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Sample records for 36cl production rate

  1. Atmospheric production rate of {sup 36}Cl

    Parrat, Y.; Hajdas, W.; Baltensperger, U.; Synal, H.A.; Kubik, P.W.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Using experimental cross sections, a new calculation of the atmospheric production rate of {sup 36}Cl was carried out. A mean production rate of 20 atoms m{sup -2}s{sup -1} was obtained, which is lower than mean {sup 36}Cl deposition rates. (author) 2 figs., 7 refs.

  2. Determination of 36Cl Production Rates Derived from the Well-Dated Deglaciation Surfaces of Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands, Washington

    Swanson, Terry W.; Caffee, Marc L.

    2001-11-01

    The 36Cl dating method is increasingly being used to determine the surface-exposure history of Quaternary landforms. Production rates for the 36Cl isotopic system, a critical component of the dating method, have now been refined using the well-constrained radiocarbon-based deglaciation history of Whidbey and Fidalgo Islands, Washington. The calculated total production rates due to calcium and potassium are 91±5 atoms 36Cl (g Ca) -1 yr -1 and are 228±18 atoms 36Cl (g K) -1 yr -1, respectively. The calculated ground-level secondary neutron production rate in air, P f(0), inferred from thermal neutron absorption by 35Cl is 762±28 neutrons (g air) -1 yr -1 for samples with low water content (1-2 wt.%). Neutron absorption by serpentinized harzburgite samples of the same exposure age, having higher water content (8-12 wt.%), is ˜40% greater relative to that for dry samples. These data suggest that existing models do not adequately describe thermalization and capture of neutrons for hydrous rock samples. Calculated 36Cl ages of samples collected from the surfaces of a well-dated dacite flow (10,600-12,800 cal yr B.P.) and three disparate deglaciated localities are consistent with close limiting calibrated 14C ages, thereby supporting the validity of our 36Cl production rates integrated over the last ˜15,500 cal yr between latitudes of 46.5° and 51°N. Although our production rates are internally consistent and yield reasonable exposure ages for other localities, there nevertheless are significant differences between these production rates and those of other investigators.

  3. Measurements of 36Cl production rates from Cl, K, and Ca in concrete at the 500-MeV neutron irradiation facility of KENS

    In high-energy accelerator facilities, concrete components around beam lines are exposed to secondary neutrons having various energies during machine operation. The neutrons produce the various long half-life radionuclides, such as 3H, 36Cl, 60Co, and 152Eu, in the concrete. Most of the nuclides mainly produced by thermal neutron-capture reactions and their specific activities are important from the viewpoint of accelerator clearance. In previous work, the specific activities of the 36Cl in the concretes at the various accelerator facilities have been measured and it was suggested that the 36Cl in the concrete is useful as an indicator for thermal neutron fluence because of a characteristic of very long half life (301 kyr). However, in the concretes of the accelerator facilities over several hundreds of MeV, the 36Cl are considerably produced by spallation from other concrete components, such as K and Ca, in addition to the thermal neutron capture of 35Cl. The contribution of the 36Cl productions from the spallation is unclear due to the lack of the cross sections for the neutron-induced reactions. In this work, therefore, we measured the 36Cl production rates in concrete from Cl, K, and Ca targets in irradiation with secondary neutrons, which were produced by a bombardment of primary 500-MeV protons with W targets, at high-energy neutron-irradiation course of KENS. Samples of NaCl, K2CO3, and CaCO3 were set into 7. irradiation spaces located on the depth raging from O to 320 cm from the concrete surface and irradiated for approximately one week. After the irradiation, separations of Cl from the samples were carried out radiochemically and the production rates of 36Cl were determined by the AMS. The production rates from Cl, K, and Ca exponentially decreased with an increase of the depth from the concrete surface, and the profiles were very similar each other. Although the production rates from Cl were two orders higher than those from Ca in the same depth, it is

  4. Calibration of cosmogenic noble gas production in ordinary chondrites based on 36Cl-36Ar ages. Part 1: Refined produced rates for cosmogenic 21Ne and 38Ar

    Dalcher, N.; Caffee, M. W.; Nishiizumi, K.; Welten, K. C.; Vogel, N.; Wieler, R.; Leya, I.

    2013-10-01

    We measured the concentrations and isotopic compositions of He, Ne, and Ar in bulk samples and metal separates of 14 ordinary chondrite falls with long exposure ages and high metamorphic grades. In addition, we measured concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclides 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl in metal separates and in the nonmagnetic fractions of the selected meteorites. Using cosmogenic 36Cl and 36Ar measured in the metal separates, we determined 36Cl-36Ar cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, which are shielding-independent and therefore particularly reliable. Using the cosmogenic noble gases and radionuclides, we are able to decipher the CRE history for the studied objects. Based on the correlation 3He/21Ne versus 22Ne/21Ne, we demonstrate that, among the meteorites studied, only one suffered significant diffusive losses (about 35%). The data confirm that the linear correlation 3He/21Ne versus 22Ne/21Ne breaks down at high shielding. Using 36Cl-36Ar exposure ages and measured noble gas concentrations, we determine 21Ne and 38Ar production rates as a function of 22Ne/21Ne. The new data agree with recent model calculations for the relationship between 21Ne and 38Ar production rates and the 22Ne/21Ne ratio, which does not always provide unique shielding information. Based on the model calculations, we determine a new correlation line for 21Ne and 38Ar production rates as a function of the shielding indicator 22Ne/21Ne for H, L, and LL chondrites with preatmospheric radii less than about 65 cm. We also calculated the 10Be/21Ne and 26Al/21Ne production rate ratios for the investigated samples, which show good agreement with recent model calculations.

  5. 36Cl deposition rate reconstruction from bomb pulse until present: A study based on groundwater records

    classically attributed to biological and atmospherical recycling processes or underestimation of the natural atmospheric production of the 36Cl. Additional source of 36Cl production has been envisaged through the activation of chlorine radicals from stratospherical CFCs, leading to a 36Cl production rate comparable with that of Ar spallation from the first approximation. Lastly, the latitudinal factor of the attenuation of the fallout rate is discussed and the impact of the jet streams is proposed as an explanation for the discrepancies in the attenuation rate

  6. Importance of the in situ production of 36Cl, 36Ar and 14C in hydrology and hydrogeochemistry

    The paper critically discusses the conditions for the in situ production of 36Cl, 36Ar and 14C. For several confined aquifers in Australia, Canada and North Africa, the 36Cl content (in atoms/L) close to recharge is about one hundred times greater than can be accounted for by reasonable evapotranspiration values. Possible additional sources of 36Cl include cosmic ray irradiation in the shallow unsaturated zone and solutions of rock chloride in environments where the in situ production of 36Cl is large. Dating of old groundwaters with 36Cl should be limited to cases where chlorinity is constant. The age of Cl-, and hence of groundwater, may then be deduced from the decay of the cosmic 36Cl input, or where the groundwater migrates into a U/Th rich environment, from the subsequent ingrowth of 36Cl because of irradiation by the high in situ neutron flux. In the case of 36Ar, after about 1.5 Ma, the accumulation rate of 36Cl is equal to the 36Cl production rate. In the uppermost few metres of continental crust and of the ocean, cosmic ray interactions enhance production by up to several orders of magnitude. Oceanic production amounts to about one-half of the total production. For Cl- rich fluid inclusions in minerals which remained exposed for a long time close to the surface, values of the 36Ar/40Ar ratio may become much higher than the atmospheric value (3.385x10-3). For 14C, in situ production reactions in both the fluid and the rock matrix and the extent to which they may interfere with the use of 14C for groundwater dating have been assessed. The reactions considered include neutron interactions, the exotic decay of radium and α particle reactions. Groundwater of very low alkalinity in high neutron flux environments (e.g. Stripa granite in central Sweden) may gain in situ produced 14C which is equivalent to a few per cent modern carbon. (author). 57 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  7. Determination and systematics of excitation functions for the production of {sup 36}Cl by means of AMS

    Sudbrock, F.; Herpers, U. [Koeln Univ. (Germany); Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland); Gloris, M.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    Studies concerning the production of the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl measured via accelerator mass spectrometry have been continued. Recently measured data on the production of {sup 36}Cl by medium and high energy protons are discussed. (author) 1 figs., 4 refs.

  8. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    Bessho, K.; Matsumura, H.; Miura, T.; Wang, Q.; Masumoto, K.; Hagura, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Seki, R.; Takahashi, T.; Sasa, K.; Sueki, K.; Matsuhiro, T.; Tosaki, Y.

    2007-06-01

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ≈5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities.

  9. Estimation of thermal neutron fluences in the concrete of proton accelerator facilities from 36Cl production

    The thermal neutron fluence that poured into the shielding concrete of proton accelerator facilities was estimated from the in situ production of 36Cl. The thermal neutron fluences at concrete surfaces during 10-30 years of operation were in the range of 1012-1014 n/cm2. The maxima in thermal neutron fluences were observed at ∼5-15 cm in the depths analyzed for 36Cl/35Cl by AMS. These characteristics imply that thermalization of neutrons occurred inside the concrete. Compared to the several tens of MeV cyclotrons, secondary neutrons penetrate deeper into the concrete at the high-energy accelerators possessing acceleration energies of 400 MeV and 12 GeV. The attenuation length of neutrons reflects the energy spectra of secondary neutrons emitted by the nuclear reaction at the beam-loss points. Increasing the energy of secondary neutrons shifts the maximum in the thermal neutron fluences to deeper positions. The data obtained in this study will be useful for the radioactive waste management at accelerator facilities

  10. The Hiroshima thermal-neutron discrepancy for (36)Cl at large distances. Part II: Natural in situ production as a source.

    Nolte, Eckehart; Huber, Thomas; Rühm, Werner; Kato, Kazuo; Lazarev, Vitali; Schultz, Ludolf

    2005-10-01

    For Hiroshima, a large discrepancy between calculated and measured thermal-neutron fluences had been reported in the past, for distances to the epicenter larger than about 1,000 m. To be more specific, measured (36)Cl concentrations in environmental samples from Hiroshima were too large at these distances, and the ratio of measured to calculated values reached about 70, at a distance of 1,800 m. In an attempt to identify other sources that might also produce (36)Cl in Hiroshima samples, the role of cosmic rays and of neutrons from natural terrestrial sources was investigated. Four reaction mechanisms were taken into account: spallation reactions of the nucleonic (hadronic) component of the cosmic rays on potassium (K) and calcium (Ca) in the sample material, particle emission after nuclear capture of negative muons by K and Ca, reactions of fast-muon induced electromagnetic, and hadronic showers with K and Ca, and neutron capture reactions with (35)Cl in the sample where the neutrons originate from the above three reaction mechanisms and from uranium and thorium decay. These mechanisms are physically described and mathematically quantified. It is shown that among those parameters important for the production of (36)Cl in granite, the chemical composition of the sample, the depth in the quarry where the sample had initially been taken, and the erosion rate at the site of the quarry are most important. Based on these physical, chemical, and geological parameters, (36)Cl concentrations were calculated for different types of granite that are typical for the Hiroshima area. In samples that were of these granite types and that had not been exposed to atomic bomb(A-bomb) neutrons, the (36)Cl concentration was also determined experimentally by means of accelerator mass spectrometry, and good agreement was found with the calculated values. The (36)Cl signal due to natural in situ production was also calculated in granite samples that had been exposed to A-bomb neutrons at

  11. Measurement of the 36Cl deposition flux in central Japan: natural background levels and seasonal variability

    Essential parameters for the applications of 36Cl as a tracer in groundwater studies include the initial 36Cl/Cl ratio, at the time of recharge, and/or the natural background deposition flux of 36Cl in the recharge area. To facilitate the hydrological use of 36Cl in central Japan, this study aimed to obtain a precise estimate of the long-term average local 36Cl flux and to characterize its seasonal variability. The 36Cl in precipitation was continuously monitored in Tsukuba, central Japan over a period of >5 years. The 36Cl flux showed a clear seasonal variation with an annual peak during the spring, which was attributed to the seasonal variability of tropopause height. The long-term average 36Cl flux (32 ± 2 atoms m−2 s−1), estimated from the measured data, was consistent with the prediction from the 36Cl latitudinal fallout model scaled using the global mean production rate of 20 atoms m−2 s−1. The initial 36Cl/Cl ratio was estimated to be (41 ± 6) × 10−15, which is similar to that of pre-bomb groundwater in the Tsukuba Upland. An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36Cl flux during the solar minimum. - Highlights: ► We monitored 36Cl in precipitation in central Japan over a period of >5 years. ► The 36Cl flux varied seasonally, with a peak in spring. ► The long-term average 36Cl flux and the initial 36Cl/Cl ratio were 32 ± 2 atoms m−2 s−1 and (41 ± 6) × 10−15, respectively. ► An observation period covering an 11-year solar cycle would yield more accurate estimates of the values, given the increased 36Cl flux during the solar minimum.

