WorldWideScience

Sample records for 3d cell cultures

  1. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels

    Therese Andersen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent, and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell–matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  2. Multizone paper platform for 3D cell cultures.

    Ratmir Derda

    Full Text Available In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc. The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously ("cells-in-gels-in-paper" or CiGiP, this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, "sections" all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures.

  3. Fabrication of Nanostructured Poly-ε-caprolactone 3D Scaffolds for 3D Cell Culture Technology

    Schipani, Rossana

    2015-04-21

    Tissue engineering is receiving tremendous attention due to the necessity to overcome the limitations related to injured or diseased tissues or organs. It is the perfect combination of cells and biomimetic-engineered materials. With the appropriate biochemical factors, it is possible to develop new effective bio-devices that are capable to improve or replace biological functions. Latest developments in microfabrication methods, employing mostly synthetic biomaterials, allow the production of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds that are able to direct cell-to-cell interactions and specific cellular functions in order to drive tissue regeneration or cell transplantation. The presented work offers a rapid and efficient method of 3D scaffolds fabrication by using optical lithography and micro-molding techniques. Bioresorbable polymer poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was the material used thanks to its high biocompatibility and ability to naturally degrade in tissues. 3D PCL substrates show a particular combination in the designed length scale: cylindrical shaped pillars with 10μm diameter, 10μm height, arranged in a hexagonal lattice with spacing of 20μm were obtained. The sidewalls of the pillars were nanostructured by attributing a 3D architecture to the scaffold. The suitability of these devices as cell culture technology supports was evaluated by plating NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and human Neural Stem Cells (hNSC) on them. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis was carried out in order to examine the micro- and nano-patterns on the surface of the supports. In addition, after seeding of cells, SEM and immunofluorescence characterization of the fabricated systems were performed to check adhesion, growth and proliferation. It was observed that cells grow and develop healthy on the bio-polymeric devices by giving rise to well-interconnected networks. 3D PCL nano-patterned pillared scaffold therefore may have considerable potential as effective tool for

  4. Surface modified alginate microcapsules for 3D cell culture

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chueh, Di-Yen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-06-01

    Culture as three dimensional cell aggregates or spheroids can offer an ideal platform for tissue engineering applications and for pharmaceutical screening. Such 3D culture models, however, may suffer from the problems such as immune response and ineffective and cumbersome culture. This paper describes a simple method for producing microcapsules with alginate cores and a thin shell of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLL-g-PEG) to encapsulate mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS) cells, generating a non-fouling surface as an effective immunoisolation barrier. We demonstrated the trapping of the alginate microcapsules in a microwell array for the continuous observation and culture of a large number of encapsulated miPS cells in parallel. miPS cells cultured in the microcapsules survived well and proliferated to form a single cell aggregate. Droplet formation of monodisperse microcapsules with controlled size combined with flow cytometry provided an efficient way to quantitatively analyze the growth of encapsulated cells in a high-throughput manner. The simple and cost-effective coating technique employed to produce the core-shell microcapsules could be used in the emerging field of cell therapy. The microwell array would provide a convenient, user friendly and high-throughput platform for long-term cell culture and monitoring.

  5. Self-Assembled Peptide Gels for 3D Cell Culture

    Tang, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Under specific conditions short peptides modified with an N-terminal fluorenyl-9-methoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) group can self-assemble into hydrogel scaffolds similar in properties to the natural extracellular matrix. Fmoc-diphenylalanine (Fmoc-FF) for instance, has been shown to form hydrogels at physiological pH that have the ability to support 2D and 3D cell culture. The aim of this investigation is to provide further understanding of the self-assembly mechanism of such systems in order to progre...

  6. Molecular Predictors of 3D Morphogenesis by Breast Cancer Cell Lines in 3D Culture

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Giricz, Orsi; Lee, Genee; Baehner, Frederick; Gray, Joe; Bissell, Mina; Kenny, Paraic; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Correlative analysis of molecular markers with phenotypic signatures is the simplest model for hypothesis generation. In this paper, a panel of 24 breast cell lines was grown in 3D culture, their morphology was imaged through phase contrast microscopy, and computational methods were developed to segment and represent each colony at multiple dimensions. Subsequently, subpopulations from these morphological responses were identified through consensus clustering to reveal three clusters of round, grape-like, and stellate phenotypes. In some cases, cell lines with particular pathobiological phenotypes clustered together (e.g., ERBB2 amplified cell lines sharing the same morphometric properties as the grape-like phenotype). Next, associations with molecular features were realized through (i) differential analysis within each morphological cluster, and (ii) regression analysis across the entire panel of cell lines. In both cases, the dominant genes that are predictive of the morphological signatures were identified. Specifically, PPAR? has been associated with the invasive stellate morphological phenotype, which corresponds to triple-negative pathobiology. PPAR? has been validated through two supporting biological assays.

  7. Molecular predictors of 3D morphogenesis by breast cancer cell lines in 3D culture.

    Ju Han

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Correlative analysis of molecular markers with phenotypic signatures is the simplest model for hypothesis generation. In this paper, a panel of 24 breast cell lines was grown in 3D culture, their morphology was imaged through phase contrast microscopy, and computational methods were developed to segment and represent each colony at multiple dimensions. Subsequently, subpopulations from these morphological responses were identified through consensus clustering to reveal three clusters of round, grape-like, and stellate phenotypes. In some cases, cell lines with particular pathobiological phenotypes clustered together (e.g., ERBB2 amplified cell lines sharing the same morphometric properties as the grape-like phenotype. Next, associations with molecular features were realized through (i differential analysis within each morphological cluster, and (ii regression analysis across the entire panel of cell lines. In both cases, the dominant genes that are predictive of the morphological signatures were identified. Specifically, PPARgamma has been associated with the invasive stellate morphological phenotype, which corresponds to triple-negative pathobiology. PPARgamma has been validated through two supporting biological assays.

  8. Impedance Spectroscopic Characterisation of Porosity in 3D Cell Culture Scaffolds with Different Channel Networks

    Canali, Chiara; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2015-01-01

    We present the application of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a method for discriminating between different polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) scaffolds for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. The validity of EIS characterisation for scaffolds having different degree of porosity...... serve as means of single-frequency measurements for fast scaffold characterization combined with in vitro monitoring of 3D cell cultures....

  9. Development of 3-D Hydrogel Culture Systems With On-Demand Cell Separation

    Hamilton, Sharon K.; Bloodworth, Nathaniel C.; Massad, Christopher S.; Hammoudi, Taymour M.; Suri, Shalu; Yang, Peter J.; Lu, Hang; Temenoff, Johnna S.

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the effects of paracrine signaling between groups of cells, particularly in the context of better understanding how stem cells contribute to tissue repair. Most current 3-D co-culture methods lack the ability to effectively separate 2 cell populations after the culture period, which is important for simultaneously analyzing the reciprocal effects of each cell type on the other. Here, we detail the development of a 3-D hydrogel co-culture system...

  10. Design of 3D printed insert for hanging culture of Caco-2 cells

    A Caco-2 cell culture on Transwell, an alternative testing to animal or human testing used in evaluating drug intestinal permeability, incorrectly estimated the absorption of actively transported drugs due to the low expression of membrane transporters. Similarly, three-dimensional (3D) cultures of Caco-2 cells, which have been recommended to be more physiological relevant, were not superior to the Transwell culture in either accuracy or convenience in drug permeability testing. Using rapid 3D printing prototyping techniques, this study proposed a hanging culture of Caco-2 cells that performed with high accuracy in predicting drug permeability in humans. As found, hanging cultured Caco-2 cells formed a confluent monolayer and maintained high cell viability on the 3D printed insert. Compared with the normal culture on Transwell, the Caco-2 cells on the 3D printed insert presented ∼30–100% higher brush border enzyme activity and ∼2–7 folds higher activity of P-glycoprotein/multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 during 21 days of incubation. For the eight membrane transporter substrates, the predictive curve of the 3D printing culture exhibited better linearity (R2 = 0.92) to the human oral adsorption than that of the Transwell culture (R2 = 0.84), indicating better prediction by the 3D printing culture. In this regard, the 3D printed insert for hanging culture could be potentially developed as a convenient and low-cost tool for testing drug oral absorption. (paper)

  11. Human disc cells in monolayer vs 3D culture: cell shape, division and matrix formation

    Hanley Edward N

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between cell shape, proliferation, and extracellular matrix (ECM production, important aspects of cell behavior, is examined in a little-studied cell type, the human annulus cell from the intervertebral disc, during monolayer vs three-dimensional (3D culture. Results Three experimental studies showed that cells respond specifically to culture microenvironments by changes in cell shape, mitosis and ECM production: 1 Cell passages showed extensive immunohistochemical evidence of Type I and II collagens only in 3D culture. Chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate were abundant in both monolayer and 3D cultures. 2 Cells showed significantly greater proliferation in monolayer in the presence of platelet-derived growth factor compared to cells in 3D. 3 Cells on Matrigel™-coated monolayer substrates became rounded and formed nodular colonies, a finding absent during monolayer growth. Conclusions The cell's in vivo interactions with the ECM can regulate shape, gene expression and other cell functions. The shape of the annulus cell changes markedly during life: the young, healthy disc contains spindle shaped cells and abundant collagen. With aging and degeneration, many cells assume a strikingly different appearance, become rounded and are surrounded by unusual accumulations of ECM products. In vitro manipulation of disc cells provides an experimental window for testing how disc cells from given individuals respond when they are grown in environments which direct cells to have either spindle- or rounded-shapes. In vitro assessment of the response of such cells to platelet-derived growth factor and to Matrigel™ showed a continued influence of cell shape even in the presence of a growth factor stimulus. These findings contribute new information to the important issue of the influence of cell shape on cell behavior.

  12. Fabrication and optimization of alginate hydrogel constructs for use in 3D neural cell culture

    Two-dimensional (2D) culture systems provide useful information about many biological processes. However, some applications including tissue engineering, drug transport studies, and analysis of cell growth and dynamics are better studied using three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. 3D culture systems can potentially offer higher degrees of organization and control of cell growth environments, more physiologically relevant diffusion characteristics, and permit the formation of more extensive 3D networks of cell-cell interactions. A 3D culture system has been developed using alginate as a cell scaffold, capable of maintaining the viability and function of a variety of neural cell types. Alginate was functionalized by the covalent attachment of a variety of whole proteins and peptide epitopes selected to provide sites for cell attachment. Alginate constructs were used to entrap a variety of neural cell types including astroglioma cells, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Neural cells displayed process outgrowth over time in culture. Cell-seeded scaffolds were characterized in terms of their biochemical and biomechanical properties, effects on seeded neural cells, and suitability for use as 3D neural cell culture models.

  13. Fabrication and optimization of alginate hydrogel constructs for use in 3D neural cell culture

    Frampton, J P; Hynd, M R; Shain, W [Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY 12210 (United States); Shuler, M L, E-mail: jf7674@albany.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 270 Olin Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) culture systems provide useful information about many biological processes. However, some applications including tissue engineering, drug transport studies, and analysis of cell growth and dynamics are better studied using three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. 3D culture systems can potentially offer higher degrees of organization and control of cell growth environments, more physiologically relevant diffusion characteristics, and permit the formation of more extensive 3D networks of cell-cell interactions. A 3D culture system has been developed using alginate as a cell scaffold, capable of maintaining the viability and function of a variety of neural cell types. Alginate was functionalized by the covalent attachment of a variety of whole proteins and peptide epitopes selected to provide sites for cell attachment. Alginate constructs were used to entrap a variety of neural cell types including astroglioma cells, astrocytes, microglia and neurons. Neural cells displayed process outgrowth over time in culture. Cell-seeded scaffolds were characterized in terms of their biochemical and biomechanical properties, effects on seeded neural cells, and suitability for use as 3D neural cell culture models.

  14. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing-Complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir;

    2015-01-01

    configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance...... at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within...... spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics...

  15. Bioimpedance monitoring of 3D cell culturing--complementary electrode configurations for enhanced spatial sensitivity.

    Canali, Chiara; Heiskanen, Arto; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Høyum, Per; Pettersen, Fred-Johan; Hemmingsen, Mette; Wolff, Anders; Dufva, Martin; Martinsen, Ørjan Grøttem; Emnéus, Jenny

    2015-01-15

    A bioimpedance platform is presented as a promising tool for non-invasive real-time monitoring of the entire process of three-dimensional (3D) cell culturing in a hydrogel scaffold. In this study, the dynamics involved in the whole process of 3D cell culturing, starting from polymerisation of a bare 3D gelatin scaffold, to human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) encapsulation and proliferation, was monitored over time. The platform consists of a large rectangular culture chamber with four embedded vertical gold plate electrodes that were exploited in two- and three terminal (2T and 3T) measurement configurations. By switching between the different combinations of electrode couples, it was possible to generate a multiplexing-like approach, which allowed for collecting spatially distributed information within the 3D space. Computational finite element (FE) analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) characterisation were used to determine the configurations' sensitivity field localisation. The 2T setup gives insight into the interfacial phenomena at both electrode surfaces and covers the central part of the 3D cell culture volume, while the four 3T modes provide focus on the dynamics at the corners of the 3D culture chamber. By combining a number of electrode configurations, complementary spatially distributed information on a large 3D cell culture can be obtained with maximised sensitivity in the entire 3D space. The experimental results show that cell proliferation can be monitored within the tested biomimetic environment, paving the way to further developments in bioimpedance tracking of 3D cell cultures and tissue engineering. PMID:25058941

  16. Gel de plaquetas: arcabouço 3D para cultura celular Platelet gel: 3D scaffold for cell culture

    Andrei Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O reparo tissular é o objetivo final da cirurgia. A cultura celular requer arcabouço mecânico que dê suporte ao crescimento celular e difusão dos nutrientes. O uso do plasma rico em plaquetas (PRP como um arcabouço 3D possui diversas vantagens: é material biológico, de fácil absorção pós-transplante, rico em fatores de crescimento, em especial PDGF- ββ e TGF-β que estimula síntese de matriz extracelular na cartilagem. OBJETIVO: Desenvolver arcabouço 3D à base de PRP. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Duas formas foram idealizadas: Sphere e Carpet. Condições estéreis foram utilizadas. O gel de plaquetas permaneceu em cultura celular, observado diariamente em microscópio invertido. RESULTADOS: Ambos arcabouços obtiveram sucesso, com aspectos positivos e negativos. DISCUSSÃO: A forma Sphere não aderiu ao plástico. Observou-se retração do gel e investigação ao microscópio dificultada devido às áreas opacas no campo visual. A forma Carpet não aderiu ao plástico e apresentou-se translúcida. O tempo de estudo foi de 20 dias. CONCLUSÕES: A produção de um arcabouço 3D PRP foi um sucesso, e trata-se de uma alternativa que necessita ser mais utilizado e investigado para que se consolide em uma rota eficiente e confiável na tecnologia de engenharia tissular, particularmente em cultura de tecido cartilaginoso.INTRODUCTION: Tissue repair has been the ultimate goal of surgery. Cell culture requires a mechanical scaffold that supports cell growth and nutrient diffusion. Using platelet-rich plasma (PRP as a 3D scaffold presents various advantages: it is a biological material, easily absorbed after transplantation, rich in growth factors, in particular, PDGF-ββ and TGF-β that stimulate extracellular matrix synthesis in cartilage culture. OBJECTIVE: To develop a PRP 3D scaffold. Material and METHODS: Two forms were idealized: Sphere and Carpet. Sterile conditions were used. The platelet gel remained in culture

  17. Self-assembling Fmoc dipeptide hydrogel for in situ 3D cell culturing

    Akpe Victor; Rydholm Susanna; Liebmann Thomas; Brismar Hjalmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Conventional cell culture studies have been performed on 2D surfaces, resulting in flat, extended cell growth. More relevant studies are desired to better mimic 3D in vivo tissue growth. Such realistic environments should be the aim of any cell growth study, requiring new methods for culturing cells in vitro. Cell biology is also tending toward miniaturization for increased efficiency and specificity. This paper discusses the application of a self-assembling peptide-derive...

  18. High Content Imaging (HCI on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D Cell Cultures

    Pranav Joshi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available High content imaging (HCI is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS. One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology.

  19. On-chip clearing of arrays of 3-D cell cultures and micro-tissues.

    Grist, S M; Nasseri, S S; Poon, T; Roskelley, C; Cheung, K C

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) cell cultures are beneficial models for mimicking the complexities of in vivo tissues, especially in tumour studies where transport limitations can complicate response to cancer drugs. 3-D optical microscopy techniques are less involved than traditional embedding and sectioning, but are impeded by optical scattering properties of the tissues. Confocal and even two-photon microscopy limit sample imaging to approximately 100-200 μm depth, which is insufficient to image hypoxic spheroid cores. Optical clearing methods have permitted high-depth imaging of tissues without physical sectioning, but they are difficult to implement for smaller 3-D cultures due to sample loss in solution exchange. In this work, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform for high-throughput on-chip optical clearing of breast cancer spheroids using the SeeDB, Clear(T2), and ScaleSQ clearing methods. Although all three methods are able to effectively clear the spheroids, we find that SeeDB and ScaleSQ more effectively clear the sample than Clear(T2); however, SeeDB induces green autofluorescence while ScaleS causes sample expansion. Our unique on-chip implementation permits clearing arrays of 3-D cultures using perfusion while monitoring the 3-D cultures throughout the process, enabling visualization of the clearing endpoint as well as monitoring of transient changes that could induce image artefacts. Our microfluidic device is compatible with on-chip 3-D cell culture, permitting the use of on-chip clearing at the endpoint after monitoring the same spheroids during their culture. This on-chip method has the potential to improve readout from 3-D cultures, facilitating their use in cell-based assays for high-content drug screening and other applications. PMID:27493703

  20. Self-assembling Fmoc dipeptide hydrogel for in situ 3D cell culturing

    Liebmann, Thomas; Rydholm, Susanna; Akpe, Victor; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2007-01-01

    Background Conventional cell culture studies have been performed on 2D surfaces, resulting in flat, extended cell growth. More relevant studies are desired to better mimic 3D in vivo tissue growth. Such realistic environments should be the aim of any cell growth study, requiring new methods for culturing cells in vitro. Cell biology is also tending toward miniaturization for increased efficiency and specificity. This paper discusses the application of a self-assembling peptide-derived hydrogel for use as a 3D cell culture scaffold at the microscale. Results Phenylalanine derivative hydrogel formation was seen to occur in multiple dispersion media. Cells were immobilized in situ within microchambers designed for cell analysis. Use of the highly biocompatible hydrogel components and simplistic procedures significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects seen with alternate 3D culture materials and microstructure loading methods. Cells were easily immobilized, sustained and removed from microchambers. Differences in growth morphology were seen in the cultured cells, owing to the 3-dimentional character of the gel structure. Degradation improved the removal of hydrogel from the microstructures, permitting reuse of the analysis platforms. Conclusion Self-assembling diphenylalanine derivative hydrogel provided a method to dramatically reduce the typical difficulties of microculture formation. Effective generation of patterned 3D cultures will lead to improved cell study results by better modeling in vivo growth environments and increasing efficiency and specificity of cell studies. Use of simplified growth scaffolds such as peptide-derived hydrogel should be seen as highly advantageous and will likely become more commonplace in cell culture methodology. PMID:18070345

  1. Self-assembling Fmoc dipeptide hydrogel for in situ 3D cell culturing

    Akpe Victor

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cell culture studies have been performed on 2D surfaces, resulting in flat, extended cell growth. More relevant studies are desired to better mimic 3D in vivo tissue growth. Such realistic environments should be the aim of any cell growth study, requiring new methods for culturing cells in vitro. Cell biology is also tending toward miniaturization for increased efficiency and specificity. This paper discusses the application of a self-assembling peptide-derived hydrogel for use as a 3D cell culture scaffold at the microscale. Results Phenylalanine derivative hydrogel formation was seen to occur in multiple dispersion media. Cells were immobilized in situ within microchambers designed for cell analysis. Use of the highly biocompatible hydrogel components and simplistic procedures significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects seen with alternate 3D culture materials and microstructure loading methods. Cells were easily immobilized, sustained and removed from microchambers. Differences in growth morphology were seen in the cultured cells, owing to the 3-dimentional character of the gel structure. Degradation improved the removal of hydrogel from the microstructures, permitting reuse of the analysis platforms. Conclusion Self-assembling diphenylalanine derivative hydrogel provided a method to dramatically reduce the typical difficulties of microculture formation. Effective generation of patterned 3D cultures will lead to improved cell study results by better modeling in vivo growth environments and increasing efficiency and specificity of cell studies. Use of simplified growth scaffolds such as peptide-derived hydrogel should be seen as highly advantageous and will likely become more commonplace in cell culture methodology.

  2. Endothelial cells stimulate growth of normal and cancerous breast epithelial cells in 3D culture

    Magnusson Magnus K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial-stromal interaction provides regulatory signals that maintain correct histoarchitecture and homeostasis in the normal breast and facilitates tumor progression in breast cancer. However, research on the regulatory role of the endothelial component in the normal and malignant breast gland has largely been neglected. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of endothelial cells on growth and differentiation of human breast epithelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D co-culture assay. Methods Breast luminal and myoepithelial cells and endothelial cells were isolated from reduction mammoplasties. Primary cells and established normal and malignant breast cell lines were embedded in reconstituted basement membrane in direct co-culture with endothelial cells and by separation of Transwell filters. Morphogenic and phenotypic profiles of co-cultures was evaluated by phase contrast microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Results In co-culture, endothelial cells stimulate proliferation of both luminal- and myoepithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells induce a subpopulation of luminal epithelial cells to form large acini/ducts with a large and clear lumen. Endothelial cells also stimulate growth and cloning efficiency of normal and malignant breast epithelial cell lines. Transwell and gradient co-culture studies show that endothelial derived effects are mediated - at least partially - by soluble factors. Conclusion Breast endothelial cells - beside their role in transporting nutrients and oxygen to tissues - are vital component of the epithelial microenvironment in the breast and provide proliferative signals to the normal and malignant breast epithelium. These growth promoting effects of endothelial cells should be taken into consideration in breast cancer biology.

  3. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture platform.

    Jeon, Jessie S; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D; Charest, Joseph L

    2011-04-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying the known commercially-viable manufacturing methods to a cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) material resulted in a microfluidic device with enhanced 3D gel capabilities, controlled surface properties, and improved potential to serve high-volume applications. Hot embossing and roller lamination molded and sealed the microfluidic device. A combination of oxygen plasma and thermal treatments enhanced the sealing, ensured proper placement of the 3D gel, and created controlled and stable surface properties within the device. Culture of cells in the new device indicated no adverse effects of the COC material or processing as compared to previous PDMS devices. The results demonstrate a methodology to transition microfluidic devices for 3D cell culture from scientific research to high-volume applications with broad clinical impact. PMID:21113663

  4. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models.

    Cemal Cagatay Bilgin

    Full Text Available BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC, and (ii heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation.

  5. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models.

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fontenay, Gerald; Cheng, Qingsu; Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i) morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC), and (ii) heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation. PMID:26978075

  6. BioSig3D: High Content Screening of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture Models

    Bilgin, Cemal Cagatay; Fontenay, Gerald; Cheng, Qingsu; Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Parvin, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    BioSig3D is a computational platform for high-content screening of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models that are imaged in full 3D volume. It provides an end-to-end solution for designing high content screening assays, based on colony organization that is derived from segmentation of nuclei in each colony. BioSig3D also enables visualization of raw and processed 3D volumetric data for quality control, and integrates advanced bioinformatics analysis. The system consists of multiple computational and annotation modules that are coupled together with a strong use of controlled vocabularies to reduce ambiguities between different users. It is a web-based system that allows users to: design an experiment by defining experimental variables, upload a large set of volumetric images into the system, analyze and visualize the dataset, and either display computed indices as a heatmap, or phenotypic subtypes for heterogeneity analysis, or download computed indices for statistical analysis or integrative biology. BioSig3D has been used to profile baseline colony formations with two experiments: (i) morphogenesis of a panel of human mammary epithelial cell lines (HMEC), and (ii) heterogeneity in colony formation using an immortalized non-transformed cell line. These experiments reveal intrinsic growth properties of well-characterized cell lines that are routinely used for biological studies. BioSig3D is being released with seed datasets and video-based documentation. PMID:26978075

  7. MAPLE deposition of 3D micropatterned polymeric substrates for cell culture

    Paun, Irina Alexandra, E-mail: irina.paun@physics.pub.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, RO-077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Faculty of Applied Sciences, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-060042, Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, Mona [Faculty of Applied Sciences, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-060042, Bucharest (Romania); Calenic, Bogdan [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dentistry, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania); Luculescu, Catalin Romeo [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, RO-077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Greabu, Maria [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Dentistry, UMF Carol Davila, Bucharest (Romania); Dinescu, Maria, E-mail: dinescum@nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, RO-077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2013-08-01

    3D micropatterned poly(lactide-co-glycolide)/polyurethane (PLGA/PU) substrates were produced by MAPLE deposition through masks and used for regulating the behavior of oral keratinocyte stem cells in response to topography. Flat PLGA/PU substrates were produced for comparison. 3D imaging of the PLGA/PU substrates and of the cultured cells was performed by Digital Holographic Microscopy. The micropatterns were in the shape of squares of 50 × 50 and 80 × 80 μm{sup 2} areas, ∼1.8 μm in height and separated by 20 μm wide channels. It was found that substrate topography guided the adhesion of the cultured cells: on the smooth substrates the cells adhered randomly and showed no preferred orientation; in contrast, on the micropatterned substrates the cells adhered preferentially onto the squares and not in the separating channels. Furthermore, key properties of the cells (size, viability, proliferation rate and stem cell marker expression) did not show any dependence on substrate topography. The size of the cultured cells, their viability, the proportions of actively/slow proliferating cells, as well as the stem cell markers expressions, were similar for both flat and micropatterned substrates. Finally, it was found that the cells cultured on the PLGA/PU substrates deposited by MAPLE exhibited similar properties as the controls (i.e. cells cultured on glass slides), indicating the capability of the former to preserve the properties of the keratinocyte stem cells.

  8. MAPLE deposition of 3D micropatterned polymeric substrates for cell culture

    3D micropatterned poly(lactide-co-glycolide)/polyurethane (PLGA/PU) substrates were produced by MAPLE deposition through masks and used for regulating the behavior of oral keratinocyte stem cells in response to topography. Flat PLGA/PU substrates were produced for comparison. 3D imaging of the PLGA/PU substrates and of the cultured cells was performed by Digital Holographic Microscopy. The micropatterns were in the shape of squares of 50 × 50 and 80 × 80 μm2 areas, ∼1.8 μm in height and separated by 20 μm wide channels. It was found that substrate topography guided the adhesion of the cultured cells: on the smooth substrates the cells adhered randomly and showed no preferred orientation; in contrast, on the micropatterned substrates the cells adhered preferentially onto the squares and not in the separating channels. Furthermore, key properties of the cells (size, viability, proliferation rate and stem cell marker expression) did not show any dependence on substrate topography. The size of the cultured cells, their viability, the proportions of actively/slow proliferating cells, as well as the stem cell markers expressions, were similar for both flat and micropatterned substrates. Finally, it was found that the cells cultured on the PLGA/PU substrates deposited by MAPLE exhibited similar properties as the controls (i.e. cells cultured on glass slides), indicating the capability of the former to preserve the properties of the keratinocyte stem cells.

  9. 3D Hepatic Cultures Simultaneously Maintain Primary Hepatocyte and Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Phenotypes

    Kim, Yeonhee; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2010-01-01

    Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes) and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC) cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs) were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D) configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM), which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1) demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism, detoxification and

  10. 3D hepatic cultures simultaneously maintain primary hepatocyte and liver sinusoidal endothelial cell phenotypes.

    Yeonhee Kim

    Full Text Available Developing in vitro engineered hepatic tissues that exhibit stable phenotype is a major challenge in the field of hepatic tissue engineering. However, the rapid dedifferentiation of hepatic parenchymal (hepatocytes and non-parenchymal (liver sinusoidal endothelial, LSEC cell types when removed from their natural environment in vivo remains a major obstacle. The primary goal of this study was to demonstrate that hepatic cells cultured in layered architectures could preserve or potentially enhance liver-specific behavior of both cell types. Primary rat hepatocytes and rat LSECs (rLSECs were cultured in a layered three-dimensional (3D configuration. The cell layers were separated by a chitosan-hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM, which served to mimic the Space of Disse. Hepatocytes and rLSECs exhibited several key phenotypic characteristics over a twelve day culture period. Immunostaining for the sinusoidal endothelial 1 antibody (SE-1 demonstrated that rLSECs cultured in the 3D hepatic model maintained this unique feature over twelve days. In contrast, rLSECs cultured in monolayers lost their phenotype within three days. The unique stratified structure of the 3D culture resulted in enhanced heterotypic cell-cell interactions, which led to improvements in hepatocyte functions. Albumin production increased three to six fold in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Only rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures exhibited increasing CYP1A1/2 and CYP3A activity. Well-defined bile canaliculi were observed only in the rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures. Together, these data suggest that rLSEC-PEM-Hepatocyte cultures are highly suitable models to monitor the transformation of toxins in the liver and their transport out of this organ. In summary, these results indicate that the layered rLSEC-PEM-hepatocyte model, which recapitulates key features of hepatic sinusoids, is a potentially powerful medium for obtaining comprehensive knowledge on liver metabolism

  11. Universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures

    Sonntag, F.; Schmieder, F.; Ströbel, J.; Grünzner, S.; Busek, M.; Günther, K.; Steege, T.; Polk, C.; Klotzbach, U.

    2016-03-01

    The miniaturization, rapid prototyping and automation of lab-on-a-chip technology play nowadays a very important role. Lab-on-a-chip technology is successfully implemented not only for environmental analysis and medical diagnostics, but also as replacement of animals used for the testing of substances in the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. For that purpose the Fraunhofer IWS and partners developed a lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays in the last years, which includes different micropumps, valves, channels, reservoirs and customized cell culture modules. This technology is already implemented for the characterization of different human cell cultures and organoids, like skin, liver, endothelium, hair follicle and nephron. The advanced universal lab-on-a-chip platform for complex, perfused 3D cell cultures is divided into a multilayer basic chip with integrated micropump and application-specific 3D printed cell culture modules. Moreover a technology for surface modification of the printed cell culture modules by laser micro structuring and a complex and flexibly programmable controlling device based on an embedded Linux system was developed. A universal lab-on-a-chip platform with an optional oxygenator and a cell culture module for cubic scaffolds as well as first cell culture experiments within the cell culture device will be presented. The module is designed for direct interaction with robotic dispenser systems. This offers the opportunity to combine direct organ printing of cells and scaffolds with the microfluidic cell culture module. The characterization of the developed system was done by means of Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV) and an optical oxygen measuring system.

  12. Human dental pulp stem cells produce mineralized matrix in 2D and 3D cultures

    M. Riccio; Resca, E.; Maraldi, T; Pisciotta, A.; Ferrari, A; Bruzzesi, G.; De Pol, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in 2D cultures and 3D biomaterials. DPSCs, separated from dental pulp by enzymatic digestion, and isolated by magnetic cell sorting were differentiated toward osteogenic lineage on 2D surface by using an osteogenic medium. During the differentiation process, DPSCs express specific bone proteins like Runx-2, Osx, OPN and OCN with a sequential expression, analogous to those occurr...

