 3D

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calzada de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Uribe, M. del R., E-mail: jlbenitesr@prodigy.net.mx [Instituto Tecnico Superior de Radiologia, Calle Leon No. 129, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm{sup 3} was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  16. 食管癌三维适形放疗与放化疗的疗效比较%ANALYSIS OF PROGNOSIS ON ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOMA PATIENTS WITH THREE -DIMENSIONAL CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY ( 3D -CRT ) ALONE OR RADIOTHERAPY COMBINED WITH CHEMOTHERAPY

    邱嵘; 王玉祥; 祝淑钗; 田丹丹; 杨洁; 刘志坤

    2011-01-01

    目的 比较食管癌三维适形放疗与放化疗的疗效.方法 回顾性分析2001年1月-2007年8月接受三维适形放疗的184例食管癌患者的临床资料,其中118例行单纯放疗(单放组)、66例放疗联合化疗(放化组),比较2组疗效及预后因素.结果 单放组和放化组比较,CT显示食管肿瘤最大直径差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);而性别、年龄、病变部位、食管造影病变长度、放疗前进食状况、T分期、N分期、M分期、临床分期和放疗剂量均差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).全组放疗后完全缓解61例、部分缓解112例、未缓解11例,总有效率(完全缓解+部分缓解)为94.02%;放化组近期疗效优于单放组(P<0.05),2组放射性食管炎和肺炎发生率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).全组1、3、4年生存率分别为64.67%、33.77%和26.64%;中位生存期18.7个月.单放组与放化组比较生存率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);但化疗>2周期者预后好于化疗1~2周期和未化疗者(P<0.05).年龄>63岁者放化组生存率明显高于单放组,而T3~4期放化组生存率低于单放组(P<0.05);颈及胸上段癌、T1~2、N0期、I~II期和放疗剂量≤64Gy组放化组生存率高于单放组,但差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);年龄≤63岁、放疗剂量>64Gy、胸中下段癌、N1~2、III~IV期、性别、食管造影显示病变长度和CT显示瘤体最大直径,放化组和单放组比较生存率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 食管癌三维适形放疗联合化疗2周期以上者可以提高局控率和生存率,而化疗1~2周期者未能获益;年龄较大者,三维适形放疗加化疗可以提高生存率;颈及胸上段癌、早期和放疗剂量较低者放化疗有提高生存率的趋势.%Objective To explore the prognosis of esophageal carcinoma patients which treated with three - dimensional conformal radiotherapy ( 3D - CRT )alone or radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Methods From

  17. 胸上段食管癌3D-CRT与IMRT的剂量学比较%Dosimetric comparison between intensity-modulated radiotherapy and conformal radiotherapy for up-per thoracic esophageal carcinoma

    刘粉霞; 翟倩倩; 孙晓东; 王慧涛; 张强; 王银亮

    2014-01-01

    均剂量、脊髓保护方面均优于3D-CRT技术;但是双肺低剂量照射区域有所增加,肺损伤的风险就有可能增大。%Objective To compare the dosimetry between three -dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT)and intensity -modulated radiotherapy(IMRT)in the treatment of upper thoracic esophageal carcino-ma,and to provide references to choose radiotherapy program for clinical physician .Methods twenty-five cases with upper esophageal carcinoma (clinical stageⅠ~Ⅲstage)were treated by 3DCRT and IMRT at the concentra three-dimensional radiation treatment planning system .The different exposure doses between target area and effected organs were compared by dose volume histogram ( DVH) with the planed target volume ( PTV) ,which must reach 95% of the prescriptive doses.Results Two different radiotherapy plans of IMRT and 3DCRT:V95, (99.91 ±0.14)%,(95.73 ±4.14)% respectively,P0.05;targeting minimum dose(Dmin)were(5 458.88 ±184.06) cGy,(4541.60 ±599.0)cGy,P0.05;Lung V10 (35.39 ±11.41)%,(29.0 ±8.80)%,P<0.05,Lung V5(44.95 ±15.55)%,(37.27 ±11.93)%,P<0.05. Conclusion Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is better than 3DCRT technology in showing PTV volume ,target conformal degrees and the mean index ,spinal cord protection ,However ,The risk of lung injury could be increased with the enlarged area of low -dose irradiation in lung .

  18. Radiotherapy for soft tissue sarcomas of extremities. Preliminary comparative dosimetric study of 3D conformal radiotherapy versus helical tomo-therapy; Radiotherapie postoperatoire des sarcomes des tissus mous des extremites. Etude dosimetrique preliminaire comparative de la radiotherapie conformationnelle avec la tomotherapie helicoidale

    Donnay, L.; Dejean, C.; Amsellem, E.; Bourezgui, H.; Figueiredo, B.H. de; Duparc, A.; Caron, J.; Tournat, H.; Lagarde, P.; Kantor, G. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Stoeckle, E. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, Dept. de Chirurgie, Institut Bergonie, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2008-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dosimetry of helical tomo-therapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-C.R.T.) with and without I.M.R.T. for the treatment of soft tissue sarcoma (S.T.S.) of the thigh. Methods and patients: A retrospective study was performed for three patients who received 3D-C.R.T. as adjuvant radiation therapy for S.T.S. of the thigh. These three patients had a tumor in posterior, adductor or anterior compartment of the thigh. In each case, three treatments plans were optimised in tomo-therapy, without bloc, with directional bloc and complete bloc of contralateral limb, to adequately treat the planning target volume and spare organ at risk. For each patient, we compare the three modalities of tomo-therapy or 'classical' I.M.R.T. from a Clinac with the 3D-C.R.T. actually performed for the treatment. Results: Tomo-therapy provides improved P.T.V. coverage and dose homogeneity. This benefit was comparable in the three tomo-therapy plans. The average D95% for tomo-therapy and 3D-C.R.T. were 97.6% and 94.8% respectively and the standard deviation is, at least, divided by two with conformal and is always better than performed with a Clinac. The volume of the surrounding soft tissues receiving at least full prescription and hot spots, as evaluated by D2%, were significantly reduced in tomo-therapy. Nevertheless, the results concerning the skin, the femur and the gonads were dependent on the tumor site in the thigh and not always improved with tomo-therapy dosimetric studies. (authors)

  19. Dosimetric impact of inter-observer variability for 3D conformal radiotherapy and volumetric modulated arc therapy: the rectal tumor target definition case

    To assess the dosimetric effect induced by inter-observer variability in target definition for 3D-conformal RT (3DCRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy by RapidArc (RA) techniques for rectal cancer treatment. Ten patients with rectal cancer subjected to neo-adjuvant RT were randomly selected from the internal database. Four radiation oncologists independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV) in blind mode. Planning target volume (PTV) was defined as CTV + 7 mm in the three directions. Afterwards, shared guidelines between radiation oncologists were introduced to give general criteria for the contouring of rectal target and the four radiation oncologists defined new CTV following the guidelines. For each patient, six intersections (I) and unions (U) volumes were calculated coupling the contours of the various oncologists. This was repeated for the contours drawn after the guidelines. Agreement Index (AI = I/U) was calculated pre and post guidelines. Two RT plans (one with 3DCRT technique using 3–4 fields and one with RA using a single modulated arc) were optimized on each radiation oncologist’s PTV. For each plan the PTV volume receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose (PTV V95%) was calculated for both target and non-target PTVs. The inter-operator AI pre-guidelines was 0.57 and was increased up to 0.69 post-guidelines. The maximum volume difference between the various CTV couples, drawn for each patient, passed from 380 ± 147 cm3 to 137 ± 83 cm3 after the introduction of guidelines. The mean percentage for the non-target PTV V95% was 93.7 ± 9.2% before and 96.6 ± 4.9%after the introduction of guidelines for the 3DCRT, for RA the increase was more relevant, passing from 86.5 ± 13.8% (pre) to 94.5 ± 7.5% (post). The OARs were maximally spared with VMAT technique while the variability between pre and post guidelines was not relevant in both techniques. The contouring inter-observer variability has dosimetric effects in the PTV coverage

  20. Acute side effects during 3-D-planned conformal radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Differences between patient's self-reported questionnaire and the corresponding doctor's report

    Background: Radiotherapy-induced side effects are often scored retrospectively according to the EORTC/RTOG scores for organs at risk by reviewing the medical records. Some studies could prove an over- or underestimation of side effects as assessed by the medical professionals. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate differences in side effects as described by the doctors and the patients. Patients and Methods: 47 patients with prostate cancer were questioned about their side effects by a radiotherapist and asked to fill in a questionnaire at the start, in the middle and at the end of radiotherapy. The data of this questionnaire and the doctor's report were scored according to the German version of the EORTC/RTOG scores for gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects and subsequently compared. We distinguished between ''moderate'' disagreement (better/worse by one grade, assessed by the doctor) and ''pronounced'' disagreement (better/worse by two grades, assessed by the doctor). Results: The number of GI and GU side effects increased during radiotherapy both according to data obtained from the doctor and the patient questionnaire. Comparing doctors' reports with patients' questionnaires, for GI side effects an agreement was found in 22/47 patients, ''moderately better'' scores by the doctor's report were found in 13/47 patients, and ''moderately worse'' scores in 9/47 patients on average. ''Pronouncedly better and worse'' scores were found in 2/47 patients. For GU side effects an agreement was seen in 22/47 patients, ''moderately better'' scores in 17/47 patients and ''moderately worse'' scores in 3/47 patients. Regarding GU side effects, only pronouncedly better scores, as assessed by the doctor, were found in a mean of 4/47 patients. If the EORTC/RTOG score is used in its original English version, a difference is found, particularly in the assessment of GU side effects, resulting in an higher amount of agreement concerning GU side effects

  1. Conformal radiotherapy: revolution or evolution?

    The advantage the most clearly known of a conformal approach takes place in the protection of sane tissues. A randomized study comparing classical radiotherapy and conformal (defined with the use of masks) has noticed a significant reduction of the delayed rectal toxicity after conformal irradiation for patients suffering of prostate tumor. This benefit has been observed with a simple technique (three beams) and a dose not really high (66 Gy). It could bring a safety margin in the case of increasing of the tumor dose. (N.C.)

  2. Acurácia na reprodutibilidade do posicionamento diário de pacientes submetidos a radioterapia conformada (RT3D para câncer de próstata Accuracy in the reproducibility of daily patients' setup in 3D conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Adelmo José Giordani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a reprodutibilidade do posicionamento de pacientes com diagnóstico de câncer de próstata submetidos a radioterapia conformada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 960 (posições anterior e lateral filmes radiológicos, de um total de 120 pacientes que receberam radioterapia conformada na próstata com técnica isocêntrica. As imagens foram obtidas em acelerador linear de partículas 6 MV. Aplicou-se protocolo específico para planejamento e tratamento da próstata, com o paciente em posição supina, mãos colocadas sobre o tórax, pés apoiados em suporte apropriado. Diariamente, os pacientes foram posicionados conforme demarcações na pele, coincidentes com os lasers da sala. Os filmes radiológicos foram comparados com as radiografias reconstruídas digitalmente (digitally reconstructed radiography - DRR em sistema de planejamento computadorizado Eclipse, a partir das tomografias. As radiografias de posicionamento foram realizadas no primeiro dia e após, semanalmente, até o término do tratamento. RESULTADOS: As médias dos deslocamentos observados foram de 1,99 ± 1,25 mm no sentido crânio-caudal, 1,37 ± 0,84 mm no látero-lateral e 1,94 ± 1,10 mm no ântero-posterior. CONCLUSÃO: O uso de protocolos específicos para posicionamento dos pacientes é possível na prática clínica, possibilita reprodutibilidade adequada e rápida correção dos possíveis erros.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the reproducibility of daily patients' setup in 3D conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study evaluated a total of 960 radiological images (anterior and lateral views of 120 patients submitted to conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer with the isocentric technique. A 6 MV particle accelerator was utilized in the process. A specific protocol for prostate radiotherapy planning and treatment was applied, with the patients placed in supine position, hands on the chest and legs placed on and

  3. Web 3D technology for virtual simulation for radiotherapy

    Virtual Simulation of patient set-up for radiotherapy using Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRRs) is becoming popular because of the advantages of higher precision and flexibility in planning at a lower cost. This technology is based on 2D concepts, as the DRR is a 2D image on which beam portals are planned. Web 3D technology is an emerging concept based on true 3D objects

  4. Model-based risk assessment for motion effects in 3D radiotherapy of lung tumors

    Werner, René; Ehrhardt, Jan; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2012-02-01

    Although 4D CT imaging becomes available in an increasing number of radiotherapy facilities, 3D imaging and planning is still standard in current clinical practice. In particular for lung tumors, respiratory motion is a known source of uncertainty and should be accounted for during radiotherapy planning - which is difficult by using only a 3D planning CT. In this contribution, we propose applying a statistical lung motion model to predict patients' motion patterns and to estimate dosimetric motion effects in lung tumor radiotherapy if only 3D images are available. Being generated based on 4D CT images of patients with unimpaired lung motion, the model tends to overestimate lung tumor motion. It therefore promises conservative risk assessment regarding tumor dose coverage. This is exemplarily evaluated using treatment plans of lung tumor patients with different tumor motion patterns and for two treatment modalities (conventional 3D conformal radiotherapy and step-&- shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy). For the test cases, 4D CT images are available. Thus, also a standard registration-based 4D dose calculation is performed, which serves as reference to judge plausibility of the modelbased 4D dose calculation. It will be shown that, if combined with an additional simple patient-specific breathing surrogate measurement (here: spirometry), the model-based dose calculation provides reasonable risk assessment of respiratory motion effects.

  5. A neurosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dedicated PACS for conformal radiotherapy

    To realise conformal cerebral stereotactic irradiations we use a Neurosurgery/stereotactic dedicated PACS between two distant hospitals. It connects the stereotactic neurosurgery planification imaging system NEUROAXIS (Sopelem-Sofretec/Ste Anne Hospital) with the dosimetric TPS ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray (Tenon Hospital). NEUROAXIS is a computer aided stereotactic biopsies and stereo-electroencephalographies, used by surgeons in operating room. The system determines the precise location data for Talairach radiological equipment (X ray source at 5 meters from film) and the geometry of scanner and MRI stereotactical referentials. It provides a full set of features for lesion localization, geometrical computations, surgical planifications, picture archiving, stereotactic angiography, CT and MRI image processing and networking. It sends images through the French public digital network ISDN (NUMERIS/France Telecom : 2x64 Kbits/s) from Ste Anne to Tenon Hospital. Stereotactic angiographic and CT images are reformatted into the DOSIGRAY image processing environment where 3-D dose distributions, displays and DVHs are computed to determine the optimal treatment. ARTEMIS-3D/Dosigray is a TPS for stereotactic radiotherapy devised by the Tenon Hospital for clinical methodology and 3D dose calculations, optimization software development and the Dosigray company for multimodality imaging, (2D(3D)) computer graphics for dose and anatomical representation and data networking. Communication within the radiation oncology department is provided by local area ETHERNET network, linking heterogeneous systems (Vaxstations-3200; Decstation (5000(240))) by means of different protocols. The works in progress are to send back via the same network the 3-D dose matrix to Neurosurgery department NEUROAXIS system. Our PACS is used since six months to treat patients. It has permitted to improve the treatment quality in comparison with our first version TPS ARTEMIS-3D

  6. Automatic respiration tracking for radiotherapy using optical 3D camera

    Li, Tuotuo; Geng, Jason; Li, Shidong

    2013-03-01

    Rapid optical three-dimensional (O3D) imaging systems provide accurate digitized 3D surface data in real-time, with no patient contact nor radiation. The accurate 3D surface images offer crucial information in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) treatments for accurate patient repositioning and respiration management. However, applications of O3D imaging techniques to image-guided radiotherapy have been clinically challenged by body deformation, pathological and anatomical variations among individual patients, extremely high dimensionality of the 3D surface data, and irregular respiration motion. In existing clinical radiation therapy (RT) procedures target displacements are caused by (1) inter-fractional anatomy changes due to weight, swell, food/water intake; (2) intra-fractional variations from anatomy changes within any treatment session due to voluntary/involuntary physiologic processes (e.g. respiration, muscle relaxation); (3) patient setup misalignment in daily reposition due to user errors; and (4) changes of marker or positioning device, etc. Presently, viable solution is lacking for in-vivo tracking of target motion and anatomy changes during the beam-on time without exposing patient with additional ionized radiation or high magnet field. Current O3D-guided radiotherapy systems relay on selected points or areas in the 3D surface to track surface motion. The configuration of the marks or areas may change with time that makes it inconsistent in quantifying and interpreting the respiration patterns. To meet the challenge of performing real-time respiration tracking using O3D imaging technology in IGRT, we propose a new approach to automatic respiration motion analysis based on linear dimensionality reduction technique based on PCA (principle component analysis). Optical 3D image sequence is decomposed with principle component analysis into a limited number of independent (orthogonal) motion patterns (a low dimension eigen-space span by eigen-vectors). New

  7. Interim Cosmetic Results and Toxicity Using 3D Conformal External Beam Radiotherapy to Deliver Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation in Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Treated With Breast-Conserving Therapy

    Purpose: We present our ongoing clinical experience utilizing three-dimensional (3D)-conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Ninety-one consecutive patients were treated with APBI using our previously reported 3D-CRT technique. The clinical target volume consisted of the lumpectomy cavity plus a 10- to 15 -mm margin. The prescribed dose was 34 or 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions given over 5 consecutive days. The median follow-up was 24 months. Twelve patients have been followed for ≥4 years, 20 for ≥3.5 years, 29 for >3.0 years, 33 for ≥2.5 years, and 46 for ≥2.0 years. Results: No local recurrences developed. Cosmetic results were rated as good/excellent in 100% of evaluable patients at ≥ 6 months (n = 47), 93% at 1 year (n = 43), 91% at 2 years (n = 21), and in 90% at ≥3 years (n = 10). Erythema, hyperpigmentation, breast edema, breast pain, telangiectasias, fibrosis, and fat necrosis were evaluated at 6, 24, and 36 months after treatment. All factors stabilized by 3 years posttreatment with grade I or II rates of 0%, 0%, 0%, 0%, 9%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Only 2 patients (3%) developed grade III toxicity (breast pain), which resolved with time. Conclusions: Delivery of APBI with 3D-CRT resulted in minimal chronic (≥6 months) toxicity to date with good/excellent cosmetic results. Additional follow-up is needed to assess the long-term efficacy of this form of APBI

  8. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT)

    Purpose: We present a novel three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) technique to treat the lumpectomy cavity, plus a 1.5-cm margin, in patients with early-stage breast cancer and study its clinical feasibility. Methods and Materials: A 3D-CRT technique for partial-breast irradiation was developed using archived CT scans from 7 patients who underwent an active breathing control study. The clinical feasibility of this technique was then assessed in 9 patients who were prospectively enrolled on an Investigational Review Board-approved protocol of partial-breast irradiation. The prescribed dose was 34 Gy in 5 patients and 38.5 Gy in 4 patients, delivered in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 consecutive days. The impact of both breathing motion and patient setup uncertainty on clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was studied, and an appropriate CTV-to-PTV (planning target volume) margin was calculated. Results: By adding a CTV-to-PTV 'breathing-only' margin of 5 mm, 98%-100% of the CTV remained covered by the 95% isodose surface at the extremes of normal inhalation and normal exhalation. The 'total' CTV-to-PTV margin employed to accommodate organ motion and setup error (10 mm) was found to be sufficient to accommodate the observed uncertainty in the delivery precision. Patient tolerance was excellent, and acute toxicity was minimal. No skin changes were noted during treatment, and at the initial 4-8-week follow-up visit, only mild localized hyperpigmentation and/or erythema was observed. No instances of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis have occurred. Conclusions: Accelerated partial-breast irradiation using 3D-CRT is technically feasible, and acute toxicity to date has been minimal. A CTV-to-PTV margin of 10 mm seems to provide coverage for most patients. However, more patients and additional studies will be needed to validate the accuracy of this margin, and longer follow-up will be needed to assess acute and chronic toxicity, tumor control, and cosmetic

  9. Film dosimetry in conformal radiotherapy

    Danciu, C.; Proimos, B.S. [Patras Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1995-12-01

    Dosimetry, through a film sandwiched in a transverse cross-section of a solid phantom, is a method of choice in Conformal Radiotherapy because: (a) the blackness (density) of the film at each point offers a measure of the total dose received at that point, and (b) the film is easily calibrated by exposing a film strip in the same cross-section, through a stationary field. The film must therefore have the following properties: (a) it must be slow, in order not to be overexposed, even at a therapeutic dose of 200 cGy, and (b) the response of the film (density versus dose curve) must be independent of the photon energy spectrum. A few slow films were compared. It was found that the Kodak X-Omat V for therapy verification was the best choice. To investigate whether the film response was independent of the photon energy, response curves for six depths, starting from the depth of maximum dose to the depth of 25 cm, in solid phantom were derived. The vertical beam was perpendicular to the anterior surface of the phantom, which was at the distance of 100 cm from the source and the field was 15x15 cm at that distance. This procedure was repeated for photon beams emitted by a Cobalt-60 unit, two 6 MV and 15 MV Linear Accelerators, as well as a 45 MV Betatron. For each of those four different beams the film response was the same for all six depths. The results, as shown in the diagrams, are very satisfactory. The response curve under a geometry similar to that actually applied, when the film is irradiated in a transverse cross-section of the phantom, was derived. The horizontal beam was almost parallel (angle of 85) to the plane of the film. The same was repeated with the central ray parallel to the film (angle 90) and at a distance of 1.5 cm from the horizontal film. The field size was again 15x15 at the lateral entrance surface of the beam. The response curves remained the same, as when the beam was perpendicular to the films.

  10. The choice of optimal radiotherapy technique for locally advanced maxillary carcinoma using 3d treatment planning system

    Mileusnić Dušan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare the isodose distribution of three radiotherapy techniques for locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma and analyze the potential of three-dimensional (3D conformal radiotherapy planning in order to determine the optimal technique for target dose delivery, and spare uninvolved healthy tissue structures. Methods. Computed tomography (CT scans of fourteen patients with T3-T4, N0, M0 maxillary sinus carcinoma were acquired and transferred to 3D treatment planning system (3D-TPS. The target volume and uninvolved dose limiting structures were contoured on axial CT slices throughout the volume of interest combining three variants of treatment plans (techniques for each patient: 1. A conventional two-dimensional (2D treatment plan with classically shaped one anterior two lateral opposite fields and two types of 3D conformal radiotherapy plans were compared for each patient. 2. Three-dimensional standard (3D-S plan one anterior + two lateral opposite coplanar fields, which outlines were shaped with multileaf collimator (MLC according to geometric information based on 3D reconstruction of target volume and organs at risk as seen in the beam eye's view (BEV projection. 3. Three-dimensional non-standard (3D-NS plan: one anterior + two lateral noncoplanar fields, which outlines were shaped in the same manner as in 3D-S plans. The planning parameters for target volumes and the degree of neurooptic structures and parotid glands protection were evaluated for all three techniques. Comparison of plans and treatment techniques was assessed by isodose distribution, dose statistics and dose-volume histograms. Results. The most enhanced conformity of the dose delivered to the target volume was achieved with 3D-NS technique, and significant differences were found comparing 3D-NS vs. 2D (Dmax: p<0,05 Daver: p<0,01; Dmin: p<0,05; V90: p<0,05, and V95: p<0,01, as well as 3D-NS vs. 3D-S technique (Dmin: p<0,05; V90: p<0,05, and V95: p<0,01, while there

  11. Estimated risk of cardiovascular disease and secondary cancers with modern highly conformal radiotherapy for early-stage mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma

    Maraldo, M.V.; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Aznar, Marianne Camille;

    2013-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors have an increased morbidity and mortality from secondary cancers and cardiovascular disease (CD). We evaluate doses with involved node radiotherapy (INRT) delivered as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT), volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), or proton therapy (P...