  12. Estimation of precipitation rates by measurements of {sup 36}Cl in the GRIP ice core with the PSI/ETH tandem accelerator

    Wagner, G.; Baumgartner, S.; Beer, J. [EAWAG, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Within the European Greenland ice core project (GRIP) {sup 36}Cl AMS measurements have been performed on ice core samples from Summit (Greenland, 73{sup o}N, 37{sup o}W). Most data analysed so far are from the lower part of the ice core. The {sup 36}Cl concentration is well correlated with {delta}{sup 18}O, which is considered as a proxy for paleotemperatures. Assuming that the deposition rate of radionuclides is independent of {delta}{sup 18}O, {sup 36}Cl is used to estimate the relationship between accumulation and {delta}{sup 18}O. The results confirm that the rapid changes of {delta}{sup 18}O, the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger events, are also reflected in the precipitation rate. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  13. Cosmogenic radionuclides in the environment: 32Si in precipitation samples from the Jungfraujoch, production cross sections of 36Cl in Argon and modeling of the atmospheric 36Cl production

    The concentrations of the cosmogenic radionuclide 32Si were measured in four fresh snow samples from the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps (3450 m asl.) to study the feasibility of measuring this potential dating nuclide with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. This technique could reduce drastically the amount of material needed for measurements of 32Si concentrations in environmental samples in contrast to conventional radiometric detection. The measured 32Si concentrations in the snow samples were between 1.84 and 6.28 μBql-1. These values agree with other measurements of precipitation samples. The measured 32Si/Sitot ratios ranged from 2.5.10-17 to 2.3.10-15 and were thus below the present detection limit of about 10-14, showing that at present it is not possible to carry out AMS measurements of 32Si in precipitation samples. For the first time, experimental cross sections of the reaction 40Ar(p,X)36Cl have been determined for the proton energy range 16-590 MeV. These cross sections were measured using a gas target, a novel method which was tested successfully by irradiating nitrogen targets to confirm literature values of the N(p,X)7Be and N(p,X)10Be cross sections. In fact, good agreement was found between the obtained cross sections with those using solid targets. Production of several radionuclides in the reaction of proton with nickel were also measured. Comparison of these cross sections with literature data proved that the proton flux measurements carried out with ionization chambers were very accurate. The excitation function of the reaction 40Ar(p,X)36Cl exhibits two maxima at proton energies of 20 MeV for the (p,αn)reaction and 95 MeV for the (p,2p3n) reaction, with maximum cross sections of 105 mb and 53 mb, respectively. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  14. First experimental results of the 33S(α,p)36Cl cross section for production in the Early Solar System

    Short-lived radionuclides (SLRs), with t1/2 36Cl (t1/2 = 3.01 × 105 a) has been determined from correlation between isotopic enrichment of its daughter isotope, 36S, and Cl abundance in meteorites. The relatively high inferred initial Solar System 36Cl/Cl ratio strongly suggests that 36Cl was produced in the ESS by bombardment of solar energetic particles on gas and dust in the protoplanetary disc. A major uncertainty in the irradiation models is the absence of experimental data. Experimental data on key 36Cl production reactions will help constrain the calculated yields. Of the reactions considered in the ESS models, the 33S(α,p)36Cl reaction is one of the most important. Here we report first results of a measurement of the averaged reaction cross section in the energy range 1.84–2.04 MeV/A. Our result, 192 ± 33 mb (1σ), is significantly higher than results of previous calculations, 102 and 34 mb.

  15. APMP comparison of measurement of surface emission rate of 36Cl large area source (APMP.RI(II)-K2.Cl-36)

    An international comparison of measurement of beta particle surface emission rate from a 36Cl large area source (APMP.RI(II)–S1.Cl-36) was carried out within the framework of the Asia-Pacific Metrology Program (APMP). Participants from APMP were NMIJ (Japan), KRISS (Korea) and INER (Chinese Taipei). Participants from the other RMOs were NIST (United States), PTB (Germany), NMISA (South Africa) and VNIIM (Russia). All the results of the participants agreed within ±1%. This was the first international comparison of measurement of surface emission rate of beta particle from a large area source. - Highlights: ► APMP comparison of measurement of beta particle surface emission rate was reported. ► Participants were NMIJ, KRISS, INER, NIST, PTB, NMISA and VNIIM. ► A 36Cl large area source was used in the comparison. ► All the results of the participants agreed within ±1%.

  16. Production of cosmogenic isotopes 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na and 36Cl in the atmosphere: Altitudinal profiles of yield functions

    Poluianov, Stepan; Mishev, Alexander L; Usoskin, Ilya G

    2016-01-01

    New consistent and precise computations of the production of five cosmogenic radio-isotopes, 7Be, 10Be, 14C, 22Na and 36Cl, in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic rays are presented in the form of tabulated yield functions. For the first time, a detailed set of the the altitude profiles of the production functions is provided which makes it possible to apply the results directly as input for atmospheric transport models. Good agreement with most of the earlier published works for columnar and global isotopic production rates is shown. Altitude profiles of the production are important, in particular for such tasks as studies of strong solar particle events in the past, precise reconstructions of solar activity on long-term scale, tracing air-mass dynamics using cosmogenic radio-isotopes, etc. As an example, computations of the $^{10}$Be deposition flux in the polar region are shown for the last decades and also for a period around 780 AD and confronted with the actual measurements in Greenland and Antarctic ice c...

  17. Slip rate variability over the Holocene period in the middle Aterno fault system (Italy), retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating of exhumed fault-plane.

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla; Pucci, Stefano; Villani, Fabio; Bourles, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aumaitre, Georges

    2016-04-01

    Numerous numerical modeling studies have described and quantified non-stochastic spatio-temporal variations of earthquake occurrences within fault-networks, such as temporal clustered earthquakes or fault synchronization. However, very few long-enough paleoseismological and geological records are available to test those models against well-constrained dataset and thus account for such variability in the fault behavior. The prerequisites for improving our understanding of fault-rupture processes and thus our capacity to better assess seismic hazard are to acquire paleoseismological records that enable to derive both long-term slip-rate and short-term variability, on a large population of faults and/or within a fault system. These conditions met in Central Apennines, an extensional province where substantial paleoseismological dataset accurately described the Holocene seismic history of a dense network of normal faults. In this study we use 36Cl in situ cosmogenic nuclide to retrieve the seismic history of 3 faults belonging to the Middle Aterno fault system, from north to south: the Bazzano fault, the Roccapreturo fault and the Sulmona fault, a portion of which ruptured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy. We use a new modeling approach to determine the age and slip of past seismic events from the 36Cl concentration profiles. This model is based on an inverse approach and uses an optimization algorithm enabling all the parameter space (number of events, age and slip of events, pre-exposure) to be explored without a priori constraints (see Tesson et al. in session TS4.2/NH4.16/SM3.8). Using this new approach, we precisely determine the slip events occurrences over the Holocene period of those three faults. The results indicate that the three studied faults have ruptured between 4.5 and 5.5 ka, while the southernmost part of the system has also ruptured between at 1.5-3 ka (Sulmona fault and southern segment of Roccapreturo). Those results are in agreement

  18. 36Cl bomb peak: comparison of modeled and measured data

    A. Eichler

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The extensive nuclear bomb testing of the fifties and sixties and the final tests in the seventies caused a strong 36Cl peak that has been observed in ice cores world-wide. The measured 36Cl deposition fluxes in eight ice cores (Dye3, Fiescherhorn, Grenzgletscher, Guliya, Huascarán, North GRIP, Inylchek (Tien Shan and Berkner Island were compared with an ECHAM5-HAM general circulation model simulation (1952–1972. We find a good agreement between the measured and the modeled 36Cl fluxes assuming that the bomb test produced global 36Cl input was ~80 kg. The model simulation indicates that the fallout of the bomb test produced 36Cl is largest in the subtropics and mid-latitudes due to the strong stratosphere-troposphere exchange. In Greenland the 36Cl bomb signal is quite large due to the relatively high precipitation rate. In Antarctica the 36Cl bomb peak is small but is visible even in the driest areas. The model suggests that the large bomb tests in the Northern Hemisphere are visible around the globe but the later (end of sixties and early seventies smaller tests in the Southern Hemisphere are much less visible in the Northern Hemisphere. The question of how rapidly and to what extent the bomb produced 36Cl is mixed between the hemispheres depends on the season of the bomb test. The model results give an estimate of the amplitude of the bomb peak around the globe.

  19. 36Cl bomb peak: comparison of modeled and measured data

    A. Eichler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The extensive nuclear bomb testing of the fifties and sixties and the final tests in the seventies caused a strong 36Cl peak that has been observed in ice cores world-wide. The measured 36Cl deposition fluxes in eight ice cores (Dye3, Fiescherhorn, Grenzgletscher, Guliya, Huascarán, North GRIP, Inylchek (Tien Shan and Berkner Island were compared with an ECHAM5-HAM general circulation model simulation (1952–1972. We find a good agreement between the measured and the modeled 36Cl fluxes assuming that the bomb test produced global 36Cl input was ~80 kg. The model simulation indicates that the fallout of the bomb test produced 36Cl is largest in the subtropics and mid-latitudes due to the strong stratosphere-troposphere exchange. In Greenland the 36Cl bomb signal is quite large due to the relatively high precipitation rate. In Antarctica the 36Cl bomb peak is small but is visible even in the driest areas. The model suggests that the large bomb tests in the Northern Hemisphere are visible around the globe but the later (end of sixties and early seventies smaller tests in the Southern Hemisphere are much less visible in the Northern Hemisphere. The question of how rapidly and to what extent the bomb produced 36Cl is mixed between the hemispheres depends on the season of the bomb test. The model results give an estimate of the amplitude of the bomb peak around the globe.

  20. EFFECT OF DOSE ON RESIDUES AND DISPOSITION OF AN EXPERIMENTAL 36CL-CHLORATE PRODUCT IN BROILERS.

    Because pathogenic Salmonella species and E. coli O157:H7 have significant impacts on human health and on the food animal industry, pre-harvest intervention techniques are being pursued to control these bacteria in food animals. An experimental sodium chlorate product (ECP) consistently reduces or e...

  1. Influence of ground level enhancements on the terrestrial production of {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C and {sup 36}Cl

    Herbst, Konstantin; Heber, Bernd [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Beer, Juerg [Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, EAWAG (Switzerland); Tylka, Allan J. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States); Dietrich, William F. [Praxis, Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides are a product of the interaction of primary cosmic rays, in particular galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), with the Earth's atmosphere. But only primary particles with energies above several 100 MeV can trigger the necessary reaction chains. Because GCRs are modulated by the solar activity on their way through the interplanetary medium the GCR-induced cosmogenic radionuclide production is anti-correlated to the solar cycle. During phases of strong solar activity also solar energetic particle (SEP) events occur frequently. In particular SEP events which can be detected by ground-based instruments, so-called ground level enhancements (GLEs), may strongly contribute to the cosmogenic radionuclide production. Beside the variation due to the modulation of GCRs we investigate the influence of 58 GLEs, which occurred within the past five solar cycles and discuss the possibility to detect such events in present ice-core and tree-ring records. In addition, an estimate for the probability to find such events over the past 10'000 years, also known as Holocene, during different modulation conditions are given.

  2. Cosmogenic 36Cl in karst waters from Bunker Cave North Western Germany - A tool to derive local evapotranspiration?

    Münsterer, C.; Fohlmeister, J.; Christl, M.; Schröder-Ritzrau, A.; Alfimov, V.; Ivy-Ochs, S.; Wackerbarth, A.; Mangini, A.