  13. Human dental pulp stem cells produce mineralized matrix in 2D and 3D cultures

    M. Riccio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs in 2D cultures and 3D biomaterials. DPSCs, separated from dental pulp by enzymatic digestion, and isolated by magnetic cell sorting were differentiated toward osteogenic lineage on 2D surface by using an osteogenic medium. During the differentiation process, DPSCs express specific bone proteins like Runx-2, Osx, OPN and OCN with a sequential expression, analogous to those occurring during osteoblast differentiation, and produce extracellular calcium deposits. In order to differentiate cells in a 3D space that mimes the physiological environment, DPSCs were cultured in two distinct bioscaffolds, MatrigelTM and Collagen sponge. With the addition of a third dimension, osteogenic differentiation and mineralized extracellular matrix production significantly improved. In particular, in MatrigelTM DPSCs differentiated with osteoblast/osteocyte characteristics and connected by gap junction, and therefore formed calcified nodules with a 3D intercellular network. Furthermore, DPSCs differentiated in collagen sponge actively secrete human type I collagen micro-fibrils and form calcified matrix containing trabecular-like structures. These neo-formed DPSCs-scaffold devices may be used in regenerative surgical applications in order to resolve pathologies and traumas characterized by critical size bone defects.

  14. Low-level laser therapy in 3D cell culture model using gingival fibroblasts.

    Basso, Fernanda G; Soares, Diana G; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-07-01

    Besides extensive data about the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on different cell types, so far, these results were obtained from monolayer cell culture models, which have limitations in terms of cell morphology and phenotype expression. Therefore, for better in vitro evaluation of the effects of LLLT, this study was performed with a 3D cell culture model, where gingival fibroblasts were seeded in collagen matrix. Cells isolated from a healthy patient were seeded in wells of 24-well plates with culture medium (DMEM) supplemented with 10 % fetal bovine serum and collagen type I solution. After 5 days, a serum-free DMEM was added to the matrices with cells that were subjected or not to three consecutive irradiations of LLLT by means of the LaserTABLE diode device (780 nm, 25 mW) at 0.5, 1.5, and 3 J/cm(2). Twenty-four hours after the last irradiation, cell viability and morphology as well as gene expression of growth factors were assessed. Histological evaluation of matrices demonstrated uniform distribution and morphology of gingival fibroblasts within the collagen matrix. LLLT at 3 J/cm(2) increased gingival fibroblast viability. Enhanced gene expression of hCOL-I and hEGF was observed for 0.5 J/cm(2), while no significant changes were detected for the other irradiation densities tested. In conclusion, LLLT promoted biostimulation of gingival fibroblasts seeded in a 3D cell culture model, demonstrating that this model can be applied for phototherapy studies and that LLLT could penetrate the collagen matrix to increase cell functions related to tissue repair. PMID:27126408

  15. Defining an optimal surface chemistry for pluripotent stem cell culture in 2D and 3D

    Zonca, Michael R., Jr.

    Surface chemistry is critical for growing pluripotent stem cells in an undifferentiated state. There is great potential to engineer the surface chemistry at the nanoscale level to regulate stem cell adhesion. However, the challenge is to identify the optimal surface chemistry of the substrata for ES cell attachment and maintenance. Using a high-throughput polymerization and screening platform, a chemically defined, synthetic polymer grafted coating that supports strong attachment and high expansion capacity of pluripotent stem cells has been discovered using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system. This optimal substrate, N-[3-(Dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide (DMAPMA) that is grafted on 2D synthetic poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membrane, sustains the self-renewal of ES cells (up to 7 passages). DMAPMA supports cell attachment of ES cells through integrin beta1 in a RGD-independent manner and is similar to another recently reported polymer surface. Next, DMAPMA has been able to be transferred to 3D by grafting to synthetic, polymeric, PES fibrous matrices through both photo-induced and plasma-induced polymerization. These 3D modified fibers exhibited higher cell proliferation and greater expression of pluripotency markers of mouse ES cells than 2D PES membranes. Our results indicated that desirable surfaces in 2D can be scaled to 3D and that both surface chemistry and structural dimension strongly influence the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Lastly, the feasibility of incorporating DMAPMA into a widely used natural polymer, alginate, has been tested. Novel adhesive alginate hydrogels have been successfully synthesized by either direct polymerization of DMAPMA and methacrylic acid blended with alginate, or photo-induced DMAPMA polymerization on alginate nanofibrous hydrogels. In particular, DMAPMA-coated alginate hydrogels support strong ES cell attachment, exhibiting a concentration dependency of DMAPMA. This research provides a

  16. 3D cell culture systems modeling tumor growth determinants in cancer target discovery.

    Thoma, Claudio R; Zimmermann, Miriam; Agarkova, Irina; Kelm, Jens M; Krek, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of cancer cells, cell biological context, heterotypic crosstalk and the microenvironment are key determinants of the multistep process of tumor development. They sign responsible, to a significant extent, for the limited response and resistance of cancer cells to molecular-targeted therapies. Better functional knowledge of the complex intra- and intercellular signaling circuits underlying communication between the different cell types populating a tumor tissue and of the systemic and local factors that shape the tumor microenvironment is therefore imperative. Sophisticated 3D multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) systems provide an emerging tool to model the phenotypic and cellular heterogeneity as well as microenvironmental aspects of in vivo tumor growth. In this review we discuss the cellular, chemical and physical factors contributing to zonation and cellular crosstalk within tumor masses. On this basis, we further describe 3D cell culture technologies for growth of MCTS as advanced tools for exploring molecular tumor growth determinants and facilitating drug discovery efforts. We conclude with a synopsis on technological aspects for on-line analysis and post-processing of 3D MCTS models. PMID:24636868

  17. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. PMID:26358782

  18. Assessing Drug Efficacy in a Miniaturized Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro 3D Cell Culture Model.

    Shelper, Todd B; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have one of the poorest prognoses among all cancers. The drug discovery efforts for this disease have largely failed, with no significant improvement in survival outcomes for advanced pancreatic cancer patients over the past 20 years. Traditional in vitro cell culture techniques have been used extensively in both basic and early drug discovery; however, these systems offer poor models to assess emerging therapeutics. More predictive cell-based models, which better capture the cellular heterogeneity and complexities of solid pancreatic tumors, are urgently needed not only to improve drug discovery success but also to provide insight into the tumor biology. Pancreatic tumors are characterized by a unique micro-environment that is surrounded by a dense stroma. A complex network of interactions between extracellular matrix (ECM) components and the effects of cell-to-cell contacts may enhance survival pathways within in vivo tumors. This biological and physical complexity is lost in traditional cell monolayer models. To explore the predictive potential of a more complex cellular system, a three-dimensional (3D) micro-tumor assay was evaluated. Efficacy of six current chemotherapeutics was determined against a panel of primary and metastatic pancreatic tumor cell lines in a miniaturized ECM-based 3D cell culture system. Suitability for potential use in high-throughput screening applications was assessed, including ascertaining the effects that miniaturization and automation had on assay robustness. Cellular health was determined by utilizing an indirect population-based metabolic activity assay and a direct imaging-based cell viability assay. PMID:27552143

  19. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture platform

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger D.; Charest, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying t...

  20. Hot embossing for fabrication of a microfluidic 3D cell culture

    Jeon, Jessie S.; Chung, Seok; Kamm, Roger Dale; Charest, Joseph L.

    2010-01-01

    Clinically relevant studies of cell function in vitro require a physiologically-representative microenvironment possessing aspects such as a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) and controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic system with a 3D collagen gel has previously served for analysis of factors inducing different responses of cells in a 3D microenvironment under controlled biochemical and biophysical parameters. In the present study, applying t...

  1. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    Chitcholtan, Kenny, E-mail: kenny.chitcholtan@otago.ac.nz [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand); Asselin, Eric, E-mail: Eric.Asselin@uqtr.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Quebec, at Trois-Rivières, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada G9A 5H7 (Canada); Parent, Sophie, E-mail: Sophie.Parent@uqtr.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biology, University of Quebec, at Trois-Rivières, C.P. 500, Trois-Rivières, Quebec, Canada G9A 5H7 (Canada); Sykes, Peter H., E-mail: peter.sykes@otago.ac.nz [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand); Evans, John J., E-mail: john.evans@otago.ac.nz [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand); Centre of Neuroendocrinology and The MacDiarmid Institute of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, University of Otago, Christchurch, 2 Riccarton Avenue, Christchurch 8011 (New Zealand)

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  2. Differences in growth properties of endometrial cancer in three dimensional (3D) culture and 2D cell monolayer

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models have an invaluable role in understanding the behaviour of tumour cells in a well defined microenvironment. This is because some aspects of tumour characteristics cannot be fully recapitulated in a cell monolayer (2D). In the present study, we compared growth patterns, expression of signalling molecules, and metabolism-associated proteins of endometrial cancer cell lines in 3D and 2D cell cultures. Cancer cells formed spherical structures in 3D reconstituted basement membrane (3D rBM), and the morphological appearance was cell line dependent. Cell differentiation was observed after 8 days in the 3D rBM. There was reduced proliferation, detected by less expression of PCNA in 3D rBM than in 2D cell monolayers. The addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) to cancer cells induced phosphorylation of EGFR and Akt in both cell culture conditions. The uptake of glucose was selectively altered in the 3D rBM, but there was a lack of association with Glut-1 expression. The secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was selectively altered in 3D rBM, and it was cell line dependent. Our data demonstrated that 3D rBM as an in vitro model can influence proliferation and metabolism of endometrial cancer cell behaviour compared to 2D cell monolayer. Changes are specific to individual cell types. The use of 3D rBM is, therefore, important in the in vitro study of targeted anticancer therapies.

  3. A Novel Flow-Perfusion Bioreactor Supports 3D Dynamic Cell Culture

    Alexander M. Sailon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bone engineering requires thicker three-dimensional constructs than the maximum thickness supported by standard cell-culture techniques (2 mm. A flow-perfusion bioreactor was developed to provide chemotransportation to thick (6 mm scaffolds. Methods. Polyurethane scaffolds, seeded with murine preosteoblasts, were loaded into a novel bioreactor. Control scaffolds remained in static culture. Samples were harvested at days 2, 4, 6, and 8 and analyzed for cellular distribution, viability, metabolic activity, and density at the periphery and core. Results. By day 8, static scaffolds had a periphery cell density of 67%±5.0%, while in the core it was 0.3%±0.3%. Flow-perfused scaffolds demonstrated peripheral cell density of 94%±8.3% and core density of 76%±3.1% at day 8. Conclusions. Flow perfusion provides chemotransportation to thick scaffolds. This system may permit high throughput study of 3D tissues in vitro and enable prefabrication of biological constructs large enough to solve clinical problems.

  4. Dual targeting of EGFR and focal adhesion kinase in 3D grown HNSCC cell cultures

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) show frequent overexpression and hyperactivity in various human malignancies including head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). To examine effects of dual EGFR/FAK inhibition on cellular radiosensitivity of HNSCC cells in a more physiological environment, we employed a previously established laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) based three-dimensional (3D) cell culture model. Materials and methods: UTSCC15 and SAS HNSCC cell lines stably transfected with EGFR-CFP or CFP were used. Single or combined EGFR (Cetuximab, siRNA) and FAK (TAE226, siRNA) inhibition were accomplished prior to measuring clonogenic survival and protein expression and phosphorylation. Immunofluorescence enabled visualization of EGFR-CFP and FAK. Results: Cetuximab resulted in higher radiosensitization in EGFR-CFP overexpressing cell lines than CFP controls. Single EGFR or FAK inhibition mediated radiosensitization, while dual EGFR/FAK targeting further augmented this effect. Despite signaling alterations upon Cetuximab and siRNA knockdown, analysis of protein expression and phosphorylation indicates EGFR and FAK signaling coexistence without obvious overlap. Conclusions: Combined EGFR/FAK targeting yielded stronger radiosensitization than either approach alone, which might be based on non-overlapping downstream signaling. Whether dual targeting of EGFR and FAK can reasonably be combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy needs clarification.

  5. A Multifunctional 3D Co-Culture System for Studies of Mammary Tissue Morphogenesis and Stem Cell Biology

    Campbell, Jonathan J.; Davidenko, Natalia; Caffarel, Maria M.; Cameron, Ruth E.; Watson, Christine J

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM) in three dimensional (3D) space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA) scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this sc...

  6. Drug penetration and metabolism in 3D cell cultures treated in a 3D printed fluidic device: assessment of irinotecan via MALDI imaging mass spectrometry.

    LaBonia, Gabriel J; Lockwood, Sarah Y; Heller, Andrew A; Spence, Dana M; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-06-01

    Realistic in vitro models are critical in the drug development process. In this study, a novel in vitro platform is employed to assess drug penetration and metabolism. This platform, which utilizes a 3D printed fluidic device, allows for dynamic dosing of three dimensional cell cultures, also known as spheroids. The penetration of the chemotherapeutic irinotecan into HCT 116 colon cancer spheroids was examined with MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). The active metabolite of irinotecan, SN-38, was also detected. After twenty-four hours of treatment, SN-38 was concentrated to the outside of the spheroid, a region of actively dividing cells. The irinotecan prodrug localization contrasted with SN-38 and was concentrated to the necrotic core of the spheroids, a region containing mostly dead and dying cells. These results demonstrate that this unique in vitro platform is an effective means to assess drug penetration and metabolism in 3D cell cultures. This innovative system can have a transformative impact on the preclinical evaluation of drug candidates due to its cost effectiveness and high throughput. PMID:27198560

  7. AlgiMatrix™ Based 3D Cell Culture System as an In-Vitro Tumor Model for Anticancer Studies

    Godugu, Chandraiah; Patel, Apurva R.; Desai, Utkarsh; Andey, Terrick; Sams, Alexandria; Singh, Mandip

    2013-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) in-vitro cultures are recognized for recapitulating the physiological microenvironment and exhibiting high concordance with in-vivo conditions. Taking the advantages of 3D culture, we have developed the in-vitro tumor model for anticancer drug screening. Methods Cancer cells grown in 6 and 96 well AlgiMatrix™ scaffolds resulted in the formation of multicellular spheroids in the size range of 100–300 µm. Spheroids were grown in two weeks in cultures without co...

  8. Surface Acoustic Waves (SAW-Based Biosensing for Quantification of Cell Growth in 2D and 3D Cultures

    Tao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection and quantification of cell viability and growth in two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D cell cultures commonly involve harvesting of cells and therefore requires a parallel set-up of several replicates for time-lapse or dose–response studies. Thus, developing a non-invasive and touch-free detection of cell growth in longitudinal studies of 3D tumor spheroid cultures or of stem cell regeneration remains a major unmet need. Since surface acoustic waves (SAWs permit mass loading-based biosensing and have been touted due to their many advantages including low cost, small size and ease of assembly, we examined the potential of SAW-biosensing to detect and quantify cell growth. Herein, we demonstrate that a shear horizontal-surface acoustic waves (SH-SAW device comprising two pairs of resonators consisting of interdigital transducers and reflecting fingers can be used to quantify mass loading by the cells in suspension as well as within a 3D cell culture platform. A 3D COMSOL model was built to simulate the mass loading response of increasing concentrations of cells in suspension in the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS well in order to predict the characteristics and optimize the design of the SH-SAW biosensor. The simulated relative frequency shift from the two oscillatory circuit systems (one of which functions as control were found to be concordant to experimental data generated with RAW264.7 macrophage and A549 cancer cells. In addition, results showed that SAW measurements per se did not affect viability of cells. Further, SH-SAW biosensing was applied to A549 cells cultured on a 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffold that generate tumor spheroids (tumoroids and the results showed the device's ability to detect changes in tumor spheroid growth over the course of eight days. Taken together, these results demonstrate the use of SH-SAW device for detection and quantification of cell growth changes over time in 2D suspension cultures and in

  9. Infrared imaging of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line phenotypes in 2D and 3D cultures.

    Smolina, Margarita; Goormaghtigh, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One current challenge in the field of breast cancer infrared imaging is the identification of carcinoma cell subtypes in the tissue. Neither sequencing nor immunochemistry is currently able to provide a cell by cell thorough classification. The latter is needed to build accurate statistical models capable of recognizing the diversity of breast cancer cell lines that may be present in a tissue section. One possible approach for overcoming this problem is to obtain the IR spectral signature of well-characterized tumor cell lines in culture. Cultures in three-dimensional matrices appear to generate an environment that mimics better the in vivo environment. There are, at present, series of breast cancer cell lines that have been thoroughly characterized in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) cultures by full transcriptomics analyses. In this work, we describe the methods used to grow, to process, and to characterize a triple-negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, in 3D laminin-rich extracellular matrix (lrECM) culture and compare it with traditional monolayer cultures and tissue sections. While unsupervised analyses did not completely separate spectra of cells grown in 2D from 3D lrECM cultures, a supervised statistical analysis resulted in an almost perfect separation. When IR spectral responses of epithelial tumor cells from clinical triple-negative breast carcinoma samples were added to these data, a principal component analysis indicated that they cluster closer to the spectra of 3D culture cells than to the spectra of cells grown on a flat plastic substrata. This result is encouraging because of correlating well-characterized cell line features with clinical biopsies. PMID:25568895

  10. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: Characterization in a 3D-cell culture model

    Gagliano, Nicoletta; Celesti, Giuseppe; Tacchini, Lorenza; Pluchino, Stefano; Sforza, Chiarella; Rasile, Marco; Valerio, Vincenza; Laghi, Luigi; Conte, Vincenzo; Procacci, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of three-dimensional (3D)-arrangement on the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. METHODS: HPAF-II, HPAC, and PL45 PDAC cells were cultured in either 2D-monolayers or 3D-spheroids. Ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, N-cadherin, collagen type I (COL-I), vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and podoplanin was assayed by confocal microscopy in cells cultured on 12-mm diameter round coverslips and in 3D-spheroids. Gene expression for E-cadherin, Snail, Slug, Twist, Zeb1, and Zeb2 was quantified by real-time PCR. E-cadherin protein level and its electrophoretic pattern were studied by Western blot in cell lysates obtained from cells grown in 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. RESULTS: The E-cadherin/β-catenin complex was expressed in a similar way in plasma membrane cell boundaries in both 2D-monolayers and 3D-spheroids. E-cadherin increased in lysates obtained from 3D-spheroids, while cleavage fragments were more evident in 2D-monolayers. N-cadherin expression was observed in very few PDAC cells grown in 2D-monolayers, but was more evident in 3D-spheroids. Some cells expressing COL-I were observed in 3D-spheroids. Podoplanin, expressed in collectively migrating cells, and αSMA were similarly expressed in both experimental conditions. The concomitant maintenance of the E-cadherin/β-catenin complex at cell boundaries supports the hypothesis of a collective migration for these cells, which is consistent with podoplanin expression. CONCLUSION: We show that a 3D-cell culture model could provide deeper insight into understanding the biology of PDAC and allow for the detection of marked differences in the phenotype of PDAC cells grown in 3D-spheroids. PMID:27182158

  11. Metabolic response of lung cancer cells to radiation in a paper-based 3D cell culture system.

    Simon, Karen A; Mosadegh, Bobak; Minn, Kyaw Thu; Lockett, Matthew R; Mohammady, Marym R; Boucher, Diane M; Hall, Amy B; Hillier, Shawn M; Udagawa, Taturo; Eustace, Brenda K; Whitesides, George M

    2016-07-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Paper (CiGiP)-in evaluating the metabolic response of lung cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The 3D tissue-like construct-prepared by stacking multiple sheets of paper containing cell-embedded hydrogels-generates a gradient of oxygen and nutrients that decreases monotonically in the stack. Separating the layers of the stack after exposure enabled analysis of the cellular response to radiation as a function of oxygen and nutrient availability; this availability is dictated by the distance between the cells and the source of oxygenated medium. As the distance between the cells and source of oxygenated media increased, cells show increased levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha, decreased proliferation, and reduced sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Each of these cellular responses are characteristic of cancer cells observed in solid tumors. With this setup we were able to differentiate three isogenic variants of A549 cells based on their metabolic radiosensitivity; these three variants have known differences in their metastatic behavior in vivo. This system can, therefore, capture some aspects of radiosensitivity of populations of cancer cells related to mass-transport phenomenon, carry out systematic studies of radiation response in vitro that decouple effects from migration and proliferation of cells, and regulate the exposure of oxygen to subpopulations of cells in a tissue-like construct either before or after irradiation. PMID:27116031

  12. The relevance of using 3D cell cultures, in addition to 2D monolayer cultures, when evaluating breast cancer drug sensitivity and resistance.

    O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    PUBLISHED 2016 Jun 10. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.9935. [Epub ahead of print] Solid tumours naturally grow in 3D wherein the spatial arrangement of cells affects how they interact with each other. This suggests that 3D cell culture may mimic the natural in vivo setting better than traditional monolayer (2D) cell culture, where cells are grown attached to plastic. Here, using HER2-positive breast cancer cell lines as models (BT474, HCC1954, EFM192A), the effects of culturing c...

  13. Increased GFAP immunoreactivity by astrocytes in response to contact with dorsal root ganglia cells in a 3D culture model

    East, Emma; Golding, Jon; Phillips, James

    2007-01-01

    Failure of repair mechanisms in the injured CNS is widely attributed to the inhibitory environment of the lesion site, most notably the formation of the glial scar which forms a physical and physiological barrier to axon regeneration. We developed an in vitro 3D cell culture model to investigate the response of astrocytes to cells found at the inhibitory interfaces formed following damage to the spinal cord. CellTrackerTM labelled dissociated DRGs were seeded onto astrocy...

  14. AlgiMatrix™ based 3D cell culture system as an in-vitro tumor model for anticancer studies.

    Chandraiah Godugu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D in-vitro cultures are recognized for recapitulating the physiological microenvironment and exhibiting high concordance with in-vivo conditions. Taking the advantages of 3D culture, we have developed the in-vitro tumor model for anticancer drug screening. METHODS: Cancer cells grown in 6 and 96 well AlgiMatrix™ scaffolds resulted in the formation of multicellular spheroids in the size range of 100-300 µm. Spheroids were grown in two weeks in cultures without compromising the growth characteristics. Different marketed anticancer drugs were screened by incubating them for 24 h at 7, 9 and 11 days in 3D cultures and cytotoxicity was measured by AlamarBlue® assay. Effectiveness of anticancer drug treatments were measured based on spheroid number and size distribution. Evaluation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic markers was done by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. The 3D results were compared with the conventional 2D monolayer cultures. Cellular uptake studies for drug (Doxorubicin and nanoparticle (NLC were done using spheroids. RESULTS: IC(50 values for anticancer drugs were significantly higher in AlgiMatrix™ systems compared to 2D culture models. The cleaved caspase-3 expression was significantly decreased (2.09 and 2.47 folds respectively for 5-Fluorouracil and Camptothecin in H460 spheroid cultures compared to 2D culture system. The cytotoxicity, spheroid size distribution, immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and nanoparticle penetration data suggested that in vitro tumor models show higher resistance to anticancer drugs and supporting the fact that 3D culture is a better model for the cytotoxic evaluation of anticancer drugs in vitro. CONCLUSION: The results from our studies are useful to develop a high throughput in vitro tumor model to study the effect of various anticancer agents and various molecular pathways affected by the anticancer drugs and formulations.

  15. A multifunctional 3D co-culture system for studies of mammary tissue morphogenesis and stem cell biology.

    Jonathan J Campbell

    Full Text Available Studies on the stem cell niche and the efficacy of cancer therapeutics require complex multicellular structures and interactions between different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM in three dimensional (3D space. We have engineered a 3D in vitro model of mammary gland that encompasses a defined, porous collagen/hyaluronic acid (HA scaffold forming a physiologically relevant foundation for epithelial and adipocyte co-culture. Polarized ductal and acinar structures form within this scaffold recapitulating normal tissue morphology in the absence of reconstituted basement membrane (rBM hydrogel. Furthermore, organoid developmental outcome can be controlled by the ratio of collagen to HA, with a higher HA concentration favouring acinar morphological development. Importantly, this culture system recapitulates the stem cell niche as primary mammary stem cells form complex organoids, emphasising the utility of this approach for developmental and tumorigenic studies using genetically altered animals or human biopsy material, and for screening cancer therapeutics for personalised medicine.

  16. 3D cell cultures of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells are radiosensitized by the focal adhesion kinase inhibitor TAE226

    Background and purpose: Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main player in integrin signaling and survival, is frequently overexpressed in human cancers and therefore postulated as potential target in cancer therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the radiosensitizing potential of the FAK inhibitor TAE226 in three-dimensional (3D) tumor cell cultures. Materials and methods: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells (FaDu, UT-SCC15, UT-SCC45), lung cancer cells (A549), colorectal carcinoma cells (DLD-1, HCT-116) and pancreatic tumor cells (MiaPaCa2, Panc1) were treated with different concentrations of TAE226 (0-1 μm; 1 or 24 h) without or in combination with irradiation (0-6 Gy, X-ray, single dose). Subsequently, 3D clonogenic survival assays (laminin-rich extracellular matrix) and Western blotting (expression/phosphorylation, e.g. FAK, Akt, ERK1/2) were performed. Results: All investigated 3D cell cultures showed a dose-dependent reduction in clonogenic survival by TAE226. Intriguingly, TAE226 only significantly radiosensitized 3D HNSCC cell cultures accompanied by a pronounced dephosphorylation of FAK, Akt and ERK1/2. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate TAE226 as potent FAK inhibitor that enhances the cellular radiosensitivity particularly of HNSCC cells grown in a 3D cell culture model. Future in vitro and in vivo investigations will clarify, to which extent this approach might be clinically relevant for radiotherapy of HNSCC.

  17. The microenvironment determines the breast cancer cells' phenotype: organization of MCF7 cells in 3D cultures

    Stromal-epithelial interactions mediate breast development, and the initiation and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed 3-dimensional (3D) in vitro models to study breast cancer tissue organization and the role of the microenvironment in phenotypic determination. The human breast cancer MCF7 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with primary human breast fibroblasts. Cells were embedded in matrices containing either type I collagen or a combination of reconstituted basement membrane proteins and type I collagen. The cultures were carried out for up to 6 weeks. For every time point (1-6 weeks), the gels were fixed and processed for histology, and whole-mounted for confocal microscopy evaluation. The epithelial structures were characterized utilizing immunohistochemical techniques; their area and proliferation index were measured using computerized morphometric analysis. Statistical differences between groups were analyzed by ANOVA, Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test and chi-square. Most of the MCF7 cells grown alone within a collagen matrix died during the first two weeks; those that survived organized into large, round and solid clusters. The presence of fibroblasts in collagen gels reduced MCF7 cell death, induced cell polarity, and the formation of round and elongated epithelial structures containing a lumen. The addition of reconstituted basement membrane to collagen gels by itself had also survival and organizational effects on the MCF7 cells. Regardless of the presence of fibroblasts, the MCF7 cells both polarized and formed a lumen. The addition of fibroblasts to the gel containing reconstituted basement membrane and collagen induced the formation of elongated structures. Our results indicate that a matrix containing both type I collagen and reconstituted basement membrane, and the presence of normal breast fibroblasts constitute the minimal permissive microenvironment to induce near-complete tumor phenotype reversion. These human

  18. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on Growth of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D and Monolayer Culture System

    Babak Qasemi-Panahi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Many studies have been showed transfer of aflatoxins, toxins produced by Aspergillus flvaus and Aspergillus parasiticus fungi, into milk. These toxins are transferred into the milk through digestive system by eating contaminated food. Due to the toxicity of these materials, it seems that it has side effects on the growth of mammary cells. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigate possible toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 on bovine mammary epithelial cells in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Methods: Specimens of the mammary tissue of bovine were sized out in size 2×2 cm in slaughterhouse. After disinfection and washing in sterile PBS, primary cell culture was performed by enzymatic digestion of tissue with collagenase. When proper numbers of cells were achieved in monolayer culture, cells were seeded in a 24-well culture plate for three-dimensional (3D culture in Matrigel matrix. After 21 days of 3D culture and reaching the required number of cells, the concentrations of 15, 25 and 35 μL of AFB1 were added to the culture in quadruplicate and incubated for 8 hours. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay and finally, any change in the morphology of the cells was studied by microscopic technique. Results: Microscopic investigations showed necrosis of the AFB1-exposed cells compared to the control cells. Also, bovine mammary epithelial cells were significantly affected by AFB1 in dose and time dependent manner in cell viability assays. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that AFB1 can induce cytotoxicity and necrosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

  19. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release

  20. Collagen esterification enhances the function and survival of pancreatic β cells in 2D and 3D culture systems

    Ko, Jae Hyung [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Dalim Tissen Co., LTD., 383-93, Yonnam-Dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang Hee [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Dalim Tissen Co., LTD., 383-93, Yonnam-Dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Seong Hee; Lee, Song [Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Si-Nae [Regenerative Medicine Research Center, Dalim Tissen Co., LTD., 383-93, Yonnam-Dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, In Kyong, E-mail: shimiink@gmail.com [Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Song Cheol, E-mail: drksc@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Science, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine & Asan Medical Center, 388-1 Pungnap-2 Dong, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-07

    Collagen, one of the most important components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), may play a role in the survival of pancreatic islet cells. In addition, chemical modifications that change the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification have been shown to increase the adhesion and proliferation of various cell types. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare the effects of native collagen (NC) and esterified collagen (EC) on β cell function and survival. After isolation by the collagenase digestion technique, rat islets were cultured with NC and EC in 2 dimensional (2D) and 3 dimensional (3D) environments for a long-term duration in vitro. The cells were assessed for islet adhesion, morphology, viability, glucose-induced insulin secretion, and mRNA expression of glucose metabolism-related genes, and visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Islet cells attached tightly in the NC group, but islet cell viability was similar in both the NC and EC groups. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was higher in the EC group than in the NC group in both 2D and 3D culture. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of glucokinase in the EC group were higher than those in the NC group and were associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion. Finally, SEM observation confirmed that islets had more intact component cells on EC sponges than on NC sponges. These results indicate that modification of collagen may offer opportunities to improve function and viability of islet cells. - Highlights: • We changed the collagen charge profile to a net positive charge by esterification. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen improved survival in both 2D and 3D culture. • Islets cultured on esterified collagen enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin release. • High levels of glucokinase mRNA may be associated with increased insulin release.

  1. Design, construction and testing of a COC 3D flow-over flow-through bioreactor for hepatic cell culture

    Windels, Jindrich; Verplancke, Rik; Jahanshahi, Amir; Heimann, Marcus; Leite, Sofia B.; Roosens, Tiffany; van Grunsven, Leo A; Barbe, Laurent; Prill, Sebastian; Jaeger, Magnus; Duschl, Claus; Vanfleteren, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this poster, we present the joint development efforts for a 3D microfluidic bioreactor for hepatic cell cultures. Cyclic Olefin Copolymer (COC) was selected for constructing the bioreactor, since the material has good chemical resistance, low adsorption and good optical properties, including low auto-fluorescence. A downside of COC is that it is much more difficult to structure than more traditional microfluidic materials, such as PDMS, PMMA, … Two parallel approaches were developed for...