  12. A little to a lot or a lot to a little? An analysis of pneumonitis risk from dose-volume histogram parameters of the lung in patients with lung cancer treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy

    We analyzed the clinical and DVH data from 49 patients treated for a thoracic malignancy using 3-D conformal treatment plans. 18 patients had developed a clinical pneumonitis (CTC II or III). The majority of patients (n = 48) received radiochemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a combination of paclitaxel and carboplatin. Patients were generally treated 5 fx/week, single dose 2 Gy, using a two-series approach (shrinking field) up to a total dose of 60-70 Gy. For every individual patient, the overall dose distribution was recalculated in the Helax-TMS by means of adding dose plans according the total dose applied in each series. The lungs were defined both as separate organs and as a whole organ. Low-dose volume (low), moderate-dose volume (> 10-40 Gy, Vmod) and high-dose volume (> 40 Gy, Vhigh), as well as V10-V40 and mean lung dose (MLD) were defined from the cumulative DVH. Dose-effect relationships were fitted with a logistic regression model. Results: Manifestation of clinical pneumonitis was within 3 months from termination of irradiation in all cases. For the ipsilateral lung, the incidence of pneumonitis was closely correlated to Vhigh. The pneumonitis rate increased from 13% up to 60%. By contrast, with increasing Vlow the pneumonitis rate dropped to low, Vmod and Vhigh of the ipsilateral, contralateral and whole lung were significantly correlated to the corresponding MLD. The incidence of pneumonitis increased with increasing MLD for the ipsilateral lung with a D50 of 32 Gy and a γ50 of 0.98. For the whole lung, the observed increase was less steep. MLD showed a close correlation to NTCP calculated by the Kutcher model. However, NTCP calculation overestimated the pneumonitis risk for the ipsilateral lung and underestimated the risk for the whole lung due to the steeper gradient. The logistic regression curve for the DVH parameters V10-V40 showed an increase of steepness toward higher doses. From the logistic regression curves, a DVH

  13. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  14. Conformal Invariance of the 3D Self-Avoiding Walk

    Kennedy, Tom

    2013-10-01

    We show that if the three-dimensional self-avoiding walk (SAW) is conformally invariant, then one can compute the hitting densities for the SAW in a half-space and in a sphere. We test these predictions by Monte Carlo simulations and find excellent agreement, thus providing evidence that the SAW is conformally invariant in three dimensions.

  15. Class solution to decrease rectal dose in prostate radiotherapy treatments 3D-CRT; Solucion de clase para disminuir dosis en recto en tratamientos de prostata con radioterapia 3D-CRT

    Andres Rodriguez, C.; Tortosa Oliver, R.; Alonso Hernandez, D.; Mari Palacios, A.; Castillo Belmonte, A. del

    2011-07-01

    This paper contains a method developed in our center with conventional 3D radiotherapy techniques to increase the dose conformation around the target volume in prostate cancer treatments significantly reduced the doses to the rectum. To evaluate the goodness of the method, the results are compared with two classical techniques of treatment.

  16. 3-D-conformal radiation therapy for pediatric giant cell tumors of the skull base

    Hug, E.B. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States). Section of Radiation Oncology; Muenter, M.W.; Vries, A. de [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Adams, J.A.; Munzenrider, J.E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Cyclotron Lab.; Rosenberg, A.E. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Pathology

    2002-05-01

    Background: Giant cell tumors (GCT) of the base of skull are rare neoplasms. This report reviews the treatment of four pediatric patients presenting with aggressive giant cell tumor, using fractionated and combined, conformal proton and photon radiation therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory. Patients and Methods: Three female patients and one adolescent male, ages 10-15 years, had undergone prior, extensive surgical resection(s) and were treated for either primary (two patients) or recurrent (two patients) disease. Gross residual tumor was evident in three patients and microscopic disease suspected in one patient. Combined proton and photon radiation theory was based on three-dimensional (3-D) planning, consisting of fractionated treatment, one fraction per day at 1.8 CGE (cobalt-gray equivalent) to total target doses of 57.6, 57.6, 59.4, and 61.2 Gy/CGE. Results: With observation times of 3.1 years, 3.3, 5.3, and 5.8 years, all four patients were alive and well and remained locally controlled without evidence of recurrent disease. Except for one patient with partial pituitary insufficiency following radiotherapy for sellar recurrent disease, thus far no late effects attributable to radiation therapy have been observed. Conclusions: 3-D conformal radiation therapy offers a realistic chance of tumor control for aggressive giant cell tumor in the skull base, either postoperatively or at time of recurrence. Conformal treatment techniques allow the safe delivery of relatively high radiation doses in the pediatric patient without apparent increase of side effects. (orig.)

  17. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using robotic radiotherapy: a dosimetric comparison with tomotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Rault, Erwann; Lacornerie, Thomas; Dang, Hong-Phuong; Crop, Frederik; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick; Pasquier, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) is a new breast treatment modality aiming to reduce treatment time using hypo fractionation. Compared to conventional whole breast irradiation that takes 5 to 6 weeks, APBI is reported to induce worse cosmetic outcomes both when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). These late normal tissue effects may be attributed to the dose volume effect because a large portion of the no...

  18. Biological modelling of fuzzy target volumes in 3D radiotherapy

    Purpose/Objective: The outcome of each radiotherapy depends critically on the optimal choice of the target volume. The goal of the radiotherapist is to include all tumor spread at the same time as saving as much healthy tissue as possible. Even when the information of all imaging modalities is combined, the diagnostic techniques are not sensitive and specific enough to visualize all microscopic tumor cell spread. Due to this lack of information there is room for different interpretations concerning the extend of the target volume, leading to a fuzzy target volume. The aim of this work is to develop a model to score different target volume boundaries within the region of diagnostic uncertainty in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Materials and Methods: In order to assess the region of diagnostic uncertainty, the radiotherapist defines interactively a minimal planning target volume that absolutely must be irradiated according to the diagnostic information available and a maximal planning target volume outside which no tumor cell spread is expected. For the NTCP calculation we use the Lyman 4 parameter model to estimate the response of an organ at risk to a uniform partial volume irradiation. The TCP calculation is based on the Poisson model of cell killing. The TCP estimation depends not only on volume, dose, clonogenic cell density and the α parameter of the linear quadratic model but also on the probability to find clonogenic cells in the considered volume. Inside the minimal PTV this probability is 1, outside the maximal PTV it is 0. Therefore all voxels inside the minimal PTV are assigned the value of 1 with respect to the target volume, all voxels outside the maximal PTV the value of 0. For voxels in the region of uncertainty in between, a 3D linear interpolation is performed. Here we assume the probability to follow the interpolated values. Starting with the minimal PTV, the expected gain in TCP and

  19. Análise comparativa dos histogramas de dose e volume entre planejamentos tridimensionais conformados e convencionais não conformados na radioterapia do câncer de próstata Comparative analysis of dose-volume histograms between 3D conformal and conventional non-conformal radiotherapy plannings for prostate cancer

    Sílvia Moreira Feitosa

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar, comparativamente, doses de radiação em volumes alvos e órgãos de risco entre planejamentos conformados e não conformados em pacientes com câncer de próstata. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: No presente trabalho foram analisados planejamentos de 40 pacientes portadores de câncer de próstata. Foram realizados planejamentos conformados, não conformados isocêntricos e não conformados utilizando a distância fonte-superfície, simulados para cada caso, para comparação das doses em volumes alvos e órgãos de risco. Para a comparação foram analisados os histogramas de dose e volume para volumes alvos e órgãos de risco. RESULTADOS: As medianas das doses foram significativamente menores no planejamento conformado analisando-se os seguintes volumes no reto: 25%, 40% e 60%. As medianas das doses foram significativamente menores no planejamento conformado analisando-se os seguintes volumes na bexiga: 30% e 60%. As doses medianas foram significativamente menores no planejamento conformado analisando-se as articulações coxofemorais direita e esquerda. As doses máximas, médias e medianas no volume alvo clínico e no volume alvo planejado foram significativamente maiores no planejamento conformado. CONCLUSÃO: O presente estudo demonstrou que por meio do planejamento conformado em pacientes com câncer de próstata é possível entregar doses maiores no volume alvo e doses menores em órgãos de risco.OBJECTIVE: The present study was aimed at comparing conformal and non-conformal radiotherapy plans designed for patients with prostate cancer, by analyzing radiation doses in target volumes and organs at risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Radiotherapy plans for 40 patients with prostate cancer were analyzed. Conformal, conformal isocentric and non-conformal plans utilizing the source-surface distance were simulated for each of the patients for comparison of radiation dose in target volumes and organs at risk. For comparison purposes

  20. Indications for quality assurance in conformal radiotherapy in Italy

    Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) is an advanced and promising technique of external beam irradiation. IMRT is able to conform the dose distribution to the 3D tumour shape also for complex geometries, preserving surrounding normal tissues and reducing the probability of side effects. IMRT is a time consuming and complex technique and its use demands high level quality assurance. It is, therefore, very important to define conditions for its utilization. Professionals of Radiotherapy Centres, with experience in the IMRT use, have constituted a multidisciplinary working group with the aim of developing indications in this field. Purpose of the present document is to highlight relevant aspects of the technique, but also to underline the high complexity of the technique, whose implementation requires extreme attention of the staff of Radiotherapy Centres involved

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy for gallbladder cancer: A dosimetric comparison of conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Xiao-Nan Sun; Qi Wang; Ben-Xing Gu; Yan-Hong Zhu; Jian-Bin Hu; Guo-Zhi Shi; Shu Zheng

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the efficacy and toxicity of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) and compare with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of gallbladder cancer.METHODS: Between November 2003 and January 2010, 20 patients with gallbladder cancer were treated with CRT with or without chemotherapy after surgical resection. Preliminary survival data were collected and examined using both Kaplan-Meier and actuarial analysis. Demographic and treatment parameters were collected. All patients were planned to receive 46-56 Gy in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction. CRT planning was compared with IMRT.RESULTS: The most common reported acute toxicities requiring medication (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade2) were nausea (10/20 patients) and diarrhea (3/20).There were no treatment-related deaths. Compared with CRT planning, IMRT significantly reduced the volume of right kidney receiving > 20 Gy and the volume of liver receiving > 30 Gy. IMRT has a negligible impact on the volume of left kidney receiving > 20 Gy. The 95% of prescribed dose for a planning tumor volume using either 3D CRT or IMRT planning were 84.0% ±6.7%, 82.9% ± 6.1%, respectively (P > 0.05).CONCLUSION: IMRT achieves similar excellent target coverage as compared with CRT planning, while reducingthe mean liver dose and volume above threshold dose. IMRT offers better sparing of the right kidney compared with CRT planning, with a significantly lower mean dose and volume above threshold dose.

  2. Comparative study of convolution, superposition, and fast superposition algorithms in conventional radiotherapy, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques for various sites, done on CMS XIO planning system

    Muralidhar K; Murthy Narayana; Raju Alluri; Sresty NVNM

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetry results that are obtained by using Convolution, Superposition and Fast Superposition algorithms in Conventional Radiotherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) for different sites, and to study the suitability of algorithms with respect to site and technique. For each of the Conventional, 3D-CRT, and IMRT techniques, four different sites, namely, Lung, Esophagus, Prostate, and Hypoph...

  3. A dose-volume intercomparison of volumetric-modulated arc therapy, 3D static conformal, and rotational conformal techniques for portal vein tumor thrombus in hepatocellular carcinoma

    We created volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans for portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) in hepatocellular carcinoma, and compared the results with those from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and rotational conformal radiotherapy (R-CRT) plans. CT scan data from 10 consecutive patients with PVTT treated with 3D-CRT between January 2008 and January 2010 were utilized in the analysis. We analyzed the dosimetric properties of the plans for the 10 patients using the three different techniques with three different isocenter doses of 50, 56 and 60 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. The D95, Dmean, homogeneity index and conformity index were compared for the planning target volume (PTV). The Dmean, V20 and V30 were also compared for normal livers. The monitor units (MUs) and the treatment time were also evaluated. The normal liver V30 for VMAT was significantly less than that for 3D-CRT for the prescribed doses of 56 and 60 Gy (P<0.05). It was also found that the normal liver V30 resulting from 3D-CRT was prohibitively increased when the prescribed dose was increased in two steps. For PTV D95, we found no significant differences between the three techniques for the 50- and 56-Gy prescriptions, or between VMAT and the other techniques for the 60-Gy prescription. The differences in the MUs and treatment times were not statistically significant between VMAT and 3D-CRT. We have demonstrated that VMAT may be a more advantageous technique for dose escalation reaching 60 Gy in the treatment of PVTT due to the reduced normal liver V30. (author)

  4. The impact of flattening-filter-free beam technology on 3D conformal RT

    The removal of the flattening filter (FF) leads to non-uniform fluence distribution with a considerable increase in dose rate. It is possible to adapt FFF beams (flattening-filter-free) in 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT) by using field in field techniques (FiF). The aim of this retrospective study is to clarify whether the quality of 3D CRT plans is influenced by the use of FFF beams. This study includes a total of 52 CT studies of RT locations that occur frequently in clinical practice. Dose volume targets were provided for the PTV of breast (n=13), neurocranium (n=11), lung (n=7), bone metastasis (n=10) and prostate (n=11) in line with ICRU report 50/62. 3D CRT planning was carried out using FiF methods. Two clinically utilized photon energies are used for a Siemens ARTISTE linear accelerator in FFF mode at 7MVFFF and 11MVFFF as well as in FF mode at 6MVFF and 10MVFF. The plan quality in relation to the PTV coverage, OAR (organs at risk) and low dose burden as well as the 2D dosimetric verification is compared with FF plans. No significant differences were found between FFF and FF plans in the mean dose for the PTV of breast, lung, spine metastasis and prostate. The low dose parameters V5Gy and V10Gy display significant differences for FFF and FF plans in some subgroups. The DVH analysis of the OAR revealed some significant differences. Significantly more fields (1.9 – 4.5) were necessary in the use of FFF beams for each location (p<0.0001) in order to achieve PTV coverage. All the tested groups displayed significant increases (1.3 – 2.2 times) in the average number of necessary MU with the use of FFF beams (p<0.001). This study has shown that the exclusive use of a linear accelerator in FFF mode is feasible in 3D CRT. It was possible to realize RT plans in comparable quality in typical cases of clinical radiotherapy. The 2D dosimetric validation of the modulated fields verified the dose calculation and thus the correct reproduction of the

  5. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  6. Transitioning from 2-D Radiation Therapy to 3-D Conformal Radiation Therapy and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Training Material

    The technology of radiation oncology has advanced very rapidly in recent years. However, the sophistication of technology available in individual radiation therapy centres varies dramatically throughout the world. Treatment capabilities with planar imaging and limited cross-sectional imaging support have been labelled as two dimensional radiation therapy (2-D RT). With increased use of more advanced cross-sectional imaging, the introduction of more complex dose calculation capabilities for treatment planning and more sophisticated treatment delivery procedures, three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) can be provided. Further sophistication in treatment planning and treatment delivery capabilities enables intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Recognizing that huge disparities exist across the world, and in an attempt to aid in advancing institutional capabilities, the IAEA published ‘Transition from 2-D Radiotherapy to 3-D Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy’ (IAEA-TECDOC-1588) in May 2008. Divided into two parts — on CRT and on IMRT — the publication provides guidelines on the transition from 2-D RT through 3-D CRT to IMRT. It is recognized that 3-D CRT is the standard of care in most radiation treatment processes and that IMRT technologies are still evolving. The publication provides clear guidelines and highlights the milestones to be achieved when transitioning from 2-D RT to 3-D CRT and IMRT. While IAEA-TECDOC-1588 provides comprehensive guidelines and milestones, the present publication provides training materials to aid professionals in the continuing education required for the implementation of more advanced treatment capabilities, especially 3-D CRT. These materials are based on the results of two consultants meetings organized by the IAEA in 2009 and 2010, primarily focused on providing guidance on what training materials were available or needed to be developed, with a special emphasis on transitioning from 2-D

  7. Evaluation of isocenter reproducibility in telemedicine of 3D-radiotherapy treatment planning

    Hirota, Saeko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Kimura, Kouji; Takada, Yoshiki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Kono, Michio [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Soejima, Toshinori; Kodama, Akihisa

    2000-09-01

    To evaluate the utility in telemedicine of Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (tele-3D-RTP) and to examine the accuracy of isocenter reproducibility in its offline trial. CT data of phantoms and patients in the satellite hospital were transferred to our hospital via floppy-disk and 3D-radiotherapy plans were generated by 3D-RTP computer in our hospital. Profile data of CT and treatment beams in the satellite hospital were pre-installed into the computer. Tele-3D-RTPs were performed in 3 phantom plans and 14 clinical plans for 13 patients. Planned isocenters were well reproduced, especially in the immobilized head and neck/brain tumor cases, whose 3D-vector of aberration was 1.96{+-}1.38 (SD) mm. This teletherapy system is well applicable for practical use and can provides cost-reduction through sharing the resources of expensive equipment and radiation oncologists. (author)

  8. Evaluation of isocenter reproducibility in telemedicine of 3D-radiotherapy treatment planning

    To evaluate the utility in telemedicine of Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Treatment Planning (tele-3D-RTP) and to examine the accuracy of isocenter reproducibility in its offline trial. CT data of phantoms and patients in the satellite hospital were transferred to our hospital via floppy-disk and 3D-radiotherapy plans were generated by 3D-RTP computer in our hospital. Profile data of CT and treatment beams in the satellite hospital were pre-installed into the computer. Tele-3D-RTPs were performed in 3 phantom plans and 14 clinical plans for 13 patients. Planned isocenters were well reproduced, especially in the immobilized head and neck/brain tumor cases, whose 3D-vector of aberration was 1.96±1.38 (SD) mm. This teletherapy system is well applicable for practical use and can provides cost-reduction through sharing the resources of expensive equipment and radiation oncologists. (author)

  9. Square root and logarithm of rotors in 3D conformal geometric algebra using polar decomposition

    L. Dorst; R.J. Valkenburg

    2011-01-01

    Conformal transformations are described by rotors in the conformal model of geometric algebra (CGA). In applications there is a need for interpolation of such transformations, especially for the subclass of 3D rigid body motions. This chapter gives explicit formulas for the square root and the logar

  10. Frog: a FRee Online druG 3D conformation generator.

    Leite, T Bohme; Gomes, D; Miteva, M A; Chomilier, J; Villoutreix, B O; Tufféry, P

    2007-07-01

    In silico screening methods based on the 3D structures of the ligands or of the proteins have become an essential tool to facilitate the drug discovery process. To achieve such process, the 3D structures of the small chemical compounds have to be generated. In addition, for ligand-based screening computations or hierarchical structure-based screening projects involving a rigid-body docking step, it is necessary to generate multi-conformer 3D models for each input ligand to increase the efficiency of the search. However, most academic or commercial compound collections are delivered in 1D SMILES (simplified molecular input line entry system) format or in 2D SDF (structure data file), highlighting the need for free 1D/2D to 3D structure generators. Frog is an on-line service aimed at generating 3D conformations for drug-like compounds starting from their 1D or 2D descriptions. Given the atomic constitution of the molecules and connectivity information, Frog can identify the different unambiguous isomers corresponding to each compound, and generate single or multiple low-to-medium energy 3D conformations, using an assembly process that does not presently consider ring flexibility. Tests show that Frog is able to generate bioactive conformations close to those observed in crystallographic complexes. Frog can be accessed at http://bioserv.rpbs.jussieu.fr/Frog.html. PMID:17485475

  11. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    De Wagter, C. [ed.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions.

  12. Conformal Radiotherapy: Physics, Treatment Planning and Verification. Proceedings book

    The goal of conformal radiotherapy is to establish radiation dose distributions that conform tightly to the target volume in view of limiting radiation to normal tissues. Conformal radiotherapy significantly improves both local control and palliation and thus contributes to increase survival and to improve the quality of life. The subjects covered by the symposium include : (1) conformal radiotherapy and multi-leaf collimation; (2) three dimensional imaging; (3) treatment simulation, planning and optimization; (4) quality assurance; and (5) dosimetry. The book of proceedings contains the abstracts of the invited lectures, papers and poster presentations as well as the full papers of these contributions

  13. Intensity modulated radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients: Is it better than three dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    De Sanctis Vitaliana; Bolzan Chiara; D’Arienzo Marco; Bracci Stefano; Fanelli Alessandro; Cox Maria; Valeriani Maurizio; Osti Mattia F; Minniti Giuseppe; Chiacchiararelli Laura; Enrici Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cure rate of early Hodgkin Lymphoma are high and avoidance of late toxicities is of paramount importance. This comparative study aims to assess the normal tissue sparing capability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) versus standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in terms of dose-volume parameters and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for different organs at risk in supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) patients. Methods Ten HL...

  14. Frog2: Efficient 3D conformation ensemble generator for small compounds

    Miteva, Maria A; Guyon, Frederic; Tufféry, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Frog is a web tool dedicated to small compound 3D generation. Here we present the new version, Frog2, which allows the generation of conformation ensembles of small molecules starting from either 1D, 2D or 3D description of the compounds. From a compound description in one of the SMILES, SDF or mol2 formats, the server will return an ensemble of diverse conformers generated using a two stage Monte Carlo approach in the dihedral space. When starting from 1D or 2D description of compounds, Frog...

  15. Dosimetry in brain tumor phantom at 15 MV 3D conformal radiation therapy

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, aggressive, highly malignant and infiltrative of all brain tumors with low rate of control. The main goal of this work was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution into a GBM simulator inside a head phantom exposed to a 15 MV 3D conformal radiation therapy in order to validate internal doses. A head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI) was used on the experiments. Such phantom holds the following synthetic structures: brain and spinal cord, skull, cervical and thoracic vertebrae, jaw, hyoid bone, laryngeal cartilages, head and neck muscles and skin. Computer tomography (CT) of the simulator was taken, capturing a set of contrasted references. Therapy Radiation planning (TPS) was performed based on those CT images, satisfying a 200 cGy prescribed dose split in three irradiation fields. The TPS assumed 97% of prescribed dose cover the prescribed treatment volume (PTV). Radiochromic films in a solid water phantom provided dose response as a function of optical density. Spatial dosimetric distribution was generated by radiochromic film samples at coronal, sagittal-anterior and sagittal-posterior positions, inserted into tumor simulator and brain. The spatial dose profiles held 70 to 120% of the prescribed dose. In spite of the stratified profile, as opposed to the smooth dose profile from TPS, the tumor internal doses were within a 5% deviation from 214.4 cGy evaluated by TPS. 83.2% of the points with a gamma value of less than 1 (3%/3mm) for TPS and experimental values, respectively. At the tumor, measured at coronal section, a few dark spots in the film caused the appearance of outlier points in 13-15% of dose deviation percentage. And, as final conclusion, such dosimeter choice and the physical anthropomorphic and anthropometric phantom provided an efficient method for validating radiotherapy protocols

  16. SU-E-T-393: Investigation of Hot Spots in Tomotherapy 3D Conformal Breast Plan

    Chen, Q; Siebers, J; Khandelwal, S [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the root-cause of hotspots inherent to Tomotherapy static beam 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for breast treatment. ASTRO (ref here) recommends that IMRT be avoided for breast treatments. Despite Tomotherapy's inherent IMRT-like optimization and delivery, our experience at a Tomotherapy-only site has been that Tomotherapy 3DCRT fail to produce a clinically acceptable plan for 79% of our breast patients. Hot-spots have been one of the major obstacles. Methods: Eight lumpectomy patients were planned according to RTOG-1005 specification. Two or four tangential beams were used for 3DCRT breast planning. To spare the contralateral breast and ipsilateral lung, part of the PTV was not covered by the primary beam, yielding adjacent hot-spots. We hypothesize that the planning system creates hotspots adjacent to the cold spots to yield scatter radiation dose compensation in the blocked region. Various phantom and patient setup were used to test the hypothesis. Results: Hot spots outside of PTV in the range of 135% - 174% were observed for patient plan. It is confirmed that the PTV partial block causes the adjacent hot spot. The root cause is the optimizer quadratic objective function over- weighs improving the cold spot. The IMRT flexibility offered by Tomotherapy is counter-productive in static-beam 3DCRT breast treatment. For phantom case, as the Modulation-Factor increases from 1.1 to 5, the hot spot increases from 110% to 300%. Limiting the 3DCRT intensity modulation is shown to produce clinically acceptable plan. Conclusion: Most of the hot spots in Tomotherapy 3DCRT breast plan originate from the planning-system optimizer attempting to cover PTV cold spots rather than from the beam energy. Altering the objective function could improve clinical acceptability of static beam Tomotherapy 3DCRT.

  17. Comparative dosimetric evaluation of three-dimensional conformal and stereotactic radiotherapy for treatment of intracranial tumors

    Aims: To evaluate the dosimetric profile among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for the treatment of intracranial tumors. Materials and methods: Seventeen patients with intra cranial tumors of benign nature or low malignant potential were enrolled and planned for SRT as well as 3D-CRT. Dosimetric comparison between these two plans was done considering the following parameters: Target coverage, conformity index, and heterogeneity index. Results: The dosimetric parameters of the 3D-CRT plans were a little inferior compared with those for the SRT plans. The difference between mean target coverage, mean conformity index and mean heterogeneity index for 3D-CRT and SRT plans was highly significant at P < 0.001 (t = 7.74), P < 0.001 (t = 5.52), and P < 0.01 (t = 3.15) respectively. Conclusion: SRT is a very efficient treatment option for intracranial tumors, in view of better target coverage and conformality compared with 3D-CRT

  18. 3D conformal planning using low segment multi-criteria IMRT optimization

    Khan, Fazal

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate automated multicriteria optimization (MCO)-- designed for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), but invoked with limited segmentation -- to efficiently produce high quality 3D conformal treatment (3D-CRT) plans. Methods: Ten patients previously planned with 3D-CRT were replanned with a low-segment inverse multicriteria optimized technique. The MCO-3D plans used the same number of beams, beam geometry and machine parameters of the corresponding 3D plans, but were limited to an energy of 6 MV. The MCO-3D plans were optimized using a fluence-based MCO IMRT algorithm and then, after MCO navigation, segmented with a low number of segments. The 3D and MCO-3D plans were compared by evaluating mean doses to individual organs at risk (OARs), mean doses to combined OARs, homogeneity indexes (HI), monitor units (MUs), physician preference, and qualitative assessments of planning time and plan customizability. Results: The MCO-3D plans significantly reduced the OAR mean doses and monitor unit...