    2012-06-01

    Monthly rain and drip waters were collected over a period of 10 months at Bunker Cave, Germany. The concentration of 36Cl and the 36Cl/Cl-ratios were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), while stable (35+37)Cl concentrations were measured with both, ion chromatography (IC) and AMS. The measured 36Cl-fluxes of (0.97 ± 0.57) × 104 atoms cm-2 month-1 (0.97 atoms m-2 month-1) in precipitation were on average twice as high as the global mean atmospheric production rate. This observation is consistent with the local fallout pattern, which is characterized by a maximum at mid-latitudes. The stable chloride concentration in drip waters (ranging from 13.2 to 20.9 mg/l) and the 36Cl-concentrations (ranging from 16.9 × 106 to 35.3 × 106 atoms/l) are a factor of 7 and 10 above the values expected from empirical evapotranspiration formulas and the rain water concentrations, respectively. Most likely the additional stable Cl is due to human impact from a nearby urban conglomeration. The large 36Cl-enrichment is attributed to the local evapotranspiration effect, which appears to be higher than the calculated values and to additional bomb-derived 36Cl from nuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 60s stored in the soil above the cave. In the densely vegetated soil above Bunker Cave, 36Cl seems not to behave as a completely conservative tracer. The bomb derived 36Cl might be retained in the soil due to uptake by minerals and organic material and is still being released now. Based on our data, the residence time of 36Cl in the soil is estimated to be about 75-85 years.

  3. Temporal evolution of 36Cl abundances in the Great Lakes

    The observed 36Cl isotopic abundance in Great Lakes water decreases from west to east, with the highest 36Cl/Cl ratio of 1332 × 10−15 in Lake Superior and the lowest 36Cl/Cl ratio of 151 × 10−15 in Lake Erie, whereas the 36Cl concentration (36Cl atoms/L) is lowest in Lake Superior and higher in the other Great Lakes. The 36Cl concentration in Lake Superior is much higher than expected from normal atmospheric deposition over the basin, consistent with deposition of nuclear bomb-produced 36Cl during 1952–1964. A conservative mass-balance model constrained by hydrological parameters and available 36Cl fluence measurements predicts the 36Cl abundances in the Great Lakes from 1945 to 2015, in excellent agreement with available data for Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron, but the model underestimates 36Cl abundances for Lakes Erie and Ontario. However, assuming that 36Cl demonstrates non-conservative behavior and is significantly retained in the drainage basins, a model incorporating a delayed input parameter successfully predicts observed 36Cl concentrations in all of the Great Lakes. - Highlights: • 36Cl/Cl ratios are the highest in Lake Superior and the lowest in Lake Erie. • 36Cl concentrations in the Great Lakes are much higher than expected natural values. • Conservative 36Cl model underestimates observed values in Lakes Erie and Ontario. • Large fraction of 36Cl atoms deposited on the watersheds are retained for decades

  4. Studies on methods of measurement of radioactivities of 36Cl and 3H in dual labelled samples

    In order to clarify how chloride molecules are transported into nervous tissue cells, we simultaneously used [36Cl] -NaCl and [3H] -inulin, and added AgNO3 to the extract from the nervous tissue, obtaining 36Cl-samples from the AgCl-precipitate and 3H-samples from the supernatant. As for radioactivity of 36Cl or 3H in the dual-labelled samples, the recovery rates by our separation method were about 100%. Using cultured astrocytoma cells, 36Cl-uptake into the cells, which was calculated by inulin assumption, was investigated. Intracellular 36Cl-radioactivity changed vis-a-vis with that in the extracellular space. The volume of intracellular water, which was calculated by 3H-inulin assumption, remained unchanged, even though a few variations in 36Cl-radioactivity in cells were determined by both our separation method and spill-over method. (author)

  5. A hydrochemical investigation using 36Cl/Cl in groundwaters

    Metcalfe, R.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes 36Cl studies which were undertaken during the H14 financial year. 6 groundwater samples were collected for 36Cl analysis. The results of this study suggest that 36Cl data could potentially be useful for interpreting groundwater origins and flow paths.

  6. 36Cl measurement program at Zuerich 6 MV tandem accelerator

    Routine measurements of 36Cl at Zuerich 6MV tandem accelerator cover a time span of 20 years. In the present contribution, we summarize our practical experience of 36Cl measurements with a special emphasis on the detection procedure and data reduction. We also outline a synopsis of our ongoing and past 36Cl projects

  7. Infiltration at yucca mountain, nevada, traced by 36Cl

    Norris, A. E.; Wolfsberg, K.; Gifford, S. K.; Bentley, H. W.; Elmore, D.

    1987-11-01

    Measurements of chloride and 36Cl in soils from two locations near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have been used to trace the infiltration of precipitation in this arid region. The results show that the 36Cl fallout from nuclear-weapons testing formed a well-defined peak at one location, with a maximum 36Cl/Cl ratio 0.5 m below the surface. The structure of the 36Cl bomb pulse at the other location was much more complex, and the quantity of 36Cl in the bomb pulse was < 1% of the 6 × 10 12 atoms {36Cl }/{m 2} in the bomb pulse at the first location. The data indicate hydrologic activity subsequent to the 36Cl bomb-pulse fallout at one location, but none at the other location.

  8. AMS measurement of the reaction 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl

    36Cl is a long-lived radionuclide (t1/2=301000 a), which is dominantly produced via the reaction 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl. In the present work we focused on: First, the production of an independent 36Cl/35Cl reference material for AMS and second, the determination of the Maxwellian averaged cross section (MACS) of 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl at 25 keV neutron energy, i.e. the energy range which is important for astrophysical network calculations. Approaching the first goal, NaCl pellets were irradiated with thermal neutrons in Vienna and Budapest. The neutron fluence, used for the calculation of the 36Cl/35Cl ratio of the irradiated samples, was determined via gold fluence monitors. For the determination of the neutron capture cross section of 35Cl at stellar energies, AMS measurements were performed on two samples, which were irradiated with neutrons of a Maxwell-Boltzmann energy distribution of 25 keV. Combining the AMS- and the neutron-fluence data, the MACS for 35Cl at 25 keV was calculated. The neutron irradiations, the measuring procedure of 36Cl at VERA and our new results are presented.

  9. Determination of paleoseismic activity over a large time-scale: Fault scarp dating with 36Cl

    Mozafari Amiri, Nasim; Tikhomirov, Dmitry; Sümer, Ökmen; Özkaymak, Çaǧlar; Uzel, Bora; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Vockenhuber, Christof; Sözbilir, Hasan; Akçar, Naki

    2016-04-01

    Bedrock fault scarps are the most direct evidence of past earthquakes to reconstruct seismic activity in a large time-scale using cosmogenic 36Cl dating if built in carbonates. For this method, a surface along the fault scarp with a minimum amount of erosion is required to be chosen as an ideal target point. The section of the fault selected for sampling should cover at least two meters of the fault surface from the lower part of the scarp, where intersects with colluvium wedge. Ideally, sampling should be performed on a continuous strip along the direction of the fault slip direction. First, samples of 10 cm high and 15 cm wide are marked on the fault surface. Then, they are collected using cutters, hammer and chisel in a thickness of 3 cm. The main geometrical factors of scarp dip, scarp height, top surface dip and colluvium dip are also measured. Topographic shielding in the sampling spot is important to be estimated as well. Moreover, density of the fault scarp and colluvium are calculated. The physical and chemical preparations are carried in laboratory for AMS and chemical analysis of the samples. A Matlab® code is used for modelling of seismically active periods based on increasing production rate of 36Cl following each rupture, when a buried section of a fault is exposed. Therefore, by measuring the amount of cosmogenic 36Cl versus height, the timing of major ruptures and their offsets are determined. In our study, Manastır, Mugırtepe and Rahmiye faults in Gediz graben, Priene-Sazlı, Kalafat and Yavansu faults in Büyük Menderes graben and Ören fault in Gökava half-graben have been examined in the seismically active region of Western Turkey. Our results reconstruct at least five periods of high seismic activity during the Holocene time, three of which reveal seismic ruptures beyond the historical pre-existing data.

  10. 36Cl studies of water movements deep within unsaturated tuffs

    Measurements of 36Cl in cuttings from a borehole that was drilled 387 m into unsaturated tuffs indicate the possible detection of significant radioactive decay of cosmogenic 36Cl in two of the samples. However, the 36Cl/Cl ratio was found to vary with the amount of pulverization of the cuttings. Work is in progress to separate the 36Cl/Cl data into cosmogenic and in situ components. The cosmogenic component will be used to trace very slow water movements through the unsaturated zone. Bomb pulse 36Cl was observed as deep as 153 m, and this identification is not constrained by the problem with pulverization. This work shows the efficacy of 36Cl measurements for detecting modern water movements deep in the unsaturated zone. 9 refs., 3 tabs

  11. Study of nuclear reactions producing 36Cl by micro-AMS

    Luís, H.; Jesus, A. P.; Fonseca, M.; Cruz, J.; Galaviz, D.; Franco, N.; Alves, E.

    2016-01-01

    36Cl is one of several short to medium lived isotopes (as compared to the earth age) whose abundances at the earlier solar system may help to clarify its formation process. There are two generally accepted possible models for the production of this radionuclide: it originated from the ejecta of a nearby supernova (where 36Cl was most probably produced in the s-process by neutron irradiation of 35Cl) and/or it was produced by in-situ irradiation of nebular dust by energetic particles (mostly, p, a, 3He -X-wind irradiation model). The objective of the present work is to measure the cross section of the 37Cl(p,d)36Cl and 35Cl(d,p)36Cl nuclear reactions, by measuring the 36Cl content of AgCl samples (previously bombarded with high energy protons and deuterons) with AMS, taking advantage of the very low detection limits of this technique for chlorine measurements. For that, the micro-AMS system of the LF1/ITN laboratory had to be optimized for chlorine measurements, as to our knowledge this type of measurements had never been performed in such a system (AMS with micro-beam). Here are presented the first results of these developments, namely the tests in terms of precision and reproducibility that were done by comparing AgCl blanks irradiated at the Portuguese National Reactor with standards produced by the dilution of the NIST SRM 4943 standard material.

  12. High (36)Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater.

    Roux, Céline; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Simonucci, Caroline; Van Meir, Nathalie; Fifield, L Keith; Diez, Olivier; Bassot, Sylvain; Simler, Roland; Bugai, Dmitri; Kashparov, Valery; Lancelot, Joël

    2014-12-01

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A (90)Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, (36)Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. (36)Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1-5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural (36)Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of (36)Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. (36)Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of (90)Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, (36)Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of (36)Cl from trench soil are better characterized. PMID:25128774

  13. 36Cl-AMS measurements with 3-MV tandem accelerator

    36C- is one of the most interesting nuclides in accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements. The application of 36Cl has been widely applied in various fields. All most all of 36Cl AMS measurements at natural isotopic concentrations have yet been performed at tandem accelerator with 5 MV or higher terminal voltage. The measure improvement of 36Cl and other medium heavy isotopes performed at 3 MV in AMS facilities is one of the hottest topics in AMS measurements. In order to increase the suppression factor of 36S, the energy loss straggling and angular straggling of 36Cl and 36S ions in various counter gases (P10, isobutane and propane) were investigated. Some groundwater samples were measured with energy of 32 MeV, and the results were in good agreement with the result obtained with ion energy of 72 MeV. The results indicate that the approximate detection limit of 36Cl in 3 MV AMS facility is 36Cl/Cl=1 × 10-14, and the uncertainty is 30% when the sample with isotopic ration 36Cl/Cl≈10-13. (authors)

  14. High 36Cl/Cl ratios in Chernobyl groundwater

    After the explosion of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in April 1986, contaminated material was buried in shallow trenches within the exclusion zone. A 90Sr plume was evidenced downgradient of one of these trenches, trench T22. Due to its conservative properties, 36Cl is investigated here as a potential tracer to determine the maximal extent of the contamination plume from the trench in groundwater. 36Cl/Cl ratios measured in groundwater, trench soil water and leaf leachates are 1–5 orders of magnitude higher than the theoretical natural 36Cl/Cl ratio. This contamination occurred after the Chernobyl explosion and currently persists. Trench T22 acts as an obvious modern point source of 36Cl, however other sources have to be involved to explain such contamination. 36Cl contamination of groundwater can be explained by dilution of trench soil water by uncontaminated water (rainwater or deep groundwater). With a plume extending further than that of 90Sr, radionuclide which is impacted by retention and decay processes, 36Cl can be considered as a suitable tracer of contamination from the trench in groundwater provided that modern release processes of 36Cl from trench soil are better characterized. - Highlights: • High 36Cl/Cl ratios measured in the Chernobyl Pilot Site groundwater. • Trench T22 acts as a modern source of groundwater contamination by 36Cl but other sources are involved. • Contamination results from dilution of a contaminated “T22” soil water with rainwater. • Processes involved in the modern release need to be investigated