  2. A photopolymerizable hydrogel for 3-D culture of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and rat neonatal cardiac cells.

    Shapira-Schweitzer, Keren; Habib, Manhal; Gepstein, Lior; Seliktar, Dror

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the in vitro ability of two types of cardiomyocytes (cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CM) and rat neonatal cardiomyocytes (rN-CM)) to survive and generate a functional cardiac syncytium in a three-dimensional in situ polymerizable hydrogel environment. Each cell type was cultured in a PEGylated fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel for up to two weeks while maturation and cardiac function were documented in terms of spontaneous contractile behavior and biomolecular organization. Quantitative contractile parameters including contraction amplitude and synchronization were measured by non-invasive image analysis. The rN-CM demonstrated the fastest maturation and the most significant spontaneous contraction. The hESC-CM maturation occurred between 10-14 days in culture, and exhibited less contraction amplitude and synchronization in comparison to the rN-CMs. The maturation of both cell types within the hydrogels was confirmed by cardiac-specific biomolecular markers, including alpha-sarcomeric actin, actinin, and connexin-43. Cellular responsiveness to isoproterenol, carbamylcholine and heptanol provided further evidence of the cardiac maturation in the 3-D PF hydrogel as well as identified a potential to use this system for in vitro drug screening. These findings indicate that the PF hydrogel biomaterial can be used as an in situ polymerizable biomaterial for stem cells and their cardiomyocyte derivatives. PMID:19027751

  3. Comparison of the Expression of Hepatic Genes by Human Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cultured in 2D and 3D Collagen Culture Systems

    Khodabandeh, Zahra; Vojdani, Zahra; Talaei-Khozani, Tahereh; Jaberipour, Mansoureh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Bahmanpour, Soghra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (HWJMSCs) express liver-specific markers such as albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, cytokeratin-19, cytokeratin-18, and glucose-6-phosphatase. Therefore, they can be considered as a good source for cell replacement therapy for liver diseases. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of various culture systems on the hepatocyte-specific gene expression pattern of naïve HWJMSCs. Methods: HWJMSCs were characterized as MSCs by detecting the surface CD markers and capability to differentiate toward osteoblast and adipocyte. HWJMSCs were cultured in 2D collagen films and 3D collagen scaffolds for 21 days and were compared to control cultures. Real time RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of liver-specific genes. Results: The HWJMSCs which were grown on non-coated culture plates expressed cytokeratin-18 and -19, alpha-fetoprotein, albumin, glucose-6-phosphatase, and claudin. The expression of the hepatic nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) was very low. The cells showed a significant increase in caludin expression when they cultured in 3D collagen scaffolds compared to the conventional monolayer culture and 2D collagen scaffold. Conclusion: Various culture systems did not influence on hepatocyte specific marker expression by HWJMSCs, except for claudin. The expression of claudin showed that 3D collagen scaffold provided the extracellular matrix for induction of the cells to interconnect with each other. PMID:26722142

  4. 3D PHOTOGRAPHS IN CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Schuhr, W.; J. D. Lee; Kiel, St.

    2013-01-01

    This paper on providing "oo-information" (= objective object-information) on cultural monuments and sites, based on 3D photographs is also a contribution of CIPA task group 3 to the 2013 CIPA Symposium in Strasbourg. To stimulate the interest in 3D photography for scientists as well as for amateurs, 3D-Masterpieces are presented. Exemplary it is shown, due to their high documentary value ("near reality"), 3D photography support, e.g. the recording, the visualization, the interpret...

  5. A fully defined and scalable 3D culture system for human pluripotent stem cell expansion and differentiation

    Lei, Yuguo; Schaffer, David V.

    2013-12-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are promising for numerous biomedical applications, such as cell replacement therapies, tissue and whole-organ engineering, and high-throughput pharmacology and toxicology screening. Each of these applications requires large numbers of cells of high quality; however, the scalable expansion and differentiation of hPSCs, especially for clinical utilization, remains a challenge. We report a simple, defined, efficient, scalable, and good manufacturing practice-compatible 3D culture system for hPSC expansion and differentiation. It employs a thermoresponsive hydrogel that combines easy manipulation and completely defined conditions, free of any human- or animal-derived factors, and entailing only recombinant protein factors. Under an optimized protocol, the 3D system enables long-term, serial expansion of multiple hPSCs lines with a high expansion rate (∼20-fold per 5-d passage, for a 1072-fold expansion over 280 d), yield (∼2.0 × 107 cells per mL of hydrogel), and purity (∼95% Oct4+), even with single-cell inoculation, all of which offer considerable advantages relative to current approaches. Moreover, the system enabled 3D directed differentiation of hPSCs into multiple lineages, including dopaminergic neuron progenitors with a yield of ∼8 × 107 dopaminergic progenitors per mL of hydrogel and ∼80-fold expansion by the end of a 15-d derivation. This versatile system may be useful at numerous scales, from basic biological investigation to clinical development.

  6. Establishment of 3D organotypic cultures using human neonatal epidermal cells.

    Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Li, Amy; Rossi, Ralph; Kaur, Pritinder

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes an ex vivo three-dimensional coculture system optimized to study the skin regenerative ability of primary human keratinocytes grown at the air-liquid interface on collagen matrices embedded with human dermal fibroblasts. An option for enrichment of keratinocyte stem cells and their progeny using fluorescence-activated cell sorting is also provided. Initially, dermal equivalents, comprising human passaged fibroblasts seeded in a collagen matrix, are grown on porous filters (3 mum) placed in transwells. After 1 week, primary human keratinocytes are seeded on this base. One week later, an air-lift transition is performed, leading to the differentiation of the keratinocytes, which are macroscopically visible as artificial skin after a couple of days. The cultures can be harvested 1 week after the air-lift and processed for immunohistochemistry or gene expression analysis. The overall procedure can be completed in 3 weeks, including the preparation of the dermal equivalent and the seeding of the primary keratinocytes. PMID:17401352

  7. The Effects of GDF-5 and Uniaxial Strain on Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3-D Culture

    Farng, Eugene; Urdaneta, Alfonso R.; Barba, David; Esmende, Sean; McAllister, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent endeavors in tissue engineering have attempted to identify the optimal parameters to create an artificial ligament. Both mechanical and biochemical stimulation have been used by others to independently modulate growth and differentiation, although few studies have explored their interactions. We applied previously described fabrication techniques to create a highly porous (90%–95% porosity, 212–300 μm), 3-D, bioabsorbable polymer scaffold (polycaprolactone). Scaffolds were coated with ...

  8. Development of nanocellulose scaffolds with tunable structures to support 3D cell culture.

    Liu, Jun; Cheng, Fang; Grénman, Henrik; Spoljaric, Steven; Seppälä, Jukka; E Eriksson, John; Willför, Stefan; Xu, Chunlin

    2016-09-01

    Swollen three-dimensional nanocellulose films and their resultant aerogels were prepared as scaffolds towards tissue engineering application. The nanocellulose hydrogels with various swelling degree (up to 500 times) and the resultant aerogels with desired porosity (porosity up to 99.7% and specific surface area up to 308m(2)/g) were prepared by tuning the nanocellulose charge density, the swelling media conditions, and the material processing approach. Representative cell-based assays were applied to assess the material biocompatibility and efficacy of the human extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimicking nanocellulose scaffolds. The effects of charge density and porosity of the scaffolds on the biological tests were investigated for the first time. The results reveal that the nanocellulose scaffolds could promote the survival and proliferation of tumor cells, and enhance the transfection of exogenous DNA into the cells. These results suggest the usefulness of the nanocellulose-based matrices in supporting crucial cellular processes during cell growth and proliferation. PMID:27185139

  9. Chrysotile effects on human lung cell carcinoma in culture: 3-D reconstruction and DNA quantification by image analysis

    Chrysotile is considered less harmful to human health than other types of asbestos fibers. Its clearance from the lung is faster and, in comparison to amphibole forms of asbestos, chrysotile asbestos fail to accumulate in the lung tissue due to a mechanism involving fibers fragmentation in short pieces. Short exposure to chrysotile has not been associated with any histopathological alteration of lung tissue. The present work focuses on the association of small chrysotile fibers with interphasic and mitotic human lung cancer cells in culture, using for analyses confocal laser scanning microscopy and 3D reconstructions. The main goal was to perform the analysis of abnormalities in mitosis of fibers-containing cells as well as to quantify nuclear DNA content of treated cells during their recovery in fiber-free culture medium. HK2 cells treated with chrysotile for 48 h and recovered in additional periods of 24, 48 and 72 h in normal medium showed increased frequency of multinucleated and apoptotic cells. DNA ploidy of the cells submitted to the same chrysotile treatment schedules showed enhanced aneuploidy values. The results were consistent with the high frequency of multipolar spindles observed and with the presence of fibers in the intercellular bridge during cytokinesis. The present data show that 48 h chrysotile exposure can cause centrosome amplification, apoptosis and aneuploid cell formation even when long periods of recovery were provided. Internalized fibers seem to interact with the chromatin during mitosis, and they could also interfere in cytokinesis, leading to cytokinesis failure which forms aneuploid or multinucleated cells with centrosome amplification

  10. Visible light cured thiol-vinyl hydrogels with tunable degradation for 3D cell culture

    Hao, Yiting; Shih, Han; Muňoz, Zachary; Kemp, Arika; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-01-01

    We report here a synthetically simple yet highly tunable and diverse visible light mediated thiol-vinyl gelation system for fabricating cell-instructive hydrogels. Gelation was achieved via a mixed-mode step-and-chain-growth photopolymerization using functionalized 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) as backbone macromer, eosin-Y as photosensitizer, and di-thiol containing molecule as dual purpose co-initiator/cross-linker. N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) was used to accelerate gelation kinetics and to adju...

  11. Genotoxic Effects of Low- and High-LET Radiation on Human Epithelial Cells Grown in 2-D Versus 3-D Culture

    Patel, Z. S.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Huff, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Risk estimation for radiation-induced cancer relies heavily on human epidemiology data obtained from terrestrial irradiation incidents from sources such as medical and occupational exposures as well as from the atomic bomb survivors. No such data exists for exposures to the types and doses of high-LET radiation that will be encountered during space travel; therefore, risk assessment for space radiation requires the use of data derived from cell culture and animal models. The use of experimental models that most accurately replicate the response of human tissues is critical for precision in risk projections. This work compares the genotoxic effects of radiation on normal human epithelial cells grown in standard 2-D monolayer culture compared to 3-D organotypic co-culture conditions. These 3-D organotypic models mimic the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics of fully-differentiated normal human tissue and are reproducible using defined components. Cultures were irradiated with 2 Gy low-LET gamma rays or varying doses of high-LET particle radiation and genotoxic damage was measured using a modified cytokinesis block micronucleus assay. Our results revealed a 2-fold increase in residual damage in 2 Gy gamma irradiated cells grown under organotypic culture conditions compared to monolayer culture. Irradiation with high-LET particle radiation gave similar results, while background levels of damage were comparable under both scenarios. These observations may be related to the phenomenon of "multicellular resistance" where cancer cells grown as 3-D spheroids or in vivo exhibit an increased resistance to killing by chemotherapeutic agents compared to the same cells grown in 2-D culture. A variety of factors are likely involved in mediating this process, including increased cell-cell communication, microenvironment influences, and changes in cell cycle kinetics that may promote survival of damaged cells in 3-D culture that would

  12. Influence of electrical stimulation on 3D-cultures of Adipose Tissue Derived Progenitor Cells (ATDPCs) behavior

    Castells-Sala, C.; Sánchez Terrones, Benjamín; Recha-Sancho, L.; V. Puig; Bragós Bardia, Ramon; C. E. Semino

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering has a fundamental role in regenerative medicine. Still today, the major motivation for cardiac regeneration is to design a platform that enables the complete tissue structure and physiological function regeneration of injured myocardium areas. Although tissue engineering approaches have been generally developed for two-dimensional (2D) culture systems, three-dimensional (3D) systems are being spotlighted as the means to mimic better in vivo cellular conditions. This manuscr...

  13. RCCS Bioreactor-Based Modelled Microgravity Induces Significant Changes on In Vitro 3D Neuroglial Cell Cultures

    Caterina Morabito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a human-derived neuro-/glial cell three-dimensional in vitro model to investigate the effects of microgravity on cell-cell interactions. A rotary cell-culture system (RCCS bioreactor was used to generate a modelled microgravity environment, and morphofunctional features of glial-like GL15 and neuronal-like SH-SY5Y cells in three-dimensional individual cultures (monotypic aggregates and cocultures (heterotypic aggregates were analysed. Cell survival was maintained within all cell aggregates over 2 weeks of culture. Moreover, compared to cells as traditional static monolayers, cell aggregates cultured under modelled microgravity showed increased expression of specific differentiation markers (e.g., GL15 cells: GFAP, S100B; SH-SY5Y cells: GAP43 and modulation of functional cell-cell interactions (e.g., N-CAM and Cx43 expression and localisation. In conclusion, this culture model opens a wide range of specific investigations at the molecular, biochemical, and morphological levels, and it represents an important tool for in vitro studies into dynamic interactions and responses of nervous system cell components to microgravity environmental conditions.

  14. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies. (paper)

  15. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  16. Printing thermoresponsive reverse molds for the creation of patterned two-component hydrogels for 3D cell culture.

    Müller, Michael; Becher, Jana; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Zenobi-Wong, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    Bioprinting is an emerging technology that has its origins in the rapid prototyping industry. The different printing processes can be divided into contact bioprinting(1-4) (extrusion, dip pen and soft lithography), contactless bioprinting(5-7) (laser forward transfer, ink-jet deposition) and laser based techniques such as two photon photopolymerization(8). It can be used for many applications such as tissue engineering(9-13), biosensor microfabrication(14-16) and as a tool to answer basic biological questions such as influences of co-culturing of different cell types(17). Unlike common photolithographic or soft-lithographic methods, extrusion bioprinting has the advantage that it does not require a separate mask or stamp. Using CAD software, the design of the structure can quickly be changed and adjusted according to the requirements of the operator. This makes bioprinting more flexible than lithography-based approaches. Here we demonstrate the printing of a sacrificial mold to create a multi-material 3D structure using an array of pillars within a hydrogel as an example. These pillars could represent hollow structures for a vascular network or the tubes within a nerve guide conduit. The material chosen for the sacrificial mold was poloxamer 407, a thermoresponsive polymer with excellent printing properties which is liquid at 4 °C and a solid above its gelation temperature ~20 °C for 24.5% w/v solutions(18). This property allows the poloxamer-based sacrificial mold to be eluted on demand and has advantages over the slow dissolution of a solid material especially for narrow geometries. Poloxamer was printed on microscope glass slides to create the sacrificial mold. Agarose was pipetted into the mold and cooled until gelation. After elution of the poloxamer in ice cold water, the voids in the agarose mold were filled with alginate methacrylate spiked with FITC labeled fibrinogen. The filled voids were then cross-linked with UV and the construct was imaged with an

  17. Nonviral Gene Delivery of Growth and Differentiation Factor 5 to Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Injected into a 3D Bovine Intervertebral Disc Organ Culture System

    Christian Bucher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD cell therapy with unconditioned 2D expanded mesenchymal stem cells (MSC is a promising concept yet challenging to realize. Differentiation of MSCs by nonviral gene delivery of growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5 by electroporation mediated gene transfer could be an excellent source for cell transplantation. Human MSCs were harvested from bone marrow aspirate and GDF5 gene transfer was achieved by in vitro electroporation. Transfected cells were cultured as monolayers and as 3D cultures in 1.2% alginate bead culture. MSC expressed GDF5 efficiently for up to 21 days. The combination of GDF5 gene transfer and 3D culture in alginate showed an upregulation of aggrecan and SOX9, two markers for chondrogenesis, and KRT19 as a marker for discogenesis compared to untransfected cells. The cells encapsulated in alginate produced more proteoglycans expressed in GAG/DNA ratio. Furthermore, GDF5 transfected MCS injected into an IVD papain degeneration organ culture model showed a partial recovery of the GAG/DNA ratio after 7 days. In this study we demonstrate the potential of GDF5 transfected MSC as a promising approach for clinical translation for disc regeneration.

  18. Sub-100 nm biodegradable nanoparticles: in vitro release features and toxicity testing in 2D and 3D cell cultures

    A big challenge in tumor targeting by nanoparticles (NPs), taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, is the fabrication of small size devices for enhanced tumor penetration, which is considered fundamental to improve chemotherapy efficacy. The purposes of this study are (i) to engineer the formulation of doxorubicin-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)–block–poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) NPs to obtain <100 nm devices and (ii) to translate standard 2D cytotoxicity studies to 3D collagen systems in which an initial step gradient of the NPs is present. Doxorubicin release can be prolonged for days to weeks depending on the NP formulation and the pH of the release medium. Sub-100 nm NPs are effectively internalized by HeLa cells in 2D and are less cytotoxic than free doxorubicin. In 3D, <100 nm NPs are significantly more toxic than larger ones towards HeLa cells, and the cell death rate is affected by the contributions of drug release and device transport through collagen. Thus, the reduction of NP size is a fundamental feature from both a technological and a biological point of view and must be properly engineered to optimize the tumor response to the NPs. (paper)

  19. CARS and SHG microscopy to follow the collagen production in living human corneal fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin gel 3D cultures

    Mortati, Leonardo; Sassi, Maria Paola

    2011-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is combined with second harmonic generation (SHG) technique in order to follow the early stage of stem cell differentiation within a 3D scaffold. CARS microscopy can detect lipid membranes and droplet compartments in living cells and SHG microscopy enables a strong imaging contrast for molecules with a non-centrosymmetric ordered structure like collagen. One of the first evidence of hMSCs differentiation is the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) where the collagen protein is its main component. This work demonstrated the multimodal CARS and SHG microscopy as a powerful non-invasive label free technique to investigate the collagen production dynamic in living cell 3D cultures. Its ability to image the cell morphology and the produced collagen distribution on a long term (4 weeks) experiment allowed to obtain important information about the cell-scaffold interaction and the ECM production. The very low limit reached in detecting collagen has permit...

  20. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines. PMID:26215372

  1. Functional Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and Progesterone Regulate Autophagy during Acini Formation by Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D Cultures

    Katarzyna Zielniok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammary gland epithelium forms a network of ducts and alveolar units under control of ovarian hormones: 17-beta-estradiol (E2 and progesterone (P4. Mammary epithelial cells (MECs cultured on reconstituted basement membrane (rBM form three-dimensional (3D acini composed of polarized monolayers surrounding a lumen. Using the 3D culture of BME-UV1 bovine MECs we previously demonstrated that autophagy was induced in the centrally located cells of developing spheroids, and sex steroids increased this process. In the present study we showed that E2 and P4 enhanced the expression of ATG3, ATG5, and BECN1 genes during acini formation, and this effect was accelerated in the presence of both hormones together. The stimulatory action of E2 and P4 was also reflected by increased levels of Atg5, Atg3, and LC3-II proteins. Additionally, the activity of kinases involved in autophagy regulation, Akt, ERK, AMPK, and mTOR, was examined. E2 + P4 slightly increased the level of phosphorylated AMPK but diminished phosphorylated Akt and mTOR on day 9 of 3D culture. Thus, the synergistic actions of E2 and P4 accelerate the development of bovine mammary acini, which may be connected with stimulation of ATGs expression, as well as regulation of signaling pathways (PI3K/Akt/mTOR; AMPK/mTOR involved in autophagy induction.

  2. Type conversion of secretomes in a 3D TAM2 and HCC cell co-culture system and functional importance of CXCL2 in HCC.

    Lu, Yu; Li, Shan; Ma, Liping; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaolian; Peng, Qiliu; Mo, Cuiju; Huang, Li; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the tumor microenvironment, driving cancer progression and metastasis, particularly in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, few studies have assessed the exact secretome composition in HCC. In the present study, the impact of different phenotype of macrophages on HCC cells was investigated. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) were found to significantly increase the proliferation, migration, and invasion abilities of SMMC7721 cells (all P cultured with SMMC7721 cells to reconstruct the tumor microenvironment. Conditioned medium from 3D single cultures of M2, SMMC7721 cells, and their co-culture system were analyzed using quantitative proteomics via iTRAQ labeling combined with mass spectrometric analysis. Secretome analysis revealed a total of 159 differential secreted proteins in the co-culture system compared to the single culture systems, with 63 being up-regulated (>1.3-fold) and 96 down-regulated (culture system and HCC tissues, and was selected for further investigation. Functional effects data suggested that recombinant human CXCL2 significantly enhanced the migration, invasion ability of SMMC7721 cells, and weakened adhesion ability. While CXCL2 neutralization and CXCR2 blockage significantly inhibited the effects of CXCL2 on SMMC7721 cells, indicating that CXCL2 may play pivotal role in HCC metastasis. PMID:27117207

  3. Reduced cytotoxicity and enhanced bioactivity of cationic antimicrobial peptides liposomes in cell cultures and 3D epidermis model against HSV.

    Ron-Doitch, Sapir; Sawodny, Beate; Kühbacher, Andreas; David, Mirjam M Nordling; Samanta, Ayan; Phopase, Jaywant; Burger-Kentischer, Anke; Griffith, May; Golomb, Gershon; Rupp, Steffen

    2016-05-10

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immunity, and act against a wide variety of pathogenic microorganisms by perturbation of the microorganism's plasma membrane. Although attractive for clinical applications, these agents suffer from limited stability and activity in vivo, as well as non-specific interaction with host biological membranes, leading to cytotoxic adverse effects. We hypothesized that encapsulation of AMPs within liposomes could result in reduced cytotoxicity, and with enhanced stability as well as bioactivity against herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). We formulated nano-sized liposomal formulations of LL-37 and indolicidin, and their physicochemical properties, cellular uptake, in vitro cytotoxicity and antiviral efficacy have been determined. Lower cytotoxicity of LL-37 liposomes was found in comparison to indolicidin liposomes attributed to the superior physicochemical properties, and to the different degree of interaction with the liposomal membrane. The disc-like shaped LL-37 liposomes (106.8±10.1nm, shelf-life stability of >1year) were taken up more rapidly and to a significantly higher extent than the free peptide by human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT), remained intact within the cells, followed by release of the active peptide within the cytoplasm and migration of the vesicles' lipids to the plasma membrane. LL-37 liposomes were found significantly less toxic than both the free agent and liposomal indolicidin. In the new 3D epidermis model (immortalized primary keratinocytes) liposomal LL-37 treatment (>20μM), but not free LL-37, efficiently protected the epidermis, inhibiting HSV-1 infection. This positive antiviral effect was obtained with no cytotoxicity even at very high concentrations (400μM). Thus, the antiviral activity of encapsulated LL-37 was significantly improved, expanding its therapeutic window. Liposomal LL-37 appears to be a promising delivery system for HSV therapy. PMID:27012977

  4. Tailored and biodegradable poly(2-oxazoline) microbeads as 3D matrices for stem cell culture in regenerative therapies.

    Lück, Steffen; Schubel, René; Rüb, Jannick; Hahn, Dominik; Mathieu, Evelien; Zimmermann, Heike; Scharnweber, Dieter; Werner, Carsten; Pautot, Sophie; Jordan, Rainer

    2016-02-01

    We present the synthesis of hydrogel microbeads based on telechelic poly(2-oxazoline) (POx) crosslinkers and the methacrylate monomers (HEMA, METAC, SPMA) by inverse emulsion polymerization. While in batch experiments only irregular and ill-defined beads were obtained, the preparation in a microfluidic (MF) device resulted in highly defined hydrogel microbeads. Variation of the MF parameters allowed to control the microbead diameter from 50 to 500 μm. Microbead elasticity could be tuned from 2 to 20 kPa by the POx:monomer composition, the POx chain length, net charge of the hydrogel introduced via the monomer as well as by the organic content of the aqueous phase. The proliferations of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on the microbeads were studied. While neutral, hydrophilic POx-PHEMA beads were bioinert, excessive colonization of hMSCs on charged POx-PMETAC and POx-PSPMA was observed. The number of proliferated cells scaled roughly linear with the METAC or SPMA comonomer content. Additional collagen I coating further improved the stem cell proliferation. Finally, a first POx-based system for the preparation of biodegradable hydrogel microcarriers is described and evaluated for stem cell culturing. PMID:26686977

  5. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    W. Schuhr

    2015-08-01

    Niepce (1827, but seem to promise a great future also in 3D Cultural Heritage documentation. *Last not least 3D printers more and more seem to conquer the IT-market, obviously showing an international competition.

  6. Real-time measurement of hyperpolarized lactate production and efflux as a biomarker of tumor aggressiveness in an MR compatible 3D cell culture bioreactor.

    Sriram, Renuka; Van Criekinge, Mark; Hansen, Ailin; Wang, Zhen J; Vigneron, Daniel B; Wilson, David M; Keshari, Kayvan R; Kurhanewicz, John

    2015-09-01

    We have developed a 3D cell/tissue culture bioreactor compatible with hyperpolarized (HP) (13)C MR and interrogated HP [1-(13)C]lactate production and efflux in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. This platform is capable of resolving intracellular and extracellular HP lactate pools, allowing the kinetic measurement of lactate production and efflux in the context of cancer aggressiveness and response to therapy. HP (13)C MR studies were performed on three immortalized human renal cell lines: HK2, a normal renal proximal tubule cell line from which a majority of RCCs arise, UMRC6, a cell line derived from a localized RCC, and UOK262, an aggressive and metastatic RCC. The intra- (Lacin ) and extracellular (Lacex ) HP lactate signals were robustly resolved in dynamic (13)C spectra of the cell lines due to a very small but reproducible chemical shift difference (0.031 ± 0.0005 ppm). Following HP [1-(13)C]pyruvate delivery, the ratio of HP Lacin /Lacex was significantly lower for UOK262 cells compared with both UMRC6 and HK2 cells due to a significant (p culture bioreactor to study not only cellular metabolism but also transport. Additionally, this platform offers a sophisticated way to follow therapeutic interventions and screen novel therapies that target lactate export. PMID:26202449

  7. Role of Ceacam1 in VEGF induced vasculogenesis of murine embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies in 3D culture

    CEACAM1 (carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein involved in cell-cell adhesion has been shown to act as an angiogenic factor for mouse and human endothelial cells. Based on the ability of CEACAM1 to initiate lumen formation in human mammary epithelial cells grown in 3D culture (Matrigel), we hypothesized that murine CEACAM1 may play a similar role in vasculogenesis. In order to test this hypothesis, murine embryonic stem (ES) cells stimulated with VEGF were differentiated into embryoid bodies (EB) for 8 days (- 8-0 d) and transferred to Matrigel in the presence or absence of anti-CEACAM1 antibody for an additional 12 days (0-12 d). In the absence of anti-CEACAM1 antibody or in the presence of an isotype control antibody, the EB in Matrigel underwent extensive sprouting, generating lengthy vascular structures with well-defined lumina as demonstrated by confocal microscopy, electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical analysis. Both the length and architecture of the vascular tubes were inhibited by anti-CEACAM1 mAb CC1, a mAb that blocks the cell-cell adhesion functions of CEACAM1, thus demonstrating a critical role for this cell-cell adhesion molecule in generating and maintaining vasculogenesis. QRT-PCR analysis of the VEGF treated ES cells grown under conditions that convert them to EB revealed expression of Ceacam1 as early as - 5 to - 3 d reaching a maximum at day 0 at which time EBs were transferred to Matrigel, thereafter levels at first declined and then increased over time. Other markers of vasculogenesis including Pecam1, VE-Cad, and Tie-1 were not detected until day 0 when EBs were transferred to Matrigel followed by a steady increase in levels, indicating later roles in vasculogenesis. In contrast, Tie-2 and Flk-1 (VEGFR2) were detected on day five of EB formation reaching a maximum at day 0 on transfer to Matrigel, similar to Ceacam1, but after which Tie-2 declined over time, while Flk-1 increased

  8. Dextran and Polymer Polyethylene Glycol (PEG Coating Reduce Both 5 and 30 nm Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Cytotoxicity in 2D and 3D Cell Culture

    Alisa Morss Clyne

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications, yet questions remain regarding the effect of nanoparticle size and coating on nanoparticle cytotoxicity. In this study, porcine aortic endothelial cells were exposed to 5 and 30 nm diameter iron oxide nanoparticles coated with either the polysaccharide, dextran, or the polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG. Nanoparticle uptake, cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, and cell morphology changes were measured. Endothelial cells took up nanoparticles of all sizes and coatings in a dose dependent manner, and intracellular nanoparticles remained clustered in cytoplasmic vacuoles. Bare nanoparticles in both sizes induced a more than 6 fold increase in cell death at the highest concentration (0.5 mg/mL and led to significant cell elongation, whereas cell viability and morphology remained constant with coated nanoparticles. While bare 30 nm nanoparticles induced significant ROS formation, neither 5 nm nanoparticles (bare or coated nor 30 nm coated nanoparticles changed ROS levels. Furthermore, nanoparticles were more toxic at lower concentrations when cells were cultured within 3D gels. These results indicate that both dextran and PEG coatings reduce nanoparticle cytotoxicity, however different mechanisms may be important for different size nanoparticles.

  9. A 3D printed microfluidic device for production of functionalized hydrogel microcapsules for culture and differentiation of human Neuronal Stem Cells (hNSC).

    Alessandri, Kevin; Feyeux, Maxime; Gurchenkov, Basile; Delgado, Christophe; Trushko, Anastasiya; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Vignjević, Daniela; Nassoy, Pierre; Roux, Aurélien

    2016-04-26

    We present here a microfluidic device that generates sub-millimetric hollow hydrogel spheres, encapsulating cells and coated internally with a layer of reconstituted extracellular matrix (ECM) of a few microns thick. The spherical capsules, composed of alginate hydrogel, originate from the spontaneous instability of a multi-layered jet formed by co-extrusion using a coaxial flow device. We provide a simple design to manufacture this device using a DLP (digital light processing) 3D printer. Then, we demonstrate how the inner wall of the capsules can be decorated with a continuous ECM layer that is anchored to the alginate gel and mimics the basal membrane of a cellular niche. Finally, we used this approach to encapsulate human Neural Stem Cells (hNSC) derived from human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hIPSC), which were further differentiated into neurons within the capsules with negligible loss of viability. Altogether, we show that these capsules may serve as cell micro-containers compatible with complex cell culture conditions and applications. These developments widen the field of research and biomedical applications of the cell encapsulation technology. PMID:27025278

  10. Osteoinduction and survival of osteoblasts and bone-marrow stromal cells in 3D biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds under static and dynamic culture conditions

    Rath, Subha N.; Strobel, Leonie A; Arkudas, Andreas; Beier, Justus P.; Maier, Anne-Kathrin; Greil, Peter; Horch, Raymund E.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    In many tissue engineering approaches, the basic difference between in vitro and in vivo conditions for cells within three-dimensional (3D) constructs is the nutrition flow dynamics. To achieve comparable results in vitro, bioreactors are advised for improved cell survival, as they are able to provide a controlled flow through the scaffold. We hypothesize that a bioreactor would enhance long-term differentiation conditions of osteogenic cells in 3D scaffolds. To achieve this either primary ra...