  19. Metallic stent and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of metallic stent combined with stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (SCRT) for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Methods: Fifty-four patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma were analyzed, including 31 treated with stent plus stereotactic conformal radiotherapy (combined group) and 23 with metallic stent alone (control group). Results: The mean survival time of combined group was 11.1 ± 4.6 months, compared with 5.1 ± 2.8 months of the control group, giving a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion: The combination of metallic stent and stereotactic conformal radiotherapy is more effective than metallic stent alone for unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinoma. (authors)

  20. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors have been demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion have been analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large

  1. Applications of three-dimensional image correlation in conformal radiotherapy

    Van Herk, M.; Gilhuijs, K.; Kwa, S.; Lebesque, J.; Muller, S.; De Munck, J.; Touw, A. [Nederlands Kanker Inst. `Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis`, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kooy, H. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The development of techniques for the registration of CT, MRI and SPECT creates new possibilities for improved target volume definition and quantitative image analysis. The discussed technique is based on chamfer matching and is suitable for automatic 3-D matching of CT with CT, CT with MRI, CT with SPECT and MRI with SPECT. By integrating CT with MRI, the diagnostic qualities of MRI are combined with the geometric accuracy of the planning CT. Significant differences in the delineation of the target volume for brain, head and neck and prostate tumors were demonstrated when using integrated CT and MRI compared with using CT alone. In addition, integration of the planning CT with pre-operative scans improves knowledge of possible tumor extents. By first matching scans based on the bony anatomy and subsequently matching on an organ of study, relative motion of the organ is quantified accurately. In a study with 42 CT scans of 11 patients, magnitude and causes of prostate motion were analysed. The most important motion of the prostate is a forward-backward rotation around a point near the apex caused by rectal volume difference. Significant correlations were also found between motion of the legs and the prostate. By integrating functional images made before and after radiotherapy with the planning CT, the relation between local change of lung function and delivered dose has been quantified accurately. The technique of chamfer matching is a convenient and more accurate alternative for the use of external markers in a CT/SPECT lung damage study. Also, damage visible in diagnostic scans can be related to radiation dose, thereby improving follow-up diagnostics. It can be concluded that 3-D image integration plays an important role in assessing and improving the accuracy of radiotherapy and is therefore indispensable for conformal therapy. However, user-friendly implementation of these techniques remains to be done to facilitate clinical application on a large scale.

  2. SU-E-T-538: Lung SBRT Dosimetric Comparison of 3D Conformal and RapidArc Planning

    Purpose: Dose distributions of RapidArc Plan can be quite different from standard 3D conformal radiation therapy. SBRT plans can be optimized with high conformity or mimic the 3D conformal treatment planning with very high dose in the center of the tumor. This study quantifies the dosimetric differences among 3D conformal plan; flattened beam and FFF beam RapidArc Plans for lung SBRT. Methods: Five lung cancer patients treated with 3D non-coplanar SBRT were randomly selected. All the patients were CT scanned with 4DCT to determine the internal target volume. Abdominal compression was applied to minimize respiratory motion for SBRT patients. The prescription dose was 48 Gy in 4 fractions. The PTV coverage was optimized by two groups of objective function: one with high conformity, another mimicking 3D conformal dose distribution with high dose in the center of PTV. Optimization constraints were set to meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. All VMAT plans were optimized with the RapidArc technique using four full arcs in Eclipse treatment planning system. The RapidArc SBRT plans with flattened 6MV beam and 6MV FFF beam were generated and dosimetric results were compared with the previous treated 3D non-coplanar plans. Results: All the RapidArc plans with flattened beam and FFF beam had similar results for the PTV and OARs. For the high conformity optimization group, The DVH of PTV exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV compared to the 3D non-coplanar plan. However, for the group mimicking the 3D conformal target dose distribution, although the PTV is very similar to the 3D conformal plan, the ITV coverage is better than 3D conformal plan. Conclusion: Due to excellent clinical experiences of 3D conformal SBRT treatment, the Rapid Arc optimization mimicking 3D conformal planning may be suggested for clinical use

  3. Estimating the costs of intensity-modulated and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in Ontario

    Yong, J.H.E.; McGowan, T.; Redmond-Misner, R.; Beca, J.; Warde, P.; Gutierrez, E.; Hoch, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a common treatment for many cancers, but up-to-date estimates of the costs of radiotherapy are lacking. In the present study, we estimated the unit costs of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (imrt) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-crt) in Ontario. Methods An activity-based costing model was developed to estimate the costs of imrt and 3D-crt in prostate cancer. It included the costs of equipment, staff, and supporting infrastructure. The framework was subsequently adapted to estimate the costs of radiotherapy in breast cancer and head-and-neck cancer. We also tested various scenarios by varying the program maturity and the use of volumetric modulated arc therapy (vmat) alongside imrt. Results From the perspective of the health care system, treating prostate cancer with imrt and 3D-crt respectively cost $12,834 and $12,453 per patient. The cost of radiotherapy ranged from $5,270 to $14,155 and was sensitive to analytic perspective, radiation technique, and disease site. Cases of head-and-neck cancer were the most costly, being driven by treatment complexity and fractions per treatment. Although imrt was more costly than 3D-crt, its cost will likely decline over time as programs mature and vmat is incorporated. Conclusions Our costing model can be modified to estimate the costs of 3D-crt and imrt for various disease sites and settings. The results demonstrate the important role of capital costs in studies of radiotherapy cost from a health system perspective, which our model can accommodate. In addition, our study established the need for future analyses of imrt cost to consider how vmat affects time consumption.

  4. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Brennan, Sinead M; Thirion, Pierre; Buckney, Steve; Shea, Carmel O; Armstrong, John

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors. PMID:19931013

  5. Factors Influencing Conformity Index in Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  6. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  7. Investigations on the quality of manual image segmentation in 3D radiotherapy planning

    In 3D radiotherapy planning image segmentation plays an important role in the definition process of target volume and organs at risk. Here, we present a method to quantify the technical precision of the manual image segmentation process. To validate our method we developed a virtual phantom consisting of several geometrical objects of changing form and contrast, which should be contoured by volunteers using the TOMAS tool for manual segmentation of the Heidelberg VOXELPLAN system. The results of this examination are presented. (orig.)

  8. Selection of candidate wells and optimization of conformance treatment design in the Barrancas Field using a 3D conformance simulator

    Crosta, Dante; Elitseche, Luis [Repsol YPF (Argentina); Gutierrez, Mauricio; Ansah, Joe; Everett, Don [Halliburton Argentina S.A., Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2004-07-01

    Minimizing the amount of unwanted water production is an important goal at the Barrancas field. This paper describes a selection process for candidate injection wells that is part of a pilot conformance project aimed at improving vertical injection profiles, reducing water cut in producing wells, and improving ultimate oil recovery from this field. The well selection process is based on a review of limited reservoir information available for this field to determine inter-well communications. The methodology focuses on the best use of available information, such as production and injection history, well intervention files, open hole logs and injectivity surveys. After the candidate wells were selected and potential water injection channels were identified, conformance treatment design and future performance of wells in the selected pilot area were evaluated using a new 3 -D conformance simulator, developed specifically for optimization of the design and placement of unwanted fluid shut-off treatments. Thus, when acceptable history match ing of the pilot area production was obtained, the 3 -D simulator was used to: evaluate the required volume of selected conformance treatment fluid; review expected pressures and rates during placement;. model temperature behavior; evaluate placement techniques, and forecast water cut reduction and incremental oil recovery from the producers in this simulated section of the pilot area. This paper outlines a methodology for selecting candidate wells for conformance treatments. The method involves application of several engineering tools, an integral component of which is a user-friendly conformance simulator. The use of the simulator has minimized data preparation time and allows the running of sensitivity cases quickly to explore different possible scenarios that best represent the reservoir. The proposed methodology provides an efficient means of identifying conformance problems and designing optimized solutions for these individual

  9. Conformal perturbation of off-critical correlators in the 3D Ising universality class

    Caselle, Michele; Magnoli, Nicodemo

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to the impressive progress of conformal bootstrap methods we have now very precise estimates of both scaling dimensions and OPE coefficients for several 3D universality classes. We show how to use this information to obtain similarly precise estimates for off-critical correlators using conformal perturbation. We discuss in particular the $$, $$ and $$ two point functions in the high and low temperature regimes of the 3D Ising model and evaluate the leading and next to leading terms in the $s = t r^{\\Delta_{t}}$ expansion, where $t$ is the reduced temperature. Our results for $$ agree both with Monte Carlo simulations and with a set of experimental estimates of the critical scattering function.

  10. Pelvic Ewing sarcomas. Three-dimensional conformal vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Mounessi, F.S.; Lehrich, P.; Haverkamp, U.; Eich, H.T. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Willich, N. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). RiSK - Registry for the Evaluation of Late Side Effects after Radiotherapy in Childhood and Adolescence; Boelling, T. [Center for Radiation Oncology, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    The goal of the present work was to assess the potential advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) over three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in pelvic Ewing's sarcoma. A total of 8 patients with Ewing sarcoma of the pelvis undergoing radiotherapy were analyzed. Plans for 3D-CRT and IMRT were calculated for each patient. Dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), conformity and homogeneity indices, as well as further parameters were evaluated. Results The average dose coverage values for PTV were comparable in 3D-CRT and IMRT plans. Both techniques had a PTV coverage of V{sub 95} > 98 % in all patients. Whereas the IMRT plans achieved a higher conformity index compared to the 3D-CRT plans (conformity index 0.79 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.19, p = 0.012), the dose distribution across the target volumes was less homogeneous with IMRT planning than with 3D-CRT planning. This difference was statistically significant (homogeneity index 0.11 {+-} 0.03 vs. 0.07 {+-} 0.0, p = 0.035). For the bowel, D{sub mean} and D{sub 1%}, as well as V{sub 2} to V{sub 60} were reduced in IMRT plans. For the bladder and the rectum, there was no significant difference in D{sub mean}. However, the percentages of volumes receiving at least doses of 30, 40, 45, and 50 Gy (V{sub 30} to V{sub 50}) were lower for the rectum in IMRT plans. The volume of normal tissue receiving at least 2 Gy (V{sub 2}) was significantly higher in IMRT plans compared with 3D-CRT, whereas at high dose levels (V{sub 30}) it was significantly lower. Compared to 3D-CRT, IMRT showed significantly better results regarding dose conformity (p = 0.012) and bowel sparing at dose levels above 30 Gy (p = 0.012). Thus, dose escalation in the radiotherapy of pelvic Ewing's sarcoma can be more easily achieved using IMRT. (orig.)

  11. Quality assurance of 3-D conformal radiation therapy for a cooperative group trial - RTOG 3D QA center initial experience

    PURPOSE: 3-D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) holds promise in allowing safe escalation of radiation dose to increase the local control of prostate cancer. Prospective evaluation of this new modality requires strict quality assurance (QA). We report the results of QA review on patients receiving 3DCRT for prostate cancer on a cooperative group trial. MATERIALS and METHODS: In 1993 the NCI awarded the ACR/RTOG and nine institutions an RFA grant to study the use of 3DCRT in the treatment of prostate cancer. A phase I/II trial was developed to: a) test the feasibility of conducting 3DCRT radiation dose escalation in a cooperative group setting; b) establish the maximum tolerated radiation dose that can be delivered to the prostate; and c) quantify the normal tissue toxicity rate when using 3DCRT. In order to assure protocol compliance each participating institution was required to implement data exchange capabilities with the RTOG 3D QA center. The QA center reviews at a minimum the first five case from each participating center and spot checks subsequent submissions. For each case review the following parameters are evaluated: 1) target volume delineation, 2) normal structure delineation, 3) CT data quality, 4) field placement, 5) field shaping, and 6) dose distribution. RESULTS: Since the first patient was registered on August 23, 1994, an additional 170 patients have been accrued. Each of the nine original approved institutions has participated and three other centers have recently passed quality assurance bench marks for study participation. Eighty patients have been treated at the first dose level (68.4 Gy minimum PTV dose) and accrual is currently ongoing at the second dose level (73.8 Gy minimum PTV dose). Of the 124 cases that have undergone complete or partial QA review, 30 cases (24%) have had some problems with data exchange. Five of 67 CT scans were not acquired by protocol standards. Target volume delineation required the submitting institution

  12. Virtual 3D tumor marking-exact intraoperative coordinate mapping improve post-operative radiotherapy

    The quality of the interdisciplinary interface in oncological treatment between surgery, pathology and radiotherapy is mainly dependent on reliable anatomical three-dimensional (3D) allocation of specimen and their context sensitive interpretation which defines further treatment protocols. Computer-assisted preoperative planning (CAPP) allows for outlining macroscopical tumor size and margins. A new technique facilitates the 3D virtual marking and mapping of frozen sections and resection margins or important surgical intraoperative information. These data could be stored in DICOM format (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) in terms of augmented reality and transferred to communicate patient's specific tumor information (invasion to vessels and nerves, non-resectable tumor) to oncologists, radiotherapists and pathologists

  13. Virtual 3D tumor marking-exact intraoperative coordinate mapping improve post-operative radiotherapy

    Essig Harald

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The quality of the interdisciplinary interface in oncological treatment between surgery, pathology and radiotherapy is mainly dependent on reliable anatomical three-dimensional (3D allocation of specimen and their context sensitive interpretation which defines further treatment protocols. Computer-assisted preoperative planning (CAPP allows for outlining macroscopical tumor size and margins. A new technique facilitates the 3D virtual marking and mapping of frozen sections and resection margins or important surgical intraoperative information. These data could be stored in DICOM format (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine in terms of augmented reality and transferred to communicate patient's specific tumor information (invasion to vessels and nerves, non-resectable tumor to oncologists, radiotherapists and pathologists.

  14. Spanish patterns of care for 3D radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Purpose: Curative radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer is a difficult challenge, despite the use of conformal radiotherapy. Optimal three-dimensional delineation of treatment volumes is essential for improvement of local control and for limiting of tissue toxicity. Material and Methods: A planning course on clinical practice of lung cancer was held in Barcelona. A questionnaire was given concerning (1) patient positioning, (2) planning-computed tomography scan, (3) accounting for tumor mobility, (4) investigative-procedure respiration-gated radiotherapy and breath-holding maneuvers, (5) generation of target volumes, (6) treatment planning, and (7) treatment delivery. This questionnaire was made to determine the Spanish application of European recommendations. Results: On the negative side, 1 hospital did not use three-dimensional tools, less than 50% used immobilization devices, and 55.6% used computed tomography slices of greater than 5 mm. On the positive side, 70.4% did not use standard margins for gross target volume derived from a computed tomography scan, 92.6% agreed with the inclusion of Naruke anatomic criteria of 1 cm or more in gross target volume planning, and 75% used V20 to estimate the risk of pneumonitis. Conclusions: This study is the first validation of European recommendations for treatment planning and execution of radiotherapy in lung cancer. The main conclusion is the need to improve the negative aspects determined

  15. Preliminary results of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Keum, Ki Chang; Park, Hee Chul; Seong, Jin Sil; Chang, Sei Kyoung; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Moon, Young Myoung; Kim, Gwi Eon; Suh, Chang Ok [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential role of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. The preliminary results on the efficacy and the toxicity of 3D-CRT are reported. Seventeen patients were enrolled in this study, which was conducted prospectively from January 1995 to June 1997. The exclusion criteria included the presence of extrahepatic metastasis, liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh classification C, tumors occupying more than two thirds of the entire liver, and a performance status of more than 3 on the ECOG scale. Two patients were treated with radiotherapy only while the remaining 15 were treated with combined transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. Radiotherapy was given to the field including the tumor plus a 1.5 cm margin using a 3D-CRT technique. The radiation dose ranged from 36 {approx} 60 Gy (median: 59.4 Gy). Tumor response was based on a radiological examination such as the CT scan, MR imaging, and hepatic artery angiography at 4 {approx} 8 weeks following the completion of treatment. The acute and subacute toxicities were monitored. An objective response was observed in 11 out of 17 patients, giving a response rate of 64.7%. The actuarial survival rate at 2 years was 21.2% from the start of radiotherapy (median survival; 19 months). Six patients developed a distant metastasis consisting of a lung metastasis in 5 patients and bone metastasis in one. The complications related to 3D-CRT were gastro-duodenitis ({>=} grade 2) in 2 patients. There were no treatment related deaths and radiation induced hepatitis. The preliminary results show that 3D-CRT is a reliable and effective treatment modality for primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma compared to other conventional modalities. Further studies to evaluate the definitive role of the 3D-CRT technique in the treatment of primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma are needed.

  16. Preliminary results of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    The purpose of this study was to determine the potential role of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. The preliminary results on the efficacy and the toxicity of 3D-CRT are reported. Seventeen patients were enrolled in this study, which was conducted prospectively from January 1995 to June 1997. The exclusion criteria included the presence of extrahepatic metastasis, liver cirrhosis of Child-Pugh classification C, tumors occupying more than two thirds of the entire liver, and a performance status of more than 3 on the ECOG scale. Two patients were treated with radiotherapy only while the remaining 15 were treated with combined transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. Radiotherapy was given to the field including the tumor plus a 1.5 cm margin using a 3D-CRT technique. The radiation dose ranged from 36 ∼ 60 Gy (median: 59.4 Gy). Tumor response was based on a radiological examination such as the CT scan, MR imaging, and hepatic artery angiography at 4 ∼ 8 weeks following the completion of treatment. The acute and subacute toxicities were monitored. An objective response was observed in 11 out of 17 patients, giving a response rate of 64.7%. The actuarial survival rate at 2 years was 21.2% from the start of radiotherapy (median survival; 19 months). Six patients developed a distant metastasis consisting of a lung metastasis in 5 patients and bone metastasis in one. The complications related to 3D-CRT were gastro-duodenitis (≥ grade 2) in 2 patients. There were no treatment related deaths and radiation induced hepatitis. The preliminary results show that 3D-CRT is a reliable and effective treatment modality for primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma compared to other conventional modalities. Further studies to evaluate the definitive role of the 3D-CRT technique in the treatment of primary unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma are needed

  17. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0–1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  18. CONSERVATIVE TREATMENT IN LOCALLY AND LOCALLY-ADVANCED PROSTATE CANCER USING CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY

    Tkachev Sergey Ivanovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of androgen deprivation and radiotherapy increase the probability of diseases full regresses and survival rate. Modern technical and technological opportunities of 3D CRT allow to increase total dose to prostate up to 72-76Gy vs. radiotherapy of 66-70Gy. In this study we compare the rates of post radiation toxicity and the efficiency of treatment for the patients receiving conventional radiotherapy and 3D CRT. The use of 3D CRT has not only result to increase of 10-years recurrence free survival rate from 74% (I grope to 86,5% (II grope, р=0,01, but also to increase of 10-years overall survival, 70% versus 78,4% (р=0,04. The proposed version of conformal 3D CRT radiation therapy made ​​it possible compared to conventional 2D RT radiation therapy by increasing SOD radiation to the tumor, accuracy and compliance with the quality assurance of radiation therapy significantly reduce rates of recurrence and significantly increase the performance of 10-year overall and disease-free survival.

  19. Building the library of RNA 3D nucleotide conformations using the clustering approach

    Zok Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of known RNA 3D structures contributes to the recognition of various RNA families and identification of their features. These tasks are based on an analysis of RNA conformations conducted at different levels of detail. On the other hand, the knowledge of native nucleotide conformations is crucial for structure prediction and understanding of RNA folding. However, this knowledge is stored in structural databases in a rather distributed form. Therefore, only automated methods for sampling the space of RNA structures can reveal plausible conformational representatives useful for further analysis. Here, we present a machine learning-based approach to inspect the dataset of RNA three-dimensional structures and to create a library of nucleotide conformers. A median neural gas algorithm is applied to cluster nucleotide structures upon their trigonometric description. The clustering procedure is two-stage: (i backbone- and (ii ribose-driven. We show the resulting library that contains RNA nucleotide representatives over the entire data, and we evaluate its quality by computing normal distribution measures and average RMSD between data points as well as the prototype within each cluster.

  20. Influence of CT/MRI Fusion Image on Target Volume and 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Brain Metastasis%CT/MRI诊断影像融合对非小细胞肺癌脑转移瘤靶区及三维适形治疗影响

    杨金山; 魏永兵; 侯超; 李静; 朱瑞霞

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较CT图像和CT/MRI融合图像来源的肺癌脑转移肿瘤靶区,评价CT/MRI融合靶区容积应用于三维适形放射治疗时,对治疗剂量的影响。方法:将20例非小细胞肺癌脑转移患者的增强CT和MRI扫描的图像传送至图像处理工作站,在CT和CT/MRI融合图像上分别勾画GTV和周围重要的器官。每个病例分别在CT图像和CT/MRI融合图像都做1个三维适形放射治疗计划。肿瘤的处方剂量为60 Gy,比较2个治疗计划中肿瘤靶区的95%容积(D95)受照平均剂量、周围正常组织的5%容积(D5)受照平均剂量。结果:CT/MRI融合图像上的肿瘤靶区平均比CT上的肿瘤靶区大21.32%。用CT上勾画的靶区有一部分肿瘤处于低剂量区,CT/MRI融合图像上的靶区D95剂量分布较好,但在周围重要器官的剂量分布较高。结论:CT/MRI融合图像有助于靶区的确定,在三维适形放射治疗计划上的肿瘤靶区剂量分布足够,能提高靶区勾画的准确性,更利于精确放疗的实施。%Objective:To compare the CT images and CT/MRI images fusion sources of lung cancer with brain metastasis tumor target,and to evaluae the effects of dose for treatment on target volume CT/MRI fusion for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. Method:The enhancement CT and MRI scan image of 20 patients with brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer was transfer to image processing workstation,GTV and surrounding vital organs on CT and CT/MRI images fusion was delineated respectively. A three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy plan was done in CT images and CT/MRI fusion images of ach case. Tumor prescription dose was 60 Gy. Compared the average dose of the 95%volume(D95)tumor target,the average dose of the 5%of the normal tissue around of the two treatment plans. Result:The tumor targets of the CT/MRI images fusion was greater than those of the CT tumor targets on average 21.32%. A part of the tumor was

  1. Concurrent gemcitabine and 3D radiotherapy in patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer

    Stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is preferably treated with concurrent schedules of chemoradiotherapy, but none is clearly superior Gemcitabine is a radiosensitizing cytotoxic drug that has been studied in phase 1 and 2 studies in this setting. The aim of this study was to describe outcome and toxicity of low-dose weekly gemcitabine combined with concurrent 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Treatment consisted of two cycles of a cisplatin and gemcitabine followed by weekly gemcitabine 300 mg/m2 during 5 weeks of 3D-CRT, 60 Gy in 5 weeks (hypofractionated-accelerated). Overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment related toxicity according to Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 were assessed. Between February 2002 and August 2008, 318 patients were treated. Median age was 64 years (range 36–86); 72% were male, WHO PS 0/1/2 was 44/53/3%. Median PFS was 15.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 12.9-18.1) and median OS was 24.6 months (95% CI., 21.0-28.1). Main toxicity (CTCAE grade ≥3) was dysphagia (12.6%), esophagitis (9.6%), followed by radiation pneumonitis (3.0%). There were five treatment related deaths (1.6%), two due to esophagitis and three due to radiation pneumonitis. Concurrent low-dose gemcitabine and 3D-CRT provides a comparable survival and toxicity profile to other available treatment schemes for unresectable stage III

  2. A 3D vision approach for correction of patient pose in radiotherapy

    Full text: To develop an approach to quantitatively determine patient surface contours as a pan of an augmented reality system for patient position and posture correction in radiotherapy. The approach is based on a 3D vision method referred to as active stereo with structured light. When a 3D object is viewed with a standard digital camera the depth information along one dimension, the axis parallel to the line of sight, is lost. With the aid of a projected structured light codification pattern, 3D coordinates of the scene can be recovered from a 2D image. Two codification strategies were examined. The spatial encoding method requires a single static pattern, thus enabling dynamic scenes to be captured. Temporal encoding methods require a set of patterns to be successively projected onto the object (see Fig. I), the encoding for each pixel is only complete when the entire series of patterns has been projected. Both methods are investigated in terms of the tradeoffs with regard to convenience, accuracy and acquisition time. The temporal method has shown high sensitivity to surface features on a human phantom even under typical office light conditions. The preliminary accuracy was in the order of millimeters at a distance of I m. The spatial encoding approach is ongoing. The most suitable approach will be integrated into the existing augmented reality system to provide a virtual surface contour of the desired patient position for visual guidance, and quantitative information of offsets between the measured and desired position.