  15. Cosmogenic 10Be, 21Ne and 36Cl in sanidine and quartz from Chilean ignimbrites

    Our initial results indicate that three cosmogenic nuclides: 10Be, 21Ne and 36Cl can be analyzed in sanidine. To uncover complex exposure histories or marked changes in denudation rates over time several nuclides with different half-lives (or stable) must be measured. Because of its shorter half-life, the combination of 36Cl and a long-lived nuclide 10Be or stable nuclide 21Ne will provide more information than the pairs 10Be and 26Al or 10Be and 21Ne (in quartz). Sanidine (alkali feldspar) is a common high temperature mineral and often dominates the phenocryst assemblage in silicic to intermediate volcanic rocks. Bedrock surfaces studied come from the Oxaya (erupted 19-23 Ma) and Lauca (erupted 2.7 Ma) ignimbrites of northern Chile. Quartz and sanidine phenocrysts coexist; therefore, we can check the viability of sanidine through direct comparison with nuclide concentrations in quartz. In addition, as quartz has no target for 36Cl in significant abundance we show that the unique power of sanidine is that 36Cl can be measured. We have obtained very good agreement between 10Be and 21Ne concentrations measured in sanidine and coexisting quartz. No meteoric 10Be was apparent in these sanidines. Concentrations of all three nuclides in mineral separates from rock sample CN309 from the Lauca ignimbrite in the Western Cordillera agree well and correspond to minimum exposure ages of 30-50 ka. 10Be and 21Ne measured in both sanidine and quartz from three rock samples from the Oxaya ignimbrite (CN19, CN23, CN104a) in the Western Escarpment record low average landscape modification rates (36Cl data from sanidine in CN23 seem to indicate shorter minimum exposures and more rapid maximum erosion rates

  16. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemistry of 239Pu, 129I, 99Tc and 36Cl

    One objective of this research programme has been to evaluate the applicability of uranium orebodies as natural analogues for testing radionuclide release-rate models used in performance assessment activities. The investigated nuclides included three of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors: plutonium-239, iodine-129, and technetium-99. The feasibility of uranium minerals as analogues for the behavior of these nuclear reaction products (NRP) in spent fuel relies upon a capability to characterise NRP concentrations in the source minerals. Measured abundances of natural 239Pu, 99Tc and 129I in uranium ores are compared to calculated abundances in order to evaluate the degree to retention of these radionuclides by the ore. This modelling study also shows the extent to which various NRP are correlated, such that one provides a constraint on the production rates of others. Under most conditions, 36Cl, another long-lived neutron-capture product found in uranium ores, is shown to be an ideal in-situ monitor of the 235U fission rate, which is the dominant source term for 129I and possibly a significant one for 99Tc. Similarly, 239Pu/U ratios can be used to establish limits on the 238U neutron-induced fission rate; the ratios measured in this study suggest that 238U induced fission comprises 129I and 99Tc. 79 refs., 21 tabs., 18 figs

  17. Accelerator-mass spectroscopy with fully stripped 36Cl

    The Garching MP tandem-post accelerator-achromator accelerator facility was extended in such way that by it a very backgroundless accelerator mass spectroscopy with fully stripped medium heavy ions was possible. As first applications microscopical amounts of 36Cl (Tsub(1/2)= 301 000 years) were detected. The detection limit lies at 36Cl/CL=4x10-15. In first measurements the method was applied to the age determination of palaeontological samples and to the study of cosmic-radiation induced reactions in the earth crust. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of 36Cl and 3He measurements in glacial surfaces on the tropical Altiplano (Cerro Tunupa volcano, 20°S)

    Schimmelpfennig, Irene; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Lavé, Jérôme; Benedetti, Lucilla; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    The combination of two or more cosmogenic nuclides measured in the same rock samples allow complex landscape exposure histories to be quantified, due to the nuclide-specific production and decay rates. In supposedly simple exposure scenarios, such as moraine chronologies, the use of more than one nuclide can also help identify outliers caused by geomorphological bias (e.g. "inheritance") or analytical problems (e.g. nuclide loss or contamination during chemical extraction). The two cosmogenic in situ nuclides 3He and 36Cl are potentially very useful to be simultaneously measured in quartz-lacking lithologies, but their application is more challenging than that of combined 10Be and 26Al measurements, which are routinely employed in quartz-bearing rocks. This is, amongst other things, because the production of 3He and 36Cl depend on various compositional factors. Therefore, 3He and 36Cl have rarely been measured in the same samples so far. Here, we present 36Cl measurements in plagioclases extracted from four moraine boulders and one roche moutonnée on the southern flank of Cerro Tunupa volcano, located in the tropical Bolivian Andes (3800-4500 m, 20°S). In pyroxenes of these samples, 3He has previously been measured to gain insights into the local deglaciation history and climate conditions about 15 kyr ago during the Lake Tauca highstand (Blard et al., 2009, 2013). The ages calculated from the measured 3He and 36Cl concentrations of the 5 samples range from 12 kyr to 180 kyr and are generally in good agreement. The good age agreement of a boulder surface (TU-1C) that is significantly older than the other boulder ages from this moraine confirm the suspicion, that it was exposed to cosmic radiation previous to its last deposition (Blard et al., 2009, 2013). In contrast, the 36Cl age of the roche moutonnée surface (TU2) is significantly younger than the corresponding 3He age, but fits well with the adjacent moraine mean age. It thus arises the question if the 3He

  19. 36Cl and 53Mn in Antarctic meteorites and 10Be-36Cl dating of Antarctic ice

    Cosmic-ray-produced 53Mn (tsub(1/2)=3.7x106 years) has been measured in twenty Antarctic meteorites by neutron activation analysis. 36Cl (tsub(1/2)=3.0x105 years) has been measured in fourteen of these objects by tandem accelerator mass spectrometry. Cosmic ray exposure ages and terrestrial ages of the meteorites are calculated from these results and from gases. 14C (tsub(1/2)=5740 years) and 26Al(tsub(1/2)=7.2x105 years) data. The terrestrial ages range from 3x104 to 5x105 years. Many of the L3-Allan Hills chrondrites seem to be a single fall based on these results. In addition, 10Be (tsub(1/2)=1.6x106 years) and 36Cl have been measured in six Antarctic ice samples. The first measurements of 10Be/36Cl ratios in the ice core samples demonstrate a new dating method for ice. (orig.)

  20. Surface exposure dating with 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl in the dry valleys, Antarctica and in the Swiss Alps

    By measuring the concentration of a cosmogenic isotope (e.g. 10Be, 26Al, 36Cl), the length of time since formation or uncovering of a rock surface can be determined rather precisely. The useful time range of these isotopes is dependent upon the production rates, the half-lives as well as on sample analysis limitations. The interplay of the various factors is shown by two examples; the dating of very old surfaces in Antarctica and the dating of a Younger Dryas moraine in the Swiss Alps. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs

  1. Inventory of site-derived 36Cl in the Snake River plain aquifier, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    Radioactive waste management practices at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in Idaho have introduced 36Cl (T1/2 = 301,000 yr) into the Snake River Plain aquifer underlying the site. The 36Cl is believed to originate from neutron activation of stable 35Cl in nuclear fuels (principally) and in reactor cooling/process water. Wastewater releases of 3H at the INEL have been documented by the site operators for the period 1952 to 1988. During this time, approximately 1.2 PBq of 3H (30,000 Ci) were introduced to the subsurface through disposal wells and seepage ponds. By sampling a number of monitoring and production wells downgradient from points of introduction, 3H movement and dispersion in the groundwater have been documented by the U.S. Geological Survey. The present report uses these historical 3H release and monitoring data to choose hydrologic parameters (matrix porosity and plume penetration depth) that produce concordance between the 3H release estimates and the inventory calculated from measurements of 3H in the subsurface. These parameters are then applied to 36Cl isopleths to generate an estimated 36Cl inventory in the subsurface. Using assumptions about irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and total fuel processed, as little as 23 g of stable chloride impurity in fuel elements would be adequate to produce the amount of 36Cl estimated to be in the groundwaters underlying the site. The highest atom concentration of 36Cl measured onsite (222x1010 atoms 1-1) corresponds to an activity level of ∼4 pCi 1-1 and represents 0.2 percent of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) drinking water standard for this radionuclide (2000 pCi 1-1)

  2. Radiochemical analysis of 90Sr, 41Ca, 129I and 36Cl in waste samples

    Full text: The decommissioning of a nuclear facility requires estimating the total inventory of radioactivity in various materials and its variation with time, which has to be carried out by the determination of the radioactivity of various radionuclides presented in the materials. Of all materials in the nuclear facilities, graphite, concrete, and steel are the main low-medium radioactive waste due to their large volume. Besides the neutron activation products of components and impurity in the materials including 36Cl and 41Ca, some fission products, such as 90Sr, 99Tc, 129I, and 137Cs also exist in the materials due to the contamination of the leaked nuclear fuel. Of these radionuclides, the determination of gamma emitters is easier and can be directly carried out by gamma spectroscopy without any radiochemical separation. But the beta and alpha emitters including 3H, 14C, 36Cl, 41Ca, 55Fe, 63Ni, 90Sr, 9 and 129I and some transuranics, have to be determined by radiochemical analysis including a completely separation of individual radionuclides from matrix and other radionuclides before measurement by beta counting, alpha spectrometry or mass spectrometry. This work presents radiochemical analytical methods developed in our laboratory in the recent years for the determination of 36Cl, 41Ca, 90Sr and 129I in bio-shielding concrete, graphite and metals. for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. Besides individual procedure for the purification of various radionuclides, a combined procedure is also developed and presented for the simultaneous determination of all four radionuclides from one sample. (author)

  3. Performance of the Chalk River 36Cl AMS system

    The MP Tandem Injector of the Chalk River TASCC (Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron) Facility is being used for 36Cl determinations in studies relating to hydrology and low and high level nuclear waste management. In addition to the accelerator, the computer controlled system comprises a multiple-sample, medium-current ion source, a high resolution injector, a low resolution velocity filter, a gas filled magnet and a Bragg-type particle detection/identification system. Accuracies of 5--10% have been achieved with good suppression of 36S and background levels as low as 5x10-1536Cl/Cl. Following a brief overview of the system, detailed results are presented for the performance of the gas-filled magnet and particle detector as well as for sources of background including ion source memory effects

  4. Reconstruction of late glacial climates from the groundwater archive: Cl- and 36Cl in the Carrizo aquifer, Texas

    The climate history (temperature and precipitation minus evapotranspiration) of southern Texas was reconstructed for the past 35 ka, on the basis of groundwater data from the Carrizo aquifer. Palaeotemperatures derived from noble gases dissolved in groundwater indicate a mean annual temperature 5 deg. C lower than today for the last glacial maximum. Recharge rates (a measure of precipitation minus evapotranspiration) were estimated from Cl- and from 36Cl concentrations after performing corrections for variations of atmospheric Cl- and 36Cl deposition rates. The two lines of evidence are consistent and indicate that the recharge rate between 16 and 20 ka was up to to 100% higher than today. The occurrence of high lake levels in the Great Basin during that period suggests that the shift to a better climate during the late glacial was a common feature of the southwestern and southern United States of America. (author). 22 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  5. Inter-comparison of cosmogenic in-situ 3He, 21Ne and 36Cl at low latitude along an altitude transect on the SE slope of the Kilimanjaro volcano (3°S, Tanzania)

    Schimmelpfennig, I.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Niedermann, S.; Finkel, R. C.; Benedetti, L.; Schneider, B.