  11. Integration of porosity and bio-functionalization to form a 3D scaffold: cell culture studies and in vitro degradation

    In this study, porous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) (50/50) microspheres have been fabricated by the gas-foaming technique using ammonium bicarbonate as a gas-foaming agent. Microspheres of different porosities have been formulated by varying the concentration of the gas-foaming agent (0%, 5%, 10% and 15% w/v). These microspheres were characterized for particle size, porosity and average pore size, morphology, water uptake ratio and surface area and it was found that the porosity, pore size and surface area increased on increasing the concentration of the gas-foaming agent. Further, the effect of porosity on degradation behavior was evaluated over a 12 week period by measuring changes in mass, pH, molecular weight and morphology. Porosity was found to have an inverse relationship with degradation rate. To render the surface of the microspheres biomimetic, peptide P-15 was coupled to the surface of these microspheres. In vitro cell viability, proliferation and morphological evaluation were carried out on these microsphere scaffolds using MG-63 cell line to study the effect of the porosity and pore size of scaffolds and to evaluate the effect of P-15 on cell growth on porous scaffolds. MTT assay, actin, alizarin staining and SEM revealed the potential of biomimetic porous PLGA (50/50) microspheres as scaffolds for tissue engineering. As shown in graphical representation, an attempt has been made to correlate the cell behavior on the scaffolds (growth, proliferation and cell death) with the concurrent degradation of the porous microsphere scaffold as a function of time.

  12. Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes in 3D Collagen I culture: an in vitro physiological environment for the study of extracellular matrix and host cell interactions

    Debora B. Petropolis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is the causative agent of American cutaneous leishmaniasis, an important neglected tropical disease. Once Leishmania amazonensis is inoculated into the human host, promastigotes are exposed to the extracellular matrix (ECM of the dermis. However, little is known about the interaction between the ECM and Leishmania promastigotes. In this study we established L. amazonensis promastigote culture in a three-dimensional (3D environment mainly composed of Collagen I (COL I. This 3D culture recreates in vitro some aspects of the human host infection site, enabling the study of the interaction mechanisms of L. amazonensis with the host ECM. Promastigotes exhibited “freeze and run” migration in the 3D COL I matrix, which is completely different from the conventional in vitro swimming mode of migration. Moreover, L. amazonensis promastigotes were able to invade, migrate inside, and remodel the 3D COL I matrix. Promastigote trans-matrix invasion and the freeze and run migration mode were also observed when macrophages were present in the matrix. At least two classes of proteases, metallo- and cysteine proteases, are involved in the 3D COL I matrix degradation caused by Leishmania. Treatment with a mixture of protease inhibitors significantly reduced promastigote invasion and migration through this matrix. Together our results demonstrate that L. amazonensis promastigotes release proteases and actively remodel their 3D environment, facilitating their migration. This raises the possibility that promastigotes actively interact with their 3D environment during the search for their cellular “home”—macrophages. Supporting this hypothesis, promastigotes migrated faster than macrophages in a novel 3D co-culture model.

  13. Stem cell reprogramming: A 3D boost

    Abilez, Oscar J.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2016-03-01

    Biophysical factors in an optimized three-dimensional microenvironment enhance the reprogramming efficiency of human somatic cells into pluripotent stem cells when compared to traditional cell-culture substrates.

  14. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    Schuhr, W.; Lee, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution promotes 3D photography as an important tool to obtain objective object information. Keeping mainly in mind World Heritage documentation as well as Heritage protection, it is another intention of this paper, to stimulate the interest in applications of 3D photography for professionals as well as for amateurs. In addition this is also an activity report of the international CIPA task group 3. The main part of this paper starts with "Digging the treasure of existing international 3D photography". This does not only belong to tangible but also to intangible Cultural Heritage. 3D photography clearly supports the recording, the visualization, the preservation and the restoration of architectural and archaeological objects. Therefore the use of 3D photography in C.H. should increase on an international level. The presented samples in 3D represent a voluminous, almost partly "forgotten treasure" of international archives for 3D photography. The next chapter is on "Promoting new 3D photography in Cultural Heritage". Though 3D photographs are a well-established basic photographic and photogrammetric tool, even suited to provide "near real" documentation, they are still a matter of research and improvement. Beside the use of 3D cameras even single lenses cameras are very much suited for photographic 3D documentation purposes in Cultural Heritage. Currently at the Faculty of Civil Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Magdeburg-Stendal, low altitude aerial photography is exposed from a maximum height of 13m, using a hand hold carbon telescope rod. The use of this "huge selfie stick" is also an (international) recommendation, to expose high resolution 3D photography of monuments under expedition conditions. In addition to the carbon rod recently a captive balloon and a hexacopter UAV- platform is in use, mainly to take better synoptically (extremely low altitude, ground truth) aerial photography. Additional experiments with respect to "easy

  15. Secondary activation of c-abl may be related to translocation to the nucleolar organizer region in an in vitro cultured rat leukemia cell line (K3D)

    Localization of cellular oncogenes (c-onc) near the break points of translocations in tumor cells has indicated involvement of these genes in neoplastic growth. Enhanced transcription of the cellular homolog (c-abl) of the transforming sequence of Abelson murine leukemia virus was observed in K3D, which was one of the cloned cell lines of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced rat erythroblastic leukemia. Since the c-abl activation was not observed in the parent cell line (K2D) from which K3D was derived and the latter was different from the former in the presence of a new marker chromosome, t(3;12), this marker may play a role in the expression of c-abl in K3D cells. In contrast to the human c-onc assignments, few rat c-onc assignments have been reported. In situ molecular hybridization studies assigned c-abl to the 3q12 site of the normal chromosome 3 and to the break point of the translocation t(3;12) in K3D cells. Another break point in this translocation chromosome 12p11 involves the nucleolar region, and the 3;12 translocation may involve c-abl and nucleolar cistrons. A cloned v-abl-specific probe was used for hybridization and labelled with 125I-dCTP. These results provide evidence of secondary c-onc activation during karyotypic evolution of cloned malignant cells

  16. EXPLORING CULTURAL HERITAGE RESOURCES IN A 3D COLLABORATIVE ENVIRONMENT

    A. Respaldiza; M. Wachowicz; Vázquez Hoehne, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cultural heritage is a complex and diverse concept, which brings together a wide domain of information. Resources linked to a cultural heritage site may consist of physical artefacts, books, works of art, pictures, historical maps, aerial photographs, archaeological surveys and 3D models. Moreover, all these resources are listed and described by a set of a variety of metadata specifications that allow their online search and consultation on the most basic characteristics of them. Some ex...

  17. Exploring Cultural Heritage Resources in a 3d Collaborative Environment

    Respaldiza, A.; Wachowicz, M.; Vázquez Hoehne, A.

    2012-06-01

    Cultural heritage is a complex and diverse concept, which brings together a wide domain of information. Resources linked to a cultural heritage site may consist of physical artefacts, books, works of art, pictures, historical maps, aerial photographs, archaeological surveys and 3D models. Moreover, all these resources are listed and described by a set of a variety of metadata specifications that allow their online search and consultation on the most basic characteristics of them. Some examples include Norma ISO 19115, Dublin Core, AAT, CDWA, CCO, DACS, MARC, MoReq, MODS, MuseumDat, TGN, SPECTRUM, VRA Core and Z39.50. Gateways are in place to fit in these metadata standards into those used in a SDI (ISO 19115 or INSPIRE), but substantial work still remains to be done for the complete incorporation of cultural heritage information. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate how the complexity of cultural heritage resources can be dealt with by a visual exploration of their metadata within a 3D collaborative environment. The 3D collaborative environments are promising tools that represent the new frontier of our capacity of learning, understanding, communicating and transmitting culture.

  18. Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-polyethylene glycol-polyamidoamine dendrimer conjugate improves liver-cell aggregation and function in 3-D spheroid culture.

    Chen, Zhanfei; Lian, Fen; Wang, Xiaoqian; Chen, Yanling; Tang, Nanhong

    2016-01-01

    The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer, a type of macromolecule material, has been used in spheroidal cell culture and drug delivery in recent years. However, PAMAM is not involved in the study of hepatic cell-spheroid culture or its biological activity, particularly in detoxification function. Here, we constructed a PAMAM-dendrimer conjugate decorated by an integrin ligand: arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. Our studies demonstrate that RGD-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-PAMAM conjugates can promote singly floating hepatic cells to aggregate together in a sphere-like growth with a weak reactive oxygen species. Moreover, RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates can activate the AKT-MAPK pathway in hepatic cells to promote cell proliferation and improve basic function and ammonia metabolism. Together, our data support the hepatocyte sphere treated by RGD-PEG-PAMAM conjugates as a potential source of hepatic cells for a biological artificial liver system. PMID:27621619

  19. Disulfide-Based Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels: A Wholly-Synthetic Thermoreversible 3D Matrix for Sheet-Based Cultures

    Simon, Karen Alambra; Warren, Nicholas J.; Mosadegh, Bobak; Mohammady, Marym R.; Whitesides, George McClelland; Armes, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    It is well-known that 3D in vitro cell cultures provide a much better model than 2D cell cultures for understanding the in vivo microenvironment of cells. However, significant technical challenges in handling and analyzing 3D cell cultures remain, which currently limits their widespread application. Herein, we demonstrate the application of wholly synthetic thermoresponsive block copolymer worms in sheet-based 3D cell culture. These worms form a soft, free-standing gel reversibly at 20–37 °C,...

  20. Reprogramming mediated radio-resistance of 3D-grown cancer cells

    In vitro 3D growth of tumors is a new cell culture model that more closely mimics the features of the in vivo environment and is being used increasingly in the field of biological and medical research. It has been demonstrated that cancer cells cultured in 3D matrices are more radio-resistant compared with cells in monolayers. However, the mechanisms causing this difference remain unclear. Here we show that cancer cells cultured in a 3D microenvironment demonstrated an increase in cells with stem cell properties. This was confirmed by the finding that cells in 3D cultures upregulated the gene and protein expression of the stem cell reprogramming factors such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, LIN28 and miR-302a, compared with cells in monolayers. Moreover, the expression of β-catenin, a regulating molecule of reprogramming factors, also increased in 3D-grown cancer cells. These findings suggest that cancer cells were reprogrammed to become stem cell-like cancer cells in a 3D growth culture microenvironment. Since cancer stem cell-like cells demonstrate an increased radio-resistance and chemo-resistance, our results offer a new perspective as to why. Our findings shed new light on understanding the features of the 3D growth cell model and its application in basic research into clinical radiotherapy and medicine. (author)

  1. Development, Characterization and Cell Cultural Response of 3D Biocompatible Micro-Patterned Poly-ε-Caprolactone Scaffolds Designed and Fabricated Integrating Lithography and Micromolding Fabrication Techniques

    Limongi, Tania

    2014-12-12

    Scaffold design and fabrication are very important subjects for biomaterial, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine research playing a unique role in tissue regeneration and repair. Among synthetic biomaterials Poly-ε- Caprolactone (PCL) is very attractive bioresorbable polyester due to its high permeability, biodegradability and capacity to be blended with other biopolymers. Thanks to its ability to naturally degrade in tissues, PCL has a great potential as a new material for implantable biomedical micro devices. This work focuses on the establishment of a micro fabrication process, by integrating lithography and micromolding fabrication techniques, for the realization of 3D microstructure PCL devices. Scaffold surface exhibits a combination in the patterned length scale; cylindrical pillars of 10 μm height and 10 μm diameter are arranged in a hexagonal lattice with periodicity of 30 μm and their sidewalls are nano-sculptured, with a regular pattern of grooves leading to a spatial modulation in the z direction. In order to demonstrate that these biocompatible pillared PCL substrates are suitable for a proper cell growth, NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts were seeded on them and cells key adhesion parameters were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunofluorescence analysis were carried out to check cell survival, proliferation and adhesion; cells growing on the PCL substrates appeared healthy and formed a well-developed network in close contact with the micro and nano features of the pillared surface. Those 3D scaffolds could be a promising solution for a wide range of applications within tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications.

  2. Galpha/LGN-mediated asymmetric spindle positioning does not lead to unequal cleavage of the mother cell in 3-D cultured MDCK cells

    Xiao, Zhuoni; Wan, Qingwen; Du, Quansheng; Zheng, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    The position of the mitotic spindle plays a key role in spatial control of cell division. It is generally believed that when a spindle is positioned asymmetrically in a dividing cell, the resulting daughter cells are usually unequal in size due to eccentric cleavage of the mother cell. Molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of unequal sized daughter cells have been extensively studied in Drosophila neuroblast and C elegans zygote where the Gα subunit of the heterotrimeric G proteins a...

  3. Ideal Positions: 3D Sonography, Medical Visuality, Popular Culture.

    Seiber, Tim

    2016-03-01

    As digital technologies are integrated into medical environments, they continue to transform the experience of contemporary health care. Importantly, medicine is increasingly visual. In the history of sonography, visibility has played an important role in accessing fetal bodies for diagnostic and entertainment purposes. With the advent of three-dimensional (3D) rendering, sonography presents the fetus visually as already a child. The aesthetics of this process and the resulting imagery, made possible in digital networks, discloses important changes in the relationship between technology and biology, reproductive health and political debates, and biotechnology and culture. PMID:26164291

  4. 3D-printed microfluidic chips with patterned, cell-laden hydrogel constructs.

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Yu, Chu Hsiang; Ersoy, Fulya; Emadi, Sharareh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Tasoglu, Savas

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing offers potential to fabricate high-throughput and low-cost fabrication of microfluidic devices as a promising alternative to traditional techniques which enables efficient design iterations in the development stage. In this study, we demonstrate a single-step fabrication of a 3D transparent microfluidic chip using two alternative techniques: a stereolithography-based desktop 3D printer and a two-step fabrication using an industrial 3D printer based on polyjet technology. This method, compared to conventional fabrication using relatively expensive materials and labor-intensive processes, presents a low-cost, rapid prototyping technique to print functional 3D microfluidic chips. We enhance the capabilities of 3D-printed microfluidic devices by coupling 3D cell encapsulation and spatial patterning within photocrosslinkable gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). The platform presented here serves as a 3D culture environment for long-term cell culture and growth. Furthermore, we have demonstrated the ability to print complex 3D microfluidic channels to create predictable and controllable fluid flow regimes. Here, we demonstrate the novel use of 3D-printed microfluidic chips as controllable 3D cell culture environments, advancing the applicability of 3D printing to engineering physiological systems for future applications in bioengineering. PMID:27321481

  5. Radiobiology goes 3D: How ECM and cell morphology impact on cell survival after irradiation

    Translational research is essential to find new therapeutic approaches to improve cancer patient survival. Despite extensive efforts in preclinical studies, many novel therapies fail to turn out to be translational from bench to beside. Therefore, new models better reflecting the conditions in vivo are needed to generate results, which transfer reliably into the clinic. The use of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models has provided new emerging insights into the understanding of cellular behavior upon cancer therapies. Interestingly, cells cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix are more radio- and chemoresistant than cells grown under conventional 2D conditions. In this review, we summarize and discuss underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon including integrin-mediated cell-matrix interactions, cell shape, nuclear organization and chromatin structure. Identifying the molecular differences between 2D and 3D cultured cells will offer the opportunity to improve our research and widen our therapeutic possibilities against cancer.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of radiation damage and preventive treatments in a 3-dimensional (3D) human cell culture model of oral mucositis

    Lambros, Maria P.; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Jonathan Moreno; Hari Chandana Mulamalla; Lavanya Kondapalli

    2015-01-01

    Cancer patients who receive radiation are often afflicted by oral mucositis, a debilitating disease, characterized by mouth sores and difficulty in swallowing. Oftentimes, cancer patients afflicted with mucositis must stop life-saving therapies. Thus it is very important to prevent mucositis before it develops. Using a validated organotypic model of human oral mucosa, a 3-dimensional cell culture model of human oral keratinocytes, it has been shown that a mixture (NAC–QYD) of N-acetyl cystein...

  7. Optimization of High Grade Glioma Cell Culture from Surgical Specimens for Use in Clinically Relevant Animal Models and 3D Immunochemistry

    Hasselbach, Laura A.; Susan M. Irtenkauf; Lemke, Nancy W.; Nelson, Kevin K.; Artem D. Berezovsky; Carlton, Enoch T.; Andrea D. Transou; Mikkelsen, Tom; deCarvalho, Ana C.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas, the most common and aggressive form of astrocytoma, are refractory to therapy, and molecularly heterogeneous. The ability to establish cell cultures that preserve the genomic profile of the parental tumors, for use in patient specific in vitro and in vivo models, has the potential to revolutionize the preclinical development of new treatments for glioblastoma tailored to the molecular characteristics of each tumor. Starting with fresh high grade astrocytoma tumors dissociated i...

  8. 3D visualization and virtual reality for cultural heritage diagnostic

    Lucio Colizzi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, many different new technologies for Cultural Heritage Diagnostic have been developed. In particular laser scanner surveys with digital photogrammetry and also multi-spectral surveys are becoming very useful and inalienable tools for non invasive diagnosis. In the SIDART Project (Integrated System for Cultural Heritage diagnosis, we develop a software able to visualize and elaborate triangulated surfaces coming from high resolution laser scanner survey. In this paper, we want to present the most innovative aspect of our study, that is the possibility to visualize and work in default mode or in immersive Stereoscopy (3D mode. This lets the operator perceive the third dimension and the “virtual investigation” of the object becomes more realistic. This lets us take into consideration in a more simple, natural and correct way and also reduce the possibility to make wrong evaluation due to the false prospective of the classic visualization.

  9. Embedding Knowledge in 3D Data Frameworks in Cultural Heritage

    Coughenour, C. M.; Vincent, M. L.; de Kramer, M.; Senecal, S.; Fritsch, D.; Flores Gutirrez, M.; Lopez-Menchero Bendicho, V. M.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    At present, where 3D modeling and visualisation in cultural heritage are concerned, an object's documentation lacks its interconnected memory provided by multidisciplinary examination and linked data. As the layers of paint, wood, and brick recount a structure's physical properties, the intangible, such as the forms of worship through song, dance, burning incense, and oral traditions, contributes to the greater story of its cultural heritage import. Furthermore, as an object or structure evolves through time, external political, religious, or environmental forces can affect it as well. As tangible and intangible entities associated with the structure transform, its narrative becomes dynamic and difficult to easily record. The Initial Training Network for Digital Cultural Heritage (ITN-DCH), a Marie Curie Actions project under the EU 7th Framework Programme, seeks to challenge this complexity by developing a novel methodology capable of offering such a holistic framework. With the integration of digitisation, conservation, linked data, and retrieval systems for DCH, the nature of investigation and dissemination will be augmented significantly. Examples of utilisating and evaluating this framework will range from a UNESCOWorld Heritage site, the Byzantine church of Panagia Forviotissa Asinou in the Troodos Mountains of Cyprus, to various religious icons and a monument located at the Monastery of Saint Neophytos. The application of this effort to the Asinou church, representing the first case study of the ITN-DCH project, is used as a template example in order to assess the technical challenges involved in the creation of such a framework.

  10. Diachronic 3d Reconstruction for Lost Cultural Heritage

    Guidi, G.; Russo, M.

    2011-09-01

    Cultural Heritage artifacts can often be underestimated for their hidden presence in the landscape. Such problem is particularly large in countries like Italy, where the massive amount of "famous" artifacts tends to neglect other presences unless properly exposed, or when the remains are dramatically damaged leaving very few interpretation clues to the visitor. In such cases a virtual presentation of the Cultural Heritage site can be of great help, specially for explaining the evolution of its status, giving sometimes sense to few spare stones. The definition of these digital representations deal with two crucial aspects: on the one hand the possibility of 3D surveying the relics in order to have an accurate geometrical image of the current status of the artifact; on the other hand the presence of historical sources both in form of written text or images, that once properly matched with the current geometrical data, may help to recreate digitally a set of 3D models representing visually the various historical phases (diachronic model), up to the current one. The core of this article is the definition of an integrated methodology that starts from an high-resolution digital survey of the remains of an ancient building and develops a coherent virtual reconstruction from different historical sources, suggesting a scalable method suitable to be re-used for generating a 4D (geometry + time) model of the artifact. This approach has been experimented on the "Basilica di San Giovanni in Conca" in Milan, a very significant example for its complex historic evolution that combines evident historic values with an invisible presence inside the city.

  11. DIACHRONIC 3D RECONSTRUCTION FOR LOST CULTURAL HERITAGE

    G. Guidi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultural Heritage artifacts can often be underestimated for their hidden presence in the landscape. Such problem is particularly large in countries like Italy, where the massive amount of "famous" artifacts tends to neglect other presences unless properly exposed, or when the remains are dramatically damaged leaving very few interpretation clues to the visitor. In such cases a virtual presentation of the Cultural Heritage site can be of great help, specially for explaining the evolution of its status, giving sometimes sense to few spare stones. The definition of these digital representations deal with two crucial aspects: on the one hand the possibility of 3D surveying the relics in order to have an accurate geometrical image of the current status of the artifact; on the other hand the presence of historical sources both in form of written text or images, that once properly matched with the current geometrical data, may help to recreate digitally a set of 3D models representing visually the various historical phases (diachronic model, up to the current one. The core of this article is the definition of an integrated methodology that starts from an high-resolution digital survey of the remains of an ancient building and develops a coherent virtual reconstruction from different historical sources, suggesting a scalable method suitable to be re-used for generating a 4D (geometry + time model of the artifact. This approach has been experimented on the "Basilica di San Giovanni in Conca" in Milan, a very significant example for its complex historic evolution that combines evident historic values with an invisible presence inside the city.

  12. Evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of humid lightweight coal ash derived from the disposal of waste on normal human keratinocyte and endothelial cell lines in 2-D and 3-D culture.

    Scanarotti, Chiara; Vernazza, Stefania; Brignone, Massimiliano; Danailova, Jenia; Pronzato, Maria A; Bassi, Anna M

    2013-12-01

    The presence of waste in the environment has frequently been indicated as a significant risk to human health. Therefore, landfill sites and the disposal of urban solid and non-hazardous waste by incineration are subject to much environmental monitoring, in addition to the regulations already in place. However, little action has been taken, and consequently no specific legislation exists, in relation to the assessment of the real biological risk of various substances, including chemical mixtures and ashes, derived from the incineration processes. This study assessed the cytotoxic potential of humid lightweight coal ash (LA) derived from incineration processes and waste management, on two cell lines: NCTC 2544 normal human keratinocytes and HECV endothelial cells. To reach this goal and to assess more-realistic methods for animal replacement, we employed different in vitro experimental approaches: acute and longer exposure to LA, by direct and indirect contact (0-2mg/ml and 16mg, respectively), both in 2-D and 3-D cultures. In 2-D HECV cultures, we observed a decrease in the viability index, but only during direct contact with LA doses higher than 0.1mg/ml. Moreover, some striking differences in cytotoxicity were observed between the 2-D and 3-D models. Taken together, these observations indicate that, for studying pollutant toxicity during longer exposure times, 3-D cultures in direct contact with the pollutant seem to offer a more suitable approach - they mimic the in vivo behaviour of cells more realistically and under strictly controlled conditions. Thus, in readiness for possible forthcoming European regulations, we believe that the proposed study, even in its preliminary phase, can provide new advice on the assessment of the toxic and biological potential of particular chemical compounds derived from waste management processes. PMID:24512233

  13. Transcriptional profiling of radiation damage and preventive treatments in a 3-dimensional (3D human cell culture model of oral mucositis

    Maria P. Lambros

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients who receive radiation are often afflicted by oral mucositis, a debilitating disease, characterized by mouth sores and difficulty in swallowing. Oftentimes, cancer patients afflicted with mucositis must stop life-saving therapies. Thus it is very important to prevent mucositis before it develops. Using a validated organotypic model of human oral mucosa, a 3-dimensional cell culture model of human oral keratinocytes, it has been shown that a mixture (NAC–QYD of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC and a traditional Chinese medicine, Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD, prevented radiation damage (Lambros et al., 2014. Here we provide detailed methods and analysis of microarray data for non-irradiated and irradiated human oral mucosal tissue with and without pretreatment with NAC, QYD and NAC-QYD. The microarray data been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO: GSE62397. These data can be used to further elucidate the mechanisms of irradiation damage in oral mucosa and its prevention.

  14. Transcriptional profiling of radiation damage and preventive treatments in a 3-dimensional (3D) human cell culture model of oral mucositis.

    Lambros, Maria P; DeSalvo, Michael K; Moreno, Jonathan; Mulamalla, Hari Chandana; Kondapalli, Lavanya

    2015-12-01

    Cancer patients who receive radiation are often afflicted by oral mucositis, a debilitating disease, characterized by mouth sores and difficulty in swallowing. Oftentimes, cancer patients afflicted with mucositis must stop life-saving therapies. Thus it is very important to prevent mucositis before it develops. Using a validated organotypic model of human oral mucosa, a 3-dimensional cell culture model of human oral keratinocytes, it has been shown that a mixture (NAC-QYD) of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and a traditional Chinese medicine, Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD), prevented radiation damage (Lambros et al., 2014). Here we provide detailed methods and analysis of microarray data for non-irradiated and irradiated human oral mucosal tissue with and without pretreatment with NAC, QYD and NAC-QYD. The microarray data been deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE62397. These data can be used to further elucidate the mechanisms of irradiation damage in oral mucosa and its prevention. PMID:26697327

  15. 3D Hydrogel Scaffolds for Articular Chondrocyte Culture and Cartilage Generation.

    Smeriglio, Piera; Lai, Janice H; Yang, Fan; Bhutani, Nidhi

    2015-01-01

    Human articular cartilage is highly susceptible to damage and has limited self-repair and regeneration potential. Cell-based strategies to engineer cartilage tissue offer a promising solution to repair articular cartilage. To select the optimal cell source for tissue repair, it is important to develop an appropriate culture platform to systematically examine the biological and biomechanical differences in the tissue-engineered cartilage by different cell sources. Here we applied a three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic hydrogel culture platform to systematically examine cartilage regeneration potential of juvenile, adult, and osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes. The 3D biomimetic hydrogel consisted of synthetic component poly(ethylene glycol) and bioactive component chondroitin sulfate, which provides a physiologically relevant microenvironment for in vitro culture of chondrocytes. In addition, the scaffold may be potentially used for cell delivery for cartilage repair in vivo. Cartilage tissue engineered in the scaffold can be evaluated using quantitative gene expression, immunofluorescence staining, biochemical assays, and mechanical testing. Utilizing these outcomes, we were able to characterize the differential regenerative potential of chondrocytes of varying age, both at the gene expression level and in the biochemical and biomechanical properties of the engineered cartilage tissue. The 3D culture model could be applied to investigate the molecular and functional differences among chondrocytes and progenitor cells from different stages of normal or aberrant development. PMID:26484414

  16. Neural cell 3D microtissue formation is marked by cytokines' up-regulation.

    Yinzhi Lai

    Full Text Available Cells cultured in three dimensional (3D scaffolds as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D substrates have been considered more physiologically relevant based on their superior ability to emulate the in vivo environment. Combined with stem cell technology, 3D cell cultures can provide a promising alternative for use in cell-based assays or biosensors in non-clinical drug discovery studies. To advance 3D culture technology, a case has been made for identifying and validating three-dimensionality biomarkers. With this goal in mind, we conducted a transcriptomic expression comparison among neural progenitor cells cultured on 2D substrates, 3D porous polystyrene scaffolds, and as 3D neurospheres (in vivo surrogate. Up-regulation of cytokines as a group in 3D and neurospheres was observed. A group of 13 cytokines were commonly up-regulated in cells cultured in polystyrene scaffolds and neurospheres, suggesting potential for any or a combination from this list to serve as three-dimensionality biomarkers. These results are supportive of further cytokine identification and validation studies with cells from non-neural tissue.

  17. Screening for Stromal and Matrix Effects in 3D Microenvironments of Breast Cancer Cells

    Montanez-Sauri, Sara I.

    Breast cancer progression ensures through the acquisition of genetic mutations, the uncontrollable growth of cells, and their progression to invasion. Studies have shown that the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment can also influence breast cancer cell progression by controlling the morphology, differentiation, proliferation, and migration of cells. However, most of the currently available in vitro screening platforms are based on the two-dimensional (2D) culture of cells, and do not provide cells with the complex 3D microenvironment that exists in vivo. Therefore, there is a need for more biologically relevant in vitro platforms to help decipher the complexity of the microenvironment and its influence in breast cancer. In this dissertation we present an automated microfluidic platform that allows to efficiently screen for the effect of multiple matrix and stromal microenvironment in 3D cultures of breast cancer cells. Several extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and stromal cells are included in the 3D microenvironments to examine their influence on breast cancer cell behavior. The screening results suggest that collagen gels with fibronectin might be influencing paracrine signals between breast cancer cells and stromal cells. The ability of the platform to culture and treat cells in 3D microenvironments offers a powerful screening tool for the identification of compounds and interactions using more in vivo-like 3D microenvironments. The identification of these mechanisms will increase our current understanding of breast cancer, and will aid in the identification of potential therapeutics.

  18. Determination of Drug Toxicity Using 3D Spheroids Constructed From an Immortal Human Hepatocyte Cell Line

    Fey, S. J.; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Numerous publications have documented that the immortal cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) cultures possess physiological behavior, which is more reminiscent of their parental organ than when the same cells are cultivated using classical two-dimensional (2D) culture techniques. The goal of this...

  19. Laser printing of cells into 3D scaffolds

    One of the most promising approaches in tissue engineering is the application of 3D scaffolds, which provide cell support and guidance in the initial tissue formation stage. The porosity of the scaffold and internal pore organization influence cell migration and play a major role in its biodegradation dynamics, nutrient diffusion and mechanical stability. In order to control cell migration and cellular interactions within the scaffold, novel technologies capable of producing 3D structures in accordance with predefined design are required. The two-photon polymerization (2PP) technique, used in this report for the fabrication of scaffolds, allows the realization of arbitrary 3D structures with submicron spatial resolution. Highly porous 3D scaffolds, produced by 2PP of acrylated poly(ethylene glycol), are seeded with cells by means of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT). In this laser printing approach, a propulsive force, resulting from laser-induced shock wave, is used to propel individual cells or cell groups from a donor substrate towards the receiver substrate. We demonstrate that with this technique printing of multiple cell types into 3D scaffolds is possible. Combination of LIFT and 2PP provides a route for the realization of 3D multicellular tissue constructs and artificial ECM engineered on the microscale.

  20. Filling gaps in cultural heritage documentation by 3D photography

    W. Schuhr; Lee, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution promotes 3D photography as an important tool to obtain objective object information. Keeping mainly in mind World Heritage documentation as well as Heritage protection, it is another intention of this paper, to stimulate the interest in applications of 3D photography for professionals as well as for amateurs. In addition this is also an activity report of the international CIPA task group 3. The main part of this paper starts with “Digging the treasure of existin...

  1. Cyto-3D-print to attach mitotic cells.

    Castroagudin, Michelle R; Zhai, Yujia; Li, Zhi; Marnell, Michael G; Glavy, Joseph S

    2016-08-01

    The Cyto-3D-print is an adapter that adds cytospin capability to a standard centrifuge. Like standard cytospinning, Cyto-3D-print increases the surface attachment of mitotic cells while giving a higher degree of adaptability to other slide chambers than available commercial devices. The use of Cyto-3D-print is cost effective, safe, and applicable to many slide designs. It is durable enough for repeated use and made of biodegradable materials for environment-friendly disposal. PMID:26464272

  2. Characteristics of tumor and host cells in 3-D simulated microgravity environment

    Chopra, V.; Dinh, T.; Wood, T.; Pellis, N.; Hannigan, E.