  3. Improving dose homogeneity in routine head and neck radiotherapy with custom 3-D compensation

    Background and purpose: Anatomic contour irregularity and tissue inhomogeneity can lead to significant radiation dose variation across the complex treatment volumes found in the head and neck (HandN) region. This dose inhomogeneity can routinely create focal hot or cold spots of 10-20% despite beam shaping with blocks or beam modification with wedges. Since 1992, we have implemented the routine use of 3-D custom tissue compensators fabricated directly from CT scan contour data obtained in the treatment position in order to improve dose uniformity in patients with tumors of the HandN. Materials and methods: Between July 1992 and January 1997, 160 patients receiving comprehensive HandN radiotherapy had 3-D custom compensators fabricated for their treatment course. Detailed dosimetric records have been analyzed for 30 cases. Dose uniformity across the treatment volume and clinically relevant maximum doses to selected anatomic sub-sites were examined with custom-compensated, uncompensated and optimally-wedged plans. Results: The use of 3-D custom compensators resulted in an average reduction of dose variance across the treatment volume from 19±4% for the uncompensated plans to 5±2% with the use of 3-D compensators. Optimally-wedged plans were variable, but on average a 10±3% dose variance was noted. For comprehensive HandN treatment which encompassed the larynx within the primary field design, the peak doses delivered were reduced by 5-15% with 3-D custom compensation as compared to optimal wedging. Conclusions: The use of 3-D custom tissue compensation can improve dose homogeneity within the treatment volume for HandN cancer patients. Maximum doses to clinically important structures which often receive greater than 105-110% of the prescribed dose are routinely reduced with the use of 3-D custom compensators. Improved dose uniformity across the treatment volume can reduce normal tissue complication profiles and potentially allow for delivery of higher total doses in

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  5. A comparison of 3-D data correlation methods for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is currently used to treat patients who are not good candidates for conventional neurosurgical procedures. For treatments of nonvascular tumor cells, it appears that fractionation offers a radiobiological advantage between tumor and normal tissues. Therefore, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) is preferred because it minimizes normal tissue complications and maximizes local tumor control probability. We have implemented a methodology clinically to perform the noninvasive patient repositioning technique. The 3-D data correlation method for high-precision and multiple fraction stereotactic treatments has been presented. Methods and Materials: Three different optimization algorithms (Hooke and Jeeves optimization, simplex optimization, and simulated annealing optimization) are evaluated to calculate the transformation parameters necessary for FSR. A least-square object function is created to perform the 3-D data matching process. By minimizing the unconstrained object function value the best fit can be approached for the reference 3-D data sets. Simulation shows that these algorithms deliver results that are comparable to the previously published correlation algorithm (singular value decomposition [SVD] method). The advantage for optimization algorithms is easily understood and can be readily implemented by using a personal computer (PC). The mathematical framework provides a tool to calculate the transformation matrix which can be used to adjust patient position for fractionated treatments. Therefore, using these algorithms for a high-precision fractionated treatment is possible without an invasive repeat fixation device and has been implemented clinically. A bite plate system was incorporated to acquire 3-D patient data. With a 3-D digital camera localization device, the patient motion can be followed in real time with the system calibrated to the isocenter. Results: Two types of data sets are utilized to study the

  6. A nanofiber based artificial electronic skin with high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability

    Zhong, Weibin; Liu, Qiongzhen; Wu, Yongzhi; Wang, Yuedan; Qing, Xing; Li, Mufang; Liu, Ke; Wang, Wenwen; Wang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The protuberances composed of intertwined elastic POE nanofibers and PPy@PVA-co-PE nanofibers afford a tunable effective elastic modulus that is capable of capturing varied strains and stresses, thereby contributing to a high sensitivity for pressure sensing. This electronic skin-like sensor demonstrates an ultra-high sensitivity (1.24 kPa-1) below 150 Pa with a detection limit as low as about 1.3 Pa. The pixelated sensor array and a RGB-LED light are then assembled into a circuit and show a feasibility for visual detection of spatial pressure. Furthermore, a nanofiber based proof-of-concept wireless pressure sensor with a bluetooth module as a signal transmitter is proposed and has demonstrated great promise for wireless monitoring of human physiological signals, indicating a potential for large scale wearable electronic devices or e-skin.Pressure sensors with 3D conformability are highly desirable components for artificial electronic skin or e-textiles that can mimic natural skin, especially for application in real-time monitoring of human physiological signals. Here, a nanofiber based electronic skin with ultra-high pressure sensitivity and 3D conformability is designed and built by interlocking two elastic patterned nanofibrous membranes. The patterned membrane is facilely prepared by casting conductive nanofiber ink into a silicon mould to form an array of semi-spheroid-like protuberances. The

  7. 3D conformation of a flexible fiber in a turbulent flow

    Verhille, Gautier; Bartoli, Adrien

    2016-07-01

    A growing number of studies is devoted to anisotropic particles in turbulent flows. In most cases, the particles are assumed to be rigid and their deformations are neglected. We present an adaptation of classical computer vision tools to reconstruct from two different images the 3D conformation of a fiber distorted by the turbulent fluctuations in a von Kármán flow. This technique allows us notably to characterize the fiber deformation by computing the correlation function of the orientation of the tangent vector. This function allows us to tackle the analogy between polymers and flexible fibers proposed by Brouzet et al. (Phys Rev Lett 112(7):074501, 2014). We show that this function depends on an elastic length ℓ _e which characterizes the particle flexibility, as is the case for polymers, but also on the fiber length L, contrary to polymers.

  8. Intensity modulated radiotherapy as neoadjuvant chemoradiation for the treatment of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Outcome analysis and comparison with a 3D-treated patient cohort

    Combs, S.E.; Habermehl, D.; Kessel, K.; Brecht, I. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Bergmann, F.; Schirmacher, P. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Werner, J.; Buechler, M.W. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Surgery; Jaeger, D. [National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Univ. Hospital of Heidelberg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany). Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background: To evaluate outcome after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-RT) as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Materials and methods: In total, 57 patients with LAPC were treated with IMRT and chemotherapy. A median total dose of 45 Gy to the PTV {sub baseplan} and 54 Gy to the PTV {sub boost} in single doses of 1.8 Gy for the PTV {sub baseplan} and median single doses of 2.2 Gy in the PTV {sub boost} were applied. Outcomes were evaluated and compared to a large cohort of patients treated with 3D-RT. Results: Overall treatment was well tolerated in all patients and IMRT could be completed without interruptions. Median overall survival was 11 months (range 5-37.5 months). Actuarial overall survival at 12 and 24 months was 36 % and 8 %, respectively. A significant impact on overall survival could only be observed for a decrease in CA 19-9 during treatment, patients with less pre-treatment CA 19-9 than the median, as well as weight loss during treatment. Local progression-free survival was 79 % after 6 months, 39 % after 12 months, and 13 % after 24 months. No factors significantly influencing local progression-free survival could be identified. There was no difference in overall and progression-free survival between 3D-RT and IMRT. Secondary resectability was similar in both groups (26 % vs. 28 %). Toxicity was comparable and consisted mainly of hematological toxicity due to chemotherapy. Conclusion: IMRT leads to a comparable outcome compared to 3D-RT in patients with LAPC. In the future, the improved dose distribution, as well as advances in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques, may improve the use of IMRT in local dose escalation strategies to potentially improve outcome. (orig.)

  9. Volumetric modulated arc planning for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy using conventional and unflattened photon beams: a dosimetric comparison with 3D technique

    Frequently, three-dimensional (3D) conformal beams are used in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Recently, volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) was introduced as a new treatment modality. VMAT techniques shorten delivery time, reducing the possibility of intrafraction target motion. However dose distributions can be quite different from standard 3D therapy. This study quantifies those differences, with focus on VMAT plans using unflattened photon beams. A total of 15 lung cancer patients previously treated with 3D or VMAT SBRT were randomly selected. For each patient, non-coplanar 3D, coplanar and non-coplanar VMAT and flattening filter free VMAT (FFF-VMAT) plans were generated to meet the same objectives with 50 Gy covering 95% of the PTV. Two dynamic arcs were used in each VMAT plan. The couch was set at ± 5° to the 0° straight position for the two non-coplanar arcs. Pinnacle version 9.0 (Philips Radiation Oncology, Fitchburg WI) treatment planning system with VMAT capabilities was used. We analyzed the conformity index (CI), which is the ratio of the total volume receiving at least the prescription dose to the target volume receiving at least the prescription dose; the conformity number (CN) which is the ratio of the target coverage to CI; and the gradient index (GI) which is the ratio of the volume of 50% of the prescription isodose to the volume of the prescription isodose; as well as the V20, V5, and mean lung dose (MLD). Paired non-parametric analysis of variance tests with post-tests were performed to examine the statistical significance of the differences of the dosimetric indices. Dosimetric indices CI, CN and MLD all show statistically significant improvement for all studied VMAT techniques compared with 3D plans (p < 0.05). V5 and V20 show statistically significant improvement for the FFF-VMAT plans compared with 3D (p < 0.001). GI is improved for the FFF-VMAT and the non-coplanar VMAT plans (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively

  10. 3D in radiotherapy - pushing the dose envelope to improve cure

    Approximately one in four newly diagnosed cancer patients receive radiation in the initial attempt to cure the tumor. In terms of the 1996 cancer incidence data, this comprises more than 350,000 patients. Inasmuch as 25% of these patients initially relapse at primary tumor sites, the issue of improving local control remains a major challenge to the profession. Recent improvements in treatment planning and delivery have enhanced the precision of radiotherapy, but radiation resistance remains a critical issue that confounds the potential for cure in many tumors. Chemical and biological modifiers of the radiation response have provided an approach with clinical promise, but their therapeutic impact remains to be established. Hence, tumor dose escalation continues to represent the most viable approach to improve local control. Recent experience with new conformal radiotherapy techniques has demonstrated that significant tumor dose escalation is feasible with concomitant reduction in normal tissue toxicity. This experience provides the best hope for immediate improvement in the rates of local tumor control. It remains, nonetheless, unclear how far the dose envelope can be pushed and whether this would be sufficient to overcome the problem of local failure. It may turn out that biological modification of the radiation response may still be necessary to provide a maximal control in certain types of tumors

  11. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Rajesh Ashok Kinhikar; Ghadi, Yogesh G.; Priyadarshini Sahoo; Sarbani Ghosh Laskar; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Jaiprakash Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription d...

  12. Modeling simulation and visualization of conformal 3D lung tumor dosimetry

    Lung tumors move during breathing depending on the patient's patho-physiological condition and orientation, thereby compromising the accurate deposition of the radiation dose during radiotherapy. In this paper, we present and validate a computer-based simulation framework to calculate the delivered dose to a 3D moving tumor and its surrounding normal tissues. The computer-based simulation framework models a 3D volumetric lung tumor and its surrounding tissues, simulates the tumor motion during a simulated dose delivery both as a self-reproducible motion and a random motion using the dose extracted from a treatment plan, and predicts the amount and location of radiation doses deposited. A radiation treatment plan of a small lung tumor (1-3 cm diameter) was developed in a commercial planning system (iPlan software, BrainLab, Munich, Germany) to simulate the radiation dose delivered. The dose for each radiation field was extracted from the software. The tumor motion was simulated for varying values of its rate, amplitude and direction within a single breath as well as from one breath to another. Such variations represent the variations in tumor motion induced by breathing variations. During the simulation of dose delivery, the dose on the target was summed to generate the real-time dose to the tumor for each beam independently. The simulation results show that the dose accumulated on the tumor varies significantly with both the tumor size and the tumor's motion rate, amplitude and direction. For a given tumor motion rate, amplitude and direction, the smaller the tumor size the smaller is the percentage of the radiation dose accumulated. The simulation results are validated by comparing the center plane of the 3D tumor with 2D film dosimetry measurements using a programmable 4D motion phantom moving in a self-reproducible pattern. The results also show the real-time capability of the framework at 40 discrete tumor motion steps per breath, which is higher than the

  13. Improving dose homogeneity in head and neck radiotherapy with custom 3-D compensation

    Purpose/Objective: Anatomic contour irregularities and tissue inhomogeneities can lead to significant radiation dose variation across complex treatment volumes. Such dose non-uniformity occurs routinely in radiation of the head and neck (H and N) despite beam shaping with blocks or beam modification with wedges. Small dose variations are amplified by the high total doses delivered (often >70 Gy) which can thereby influence late normal tissue complications as well as tumor control. We have therefore implemented the routine use of 3-D custom tissue compensators for our H and N cancer patients fabricated directly from CT scan contour data obtained in the treatment position. The capacity of such compensators to improve dose uniformity in patients with tumors of the H and N is herein reported. Materials and Methods: Between July 1992 and March 1995, 80 patients receiving H and N radiotherapy had 3-D custom compensators fabricated for their treatment course. Detailed dosimetric records have been reviewed for thirty cases to date (60 custom compensators). Dose uniformity across the treatment volume, peak dose delivery and maximum doses to selected, clinically relevant, anatomic subsites were analyzed and compared with uncompensated and wedged plans. Dose-volume histograms were generated and volumes receiving greater than 5% and 10% of the prescribed dose noted. Phantom dose measurements were performed for compensated fields using a water chamber and were compared to calculated doses in order to evaluate the accuracy of isodoses generated by the Theraplan treatment planning system. Accuracy of the fabrication and positioning of the custom compensators was verified by direct measurement. Results: Custom compensators resulted in an average reduction of dose variance across the treatment volume from 13.8% (7-20%) for the uncompensated plans to 4.5% (2-7%) with the compensators. Wedged plans were variable but on average an 8% (3-15%) dose variance was noted. Maximum doses

  14. Estimate of the damage in organs induced by neutrons in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    By means of Monte Carlo methods was considered the damage in the organs, induced by neutrons, of patients with cancer that receive treatment in modality of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with lineal accelerator Varian Ix. The objective of this work was to estimate the damage probability in radiotherapy patients, starting from the effective dose by neutrons in the organs and tissues out of the treatment region. For that a three-dimensional mannequin of equivalent tissue of 30 x 100 x 30 cm3 was modeled and spherical cells were distributed to estimate the Kerma in equivalent tissue and the absorbed dose by neutrons. With the absorbed dose the effective dose was calculated using the weighting factors for the organ type and radiation type. With the effective dose and the damage factors, considered in the ICRP 103, was considered the probability of damage induction in organs. (Author)

  15. Treatment of left sided breast cancer for a patient with funnel chest: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy vs. 3D-CRT and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    This case study presents a rare case of left-sided breast cancer in a patient with funnel chest, which is a technical challenge for radiation therapy planning. To identify the best treatment technique for this case, 3 techniques were compared: conventional tangential fields (3D conformal radiotherapy [3D-CRT]), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The plans were created for a SynergyS® (Elekta, Ltd, Crawley, UK) linear accelerator with a BeamModulator™ head and 6-MV photons. The planning system was Oncentra Masterplan® v3.3 SP1 (Nucletron BV, Veenendal, Netherlands). Calculations were performed with collapsed cone algorithm. Dose prescription was 50.4 Gy to the average of the planning target volume (PTV). PTV coverage and homogeneity was comparable for all techniques. VMAT allowed reducing dose to the ipsilateral organs at risk (OAR) and the contralateral breast compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT: The volume of the left lung receiving 20 Gy was 19.3% for VMAT, 26.1% for IMRT, and 32.4% for 3D-CRT. In the heart, a D15% of 9.7 Gy could be achieved with VMAT compared with 14 Gy for IMRT and 46 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral breast, D15% was 6.4 Gy for VMAT, 8.8 Gy for IMRT, and 10.2 Gy for 3D-CRT. In the contralateral lung, however, the lowest dose was achieved with 3D-CRT with D10% of 1.7 Gy for 3D-CRT, and 6.7 Gy for both IMRT and VMAT. The lowest number of monitor units (MU) per 1.8-Gy fraction was required by 3D-CRT (192 MU) followed by VMAT (518 MU) and IMRT (727 MU). Treatment time was similar for 3D-CRT (3 min) and VMAT (4 min) but substantially increased for IMRT (13 min). VMAT is considered the best treatment option for the presented case of a patient with funnel chest. It allows reducing dose in most OAR without compromising target coverage, keeping delivery time well below 5 minutes

  16. New customized patient repositioning system for use in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and radiotherapy

    Purpose/Objective: To develop a safe and easy method for customized patient repositioning and immobilization prior to 3-D treatment planning and during precise radiotherapy. Materials and methods: The new material consists of impression material, and covering material to fix and hold the impression. The impression material is composed of numerous effervescent polystyrene beads (3.1 mm in diameter) coated by polymerizing substance, urethane prepolymer. When being wet, the material beads adhere to each other due to polymelization, and it is hardened in 5 to 10 minutes. Within one hour the mold is sufficiently dry to be used for treatment planning utilizing computed tomography(CT). The physical characteristics of the material, the subjective comfort of the patient, the reduction in time required for repositioning in the treatment of the head and neck tumors, and the reduction in patient movement in the treatment of the breast cancers were investigated. Results: During the hardening stage, the maximum temperature of the material was 33 deg. C. Non-toxic CO2 gas was produced and evaporated from the covering fabric. The mold, with a density of 0.095, was strong enough to endure compression, flexure, and scratching. In the healthy volunteers, no sensitivity to the skin was observed after 12 hours' attachment to the skin. The CT number of the material was less than minus 800, and no build-up effect was demonstrated in megavoltage photon therapy. Various molds were made and used as neck rest adjunctive to thermoplastic face mask, whole body cast, and arm rest (Figure). A questionnaire survey administered to 59 patients with brain, head and neck tumors, and to 18 patients with breast cancers, revealed that subjective comfort was markedly improved (90.9%) of improved (9.1%) by virtue of the new material. In the treatment of head and neck tumors, the mean time and SD for repositioning were 61.1 ± 13.6 seconds with the ready-made neck-rest and 49.4 ± 8.4 seconds with the

  17. A comparison of 3-D data correlation methods for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR)

    Purpose/Objective: Stereotactic Radiosurgery is currently used to treat patients who are not good candidates for conventional neurosurgical procedures. For treatments of nonvascular tumor cells, it appears that fractionation will offer a radiological advantage between tumor and normal tissues. Therefore, Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy (FSR) is preferred because it minimizes normal tissue complications and maximizes local tumor control probability. We have implemented a methodology clinically to perform the non-invasive patient repositioning technique. The 3-D data correlation method for high precision and multiple fraction stereotactic treatments has been presented. Materials and Methods: Three different optimization algorithms (Hooke and Jeeves optimization, Simplex optimization, and Simulated Annealing optimization) are evaluated to calculate the transformation parameters necessary for FSR. These algorithms are based on rigid body transformation in which the patient surfaces are considered as reference. A least-square object function is created to perform the 3-D data matching process. By minimizing the unconstrained object function value the best fit can be approached for the reference 3-D data sets. Simulation shows that these algorithms give results which are comparable to the previously published correlation algorithm (Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) method). The advantage is that these algorithms are easily understood and can be readily implemented using a personal computer. The mathematical framework provides a tool to calculate the transformation matrix which can be used to adjust patient position for fractionated treatment. Therefore, using these algorithms for a high precision fractionated treatment is possible without invasive repeat fixation device. A bite plate system was incorporated to acquire 3-D patient data. With 3-D digital camera localization device, the patient motion can be followed in real time with the system calibrated to the

  18. Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy for pancreatic malignancies: Dosimetric comparison with sliding-window intensity-modulated radiotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Nabavizadeh, Nima, E-mail: nabaviza@ohsu.edu; Simeonova, Anna O.; Waller, Joseph G.; Romer, Jeanna L.; Monaco, Debra L.; Elliott, David A.; Tanyi, James A.; Fuss, Martin; Thomas, Charles R.; Holland, John M.

    2014-10-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) is an iteration of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), both of which deliver highly conformal dose distributions. Studies have shown the superiority of VMAT and IMRT in comparison with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs-at-risk (OARs) sparing. This is the first study examining the benefits of VMAT in pancreatic cancer for doses more than 55.8 Gy. A planning study comparing 3D-CRT, IMRT, and VMAT was performed in 20 patients with pancreatic cancer. Treatments were planned for a 25-fraction delivery of 45 Gy to a large field followed by a reduced-volume 8-fraction external beam boost to 59.4 Gy in total. OARs and PTV doses, conformality index (CI) deviations from 1.0, monitor units (MUs) delivered, and isodose volumes were compared. IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 for the large-field and the boost plans were equivalent (large field: 0.032 and 0.046, respectively; boost: 0.042 and 0.037, respectively; p > 0.05 for all comparisons). Both IMRT and VMAT CI deviations from 1.0 were statistically superior to 3D-CRT (large field: 0.217, boost: 0.177; p < 0.05 for all comparisons). VMAT showed reduction of the mean dose to the boost PTV (VMAT: 61.4 Gy, IMRT: 62.4 Gy, and 3D-CRT: 62.3 Gy; p < 0.05). The mean number of MUs per fraction was significantly lower for VMAT for both the large-field and the boost plans. VMAT delivery time was less than 3 minutes compared with 8 minutes for IMRT. Although no statistically significant dose reduction to the OARs was identified when comparing VMAT with IMRT, VMAT showed a reduction in the volumes of the 100% isodose line for the large-field plans. Dose escalation to 59.4 Gy in pancreatic cancer is dosimetrically feasible with shorter treatment times, fewer MUs delivered, and comparable CIs for VMAT when compared with IMRT.

  19. Influence of 3D-CRT pelvic irradiation on outcome in prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy

    Purpose: The role of pelvic irradiation (PRT) in the treatment of prostate cancer remains unclear. We reviewed our institution's experience with three-dimensional conformal external beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT) during the prostate-specific antigen era to determine the influence of PRT on the risk of biochemical recurrence in patients who have a predicted risk of lymph node involvement. Methods and Materials: Between March 1985 and January 2001, 1832 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive 3D-CRT. All treatments involved CT planning to ensure coverage of the intended targets. Treatment consisted of prostate-only treatment, prostate and seminal vesicle treatment, or PRT of lymph nodes at risk followed by a boost. To create relatively homogenous analysis groups, each patient's percentage of risk of lymph node (%rLN) involvement was assigned by matching the patient's T stage, Gleason score, and initial prostate-specific antigen level to the appropriate value as described in the updated Partin tables. Three categories of %rLN involvement were defined: low, 0-5%; intermediate, >5-15%; and high, >15%. Biochemical recurrence was defined as the first occurrence of either the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition of prostate-specific antigen failure or the initiation of salvage hormonal therapy for any reason. Results: The risk status (%rLN) could be determined for 709 low-risk, 263 intermediate-risk, and 309 high-risk patients. The actuarial freedom from biochemical recurrence (bNED) and the log-rank test for the similarity of the control and treatment survival functions are reported for each risk group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for the entire population treated with PRT, with a relative risk reduction of 0.72 (95% confidence interval 0.54-0.97). Although the multivariate analysis could not determine the patient population that would most benefit from

  20. Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Delivery of Prostate Radiotherapy: Comparison With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel form of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) optimization that allows the radiation dose to be delivered in a single gantry rotation of up to 360o, using either a constant dose rate (cdr-VMAT) or variable dose rate (vdr-VMAT) during rotation. The goal of this study was to compare VMAT prostate RT plans with three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and IMRT plans. Patients and Methods: The 3D-CRT, five-field IMRT, cdr-VMAT, and vdr-VMAT RT plans were created for 10 computed tomography data sets from patients undergoing RT for prostate cancer. The parameters evaluated included the doses to organs at risk, equivalent uniform doses, dose homogeneity and conformality, and monitor units required for delivery of a 2-Gy fraction. Results: The IMRT and both VMAT techniques resulted in lower doses to normal critical structures than 3D-CRT plans for nearly all dosimetric endpoints analyzed. The lowest doses to organs at risk and most favorable equivalent uniform doses were achieved with vdr-VMAT, which was significantly better than IMRT for the rectal and femoral head dosimetric endpoints (p < 0.05) and significantly better than cdr-VMAT for most bladder and rectal endpoints (p < 0.05). The vdr-VMAT and cdr-VMAT plans required fewer monitor units than did the IMRT plans (relative reduction of 42% and 38%, respectively; p = 0.005) but more than for the 3D-CRT plans (p = 0.005). Conclusion: The IMRT and VMAT techniques achieved highly conformal treatment plans. The vdr-VMAT technique resulted in more favorable dose distributions than the IMRT or cdr-VMAT techniques, and reduced the monitor units required compared with IMRT

  1. Monte Carlo methods for direct calculation of 3D dose distributions for photon fields in radiotherapy

    Even with state of the art treatment planning systems the photon dose calculation can be erroneous under certain circumstances. In these cases Monte Carlo methods promise a higher accuracy. We have used the photon transport code CHILD of the GSF-Forschungszentrum, which was developed to calculate dose in diagnostic radiation protection matters. The code was refined for application in radiotherapy for high energy photon irradiation and should serve for dose verification in individual cases. The irradiation phantom can be entered as any desired 3D matrix or be generated automatically from an individual CT database. The particle transport takes into account pair production, photo, and Compton effect with certain approximations. Efficiency is increased by the method of 'fractional photons'. The generated secondary electrons are followed by the unscattered continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA). The developed Monte Carlo code Monaco Matrix was tested with simple homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms through comparisons with simulations of the well known but slower EGS4 code. The use of a point source with a direction independent energy spectrum as simplest model of the radiation field from the accelerator head is shown to be sufficient for simulation of actual accelerator depth dose curves. Good agreement (<2%) was found for depth dose curves in water and in bone. With complex test phantoms and comparisons with EGS4 calculated dose profiles some drawbacks in the code were found. Thus, the implementation of the electron multiple-scattering should lead us to step by step improvement of the algorithm. (orig.)