    2010-12-01

    Because the intensity and energy spectrum of the cosmic ray flux is affected by atmospheric depth and geomagnetic-field strength, cosmogenic nuclide production rates increase considerably with altitude and to a lesser degree with latitude. The scaling methods used to account for spatial variability in production rates assume that all cosmogenic nuclides have the same altitude dependence. In this study we evaluate whether the production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl, 3He and 21Ne change differently with altitude, which is plausible due to the different energy-thresholds of their production reactions. If so, nuclide-specific scaling factors would be required. Concentrations of the three cosmogenic nuclides were determined in mafic phenocrysts over an altitude transect between 1000 and 4300 m at Kilimanjaro volcano (3° S). Altitude-dependence of relative production rates was assessed in two ways: by determination of concentration ratios and by calculation of apparent exposure age ratios for all nuclide pairs. The latter accounts for characteristics of 36Cl that the stable nuclides 3He and 21Ne do not possess (radioactive decay, high sensitivity to mineral composition and significant contributions from production reactions other than spallation). All ratios overlap within error over the entire transect, and altitudinal variation in relative production rates is not therefore evident. This suggests that nuclide-specific scaling factors are not required for the studied nuclides at this low latitude location. However, because previous studies [1,2] documented anomalous altitude-dependent variations of 3He production at mid-latitude sites, the effect of latitude on cross-calibrations should be further evaluated. We determined cosmogenic 21Ne/3He concentration ratios of 0.187 ± 0.010 in pyroxenes and 0.375 ± 0.015 in olivines, agreeing with those reported in previous studies. Despite the absence of independently determined ages for the studied lava surfaces, the consistency in

  6. Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, Part D. U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    The present paper presents the 36Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of 36Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of 36Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of 36Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, 39K(n,α)36Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the 36Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain ∼ 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that 36Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of 36Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure 36Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded 36Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been 36Cl measurements made by a Japanese group. The impetus for the extensive 36Cl and other neutron activation measurements was the

  7. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 36Cl produced by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    Accelerator mass spectrometry was performed at the Munich tandem laboratory to determine 36Cl/Cl ratios of samples from a tombstone exposed to neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. The ratios were determined from the surface to deeper positions. The depth profile of 36Cl/Cl can be used for estimating the neutron energy distribution and intensity near the hypocentre in Hiroshima. (author)

  8. Radiological assessment of 36Cl in the disposal of used CANDU fuel

    An assessment of the potential radiological impact of 36Cl in the disposal of used CANDU fuel has been performed. The assessment was based on new data on chlorine impurity levels in used fuel. Data bases for the vault, geosphere, and biosphere models used in the EIS postclosure assessment case study (Goodwin et al. 1994) were modified to include the necessary 36Cl data. The resulting safety analysis shows that estimated radiological risks from 36Cl are forty times lower than from 129I at 104 a; this, incorporation of 36Cl into the models does not change the overall conclusions of the study of Goodwin et al. (1994a). For human intrusion scenarios, an analysis using the methodology of Wuschke (1992) showed that the maximum risk is unaffected by the inclusion of 36Cl. (author). 51 refs., 5 tabs., 15 figs

  9. Determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete using pyrohydrolysis and liquid scintillation counting.

    Itoh, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Hatakeyama, Mutsuo; Tachibana, Mitsuo

    2002-07-01

    A method for the determination of 36Cl in biological shield concrete of nuclear reactors was developed. Cl in the concrete sample was extracted quantitatively by pyrohydrolysis at 900 degrees C and recovered in Na2CO3 solution for subsequent measurement of 36Cl by liquid scintillation counting. WO3 was used as an accelerator in the pyrohydrolysis. The Cl extraction procedure was optimized by investigating experimental conditions with the use of ion chromatography and its recovery was evaluated by the analysis of the geochemical reference samples. The detection limit of 36Cl was 0.02 Bq g(-1) for a sample weight of 2 g. The relative standard deviation was 3-7% for the samples containing 0.5 Bq g(-1) levels of 36Cl. The method was applied to determine 36Cl in biological shield concrete of the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor. PMID:12173658

  10. The Hiroshima thermal-neutron discrepancy for (36)Cl at large distances. Part I: New (36)Cl measurements in granite samples exposed to A-bomb neutrons.

    Huber, Thomas; Rühm, Werner; Kato, Kazuo; Egbert, Stephen D; Kubo, Florian; Lazarev, Vitali; Nolte, Eckehart

    2005-10-01

    The long-lived radioisotope (36)Cl (half-life: 301,000 years) was measured in granite samples exposed to A-bomb neutrons at distances from 94 to 1,591 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima, by means of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios decrease from 1.6 x 10(-10) close to the hypocenter to about 1-2 x 10(-13), at a distance of 1,300 m from the hypocenter. At this distance and beyond the measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios do not change significantly and scatter around values of 1-2 x 10(-13). These findings suggest that the (36)Cl had been predominantly produced by thermalized neutrons from the A-bomb via neutron capture on stable (35)Cl, at distances from the hypocenter smaller than about 1,200 m. At larger distances, however, confounding processes induced by cosmic rays or neutrons from the decay of uranium and thorium become important. This hypothesis is theoretically and experimentally supported in a consecutive paper. The results are compared to calculations that are based on the most recent dosimetry system DS02. Close to the hypocenter, measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios are lower than those calculated, while they are significantly higher at large distances from the hypocenter. If the contribution of the cosmic rays and of the neutrons from the decay of uranium and thorium in the sample was subtracted, however, no significant deviation from the DS02 calculations was observed, at those distances. Thus, the Hiroshima neutron discrepancy reported in the literature for (36)Cl for samples from large distances from the hypocenter, i.e., higher measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios than predicted by the previous dosimetry system DS86, was not confirmed. PMID:16177928

  11. 36Cl and 14C behaviour in UNGG graphite during leaching experiments

    Graphite has been used as a moderator in Natural Uranium Graphite Gas reactors. Among the radionuclides, the long-lived activation product 36Cl and 14C, which are abundant in graphite after irradiation can be the main contributors to the dose during disposal. This paper deals with the first results obtained on irradiated graphite from French G2 reactor. Both leaching and diffusion experiments have been performed in order to understand and quantify the radionuclides behaviour. Chlorine leaching seems to be controlled by diffusion transport through graphite matrix. On the contrary 14C leaching is very low, probably because after irradiation, the remaining 14C was produced from 13C activation in the crystalline structure of graphite. (authors)

  12. Groundwater dilution and residence times, and constraints on chloride source, in the Mokai geothermal system, New Zealand, from chemical, stable isotope, tritium, and 36Cl data

    The maximum measured temperature of the production wells is near 323C at 2500 m depth, whereas temperatures in two wells on the northern margin of the upflow are 36Cl/Cl ratio of 2.6 x 10-15 and a 36Cl concentration of 106 atoms per 10-6 kg. This fluid has a lower ration (by a factor of 90) and a higher absolute concentration (by a factor of 7) than present-day stream water. However, the marginal wells have been diluted by groundwater with at least 500 36Cl atoms per 10-6 kg, 30 times richer in 36Cl than present-day stream waters. This spike is most likely due to circulation of precipitation formed during thermonuclear testing to depths of 1,000 m. The amount of 36Cl in the deep fluid at Mokai is 5-10 times less than that predicted from a calculation of the neutron fluxes in the silicic reservoir and underlying greywacke basement rocks. This indicates that the fluids have interacted with more primitive rocks below the drilled depths of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, with the chloride possibly derived from a magmatic brine

  13. New approaches investigating production rates of in-situ produced terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides

    Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); FZD, Dresden (Germany); Braucher, Regis; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourles, Didier [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2010-07-01

    In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides have proved to be valuable tools for environmental and Earth sciences. However, accurate application of this method is only possible, if terrestrial production rates in a certain environment over a certain time period and their depth-dependence within the exposed material are exactly known. Unfortunately, the existing data and models differ up to several tens of percent. Thus, one of the European project CRONUS-EU goals is the high quality calibration of the {sup 36}Cl production rate by spallation at independently dated surfaces. As part of fulfilling this task we have investigated calcite-rich samples from four medieval landslide areas in the Alps: Mont Granier, Le Claps, Dobratsch, and Veliki Vrh (330-1620 m, 1248-1442 AD). For investigating the depth-dependence of the different nuclear reactions, especially, the muon- and thermal neutron-induced contributions, we have analysed mixtures of carbonates and siliceous conglomerate samples - for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl - exposed at different shielding depths and taken from a core drilled in 2005 at La Ciotat, France (from surface to 11 m shielding). AMS of {sup 36}Cl was performed at LLNL and ETH, {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al at ASTER.

  14. Radiochemical determination of 129I and 36Cl in MEGAPIE, a proton irradiated lead-bismuth eutectic spallation target

    The concentrations of the long-lived nuclear reaction products 129I and 36Cl have been measured in samples from the MEGAPIE liquid metal spallation target. Samples from the bulk target material (lead-bismuth eutectic, LBE), from the interface of the metal free surface with the cover gas, from LBE/steel interfaces and from noble metal absorber foils installed in the cover gas system were analysed using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Laboratory of Ion beam Physics at ETH Zuerich. The major part of 129I and 36Cl was found accumulated on the interfaces, particularly at the interface of LBE and the steel walls of the target container, while bulk LBE samples contain only a minor fraction of these nuclides. Both nuclides were also detected on the absorber foils to a certain extent (<< 1% of the total amount). The latter number is negligible concerning the radio-hazard of the irradiated target material; however it indicates a certain affinity of the absorber foils for halogens, thus proving the principle of using noble metal foils for catching these volatile radionuclides. The total amounts of 129I and 36Cl in the target were estimated from the analytical data by averaging within the different groups of samples and summing up these averages over the total target. This estimation could account for about half of the amount of 129I and 36Cl predicted to be produced using nuclear physics modelling codes for both nuclides. The significance of the results and the associated uncertainties are discussed.

  15. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, 10Be (T1/2=1.5Ma), 26Al (0.7Ma) and 36Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth's crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of 10Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka

  16. Measurements of 36Cl in Antarctic meteorites and Antarctic ice using a Van de Graaff accelerator

    Cosmic-ray produced 36Cl(tsub(1/2) = 3.0 X 105 years) has been measured in four Antarctic meteorites and one sample of Antarctic ice using a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator as an ultrasensitive mass spectrometer with the extremely low background level of 36Cl/Cl -16. Results from this ion counting technique (applied here to extraterrestrial materials for the first time) are used to support a two-stage irradiation model for the Yamato-7301and Allan Hills-76008 meteorites and to show a long terrestrial age (0.7 +- 0.1 m.y.) for Allan Hills-77002. Yamato-7304 has a terrestrial age of less than 0.1 m.y. The 36Cl content of the Antarctic ice sample from the Yamato Mountain area implies that the age of the ice cap at this site is less than one 36Cl half-life. (Auth.)

  17. AMS analysis of 36Cl induced in concrete of accelerator facilities

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied to the analysis of 36Cl induced in concrete samples obtained from accelerator facilities. In order to use a small amount of concrete sample and to separate chlorine as pure as possible, an improvement of separation process was developed. Chlorine was extracted from 1-5 g of concrete into 0.01 M nitric acid in a pressurized decomposition vessel. After determining chlorine using ion chromatography, a certain amount of NaCl solution was added to obtain sufficient amounts of AgCl precipitate and to dilute to a suitable isotope ratio of 36Cl to 35Cl (36Cl/35Cl) for the AMS (10-12-10-10). A careful purification procedure was applied to reduce 36S interference in AMS. Good reproducibility and small error throughout the chemical process for sample preparation was attained. Depth profiles of 36Cl/35Cl in concrete of a medium-energy cyclotron were measured by the developed method and compared with the results of γ-emitters induced by thermal neutrons. Since it was confirmed that 36Cl was produced by thermal neutron capture of 35Cl, the thermal neutron fluence irradiated during accelerator operation could be obtained using 36Cl/35Cl. In order to estimate the neutron fluences, the 36Cl/35Cl measurement by AMS is more useful than radioactivity measurements of other isotopes such as γ-emitters because AMS directly provides the isotope ratio and the half-life of 36Cl is very long. (orig.)

  18. 36Cl-Messungen zur Erklärung der Neutronen-Diskrepanz von Hiroshima

    Huber, Thomas Christian

    2007-01-01

    Messungen von Radionukliden, die in Hiroshima durch thermische Neutronen produziert wurden, zeigten Unterschiede zu den im Dosimetriesystem DS86 gerechneten Werten. Dies wurde in der Literatur oft als sogenannte Hiroshima Diskrepanz bezeichnet. Im Rahmen dieser Arbeit wurde 36Cl, das durch thermische Neutronen produziert wurde, in Granit-Proben aus Hiroshima gemessen. Durch Korrektur der in dieser Arbeit erhaltenen Messwerte von Proben aus Hiroshima mit gerechneten natürlichen 36Cl-Konzentrat...

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry of 36Cl produced by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb.