    Co-cultures of three-dimensional (3-D) constructs of one cell type with dispersed cells of a second cell type in low-shear rotating suspension cultures in simulated microgravity environment have been used to investigate invasive properties of normal and malignant cell types. We have shown that the epithelial and endothelial cells undergo a switch in characteristics when grown in an in vitro 3-D environment, that mimics the in vivo host environment as compared with conventional two-dimensional (2-D) monolayer cultures. Histological preparations and immunohistochemical staining procedures of cocultured harvests demonstrated various markers of interest: like collagen vimentin, mucin, elastin, fibrin, fibrinogen, cytokeratin, adhesion molecules and various angiogenic factors by tumor cells from gynecological cancer patients along with fibroblasts, endothelial cells and patient-derived mononuclear cells (n=8). The growth rate was enhanced 10-15 folds by 3-D cocultures of patient-derived cells as compared with 2-D monolayer cultures and 3-D monocultures. The production of interleukin-2, interleukin-6, interleukin -8, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and angiogenin was studied by using ELISA and RT- PCR. Human umbilical vein-derived endothelial cell (HUVEC) were used to study the mitogenic response of the conditioned medium collected from 3-D monocultures and cocultures during proliferation and migration assays. The conditioned medium collected from 3-D cocultures of cancer cells also 1) increased the expression of message levels of vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor flt-1 and KDR was observed by HUVEC, and 2) increased the expression of intracellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules on the surface of HUVEC, when measured by using Live cell ELISA assays and immunofluorescent staining as compared with 3-D monocultures of normal epithelial cells. There was an increase in production of 1) enzymatic activity that

  3. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D-epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: phase II enzymes.

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Ruwiedel, Karsten; Hübenthal, Ulrike; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Abel, Josef; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    The 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals in cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity. Therefore, skin in vitro models have to replace chemical testing in vivo. However, the metabolic competence neither of human skin nor of alternative in vitro models has so far been fully characterized, although skin is the first-pass organ for accidentally or purposely (cosmetics and pharmaceuticals) applied chemicals. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic-metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities to models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and N-acetyltransferase in ex vivo human skin, the 3D epidermal model EpiDerm 200 (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines (HaCaT and NCTC 2544) and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. We show that all three phase II enzymes are present and highly active in skin as compared to phase I. Human skin, therefore, represents a more detoxifying than activating organ. This work systematically compares the activities of three important phase II enzymes in four different in vitro models directly to human skin. We conclude from our studies that 3D epidermal models, like the EPI-200 employed here, are superior over monolayer cultures in mimicking human skin xenobiotic metabolism and thus better suited for dermatotoxicity testing. PMID:22509834

  4. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  5. Fibroblasts Lead the Way: A Unified View of 3D Cell Motility.

    Petrie, Ryan J; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2015-11-01

    Primary human fibroblasts are remarkably adaptable, able to migrate in differing types of physiological 3D tissue and on rigid 2D tissue culture surfaces. The crawling behavior of these and other vertebrate cells has been studied intensively, which has helped generate the concept of the cell motility cycle as a comprehensive model of 2D cell migration. However, this model fails to explain how cells force their large nuclei through the confines of a 3D matrix environment and why primary fibroblasts can use more than one mechanism to move in 3D. Recent work shows that the intracellular localization of myosin II activity is governed by cell-matrix interactions to both force the nucleus through the extracellular matrix (ECM) and dictate the type of protrusions used to migrate in 3D. PMID:26437597

  6. Disulfide-Based Diblock Copolymer Worm Gels: A Wholly-Synthetic Thermoreversible 3D Matrix for Sheet-Based Cultures.

    Simon, Karen A; Warren, Nicholas J; Mosadegh, Bobak; Mohammady, Marym R; Whitesides, George M; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-14

    It is well-known that 3D in vitro cell cultures provide a much better model than 2D cell cultures for understanding the in vivo microenvironment of cells. However, significant technical challenges in handling and analyzing 3D cell cultures remain, which currently limits their widespread application. Herein, we demonstrate the application of wholly synthetic thermoresponsive block copolymer worms in sheet-based 3D cell culture. These worms form a soft, free-standing gel reversibly at 20-37 °C, which can be rapidly converted into a free-flowing dispersion of spheres on cooling to 5 °C. Functionalization of the worms with disulfide groups was found to be essential for ensuring sufficient mechanical stability of these hydrogels to enable long-term cell culture. These disulfide groups are conveniently introduced via statistical copolymerization of a disulfide-based dimethacrylate under conditions that favor intramolecular cyclization and subsequent thiol/disulfide exchange leads to the formation of reversible covalent bonds between adjacent worms within the gel. This new approach enables cells to be embedded within micrometer-thick slabs of gel with good viability, permits cell culture for at least 12 days, and facilitates recovery of viable cells from the gel simply by incubating the culture in buffer at 4 °C (thus, avoiding the enzymatic degradation required for cell harvesting when using commercial protein-based gels, such as Matrigel). PMID:26509930

  7. Cell force measurements in 3D microfabricated environments based on compliant cantilevers.

    Marelli, Mattia; Gadhari, Neha; Boero, Giovanni; Chiquet, Matthias; Brugger, Jürgen

    2014-01-21

    We report the fabrication, functionalization and testing of microdevices for cell culture and cell traction force measurements in three-dimensions (3D). The devices are composed of bent cantilevers patterned with cell-adhesive spots not lying on the same plane, and thus suspending cells in 3D. The cantilevers are soft enough to undergo micrometric deflections when cells pull on them, allowing cell forces to be measured by means of optical microscopy. Since individual cantilevers are mechanically independent of each other, cell traction forces are determined directly from cantilever deflections. This proves the potential of these new devices as a tool for the quantification of cell mechanics in a system with well-defined 3D geometry and mechanical properties. PMID:24217771

  8. Enhancement of neurite outgrowth in neuron cancer stem cells by growth on 3-D collagen scaffolds

    Highlights: ► Neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) behave high multiply of growth on collagen scaffold. ► Enhancement of NCSCs neurite outgrowth on porous collagen scaffold. ► 3-D collagen culture of NCSCs shows an advance differentiation than 2-D culture. -- Abstract: Collagen is one component of the extracellular matrix that has been widely used for constructive remodeling to facilitate cell growth and differentiation. The 3-D distribution and growth of cells within the porous scaffold suggest a clinical significance for nerve tissue engineering. In the current study, we investigated proliferation and differentiation of neuron cancer stem cells (NCSCs) on a 3-D porous collagen scaffold that mimics the natural extracellular matrix. We first generated green fluorescence protein (GFP) expressing NCSCs using a lentiviral system to instantly monitor the transitions of morphological changes during growth on the 3-D scaffold. We found that proliferation of GFP-NCSCs increased, and a single cell mass rapidly grew with unrestricted expansion between days 3 and 9 in culture. Moreover, immunostaining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN) revealed that NCSCs grown on the 3-D collagen scaffold significantly enhanced neurite outgrowth. Our findings confirmed that the 80 μm porous collagen scaffold could enhance attachment, viability and differentiation of the cancer neural stem cells. This result could provide a new application for nerve tissue engineering and nerve regeneration.

  9. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Tong Luo

    Full Text Available The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation.A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD. In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°.A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  10. XPO1 Inhibition Preferentially Disrupts the 3D Nuclear Organization of Telomeres in Tumor Cells.

    Taylor-Kashton, Cheryl; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Baloglu, Erkan; Senapedis, William; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G; Kotb, Rami; Mai, Sabine

    2016-12-01

    Previous work has shown that the three-dimensional (3D) nuclear organization of telomeres is altered in cancer cells and the degree of alterations coincides with aggressiveness of disease. Nuclear pores are essential for spatial genome organization and gene regulation and XPO1 (exportin 1/CRM1) is the key nuclear export protein. The Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds developed by Karyopharm Therapeutics (KPT-185, KPT-330/selinexor, and KPT-8602) inhibit XPO1 nuclear export function. In this study, we investigated whether XPO1 inhibition has downstream effects on the 3D nuclear organization of the genome. This was assessed by measuring the 3D telomeric architecture of normal and tumor cells in vitro and ex vivo. Our data demonstrate for the first time a rapid and preferential disruption of the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres in tumor cell lines and in primary cells ex vivo derived from treatment-naïve newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients. Normal primary cells in culture as well as healthy lymphocyte control cells from the same patients were minimally affected. Using both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tumor cell lines, we found that the downstream effects on the 3D nuclear telomere structure are independent of tumor type. We conclude that the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres is a sensitive indicator of cellular response when treated with XPO1 inhibitors. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2711-2719, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991404

  11. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application.

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  12. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-05-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy.

  13. Engineering a 3D microfluidic culture platform for tumor-treating field application

    Pavesi, Andrea; Adriani, Giulia; Tay, Andy; Warkiani, Majid Ebrahimi; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Wong, Siew Cheng; Kamm, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    The limitations of current cancer therapies highlight the urgent need for a more effective therapeutic strategy. One promising approach uses an alternating electric field; however, the mechanisms involved in the disruption of the cancer cell cycle as well as the potential adverse effects on non-cancerous cells must be clarified. In this study, we present a novel microfluidic device with embedded electrodes that enables the application of an alternating electric field therapy to cancer cells in a 3D extracellular matrix. To demonstrate the potential of our system to aid in designing and testing new therapeutic approaches, cancer cells and cancer cell aggregates were cultured individually or co-cultured with endothelial cells. The metastatic potential of the cancer cells was reduced after electric field treatment. Moreover, the proliferation rate of the treated cancer cells was lower compared with that of the untreated cells, whereas the morphologies and proliferative capacities of the endothelial cells were not significantly affected. These results demonstrate that our novel system can be used to rapidly screen the effect of an alternating electric field on cancer and normal cells within an in vivo-like microenvironment with the potential to optimize treatment protocols and evaluate synergies between tumor-treating field treatment and chemotherapy. PMID:27215466

  14. 3D culture of ovarian follicles: a system towards their engineering?

    Zuccotti, Maurizio; Merico, Valeria; Rebuzzini, Paola; Belli, Martina; Vigone, Giulia; Mulas, Francesca; Fassina, Lorenzo; Wruck, Wasco; Adjaye, James; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Garagna, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Infertility in women is a health priority. Designing a robust culture protocol capable of attaining complete follicle growth is an exciting challenge, for its potential clinical applications, but also as a model to observe and closely study the sequence of molecular events that lie behind the intricate relationship existing between the oocyte and surrounding follicle cells. Here, we describe the procedures used to maintain the ovarian follicle 3D architecture employing a variety of in vitro systems and several types of matrices. Collagen and alginate are the matrices that led to better results, including proof-of-concept of full-term development. Pioneer in its kind, these studies underlie the drawbacks encountered and the need for a culture system that allows more quantitative analyses and predictions, projecting the culture of the ovarian follicle into the realm of tissue engineering. PMID:26505254

  15. Chemotherapeutic efficiency of drugs in vitro: Comparison of doxorubicin exposure in 3D and 2D culture matrices.

    Casey, A; Gargotti, M; Bonnier, F; Byrne, H J

    2016-06-01

    The interest in the use of 3D matrices for in vitro analysis, with a view to increasing the relevance of in vitro studies and reducing the dependence on in vivo studies, has been growing in recent years. Cells grown in a 3D in vitro matrix environment have been reported to exhibit significantly different properties to those in a conventional 2D culture environment. However, comparison of 2D and 3D cell culture models have recently been noted to result in differing responses of cytotoxic assays, without any associated change in viability. The effect was attributed to differing conversion rates and effective concentrations of the resazurin assay in 2D and 3D environments, rather than differences in cellular metabolism. In this study, the efficacy of a chemotherapeutic agent, doxorubicin, is monitored and compared in conventional 2D and 3D collagen gel exposures of immortalized human cervical cells. Viability was monitored with the aid of the Alamar Blue assay and drug internalisation was verified using confocal microscopy. Drug uptake and retention within the collagen matrix was monitored by absorption spectroscopy. The viability studies showed apparent differences between the 2D and 3D culture systems, the differences attributed in part to the physical transition from 2D to a 3D environment causing alterations to dye resazurin uptake and conversion rates. The use of 3D culture matrices has widely been interpreted to result in "reduced" toxicity or cellular "resistance" to the chemotherapeutic agent. The results of this study show that the reduced efficiency of the drug to cells grown in the 3D environment can be accounted for by a sequential reduction of the effective concentration of the test compound and assay. This is due to absorption within the collagen gel inducing a higher uptake of both drug and assay thereby influencing the toxic impact of the drug and conversion rate of resazurin, and. The increased effective surface area of the cell exposed to the drug

  16. Development and Validation of a 3D Clinostat for the Study of Cells during Microgravity Simulation.

    Russomano, T; Cardoso, R; Falcao, F; Dalmarco, G; V Dos Santos, C; F Dos Santos, L; G de Azevedo, D; Dos Santos, M; Martinelli, L; Motta, J; Forraz, N; McGuckin, C

    2005-01-01

    The clinostat was originally used to find out why plant roots appear to grow predominantly toward the center of the Earth. Over the last 2-3 decades, slow- and fast-rotating 2D and 3D clinostats have been used to assess cellular adaptation to this environment. A cell culture is placed in a spin module of the clinostat platform and its rotation is set empirically (2-3 rpm). The machine is then allowed to run for a specified period (hours to days) after which the cultures are removed and assayed for specific properties, such as cell growth, size and shape, distribution of receptors, integrity of the cytoskeleton or gene expression. A 3D clinostat was developed by the Microgravity Laboratory/IPCT-PUCRS group and validated by the Stem Cell Group of Kingston University London, which used 4 different types of human cancer cells and cord blood stem cells (CBSC). After rotation for 19h at 37degC, 5%CO2 humidified atmosphere, the 3D clinostat significantly improved proliferation potential of all tested cell populations when compared to static cultures. After only 5 days, high definition microscopic analysis revealed that all CBSC adhered and expanded onto the BDtrade 3D collagen composite scaffolds, and cross-developed into hepatocyte-like cells upon stimulation. PMID:17282243

  17. Alteration of cellular behavior and response to PI3K pathway inhibition by culture in 3D collagen gels.

    Brian Fallica

    Full Text Available Most investigations into cancer cell drug response are performed with cells cultured on flat (2D tissue culture plastic. Emerging research has shown that the presence of a three-dimensional (3D extracellular matrix (ECM is critical for normal cell behavior including migration, adhesion, signaling, proliferation and apoptosis. In this study we investigate differences between cancer cell signaling in 2D culture and a 3D ECM, employing real-time, live cell tracking to directly observe U2OS human osteosarcoma and MCF7 human breast cancer cells embedded in type 1 collagen gels. The activation of the important PI3K signaling pathway under these different growth conditions is studied, and the response to inhibition of both PI3K and mTOR with PI103 investigated. Cells grown in 3D gels show reduced proliferation and migration as well as reduced PI3K pathway activation when compared to cells grown in 2D. Our results quantitatively demonstrate that a collagen ECM can protect U2OS cells from PI103. Overall, our data suggests that 3D gels may provide a better medium for investigation of anti-cancer drugs than 2D monolayers, therefore allowing better understanding of cellular response and behavior in native like environments.

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of electrohydrodynamic jet 3D printed polycaprolactone/chitosan cell carriers using human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts.

    Wu, Yang; Sriram, Gopu; Fawzy, Amr S; Fuh, Jerry Yh; Rosa, Vinicius; Cao, Tong; Wong, Yoke San

    2016-08-01

    Biological function of adherent cells depends on the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions in three-dimensional space. To understand the behavior of cells in 3D environment and their interactions with neighboring cells and matrix requires 3D culture systems. Here, we present a novel 3D cell carrier scaffold that provides an environment for routine 3D cell growth in vitro We have developed thin, mechanically stable electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) 3D printed polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan macroporous scaffolds with precise fiber orientation for basic 3D cell culture application. We have evaluated the application of this technology by growing human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts within these 3D scaffolds. Assessment of cell viability and proliferation of cells seeded on polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan 3D-scaffolds show that the human embryonic stem cell-derived fibroblasts could adhere and proliferate on the scaffolds over time. Further, using confocal microscopy we demonstrate the ability to use fluorescence-labelled cells that could be microscopically monitored in real-time. Hence, these 3D printed polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/Chitosan scaffolds could be used as a cell carrier for in vitro 3D cell culture-, bioreactor- and tissue engineering-related applications in the future. PMID:27252227

  19. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from the sand rat: transforming growth factor beta and 3D co-culture with human disc cells stimulate proteoglycan and collagen type I rich extracellular matrix

    Tapp, Hazel; Deepe, Ray; Ingram, Jane A; Kuremsky, Marshall; Hanley, Edward N; Gruber, Helen E.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has a potential application in the biological treatment of disc degeneration. Our objectives were: to direct adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSC) from the sand rat to produce a proteoglycan and collagen type I extracellular matrix (ECM) rich in known ECM components of the annulus fibrosis of disc; and to stimulate proteoglycan production by co-culture of human annulus cells with AD-MSC. Methods AD-MSC were isolated and characterised ...

  20. 3D chitosan-gelatin-chondroitin porous scaffold improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    A porous 3D scaffold was developed to support and enhance the differentiation process of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into osteoblasts in vitro. The 3D scaffold was made with chitosan, gelatin and chondroitin and it was crosslinked by EDAC. The scaffold physicochemical properties were evaluated. SEM revealed the high porosity and interconnection of pores in the scaffold; rheological measurements show that the scaffold exhibits a characteristic behavior of strong gels. The elastic modulus found in compressive tests of the crosslinked scaffold was about 50 times higher than the non-crosslinked one. After 21 days, the 3D matrix submitted to hydrolytic degradation loses above 40% of its weight. MSC were collected from rat bone marrow and seeded in chitosan-gelatin-chondroitin 3D scaffolds and in 2D culture plates as well. MSC were differentiated into osteoblasts for 21 days. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were followed weekly during the osteogenic process. The osteogenic differentiation of MSC was improved in 3D culture as shown by MTT assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. On the 21st day, bone markers, osteopontin and osteocalcin, were detected by the PCR analysis. This study shows that the chitosan-gelatin-chondroitin 3D structure provides a good environment for the osteogenic process and enhances cellular proliferation

  1. Biodynamic Doppler imaging of subcellular motion inside 3D living tissue culture and biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    Nolte, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Biodynamic imaging is an emerging 3D optical imaging technology that probes up to 1 mm deep inside three-dimensional living tissue using short-coherence dynamic light scattering to measure the intracellular motions of cells inside their natural microenvironments. Biodynamic imaging is label-free and non-invasive. The information content of biodynamic imaging is captured through tissue dynamics spectroscopy that displays the changes in the Doppler signatures from intracellular constituents in response to applied compounds. The affected dynamic intracellular mechanisms include organelle transport, membrane undulations, cytoskeletal restructuring, strain at cellular adhesions, cytokinesis, mitosis, exo- and endo-cytosis among others. The development of 3D high-content assays such as biodynamic profiling can become a critical new tool for assessing efficacy of drugs and the suitability of specific types of tissue growth for drug discovery and development. The use of biodynamic profiling to predict clinical outcome of living biopsies to cancer therapeutics can be developed into a phenotypic companion diagnostic, as well as a new tool for therapy selection in personalized medicine. This invited talk will present an overview of the optical, physical and physiological processes involved in biodynamic imaging. Several different biodynamic imaging modalities include motility contrast imaging (MCI), tissue-dynamics spectroscopy (TDS) and tissue-dynamics imaging (TDI). A wide range of potential applications will be described that include process monitoring for 3D tissue culture, drug discovery and development, cancer therapy selection, embryo assessment for in-vitro fertilization and artificial reproductive technologies, among others.

  2. A novel mechanotactic 3D modeling of cell morphology

    Cell morphology plays a critical role in many biological processes, such as cell migration, tissue development, wound healing and tumor growth. Recent investigations demonstrate that, among other stimuli, cells adapt their shapes according to their substrate stiffness. Until now, the development of this process has not been clear. Therefore, in this work, a new three-dimensional (3D) computational model for cell morphology has been developed. This model is based on a previous cell migration model presented by the same authors. The new model considers that during cell–substrate interaction, cell shape is governed by internal cell deformation, which leads to an accurate prediction of the cell shape according to the mechanical characteristic of its surrounding micro-environment. To study this phenomenon, the model has been applied to different numerical cases. The obtained results, which are qualitatively consistent with well-known related experimental works, indicate that cell morphology not only depends on substrate stiffness but also on the substrate boundary conditions. A cell located within an unconstrained soft substrate (several kPa) with uniform stiffness is unable to adhere to its substrate or to send out pseudopodia. When the substrate stiffness increases to tens of kPa (intermediate and rigid substrates), the cell can adequately adhere to its substrate. Subsequently, as the traction forces exerted by the cell increase, the cell elongates and its shape changes. Within very stiff (hard) substrates, the cell cannot penetrate into its substrate or send out pseudopodia. On the other hand, a cell is found to be more elongated within substrates with a constrained surface. However, this elongation decreases when the cell approaches it. It can be concluded that the higher the net traction force, the greater the cell elongation, the larger the cell membrane area, and the less random the cell alignment. (paper)

  3. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  4. The cultural divide: exponential growth in classical 2D and metabolic equilibrium in 3D environments.

    Krzysztof Wrzesinski

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures. We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are dramatically different. RESULTS: Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved in cholesterol and urea synthesis are increased consistent with the attainment of cholesterol and urea production rates seen in vivo. DNA repair enzymes are increased even though cells are predominantly in Go. Transport around the cell--along the microtubules, through the nuclear pore and in various types of vesicles has been prioritized. There are numerous coherent changes in transcription, splicing, translation, protein folding and degradation. The amount of individual proteins within complexes is shown to be highly coordinated. Typically subunits which initiate a particular function are present in increased amounts compared to other subunits of the same complex. SUMMARY: We have previously demonstrated that cells at dynamic equilibrium can match the physiological performance of cells in tissues in vivo. Here we describe the multitude of protein changes necessary to achieve this performance.

  5. Xenobiotic metabolism capacities of human skin in comparison with a 3D epidermis model and keratinocyte-based cell culture as in vitro alternatives for chemical testing: activating enzymes (Phase I).

    Götz, Christine; Pfeiffer, Roland; Tigges, Julia; Blatz, Veronika; Jäckh, Christine; Freytag, Eva-Maria; Fabian, Eric; Landsiedel, Robert; Merk, Hans F; Krutmann, Jean; Edwards, Robert J; Pease, Camilla; Goebel, Carsten; Hewitt, Nicola; Fritsche, Ellen

    2012-05-01

    Skin is important for the absorption and metabolism of exposed chemicals such as cosmetics or pharmaceuticals. The Seventh Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive prohibits the use of animals for cosmetic testing for certain endpoints, such as genotoxicity; therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the xenobiotic metabolizing capacities of human skin and to compare these activities with reconstructed 3D skin models developed to replace animal testing. We have measured Phase I enzyme activities of cytochrome P450 (CYP) and cyclooxygenase (COX) in ex vivo human skin, the 3D skin model EpiDerm™ (EPI-200), immortalized keratinocyte-based cell lines and primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes. Our data demonstrate that basal CYP enzyme activities are very low in whole human skin and EPI-200 as well as keratinocytes. In addition, activities in monolayer cells differed from organotypic tissues after induction. COX activity was similar in skin, EPI-200 and NHEK cells, but was significantly lower in immortalized keratinocytes. Hence, the 3D model EPI-200 might represent a more suitable model for dermatotoxicological studies. Altogether, these data help to better understand skin metabolism and expand the knowledge of in vitro alternatives used for dermatotoxicity testing. PMID:22509833

  6. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer

  7. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Z. Wen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  8. A spheroid-based 3-D culture model for pancreatic cancer drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay

    Wen, Z.; Liao, Q.; Hu, Y.; You, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhao, Y. [Department of General Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Science and Peking Union Medical College, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-08-10

    Current therapy for pancreatic cancer is multimodal, involving surgery and chemotherapy. However, development of pancreatic cancer therapies requires a thorough evaluation of drug efficacy in vitro before animal testing and subsequent clinical trials. Compared to two-dimensional culture of cell monolayer, three-dimensional (3-D) models more closely mimic native tissues, since the tumor microenvironment established in 3-D models often plays a significant role in cancer progression and cellular responses to the drugs. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the benefits of 3-D in vitro models of various cancers. In the present study, we have developed a spheroid-based, 3-D culture of pancreatic cancer cell lines MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 for pancreatic drug testing, using the acid phosphatase assay. Drug efficacy testing showed that spheroids had much higher drug resistance than monolayers. This model, which is characteristically reproducible and easy and offers rapid handling, is the preferred choice for filling the gap between monolayer cell cultures and in vivo models in the process of drug development and testing for pancreatic cancer.

  9. 3D MODELLING AND INTERACTIVE WEB-BASED VISUALIZATION OF CULTURAL HERITAGE OBJECTS

    Koeva, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, there are rapid developments in the fields of photogrammetry, laser scanning, computer vision and robotics, together aiming to provide highly accurate 3D data that is useful for various applications. In recent years, various LiDAR and image-based techniques have been investigated for 3D modelling because of their opportunities for fast and accurate model generation. For cultural heritage preservation and the representation of objects that are important for tourism and their interact...

  10. 3D Modeling from Multi-views Images for Cultural Heritage in Wat-Pho, Thailand

    Soontranon, N.; Srestasathiern, P.; Lawawirojwong, S.

    2015-08-01

    In Thailand, there are several types of (tangible) cultural heritages. This work focuses on 3D modeling of the heritage objects from multi-views images. The images are acquired by using a DSLR camera which costs around 1,500 (camera and lens). Comparing with a 3D laser scanner, the camera is cheaper and lighter than the 3D scanner. Hence, the camera is available for public users and convenient for accessing narrow areas. The acquired images consist of various sculptures and architectures in Wat-Pho which is a Buddhist temple located behind the Grand Palace (Bangkok, Thailand). Wat-Pho is known as temple of the reclining Buddha and the birthplace of traditional Thai massage. To compute the 3D models, a diagram is separated into following steps; Data acquisition, Image matching, Image calibration and orientation, Dense matching and Point cloud processing. For the initial work, small heritages less than 3 meters height are considered for the experimental results. A set of multi-views images of an interested object is used as input data for 3D modeling. In our experiments, 3D models are obtained from MICMAC (open source) software developed by IGN, France. The output of 3D models will be represented by using standard formats of 3D point clouds and triangulated surfaces such as .ply, .off, .obj, etc. To compute for the efficient 3D models, post-processing techniques are required for the final results e.g. noise reduction, surface simplification and reconstruction. The reconstructed 3D models can be provided for public access such as website, DVD, printed materials. The high accurate 3D models can also be used as reference data of the heritage objects that must be restored due to deterioration of a lifetime, natural disasters, etc.

  11. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  12. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  13. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues.

  14. 3D patterned stem cell differentiation using thermo-responsive methylcellulose hydrogel molds

    Lee, Wonjae; Park, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific patterned stem cell differentiation serves as the basis for the development, remodeling, and regeneration of the multicellular structure of the native tissues. We herein proposed a cytocompatible 3D casting process to recapitulate this patterned stem cell differentiation for reconstructing multicellular tissues in vitro. We first reconstituted the 2D culture conditions for stem cell fate control within 3D hydrogel by incorporating the sets of the diffusible signal molecules delivered through drug-releasing microparticles. Then, utilizing thermo-responsivity of methylcellulose (MC), we developed a cytocompatible casting process to mold these hydrogels into specific 3D configurations, generating the targeted spatial gradients of diffusible signal molecules. The liquid phase of the MC solution was viscous enough to adopt the shapes of 3D impression patterns, while the gelated MC served as a reliable mold for patterning the hydrogel prepolymers. When these patterned hydrogels were integrated together, the stem cells in each hydrogel distinctly differentiated toward individually defined fates, resulting in the formation of the multicellular tissue structure bearing the very structural integrity and characteristics as seen in vascularized bones and osteochondral tissues. PMID:27381562

  15. Metadata and Tools for Integration and Preservation of Cultural Heritage 3D Information

    Achille Felicetti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate many of the various storage, portability and interoperability issues arising among archaeologists and cultural heritage people when dealing with 3D technologies. On the one side, the available digital repositories look often unable to guarantee affordable features in the management of 3D models and their metadata; on the other side the nature of most of the available data format for 3D encoding seem to be not satisfactory for the necessary portability required nowadays by 3D information across different systems. We propose a set of possible solutions to show how integration can be achieved through the use of well known and wide accepted standards for data encoding and data storage. Using a set of 3D models acquired during various archaeological campaigns and a number of open source tools, we have implemented a straightforward encoding process to generate meaningful semantic data and metadata. We will also present the interoperability process carried out to integrate the encoded 3D models and the geographic features produced by the archaeologists. Finally we will report the preliminary (rather encouraging development of a semantic enabled and persistent digital repository, where 3D models (but also any kind of digital data and metadata can easily be stored, retrieved and shared with the content of other digital archives.