  2. An ill-conditioning conformal radiotherapy analysis based on singular values decomposition

    Clinical experience in stereotactic radiotherapy of irregular complex lesions had shown that optimization algorithms were necessary to improve the dose distribution. We have developed a general optimization procedure which can be applied to different conformal irradiation techniques. In this presentation this procedure is tested on the stereotactic radiotherapy modality of complex cerebral lesions treated with multi-isocentric technique based on the 'associated targets methodology'. In this inverse procedure we use the singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis which proposes several optimal solutions for the narrow beams weights of each isocentre. The SVD analysis quantifies the ill-conditioning of the dosimetric calculation of the stereotactic irradiation, using the condition number which is the ratio of the bigger to smaller singular values. Our dose distribution optimization approach consists on the study of the irradiation parameters influence on the stereotactic radiotherapy inverse problem. The adjustment of the different irradiation parameters into the 'SVD optimizer' procedure is realized taking into account the ratio of the quality reconstruction to the time calculation. It will permit a more efficient use of the 'SVD optimizer' in clinical applications for real 3D lesions. The evaluation criteria for the choice of satisfactory solutions are based on the dose-volume histograms and clinical considerations. We will present the efficiency of ''SVD optimizer'' to analyze and predict the ill-conditioning in stereotactic radiotherapy and to recognize the topography of the different beams in order to create optimal reconstructed weighting vector. The planification of stereotactic treatments using the ''SVD optimizer'' is examined for mono-isocentrically and complex dual-isocentrically treated lesions. The application of the SVD optimization technique provides conformal dose distribution for complex intracranial lesions. It is a general optimization procedure

  3. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV ≤2 cm3), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to ≤100 cm3), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm3), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors

  4. MO-H-19A-03: Patient Specific Bolus with 3D Printing Technology for Electron Radiotherapy

    Zou, W; Swann, B; Siderits, R; McKenna, M; Khan, A; Yue, N; Zhang, M [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Fisher, T [Memorial Medical Center, Modesto, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Bolus is widely used in electron radiotherapy to achieve desired dose distribution. 3D printing technologies provide clinicians with easy access to fabricate patient specific bolus accommodating patient body surface irregularities and tissue inhomogeneity. This study presents the design and the clinical workflow of 3D printed bolus for patient electron therapy in our clinic. Methods: Patient simulation CT images free of bolus were exported from treatment planning system (TPS) to an in-house developed software package. Bolus with known material properties was designed in the software package and then exported back to the TPS as a structure. Dose calculation was carried out to examine the coverage of the target. After satisfying dose distribution was achieved, the bolus structure was transferred in Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file format for the 3D printer to generate the machine codes for printing. Upon receiving printed bolus, a quick quality assurance was performed with patient resimulated with bolus in place to verify the bolus dosimetric property before treatment started. Results: A patient specific bolus for electron radiotherapy was designed and fabricated in Form 1 3D printer with methacrylate photopolymer resin. Satisfying dose distribution was achieved in patient with bolus setup. Treatment was successfully finished for one patient with the 3D printed bolus. Conclusion: The electron bolus fabrication with 3D printing technology was successfully implemented in clinic practice.

  5. MO-H-19A-03: Patient Specific Bolus with 3D Printing Technology for Electron Radiotherapy

    Purpose: Bolus is widely used in electron radiotherapy to achieve desired dose distribution. 3D printing technologies provide clinicians with easy access to fabricate patient specific bolus accommodating patient body surface irregularities and tissue inhomogeneity. This study presents the design and the clinical workflow of 3D printed bolus for patient electron therapy in our clinic. Methods: Patient simulation CT images free of bolus were exported from treatment planning system (TPS) to an in-house developed software package. Bolus with known material properties was designed in the software package and then exported back to the TPS as a structure. Dose calculation was carried out to examine the coverage of the target. After satisfying dose distribution was achieved, the bolus structure was transferred in Standard Tessellation Language (STL) file format for the 3D printer to generate the machine codes for printing. Upon receiving printed bolus, a quick quality assurance was performed with patient resimulated with bolus in place to verify the bolus dosimetric property before treatment started. Results: A patient specific bolus for electron radiotherapy was designed and fabricated in Form 1 3D printer with methacrylate photopolymer resin. Satisfying dose distribution was achieved in patient with bolus setup. Treatment was successfully finished for one patient with the 3D printed bolus. Conclusion: The electron bolus fabrication with 3D printing technology was successfully implemented in clinic practice

  6. A custom made phantom for dosimetric audit and quality assurance of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    The ultimate check of the actual dose delivered to a patient in radiotherapy can be achieved by using dosimetric measurements. The aims of this study were to develop and evaluate a custom handmade head and neck phantom for evaluation of Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) dose planning and delivery. A phantom of head and neck region of a medium built male patient with nasopharyngeal cancer was constructed from Perspex material. Primary and secondary Planning Target Volume (PTV) and twelve Organs at Risk (OAR) were delineated using Treatment Planning System (TPS) guided by computed tomography printout transverse images. One hundred and seven (107) holes distributed among the organs were loaded with Rod-shaped Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF:Mg, Ti TLDs) after common and individual calibration. Head and neck phantom was imaged, planned and irradiated conformally (3D-CRT) by linear accelerator (LINAC Siemens Artiste). The planned predicted doses by TPS at PTV and OAR regions were obtained and compared with the TLD measured doses using the phantom. Repeated TLD measurements were reproducible with a percent standard deviation of < 3.5 %. Moreover, the average of dose discrepancies between TLDs reading and TPS predicted doses were found to be < 5.3 %. The phantom's preliminary results have proved to be a valuable tool for 3D-CRT treatment dose verification. (author)

  7. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: Evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity

    During the past few years the concept of cranial sterotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3%±2.3% (lung), 95.0%±4.5% (liver), and 92.1%±5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73±0.09 (lung), 0.77±0.10 (liver), and 0.70±0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields. (orig.)

  8. Conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation of pediatrics tumors

    The objective of this study is to take stock on the validated and potential indications of the conformal radiotherapy with intensity modulation ( intensity modulated radiotherapy I.M.R.T.) in pediatrics and to propose recommendations for its use as well as the adapted dose constraints. About 40 to 50% of children treated for a cancer are irradiated. The I.M.R.T., by linear accelerator or helical tomo-therapy has for aim to give a homogenous dose to the target volume and to save organs at risk. Its use in pediatrics seems particularly interesting because of the complexity of target volumes and the closeness of organs at risk. In compensation for these positive elements, the importance of low doses irradiation given in big volumes makes fear event consequences on growth and an increased incidence of secondary cancers in children suffering from tumors with high cure rates and long life expectancy. (N.C.)

  9. 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy: Multimedia Introduction to Methods and Techniques

    W Schlegel and A Mahr Berlin: Springer (2001) 107 Euros, ISBN: 3-540-14884-1. This book on CD-ROM, written by Wolfgang Schlegel and Andreas Mahr of the Radiation Physics Department of the Deutsches Krebsforschungzentrum (DKFZ) in Heidelberg, is extensive and comprehensive. It covers almost all issues of 3D conformal therapy, including the most recent developments. It is very useful as an introduction for physicists new to the field of radiation therapy and it also has its value as a reference guide for experienced medical physicists. It is particularly useful as a source of illustrations for those teaching in radiation therapy. In general the book is well written and the material is well organized. The contents of the different chapters are not very well balanced, however. Some subjects are discussed quite extensively, while others are treated very briefly. The authors explain in the introduction that the emphasis will be on the work performed at the DKFZ and that comprehensiveness was not a primary concern. Nevertheless some paragraphs could be more extensive, whereas in some paragraphs less detail would be preferable. In most cases the figures and movies illustrate the subject well and the movies in particular are often very instructive. Some of the movies, however, do not really contribute to the understanding of the subject and could be omitted. On the other hand in some paragraphs there is a lack of illustrations. The presentation on CD-ROM has great advantages as compared to a conventional book. One can navigate around easily, connections between chapters and paragraphs are easily made (via links) and one can jump directly to the reference list and back. The option of interactive illustrations and movies is a unique and nice feature. A 'find' option would be a very helpful extra to locate information. Part I on CRT with photon and electron beams starts with a chapter on immobilization with emphasis on stereotactic treatments, followed by a chapter on imaging

  10. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 μg/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 μg/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles

  11. 3-D conformal treatment of prostate cancer to 74 Gy vs. high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: A cross-sectional quality-of-life survey

    Vordermark, Dirk [Univ. of Wuerzburg (DE). Dept. of Radiation Oncology] (and others)

    2006-09-15

    The effects of two modalities of dose-escalated radiotherapy on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were compared. Forty-one consecutive patients were treated with a 3-D conformal (3-DC) boost to 74 Gy, and 43 with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost (2x9 Gy), following 3-D conformal treatment to 46 Gy. Median age was 70 years in both groups, median initial PSA was 7.9 {mu}g/l in 3-DC boost patients and 8.1 {mu}g/l in HDR boost patients. Stage was 7 in 52% and 47%, respectively. HRQOL was assessed cross-sectionally using EORTC QLQ-C30 and organ-specific PR25 modules 3-32 (median 19) and 4-25 (median 14) months after treatment, respectively. Questionnaires were completed by 93% and 97% of patients, respectively. Diarrhea and insomnia scores were significantly increased in both groups. In the PR25 module, scores of 3-DC boost and HDR boost patients for urinary, bowel and treatment-related symptoms were similar. Among responders, 34% of 3-DC boost patients and 86% of HDR boost patients had severe erectile problems. Dose escalation in prostate cancer by either 3-DC boost to 74 Gy or HDR brachytherapy boost appears to result in similar HRQOL profiles.

  12. Comparison of radiotherapy dosimetry for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on electron density calibration

    Kartutik, K.; Wibowo, W. E.; Pawiro, S. A.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate calculation of dose distribution affected by inhomogeneity tissue is required in radiotherapy planning. This study was performed to determine the ratio between radiotherapy planning using 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT based on a calibrated curve of CT-number in the lung for different target's shape in 3D-CRT, IMRT, and spinal cord for SBRT. Calibration curves of CT-number were generated under measurement basis and introduced into TPS, then planning was performed for 3D-CRT, IMRT, and SBRT with 7, and 15 radiation fields. Afterwards, planning evaluation was performed by comparing the DVH curve, HI, and CI. 3D-CRT and IMRT produced the lowest HI at calibration curve of CIRS 002LFC with the value 0.24 and 10. Whereas SBRT produced the lowest HI on a linear calibration curve with a value of 0.361. The highest CI in IMRT and SBRT technique achieved using a linear calibration curve was 0.97 and 1.77 respectively. For 3D-CRT, the highest CI was obtained by using calibration curve of CIRS 062M with the value of 0.45. From the results of CI and HI, it is concluded that the calibration curve of CT-number does not significantly differ with Schneider's calibrated curve, and inverse planning gives a better result than forward planning.

  13. Dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal, IMRT, and V-MAT techniques for accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI)

    Qiu, Jian-Jian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chang, Zheng; Horton, Janet K.; Wu, Qing-Rong Jackie; Yoo, Sua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Yin, Fang-Fang, E-mail: fangfang.yin@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose is to dosimetrically compare the following 3 delivery techniques: 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMRT), and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (V-MAT) in the treatment of accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). Overall, 16 patients with T1/2N0 breast cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (multiple, noncoplanar photon fields) on the RTOG 0413 partial-breast trial. These cases were subsequently replanned using static gantry IMRT and V-MAT technology to understand dosimetric differences among these 3 techniques. Several dosimetric parameters were used in plan quality evaluation, including dose conformity index (CI) and dose-volume histogram analysis of normal tissue coverage. Quality assurance studies including gamma analysis were performed to compare the measured and calculated dose distributions. The IMRT and V-MAT plans gave more conformal target dose distributions than the 3D-CRT plans (p < 0.05 in CI). The volume of ipsilateral breast receiving 5 and 10 Gy was significantly less using the V-MAT technique than with either 3D-CRT or IMRT (p < 0.05). The maximum lung dose and the ipsilateral lung volume receiving 10 (V{sub 10}) or 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) were significantly less with both V-MAT and IMRT (p < 0.05). The IMRT technique was superior to 3D-CRT and V-MAT of low dose distributions in ipsilateral lung (p < 0.05 in V{sub 5} and D{sub 5}). The total mean monitor units (MUs) for V-MAT (621.0 ± 111.9) were 12.2% less than those for 3D-CRT (707.3 ± 130.9) and 46.5% less than those for IMRT (1161.4 ± 315.6) (p < 0.05). The average machine delivery time was 1.5 ± 0.2 minutes for the V-MAT plans, 7.0 ± 1.6 minutes for the 3D-CRT plans, and 11.5 ± 1.9 minutes for the IMRT plans, demonstrating much less delivery time for V-MAT. Based on this preliminary study, V-MAT and IMRT techniques offer improved dose conformity as compared with 3D-CRT techniques without increasing dose to the ipsilateral lung. In

  14. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for boost or salvage treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Purpose: To compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for the boost treatment of new-onset nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) or the salvage treatment of locally recurrent NPC. Methods and Materials: Between January 14 and February 23, 2000, 5-field 3D-CRT treatment plans were generated for 14 consecutive NPC patients using the ADAC Pinnacle planning system in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. The planning data of these patients were later transferred to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, where new IMRT plans, also using 5-7 radiation fields were created for each patient using an inverse treatment planning system. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were compared for all 14 patients. The relationship between the anatomic shapes and locations of targets and the results of different plans were studied. Results: Target doses were more homogeneous in IMRT plans. The average maximal brainstem dose (D05, the dose received by 5% of the brainstem volume) decreased from 30.9% of the prescription dose with 3D-CRT to 15.3% and 14.7% with 5- and 7-field IMRT, respectively (p=0.004 and 0.003, respectively, compared with 3D-CRT, paired Student's t test). Five anatomic factors were found that predicted greater benefits with IMRT. These factors were (1) vertical length of target >7 cm, (2) minimal distance between target and brainstem 0.6 cm, (4) maximal AP overlap of target and spinal cord >1 cm, and (5) vertical overlap of target and eyes >0 cm. For the 7 patients with at least 1 of these 5 anatomic factors, the benefits achieved by IMRT planning would have been greater than the benefits for the other 7 patients (p=0.005, Fisher's exact test). Conclusion: For boost or salvage treatment of NPC, lower normal tissue doses and more homogeneous target doses were achieved with IMRT plans. For NPC patients with at least 1 of the 5 anatomic factors, IMRT is highly recommended

  15. GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    Gu, Xuejun; Jelen, Urszula; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework. Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck cases and 5 lung cases). For all cases, there i...

  16. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for primary hepatic cancer

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for unresectable primary hepatic cancer (PHC). Methods: 117 patients with locally advanced liver cancer were treated by 3DCRT using 8 MV X-ray. The mean gross target volume (GTV) was 478.5 cm3 (30-2015 cm3). Patients received a total dose of 40.0-57.6 Gy (mean 50.8 Gy), 4-8 Gy per session every other day. Results: Immediately response rates were CR 11.9%; PR 64.2%; NR 18.3%; PD 5.5%, respectively. The CR + PR response rate was 76.1%. The 1-, 2-, 3- year survival rates were 68.6%, 42.0%, 28.8%, respectively. The CR and PR rates of lesions complicated with portal venous cancer embolus (PVCE) were 82.5%, 10.0%, with a response rate (CR + PR) of 92.5%. The 1-, 2-year survival rates of PHC with PVCE were 52.1% and 19.7%. The incidence of radiation-induced hepatitis was 7.3%. The Clild-pugh class and GTV were independent prognostic factors when analyzed by Cox propotional hazards model. Conclusions: It is effective to treat unresectable primary hepatic cancer with three-demensional conformal radiotherapy by improving the local control and the survival. It is also effective for lesions complicated with portal venous cancer embolus. (authors)

  17. IMRT or conformal radiotherapy for adjuvant treatment of retroperitoneal sarcoma?

    Purpose: To compare the dose distribution between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with six coplanar beams (6b-IMRT) and IMRT with nine coplanar beams (9b-IMRT) during adjuvant radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma. Methods and materials: The 10 most recent patients who had received adjuvant radiotherapy were reviewed. Three different treatment plans were generated (3DCRT, 6b-IMRT and 9b-IMRT) to deliver 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. The dose delivered to the organs at risk (intestinal cavity (IC), contra- and ipsilateral kidney, liver, stomach and whole body), and the conformity index (CI) were compared. Results: The integral dose to the intestinal cavity was similar with the three modalities but the dose distribution was different, with a change-over around 25 Gy: the V50 and the V40 were reduced five- and twofold, respectively, with IMRT compared to 3DCRT, and the V20 was increased by about 25% with IMRT. A similar integral dose was delivered to the whole body with the three modalities. The treated volume (V95 body) was approximately halved with IMRT compared to 3DCRT, and the CI was twice as good with IMRT than with 3DCRT. As expected, the V5 (body) was higher with IMRT compared to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001) (a 12% increase with 6b-IMRT and a 21% increase with 9b-IMRT). Compared to 3DCRT, the mean dose delivered to the contralateral kidney increased from 1.5 to 4-4.4 Gy with IMRT. The number of monitor units was increased with IMRT, especially when nine beams were used instead of six. Conclusions: As expected, IMRT greatly reduced the high-dose irradiated volume and increased the low-dose exposure of the intestinal cavity, with a change-over around 25 Gy, compared to 3DCRT. The conformity index was compellingly better with IMRT. The integral dose delivered to the whole body was conserved with both 3DCRT and IMRT. Longer follow-up is needed to assess late toxicities to the small bowel, contralateral kidney and the

  18. UniCon3D: de novo protein structure prediction using united-residue conformational search via stepwise, probabilistic sampling

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Recent experimental studies have suggested that proteins fold via stepwise assembly of structural units named ‘foldons’ through the process of sequential stabilization. Alongside, latest developments on computational side based on probabilistic modeling have shown promising direction to perform de novo protein conformational sampling from continuous space. However, existing computational approaches for de novo protein structure prediction often randomly sample protein conformational space as opposed to experimentally suggested stepwise sampling. Results: Here, we develop a novel generative, probabilistic model that simultaneously captures local structural preferences of backbone and side chain conformational space of polypeptide chains in a united-residue representation and performs experimentally motivated conditional conformational sampling via stepwise synthesis and assembly of foldon units that minimizes a composite physics and knowledge-based energy function for de novo protein structure prediction. The proposed method, UniCon3D, has been found to (i) sample lower energy conformations with higher accuracy than traditional random sampling in a small benchmark of 6 proteins; (ii) perform comparably with the top five automated methods on 30 difficult target domains from the 11th Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) experiment and on 15 difficult target domains from the 10th CASP experiment; and (iii) outperform two state-of-the-art approaches and a baseline counterpart of UniCon3D that performs traditional random sampling for protein modeling aided by predicted residue-residue contacts on 45 targets from the 10th edition of CASP. Availability and Implementation: Source code, executable versions, manuals and example data of UniCon3D for Linux and OSX are freely available to non-commercial users at http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/UniCon3D/. Contact: chengji@missouri.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are

  19. Correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and 3D tumor motion in gated radiotherapy

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between the respiratory waveform measured using a respiratory sensor and three-dimensional (3D) tumor motion. Methods and materials: A laser displacement sensor (LDS: KEYENCE LB-300) that measures distance using infrared light was used as the respiratory sensor. This was placed such that the focus was in an area around the patient's navel. When the distance from the LDS to the body surface changes as the patient breathes, the displacement is detected as a respiratory waveform. To obtain the 3D tumor motion, a biplane digital radiography unit was used. For the tumor in the lung, liver, and esophagus of 26 patients, the waveform was compared with the 3D tumor motion. The relationship between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was analyzed by means of the Fourier transform and a cross-correlation function. Results: The respiratory waveform cycle agreed with that of the cranial-caudal and dorsal-ventral tumor motion. A phase shift observed between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was principally in the range 0.0 to 0.3 s, regardless of the organ being measured, which means that the respiratory waveform does not always express the 3D tumor motion with fidelity. For this reason, the standard deviation of the tumor position in the expiration phase, as indicated by the respiratory waveform, was derived, which should be helpful in suggesting the internal margin required in the case of respiratory gated radiotherapy. Conclusion: Although obtained from only a few breathing cycles for each patient, the correlation between the respiratory waveform and the 3D tumor motion was evident in this study. If this relationship is analyzed carefully and an internal margin is applied, the accuracy and convenience of respiratory gated radiotherapy could be improved by use of the respiratory sensor.Thus, it is expected that this procedure will come into wider use

  20. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in patients with gynecologic malignancies: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    To quantitatively evaluate the safety and related-toxicities of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) dose–volume histograms (DVHs), as compared to the conventional three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), in gynecologic malignancy patients by systematic review of the related publications and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were retrieved from the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases up to August 2011. Two independent reviewers assessed the included studies and extracted data. Pooled average percent irradiated volumes of adjacent non-cancerous tissues were calculated and compared between IMRT and 3D-CRT for a range of common radiation doses (5-45Gy). In total, 13 articles comprised of 222 IMRT-treated and 233 3D-CRT-treated patients were included. For rectum receiving doses ≥30 Gy, the IMRT pooled average irradiated volumes were less than those from 3D-CRT by 26.40% (30 Gy, p = 0.004), 27.00% (35 Gy, p = 0.040), 37.30% (40 Gy, p = 0.006), and 39.50% (45 Gy, p = 0.002). Reduction in irradiated small bowel was also observed for IMRT-delivered 40 Gy and 45 Gy (by 17.80% (p = 0.043) and 17.30% (p = 0.012), respectively), as compared with 3D-CRT. However, there were no significant differences in the IMRT and 3D-CRT pooled average percent volumes of irradiated small bowel or rectum from lower doses, or in the bladder or bone marrow from any of the doses. IMRT-treated patients did not experience more severe acute or chronic toxicities than 3D-CRT-treated patients. IMRT-delivered high radiation dose produced significantly less average percent volumes of irradiated rectum and small bowel than 3D-CRT, but did not differentially affect the average percent volumes in the bladder and bone marrow

  1. Dosimetric verification of complex radiotherapy with a 3D optically based dosimetry system - Dose painting and target tracking

    Skyt, Peter S. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ./Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus Univ., Aarhus (Denmark)], e-mail: skyt@phys.au.dk; Petersen, Joergen B. B.; Yates, Esben S.; Muren, Ludvig P. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ./Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Poulsen, Per R.; Ravkilde, Thomas L. [Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Balling, Peter [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus Univ., Aarhus (Denmark)

    2013-10-15

    Background: The increasing complexity of radiotherapy (RT) has motivated research into three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry. In this study we investigate the use of 3D dosimetry with polymerizing gels and optical computed tomography (optical CT) as a verification tool for complex RT: dose painting and target tracking. Materials and Methods: For the dose painting studies, two dosimeters were irradiated with a seven-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with and without dose prescription based on a hypoxia image dataset of a head and neck patient. In the tracking experiments, two dosimeters were irradiated with a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan with and without clinically measured prostate motion and a third with both motion and target tracking. To assess the performance, 3D gamma analyses were performed between measured and calculated stationary dose distributions. Results: Gamma pass-rates of 95.3 % and 97.3 % were achieved for the standard and dose-painted IMRT plans. Gamma pass-rates of 91.4 % and 54.4 % were obtained for the stationary and moving dosimeter, respectively, while tracking increased the pass-rate for the moving dosimeter to 90.4 %. Conclusions: This study has shown that the 3D dosimetry system can reproduce and thus verify complex dose distributions, also when influenced by motion.