    Kato, K; Habara, M; Yoshizawa, Y; Biebel, U; Haberstock, G; Heinzl, J; Korschinek, G; Morinaga, H; Nolte, E

    1990-10-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry was performed at the Munich tandem laboratory to determine 36Cl/Cl ratios of samples from a tombstone exposed to neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. The ratios were determined from the surface to deeper positions. The depth profile of 36Cl/Cl can be used for estimating the neutron energy distribution and intensity near the hypocentre in Hiroshima. PMID:1976726

  20. Determination of 36Cl/Cl ratio in ground water using the accelerator mass spectrometry technique

    The Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) programme using the 14 MV Pelletron Accelerator at Mumbai has been initiated with major emphasis on the determination of 36Cl in water samples, of interest to hydrology and environment. In order to carry out the AMS measurement, a beam chopper to cut down beam intensity by a factor of 20 has been developed and commissioned. A multi-anode gas -si detector has been built to separate 36Cl from the interfering 36S. A new TPS system has been procured to operate the machine in the GVM mode. Standard and blank samples from Prime lab, Purdue have been employed in these measurements to standardise the technique for 36Cl/Cl ratio determination. The detector was calibrated using the stable 35,37Cl ions. The background 36Cl in the system has been measured using the blank sample from Purdue and it was estimated that the ratio of 36Cl/Cl was of the order of 10-13 in the present setup. Ground water samples collected from South India were converted to AgCl and put in the SNICS ion source for the AMS measurements. These ground water samples, with 14C content estimated to be in the range of 1 to 4 pMC indicate that the samples may be more than 35,000 years old. Using the AMS technique we have determined the 36Cl/Cl ratio values for these ground water samples. They are found to range between 2 to 5 x 10-12. Additional measurements are planned to determine the age of the water samples and to understand the reasons for the observed high values of 36Cl in these samples. (author)

  1. Hith resolution {beta}-spectroscopy of the isotope {sup 36}Cl using magnetic calorimeters; Entwicklung magnetischer Mikrokalorimeter fuer die hochaufloesende Spektroskopie des {beta}-Emitters {sup 36}Cl

    Rotzinger, H.

    2006-12-13

    This thesis describes the development of a high resolution magnetic calorimeter for the detection of the {beta}-spectrum of the isotope {sup 36}Cl with endpoint energy of 709.6 keV. The temperature rise of a metallic paramagnetic sensor due to an energy deposition is sensed by measuring its magnetization using a sensitive DC-SQUID magnetometer. For a high detection efficiency an 4{pi} gold absorber was used. The heat capacity and the geometry of the absorber is optimally matched by a flat sensor and an optimized meander shaped readout coil. The fabrication of the superconducting structures and the detector setup are described. In addition, the relevant noise sources, the energy resolution and the quantum efficiency are discussed. A measured {sup 36}Cl-spectrum with an energy resolution of {delta}E{sub FWHM}=750 eV is presented and compared with existing experimental and theoretical data. (orig.)

  2. Ethanol enhances GABA-induced 36Cl-influx in primary spinal cord cultured neurons

    Ethanol has a pharmacological profile similar to other centrally acting drugs, which facilitate GABAergic transmission. GABA is known to produce its effects by increasing the conductance to Cl- ions. In this study, we have examined the effect of ethanol on GABA-induced 36Cl-influx in primary spinal cord cultured neurons. GABA produces a concentration-dependent, and saturable effect on 36Cl-influx in these neurons. Ethanol potentiates the effect of GABA on 36Cl-influx in these neurons. GABA (20 microM) increased the 36Cl-influx by 75% over the basal value, and in the presence of 50 mM ethanol, the observed increase was 142%. Eadie-Hoffstee analysis of the saturation curves indicated that ethanol decreases the Km value of GABA (10.6 microM to 4.2 microM), and also increases the Vmax. Besides potentiating the effect of GABA, ethanol also appears to have a direct effect in the absence of added GABA. These results suggest that ethanol enhances GABA-induced 36Cl-influx and indicate a role of GABAergic system in the actions of ethanol. These results also support the behavioral and electrophysiological studies, which have implicated GABA systems in the actions of ethanol. The potential mechanism(s) and the role of direct effect of ethanol is not clear at this time, but is currently being investigated

  3. Measurement of the natural 36Cl and 236U uranium mineral with accelerator mass spectrometry

    The concentration of the natural ultra-trace radionuclides 36Cl and 236U in the uranium depended on the neutron flux. In this article, a method for measuring 36Cl and 236U in the same uranium mineral with accelerator mass spectrometry was developed in China Institute of Atomic Energy, providing a protocol of the potential application of 236U in uranium mining, environmental, and geological research. The two samples were from Guangxi and Shanxi province, China, and their ratios 36Cl/Cl and 236U/238U were measured. More experimental data conduced to understand the natural nuclides in the uranium mineral. We plan to conduct more efforts on the research. (authors)

  4. Attempt to determine the environmental 36Cl concentration in water by liquid scintillation counting

    Florkowski, T.; Schuszler, Ch.

    1986-11-01

    A low-background liquid scintillation spectrometer (ALOKA SL-1) located in the IAEA Isotope Hydrology Laboratory in Vienna was used for 36Cl activity measurement in water samples. The procedure of sample preparation consists of synthesizing of silicon tetrachloride or sodium chloride followed by purification. In both cases the limiting factor in the analysis appeared to be the pure reproducibility of the sample preparation procedure. The conclusion from these experiments is that the liquid scintillation method could be feasible only for the identification of the "bomb chlorine" but is far from being suitable for the accurate determination of 36Cl in groundwater for dating purposes.

  5. Determination of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl in meteorites

    Merchel, S.; Herpers [Koeln Univ. (Germany); Neumann, S.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany); Kubik, P.W.; Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides were determined in stony ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al) and iron ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl) meteorites using AMS after radiochemical separation. A selection of these data is briefly discussed with respect to exposure histories of the meteorites and is compared to model calculations. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  6. Distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-chlorine dioxide gas during the fumigation of tomatoes and cantaloupe

    The distribution and chemical fate of 36Cl-ClO2 gas subsequent to fumigation of tomatoes or cantaloupe was investigated as was major factors that affect the formation of chloroxyanion byproducts. Approximately 22% of the generated 36Cl-ClO2 was present on fumigated tomatoes after a 2-hour exposure t...

  7. Investigation of the reaction 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl

    The γ-radiation following capture of non-polarized thermal neutrons in 35Cl has been investigated. Of the 420 γ-rays ascribed to the 35Cl(n,γ)36Cl reaction, 236 have been placed in a 36Cl decay scheme. The branching ratios and the excitation energies (with 0.04-0.9 KeV errors) of 72 bound states have been determined. Spin assignments and spin restrictions or confirmations have been made for a total of 20 levels. The multipole mixing ratios for some primary γ-ray transitions have been determined. There exists a significant correlation between (d,p) stripping strengths and (n,γ) reduced primary transition probabilities for transitions to lsub(n)(d,p) = 0 levels

  8. Depth dependence of soil carbonate accumulation based on cosmogenic 36Cl dating

    Liu, Beiling; Phillips, Fred M.; Elmore, David; Sharma, Pankaj

    1994-12-01

    Indurated pedogenic carbonate layers (calcretes) are common in soils on stable surfaces in arid to semiarid climates. The morphology and composition of calcretes provide important information on the geomorphic and climatic histories of the regions where they are formed, but they have proved difficult to date with conventional radiometric methods. We report cosmogenic 36Cl-buildup ages from three fractions (leachable Cl, carbonate, silicate) of a calcrete from the surface of an alluvial slope below the Ajo Mountains in southern Arizona. All three fractions give reasonably concordant ages, ranging from 700 ka at the base of the calcrete horizon to 200 ka at its top. These ages are in good agreement both with estimates of age based on correlation with similar, independently dated, soils in the region and with 36Cl-buildup ages on surficial boulders. These results support the ideas that calcretes accumulate upward with time and that water movement through the carbonate matrix is very limited after induration.

  9. Determination of 36Cl in JCO samples by AMS at Tsukuba

    Chlorine-36 in environmental samples collected at JCO criticality accident site has been measured by accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS). The atomic ratio of 36Cl/Cl in the soil sample (10 m of the reactor vessel) was 11 x 10-12, which corresponds to a thermal neutron flux of 2.5 x 1011 cm-2. This ratio is higher than calculated ratio, 4.2 x 10-12 by Imanaka (Kyoto Univ.). Furthermore we collected more soil samples in Tokai within 10 km from JCO site and Tsukuba, 60 km far from Tokai. The 36Cl/Cl ratios in some soil samples showed higher than in JCO site. The origin of the higher ratios has not been clarified. (author)

  10. Cosmogenic in situ production of radionuclides: Exposure ages and erosion rates

    Experimental data for the cosmogenic in situ production of radionuclides and its depth dependence are used for two applications, the determination of exposure ages and of erosion rates. Concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides 10Be, 14C and 26Al in quartz are presented as function of exposure age, depth before exposure and erosion rate after exposure. It is shown that the cosmogenic production before exposure can introduce important corrections to the representation without consideration of pre-exposure production. Depth profiles of 10Be, 14C and 26Al in quartz and sulfur, of 36Cl in K2O, CaCO3, granite and concrete and of 53Mn in Fe2O3 are given as function of erosion rate. Consequences to determinations of neutron fluences in Hiroshima are discussed

  11. Accelerator mass spectrometry with fully stripped 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 59Ni ions

    The detection system of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with completely stripped ions of 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 59Ni at the Munich accelerator laboratory and measurements with these ions are presented. Detection limits are given. The presented applications are: dating of groundwater of the Milk River aquifer and deduction of the neutron fluence and spectrum of the Hiroshima A-bomb. (orig.)

  12. Radiochemical determination of {sup 129}I and {sup 36}Cl in MEGAPIE, a proton irradiated lead-bismuth eutectic spallation target

    Hammer-Rotzler, Bernadette; Tuerler, Andreas [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Neuhausen, Joerg; Boutellier, Viktor; Wohlmuther, Michael; Schumann, Dorothea [Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Vockenhuber, Christof [ETH Zurich (Switzerland). Lab. of Ion Beam Physics

    2015-07-01

    The concentrations of the long-lived nuclear reaction products {sup 129}I and {sup 36}Cl have been measured in samples from the MEGAPIE liquid metal spallation target. Samples from the bulk target material (lead-bismuth eutectic, LBE), from the interface of the metal free surface with the cover gas, from LBE/steel interfaces and from noble metal absorber foils installed in the cover gas system were analysed using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Laboratory of Ion beam Physics at ETH Zuerich. The major part of {sup 129}I and {sup 36}Cl was found accumulated on the interfaces, particularly at the interface of LBE and the steel walls of the target container, while bulk LBE samples contain only a minor fraction of these nuclides. Both nuclides were also detected on the absorber foils to a certain extent (<< 1% of the total amount). The latter number is negligible concerning the radio-hazard of the irradiated target material; however it indicates a certain affinity of the absorber foils for halogens, thus proving the principle of using noble metal foils for catching these volatile radionuclides. The total amounts of {sup 129}I and {sup 36}Cl in the target were estimated from the analytical data by averaging within the different groups of samples and summing up these averages over the total target. This estimation could account for about half of the amount of {sup 129}I and {sup 36}Cl predicted to be produced using nuclear physics modelling codes for both nuclides. The significance of the results and the associated uncertainties are discussed.