  16. Perfusion Stirred-Tank Bioreactors for 3D Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells.

    Simão, Daniel; Arez, Francisca; Terasso, Ana P; Pinto, Catarina; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Brito, Catarina; Alves, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic breakthroughs in neurological disorders have been hampered by the lack of accurate central nervous system (CNS) models. The development of these models allows the study of the disease onset/progression mechanisms and the preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics. This has traditionally relied on genetically engineered animal models that often diverge considerably from the human phenotype (developmental, anatomic, and physiological) and 2D in vitro cell models, which fail to recapitulate the characteristics of the target tissue (cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, cell polarity, etc.). Recapitulation of CNS phenotypic and functional features in vitro requires the implementation of advanced culture strategies, such as 3D culture systems, which enable to mimic the in vivo structural and molecular complexity. Models based on differentiation of human neural stem cells (hNSC) in 3D cultures have great potential as complementary tools in preclinical research, bridging the gap between human clinical studies and animal models. The development of robust and scalable processes for the 3D differentiation of hNSC can improve the accuracy of early stage development in preclinical research. In this context, the use of software-controlled stirred-tank bioreactors (STB) provides an efficient technological platform for hNSC aggregation and differentiation. This system enables to monitor and control important physicochemical parameters for hNSC culture, such as dissolved oxygen. Importantly, the adoption of a perfusion operation mode allows a stable flow of nutrients and differentiation/neurotrophic factors, while clearing the toxic by-products. This contributes to a setting closer to the physiological, by mimicking the in vivo microenvironment. In this chapter, we address the technical requirements and procedures for the implementation of 3D differentiation strategies of hNSC, by operating STB under perfusion mode for long-term cultures. This strategy is suitable

  17. 三维环境下肌源性干细胞分化为胰岛样细胞团%Muscle-derived stem cells differentiate into the islet cells in 3D culture

    殷甜甜; 刘畅; 梅晰凡; 王滢丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of the extracellular microenvironment in muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) differentiating into the islet cells. Methods: MDSCs were extracted by mixed enzymatic digestion, purified by differential adherent culture, and induced by the cells after split into following groups: a collagen and chemical group, a chemical group and a control group. The differentiation was induced separately and the cell morphology was observed simultaneously. Insulin producing cell clusters (IPCCs) were identified by dithizone (DTZ) staining, immunocytochemical staining were used to examine the production of insulin glucagons etc and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to evaluate gene expression.Results: Under an ordinary light microscope, the size of the islet cells induced by the collagen and chemical group was bigger than that in the chemical group; and the DTZ dyeing results showed that the induced islet cells of the collagen and chemical group secreted more insulin than did those of the chemical group; immunocytochemical staining showed that the induced islet cells in the collagen and chemical group were more similar to adult rat islet tissues, and detected by RT-polymerase chain reaction, the gene expression of the induced islet cells in the collagen and chemical group was higher than that in the chemical group. Conclusion: In the three dimensional environment, muscle stem cells could differentiate into the pancreatic islet cells, and muscle source cells can be differentiated into bigger and more mature islet cells.%目的:运用三维细胞培养模型研究细胞外微环境对肌源性干细胞分化为胰岛样细胞的作用.方法:用差速贴壁的方法对SD大鼠肌源性干细胞进行分离和培养,将细胞分为胶原支架化学诱导剂组,化学诱导剂组,空白组.分别观察诱导后细胞的生长形态,采用双巯腙DTZ染色鉴定胰岛素分泌细胞,细胞免疫化学检测胰岛相关蛋

  18. Results of comparative RBMK neutron computation using VNIIEF codes (cell computation, 3D statics, 3D kinetics). Final report

    In conformity with the protocol of the Workshop under Contract open-quotes Assessment of RBMK reactor safety using modern Western Codesclose quotes VNIIEF performed a neutronics computation series to compare western and VNIIEF codes and assess whether VNIIEF codes are suitable for RBMK type reactor safety assessment computation. The work was carried out in close collaboration with M.I. Rozhdestvensky and L.M. Podlazov, NIKIET employees. The effort involved: (1) cell computations with the WIMS, EKRAN codes (improved modification of the LOMA code) and the S-90 code (VNIIEF Monte Carlo). Cell, polycell, burnup computation; (2) 3D computation of static states with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes and comparison with results of computation with the NESTLE code (USA). The computations were performed in the geometry and using the neutron constants presented by the American party; (3) 3D computation of neutron kinetics with the KORAT-3D and NEU codes. These computations were performed in two formulations, both being developed in collaboration with NIKIET. Formulation of the first problem maximally possibly agrees with one of NESTLE problems and imitates gas bubble travel through a core. The second problem is a model of the RBMK as a whole with imitation of control and protection system controls (CPS) movement in a core

  19. State-of-the-Art of 3D Cultures (Organs-on-a-Chip) in Safety Testing and Pathophysiology

    Alepee, Natalie; Bahinski, Anthony; Daneshian, Mardas; De Weyer, Bart; Fritsche, Ellen; Goldberg, Alan; Hansmann, Jan; Hartung, Thomas; Haycock, John; Hogberg, Helena T.; Hoelting, Lisa; Jens M Kelm; Kadereit, Suzanne; McVey, Emily; Landsiedel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Integrated approaches using different in vitro methods in combination with bioinformatics can (i) increase the success rate and speed of drug development; (ii) improve the accuracy of toxicological risk assessment; and (iii) increase our understanding of disease. An important building block of this strategy that has emerged during the last years are threedimensional (3D) cell culture models. The majority of these models are organotypic, i.e., they aim to reproduce major functions of an organ ...

  20. File list: Pol.ALL.20.Polr3d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.20.Polr3d.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase Polr3d All cell types SRX301459,SRX373...73041 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.20.Polr3d.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.ALL.05.Polr3d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.05.Polr3d.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase Polr3d All cell types SRX373040,SRX373...04148 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.05.Polr3d.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.ALL.50.Polr3d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.50.Polr3d.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase Polr3d All cell types SRX301459,SRX373...04147 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.50.Polr3d.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.ALL.10.Polr3d.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Full Text Available Pol.ALL.10.Polr3d.AllCell mm9 RNA polymerase Polr3d All cell types SRX373040,SRX301...04147 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.ALL.10.Polr3d.AllCell.bed ...

  4. A 3D printed nano bone matrix for characterization of breast cancer cell and osteoblast interactions

    Zhu, Wei; Castro, Nathan J.; Cui, Haitao; Zhou, Xuan; Boualam, Benchaa; McGrane, Robert; Glazer, Robert I.; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Bone metastasis is one of the most prevalent complications of late-stage breast cancer, in which the native bone matrix components, including osteoblasts, are intimately involved in tumor progression. The development of a successful in vitro model would greatly facilitate understanding the underlying mechanism of breast cancer bone invasion as well as provide a tool for effective discovery of novel therapeutic strategies. In the current study, we fabricated a series of in vitro bone matrices composed of a polyethylene glycol hydrogel and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite of varying concentrations to mimic the native bone microenvironment for the investigation of breast cancer bone metastasis. A stereolithography-based three-dimensional (3D) printer was used to fabricate the bone matrices with precisely controlled architecture. The interaction between breast cancer cells and osteoblasts was investigated in the optimized bone matrix. Using a Transwell® system to separate the two cell lines, breast cancer cells inhibited osteoblast proliferation, while osteoblasts stimulated breast cancer cell growth, whereas, both cell lines increased IL-8 secretion. Breast cancer cells co-cultured with osteoblasts within the 3D bone matrix formed multi-cellular spheroids in comparison to two-dimensional monolayers. These findings validate the use of our 3D printed bone matrices as an in vitro metastasis model, and highlights their potential for investigating breast cancer bone metastasis.

  5. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  6. Melanin Transfer in Human 3D Skin Equivalents Generated Exclusively from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Karl Gledhill

    Full Text Available The current utility of 3D skin equivalents is limited by the fact that existing models fail to recapitulate the cellular complexity of human skin. They often contain few cell types and no appendages, in part because many cells found in the skin are difficult to isolate from intact tissue and cannot be expanded in culture. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs present an avenue by which we can overcome this issue due to their ability to be differentiated into multiple cell types in the body and their unlimited growth potential. We previously reported generation of the first human 3D skin equivalents from iPSC-derived fibroblasts and iPSC-derived keratinocytes, demonstrating that iPSCs can provide a foundation for modeling a complex human organ such as skin. Here, we have increased the complexity of this model by including additional iPSC-derived melanocytes. Epidermal melanocytes, which are largely responsible for skin pigmentation, represent the second most numerous cell type found in normal human epidermis and as such represent a logical next addition. We report efficient melanin production from iPSC-derived melanocytes and transfer within an entirely iPSC-derived epidermal-melanin unit and generation of the first functional human 3D skin equivalents made from iPSC-derived fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanocytes.

  7. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs

    Michael Cornforth

    2012-03-26

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

  8. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application. PMID:25609254

  9. Engineering a perfusable 3D human liver platform from iPS cells.

    Schepers, Arnout; Li, Cheri; Chhabra, Arnav; Seney, Benjamin Tschudy; Bhatia, Sangeeta

    2016-07-01

    In vitro models of human tissue are crucial to our ability to study human disease as well as develop safe and effective drug therapies. Models of single organs in static and microfluidic culture have been established and shown utility for modeling some aspects of health and disease; however, these systems lack multi-organ interactions that are critical to some aspects of drug metabolism and toxicity. Thus, as part of a consortium of researchers, we have developed a liver chip that meets the following criteria: (1) employs human iPS cells from a patient of interest, (2) cultures cells in perfusable 3D organoids, and (3) is robust to variations in perfusion rate so as to be compatible in series with other specialized tissue chips (e.g. heart, lung). In order to achieve this, we describe methods to form hepatocyte aggregates from primary and iPS-derived cells, alone and in co-culture with support cells. This necessitated a novel culture protocol for the interrupted differentiation of iPS cells that permits their removal from a plated surface and aggregation while maintaining phenotypic hepatic functions. In order to incorporate these 3D aggregates in a perfusable platform, we next encapsulated the cells in a PEG hydrogel to prevent aggregation and overgrowth once on chip. We adapted a C-trap chip architecture from the literature that enabled robust loading with encapsulated organoids and culture over a range of flow rates. Finally, we characterize the liver functions of this iHep organoid chip under perfusion and demonstrate a lifetime of at least 28 days. We envision that such this strategy can be generalized to other microfluidic tissue models and provides an opportunity to query patient-specific liver responses in vitro. PMID:27296616

  10. Optimization of a 3D Dynamic Culturing System for In Vitro Modeling of Frontotemporal Neurodegeneration-Relevant Pathologic Features

    Tunesi, Marta; Fusco, Federica; Fiordaliso, Fabio; Corbelli, Alessandro; Biella, Gloria; Raimondi, Manuela T.

    2016-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder that is diagnosed with increasing frequency in clinical setting. Currently, no therapy is available and in addition the molecular basis of the disease are far from being elucidated. Consequently, it is of pivotal importance to develop reliable and cost-effective in vitro models for basic research purposes and drug screening. To this respect, recent results in the field of Alzheimer’s disease have suggested that a tridimensional (3D) environment is an added value to better model key pathologic features of the disease. Here, we have tried to add complexity to the 3D cell culturing concept by using a microfluidic bioreactor, where cells are cultured under a continuous flow of medium, thus mimicking the interstitial fluid movement that actually perfuses the body tissues, including the brain. We have implemented this model using a neuronal-like cell line (SH-SY5Y), a widely exploited cell model for neurodegenerative disorders that shows some basic features relevant for FTLD modeling, such as the release of the FTLD-related protein progranulin (PRGN) in specific vesicles (exosomes). We have efficiently seeded the cells on 3D scaffolds, optimized a disease-relevant oxidative stress experiment (by targeting mitochondrial function that is one of the possible FTLD-involved pathological mechanisms) and evaluated cell metabolic activity in dynamic culture in comparison to static conditions, finding that SH-SY5Y cells cultured in 3D scaffold are susceptible to the oxidative damage triggered by a mitochondrial-targeting toxin (6-OHDA) and that the same cells cultured in dynamic conditions kept their basic capacity to secrete PRGN in exosomes once recovered from the bioreactor and plated in standard 2D conditions. We think that a further improvement of our microfluidic system may help in providing a full device where assessing basic FTLD-related features (including PRGN dynamic secretion) that may

  11. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis

  12. Co-culture of 3D tumor spheroids with fibroblasts as a model for epithelial–mesenchymal transition in vitro

    Kim, Sun-Ah, E-mail: j.sarah.k@gmail.com [Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Kyung, E-mail: leeek@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Evolution Research Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kuh, Hyo-Jeong, E-mail: hkuh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biomedicine & Health Sciences, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Evolution Research Center, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) acts as a facilitator of metastatic dissemination in the invasive margin of malignant tumors where active tumor–stromal crosstalks take place. Co-cultures of cancer cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are often used as in vitro models of EMT. We established a tumor–fibroblast proximity co-culture using HT-29 tumor spheroids (TSs) with CCD-18co fibroblasts. When co-cultured with TSs, CCD-18co appeared activated, and proliferative activity as well as cell migration increased. Expression of fibronectin increased whereas laminin and type I collagen decreased in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to TSs alone, closely resembling the margin of in vivo xenograft tissue. Active TGFβ1 in culture media significantly increased in TS co-cultures but not in 2D co-cultures of cancer cells–fibroblasts, indicating that 3D context-associated factors from TSs may be crucial to crosstalks between cancer cells and fibroblasts. We also observed in TSs co-cultured with fibroblasts increased expression of α-SMA, EGFR and CTGF; reduced expression of membranous β-catenin and E-cadherin, together suggesting an EMT-like changes similar to a marginal region of xenograft tissue in vivo. Overall, our in vitro TS–fibroblast proximity co-culture mimics the EMT-state of the invasive margin of in vivo tumors in early metastasis. - Highlights: • An adjacent co-culture of tumor spheroids and fibroblasts is presented as EMT model. • Activation of fibroblasts and increased cell migration were shown in co-culture. • Expression of EMT-related factors in co-culture was similar to that in tumor tissue. • Crosstalk between spheroids and fibroblasts was demonstrated by secretome analysis.

  13. Mackay campus of environmental education and digital cultural construction: the application of 3D virtual reality

    Chien, Shao-Chi; Chung, Yu-Wei; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Huang, Jun-Yi; Chang, Jhih-Ting; He, Cai-Ying; Cheng, Yi-Wen

    2012-04-01

    This study uses 3D virtual reality technology to create the "Mackay campus of the environmental education and digital cultural 3D navigation system" for local historical sites in the Tamsui (Hoba) area, in hopes of providing tourism information and navigation through historical sites using a 3D navigation system. We used Auto CAD, Sketch Up, and SpaceEyes 3D software to construct the virtual reality scenes and create the school's historical sites, such as the House of Reverends, the House of Maidens, the Residence of Mackay, and the Education Hall. We used this technology to complete the environmental education and digital cultural Mackay campus . The platform we established can indeed achieve the desired function of providing tourism information and historical site navigation. The interactive multimedia style and the presentation of the information will allow users to obtain a direct information response. In addition to showing the external appearances of buildings, the navigation platform can also allow users to enter the buildings to view lifelike scenes and textual information related to the historical sites. The historical sites are designed according to their actual size, which gives users a more realistic feel. In terms of the navigation route, the navigation system does not force users along a fixed route, but instead allows users to freely control the route they would like to take to view the historical sites on the platform.

  14. Establishment of 3D Co-Culture Models from Different Stages of Human Tongue Tumorigenesis: Utility in Understanding Neoplastic Progression

    Sawant, Sharada; Dongre, Harsh; Singh, Archana Kumari; Joshi, Shriya; Costea, Daniela Elena; Mahadik, Snehal; Ahire, Chetan; Makani, Vidhi; Dange, Prerana; Sharma, Shilpi; Chaukar, Devendra; Vaidya, Milind

    2016-01-01

    To study multistep tumorigenesis process, there is a need of in-vitro 3D model simulating in-vivo tissue. Present study aimed to reconstitute in-vitro tissue models comprising various stages of neoplastic progression of tongue tumorigenesis and to evaluate the utility of these models to investigate the role of stromal fibroblasts in maintenance of desmosomal anchoring junctions using transmission electron microscopy. We reconstituted in-vitro models representing normal, dysplastic, and malignant tissues by seeding primary keratinocytes on either fibroblast embedded in collagen matrix or plain collagen matrix in growth factor-free medium. The findings of histomorphometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy analyses of the three types of 3D cultures showed that the stratified growth, cell proliferation, and differentiation were comparable between co-cultures and their respective native tissues; however, they largely differed in cultures grown without fibroblasts. The immunostaining intensity of proteins, viz., desmoplakin, desmoglein, and plakoglobin, was reduced as the disease stage increased in all co-cultures as observed in respective native tissues. Desmosome-like structures were identified using immunogold labeling in these cultures. Moreover, electron microscopic observations revealed that the desmosome number and their length were significantly reduced and intercellular spaces were increased in cultures grown without fibroblasts when compared with their co-culture counterparts. Our results showed that the major steps of tongue tumorigenesis can be reproduced in-vitro. Stromal fibroblasts play a role in regulation of epithelial thickness, cell proliferation, differentiation, and maintenance of desmosomalanchoring junctions in in-vitro grown tissues. The reconstituted co-culture models could help to answer various biological questions especially related to tongue tumorigenesis. PMID:27501241

  15. 3D-Printing Crystallographic Unit Cells for Learning Materials Science and Engineering

    Rodenbough, Philip P.; Vanti, William B.; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Introductory materials science and engineering courses universally include the study of crystal structure and unit cells, which are by their nature highly visual 3D concepts. Traditionally, such topics are explored with 2D drawings or perhaps a limited set of difficult-to-construct 3D models. The rise of 3D printing, coupled with the wealth of…

  16. Calcium Electroporation: Evidence for Differential Effects in Normal and Malignant Cell Lines, Evaluated in a 3D Spheroid Model

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha; Gehl, Julie; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill efficacy–and normal cell sensitivity. Methods Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different h...

  17. The potential of 3D techniques for cultural heritage object documentation

    Bitelli, Gabriele; Girelli, Valentina A.; Remondino, Fabio; Vittuari, Luca

    2007-01-01

    The generation of 3D models of objects has become an important research point in many fields of application like industrial inspection, robotics, navigation and body scanning. Recently the techniques for generating photo-textured 3D digital models have interested also the field of Cultural Heritage, due to their capability to combine high precision metrical information with a qualitative and photographic description of the objects. In fact this kind of product is a fundamental support for documentation, studying and restoration of works of art, until a production of replicas by fast prototyping techniques. Close-range photogrammetric techniques are nowadays more and more frequently used for the generation of precise 3D models. With the advent of automated procedures and fully digital products in the 1990s, it has become easier to use and cheaper, and nowadays a wide range of commercial software is available to calibrate, orient and reconstruct objects from images. This paper presents the complete process for the derivation of a photorealistic 3D model of an important basalt stela (about 70 x 60 x 25 cm) discovered in the archaeological site of Tilmen Höyük, in Turkey, dating back to 2nd mill. BC. We will report the modeling performed using passive and active sensors and the comparison of the achieved results.

  18. Induced tauopathy in a novel 3D-culture model mediates neurodegenerative processes: a real-time study on biochips.

    Diana Seidel

    Full Text Available Tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease represent one of the major health problems of aging population worldwide. Therefore, a better understanding of tau-dependent pathologies and consequently, tau-related intervention strategies is highly demanded. In recent years, several tau-focused therapies have been proposed with the aim to stop disease progression. However, to develop efficient active pharmaceutical ingredients for the broad treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients, further improvements are necessary for understanding the detailed neurodegenerative processes as well as the mechanism and side effects of potential active pharmaceutical ingredients (API in the neuronal system. In this context, there is a lack of suitable complex in vitro cell culture models recapitulating major aspects of taupathological degenerative processes in sufficient time and reproducible manner.Herewith, we describe a novel 3D SH-SY5Y cell-based, tauopathy model that shows advanced characteristics of matured neurons in comparison to monolayer cultures without the need of artificial differentiation promoting agents. Moreover, the recombinant expression of a novel highly pathologic fourfold mutated human tau variant lead to a fast and emphasized degeneration of neuritic processes. The neurodegenerative effects could be analyzed in real time and with high sensitivity using our unique microcavity array-based impedance spectroscopy measurement system. We were able to quantify a time- and concentration-dependent relative impedance decrease when Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology was induced in the neuronal 3D cell culture model. In combination with the collected optical information, the degenerative processes within each 3D-culture could be monitored and analyzed. More strikingly, tau-specific regenerative effects caused by tau-focused active pharmaceutical ingredients could be quantitatively monitored by impedance spectroscopy.Bringing together our novel complex 3

  19. Validation of an in vitro 3D bone culture model with perfused and mechanically stressed ceramic scaffold

    G Bouet

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An engineered three dimensional (3D in vitro cell culture system was designed with the goal of inducing and controlling in vitro osteogenesis in a reproducible manner under conditions more similar to the in vivo bone microenvironment than traditional two-dimensional (2D models. This bioreactor allows efficient mechanical loading and perfusion of an original cubic calcium phosphate bioceramic of highly controlled composition and structure. This bioceramic comprises an internal portion containing homogeneously interconnected macropores surrounded by a dense layer, which minimises fluid flow bypass around the scaffold. This dense and flat layer permits the application of a homogeneous loading on the bioceramic while also enhancing its mechanical strength. Numerical modelling of constraints shows that the system provides direct mechanical stimulation of cells within the scaffold. Experimental results establish that under perfusion at a steady flow of 2 µL/min, corresponding to 3 ≤ Medium velocity ≤ 23 µm/s, mouse calvarial cells grow and differentiate as osteoblasts in a reproducible manner, and lay down a mineralised matrix. Moreover, cells respond to mechanical loading by increasing C-fos expression, which demonstrates the effective mechanical stimulation of the culture within the scaffold. In summary, we provide a “proof-of-concept” for osteoblastic cell culture in a controlled 3D culture system under perfusion and mechanical loading. This model will be a tool to analyse bone cell functions in vivo, and will provide a bench testing system for the clinical assessment of bioactive bone-targeting molecules under load.

  20. Effect of biomimetic 3D environment of an injectable polymeric scaffold on MG-63 osteoblastic-cell response

    Solid PLGA microspheres were fabricated and characterized in terms of their in vitro degradation behaviour. Microsphere scaffolds were then modified covalently by P-15 (GTPGPQGIAGQRGVV) to obtain a 3D bioactive collagen surrogate matrix for bone filling applications. These scaffolds were characterized for surface topography, hydrophilicity and evaluated for their effect on osteoblastic activity of MG-63 cell line vis-a-vis 2D monolayer culture. AFM and contact angle experiments indicated enhanced nano-level roughness and hydrophilicity on P-15 modification. Modified scaffolds showed enhanced cell attachment, proliferation, extracellular matrix formation, mineralization and collagen type-I expression when compared to unmodified microspheres, prerequisite for bone filling applications. On long term in vitro cell culture, however, decreased cell viability was observed which may be attributed to the acidic microenvironment generated due to polymer degradation and reduction in nutrient diffusion through the copious ECM formed in 3D scaffolds. Though a higher cell count could be obtained in 2D monolayer cell culture, it was overshadowed by weak cell attachment, poor phenotypic characteristics, decreased cell viability and low mineralization levels, over 28 day cell culture studies. Results indicate that P-15 modified microsphere scaffolds may provide a natural, biomimetic 3D environment and may be successfully exploited for non-invasive bone filling applications.

  1. Assessment of different 3D culture systems to study tumor phenotype and chemosensitivity in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Zeeberg, Katrine; Cardone, Rosa Angela; Greco, Maria Raffaella; Saccomano, Mara; Nøhr-Nielsen, Asbjørn; Alves, Frauke; Pedersen, Stine Falsig; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly malignant disease with a very poor prognosis, due to the influence of the tumor stroma, which promotes tumor growth, early invasion and chemoradiation resistance. Efforts to develop models for identifying novel anticancer therapeutic compounds have been hampered by the limited ability of in vitro models to mimic these in vivo tumor-stroma interactions. This has led to the development of various three-dimensional (3D) culture platforms recapitulating the in vivo tumor-stroma crosstalk and designed to better understand basic cancer processes and screen drug action. However, a consensus for different experimental 3D platforms is still missing in PDAC. We compared four PDAC cell lines of different malignancy grown in 2D monolayers to three of the more commonly used 3D techniques (ultralow adhesion concave microwells, Matrigel inclusion and organotypic systems) and to tumors derived from their orthotopic implantation in mice. In these 3D platforms, we observed that cells grow with very different tumor morphologies and the organotypic setting most closely resembles the tumor cytoarchitecture obtained by orthotopically implanting the four cell lines in mice. We then analyzed the molecular and cellular responses of one of these cell lines to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) stimulation with EGF and inhibition with erlotinib and found that only in the 3D platforms, and especially the organotypic, cells: i) responded to EGF by changing the expression of signalling components underlying cell-stroma crosstalk and tissue architecture, growth, invasion and drug resistance (E-cadherin, EGFR, ezrin, β1 integrin, NHERF1 and HIF-1α) similar to those reported in vivo; ii) had stimulated growth and increased erlotinib sensitivity in response to EGF, more faithfully mimicking their known in vivo behaviour. Altogether, these results, indicate the organotypic as the most relevant physiological 3D system to study the

  2. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    Foroni, Laura [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Vasuri, Francesco, E-mail: vasurifrancesco@libero.it [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Chair of Vascular Surgery, Department of Specialistic Surgery and Anaesthesiological Sciences, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Valente, Sabrina [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Gualandi, Chiara [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Focarete, Maria Letizia [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); Health Science and Technologies–Interdepartmental Center for Industrial Research (HST-ICIR), Bologna University (Italy); Caprara, Giacomo [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy); Scandola, Mariastella [Department of Chemistry “G. Ciamician” and National Consortium of Materials Science and Technology (INSTM, RU Bologna), Bologna University (Italy); D' Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea [Pathology Unit, Department of Haematology, Oncology and Clinical Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna University (Italy)

    2013-06-10

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  3. The role of 3D microenvironmental organization in MCF-7 epithelial–mesenchymal transition after 7 culture days

    We present a multi-technique study on in vitro epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in human MCF-7 cells cultured on electrospun scaffolds of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), with random and aligned fiber orientations. Our aim is to investigate the morphological and genetic characteristics induced by extracellular matrix in tumor cells cultured in different 3D environments, and at different time points. Cell vitality was assessed with AlamarBlue at days 1, 3, 5 and 7. Scanning electron microscopy was performed at culture days 3 and 7. Immunohistochemistry (for E-cadherin, β-catenin, cytokeratins, nucleophosmin, tubulin, Ki-67 and vimentin), immunofluorescence (for F-actin) western blot (for E-cadherin, β-catenin and vimentin) and transmission electron microscopy were carried out at day 7. An EMT gene array followed by PCR analysis confirmed the regulation of selected genes. At day 7, scanning electron microscopy on aligned-PLA revealed spindle-shaped cells gathered in buds and ribbon-like structures, with a higher nucleolar/nuclear ratio and a loss in E-cadherin and β-catenin at immunohistochemistry and western blot. An up-regulation of SMAD2, TGF-β2, TFPI2 and SOX10 was found in aligned-PLA compared to random-PLA cultured cells. The topography of the extracellular matrix has a role in tumor EMT, and a more aggressive phenotype characterizes MCF-7 cells cultured on aligned-PLA scaffold. -- Highlights: • After 7 culture days an aligned-PLA scaffold induces a spindle shape to MCF-7 cells. • Despite these changes, the aligned MCF-7 cells keep an epithelial phenotype. • The extracellular environment alone influences the E-cadherin/β-catenin axis. • The extracellular environment can promote the epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  4. Minimal Camera Networks for 3D Image Based Modeling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    Bashar Alsadik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue “Lamassu”. Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883–859 BC. Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction and the final accuracy of 1 mm.

  5. Minimal camera networks for 3D image based modeling of cultural heritage objects.

    Alsadik, Bashar; Gerke, Markus; Vosselman, George; Daham, Afrah; Jasim, Luma

    2014-01-01

    3D modeling of cultural heritage objects like artifacts, statues and buildings is nowadays an important tool for virtual museums, preservation and restoration. In this paper, we introduce a method to automatically design a minimal imaging network for the 3D modeling of cultural heritage objects. This becomes important for reducing the image capture time and processing when documenting large and complex sites. Moreover, such a minimal camera network design is desirable for imaging non-digitally documented artifacts in museums and other archeological sites to avoid disturbing the visitors for a long time and/or moving delicate precious objects to complete the documentation task. The developed method is tested on the Iraqi famous statue "Lamassu". Lamassu is a human-headed winged bull of over 4.25 m in height from the era of Ashurnasirpal II (883-859 BC). Close-range photogrammetry is used for the 3D modeling task where a dense ordered imaging network of 45 high resolution images were captured around Lamassu with an object sample distance of 1 mm. These images constitute a dense network and the aim of our study was to apply our method to reduce the number of images for the 3D modeling and at the same time preserve pre-defined point accuracy. Temporary control points were fixed evenly on the body of Lamassu and measured by using a total station for the external validation and scaling purpose. Two network filtering methods are implemented and three different software packages are used to investigate the efficiency of the image orientation and modeling of the statue in the filtered (reduced) image networks. Internal and external validation results prove that minimal image networks can provide highly accurate records and efficiency in terms of visualization, completeness, processing time (>60% reduction) and the final accuracy of 1 mm. PMID:24670718

  6. Towards a 3d Based Platform for Cultural Heritage Site Survey and Virtual Exploration

    Seinturier, J.; Riedinger, C.; Mahiddine, A.; Peloso, D.; Boï, J.-M.; Merad, D.; Drap, P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper present a 3D platform that enables to make both cultural heritage site survey and its virtual exploration. It provides a single and easy way to use framework for merging multi scaled 3D measurements based on photogrammetry, documentation produced by experts and the knowledge of involved domains leaving the experts able to extract and choose the relevant information to produce the final survey. Taking into account the interpretation of the real world during the process of archaeological surveys is in fact the main goal of a survey. New advances in photogrammetry and the capability to produce dense 3D point clouds do not solve the problem of surveys. New opportunities for 3D representation are now available and we must to use them and find new ways to link geometry and knowledge. The new platform is able to efficiently manage and process large 3D data (points set, meshes) thanks to the implementation of space partition methods coming from the state of the art such as octrees and kd-trees and thus can interact with dense point clouds (thousands to millions of points) in real time. The semantisation of raw 3D data relies on geometric algorithms such as geodetic path computation, surface extraction from dense points cloud and geometrical primitive optimization. The platform provide an interface that enables expert to describe geometric representations of interesting objects like ashlar blocs, stratigraphic units or generic items (contour, lines, … ) directly onto the 3D representation of the site and without explicit links to underlying algorithms. The platform provide two ways for describing geometric representation. If oriented photographs are available, the expert can draw geometry on a photograph and the system computes its 3D representation by projection on the underlying mesh or the points cloud. If photographs are not available or if the expert wants to only use the 3D representation then he can simply draw objects shape on it. When 3D

  7. Alginate based 3D hydrogels as an in vitro co-culture model platform for the toxicity screening of new chemical entities

    Prediction of human response to potential therapeutic drugs is through conventional methods of in vitro cell culture assays and expensive in vivo animal testing. Alternatives to animal testing require sophisticated in vitro model systems that must replicate in vivo like function for reliable testing applications. Advancements in biomaterials have enabled the development of three-dimensional (3D) cell encapsulated hydrogels as in vitro drug screening tissue model systems. In this study, we have developed an in vitro platform to enable high density 3D culture of liver cells combined with a monolayer growth of target breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) in a static environment as a representative example of screening drug compounds for hepatotoxicity and drug efficacy. Alginate hydrogels encapsulated with serial cell densities of HepG2 cells (105-108 cells/ml) are supported by a porous poly-carbonate disc platform and co-cultured with MCF-7 cells within standard cell culture plates during a 3 day study period. The clearance rates of drug transformation by HepG2 cells are measured using a coumarin based pro-drug. The platform was used to test for HepG2 cytotoxicity 50% (CT50) using commercially available drugs which further correlated well with published in vivo LD50 values. The developed test platform allowed us to evaluate drug dose concentrations to predict hepatotoxicity and its effect on the target cells. The in vitro 3D co-culture platform provides a scalable and flexible approach to test multiple-cell types in a hybrid setting within standard cell culture plates which may open up novel 3D in vitro culture techniques to screen new chemical entity compounds. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → A porous support disc design to support the culture of desired cells in 3D hydrogels. → Demonstrated the co-culture of two cell types within standard cell-culture plates. → A scalable, low cost approach to toxicity screening involving multiple cell types.

  8. Microtubule regulation of corneal fibroblast morphology and mechanical activity in 3-D culture

    Kim, Areum; Petroll, W. Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of microtubules in regulating corneal fibroblast structure and mechanical behavior using static (3-D) and dynamic (4-D) imaging of both cells and their surrounding matrix. Human corneal fibroblasts transfected to express GFP-zyxin (to label focal adhesions) or GFP-tubulin (to label microtubules) were plated at low density inside 100 μm thick type I collagen matrices. After 24 hours, the effects of nocodazole (to depolymerize microtubules),...