  2. Dosimetric verification of complex radiotherapy with a 3D optically based dosimetry system - Dose painting and target tracking

    Background: The increasing complexity of radiotherapy (RT) has motivated research into three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry. In this study we investigate the use of 3D dosimetry with polymerizing gels and optical computed tomography (optical CT) as a verification tool for complex RT: dose painting and target tracking. Materials and Methods: For the dose painting studies, two dosimeters were irradiated with a seven-field intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan with and without dose prescription based on a hypoxia image dataset of a head and neck patient. In the tracking experiments, two dosimeters were irradiated with a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan with and without clinically measured prostate motion and a third with both motion and target tracking. To assess the performance, 3D gamma analyses were performed between measured and calculated stationary dose distributions. Results: Gamma pass-rates of 95.3 % and 97.3 % were achieved for the standard and dose-painted IMRT plans. Gamma pass-rates of 91.4 % and 54.4 % were obtained for the stationary and moving dosimeter, respectively, while tracking increased the pass-rate for the moving dosimeter to 90.4 %. Conclusions: This study has shown that the 3D dosimetry system can reproduce and thus verify complex dose distributions, also when influenced by motion

  3. Conformal radiotherapy using multileaf collimation: quality assurance and in vivo dosimetry

    Aletti, P. [Centre A. Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    1995-12-01

    The application of quality assurance principles in three dimensional conformal therapy is discussed.Critical requirements in three dimensional radiotherapy are the patient immobilization, the location, and the delivered dose. General recommendations with respect to the equipment for conformal radiotherapy and personnel are made.

  4. Is volumetric modulated arc-therapy the final evolution of conformal radiotherapy?

    Technology development in radiotherapy has improved significantly during the last decade. The rapid evolution of 3D radiotherapy to intensity-modulated radiotherapy was possible thanks to inverse planning systems. Intensity modulated radiotherapy improved in its turn by possibilities of volumetric irradiation during a single rotation, reducing therefore the overall treatment. This article presents the technical parameters of this volumetric irradiation technique and a review of miscellaneous clinical indications. (authors)

  5. Phase II trial of 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation: Lessons learned from patients and physicians’ evaluation

    Introduction: The present study prospectively reported both physicians’ and patients’ assessment for toxicities, cosmetic assessment and patients’ satisfaction after 3D-conformal accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Materials and Methods: From October 2007 to September 2009, 30 early breast cancer patients were enrolled in a 3D-conformal APBI Phase II trial (40 Gy/10 fractions/5 days). Treatment related toxicities and cosmetic results were assessed by both patients and physicians at each visit (at 1, 2, 6 months, and then every 6 months). Patient satisfaction was also scored. Results: After a median follow-up of 27.7 months, all patients were satisfied with APBI treatment, regardless of cosmetic results or late adverse events. Good/excellent cosmetic results were noticed by 80% of patients versus 92% of cases by radiation oncologists. Breast pain was systematically underestimated by physicians (8–20% vs. 16.6–26.2%; Kappa coefficient KC = 0.16–0.44). Grade 1 and 2 fibrosis and/or breast retraction occurred in 7–12% of patients and were overestimated by patients (KC = 0.14–0.27). Conclusions: Present results have shown discrepancies between patient and physician assessments. In addition to the assessment of efficacy and toxicity after 3D-conformal APBI, patients’ cosmetic results consideration and satisfaction should be also evaluated.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy

    Rajesh Ashok Kinhikar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, and helical tomotherapy (HT for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT. A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV. Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI and homogeneity index (HI. Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13, 1.18 (SD 0.11, and 1.08 (SD 0.04, respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05, 1.08 (SD 0.02, and 1.07 (SD 0.04, respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35, 7.04 (SD 0.45, and 5.43 (SD 0.29, respectively. D2cmwas found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Kinhikar, Rajesh Ashok; Ghadi, Yogesh G; Sahoo, Priyadarshini; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Agarwal, Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV). Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13), 1.18 (SD 0.11), and 1.08 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05), 1.08 (SD 0.02), and 1.07 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35), 7.04 (SD 0.45), and 5.43 (SD 0.29), respectively. D2cm was found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT) without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity. PMID:26865754

  8. Comparative study of conformal versus intensity modulated radiotherapy treatment plans

    Full text: In order to establish some early clinical experience in the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) as an alternative treatment method to conformal irradiation, we selected a number of specifically difficult clinical cases to compare. Complex tumour shapes located in the skull (two cases), close to the spinal cord (two cases) and one standard prostate case were chosen for this study. A Varian CadPlan system is used for the conformal treatment plans and Helios for the IMRT plans. In both these techniques, the linear accelerator multileaf collimator system is used to shape the beam about the target volume. The Royal North Shore Hospital Varian Clinac 600C/D linear accelerator also has dynamic multileaf collimator control (DMLC) capabilities for IMRT. The five cases reported here were planned by the radiation therapists for conformal treatment and then re-planned by physics using the CadPlan's Helios inverse planning option to produce an alternative IMRT plan. Both planners worked independently of each other. Treatment set-up errors were not considered as part of this study but it is apparent here that positional errors and immobilisation are particularly important factors to consider. An allowance for all errors must therefore be included for all critical organ outlines as well as the target volume for both the conformal or IMRT treatments. Visually, the covering of regularly shaped treatment volumes for the IMRT plans was improved marginally over the conformal plan. However, complex treatment volumes (such as the posterior orbital region with surrounding critical structures) showed very clear improvements. The IMRT dose drop-off at the edge of the target volume was not as sharp as the conformal equivalent. The dose-volume-histogram (DVH) provides a limited analytical tool to quantify these observations. The DVH generally indicated similar curves for the IMRT and conformal target volume but significant IMRT improvements in limiting the dose to

  9. 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) and prognostic factors for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer. Methods: Between July 1998 and July 2001, 33 patients with cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer were treated with 3D CRT(2 Gy per day, 5 sessions a week to a total dose of 66-68 Gy over 6-7 weeks). Acute toxicities and survival rates were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier method and prognostic factors were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard model. Results: The 1-, 2-, 3-year local control rates were 87.9%, 75.8%, 45.5% respectively. The 1-, 2-, 3-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 72.7%, 60.6%, 30.3% and 78.8%, 66.8%, 44.2% respectively. GradeI- II acute esophagitis and bronchitis were the most common radiation side effects. Multivariate analysis revealed that the depth of primary tumor invasion, regional lymph node metastasis and tumor length were independent prognostic factors (P<0.05). Conclusions: 3D CRT can be considered as an effective and feasible approach to cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer treatment. The depth of primary tumor invasion, regional lymph node status and tumor length are important prognostic indicators for cervical and upper-thoracic esophageal cancer. (authors)

  10. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for portal vein tumor thrombosis alone in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Lee, Ju Hye Kim Dong Hyun; Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Won Taek; Heo, Jeong; Woo, Hyun Young [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho [Dept.of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    We sought to evaluate the clinical outcomes of 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) alone in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed data on 46 patients who received 3D-CRT for PVTT alone between June 2002 and December 2011. Response was evaluated following the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Prognostic factors and 1-year survival rates were compared between responders and non-responders. Thirty-seven patients (80.4%) had category B Child-Pugh scores. The Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score was 2 in 20 patients. Thirty patients (65.2%) had main or bilateral PVTT. The median irradiation dose was 50 Gy (range, 35 to 60 Gy) and the daily median dose was 2 Gy (range, 2.0 to 2.5 Gy). PVTT response was classified as complete response in 3 patients (6.5%), partial response in 12 (26.1%), stable disease in 19 (41.3%), and progressive disease in 12 (26.1%). There were 2 cases of grade 3 toxicities during or 3 months after radiotherapy. Twelve patients in the responder group (15 patients) received at least 50 Gy irradiation, but about 84% of patients in the non-responder group received less than 50 Gy. The 1-year survival rate was 66.8% in responders and 27.4% in non-responders constituting a statistically significant difference (p = 0.008). Conformal radiotherapy for PVTT alone could be chosen as a palliative treatment modality in patients with unfavorable conditions (liver, patient, or tumor factors). However, more than 50 Gy of radiation may be required.

  11. Automatic 3D segmentation of the prostate on magnetic resonance images for radiotherapy planning

    Alvarez Jiménez, Charlems

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Accurate segmentation of the prostate, the seminal vesicles, the bladder and the rectum is a crucial step for planning radiotherapy (RT) procedures. Modern radiotherapy protocols have included the delineation of the pelvic organs in magnetic resonance images (MRI), as the guide to the therapeutic beam irradiation over the target organ. However, this task is highly inter and intra-expert variable and may take about 20 minutes per patient, even for trained experts, constituting an imp...

  12. MIC(0) preconditioning of 3D FEM problems on unstructured grids: Conforming and non-conforming elements

    Margenov, Svetozar; Kosturski, Nikola

    2009-04-01

    In this study, the topics of grid generation and FEM applications are studied together following their natural synergy. We consider the following three tetrahedral grid generators: NETGEN, TetGen, and Gmsh. After that, the performance of the MIC(0) preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) solver is analyzed for both conforming and non-conforming linear FEM problems. If positive off-diagonal entries appear in the corresponding matrix, a diagonal compensation is applied to get an auxiliary M-matrix allowing a stable MIC(0) factorization. The presented numerical experiments for elliptic and parabolic problems well illustrate the similar PCG convergence rate of the MIC(0) preconditioner for both, structured and unstructured grids.

  13. External validation of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy based NTCP models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva among patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of predictive models for patient-rated xerostomia (XER6M) and sticky saliva (STIC6M) at 6 months after completion of primary (chemo)radiation developed in head and neck cancer patients treated with 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) to predict outcome in patients treated with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and materials: Recently, we published the results of a prospective study on predictive models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva in head and neck cancer patients treated with 3D-CRT (3D-CRT based NTCP models). The 3D-CRT based model for XER6M consisted of three factors, including the mean parotid dose, age, and baseline xerostomia (none versus a bit). The 3D-CRT based model for STIC6M consisted of the mean submandibular dose, age, the mean sublingual dose, and baseline sticky saliva (none versus a bit). In the current study, a population consisting of 162 patients treated with IMRT was used to test the external validity of these 3D-CRT based models. External validity was described by the explained variation (R2 Nagelkerke) and the Brier score. The discriminative abilities of the models were calculated using the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) and calibration (i.e. the agreement between predicted and observed outcome) was assessed with the Hosmer–Lemeshow “goodness-of-fit” test. Results: Overall model performance of the 3D-CRT based predictive models for XER6M and STIC6M was significantly worse in terms of the Brier score and R2 Nagelkerke among patients treated with IMRT. Moreover the AUC for both 3D-CRT based models in the IMRT treated patients were markedly lower. The Hosmer–Lemeshow test showed a significant disagreement for both models between predicted risk and observed outcome. Conclusion: 3D-CRT based models for patient-rated xerostomia and sticky saliva among head and neck cancer patients treated with primary radiotherapy or chemoradiation

  14. Conformal irradiation technique for respiration-gated proton radiotherapy

    A new irradiation technique for charged particle radiotherapy is developed to reduce unwanted dose transfer to the normal tissues around tumor. The filter is made of many layers produced by using stereolithography. The new filter can make a static irradiation field where the width of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) is two-dimensionally adjusted to the shape of the target. In the case of a moving organ by the respiration, the new filter has an advantage in its less fluctuation of the dose distribution in compared with the simple scanning method. Conformal irradiation fields are realized by the new filter in experiments with intensity modulation. A comparison between the new technique and the traditional one is shown in dose distributions calculated by a treatment planning system including the function of the new filter. (author)

  15. Physical and methodological aspects of the multimodality imaging and principles of the treatment planning for the conformal 3-D radiation therapy; Aspects physiques et methodologiques de l'imagerie multimodalites et principes de planification dosimetrique pour la radiotherapie conformationnelle tridimensionnelle

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Foulquier, J.N.; Petegnief, Y. [Hopital Tenon, Unite de Physique Medicale, 75 - Paris (France); Touboul, E. [Hopital Tenon, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Petegnief, Y. [Hopital Tenon, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-10-01

    The recent evolutions of the imaging modalities, the dose calculation models, the linear accelerators and the portal imaging permit to improve the quality of the conformal radiation therapy treatment planning. With DICOM protocols, the acquired imaging data coming from different modalities are treated by efficient image fusion algorithms and yield more precise target volumes and organs at risk. The transformation of the clinical target volumes (CTV) to planning target volumes (PTV) can be realised using advanced probabilistic techniques based on clinical experience. The treatment plans evaluation is based on the dose volume histograms. Their precision and clinical relevance are improved by the multimodality imaging and the advanced dose calculation models. The introduction of the inverse planning systems permitting to realize modulated intensity radiation therapy generates highly conformal dose distributions. All the previously cited complex techniques require the application of rigorous quality assurance programs. (author)

  16. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam's eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam's eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment

  17. Conformal three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in Lund

    Knoos, T.; Nilsson, P. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Anders, A. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    1995-12-01

    The use of conformal therapy is based on 3-dimensional treatment planning as well as on methods and routines for 3-dimensional patient mapping, 3-dimensional virtual simulation and others. The management of patients at the Radiotherapy Department at the University Hospital in Lund (Sweden) is discussed. About 2100 new patients are annually treated with external radiotherapy using seven linear accelerators. Three of the accelerators have dual photon energies and electron treatment facilities. A multi-leaf collimator as well as an electronic portal imaging device are available on one machine. Two simulators and an in-house CT-scanner are used for treatment planning. From 1988 to 1992 Scandiplan (Umplan) was used. Since 1992, the treatment planning system is TMS (HELAX AB, Sweden), which is based on the pencil beam algorithm of Ahnesjo. The calculations use patient modulated accelerator specific energy fluence spectra which are compiled with pencil beams from Monte Carlo generated energy absorption kernels. Heterogeneity corrections are performed with results close to conventional algorithms. Irregular fields, either from standard or individual blocks and from multi-leaf collimators are handled by the treatment planning system. The field shape is determined conveniently using the beam`s eye view. The final field shape is exported electronically to either the block cutting machine or the multileaf collimator control computer. All patient fields are checked against the beam`s eye view during simulation using manual methods. Treatment verification is performed by portal films and in vivo dosimetry with silicon diodes or TL-dosimetry. Up to now, approximately 4400 patients have received a highly individualized 3-dimensional conformal treatment.

  18. Practical performance for CT simulator set up and commissioning for 3d radiotherapy

    Full text: We present a summary of the protocol used to commission two GE LightSpeed and One Siemens CT-Sim for 3D radiotherapy in early 2004. The protocol defined was based on AAPM TG-66 and ACPSEM 1997 position paper. Scanning Med-TEC Iso-align Laser Alignment Device for three-D isocentre alignment 1. Couch Movement Accuracy for both manual and scanning movement checked before isocentre alignment, as the reference distance is required for the external isocentre setup. 2. Gantry scan rotation circle vertical and tilted angle alignment checked by overlaying the vertical and horizontal image coordinate lines using the aligned ball-bearings in the phantom to determine the gantry cross plane image vertical accuracy and tilt angle accuracy. 3. Zero scan position determined by scanning the horizontally set Med-Align phantom, and adjusting the phantom position forward and backward to match the image scanning centre. 4. Internal lasers position determined by the position of aligned Med-Align phantom after the scanning centre determined. 5. Couch top to Gantry Perpendicular checked by matching the couch axis in the longitudinal and lateral direction to the position of the laser lines determined according to the CT scanning orientation. 6. Couch Central Axis aligned to ensure the couch travels though the internal isocentre for the full range of longitudinal of movement. 7. External isocentre and laser focus can be determined by moving the couch back a set distance (50cm or 60cm normally) from the internal isocentre. Planning image transfer and DRR image alignment 1. Scanning Centre indicated on the planning image depends on the functionality of the planning system. Some planning systems load the image with the scanning centre at zero position, others load up the image with the absolute distance. 2. Zero Slice position aligned to the centre of the phantom using the external laser. 3. Orientation and Distance were checked by scanning the Iso-align in both vertical and

  19. 3D radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer: the Shanghai Cancer Hospital experience.

    Su-Ping Liu

    Full Text Available We evaluate the outcomes of irradiation by using three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer. Between 2007 and 2010, 50 patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were treated using 3D-RT or IMRT. The median time interval between the initial treatment and the start of irradiation was 12 (6-51 months. Salvage surgery was performed before irradiation in 5 patients, and 38 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Sixteen patients underwent 3D-RT, and 34 patients received IMRT. Median follow-up for all the patients was 18.3 months. Three-year overall survival and locoregional control were 56.1% and 59.7%, respectively. Three-year progression-free survival and disease-free survival were 65.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Nine patients developed grade 3 leukopenia. Grade 5 acute toxicity was not observed in any of the patients; however, 2 patients developed Grade 3 late toxicity. 3D-RT or IMRT is effective for the treatment of recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer, with the 3-year overall survival of 56.1%, and its complications are acceptable. Long-term follow-up and further studies are needed to confirm the role of 3D-RT or IMRT in the multimodality management of the disease.

  20. Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy (3D-CRT) for Prostate Cancer on RTOG 9406

    Purpose: Report of clinical cancer control outcomes on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406, a three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) dose escalation trial for localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: RTOG 9406 is a Phase I/II multi-institutional dose escalation study of 3D-CRT for men with localized prostate cancer. Patients were registered on five sequential dose levels: 68.4 Gy, 73.8 Gy, 79.2 Gy, 74 Gy, and 78 Gy with 1.8 Gy/day (levels I–III) or 2.0 Gy/day (levels IV and V). Neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) from 2 to 6 months was allowed. Protocol-specific, American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), and Phoenix biochemical failure definitions are reported. Results: Thirty-four institutions enrolled 1,084 patients and 1,051 patients are analyzable. Median follow-up for levels I, II, III, IV, and V was 11.7, 10.4, 11.8, 10.4, and 9.2 years, respectively. Thirty-six percent of patients received NHT. The 5-year overall survival was 90%, 87%, 88%, 89%, and 88% for dose levels I–V, respectively. The 5-year clinical disease-free survival (excluding protocol prostate-specific antigen definition) for levels I–V is 84%, 78%, 81%, 82%, and 82%, respectively. By ASTRO definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 57%, 59%, 52%, 64% and 75% (low risk); 46%, 52%, 54%, 56%, and 63% (intermediate risk); and 50%, 34%, 46%, 34%, and 61% (high risk) for levels I–V, respectively. By the Phoenix definition, the 5-year disease-free survivals were 68%, 73%, 67%, 84%, and 80% (low risk); 70%, 62%, 70%, 74%, and 69% (intermediate risk); and 42%, 62%, 68%, 54%, and 67% (high risk) for levels I–V, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3D-CRT yields favorable outcomes for localized prostate cancer. This multi-institutional experience allows comparison to other experiences with modern radiation therapy.

  1. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  2. Involved-Site Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Versus 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo, E-mail: andreariccardo.filippi@unito.it [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciammella, Patrizia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Piva, Cristina; Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Botto, Barbara [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Gavarotti, Paolo [Hematology, University of Torino and Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Merli, Francesco [Hematology Unit, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Vitolo, Umberto [Hematology, Città della Salute e della Scienza, Torino (Italy); Iotti, Cinzia [Radiation Therapy Unit, Department of Oncology and Advanced Technology, ASMN Hospital IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) allows for margin reduction and highly conformal dose distribution, with consistent advantages in sparing of normal tissues. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare involved-site IG-IMRT with involved-site 3D conformal RT (3D-CRT) in the treatment of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) involving the mediastinum, with efficacy and toxicity as primary clinical endpoints. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 90 stage IIA HL patients treated with either involved-site 3D-CRT or IG-IMRT between 2005 and 2012 in 2 different institutions. Inclusion criteria were favorable or unfavorable disease (according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria), complete response after 3 to 4 cycles of an adriamycin- bleomycin-vinblastine-dacarbazine (ABVD) regimen plus 30 Gy as total radiation dose. Exclusion criteria were chemotherapy other than ABVD, partial response after ABVD, total radiation dose other than 30 Gy. Clinical endpoints were relapse-free survival (RFS) and acute toxicity. Results: Forty-nine patients were treated with 3D-CRT (54.4%) and 41 with IG-IMRT (45.6%). Median follow-up time was 54.2 months for 3D-CRT and 24.1 months for IG-IMRT. No differences in RFS were observed between the 2 groups, with 1 relapse each. Three-year RFS was 98.7% for 3D-CRT and 100% for IG-IMRT. Grade 2 toxicity events, mainly mucositis, were recorded in 32.7% of 3D-CRT patients (16 of 49) and in 9.8% of IG-IMRT patients (4 of 41). IG-IMRT was significantly associated with a lower incidence of grade 2 acute toxicity (P=.043). Conclusions: RFS rates at 3 years were extremely high in both groups, albeit the median follow-up time is different. Acute tolerance profiles were better for IG-IMRT than for 3D-CRT. Our preliminary results support the clinical safety and efficacy of advanced RT planning and delivery techniques in patients affected with early stage HL, achieving complete

  3. Multiple two-dimensional versus three-dimensional PTV definition in treatment planning for conformal radiotherapy

    Purpose: To demonstrate the need for a fully three-dimensional (3D) computerized expansion of the gross tumour volume (GTV) or clinical target volume (CTV), as delineated by the radiation oncologist on CT slices, to obtain the proper planning target volume (PTV) for treatment planning according to the ICRU-50 recommendations. Materials and methods: For 10 prostate cancer patients two PTVs have been determined by expansion of the GTV with a 1.5 cm margin, i.e. a 3D PTV and a multiple 2D PTV. The former was obtained by automatically adding the margin while accounting in 3D for GTV contour differences in neighbouring slices. The latter was generated by automatically adding the 1.5 cm margin to the GTV in each CT slice separately; the resulting PTV is a computer simulation of the PTV that a radiation oncologist would obtain with (the still common) manual contouring in CT slices. For each patient the two PTVs were compared to assess the deviations of the multiple 2D PTV from the 3D PTV. For both PTVs conformal plans were designed using a three-field technique with fixed block margins. For each patient dose-volume histograms and tumour control probabilities (TCPs) of the (correct) 3D PTV were calculated, both for the plan designed for this PTV and for the treatment plan based on the (deviating) 2D PTV.Results: Depending on the shape of the GTV, multiple 2D PTV generation could locally result in a 1 cm underestimation of the GTV-to-PTV margin. The deviations occurred predominantly in the cranio-caudal direction at locations where the GTV contour shape varies significantly from slice to slice. This could lead to serious underdosage and to a TCP decrease of up to 15%. Conclusions: A full 3D GTV-to-PTV expansion should be applied in conformal radiotherapy to avoid underdosage. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  4. Comparison of static conformal field with multiple noncoplanar arc techniques for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy

    Purpose: Compare the use of static conformal fields with the use of multiple noncoplanar arcs for stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of intracranial lesions. Evaluate the efficacy of these treatment techniques to deliver dose distributions comparable to those considered acceptable in current radiotherapy practice. Methods and Materials: A previously treated radiosurgery case of a patient presenting with an irregularly shaped intracranial lesion was selected. Using a three-dimensional (3D) treatment-planning system, treatment plans using a single isocenter multiple noncoplanar arc technique and multiple noncoplanar conformal static fields were generated. Isodose distributions and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were computed for each treatment plan. We required that the 80% (of maximum dose) isodose surface enclose the target volume for all treatment plans. The prescription isodose was set equal to the minimum target isodose. The DVHs were analyzed to evaluate and compare the different treatment plans. Results: The dose distribution in the target volume becomes more uniform as the number of conformal fields increases. The volume of normal tissue receiving low doses (> 10% of prescription isodose) increases as the number of static fields increases. The single isocenter multiple arc plan treats the greatest volume of normal tissue to low doses, approximately 1.6 times more volume than that treated by four static fields. The volume of normal tissue receiving high (> 90% of prescription isodose) and intermediate (> 50% of prescription isodose) doses decreases by 29 and 22%, respectively, as the number of static fields is increased from four to eight. Increasing the number of static fields to 12 only further reduces the high and intermediate dose volumes by 10 and 6%, respectively. The volume receiving the prescription dose is more than 3.5 times larger than the target volume for all treatment plans. Conclusions: Use of a multiple noncoplanar

  5. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna, E-mail: anapaulafortuna@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (CAISM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Centro de Atencao Integrada a Saude da Mulher. Divisao de Radioterapia; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Divisao de Radioterapia

    2016-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm{sup 3} had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm{sup 3}. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm{sup 3} should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. Keywords: Rectal volume; Prostate cancer; Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  6. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Objective: To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results: The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion: The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. Keywords: Rectal volume; Prostate cancer; Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Comparison of 3D and 4D Monte Carlo optimization in robotic tracking stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Chan, Mark K.H. [Tuen Mun Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Hong Kong (S.A.R) (China); Werner, Rene [The University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Computational Neuroscience, Hamburg (Germany); Ayadi, Miriam [Leon Berard Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Lyon (France); Blanck, Oliver [University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany)

    2014-09-20

    To investigate the adequacy of three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo (MC) optimization (3DMCO) and the potential of four-dimensional (4D) dose renormalization (4DMC{sub renorm}) and optimization (4DMCO) for CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA) radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. For 20 lung tumors, 3DMCO and 4DMCO plans were generated with planning target volume (PTV{sub 5} {sub mm}) = gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 5 mm, assuming 3 mm for tracking errors (PTV{sub 3} {sub mm}) and 2 mm for residual organ deformations. Three fractions of 60 Gy were prescribed to ≥ 95 % of the PTV{sub 5} {sub mm}. Each 3DMCO plan was recalculated by 4D MC dose calculation (4DMC{sub recal}) to assess the dosimetric impact of organ deformations. The 4DMC{sub recal} plans were renormalized (4DMC{sub renorm}) to 95 % dose coverage of the PTV{sub 5} {sub mm} for comparisons with the 4DMCO plans. A 3DMCO plan was considered adequate if the 4DMC{sub recal} plan showed ≥ 95 % of the PTV{sub 3} {sub mm} receiving 60 Gy and doses to other organs at risk (OARs) were below the limits. In seven lesions, 3DMCO was inadequate, providing < 95 % dose coverage to the PTV{sub 3} {sub mm}. Comparison of 4DMC{sub recal} and 3DMCO plans showed that organ deformations resulted in lower OAR doses. Renormalizing the 4DMC{sub recal} plans could produce OAR doses higher than the tolerances in some 4DMC{sub renorm} plans. Dose conformity of the 4DMC{sub renorm} plans was inferior to that of the 3DMCO and 4DMCO plans. The 4DMCO plans did not always achieve OAR dose reductions compared to 3DMCO and 4DMC{sub renorm} plans. This study indicates that 3DMCO with 2 mm margins for organ deformations may be inadequate for Cyberknife-based lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Renormalizing the 4DMC{sub recal} plans could produce degraded dose conformity and increased OAR doses; 4DMCO can resolve this problem. (orig.) [German] Untersucht wurde die Angemessenheit einer dreidimensionalen (3-D) Monte

  8. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    Gu, Xuejun; Jelen, Urszula; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework [Gu et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97, 2009]. Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck c...