  13. Methyl salicylate as a medium for radioassay of 36Cl using a liquid scintillation spectrometer

    Methyl salicylate (MS), a high refractive index liquid with wave-shifting properties, has been used as a Cherenkov radiation generating medium for the radioassay of 36Cl by liquid scintillation (LS) spectrometer. Comparative experiments, using both a standard toluene-based LS fluor and toluene alone, for the measurement of 36Cl were undertaken. The methyl salicylate medium was found to perform at an intermediate counting efficiency, near that for the LS fluor. In the presence of moderate amounts of nitromethane, the MS was less susceptible to chemical quenching effects than either the fluor or toluene. Counting efficiencies for 36Cl in MS, toluene and toluene fluor respectively were 82.4, 28.4 and 100.3 percent with a Picker Liquimat 220 LS spectrometer, and 91.6, 54.9 and 100.0 percent with a Searle Mark III LS spectrometer. The addition of nitromethane (11.3 percent of final volume) reduced these efficiencies to 50.5, 10.0 and 15.4 percent, and to 58.8, 12.4 and 19.0 percent, respectively. The data are discussed in relation to observed changes in the pulse height spectra. Chemical quench correction by ESCR and by SCR methods is reported

  14. An Alluvial Surface Chronology Based on Cosmogenic 36Cl Dating, Ajo Mountains (Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument), Southern Arizona

    Liu, Beiling; Phillips, Fred M.; Pohl, Molly M.; Sharma, Pankaj

    1996-01-01

    A chronology of alluvial surfaces on piedmont slopes below the western Ajo Mountains, southern Arizona, has been obtained using cosmogenic 36Cl accumulation and AMS radiocarbon dating. The apparent 36Cl ages of individual boulders range from 520,000 to 13,000 yr, and the 14C ages of organic material in the two young terraces are 2750-2350 and 17,800 cal yr B.P. The sequence of 36Cl ages is consistent with the apparent stratigraphic order, but groupings of similar ages for different surfaces appear to result from repeated reworking of older surfaces associated with the deposition of younger ones. The youngest surface gave a distribution of 36Cl ages about 30,000 yr older than the 14C and soil ages; however, this distribution had 36Cl ages that overlapped with 36Cl ages from active channels and hillslopes. We attribute the older-than-expected exposure ages of sampled boulders to inheritance of 36Cl while residing near the surface during very slow erosion on the mountain front. Our results show that although cosmogenic nuclide accumulation can help establish chronologies for surfaces in piedmont settings, care must be used in evaluating the effects of complex exposure histories.

  15. Surface exposure history using in-situ cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl - applications to the Australian environment

    Fink, D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Physics Division

    1999-11-01

    Production of the long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides, {sup 10}Be (T{sub 1/2}=1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma), is dominated by the interaction of cosmic-rays with the upper atmosphere. They are also produced in exposed surface rocks and within the first meter or so of the Earth`s crust. This is called in-situ production and although only a million atoms or so of {sup 10}Be are produced within a ten thousand year exposure period per gram of surface rock, the technique of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can be applied to measure this tell-tale signal. The build-up over time of these radionuclides can be utilised as radiometric clocks to elucidate the exposure history of geomorphic formations and surfaces that have experienced some event or process that delivers previously unexposed material to cosmic-ray irradiation. Hence the reconstruction of glacial chronologies (ie time a bedrock surface was uncovered by ice retreat, or deposition age of glacial moraines), development of raised river terraces and paleo-beach ridges, age of meteorite impact craters and volcanic eruptions have been addressed with the in-situ method. Moreover, geomorphological processes of landscape evolution such as surface erosion rates, continental weathering, sediment transport and deposition, uplift rates can also be studied. The in-situ method is described along with examples of cosmogenic dating projects at ANSTO. It is estimated that it works best over the time period from 5 ka to 5 Ma and can identify erosion rates ranging from 0.1 to 10 mm/ka 20 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Modelling water and {sup 36}Cl cycling in a Belgian pine forest - Model for {sup 36}Cl cycling in a Belgian pine forest

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Gielen, Sienke [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    A simplified, 1-D soil-groundwater-vegetation model to represent the cycling of water and of {sup 36}Cl in a Belgian Scots pine forest is presented and discussed. The model contains a soil column with layers of different (but uniform) field capacity and soil porosity, which are penetrated by tree roots. Flow through porous media is assumed to circulate according to Darcy and Philips laws, using empirical soil hydraulic properties without recourse to Richards' equation. The vegetation is represented by means of a compartment model including simplified representation of sap flow, translocation and litterfall in relation to different parts of the tree. The water table height is variable according to the balance between precipitation, capillary rise, solar radiation, plant uptake and evapotranspiration. The influence of local fluvial sources of water can also be evaluated in a simplified way as a losing/gaining stream input to the soil column. Time dependent data on temperature, solar irradiation, rainfall, crop coefficient and leaf area index (LAI) are used as input to the model in order to calculate evapotranspiration and a simplified approach to foliar interception. The chlorine flux follows the water flux in both soil and the trees, using retardation in soil and experimentally measured translocation factors within the plant. The chlorine flux is optimised and validated with recourse to a previous {sup 36}Cl compartment model. Although considered to be a relatively simple model, initial results suggest a reasonable consistency between previously published water balance and field measurements in a Scots pine stand from the vicinity of Mol, Belgium. The mean soil water content is predicted to be around 25%, the plant water is stored in the order roots > plant above roots > leaf surfaces, water table height below ground fluctuates between 2.1 and 2.6 m compared with a measured water table height of 1.8 - 20 m and pine transpiration is less than 1.2 mm/d compared

  17. Modelling water and 36Cl cycling in a Belgian pine forest - Model for 36Cl cycling in a Belgian pine forest

    A simplified, 1-D soil-groundwater-vegetation model to represent the cycling of water and of 36Cl in a Belgian Scots pine forest is presented and discussed. The model contains a soil column with layers of different (but uniform) field capacity and soil porosity, which are penetrated by tree roots. Flow through porous media is assumed to circulate according to Darcy and Philips laws, using empirical soil hydraulic properties without recourse to Richards' equation. The vegetation is represented by means of a compartment model including simplified representation of sap flow, translocation and litterfall in relation to different parts of the tree. The water table height is variable according to the balance between precipitation, capillary rise, solar radiation, plant uptake and evapotranspiration. The influence of local fluvial sources of water can also be evaluated in a simplified way as a losing/gaining stream input to the soil column. Time dependent data on temperature, solar irradiation, rainfall, crop coefficient and leaf area index (LAI) are used as input to the model in order to calculate evapotranspiration and a simplified approach to foliar interception. The chlorine flux follows the water flux in both soil and the trees, using retardation in soil and experimentally measured translocation factors within the plant. The chlorine flux is optimised and validated with recourse to a previous 36Cl compartment model. Although considered to be a relatively simple model, initial results suggest a reasonable consistency between previously published water balance and field measurements in a Scots pine stand from the vicinity of Mol, Belgium. The mean soil water content is predicted to be around 25%, the plant water is stored in the order roots > plant above roots > leaf surfaces, water table height below ground fluctuates between 2.1 and 2.6 m compared with a measured water table height of 1.8 - 20 m and pine transpiration is less than 1.2 mm/d compared with a measured

  18. Preparation and characterization of sup 35 Cl and sup 36 Cl samples for (n,p) cross section measurements

    Eykens, R.; Goetz, A.; Lamberty, A.; Gestel, J. van; Pauwels, J. (Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium)); Wagemans, C.; Druyts, S. (Nuclear Physics Lab., State Univ., Ghent (Belgium)); Hondt, P. d' (SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium))

    1991-05-15

    The {sup 35}Cl(n,p) and the {sup 36}Cl(n,p) reactions are of great importance for astrophysics. Several silver chloride samples were evaporated on platinum coated aluminium backings. The sample definition has been achieved by combining destructive and non-destructive methods. The isotopic composition of the {sup 36}Cl-enriched material was verified. Pulse height spectra of {sup 35}Cl(n{sub th},p) and {sup 36}Cl(n{sub th},p) are shown. The samples prepared and assayed in this way have proven to fulfil the experimental requirements and have been used to determine the reaction cross sections of {sup 35}Cl(n{sub th},p) and {sup 36}Cl(n{sub th},p). (orig.).

  19. AMS Measurement of 36Cl With a Gas-filled Time of Flight Detector

    GUANYong-jing; HEMing; RUANXiang-dong; WANGHui-juan; LIGuo-qiang; WUShao-yong; WUWei-ming; JIANGShan

    2003-01-01

    In order to determine 36Cl and 36S with high sensitivity by AMS, the present study has been done.Difference of time flight in the gas dependences to total energy, gas pressure in the chamber, and the flight length for isobars. The time resolution (FWHM) of the detector system is 800 ps without gas-filled when the ion energy is 72 MeV. Time straggling is growth with the increase of gas pressure in the chamber.Time straggling caused by the gas pressure is shown in Fig.1.

  20. Chloride isolation for accelerator mass spectrometry of 36Cl produced by atomic bomb neutrons

    Accelerator mass spectrometry was performed at the Munich tandem laboratory to determine the ratio of 36Cl/Cl in silicate rock samples exposed to neutrons of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chloride was chemically separated from silicate rock for this purpose. Five grams of silicate rock was fused with 30 g of sodium hydroxide and dissolved in 900 ml of water. The chloride in the resulting solution was spectrophotometrically determined. Chloride was precipitated as silver chloride by addition of appropriate amounts of silver nitrate, and silver chloride was then collected on a membrane filter. The chloride in the rock samples was thus isolated quantitatively. (author)

  1. Intercomparison study on (152)Eu gamma ray and (36)Cl AMS measurements for development of the new Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02).

    Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Tanaka, K; Ishikawa, M; Straume, T; Komura, K; Rühm, W; Nolte, E; Huber, T; Nagashima, Y; Seki, R; Sasa, K; Sueki, K; Fukushima, H; Egbert, S D; Imanaka, T

    2008-07-01

    In the process of developing a new dosimetry system for atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (DS02), an intercomparison study between (152)Eu and (36)Cl measurements was proposed, to reconcile the discrepancy previously observed in the Hiroshima data between measurements and calculations of thermal neutron activation products. Nine granite samples, exposed to the atomic-bomb radiation in Hiroshima within 1,200 m of the hypocenter, as well as mixed standard solutions containing known amounts of europium and chlorine that were neutron-activated by a (252)Cf source, were used for the intercomparison. Gamma-ray spectrometry for (152)Eu was carried out with ultra low-background Ge detectors at the Ogoya Underground Laboratory, Kanazawa University, while three laboratories participated in the (36)Cl measurement using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS): The Technical University of Munich, Germany, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA and the University of Tsukuba, Japan. Measured values for the mixed standard solutions showed good agreement among the participant laboratories. They also agreed well with activation calculations, using the neutron fluences monitored during the (252)Cf irradiation, and the corresponding activation cross-sections taken from the JENDL-3.3 library. The measured-to-calculated ratios obtained were 1.02 for (152)Eu and 0.91-1.02 for (36)Cl, respectively. Similarly, the results of the granite intercomparison indicated good agreement with the DS02 calculation for these samples. An average measured-to-calculated ratio of 0.98 was obtained for all granite intercomparison measurements. The so-called neutron discrepancy that was previously observed and that which included increasing measured-to-calculated ratios for thermal neutron activation products for increasing distances beyond 1,000 m from the hypocenter was not seen in the results of the intercomparison study. The previously claimed discrepancy could be explained by

  2. Ion irradiation of 37Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of 36Cl in irradiated graphite

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as 14C, 3H or 36Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide’s location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of 37Cl, to simulate the presence of 36Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the 36Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted 37Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite

  3. Ion irradiation of 37Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of 36Cl in irradiated graphite

    Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y.; Blondel, A.; Galy, N.; Sainsot, P.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Deldicque, D.

    2015-09-01

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as 14C, 3H or 36Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide's location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of 37Cl, to simulate the presence of 36Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the 36Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted 37Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite.

  4. 36Cl measurements in Hiroshima granite samples as part of an international intercomparison study. Results from the Munich group.