  9. Prognostic breast cancer signature identified from 3D culture model accurately predicts clinical outcome across independent datasets

    Martin, Katherine J.; Patrick, Denis R.; Bissell, Mina J.; Fournier, Marcia V.

    2008-10-20

    One of the major tenets in breast cancer research is that early detection is vital for patient survival by increasing treatment options. To that end, we have previously used a novel unsupervised approach to identify a set of genes whose expression predicts prognosis of breast cancer patients. The predictive genes were selected in a well-defined three dimensional (3D) cell culture model of non-malignant human mammary epithelial cell morphogenesis as down-regulated during breast epithelial cell acinar formation and cell cycle arrest. Here we examine the ability of this gene signature (3D-signature) to predict prognosis in three independent breast cancer microarray datasets having 295, 286, and 118 samples, respectively. Our results show that the 3D-signature accurately predicts prognosis in three unrelated patient datasets. At 10 years, the probability of positive outcome was 52, 51, and 47 percent in the group with a poor-prognosis signature and 91, 75, and 71 percent in the group with a good-prognosis signature for the three datasets, respectively (Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, p<0.05). Hazard ratios for poor outcome were 5.5 (95% CI 3.0 to 12.2, p<0.0001), 2.4 (95% CI 1.6 to 3.6, p<0.0001) and 1.9 (95% CI 1.1 to 3.2, p = 0.016) and remained significant for the two larger datasets when corrected for estrogen receptor (ER) status. Hence the 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome in both ER-positive and ER-negative tumors, though individual genes differed in their prognostic ability in the two subtypes. Genes that were prognostic in ER+ patients are AURKA, CEP55, RRM2, EPHA2, FGFBP1, and VRK1, while genes prognostic in ER patients include ACTB, FOXM1 and SERPINE2 (Kaplan-Meier p<0.05). Multivariable Cox regression analysis in the largest dataset showed that the 3D-signature was a strong independent factor in predicting breast cancer outcome. The 3D-signature accurately predicts breast cancer outcome across multiple datasets and holds prognostic

  10. Mechanisms of DNA damage response to targeted irradiation in organotypic 3D skin cultures.

    Anna Acheva

    Full Text Available DNA damage (caused by direct cellular exposure and bystander signaling and the complex pathways involved in its repair are critical events underpinning cellular and tissue response following radiation exposures. There are limited data addressing the dynamics of DNA damage induction and repair in the skin particularly in areas not directly exposed. Here we investigate the mechanisms regulating DNA damage, repair, intracellular signalling and their impact on premature differentiation and development of inflammatory-like response in the irradiated and surrounding areas of a 3D organotypic skin model. Following localized low-LET irradiation (225 kVp X-rays, low levels of 53BP1 foci were observed in the 3D model (3.8±0.28 foci/Gy/cell with foci persisting and increasing in size up to 48 h post irradiation. In contrast, in cell monolayers 14.2±0.6 foci/Gy/cell and biphasic repair kinetics with repair completed before 24 h was observed. These differences are linked to differences in cellular status with variable level of p21 driving apoptotic signalling in 2D and accelerated differentiation in both the directly irradiated and bystander areas of the 3D model. The signalling pathways utilized by irradiated keratinocytes to induce DNA damage in non-exposed areas of the skin involved the NF-κB transcription factor and its downstream target COX-2.

  11. 3D measurements of live cells via digital holographic microscopy and terahertz spectroscopy

    Park, Jun Yong; Oser, Dorian; Iapozzuto, Peter; Norbury, Sean; Mahajan, Supriya; Khmaladze, Alexander; Sharikova, Anna

    2016-03-01

    This is a study of the central nervous system (CNS) cells, including brain micro vascular endothelial cells (BMV) that constitute the blood brain barrier, and C6 glial cells that are the predominant cell in the brain. The cells are exposed to various chemicals by non-invasive, label-free methods. Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is a technique that records an interference pattern between an object and reference waves, so that the computationally reconstructed holographic image contains both amplitude and phase information, and 3D images are obtained. The measurement of cell cultures by digital holographic microscopy yields information about cell death mechanisms, since these processes are correlated with individual cell volume. Our in-house DHM combines a visible (red) laser source with a conventional microscope base, and LabVIEW-run data processing. Terahertz spectral signatures are associated with structural changes in molecules and provide complementary information about cells. Both CNS cells BMV and C6 cells are treated with the drug "Methamphetamine" (METH), which induces apoptosis in neuronal cells and exhibits decrease in cell volume, a characteristic of cells undergoing apoptosis (induced cell death). METH can cause CNS cell death by cross-talk between mitochondria-, endoplasmic reticulum-, and receptor-mediated apoptotic events, all of which results in drug induced changes in neuroplasticity and significant neuropathology. Doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, is used as a control. We observe that METH treatment resulted in more pronounced cell volume shrinkage in both the BMV and C6 cells, as compared to DOX-induced cell apoptosis.

  12. Intrinsic FGF2 and FGF5 promotes angiogenesis of human aortic endothelial cells in 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system.

    Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Joo, Hyung Joon; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Chi-Yeon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Cui, Long-Hui; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The human body contains different endothelial cell types and differences in their angiogenic potential are poorly understood. We compared the functional angiogenic ability of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic cell culture system. HAECs and HUVECs exhibited similar cellular characteristics in a 2D culture system; however, in the 3D microfluidic angiogenesis system, HAECs exhibited stronger angiogenic potential than HUVECs. Interestingly, the expression level of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF5 under vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A stimulation was significantly higher in HAECs than in HUVECs. Moreover, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGF2 and FGF5 more significantly attenuated vascular sprouting induced from HAECs than HUVECs. Our results suggest that HAECs have greater angiogenic potential through FGF2 and FGF5 upregulation and could be a compatible endothelial cell type to achieve robust angiogenesis. PMID:27357248

  13. Microfluidics 3D gel-island chip for single cell isolation and lineage-dependent drug responses study.

    Zhang, Zhixiong; Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Luan, Yi; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-07-01

    3D cell culture in the extracellular matrix (ECM), which not only provides structural support to cellular constituents, but also initiates regulatory biochemical cues for a variety of important cell functions in tissue, has become more and more important in understanding cancer pathology and drug testing. Although the ECM-gel has been used in cell culture both in bulk and on-chip, previous studies focused on collective cell behavior rather than single-cell heterogeneity. To track the behavior of each individual cell, we have developed a gel-island chip, which can form thousands of islands containing single cells encapsulated by the desired ECM. Optimized by Poisson's distribution, the device can attain 34% single cell capture efficiency of the exact number of single cells per island. A good culture media exchange rate and high cell viability can be achieved in the gel-islands. The cells in the islands can be automatically counted for high-throughput analysis. As a proof of concept, we monitored the proliferation and differentiation of single Notch+ (stem-like) T47D breast cancer cells. The 3D collagen gel environment was found to be favorable for the stem-like phenotype through better self-renewal and de-differentiation (Notch- to Notch+ transition). More interestingly, we found that the Notch- de-differentiated cells were more resistant to doxorubicin and cisplatin than the Notch+ cells. Combining the 3D ECM culture and single cell resolution, the presented platform can automatically analyze the individual cell behaviors of hundreds of cells using a small amount of drug and reagents. PMID:27270563

  14. Analyzing Biological Performance of 3D-Printed, Cell-Impregnated Hybrid Constructs for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Izadifar, Zohreh; Chang, Tuanjie; Kulyk, William; Chen, Xiongbiao; Eames, B Frank

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting of hybrid constructs is a promising biofabrication method for cartilage tissue engineering because a synthetic polymer framework and cell-impregnated hydrogel provide structural and biological features of cartilage, respectively. During bioprinting, impregnated cells may be subjected to high temperatures (caused by the adjacent melted polymer) and process-induced mechanical forces, potentially compromising cell function. This study addresses these biofabrication issues, evaluating the heat distribution of printed polycaprolactone (PCL) strands and the rheological property and structural stability of alginate hydrogels at various temperatures and concentrations. The biocompatibility of parameters from these studies was tested by culturing 3D hybrid constructs bioprinted with primary cells from embryonic chick cartilage. During initial two-dimensional culture expansion of these primary cells, two morphologically and molecularly distinct cell populations ("rounded" and "fibroblastic") were isolated. The biological performance of each population was evaluated in 3D hybrid constructs separately. The cell viability, proliferation, and cartilage differentiation were observed at high levels in hybrid constructs of both cell populations, confirming the validity of these 3D bioprinting parameters for effective cartilage tissue engineering. Statistically significant performance variations were observed, however, between the rounded and fibroblastic cell populations. Molecular and morphological data support the notion that such performance differences may be attributed to the relative differentiation state of rounded versus fibroblastic cells (i.e., differentiated chondrocytes vs. chondroprogenitors, respectively), which is a relevant issue for cell-based tissue engineering strategies. Taken together, our study demonstrates that bioprinting 3D hybrid constructs of PCL and cell-impregnated alginate hydrogel is a promising approach for

  15. Skin equivalent tissue-engineered construct: co-cultured fibroblasts/ keratinocytes on 3D matrices of sericin hope cocoons.

    Sunita Nayak

    Full Text Available The development of effective and alternative tissue-engineered skin replacements to autografts, allografts and xenografts has became a clinical requirement due to the problems related to source of donor tissue and the perceived risk of disease transmission. In the present study 3D tissue engineered construct of sericin is developed using co-culture of keratinocytes on the upper surface of the fabricated matrices and with fibroblasts on lower surface. Sericin is obtained from "Sericin Hope" silkworm of Bombyx mori mutant and is extracted from cocoons by autoclave. Porous sericin matrices are prepared by freeze dried method using genipin as crosslinker. The matrices are characterized biochemically and biophysically. The cell proliferation and viability of co-cultured fibroblasts and keratinocytes on matrices for at least 28 days are observed by live/dead assay, Alamar blue assay, and by dual fluorescent staining. The growth of the fibroblasts and keratinocytes in co-culture is correlated with the expression level of TGF-β, b-FGF and IL-8 in the cultured supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The histological analysis further demonstrates a multi-layered stratified epidermal layer of uninhibited keratinocytes in co-cultured constructs. Presence of involucrin, collagen IV and the fibroblast surface protein in immuno-histochemical stained sections of co-cultured matrices indicates the significance of paracrine signaling between keratinocytes and fibroblasts in the expression of extracellular matrix protein for dermal repair. No significant amount of pro inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and nitric oxide production are evidenced when macrophages grown on the sericin matrices. The results all together depict the potentiality of sericin 3D matrices as skin equivalent tissue engineered construct in wound repair.

  16. The Cultural Divide: Exponential Growth in Classical 2D and Metabolic Equilibrium in 3D Environments

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cellular metabolism can be considered to have two extremes: one is characterized by exponential growth (in 2D cultures) and the other by a dynamic equilibrium (in 3D cultures). We have analyzed the proteome and cellular architecture at these two extremes and found that they are...... dramatically different. Results: Structurally, actin organization is changed, microtubules are increased and keratins 8 and 18 decreased. Metabolically, glycolysis, fatty acid metabolism and the pentose phosphate shunt are increased while TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation is unchanged. Enzymes involved...... types of vesicles has been prioritized. There are numerous coherent changes in transcription, splicing, translation, protein folding and degradation. The amount of individual proteins within complexes is shown to be highly coordinated. Typically subunits which initiate a particular function are present...

  17. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    Wenzel, Carsten; Riefke, Björn; Gründemann, Stephan; Krebs, Alice; Christian, Sven; Prinz, Florian; Osterland, Marc; Golfier, Sven; Räse, Sebastian [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Ansari, Nariman [Physical Biology Group, Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (BMLS), Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany); Esner, Milan; Bickle, Marc [Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, High-Throughput Technology Development Studio (TDS), Dresden (Germany); Pampaloni, Francesco; Mattheyer, Christian; Stelzer, Ernst H. [Physical Biology Group, Buchmann Institute for Molecular Life Sciences (BMLS), Goethe University Frankfurt (Germany); Parczyk, Karsten; Prechtl, Stefan [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Steigemann, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Steigemann@bayer.com [Bayer Pharma AG, Global Drug Discovery, Muellerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  18. 3D high-content screening for the identification of compounds that target cells in dormant tumor spheroid regions

    Cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions need to adapt to an unfavorable metabolic microenvironment. As distance from supplying blood vessels increases, oxygen and nutrient concentrations decrease and cancer cells react by stopping cell cycle progression and becoming dormant. As cytostatic drugs mainly target proliferating cells, cancer cell dormancy is considered as a major resistance mechanism to this class of anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, substances that target cancer cells in poorly vascularized tumor regions have the potential to enhance cytostatic-based chemotherapy of solid tumors. With three-dimensional growth conditions, multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) reproduce several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, including oxygen and nutrient gradients as well as the development of dormant tumor regions. We here report the setup of a 3D cell culture compatible high-content screening system and the identification of nine substances from two commercially available drug libraries that specifically target cells in inner MCTS core regions, while cells in outer MCTS regions or in 2D cell culture remain unaffected. We elucidated the mode of action of the identified compounds as inhibitors of the respiratory chain and show that induction of cell death in inner MCTS core regions critically depends on extracellular glucose concentrations. Finally, combinational treatment with cytostatics showed increased induction of cell death in MCTS. The data presented here shows for the first time a high-content based screening setup on 3D tumor spheroids for the identification of substances that specifically induce cell death in inner tumor spheroid core regions. This validates the approach to use 3D cell culture screening systems to identify substances that would not be detectable by 2D based screening in otherwise similar culture conditions. - Highlights: • Establishment of a novel method for 3D cell culture based high-content screening. • First reported high

  19. Efficient Use of Video for 3d Modelling of Cultural Heritage Objects

    Alsadik, B.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2015-03-01

    Currently, there is a rapid development in the techniques of the automated image based modelling (IBM), especially in advanced structure-from-motion (SFM) and dense image matching methods, and camera technology. One possibility is to use video imaging to create 3D reality based models of cultural heritage architectures and monuments. Practically, video imaging is much easier to apply when compared to still image shooting in IBM techniques because the latter needs a thorough planning and proficiency. However, one is faced with mainly three problems when video image sequences are used for highly detailed modelling and dimensional survey of cultural heritage objects. These problems are: the low resolution of video images, the need to process a large number of short baseline video images and blur effects due to camera shake on a significant number of images. In this research, the feasibility of using video images for efficient 3D modelling is investigated. A method is developed to find the minimal significant number of video images in terms of object coverage and blur effect. This reduction in video images is convenient to decrease the processing time and to create a reliable textured 3D model compared with models produced by still imaging. Two experiments for modelling a building and a monument are tested using a video image resolution of 1920×1080 pixels. Internal and external validations of the produced models are applied to find out the final predicted accuracy and the model level of details. Related to the object complexity and video imaging resolution, the tests show an achievable average accuracy between 1 - 5 cm when using video imaging, which is suitable for visualization, virtual museums and low detailed documentation.

  20. a Semi-Automated Point Cloud Processing Methodology for 3d Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Kıvılcım, C. Ö.; Duran, Z.

    2016-06-01

    The preliminary phase in any architectural heritage project is to obtain metric measurements and documentation of the building and its individual elements. On the other hand, conventional measurement techniques require tremendous resources and lengthy project completion times for architectural surveys and 3D model production. Over the past two decades, the widespread use of laser scanning and digital photogrammetry have significantly altered the heritage documentation process. Furthermore, advances in these technologies have enabled robust data collection and reduced user workload for generating various levels of products, from single buildings to expansive cityscapes. More recently, the use of procedural modelling methods and BIM relevant applications for historic building documentation purposes has become an active area of research, however fully automated systems in cultural heritage documentation still remains open. In this paper, we present a semi-automated methodology, for 3D façade modelling of cultural heritage assets based on parametric and procedural modelling techniques and using airborne and terrestrial laser scanning data. We present the contribution of our methodology, which we implemented in an open source software environment using the example project of a 16th century early classical era Ottoman structure, Sinan the Architect's Şehzade Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey.

  1. Digital microfabrication of user-defined 3D microstructures in cell-laden hydrogels.

    Soman, Pranav; Chung, Peter H; Zhang, A Ping; Chen, Shaochen

    2013-11-01

    Complex 3D interfacial arrangements of cells are found in several in vivo biosystems such as blood vasculature, renal glomeruli, and intestinal villi. Current tissue engineering techniques fail to develop suitable 3D microenvironments to evaluate the concurrent effects of complex topography and cell encapsulation. There is a need to develop new fabrication approaches that control cell density and distribution within complex 3D features. In this work, we present a dynamic projection printing process that allows rapid construction of complex 3D structures using custom-defined computer-aided-design (CAD) files. Gelatin-methacrylate (GelMA) constructs featuring user-defined spiral, pyramid, flower, and dome micro-geometries were fabricated with and without encapsulated cells. Encapsulated cells demonstrate good cell viability across all geometries both on the scaffold surface and internal to the structures. Cells respond to geometric cues individually as well as collectively throughout the larger-scale patterns. Time-lapse observations also reveal the dynamic nature of mechanical interactions between cells and micro-geometry. When compared to conventional cell-seeding, cell encapsulation within complex 3D patterned scaffolds provides long-term control over proliferation, cell morphology, and geometric guidance. Overall, this biofabrication technique offers a flexible platform to evaluate cell interactions with complex 3D micro-features, with the ability to scale-up towards high-throughput screening platforms. PMID:23686741

  2. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    Lambros, Maria Polikandritou, E-mail: mlambros@westernu.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Parsa, Cyrus [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Mulamalla, HariChandana [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Orlando, Robert [Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Lau, Bernard [Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Huang, Ying [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Pon, Doreen [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Chow, Moses [Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States); Center for Advancement of Drug Research and Evaluation (CADRE), Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766 (United States)

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. {yields} 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. {yields} 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. {yields} 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this

  3. Identifying cell and molecular stress after radiation in a three-dimensional (3-D) model of oral mucositis

    Research highlights: → We irradiated a 3-D human oral cell culture of keratinocytes and fibroblasts with 12 and 2 Gy. → 6 h after irradiation the histopathology and apoptosis of the 3-D culture were evaluated. Microarrays were used to assess the gene expression in the irradiated 3-D tissue. → 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic changes and cellular apoptosis. → 12 Gy significantly affected genes of the NF-kB pathway, inflammatory cytokines and DAMPs. -- Abstract: Mucositis is a debilitating adverse effect of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. It is important to develop a simple and reliable in vitro model, which can routinely be used to screen new drugs for prevention and treatment of mucositis. Furthermore, identifying cell and molecular stresses especially in the initiation phase of mucositis in this model will help towards this end. We evaluated a three-dimensional (3-D) human oral cell culture that consisted of oral keratinocytes and fibroblasts as a model of oral mucositis. The 3-D cell culture model was irradiated with 12 or 2 Gy. Six hours after the irradiation we evaluated microscopic sections of the cell culture for evidence of morphologic changes including apoptosis. We used microarrays to compare the expression of several genes from the irradiated tissue with identical genes from tissue that was not irradiated. We found that irradiation with 12 Gy induced significant histopathologic effects including cellular apoptosis. Irradiation significantly affected the expression of several genes of the NF-kB pathway and several inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1B, 1L-8, NF-kB1, and FOS compared to tissue that was not irradiated. We identified significant upregulation of several genes that belong to damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as HMB1, S100A13, SA10014, and SA10016 in the 3-D tissues that received 12 Gy but not in tissues that received 2 Gy. In conclusion, this model quantifies radiation damage and this is an important first

  4. Low cost production of 3D-printed devices and electrostimulation chambers for the culture of primary neurons.

    Wardyn, Joanna D; Sanderson, Chris; Swan, Laura E; Stagi, Massimiliano

    2015-08-15

    The analysis of primary neurons is a basic requirement for many areas of neurobiology. However, the range of commercial systems available for culturing primary neurons is functionally limiting, and the expense of these devices is a barrier to both exploratory and large-scale studies. This is especially relevant as primary neurons often require unusual geometries and specialised coatings for optimum growth. Fortunately, the recent revolution in 3D printing offers the possibility to generate customised devices, which can support neuronal growth and constrain neurons in defined paths, thereby enabling many aspects of neuronal physiology to be studied with relative ease. In this article, we provide a detailed description of the system hardware and software required to produce affordable 3D-printed culture devices, which are also compatible with live-cell imaging. In addition, we also describe how to use these devices to grow and stimulate neurons within geometrically constrained compartments and provide examples to illustrate the practical utility and potential that these protocols offer for many aspects of experimental neurobiology. PMID:25962333

  5. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  6. 3D porous biomimetically modified hydrogels supporting stem cells adhesion

    Studenovská, Hana; Vodička, Petr; Proks, Vladimír; Juhásová, Jana; Motlík, Jan; Rypáček, František

    Dublin : National University of Ireland , 2011. s. 119, psiii-630. [Annual Conference of the European Society for Biomaterials /24./. 04.09.2011-08.09.2011, Dublin] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : porous hydrogel * cell adhesion * polypeptide Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. 3D-Modelling of polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    Dugas, J.; Oualid, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work is concerned with the effect of grain boundaries (gb) on the main parameters which characterize polycrystalline silicon solar cells. The variation with illumination of the grain boundary effective recombination velocity has been calculated by means of a self-consistent procedure which takes into account the bending of the minority carrier quasi-Fermi level in the space-charge region and in the gb quasi-neutral region. Abaci have been plotted which allow to predict the photovoltaic p...

  8. Rapid Assembly of Heterogeneous 3D Cell Microenvironments in a Microgel Array.

    Li, Yiwei; Chen, Pu; Wang, Yachao; Yan, Shuangqian; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Koehler, Stephan A; Demirci, Utkan; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Heterogeneous 3D cell microenvironment arrays are rapidly assembled by combining surface-wettability-guided assembly and microdroplet-array-based operations. This approach enables precise control over individual shapes, sizes, chemical concentrations, cell density, and 3D spatial distribution of multiple components. This technique provides a cost-effective solution to meet the increasing demand of stem cell research, tissue engineering, and drug screening. PMID:26991071

  9. A Simplified Method for Three-Dimensional (3-D Ovarian Tissue Culture Yielding Oocytes Competent to Produce Full-Term Offspring in Mice.

    Carolyn M Higuchi

    Full Text Available In vitro growth of follicles is a promising technology to generate large quantities of competent oocytes from immature follicles and could expand the potential of assisted reproductive technologies (ART. Isolated follicle culture is currently the primary method used to develop and mature follicles in vitro. However, this procedure typically requires complicated, time-consuming procedures, as well as destruction of the normal ovarian microenvironment. Here we describe a simplified 3-D ovarian culture system that can be used to mature multilayered secondary follicles into antral follicles, generating developmentally competent oocytes in vitro. Ovaries recovered from mice at 14 days of age were cut into 8 pieces and placed onto a thick Matrigel drop (3-D culture for 10 days of culture. As a control, ovarian pieces were cultured on a membrane filter without any Matrigel drop (Membrane culture. We also evaluated the effect of activin A treatment on follicle growth within the ovarian pieces with or without Matrigel support. Thus we tested four different culture conditions: C (Membrane/activin-, A (Membrane/activin+, M (Matrigel/activin-, and M+A (Matrigel/activin+. We found that the cultured follicles and oocytes steadily increased in size regardless of the culture condition used. However, antral cavity formation occurred only in the follicles grown in the 3-D culture system (M, M+A. Following ovarian tissue culture, full-grown GV oocytes were isolated from the larger follicles to evaluate their developmental competence by subjecting them to in vitro maturation (IVM and in vitro fertilization (IVF. Maturation and fertilization rates were higher using oocytes grown in 3-D culture (M, M+A than with those grown in membrane culture (C, A. In particular, activin A treatment further improved 3-D culture (M+A success. Following IVF, two-cell embryos were transferred to recipients to generate full-term offspring. In summary, this simple and easy 3-D ovarian

  10. Fluid flow increases mineralized matrix deposition in 3D perfusion culture of marrow stromal osteoblasts in a dose-dependent manner

    Bancroft, Gregory N.; Sikavitsas, Vassilios I.; van den Dolder, Juliette; Sheffield, Tiffany L.; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Jansen, John A.; Mikos, Antonios G.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Bone is a complex highly structured mechanically active 3D tissue composed of cellular and matrix elements. The true biological environment of a bone cell is thus derived from a dynamic interaction between responsively active cells experiencing mechanical forces and a continuously changing 3D matrix architecture. To investigate this phenomenon in vitro, marrow stromal osteoblasts were cultured on 3D scaffolds under flow perfusion with different rates of flow for an extended period to permit osteoblast differentiation and significant matrix production and mineralization. With all flow conditions, mineralized matrix production was dramatically increased over statically cultured constructs with the total calcium content of the cultured scaffolds increasing with increasing flow rate. Flow perfusion induced de novo tissue modeling with the formation of pore-like structures in the scaffolds and enhanced the distribution of cells and matrix throughout the scaffolds. These results represent reporting of the long-term effects of fluid flow on primary differentiating osteoblasts and indicate that fluid flow has far-reaching effects on osteoblast differentiation and phenotypic expression in vitro. Flow perfusion culture permits the generation and study of a 3D, actively modeled, mineralized matrix and can therefore be a valuable tool for both bone biology and tissue engineering.

  11. A miniature microbial fuel cell with conducting nanofibers-based 3D porous biofilm

    Jiang, Huawei; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Miniature microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has received growing interest due to its potential applications in high-throughput screening of bacteria and mutants to elucidate mechanisms of electricity generation. This paper reports a novel miniature MFC with an improved output power density and short startup time, utilizing electrospun conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanofibers as a 3D porous anode within a 12 μl anolyte chamber. This device results in 423 μW cm-3 power density based on the volume of the anolyte chamber, using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The device also excels in a startup time of only 1hr. The high conductivity of the electrospun nanofibers makes them suitable for efficient electron transfer. The mean pore size of the conducting nanofibers is several micrometers, which is favorable for bacterial penetration and colonization of surfaces of the nanofibers. We demonstrate that S. oneidensis can fully colonize the interior region of this nanofibers-based porous anode. This work represents a new attempt to explore the use of electrospun PEDOT nanofibers as a 3D anode material for MFCs. The presented miniature MFC potentially will provide a high-sensitivity, high-throughput tool to screen suitable bacterial species and mutant strains for use in large-size MFCs.

  12. Towards the development of a 3D full cell and external busbars thermo-electric model

    Taking advantage of the increasing power of computers, it is now practical to consider building a 3D full cell and external busbars thermo-electric model. In the present study, a 3D full cell quarter thermo-electric model and a 3D cathode half plus liquid zone and busbars thermo-electric model have been developed and solved using a PIll 800 MHz computer. Developing a 3D full cell and external busbars thermo-electric model will constitute a step further towards the development of a fully 'multi-physic' unified aluminium reduction cell model. Already, a full cell thermo-electric model will be able to interact with a MHD model by providing it with accurate liquid zone current density and potshell temperature data and by receiving from it local liquid/ledge interface heat transfer coefficients. (author)

  13. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm). PMID:27219645

  14. Development of 3D in vitro platform technology to engineer mesenchymal stem cells

    Hosseinkhani H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hossein Hosseinkhani,1 Po-Da Hong,1 Dah-Shyong Yu,2 Yi-Ru Chen,3 Diana Ickowicz,4 Ira-Yudovin Farber,4 Abraham J Domb41Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (TAIWANTECH, 2Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan, 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, 4Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy-Faculty of Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: This study aims to develop a three-dimensional in vitro culture system to genetically engineer mesenchymal stem cells (MSC to express bone morphogenic protein-2. We employed nanofabrication technologies borrowed from the spinning industry, such as electrospinning, to mass-produce identical building blocks in a variety of shapes and sizes to fabricate electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid and collagen. Homogenous nanoparticles of cationic biodegradable natural polymer were formed by simple mixing of an aqueous solution of plasmid DNA encoded bone morphogenic protein-2 with the same volume of cationic polysaccharide, dextran-spermine. Rat bone marrow MSC were cultured on electrospun nanofiber sheets comprised of composites of poly (glycolic acid and collagen prior to the incorporation of the nanoparticles into the nanofiber sheets. Bone morphogenic protein-2 was significantly detected in MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with nanoparticles after 2 days compared with MSC cultured on nanofiber sheets incorporated with naked plasmid DNA. We conclude that the incorporation of nanoparticles into nanofiber sheets is a very promising strategy to genetically engineer MSC and can be used for further applications in regenerative medicine therapy.Keywords: 3D culture, nanoparticles, nanofibers, polycations, tissue engineering

  15. 3D co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes and cytoprotective effects on keratinocytes against reactive oxygen species by insect virus-derived protein microcrystals

    Stable protein microcrystals called polyhedra are produced by certain insect viruses. Cytokines, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), can be immobilized within polyhedra. Here, we investigated three-dimensional (3D) co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes on collagen gel containing FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra. Melanocytes were observed to reside at the base of the 3D cell culture and melanin was also typically observed in the lower layer. The 3D cell culture model with FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra was a useful in vitro model of the epidermis due to effective melanogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. FGF-7 polyhedra showed a potent cytoprotective effect when keratinocytes were treated with menadione, which is a generator of reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effect was activated by the inositol triphosphate kinase–Akt pathway leading to upregulation of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 6. - Highlights: • 3D cultures using FGF-2 and FGF-7 microcrystals as a human skin model • Cytoprotection of keratinocytes against ROS by FGF-7 microcrystals • Overexpression of SOD and Prdx6 in keratinocytes by FGF-7 microcrystals

  16. 3D co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes and cytoprotective effects on keratinocytes against reactive oxygen species by insect virus-derived protein microcrystals

    Shimabukuro, Junji; Yamaoka, Ayako; Murata, Ken-ichi [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Kotani, Eiji [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Hirano, Tomoko [Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Nakajima, Yumiko [Functional Genomics Group, COMB, Tropical Biosphere Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Matsumoto, Goichi [Division of Oral Surgery, Yokohama Clinical Education Center of Kanagawa Dental University, Yokohama (Japan); Mori, Hajime, E-mail: hmori@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-09-01

    Stable protein microcrystals called polyhedra are produced by certain insect viruses. Cytokines, such as fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), can be immobilized within polyhedra. Here, we investigated three-dimensional (3D) co-cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes on collagen gel containing FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra. Melanocytes were observed to reside at the base of the 3D cell culture and melanin was also typically observed in the lower layer. The 3D cell culture model with FGF-2 and FGF-7 polyhedra was a useful in vitro model of the epidermis due to effective melanogenesis, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. FGF-7 polyhedra showed a potent cytoprotective effect when keratinocytes were treated with menadione, which is a generator of reactive oxygen species. The cytoprotective effect was activated by the inositol triphosphate kinase–Akt pathway leading to upregulation of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and peroxiredoxin 6. - Highlights: • 3D cultures using FGF-2 and FGF-7 microcrystals as a human skin model • Cytoprotection of keratinocytes against ROS by FGF-7 microcrystals • Overexpression of SOD and Prdx6 in keratinocytes by FGF-7 microcrystals.

  17. Recovery of important physiological functions in 3D culture of immortal hepatocytes

    Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Fey, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    grow human liver cells in ‘3 dimensional’ cultures so that they behave very similar to the liver in our bodies. By growing the immortal hepatocytes in specially designed bioreactors they form small pieces of ‘pseudotissue’ which exhibit several of the functions seen in the adult liver. We have grown...