  9. Determining inter-fractional motion of the uterus using 3D ultrasound imaging during radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    Baker, Mariwan; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Behrens, Claus F.

    2014-01-01

    Uterine positional changes can reduce the accuracy of radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to; 1) Quantify the inter-fractional uterine displacement using a novel 3D ultrasound (US) imaging system, and 2) Compare the result with the bone match shift determined...... by Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) imaging.Five cervical cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Three of them underwent weekly CBCT imaging prior to treatment and bone match shift was applied. After treatment delivery they underwent a weekly US scan. The transabdominal scans were conducted using a Clarity US...

  10. Does hormonal therapy influence sexual function in men receiving 3D conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer?

    Purpose: We evaluated the effect of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) with or without hormonal therapy (HT) on sexual function (SF) in prostate cancer patients whose SF was known before all treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1996 and March 1999, 144 patients received 3D-CRT (median dose = 70.2 Gy, range 66.6-79.2 Gy) for prostate cancer and had pre- and post-therapy SF data. All SF data were obtained with the O'Leary Brief SF Inventory, a self-administered, multidimensional, validated instrument. We defined total sexual potency as erections firm enough for penetration during intercourse. Mean follow-up time was 21 months (SD ± 11 months). The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test for significance of the change from baseline. Results: Before 3D-CRT, 87 (60%) of 144 men were totally potent as compared to only 47 (47%) of 101 at 1-year follow-up. Of the 60 men totally potent at baseline and followed for at least 1 year, 35 (58%) remained totally potent. These changes corresponded to a significant reduction in SF (p<0.05). Patients who had 3D-CRT alone were more likely to be totally potent at 1 year than those receiving 3D-CRT with HT (56% vs. 31%, p=0.012); however, they were also more likely to be potent at baseline (71% vs. 44%, p=0.001). Although these two groups had a significant reduction in SF from baseline, their change was not significantly different from each other. Conclusion: These data indicate that 3D-CRT causes a significant reduction in total sexual potency as compared to pretreatment baseline. The addition of HT does not appear to increase the risk of sexual dysfunction

  11. Treating benign optic nerve tumors with a 3-D conformal plan

    A 68 year old male patient presented for radiation therapy for treatment of a benign tumor, a glioma of his left optic nerve. The radiation oncologist intended to prescribe 52.2 Gy to the planning target volume, while maintaining a maximum of 54 Gy to the optic nerves and the optic chiasm and a maximum of 40–45 Gy to the globes in order to minimize the possibility of damaging the optic system, which is especially important as this is a benign tumor. The dosimetrist devised a conformal non-coplanar three-dimensional plan with a slightly weighted forward planning component. This plan was created in approximately 15 minutes after the critical organs and the targets were delineated and resulted in an extremely conformal and homogenous plan, treating the target while sparing the nearby critical structures. This approach can also be extended to other tumors in the brain - benign or malignant

  12. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy with conformal radiotherapy in cancer on anal canal

    Full text: Introduction: The aim of the Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) use is homogeneous irradiation of volume for radiotherapy and preservation of critical organs and normal healthy tissues. The aim of the study is to develop a protocol for radiotherapy of cancer of the anal canal with IMRT, evaluation of dosimetric plans by comparison with analogous obtained with conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Materials and Methods: The protocol was developed using data of 10 patients with carcinoma of the anal canal in clinical stage T3 -4N1-3M0, as 5 patients were treated with CRT, and 5 of them were treated on this protocol. Planned target volumes are: PTV A - perineum with anal opening and anal canal, rectum and all lymph chains in the pelvis (pre-sacral, perirectal, internal iliac, external iliac and obturator) and PTV B - inguinal lymph nodes. Planned total therapeutic dose is 50 Gy, fractionated 2 Gy per day. Critical organs are small intestinal loops, bladder, and hips. Through the dose- volume histograms analysis of the results in the two groups are compared. Results: The results of the analysis of the dose - volume histograms show the following advantages of IMRT over CRT: Better homogeneity of the dose distribution, particularly for PTV B, where for the IMRT plan only 2% of the volume receive a dose > 52 Gy, while on CRT 15% receive a dose > 60Gy; average dose in IMRT plan for intestinal loops, bladder and femoral is with 7 Gy lower and the maximum dose for the critical organs is low and substantially less volume from the critical organs receive it . Conclusion: IMRT protocol offers better homogeneity in the planned target volumes and lower doses to critical organs. Time for planning, verification and simulation of plan for radiotherapy is doubled compared to CRT. The time for irradiation of a patient is similar to this for CRT - about 10 minutes

  13. Design and implementation of a rotational radiotherapy technique for breast cancer treatment and their comparison with 3-D-Crt irradiation technique

    Breast cancer is one of oncological diseases worldwide, as well in Mexico, which causes even more deaths than cervical cancer; this condition is the second death cause in women aged 30-54 years and threatens all socio-economic groups. The treatment is highly dependent on the stage which is detected and based on protocols that include a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This paper studies the main irradiation technique for patients with mastectomy, breast full cycle (irradiation of the chest well and supraclavicular nodes) in their mode Three Dimensional - Conformal Radiation Therapy (3-D-Crt), and compared with the Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) technique proposed in this paper. In both techniques the prescription was 50 Gy divided into 25 fractions. The techniques were applied in three female patients (being an initial study) with disease of the left side, the target volume and organs at risk were delineated by the medical treating radiation oncologist, the planning system used was Eclipse version 10; for quantitative comparison of both plans indexes of homogeneity were used, con formality, the target volume coverage and normal tissue, sub factors and overdosing, the conformation number and coverage quality. They were evaluated and compared the media, maximum and minimum dose of the organs at risk, based on the fact that the coverage of the target volume, dose gradient and dose at risk organs are acceptable (prescription dose greater that 90% coverage, gradient less that 20% and organs at risk in accordance with the Quantec limitations for both versions). (Author)

  14. Integral Dose and Radiation-Induced Secondary Malignancies: Comparison between Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy

    Stefano G. Masciullo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT, estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED on the target (BED = 76Gy10. Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05. Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002, secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001. This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  15. Intensity modulated radiotherapy in early stage Hodgkin lymphoma patients: Is it better than three dimensional conformal radiotherapy?

    De Sanctis Vitaliana

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cure rate of early Hodgkin Lymphoma are high and avoidance of late toxicities is of paramount importance. This comparative study aims to assess the normal tissue sparing capability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT versus standard three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT in terms of dose-volume parameters and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP for different organs at risk in supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL patients. Methods Ten HL patients were actually treated with 3D-CRT and all treatments were then re-planned with IMRT. Dose-volume parameters for thyroid, oesophagus, heart, coronary arteries, lung, spinal cord and breast were evaluated. Dose-volume histograms generated by TPS were analyzed to predict the NTCP for the considered organs at risk, according to different endpoints. Results Regarding dose-volume parameters no statistically significant differences were recorded for heart and origin of coronary arteries. We recorded statistically significant lower V30 with IMRT for oesophagus (6.42 vs 0.33, p = 0.02 and lungs (4.7 vs 0.1 p = 0.014 for the left lung and 2.59 vs 0.1 p = 0.017 for the right lung and lower V20 for spinal cord (17.8 vs 7.2 p = 0.02. Moreover the maximum dose to the spinal cord was lower with IMRT (30.2 vs 19.9, p Conclusions In HL male patients IMRT seems feasible and accurate while for women HL patients IMRT should be used with caution.

  16. Comparative study of convolution, superposition, and fast superposition algorithms in conventional radiotherapy, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques for various sites, done on CMS XIO planning system

    Muralidhar K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare the dosimetry results that are obtained by using Convolution, Superposition and Fast Superposition algorithms in Conventional Radiotherapy, Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3D-CRT, and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT for different sites, and to study the suitability of algorithms with respect to site and technique. For each of the Conventional, 3D-CRT, and IMRT techniques, four different sites, namely, Lung, Esophagus, Prostate, and Hypopharynx were analyzed. Treatment plans were created using 6MV Photon beam quality using the CMS XiO (Computerized Medical System, St.Louis, MO treatment planning system. The maximum percentage of variation recorded between algorithms was 3.7% in case of Ca.Lung, for the IMRT Technique. Statistical analysis was performed by comparing the mean relative difference, Conformity Index, and Homogeneity Index for target structures. The fast superposition algorithm showed excellent results for lung and esophagus cases for all techniques. For the prostate, the superposition algorithm showed better results in all techniques. In the conventional case of the hypopharynx, the convolution algorithm was good. In case of Ca. Lung, Ca Prostate, Ca Esophagus, and Ca Hypopharynx, OARs got more doses with the superposition algorithm; this progressively decreased for fast superposition and convolution algorithms, respectively. According to this study the dosimetric results using different algorithms led to significant variation and therefore care had to be taken while evaluating treatment plans. The choice of a dose calculation algorithm may in certain cases even influence clinical results.

  17. Intensity-Modulated vs. Conformal Radiotherapy of Parotid Gland Tumors: Potential Impact on Hearing Loss

    In 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy of parotid gland tumors, little effort is made to avoid the auditory system or the oral cavity. Damage may occur when the ear is located inside the treatment field. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate an intensity-modulation radiotherapy (IMRT) class solution, and to compare this technique to a 3D conformal approach with respect to hearing loss. Twenty patients with parotid gland cancer were retrospectively planned with 2 different techniques using the original planning target volume (PTV). First, a conventional technique using a wedged beam pair was applied, yielding a dose distribution conformal to the shape of the PTV. Next, an IMRT technique using a fluence map optimization with predefined constraints was designed. A dose of 66 Gy in the PTV was given at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measures (ICRU) dose prescription point. Dose-volume histograms of the PTV and organs at risk (OARs), such as auditory system, oral cavity, and spinal cord, were compared. The dose in the OARs was lower in the IMRT plans. The mean volume of the middle ear receiving a dose higher than 50 Gy decreased from 66.5% to 33.4%. The mean dose in the oral cavity decreased from 19.4 Gy to 16.6 Gy. The auditory system can be spared if the distance between the inner ear and the PTV is 0.6 cm or larger, and if the overlap between the middle ear and the PTV is smaller than 10%. The maximum dose in the spinal cord was below 40 Gy in all treatment plans. The mean volume of the PTV receiving less than 95% of the prescribed dose increased in the IMRT plan slightly from 3.3% to 4.3 % (p = 0.01). The mean volume receiving more than 107% increased from 0.9% to 2.5% (p = 0.02). It can be concluded that the auditory system, as well as the oral cavity, can be spared with IMRT, but at the cost of a slightly larger dose inhomogeneity in the PTV. The IMRT technique can therefore, in most cases, be recommended as the treatment

  18. Evaluation of the optimal field arrangement for conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer patients

    M. Mahmoud; K Elshahat; H. William; M.Barsum; Amr Gaber

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal field arrangement for conformal radiotherapy (CFRT) for prostate cancer patients. Methods: Thirty patients with prostate cancer of different grades and stages were treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy to minimize the dose to bladder, rectum and head of both femora using four fields (4F), five fields (5F), six fields (6F) and ARC techniques to minimize the risk of over dose to bladder, rectum and femoral heads. Patients received a total dose between 76 to 78 Gy given in 38 to 39 fractions over 7.5 to 8 weeks. Results: It was observed that V95, D95, D50 and D5 values for planning target volume (PTV) were comparatively higher when planned by 5 fields technique than when planned by fixed field technique (91%, 91%, 90% and 91.4% for skip-scan technique versus 85%, 87%, 86% and 88% by fixed field). The organs like rectum and urinary bladder get much higher dose when treated by fixed field techniques than rotation or 5 fields technique, when comparison was made for V95, V50 and DM values for rectum and urinary bladder obtained by 5 fields technique planning and 4/6 field planning, the value for 5 fields technique was found to be lower than 4/6 field technique (1%, 70% and 51% versus 13%, 91% and 55% for rectum and 4%, 25% and 51% versus 16%, 38% and 56% for urinary bladder respectively). Conclusion: Similarly for femoral heads, planning by full rotational technique had been observed to be beneficial as compared to when planning was done by fixed field technique (0%, 0% and 29% versus 0%, 1% and 28%).

  19. 4DCBCT-based motion modeling and 3D fluoroscopic image generation for lung cancer radiotherapy

    Dhou, Salam; Hurwitz, Martina; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross; Lewis, John

    2015-03-01

    A method is developed to build patient-specific motion models based on 4DCBCT images taken at treatment time and use them to generate 3D time-varying images (referred to as 3D fluoroscopic images). Motion models are built by applying Principal Component Analysis (PCA) on the displacement vector fields (DVFs) estimated by performing deformable image registration on each phase of 4DCBCT relative to a reference phase. The resulting PCA coefficients are optimized iteratively by comparing 2D projections captured at treatment time with projections estimated using the motion model. The optimized coefficients are used to generate 3D fluoroscopic images. The method is evaluated using anthropomorphic physical and digital phantoms reproducing real patient trajectories. For physical phantom datasets, the average tumor localization error (TLE) and (95th percentile) in two datasets were 0.95 (2.2) mm. For digital phantoms assuming superior image quality of 4DCT and no anatomic or positioning disparities between 4DCT and treatment time, the average TLE and the image intensity error (IIE) in six datasets were smaller using 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating positioning disparities and tumor baseline shifts at treatment time compared to planning 4DCT, the average TLE (95th percentile) and IIE were 4.2 (5.4) mm and 0.15 using 4DCT-based models, while they were 1.2 (2.2) mm and 0.10 using 4DCBCT-based ones, respectively. 4DCBCT-based models were shown to perform better when there are positioning and tumor baseline shift uncertainties at treatment time. Thus, generating 3D fluoroscopic images based on 4DCBCT-based motion models can capture both inter- and intra- fraction anatomical changes during treatment.

  20. Physical-dosimetric enabling a dual linear accelerator 3D planning systems for radiotherapy

    The process of commissioning clinical linear accelerator requires a dual comprehensive study of the therapeutic beam parameters, both photons Electron. All information gained by measuring physical and dosimetric these beams must be analyzed, processed and refined for further modeling in computer-based treatment planning (RTPS). Of professionalism of this process will depend on the accuracy and precision of the calculations the prescribed doses. This paper aims to demonstrate availability clinical linear accelerator system-RTPS with late radiotherapy treatments shaped beam of photons and electrons. (author)

  1. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    Gu, Xuejun; Jelen, Urszula; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-06-01

    Targeting at the development of an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on graphics processing unit (GPU). This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework (Gu et al 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97). Dosimetric evaluations against Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on ten IMRT treatment plans (five head-and-neck cases and five lung cases). For all cases, there is improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm and for most cases the improvement is significant. Regarding the efficiency, because of the appropriate arrangement of memory access and the usage of GPU intrinsic functions, the dose calculation for an IMRT plan can be accomplished well within 1 s (except for one case) with this new GPU-based FSPB algorithm. Compared to the previous GPU-based FSPB algorithm without 3D-density correction, this new algorithm, though slightly sacrificing the computational efficiency (~5-15% lower), has significantly improved the dose calculation accuracy, making it more suitable for online IMRT replanning.

  2. Dosimetric comparison of parietal helical tomo-therapy, radiotherapy with TomoDirectTM and conventional conformational radiotherapy

    The author report a comparison of treatment plans of helical tomo-therapy, radiotherapy with TomoDirect and conventional conformational radiotherapy in the case of an extended parietal recurrence of a right breast cancer. The three techniques provide a good coverage of the previsional target volume. Otherwise, they are compared in terms of maximum dose, organ-at-risk sparing. TomoDirect gives the best results. Short communication

  3. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca2+ on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology.

  4. Probing Protein 3D Structures and Conformational Changes Using Electrochemistry-Assisted Isotope Labeling Cross-Linking Mass Spectrometry.

    Zheng, Qiuling; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shiyong; Chen, Hao

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a new chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (MS) method in combination with electrochemistry and isotope labeling strategy for probing both protein three-dimensional (3D) structures and conformational changes. For the former purpose, the target protein/protein complex is cross-linked with equal mole of premixed light and heavy isotope labeled cross-linkers carrying electrochemically reducible disulfide bonds (i.e., DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 in this study, DSP = dithiobis[succinimidyl propionate]), digested and then electrochemically reduced followed with online MS analysis. Cross-links can be quickly identified because of their reduced intensities upon electrolysis and the presence of doublet isotopic peak characteristics. In addition, electroreduction converts cross-links into linear peptides, facilitating MS/MS analysis to gain increased information about their sequences and modification sites. For the latter purpose of probing protein conformational changes, an altered procedure is adopted, in which the protein in two different conformations is cross-linked using DSP-d0 and DSP-d8 separately, and then the two protein samples are mixed in 1:1 molar ratio. The merged sample is subjected to digestion and electrochemical mass spectrometric analysis. In such a comparative cross-linking experiment, cross-links could still be rapidly recognized based on their responses to electrolysis. More importantly, the ion intensity ratios of light and heavy isotope labeled cross-links reveal the conformational changes of the protein, as exemplified by examining the effect of Ca(2+) on calmodulin conformation alternation. This new cross-linking MS method is fast and would have high value in structural biology. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26902947

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Causes Fewer Side Effects than Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy When Used in Combination With Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    Purpose: To measure the benefits of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) when used in combination with brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with localized prostate cancer who received external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in combination with brachytherapy with at least 1 year follow-up (n = 812). Combination therapy consisted of 103Pd or 125I implant, followed by a course of EBRT. From 1993 to March 2003 521 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, and from April 2003 to March 2009 291 patients were treated with IMRT. Urinary symptoms were prospectively measured with the International Prostate Symptom Score questionnaire with a single quality of life (QOL) question; rectal bleeding was assessed per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The Pearson χ2 test was used to compare toxicities experienced by patients who were treated with either IMRT or 3D-CRT. Logistic regression analyses were also performed to rule out possible confounding factors. Results: Within the first 3 months after treatment, patients treated with 3D-CRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 19% mild, 44% moderate, and 37% severe; patients treated with IMRT scored their urinary symptoms as follows: 36% mild, 47% moderate, and 17% severe (p < 0.001). The 3D-CRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 35% positive, 20% neutral, and 45% negative; IMRT patients rated their QOL as follows: 51% positive, 18% neutral, and 31% negative (p < 0.001). After 1 year of follow-up there was no longer any difference in urinary morbidity between the two groups. Logistic regression confirmed the differences in International Prostate Symptom Score and QOL in the acute setting (p < 0.001 for both). Grade ≥2 rectal bleeding was reported by 11% of 3D-CRT patients and 7% of

  6. A 3D global-to-local deformable mesh model based registration and anatomy-constrained segmentation method for image guided prostate radiotherapy

    Zhou Jinghao; Kim, Sung; Jabbour, Salma; Goyal, Sharad; Haffty, Bruce; Chen, Ting; Levinson, Lydia; Metaxas, Dimitris; Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Department of Bioinformatics, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: In the external beam radiation treatment of prostate cancers, successful implementation of adaptive radiotherapy and conformal radiation dose delivery is highly dependent on precise and expeditious segmentation and registration of the prostate volume between the simulation and the treatment images. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel, fast, and accurate segmentation and registration method to increase the computational efficiency to meet the restricted clinical treatment time requirement in image guided radiotherapy. Methods: The method developed in this study used soft tissues to capture the transformation between the 3D planning CT (pCT) images and 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) treatment images. The method incorporated a global-to-local deformable mesh model based registration framework as well as an automatic anatomy-constrained robust active shape model (ACRASM) based segmentation algorithm in the 3D CBCT images. The global registration was based on the mutual information method, and the local registration was to minimize the Euclidian distance of the corresponding nodal points from the global transformation of deformable mesh models, which implicitly used the information of the segmented target volume. The method was applied on six data sets of prostate cancer patients. Target volumes delineated by the same radiation oncologist on the pCT and CBCT were chosen as the benchmarks and were compared to the segmented and registered results. The distance-based and the volume-based estimators were used to quantitatively evaluate the results of segmentation and registration. Results: The ACRASM segmentation algorithm was compared to the original active shape model (ASM) algorithm by evaluating the values of the distance-based estimators. With respect to the corresponding benchmarks, the mean distance ranged from -0.85 to 0.84 mm for ACRASM and from -1.44 to 1.17 mm for ASM. The mean absolute distance ranged from 1.77 to 3.07 mm for ACRASM and from 2.45 to

  7. A 3D global-to-local deformable mesh model based registration and anatomy-constrained segmentation method for image guided prostate radiotherapy

    Purpose: In the external beam radiation treatment of prostate cancers, successful implementation of adaptive radiotherapy and conformal radiation dose delivery is highly dependent on precise and expeditious segmentation and registration of the prostate volume between the simulation and the treatment images. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel, fast, and accurate segmentation and registration method to increase the computational efficiency to meet the restricted clinical treatment time requirement in image guided radiotherapy. Methods: The method developed in this study used soft tissues to capture the transformation between the 3D planning CT (pCT) images and 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) treatment images. The method incorporated a global-to-local deformable mesh model based registration framework as well as an automatic anatomy-constrained robust active shape model (ACRASM) based segmentation algorithm in the 3D CBCT images. The global registration was based on the mutual information method, and the local registration was to minimize the Euclidian distance of the corresponding nodal points from the global transformation of deformable mesh models, which implicitly used the information of the segmented target volume. The method was applied on six data sets of prostate cancer patients. Target volumes delineated by the same radiation oncologist on the pCT and CBCT were chosen as the benchmarks and were compared to the segmented and registered results. The distance-based and the volume-based estimators were used to quantitatively evaluate the results of segmentation and registration. Results: The ACRASM segmentation algorithm was compared to the original active shape model (ASM) algorithm by evaluating the values of the distance-based estimators. With respect to the corresponding benchmarks, the mean distance ranged from -0.85 to 0.84 mm for ACRASM and from -1.44 to 1.17 mm for ASM. The mean absolute distance ranged from 1.77 to 3.07 mm for ACRASM and from 2.45 to

  8. Semiautomatic registration of 3D transabdominal ultrasound images for patient repositioning during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is to propose and evaluate registration algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) transabdominal (TA) ultrasound (US) images to setup postprostatectomy patients during radiation therapy. Methods: Three registration methods have been developed and evaluated to register a reference 3D-TA-US image acquired during the planning CT session and a 3D-TA-US image acquired before each treatment session. The first method (method A) uses only gray value information, whereas the second one (method B) uses only gradient information. The third one (method C) combines both sets of information. All methods restrict the comparison to a region of interest computed from the dilated reference positioning volume drawn on the reference image and use mutual information as a similarity measure. The considered geometric transformations are translations and have been optimized by using the adaptive stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Validation has been carried out using manual registration by three operators of the same set of image pairs as the algorithms. Sixty-two treatment US images of seven patients irradiated after a prostatectomy have been registered to their corresponding reference US image. The reference registration has been defined as the average of the manual registration values. Registration error has been calculated by subtracting the reference registration from the algorithm result. For each session, the method has been considered a failure if the registration error was above both the interoperator variability of the session and a global threshold of 3.0 mm. Results: All proposed registration algorithms have no systematic bias. Method B leads to the best results with mean errors of −0.6, 0.7, and −0.2 mm in left–right (LR), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions, respectively. With this method, the standard deviations of the mean error are of 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  9. Semiautomatic registration of 3D transabdominal ultrasound images for patient repositioning during postprostatectomy radiotherapy