  18. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  19. Cell Proliferation on Macro/Nano Surface Structure and Collagen Immobilization of 3D Polycaprolactone Scaffolds.

    Park, Young-Ouk; Myung, Sung-Woon; Kook, Min-Suk; Jung, Sang-Chul; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In this study, 3D polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds were fabricated by 3D printing technique. The macro/nano morphology of, 3D PCL scaffolds surface was etched with oxygen plasma. Acrylic acid (AA) plasma-polymerization was performed to functionalize the macro/nano surface with carboxyl groups and then collagen was immobilized with plasma-polymerized 3D PCL scaffolds. After O2 plasma and AA plasma-polymerization, contact angles were decreased. The FE-SEM and AFM results showed that O2 plasma is increased the surface roughness. The MTT assay results showed that proliferation of the M3CT3-E1 cells increased on the oxygen plasma treated and collagen immobilized 3D PCL scaffolds. PMID:27433597

  20. [Novel methods for studies of testicular development and spermatogenesis: From 2D to 3D culture].

    Zhang, Lian-dong; Li, He-cheng; Zhang, Tong-dian; Wang, Zi-ming

    2016-03-01

    The two-dimensional model of cell culture is an important method in the study of testicular development and spermatogenesis but can not effectively mimic and regulate the testicular microenvironment and the whole process of spermatogenesis due to the lack of relevant cell factors and the disruption of a three-dimensional spatial structure. In the past 20 years, the development and optimization of the in vitro model such as testis organotypic culture and in vivo model such as testis transplantation achieved a transformation from two- to three-dimension. The maintenance and optimization of the testicular niche structure could mimic the testicular microenvironment and cell types including Leydig, Sertoli and germ cells, which showed similar biological behaviors to those in vivo. Besides, the cell suspension or tissue fragment floats in the gas-liquid interface so that the development of somatic and germ cells is well maintained in vitro whilst the feedback linkage between grafted testis tissue and hypothalamus-pituitary of the host rebuilt in the in vitro model provides an endocrinological basis for spermatogenesis, which serves as an effective methodology to better understand the organogenesis and development of the testis as well as testicular function regulation, advancing the concept of treatment of male infertility. Al- though each of the methods may have its limitations, the progress in the processing, freezing, thawing, and transplantation of cells and tissues will surely promote their clinical application and present their value in translational medicine. PMID:27172668

  1. Micromorph silicon tandem solar cells with fully integrated 3D photonic crystal intermediate reflectors

    Üpping, J.; Bielawny, A.; Fahr, S.; Rockstuhl, C.; Lederer, F.; Steidl, L.; Zentel, R.; Beckers, T.; Lambertz, A.; Carius, R.; Wehrspohn, R. B.

    2010-05-01

    A 3D photonic intermediate reflector for textured micromorph silicon tandem solar cells has been investigated. In thin-film silicon tandem solar cells consisting of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon with two junctions of a-Si/c-Si, efficiency enhancements can be achieved by increasing the current density in the a-Si top cell providing an optimized current matching at high current densities. For an ideal photon-management between top and bottom cell, a spectrally-selective intermediate reflective layer (IRL) is necessary. We present the first fully-integrated 3D photonic thin-film IRL device incorporated on a planar substrate. Using a ZnO inverted opal structure the external quantum efficiency of the top cell in the spectral region of interest could be enhanced. As an outlook we present the design and the preparation of a 3D self organized photonic crystal structure in a textured micromorph tandem solar cell.

  2. 3D photonic crystal interlayers for micromorph thin film silicon tandem cell

    Uepping, Johannes; Bielawny, Andreas; Otto, Martin; Wehrspohn, Ralf B. [Institute of Physics, University of Halle, Wittenberg (Germany); Steidl, Lorenz; Zentel, Rudolf [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Mainz (Germany); Lee, Seung-Mo; Knez, Mato [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle (Germany); Beckers, Thomas; Carius, Reinhard [Institute of Energy Research, IEF-5 Photovoltaics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A 3D photonic intermediate reflector for textured micromorph silicon tandem solar cells has been investigated. In thin-film silicon tandem solar cells consisting of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon with two junctions of a-Si/{mu}c-Si, efficiency enhancements can be achieved by increasing the current density in the a-Si top cell. It is one goal to provide an optimized current matching at high current densities. For an ideal photon-management between top and bottom cell, a spectrally selective intermediate reflective layer (IRL) is necessary. We show results toward the first fully integrated 3D photonic thin-film IRL device incorporated in a state-of-the-art textured tandem solar cell. The design and the preparation of a 3D self organized inverted opal photonic crystal structure in a textured micromorph tandem solar cell is presented.

  3. The Effects of Matrix Stiffness and RhoA on the Phenotypic Plasticity of Smooth Muscle Cells in a 3-D Biosynthetic Hydrogel System

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kim, Peter D.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seliktar, Dror; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies using 2-D cultures have shown that the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell migration, spreading, proliferation, and differentiation; however, cellular mechanosensing in 3-D remains under-explored. To investigate this topic, a unique biomaterial system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated fibrinogen was adapted to study phenotypic plasticity in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as a function of ECM mechanics in 3-D. Tuning compressive modulus between 44...

  4. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  5. Accuracy of cultural heritage 3D models by RPAS and terrestrial photogrammetry

    Bolognesi, M.; Furini, A.; Russo, V.; Pellegrinelli, A.; Russo, P.

    2014-06-01

    The combined use of high-resolution digital images taken from ground as well as from RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems) have significantly increased the potential of close range digital photogrammetry applications in Cultural Heritage surveying and modeling. It is in fact possible, thanks to SfM (Structure from Motion), to simultaneously process great numbers of aerial and terrestrial images for the production of a dense point cloud of an object. In order to analyze the accuracy of results, we started numerous tests based on the comparison between 3D digital models of a monumental complex realized by the integration of aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry and an accurate TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) reference model of the same object. A lot of digital images of a renaissance castle, assumed as test site, have been taken both by ground level and by RPAS at different distances and flight altitudes and with different flight patterns. As first step of the experimentation, the images were previously processed with Agisoft PhotoScan, one of the most popular photogrammetric software. The comparison between the photogrammetric DSM of the monument and a TLS reference one was carried out by evaluating the average deviation between the points belonging to the two entities, both globally and locally, on individual façades and architectural elements (sections and particular). In this paper the results of the first test are presented. A good agreement between photogrammetric and TLS digital models of the castle is pointed out.

  6. Label-free characterization of white blood cells by measuring 3D refractive index maps

    Yoon, Jonghee; Park, HyunJoo; Choi, Chulhee; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of white blood cells (WBCs) is crucial for blood analyses and disease diagnoses. However, current standard techniques rely on cell labeling, a process which imposes significant limitations. Here we present three-dimensional (3D) optical measurements and the label-free characterization of mouse WBCs using optical diffraction tomography. 3D refractive index (RI) tomograms of individual WBCs are constructed from multiple two-dimensional quantitative phase images of samples illuminated at various angles of incidence. Measurements of the 3D RI tomogram of WBCs enable the separation of heterogeneous populations of WBCs using quantitative morphological and biochemical information. Time-lapse tomographic measurements also provide the 3D trajectory of micrometer-sized beads ingested by WBCs. These results demonstrate that optical diffraction tomography can be a useful and versatile tool for the study of WBCs.

  7. High sensitivity plasmonic biosensor based on nanoimprinted quasi 3D nanosquares for cell detection.

    Zhu, Shuyan; Li, Hualin; Yang, Mengsu; Pang, Stella W

    2016-07-22

    Quasi three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructures consisting of Au nanosquares on top of SU-8 nanopillars and Au nanoholes on the bottom were developed and fabricated using nanoimprint lithography with simultaneous thermal and UV exposure. These 3D plasmonic nanostructures were used to detect cell concentration of lung cancer A549 cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Nanoimprint technology has the advantage of producing high uniformity plasmonic nanostructures for such biosensors. Multiple resonance modes were observed in these quasi 3D plasmonic nanostructures. The hybrid coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances and Fabry-Perot cavity modes in the quasi 3D nanostructures resulted in high sensitivity of 496 nm/refractive index unit. The plasmonic resonance peak wavelength and sensitivity could be tuned by varying the Au thickness. Resonance peak shifts for different cells at the same concentration were distinct due to their different cell area and confluency. The cell concentration detection limit covered a large range of 5 × 10(2) to 1 × 10(7) cells ml(-1) with these new plasmonic nanostructures. They also provide a large resonance peak shift of 51 nm for as little as 0.08 cells mm(-2) of RPE cells for high sensitivity cell detection. PMID:27275952

  8. High sensitivity plasmonic biosensor based on nanoimprinted quasi 3D nanosquares for cell detection

    Zhu, Shuyan; Li, Hualin; Yang, Mengsu; Pang, Stella W.

    2016-07-01

    Quasi three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanostructures consisting of Au nanosquares on top of SU-8 nanopillars and Au nanoholes on the bottom were developed and fabricated using nanoimprint lithography with simultaneous thermal and UV exposure. These 3D plasmonic nanostructures were used to detect cell concentration of lung cancer A549 cells, retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Nanoimprint technology has the advantage of producing high uniformity plasmonic nanostructures for such biosensors. Multiple resonance modes were observed in these quasi 3D plasmonic nanostructures. The hybrid coupling of localized surface plasmon resonances and Fabry–Perot cavity modes in the quasi 3D nanostructures resulted in high sensitivity of 496 nm/refractive index unit. The plasmonic resonance peak wavelength and sensitivity could be tuned by varying the Au thickness. Resonance peak shifts for different cells at the same concentration were distinct due to their different cell area and confluency. The cell concentration detection limit covered a large range of 5 × 102 to 1 × 107 cells ml‑1 with these new plasmonic nanostructures. They also provide a large resonance peak shift of 51 nm for as little as 0.08 cells mm‑2 of RPE cells for high sensitivity cell detection.

  9. MULTILEVEL (3D) MICROFLUIDIC TECHNOLOGY FOR AN INNOVATIVE MAGNETIC CELL SEPARATION PLATFORM

    Fouet, Marc; Cargou, Sébastien; Courson, Rémi; Blatché, Charline; Montrose, A.; Reybier, K; Gué, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a new concept of devices, which by combining 3D fluid engineering and localized mag-netic actuation enables the full integration of a cell tagging and magnetic separation device. We used a low cost, commercially available dry film (EMS Inc, Ohio, USA) that fits microfluidic requirements and gives the possibility to build easily 3D microfluidic structures. The labelling of blood monocytes with su-perparamagnetic particles was performed "up stream" with the aim of a microparticle...

  10. Imaging- and Flow Cytometry-based Analysis of Cell Position and the Cell Cycle in 3D Melanoma Spheroids.

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Anfosso, Andrea; Ahmed, Farzana; Weninger, Wolfgang; Haass, Nikolas K

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids are utilized in cancer research as a more accurate model of the in vivo tumor microenvironment, compared to traditional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The spheroid model is able to mimic the effects of cell-cell interaction, hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, and drug penetration. One characteristic of this model is the development of a necrotic core, surrounded by a ring of G1 arrested cells, with proliferating cells on the outer layers of the spheroid. Of interest in the cancer field is how different regions of the spheroid respond to drug therapies as well as genetic or environmental manipulation. We describe here the use of the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (FUCCI) system along with cytometry and image analysis using commercial software to characterize the cell cycle status of cells with respect to their position inside melanoma spheroids. These methods may be used to track changes in cell cycle status, gene/protein expression or cell viability in different sub-regions of tumor spheroids over time and under different conditions. PMID:26779761

  11. BMP4 inhibits the proliferation of breast cancer cells and induces an MMP-dependent migratory phenotype in MDA-MB-231 cells in 3D environment

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family of proteins. BMPs regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and motility, and have also been reported to be involved in cancer pathogenesis. We have previously shown that BMP4 reduces breast cancer cell proliferation through G1 cell cycle arrest and simultaneously induces migration in a subset of these cell lines. Here we examined the effects of BMP4 in a more physiological environment, in a 3D culture system. We used two different 3D culture systems; Matrigel, a basement membrane extract from mouse sarcoma cells, and a synthetic polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel. AlamarBlue reagent was used for cell proliferation measurements and immunofluorescence was used to determine cell polarity. Expression of cell cycle regulators was examined by Western blot and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression by qRT-PCR. The MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells formed round acini with correct apicobasal localization of α6 integrin in Matrigel whereas irregular structures were seen in PEG gel. The two 3D matrices also supported dissimilar morphology for the breast cancer cells. In PEG gel, BMP4 inhibited the growth of MCF-10A and the three breast cancer cell lines examined, thus closely resembling the 2D culture conditions, but in Matrigel, no growth inhibition was observed in MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-361 cells. Furthermore, BMP4 induced the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in 2D and 3D culture, thereby partly explaining the growth arrest. Interestingly, MDA-MB-231 cells formed large branching, stellate structures in response to BMP4 treatment in Matrigel, suggestive of increased cell migration or invasion. This effect was reversed by Batimastat, a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor, and subsequent analyses showed BMP4 to induce the expression of MMP3 and MMP14, that are thus likely to be responsible for the stellate phenotype. Taken together, our results show that Matrigel

  12. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    Cornforth, Michael N. [The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX (United States)

    2013-05-03

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

  13. Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration.

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Osteochondral regeneration remains nowadays a major problem since the outcome of current techniques is not satisfactory in terms of functional tissue formation and development. A possible solution is the combination of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate scaffolds with instructive properties. In this study, the differentiation of hMSCs within a scaffold presenting a gradient in pore shape is presented. The variation in pore shape is determined by varying the angle formed by the fibers of two consequent layers. The fiber deposition patterns are 0-90, which generate squared pores, 0-45, 0-30, and 0-15, that generate rhomboidal pores with an increasing major axis as the deposition angle decreases. Within the gradient construct, squared pores support a better chondrogenic differentiation whereas cells residing in the rhomboidal pores display a better osteogenic differentiation. When cultured under osteochondral conditions the trend in both osteogenic and chondrogenic markers is maintained. Engineering the pore shape, thus creating axial gradients in structural properties, seems to be an instructive strategy to fabricate functional 3D scaffolds that are able to influence hMSCs differentiation for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:27109461

  14. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'

  15. 3D photonic crystal interlayers for micromorph thin film silicon tandem cell

    Bielawny, Andreas; Uepping, Johannes; Miclea, Paul T.; Wehrspohn, Ralf B. [Institute of Physics, University of Halle, Wittenberg (Germany); Rockstuhl, Carsten; Lederer, Falk [Institue of Physics, Solid States Optics, University of Jena (Germany); Peters, Marius [Freiburg Centre for Material Research, University of Freiburg (Germany); Steidl, Lorenz; Zentel, Rudolf [Dept. of Chemistry, Pharmacy and Earth Science, University of Mainz (Germany); Lee, Seung-Mo; Knez, Mato [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle (Germany); Lambertz, Andreas; Carius, Reinhard [Institute of Energy Research, IEF-5 Photovoltaics, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The concept of 3D photonic intermediate reflectors for micromorph silicon tandem cells has been investigated toward first prototype cells. The reflector enhances the absorption of spectrally selected light in the top cell and decreases the current mismatch between both junctions. Our device is an inverted opal structure made of ZnO and built using self organized nanoparticles and atomic layer deposition coating methods. This 3D photonic crystal intermediate layer is less dependent of the angle of incidence than other state of the art thickness dependent massive interlayers. We present design rules, preparation and characterization of a 3D photonic thin film device. A first prototype is compared to a state of the art reference silicon tandem cell.

  16. Cell volume and geometric parameters determination in living cells using confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: David Hevia, Aida Rodriguez-Garcia, Marta Alonso-Gervós, Isabel Quirós-González, Henar M Cimadevilla, Carmen Gómez-Cordovés, Rosa M Sainz & Juan C Mayo ### Abstract The protocol reported here describes a simple, easy, fast and reproducible method aimed to know the geometric parameters of living cells based on confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with 3D reconstruction software. Briefly, the method is based on intrinsic fluorescence properties of acridine orange (AO...

  17. 3D-printed concentrator arrays for external light trapping on thin film solar cells

    van Dijk, Lourens; Marcus, E. A. Pepijn; Oostra, A. Jolt; Schropp, Ruud E. I.; Di Vece, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    After our recent demonstration of a 3D-printed external light trap on a small solar cell, we now consider its potential for large solar panels. An external light trap consists of a parabolic concentrator and a spacer that redirects the photons that are reflected by the solar cell back towards the so

  18. 3D Image-Guided Automatic Pipette Positioning for Single Cell Experiments in vivo

    Brian Long; Lu Li; Ulf Knoblich; Hongkui Zeng; Hanchuan Peng

    2015-01-01

    We report a method to facilitate single cell, image-guided experiments including in vivo electrophysiology and electroporation. Our method combines 3D image data acquisition, visualization and on-line image analysis with precise control of physical probes such as electrophysiology microelectrodes in brain tissue in vivo. Adaptive pipette positioning provides a platform for future advances in automated, single cell in vivo experiments.

  19. A 3D in vitro model reveals differences in the astrocyte response elicited by potential stem cell therapies for CNS injury

    East, Emma; Johns, Noemie; Georgiou, Melanie; Golding, Jon; Loughlin, Jane; Kingham, Paul; Phillips, James

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to develop a 3D culture model to test the extent to which transplanted stem cells modulate astrocyte reactivity, where exacerbated glial cell activation could be detrimental to CNS repair success. Materials & methods: The reactivity of rat astrocytes to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) and differentiated adipose-derived stem cells was assessed after 5 days. Schwann cells were used as a positive control. Results: NCSCs and differ...

  20. Longitudinal, label-free, quantitative tracking of cell death and viability in a 3D tumor model with OCT

    Jung, Yookyung; Klein, Oliver J.; Wang, Hequn; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro tumor models are highly useful tools for studying tumor growth and treatment response of malignancies such as ovarian cancer. Existing viability and treatment assessment assays, however, face shortcomings when applied to these large, complex, and heterogeneous culture systems. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, label-free, optical imaging technique that can visualize live cells and tissues over time with subcellular resolution and millimeters of optical penetration depth. Here, we show that OCT is capable of carrying out high-content, longitudinal assays of 3D culture treatment response. We demonstrate the usage and capability of OCT for the dynamic monitoring of individual and combination therapeutic regimens in vitro, including both chemotherapy drugs and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. OCT was validated against the standard LIVE/DEAD Viability/Cytotoxicity Assay in small tumor spheroid cultures, showing excellent correlation with existing standards. Importantly, OCT was shown to be capable of evaluating 3D spheroid treatment response even when traditional viability assays failed. OCT 3D viability imaging revealed synergy between PDT and the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic carboplatin that evolved over time. We believe the efficacy and accuracy of OCT in vitro drug screening will greatly contribute to the field of cancer treatment and therapy evaluation.

  1. From Dynamic Live Cell Imaging to 3D Ultrastructure: Novel Integrated Methods for High Pressure Freezing and Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy.

    Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Tosch, Valérie; Hentsch, Didier; Koch, Marc; Kessler, Pascal; Schwab, Yannick; Laporte, Jocelyn

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In cell biology, the study of proteins and organelles requires the combination of different imaging approaches, from live recordings with light microscopy (LM) to electron microscopy (EM). METHODOLOGY: To correlate dynamic events in adherent cells with both ultrastructural and 3D information, we developed a method for cultured cells that combines confocal time-lapse images of GFP-tagged proteins with electron microscopy. With laser micro-patterned culture substrate, we created coo...

  2. Digital Image Analysis of Cells : Applications in 2D, 3D and Time

    Pinidiyaarachchi, Amalka

    2009-01-01

    Light microscopes are essential research tools in biology and medicine. Cell and tissue staining methods have improved immensely over the years and microscopes are now equipped with digital image acquisition capabilities. The image data produced require development of specialized analysis methods. This thesis presents digital image analysis methods for cell image data in 2D, 3D and time sequences. Stem cells have the capability to differentiate into specific cell types. The mechanism behind di...

  3. An Innovative Cell Microincubator for Drug Discovery Based on 3D Silicon Structures

    Francesca Aredia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently employed three-dimensional (3D silicon microstructures (SMSs consisting in arrays of 3 μm-thick silicon walls separated by 50 μm-deep, 5 μm-wide gaps, as microincubators for monitoring the biomechanical properties of tumor cells. They were here applied to investigate the in vitro behavior of HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells driven to apoptosis by the chemotherapeutic drug Bleomycin. Our results, obtained by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrated that HT1080 cells exhibited a great ability to colonize the narrow gaps. Remarkably, HT1080 cells grown on 3D-SMS, when treated with the DNA damaging agent Bleomycin under conditions leading to apoptosis, tended to shrink, reducing their volume and mimicking the normal behavior of apoptotic cells, and were prone to leave the gaps. Finally, we performed label-free detection of cells adherent to the vertical silicon wall, inside the gap of 3D-SMS, by exploiting optical low coherence reflectometry using infrared, low power radiation. This kind of approach may become a new tool for increasing automation in the drug discovery area. Our results open new perspectives in view of future applications of the 3D-SMS as the core element of a lab-on-a-chip suitable for screening the effect of new molecules potentially able to kill tumor cells.

  4. Heterogeneous Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Extracellular Matrix Composites

    Jung, Jangwook P.; Bache-Wiig, Meredith K.; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are structural elements of tissue and also potent signaling molecules. Previously, our laboratory showed that ECM of 2D coatings can trigger differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into mesodermal lineages in an ECM-specific manner over 14 days, in some cases comparable to chemical induction. To test whether a similar effect was possible in a 3D, tissue-like environment, we designed a synthetic-natural biomaterial composite. The composite can present whole-molecule ECM proteins to cells, even those that do not spontaneously form hydrogels ex vivo, in 3D. To this end, we entrapped collagen type I, laminin-111, or fibronectin in ECM composites with MSCs and directly compared markers of mesodermal differentiation including cardiomyogenic (ACTC1), osteogenic (SPP1), adipogenic (PPARG), and chondrogenic (SOX9) in 2D versus 3D. We found the 3D condition largely mimicked the 2D condition such that the addition of type I collagen was the most potent inducer of differentiation to all lineages tested. One notable difference between 2D and 3D was pronounced adipogenic differentiation in 3D especially in the presence of exogenous collagen type I. In particular, PPARG gene expression was significantly increased ∼16-fold relative to chemical induction, in 3D and not in 2D. Unexpectedly, 3D engagement of ECM proteins also altered immunomodulatory function of MSCs in that expression of IL-6 gene was elevated relative to basal levels in 2D. In fact, levels of IL-6 gene expression in 3D composites containing exogenously supplied collagen type I or fibronectin were statistically similar to levels attained in 2D with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation and these levels were sustained over a 2-week period. Thus, this novel biomaterial platform allowed us to compare the biochemical impact of whole-molecule ECM proteins in 2D versus 3D indicating enhanced adipogenic differentiation and IL-6 expression

  5. A new method to address unmet needs for extracting individual cell migration features from a large number of cells embedded in 3D volumes.

    Ivan Adanja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro cell observation has been widely used by biologists and pharmacologists for screening molecule-induced effects on cancer cells. Computer-assisted time-lapse microscopy enables automated live cell imaging in vitro, enabling cell behavior characterization through image analysis, in particular regarding cell migration. In this context, 3D cell assays in transparent matrix gels have been developed to provide more realistic in vitro 3D environments for monitoring cell migration (fundamentally different from cell motility behavior observed in 2D, which is related to the spread of cancer and metastases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper we propose an improved automated tracking method that is designed to robustly and individually follow a large number of unlabeled cells observed under phase-contrast microscopy in 3D gels. The method automatically detects and tracks individual cells across a sequence of acquired volumes, using a template matching filtering method that in turn allows for robust detection and mean-shift tracking. The robustness of the method results from detecting and managing the cases where two cell (mean-shift trackers converge to the same point. The resulting trajectories quantify cell migration through statistical analysis of 3D trajectory descriptors. We manually validated the method and observed efficient cell detection and a low tracking error rate (6%. We also applied the method in a real biological experiment where the pro-migratory effects of hyaluronic acid (HA were analyzed on brain cancer cells. Using collagen gels with increased HA proportions, we were able to evidence a dose-response effect on cell migration abilities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The developed method enables biomedical researchers to automatically and robustly quantify the pro- or anti-migratory effects of different experimental conditions on unlabeled cell cultures in a 3D environment.

  6. 5D Modelling: An Efficient Approach for Creating Spatiotemporal Predictive 3D Maps of Large-Scale Cultural Resources

    Doulamis, A.; Doulamis, N.; Ioannidis, C.; Chrysouli, C.; Grammalidis, N.; Dimitropoulos, K.; Potsiou, C.; Stathopoulou, E.-K.; Ioannides, M.

    2015-08-01

    Outdoor large-scale cultural sites are mostly sensitive to environmental, natural and human made factors, implying an imminent need for a spatio-temporal assessment to identify regions of potential cultural interest (material degradation, structuring, conservation). On the other hand, in Cultural Heritage research quite different actors are involved (archaeologists, curators, conservators, simple users) each of diverse needs. All these statements advocate that a 5D modelling (3D geometry plus time plus levels of details) is ideally required for preservation and assessment of outdoor large scale cultural sites, which is currently implemented as a simple aggregation of 3D digital models at different time and levels of details. The main bottleneck of such an approach is its complexity, making 5D modelling impossible to be validated in real life conditions. In this paper, a cost effective and affordable framework for 5D modelling is proposed based on a spatial-temporal dependent aggregation of 3D digital models, by incorporating a predictive assessment procedure to indicate which regions (surfaces) of an object should be reconstructed at higher levels of details at next time instances and which at lower ones. In this way, dynamic change history maps are created, indicating spatial probabilities of regions needed further 3D modelling at forthcoming instances. Using these maps, predictive assessment can be made, that is, to localize surfaces within the objects where a high accuracy reconstruction process needs to be activated at the forthcoming time instances. The proposed 5D Digital Cultural Heritage Model (5D-DCHM) is implemented using open interoperable standards based on the CityGML framework, which also allows the description of additional semantic metadata information. Visualization aspects are also supported to allow easy manipulation, interaction and representation of the 5D-DCHM geometry and the respective semantic information. The open source 3DCity

  7. HER2 signaling pathway activation and response of breast cancer cells to HER2-targeting agents is dependent strongly on the 3D microenvironment

    Weigelt, Britta; Lo, Alvin T; Park, Catherine C; Gray, Joe W; Bissell, Mina J

    2009-07-27

    Development of effective and durable breast cancer treatment strategies requires a mechanistic understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on response. Previous work has shown that cellular signaling pathways and cell morphology are dramatically influenced by three-dimensional (3D) cultures as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayers. Here, we compared 2D and 3D culture models to determine the impact of 3D architecture and extracellular matrix (ECM) on HER2 signaling and on the response of HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the HER2-targeting agents Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab and Lapatinib. We show that the response of the HER2-amplified AU565, SKBR3 and HCC1569 cells to these anti-HER2 agents was highly dependent on whether the cells were cultured in 2D monolayer or 3D laminin-rich ECM gels. Inhibition of {beta}1 integrin, a major cell-ECM receptor subunit, significantly increased the sensitivity of the HER2-amplified breast cancer cell lines to the humanized monoclonal antibodies Trastuzumab and Pertuzumab when grown in a 3D environment. Finally, in the absence of inhibitors, 3D cultures had substantial impact on HER2 downstream signaling and induced a switch between PI3K-AKT- and RAS-MAPKpathway activation in all cell lines studied, including cells lacking HER2 amplification and overexpression. Our data provide direct evidence that breast cancer cells are able to rapidly adapt to different environments and signaling cues by activating alternative pathways that regulate proliferation and cell survival, events that may play a significant role in the acquisition of resistance to targeted therapies.

  8. Study of a Microfluidic Chip Integrating Single Cell Trap and 3D Stable Rotation Manipulation

    Liang Huang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single cell manipulation technology has been widely applied in biological fields, such as cell injection/enucleation, cell physiological measurement, and cell imaging. Recently, a biochip platform with a novel configuration of electrodes for cell 3D rotation has been successfully developed by generating rotating electric fields. However, the rotation platform still has two major shortcomings that need to be improved. The primary problem is that there is no on-chip module to facilitate the placement of a single cell into the rotation chamber, which causes very low efficiency in experiment to manually pipette single 10-micron-scale cells into rotation position. Secondly, the cell in the chamber may suffer from unstable rotation, which includes gravity-induced sinking down to the chamber bottom or electric-force-induced on-plane movement. To solve the two problems, in this paper we propose a new microfluidic chip with manipulation capabilities of single cell trap and single cell 3D stable rotation, both on one chip. The new microfluidic chip consists of two parts. The top capture part is based on the least flow resistance principle and is used to capture a single cell and to transport it to the rotation chamber. The bottom rotation part is based on dielectrophoresis (DEP and is used to 3D rotate the single cell in the rotation chamber with enhanced stability. The two parts are aligned and bonded together to form closed channels for microfluidic handling. Using COMSOL simulation and preliminary experiments, we have verified, in principle, the concept of on-chip single cell traps and 3D stable rotation, and identified key parameters for chip structures, microfluidic handling, and electrode configurations. The work has laid a solid foundation for on-going chip fabrication and experiment validation.

  9. Mechano-sensing and cell migration: a 3D model approach

    Cell migration is essential for tissue development in different physiological and pathological conditions. It is a complex process orchestrated by chemistry, biological factors, microstructure and surrounding mechanical properties. Focusing on the mechanical interactions, cells do not only exert forces on the matrix that surrounds them, but they also sense and react to mechanical cues in a process called mechano-sensing. Here, we hypothesize the involvement of mechano-sensing in the regulation of directional cell migration through a three-dimensional (3D) matrix. For this purpose, we develop a 3D numerical model of individual cell migration, which incorporates the mechano-sensing process of the cell as the main mechanism regulating its movement. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that factors, such as substrate stiffness, boundary conditions and external forces, regulate specific and distinct cell movements

  10. 3D Culture of Chondrocytes in Gelatin Hydrogels with Different Stiffness

    Xiaomeng Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gelatin hydrogels can mimic the microenvironments of natural tissues and encapsulate cells homogeneously, which makes them attractive for cartilage tissue engineering. Both the mechanical and biochemical properties of hydrogels can affect the phenotype of chondrocytes. However, the influence of each property on chondrocyte phenotype is unclear due to the difficulty in separating the roles of these properties. In this study, we aimed to study the influence of hydrogel stiffness on chondrocyte phenotype while excluding the role of biochemical factors, such as adhesion site density in the hydrogels. By altering the degree of methacryloyl functionalization, gelatin hydrogels with different stiffnesses of 3.8, 17.1, and 29.9 kPa Young’s modulus were prepared from the same concentration of gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA macromers. Bovine articular chondrocytes were encapsulated in the hydrogels and cultured for 14 days. The influence of hydrogel stiffness on the cell behaviors including cell viability, cell morphology, and maintenance of chondrogenic phenotype was evaluated. GelMA hydrogels with high stiffness (29.9 kPa showed the best results on maintaining chondrogenic phenotype. These results will be useful for the design and preparation of scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.