    Presles, Benoît, E-mail: benoit.presles@creatis.insa-lyon.fr; Rit, Simon; Sarrut, David [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon F-69621, France and Léon Bérard Cancer Center, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69373 (France); Fargier-Voiron, Marie; Liebgott, Hervé [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR5220, Inserm U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon F-69621 (France); Biston, Marie-Claude; Munoz, Alexandre; Pommier, Pascal [Léon Bérard Cancer Center, Université de Lyon, Lyon F-69373 (France); Lynch, Rod [The Andrew Love Cancer Centre, University Hospital Geelong, Geelong 3220 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is to propose and evaluate registration algorithms of three-dimensional (3D) transabdominal (TA) ultrasound (US) images to setup postprostatectomy patients during radiation therapy. Methods: Three registration methods have been developed and evaluated to register a reference 3D-TA-US image acquired during the planning CT session and a 3D-TA-US image acquired before each treatment session. The first method (method A) uses only gray value information, whereas the second one (method B) uses only gradient information. The third one (method C) combines both sets of information. All methods restrict the comparison to a region of interest computed from the dilated reference positioning volume drawn on the reference image and use mutual information as a similarity measure. The considered geometric transformations are translations and have been optimized by using the adaptive stochastic gradient descent algorithm. Validation has been carried out using manual registration by three operators of the same set of image pairs as the algorithms. Sixty-two treatment US images of seven patients irradiated after a prostatectomy have been registered to their corresponding reference US image. The reference registration has been defined as the average of the manual registration values. Registration error has been calculated by subtracting the reference registration from the algorithm result. For each session, the method has been considered a failure if the registration error was above both the interoperator variability of the session and a global threshold of 3.0 mm. Results: All proposed registration algorithms have no systematic bias. Method B leads to the best results with mean errors of −0.6, 0.7, and −0.2 mm in left–right (LR), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions, respectively. With this method, the standard deviations of the mean error are of 1.7, 2.4, and 2.6 mm in LR, SI, and AP directions, respectively

  10. Effects of conventional fractionated three dimensional conformal radiotherapy on unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy and toxicity of conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) on unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). Methods: Fifty two patients with unresectable HCC, all without extrahepatic metastases, were treated by 3D-CRT conducted 5 times a week with the total radiation dose of 36-66 Gy and a daily dose of 2 Gy. The curative effect was evaluated by CT scan to observe the maximum tumor size. Survival rates,survival time, and adverse responses were recorded. Results: The total effective rate of the 52 patients was 69.2% with complete response (CR) in 2 patients and partial response (PR) in 34 patients. The incidence rate of radioactive hepatitis was 1.92%. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year survival rates were 57.7%, 34.6%, 23.1%, and 9.61% respectively, and the median survival time was 10.5 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year local control rates were 67%, 51.5%, 32.3%, and 2.24%, and the 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year distant metastasis rate were 17.2%, 23.5%, 36.7%, and 76.9% respectively. The intrahepatic metastases rate was 62.5% and 37.5% of the patients suffered from extrahepatic metastasis, including metastases of lung,bone,and retroperitoneal lymph nodes. The remission rate of the ≥50 Gy group was 76.9%, significantly higher than that of the ≤50 Gy group (46.2%, χ2=10.72, P<0.05).There was no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and two patients (3.84%) developed gastric or duodenal ulcer. Conclusions: Conventional fractionated 3D-CRT evokes a rather effective response for unresectable HCC with acceptable toxicity. Radiation dose seems to be a significant prognostic factor in RT response for HCC. (authors)

  11. The analysis of prognostic factors affecting post-radiation acute reaction after conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Spych, Michał; Gottwald, Leszek; Klonowicz, Małgorzata; Biegała, Michał; Bibik, Robert; Fijuth, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim was to evaluate the risk of acute side effects in the lung after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) in patients treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An attempt was made to single out clinical factors and factors related to treatment technique which may induce acute post-radiation pneumonitis. Material and methods The analysis concerned 34 consecutive patients who underwent radical radiation therapy for NSCLC. Intensity of early toxicity was evaluated...

  12. Advantages of mesh tallying in MCNPX for 3D dose calculations in radiotherapy

    The energy deposition mesh tally option of MCNPX Monte Carlo code is very useful for 3-Dimentional (3D) dose calculations. In this study, the 3D dose calculation was done for CT-based Monte Carlo treatment planning in which the energy deposition mesh tally were superimposed on merged voxel model. The results were compared with those of obtained from the common energy deposition (*F8) tally method for all cells of non-merged voxel model. The results of these two tallies and their respective computational times are compared, and the advantages of the proposed method are discussed. For this purpose, a graphical user interface (GUI) application was developed for reading CT slice data of patient, creating voxelized model of patient, optionally merging adjacent cells with the same material to reduce the total number of cells, reading beam configuration from commercial treatment planning system transferred in DICOM-RT format, and showing the isodose distribution on the CT images. To compare the results of Monte Carlo calculated and TiGRT planning system (LinaTech LLC, USA), treatment head of the Siemens ONCOR Impression accelerator was also simulated and the phase-space data on the scoring plane just above the Y-jaws was created and used. The results for a real prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan showed that the proposed method was fivefold faster while the precision was almost the same. (author)

  13. Usefulness of 3D conformal radiation therapy for reduction of radiation-induced white matter injury

    The usefulness of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in decreasing radiation-induced white matter changes (WMC) was assessed. Thirty-seven patients (age 5-77 years, mean 42 years; male/female=11/26) with primary intracranial tumors received 40 Gy or more, and were followed up with MRI for more than one year. Thirty-four patients underwent chemotherapy (with a platinum drug, 16; without a platinum drug, 18). Nineteen were treated with 3DCRT (radiation dose, range 60-64 Gy, mean 60.2 Gy; maximum width of radiation field, range 7-16 cm, mean 12.5 cm) and 18 were treated with non-3DCRT (radiation dose, range 40-62.4 Gy, mean 53.4 Gy; maximum width of radiation field, range 4-19 cm, mean 12.3 cm). WMC occurred in 37% of the 3DCRT group and 50% of the non-3DCRT group. Among the patients with WMC, Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) deteriorated in none of the 3DCRT group, whereas KPS deteriorated in 3 of 9 in the non-3DCRT group. All the patients with deterioration of KPS were at least 50 years of age. KPS did not strictly correlate with the severity of white matter changes on MRI. Chemotherapy with a platinum drug increased the incidence of WMC. Age (<50 years vs. ≥50 years), gender, radiation technique (3DCRT vs. non-3DCRT), radiation dose (<60 Gy vs. ≥60 Gy), maximum field-size (<12 cm vs. ≥12 cm), and maximum boost-field size (<10 cm vs. ≥10 cm) were not relevant to the incidence and severity of WMC. Though 3DCRT did not decrease the incidence and severity of white matter change on MRI, it may be useful to preserve the KPS, especially for older patients. (author)

  14. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm3), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  15. Quality assurance in conformal radiotherapy: DYNARAD consensus report on practice guidelines

    Background and purpose: Conformal radiotherapy has only recently been widely implemented. Although not all aspects have yet been adequately proven, it is generally recognized that maintaining a high degree of precision throughout the process is critical to the treatment outcome while the focus for quality assurance and quality improvement will need to concentrate more on human factors, procedures, communication, organization and training. A general consensus document on quality assurance guidelines for institutions that deliver conformal radiotherapy treatments to patients has been elaborated within the framework of the DYNARAD/BIOMED concerted action on conformal radiotherapy. The present paper aims to highlight those issues that were identified as of specific importance to conformal radiotherapy. The work reported here further details this guidance by direct correlation with the issues involved in the special case of conformal radiotherapy. Methods: The DYNARAD document has been drafted in the form of a desktop guide comprising six sets of guidelines and is based on the ESTRO advisory report on 'Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy'. Results and conclusions: The document has been endorsed by the DYNARAD group of institutions. As such it can form the basis for further discussions and enter into the subsequent phase of expanding its consensus basis

  16. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark: From 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines of The Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group

    Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Hanne M.;

    2008-01-01

    , it was investigated whether it was possible to find a treatment technique alternative to the one recommended by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG). A dosimetric comparison of a combined photon/electron 3-field technique (3F) and a partial wide tangent technique (PWT) was carried out on individual......This paper describes the procedure of changing from 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines for post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark. The aim of introducing 3D planning for post-mastectomy radiotherapy was to optimize the target coverage and minimize the dose to the normal tissues. Initially...... to 3F. It was concluded that PWT was an appropriate choice of technique for future radiation treatment of post-mastectomy patients. A working group was formed and guidelines for 3D planning were developed during a series of workshops where radiation oncologists and physicists from all radiotherapy...

  17. Quality of Life and Survival Outcome for Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Receiving Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy vs. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy-A Longitudinal Study

    Purpose: To investigate the changes of quality of life (QoL) and survival outcomes for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Two hundred and three newly diagnosed NPC patients, who were curatively treated by 3D-CRT (n = 93) or IMRT (n = 110) between March 2002 and July 2004, were analyzed. The distributions of clinical stage according to American Joint Committee on Cancer 1997 were I: 15 (7.4%), II: 78 (38.4%), III: 74 (36.5%), and IV: 36 (17.7%). QoL was longitudinally assessed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 and the EORTC QLQ-H and N35 questionnaires at the five time points: before RT, during RT (36 Gy), and 3 months, 12 months, and 24 months after RT. Results: The 3-year locoregional control, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival rates were 84.8%, 76.7%, and 81.7% for the 3D-CRT group, respectively, compared with 84.2%, 82.6%, and 85.4% for the IMRT group (p value > 0.05). A general trend of maximal deterioration in most QoL scales was observed during RT, followed by a gradual recovery thereafter. There was no significant difference in most scales between the two groups at each time point. The exception was that patients treated by IMRT had a both statistically and clinically significant improvement in global QoL, fatigue, taste/smell, dry mouth, and feeling ill at the time point of 3 months after RT. Conclusions: The potential advantage of IMRT over 3D-CRT in treating NPC patients might occur in QoL outcome during the recovery phase of acute toxicity

  18. A GPU-based finite-size pencil beam algorithm with 3D-density correction for radiotherapy dose calculation

    Gu, Xuejun; Li, Jinsheng; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-01-01

    Targeting at developing an accurate and efficient dose calculation engine for online adaptive radiotherapy, we have implemented a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm with a 3D-density correction method on GPU. This new GPU-based dose engine is built on our previously published ultrafast FSPB computational framework [Gu et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 54 6287-97, 2009]. Dosimetric evaluations against MCSIM Monte Carlo dose calculations are conducted on 10 IMRT treatment plans with heterogeneous treatment regions (5 head-and-neck cases and 5 lung cases). For head and neck cases, when cavities exist near the target, the improvement with the 3D-density correction over the conventional FSPB algorithm is significant. However, when there are high-density dental filling materials in beam paths, the improvement is small and the accuracy of the new algorithm is still unsatisfactory. On the other hand, significant improvement of dose calculation accuracy is observed in all lung cases. Especially when the target is in the m...

  19. Evaluation of the Accuracy of a 3D Surface Imaging System for Patient Setup in Head and Neck Cancer Radiotherapy

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) surface imaging system (AlignRT) registration algorithms for head-and-neck cancer patient setup during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients, each undergoing six repeated weekly helical computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment course (total 77 CTs including planning CT), were included in the study. Patient surface images used in AlignRT registration were not captured by the 3D cameras; instead, they were derived from skin contours from these CTs, thereby eliminating issues with immobilization masks. The results from surface registrations in AlignRT based on CT skin contours were compared to those based on bony anatomy registrations in Pinnacle3, which was considered the gold standard. Both rigid and nonrigid types of setup errors were analyzed, and the effect of tumor shrinkage was investigated. Results: The maximum registration errors in AlignRT were 0.2° for rotations and 0.7 mm for translations in all directions. The rigid alignment accuracy in the head region when applied to actual patient data was 1.1°, 0.8°, and 2.2° in rotation and 4.5, 2.7, and 2.4 mm in translation along the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral axes at 90% confidence level. The accuracy was affected by the patient’s weight loss during treatment course, which was patient specific. Selectively choosing surface regions improved registration accuracy. The discrepancy for nonrigid registration was much larger at 1.9°, 2.4°, and 4.5° and 10.1, 11.9, and 6.9 mm at 90% confidence level. Conclusions: The 3D surface imaging system is capable of detecting rigid setup errors with good accuracy for head-and-neck cancer. Further investigations are needed to improve the accuracy in detecting nonrigid setup errors.

  20. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low α/β ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific α/β ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues

  1. Equivalent Biochemical Control and Improved Prostate-Specific Antigen Nadir After Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy Versus High-Dose Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy and High-Dose Conformal Proton Beam Radiotherapy Boost

    Purpose: Permanent prostate implant brachytherapy (PPI), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and conformal proton beam radiotherapy (CPBRT) are used in the treatment of localized prostate cancer, although no head-to-head trials have compared these modalities. We studied the biochemical control (biochemical no evidence of disease [bNED]) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir achieved with contemporary PPI, and evaluated it against 3D-CRT and CPBRT. Patients and Methods: A total of 249 patients were treated with PPI at the University of California, San Francisco, and the outcomes were compared with those from a 3D-CRT cohort and the published results of a high-dose CPBRT boost (CPBRTB) trial. For each comparison, subsets of the PPI cohort were selected with patient and disease criteria similar to those of the reference group. Results: With a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the bNED rate at 5 and 7 years achieved with PPI was 92% and 86%, respectively, using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) definition, and 93% using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. Using the ASTRO definition, a 5-year bNED rate of 78% was achieved for the 3D-CRT patients compared with 94% for a comparable PPI subset and 93% vs. 92%, respectively, using the PSA nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition. The median PSA nadir for patients treated with PPI and 3D-CRT was 0.10 and 0.40 ng/mL, respectively (p < .0001). For the CPBRT comparison, the 5-year bNED rate after a CPBRTB was 91% using the ASTRO definition vs. 93% for a similar group of PPI patients. A greater proportion of PPI patients achieved a lower PSA nadir compared with those achieved in the CPBRTB trial (PSA nadir ≤0.5 ng/mL, 91% vs. 59%, respectively). Conclusion: We have demonstrated excellent outcomes in low- to intermediate-risk patients treated with PPI, suggesting at least equivalent 5-year bNED rates and a greater proportion of men achieving lower PSA nadirs compared with 3D-CRT or

  2. Evidence-based review of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: An ASTRO outcomes initiative

    Purpose: To perform a systematic review of the evidence to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for localized prostate cancer; provide a clear presentation of the key clinical outcome questions related to the use of 3D-CRT in the treatment of localized prostate cancer that may be answered by a formal literature review; and provide concise information on whether 3D-CRT improves the clinical outcomes in the treatment of localized prostate cancer compared with conventional RT. Methods and Materials: We performed a systematic review of the literature through a structured process developed by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's Outcomes Committee that involved the creation of a multidisciplinary task force, development of clinical outcome questions, a formal literature review and data abstraction, data review, and outside peer review. Results: Seven key clinical questions were identified. The results and task force conclusions of the literature review for each question are reported. Conclusion: The technological goals of reducing morbidity with 3D-CRT have been achieved. Randomized trials and follow-up of completed trials remain necessary to address these clinical outcomes specifically with regard to patient subsets and the use of hormonal therapy

  3. Advantages and disadvantages of using non-coplanar techniques in radiotherapy of the abdomen formed 3D; Ventajas e inconvenientes del uso de tecnicas con coplanares en radiaoterpia 3D conformada de abdomen

    Urena Llinares, A.; Castro Ramirez, I.; Iborra Oquendo, M. A; Quinones Rodriguez, L. A.; Angulo Pain, E.

    2011-07-01

    3D Radiotherapy locations abdomen, especially in pancreas and stomach cancers is often extremely difficult if we are to meet the dose constraints to organs at risk due to proximity and many of these (liver, kidneys, intestines, lungs, bone. ..). Of these, the most critical are the kidneys, which also present values of tolerance, in most cases difficult to meet. This is done in our hospital are using non-coplanar techniques performing well both as coating PTV dose to both kidneys.

  4. 3D quantitative assessment of response to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma

    To determine clinical outcome of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) after treatment with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by using 3D quantitative response assessment on MRI. This retrospective analysis included 162 patients who underwent radiation therapy for sporadic VS. Measurements on T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (in 2-year post-therapy intervals: 0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10, 10-12 years) were taken for total tumour volume (TTV) and enhancing tumour volume (ETV) based on a semi-automated technique. Patients were considered non-responders (NRs) if they required subsequent microsurgical resection or developed radiological progression and tumour-related symptoms. Median follow-up was 4.1 years (range: 0.4-12.0). TTV and ETV decreased for both the FSRT and SRS groups. However, only the FSRT group achieved significant tumour shrinkage (p < 0.015 for TTV, p < 0.005 for ETV over time). The 11 NRs showed proportionally greater TTV (median TTV pre-treatment: 0.61 cm3, 8-10 years after: 1.77 cm3) and ETV despite radiation therapy compared to responders (median TTV pre-treatment: 1.06 cm3; 10-12 years after: 0.81 cm3; p = 0.001). 3D quantification of VS showed a significant decrease in TTV and ETV on FSRT-treated patients only. NR had significantly greater TTV and ETV over time. (orig.)

  5. 3D quantitative assessment of response to fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery of vestibular schwannoma

    Schneider, T. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hamburg (Germany); Chapiro, J. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lin, M. [Philips Research North America, Ultrasound Imaging and Interventions (UII), Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Geschwind, J.F. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Imaging Science, New Haven, CT (United States); Kleinberg, L. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD (United States); Rigamonti, D.; Jusue-Torres, I.; Marciscano, A.E. [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Yousem, D.M. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Division of Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-03-15

    To determine clinical outcome of patients with vestibular schwannoma (VS) after treatment with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and single-session stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by using 3D quantitative response assessment on MRI. This retrospective analysis included 162 patients who underwent radiation therapy for sporadic VS. Measurements on T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (in 2-year post-therapy intervals: 0-2, 2-4, 4-6, 6-8, 8-10, 10-12 years) were taken for total tumour volume (TTV) and enhancing tumour volume (ETV) based on a semi-automated technique. Patients were considered non-responders (NRs) if they required subsequent microsurgical resection or developed radiological progression and tumour-related symptoms. Median follow-up was 4.1 years (range: 0.4-12.0). TTV and ETV decreased for both the FSRT and SRS groups. However, only the FSRT group achieved significant tumour shrinkage (p < 0.015 for TTV, p < 0.005 for ETV over time). The 11 NRs showed proportionally greater TTV (median TTV pre-treatment: 0.61 cm{sup 3}, 8-10 years after: 1.77 cm{sup 3}) and ETV despite radiation therapy compared to responders (median TTV pre-treatment: 1.06 cm{sup 3}; 10-12 years after: 0.81 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.001). 3D quantification of VS showed a significant decrease in TTV and ETV on FSRT-treated patients only. NR had significantly greater TTV and ETV over time. (orig.)

  6. A frequency-based approach to locate common structure for 2D-3D intensity-based registration of setup images in prostate radiotherapy

    In many radiotherapy clinics, geometric uncertainties in the delivery of 3D conformal radiation therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy of the prostate are reduced by aligning the patient's bony anatomy in the planning 3D CT to corresponding bony anatomy in 2D portal images acquired before every treatment fraction. In this paper, we seek to determine if there is a frequency band within the portal images and the digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of the planning CT in which bony anatomy predominates over non-bony anatomy such that portal images and DRRs can be suitably filtered to achieve high registration accuracy in an automated 2D-3D single portal intensity-based registration framework. Two similarity measures, mutual information and the Pearson correlation coefficient were tested on carefully collected gold-standard data consisting of a kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) and megavoltage portal images in the anterior-posterior (AP) view of an anthropomorphic phantom acquired under clinical conditions at known poses, and on patient data. It was found that filtering the portal images and DRRs during the registration considerably improved registration performance. Without filtering, the registration did not always converge while with filtering it always converged to an accurate solution. For the pose-determination experiments conducted on the anthropomorphic phantom with the correlation coefficient, the mean (and standard deviation) of the absolute errors in recovering each of the six transformation parameters were θx:0.18(0.19) deg., θy:0.04(0.04) deg., θz:0.04(0.02) deg., tx:0.14(0.15) mm, ty:0.09(0.05) mm, and tz:0.49(0.40) mm. The mutual information-based registration with filtered images also resulted in similarly small errors. For the patient data, visual inspection of the superimposed registered images showed that they were correctly aligned in all instances. The results presented in this paper suggest that robust and accurate registration

  7. Trans-arterial chemo-embolization and conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma; Chimioembolisation et radiotherapie de conformation dans le traitement du carcinome hepatocellulaire

    Merle, P. [Service d' hepatogastroenterologie, hopital de l' Hotel-dieu, 1, place de l' Hopital, 69002 Lyon (France); Inserm U871, equipe ' Oncogenese hepatique et hepatites virales' , 151, cours Albert-Thomas, 69003 Lyon (France); Universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, IFR62 Lyon-Est, 8, avenue Rockefeller, 69008 Lyon (France); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69310 Pierre-Benite (France); equipe ' Ciblage therapeutique par les agents physiques' , EA 37-38, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-Novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2011-02-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a poor prognosis tumour. The potential curative therapeutic options are ortho-topic liver transplantation, surgical resection and radiofrequency ablation. Unfortunately, only a minority of patients (around 20%) are eligible for these techniques. Thus, patients can benefit from palliative options, such as trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) or sorafenib that bring only modest benefit on survival. Conformal radiotherapy allows delivering high dose radiation within a precise tumour volume while sparing the surrounding liver parenchyma. As employed in mono-therapy, conformal radiotherapy is highly efficient for small size hepatocellular carcinoma (< 5 cm). Above 5 cm, its efficacy is more limited but its association with TACE gives spectacular rates of complete responses. Controlled phase 2 or 3 trials are urgently warranted to define its indications in the therapeutic algorithm of hepatocellular carcinoma. (authors)

  8. In vivo surface dose measurement using GafChromic film dosimetry in breast cancer radiotherapy: comparison of 7-field IMRT, tangential IMRT and tangential 3D-CRT

    The purpose of this study was to compare the surface dose of 7-field IMRT (7 F-IMRT), tangential beam IMRT (TB-IMRT), and tangential beam 3D-CRT (3D-CRT) of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy by means of in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy of the whole breast or the chest wall were eligible for the study. Study patients were treated with a treatment plan using two different radiotherapy techniques (first patient series, 3D-CRT followed by TB-IMRT; second patient series, TB-IMRT followed by 7 F-IMRT). The surface dose was evaluated on three consecutive treatment fractions per radiotherapy technique using in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. The paired t-test was used to assess the difference of in vivo GafChromic film readings or calculated plan parameters of the compared pairs of radiation techniques for statistical significance. Forty-five unselected breast cancer patients were analysed in this study. 7 F-IMRT significantly reduced the surface dose compared to TB-IMRT. Differences were greatest in the central and lateral breast or chest wall region and amounted to a dose reduction of -11.8% to -18.8%. No significant difference of the surface dose was observed between TB-IMRT and 3D-CRT. A corresponding observation was obtained for the calculated skin dose derived from dose-volume histograms. In adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy, 7 F-IMRT offers a significantly reduced surface dose compared to TB-IMRT or 3D-CRT

  9. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes.

  10. SU-D-9A-06: 3D Localization of Neurovascular Bundles Through MR-TRUS Registration in Prostate Radiotherapy

    Purpose: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common complication of prostate-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and the major mechanism is radiation-induced neurovascular bundle (NVB) damage. However, the localization of the NVB remains challenging. This study's purpose is to accurately localize 3D NVB by integrating MR and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images through MR-TRUS fusion. Methods: T1 and T2-weighted MR prostate images were acquired using a Philips 1.5T MR scanner and a pelvic phase-array coil. The 3D TRUS images were captured with a clinical scanner and a 7.5 MHz biplane probe. The TRUS probe was attached to a stepper; the B-mode images were captured from the prostate base to apex at a 1-mm step and the Doppler images were acquired in a 5-mm step. The registration method modeled the prostate tissue as an elastic material, and jointly estimated the boundary condition (surface deformation) and the volumetric deformations under elastic constraint. This technique was validated with a clinical study of 7 patients undergoing RT treatment for prostate cancer. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of landmarks, as well as previous ultrasound Doppler images of patients. Results: MR-TRUS registration was successfully performed for all patients. The mean displacement of the landmarks between the post-registration MR and TRUS images was 1.37±0.42 mm, which demonstrated the precision of the registration based on the biomechanical model; and the NVB volume Dice Overlap Coefficient was 92.1±3.2%, which demonstrated the accuracy of the NVB localization. Conclusion: We have developed a novel approach to improve 3D NVB localization through MR-TRUS fusion for prostate RT, demonstrated its clinical feasibility, and validated its accuracy with ultrasound Doppler data. This technique could be a useful tool as we try to spare the NVB in prostate RT, monitor NBV response to RT, and potentially improve post-RT potency outcomes