    Huber, T; Rühm, W; Hoshi, M; Egbert, S D; Nolte, E

    2003-04-01

    Within the effort to resolve the so-called Hiroshima neutron discrepancy, an international intercomparison study has been carried out on granite samples from Hiroshima, with participating institutions from Japan, the US, and Germany. (36)Cl and (152)Eu produced in these samples by thermal neutrons from the A-bomb explosion were assessed independently by means of different techniques. At the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory near Munich, Germany, (36)Cl concentrations were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry. Measured (36)Cl/Cl ratios ranged from 1,670 x 10(-13) (at a distance of 146 m from the hypocenter) to 2.2 x 10(-13) (at a distance of 1,163 m from the hypocenter). One granite sample not exposed to A-bomb neutrons was measured as a control, and a (36)Cl/Cl ratio of 2.6 x 10(-13) was obtained. On average, our experimental results are 20-30% lower than those provided by model calculations based on the dosimetry system DS86. The results presented here do not support previous assessments of (36)Cl, (60)Co, and (152)Eu which had suggested much larger thermal neutron fluences than those calculated on the basis of DS86 for distances from the hypocenter of more than 1,000 m. PMID:12684827

  5. Transfer of 45Ca and 36Cl at the blood-nerve barrier of the sciatic nerve in rats fed low or high calcium diets

    Unidirectional fluxes of 45Ca, 36Cl, and of [3H]mannitol from blood into the sciatic nerve and cerebral cortex were determined from 5- and 15-min uptakes of these tracers after an intravenous (i.v.) bolus injection in awake rats. Rats were fed diets for 8 wk, that had either a low (0.01% wt/wt), normal (0.67%), or high (3%) Ca content. Plasma [Ca] was 32% less and 11% more in rats fed low (LOCA) and high Ca diets (HICA), respectively, than in rats fed a normal Ca diet (CONT). The mean permeability-surface area product (PA) of 45Ca at the blood-nerve barrier was about eightfold higher than at the blood-brain barrier in the same animals and did not differ significantly between groups (greater than 0.05). Mean PA ratios of 45Ca/36Cl for the blood-nerve and blood-brain barriers in CONT rats, 0.52 ± 0.04 and 0.40 ± 0.02, respectively, were not significantly different from corresponding ratios in LOCA and HICA groups, and corresponded to the aqueous limiting diffusion ratio (0.45). The authors results show no evidence for concentration-dependent transport of Ca over a plasma [Ca] range of 0.8-1.4 mmol/liter at the blood-nerve barrier of the rat peripheral nerve, and suggest that Ca and Cl exchange slowly between nerve and blood via paracellular pathways

  6. Distribution of 36Cl in the Yoro River Basin, Central Japan, and Its Relation to the Residence Time of the Regional Groundwater Flow System

    Akihiko Kondoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the potential of 36Cl in tracing young groundwater with residence times of up to ~50 years. Groundwater samples were obtained from 16 irrigation wells in paddy fields located within an upland–lowland system in the Yoro River basin, Central Japan. The 36Cl/Cl ratios were in the range of 17 to 362 × 10−15. Among the samples with higher Cl− concentrations (>10 mg/L, two samples showed high nitrate concentrations as well (>30 mg/L. Except for these samples, the distribution of 36Cl in groundwater was essentially consistent with previous tritium concentration data measured in 1982 and 1994, considering the time that has elapsed since these earlier measurements were performed. 36Cl/Cl values were less than 30 × 10−15 in lowland areas, with higher values in and around upland areas. The results indicate longer residence times in the regional groundwater flow system (>50 years than those estimated in previous studies, especially in the area west of the Yoro River. The results demonstrate the ability of 36Cl to trace young groundwater flow, particularly because high values of bomb-derived 36Cl/Cl are easily discriminated from pre-bomb water with low 36Cl/Cl values. Because of its very long half-life (3.01 × 105 years, 36Cl remains even after tritium is no longer available.

  7. Deriving earthquake history of the Knidos Fault Zone, SW Turkey, using cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of the fault scarp.

    Yildirim, Cengiz; Ersen Aksoy, Murat; Akif Sarikaya, Mehmet; Tuysuz, Okan; Genc, S. Can; Ertekin Doksanalti, Mustafa; Sahin, Sefa; Benedetti, Lucilla; Tesson, Jim; Aster Team

    2016-04-01

    Formation of bedrock fault scarps in extensional provinces is a result of large and successive earthquakes that ruptured the surface several times. Extraction of seismic history of such faults is critical to understand the recurrence intervals and the magnitude of paleo-earthquakes and to better constrain the regional seismic hazard. Knidos on the Datca Peninsula (SW Turkey) is one of the largest cities of the antique times and sits on a terraced hill slope formed by en-echelon W-SW oriented normal faults. The Datça Peninsula constitutes the southern boundary of the Gulf of Gökova, one of the largest grabens developed on the southernmost part of the Western Anatolian Extensional Province. Our investigation relies on cosmogenic 36Cl surface exposure dating of limestone faults scarps. This method is a powerful tool to reconstruct the seismic history of normal faults (e.g. Schlagenhauf et al 2010, Benedetti et al. 2013). We focus on one of the most prominent fault scarp (hereinafter Mezarlık Fault) of the Knidos fault zone cutting through the antique Knidos city. We collected 128 pieces of tablet size (10x20cm) 3-cm thick samples along the fault dip and opened 4 conventional paleoseismic trenches at the base of the fault scarp. Our 36Cl concentration profile indicates that 3 to 4 seismic events ruptured the Mezarlık Fault since Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results from the paleoseismic trenching are also compatible with 36Cl results, indicating 3 or 4 seismic events that disturbed the colluvium deposited at the base of the scarp. Here we will present implications for the seismic history and the derived slip-rate of the Mezarlık Fault based on those results. This project is supported by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK, Grant number: 113Y436) and it was conducted with the Decision of the Council of Ministers with No. 2013/5387 on the date 30.09.2013 and was done with the permission of Knidos Presidency of excavation in

  8. In-situ buildup of cosmogenic isotopes at the earth`s surface: measurement of erosion rates and exposure times

    Fifield, L.K.; Allan, G.L.; Stone, J.O.H.; Evans, J.M.; Cresswell, R.G.; Ophel, T.R. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Cosmic rays produce a number of nuclides in rocks that can be used to determine the geomorphic history of surfaces. The most useful are the radioactive isotopes {sup 10}Be (t{sub 1/2} = 1.5Ma), {sup 26}Al (0.7Ma) and {sup 36}Cl (0.3Ma). Within the top 2m of the surface, these are produced principally by fast neutrons. At greater depths, production is dominated by the capture of negative muons. Measurements of a single nuclide produced in situ can be used to determine total exposure times or erosion rates. The use of multiple nuclides with different half-lives makes it possible to determine more complex histories, such as exposures interrupted by periods of burial. At the ANU, all three of the isotopes above are being used to study a variety of problems in geomorphology and paleoclimatology, although to date, most of the work has concentrated on {sup 36}Cl. The accumulation of cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) provides a means of measuring erosion rates on limestone surfaces. Sensitivity is achieved over a wide range of erosion rates due to the high production rate of {sup 36}Cl in calcite (typically greater than 30 atoms/g/yr) and a detection limit of ca. 5000 atoms/g attainable with the ANU AMS system. The method is simplified by the predominance of Ca reactions (principally spallation) over other sources of {sup 36}Cl in calcite, and the ease of sample preparation. This presentation discuss the results of measurements of {sup 36}Cl in calcite from limestone samples from Australia and Papua New Guinea. Erosion rates derived from these measurements range from 3 microns per year (Australia) to over 200 microns per year in the New Guinea highlands. 3 refs.

  9. Initial results from isotope dilution for Cl and 36Cl measurements at the PSI/ETH Zurich AMS facility

    The first results of our use of isotope dilution for determining total Cl and 36Cl in the same rock sample material are presented here. Tests with a dilution series of hypothetical rock Cl concentrations between 5 and 200 ppm verified that our accelerator set-up is appropriate for the low-energy side 37Cl/35Cl measurements. Results from limestone and dolomite samples from the Flims rockslide (Switzerland) indicate the extraction methods described here yield highly reproducible total Cl and 36Cl concentrations with excellent precision to very low values. Replicate measurements suggest that the rocks we are analyzing from the Flims rockslide are closed to uptake or loss of the isotopes of Cl

  10. Evidence from cosmic-ray exposure dating based on 36Cl for the pre-Minoan caldera on Santorini, Greece

    Athanassas, Constantin; Bourlès, Didier; Braucher, Regis; Druitt, Tim; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Léanni, Laetitia

    2016-04-01

    The physiography of Santorini prior to the Minoan (Late Bronze Age) eruption (17th century BCE) is of great archaeological interest, given the importance of Santorini as a commercial centre and port in the Minoan empire. However, the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera has been a point of controversy: Heiken and McCoy (1984) advocated the existence, in the southern part of the present-day caldera, of a pre-existing caldera formed during the 172 ka Lower Pumice eruption, whereas Druitt and Francaviglia (1992), based on the presence of in situ plinian pumice from the Minoan eruption adhering to the modern cliff, conceived the pre-Minoan (22 ka) caldera as having occupied much of the northern basin of the present-day caldera. With the goal of settling the debate we performed cosmic ray exposure dating employing in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl to date different generations of caldera cliffs at Santorini, and hence to identify those cliffs predating the Minoan eruption. Our methodology involved the determination of the in situ-produced cosmogenic 36Cl in basaltic and andesitic rocks cropping out in the cliffs. The samples returned 36Cl CRE ages consistent with previously published field mapping of cliff populations based on geomorphological and stratigraphic arguments (Druitt and Francaviglia 1992), suggesting that much of the present cliff line of northern Santorini predated the Minoan eruption, or was superficially modified by landslips and rockfalls during that eruption. The 36Cl CRE ages enable us to better define the paleogeography of the pre-Minoan caldera. References [1] Druitt, T. H. and Francaviglia, V.1992. Caldera formation on Santorini and the physiography of the islands in the Late Bronze Age. Bulletin of Volcanology 54, 484-493. [2] Heiken G and McCoy F (1984) Caldera development during the Minoan eruption, Thira, Cyclades, Greece. Journal of Geophysical Research: 89 (B10), 8841-8862.

  11. Methodological study on exposure date of Tiankeng by AMS measurement of in situ produced cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl

    Dong Kejun [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Li Shizhuo [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); CNNC China North Nuclear Fuel Company Ltd., Baotou 014035 (China); He Ming [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Sasa, Kimikazu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Matsushi, Yuki [Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University (Japan); Huang Baojian [Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Guilin 541004 (China); Ruan Xiangdong; Guan Yongjing [College of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Takahashi, Tsutomu [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Sueki, Keisuke [Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Li Chaoli; Wu Shaoyong [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Wang Xianggao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); Institute of Karst Geology, Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences, Guilin 541004 (China); Shen Hongtao [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China); College of Physics and Technology, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin 541004 (China); Nagashima, Yasuo [Tandem Accelerator Complex, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Jiang Shan, E-mail: jiangs@ciae.ac.cn [China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275(50), Beijing 102413 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Tiankeng is a typical Karst relief of the late Quaternary Period. Studies on the exposure ages of Tiankeng are very important in geographical research to elucidate the formation condition, the developing process, and the features of biological species. {sup 36}Cl on the surface layer of the rupture cross-section of Tiankeng is largely produced by cosmogenic high-energy neutron induced reactions {sup 40}Ca(n, {alpha}p) and {sup 39}K(n, {alpha}), and has accumulated since the formation of the Tiankeng. Low-energy neutron reaction {sup 35}Cl(n, {gamma}) contributes a small portion of {sup 36}Cl. In this work, the concentration of the cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in rock samples taken from Dashiwei Tiankeng, Leye County, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, was measured jointly by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) laboratories of CIAE and University of Tsukuba in an effort to estimate the formation time (or exposure age) of the Tiankeng. The results show that the exposure time of Da Shiwei Tiankeng is about 26 {+-} 9.6 ka (without erosion correction). The sampling strategy and procedures, experimental set-up, and preliminary results will be presented in detail.

  12. "Groundwater ages" of the Lake Chad multi-layer aquifers system inferred from 14C and 36Cl data

    Bouchez, Camille; Deschamps, Pierre; Goncalves, Julio; Hamelin, Bruno; Seidel, Jean-Luc; Doumnang, Jean-Claude

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of recharge, paleo-recharge and groundwater residence time of aquifer systems of the Sahel is pivotal for a sustainable management of this vulnerable resource. Due to its stratified aquifer system, the Lake Chad Basin (LCB) offers the opportunity to assess recharge processes over time and to link climate and hydrology in the Sahel. Located in north-central Africa at the fringe between the Sahel and the Sahara, the lake Chad basin (LCB) is an endorheic basin of 2,5.106 km2. With a monsoon climate, the majority of the rainfall occurs in the southern one third of the basin, the Chari/Logone River system transporting about 90% of the runoff generated within the drainage basin. A complex multi-layer aquifer system is located in the central part of the LCB. The Quaternary unconfined aquifer, covering 500 000 km2, is characterized by the occurrence of poorly understood piezometric depressions. Artesian groundwaters are found in the Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine and deltaic sedimentary aquifers (early Pliocene and Continental Terminal). The present-day lake is in hydraulic contact with the Quaternary Aquifer, but during past megalake phases, most of the Quaternary aquifer was submerged and may experience major recharge events. To identify active recharge area and assess groundwater dynamics, one hundred surface and groundwater samples of all layers have been collected over the southern part of the LCB. Major and trace elements have been analyzed. Measurements of 36Cl have been carried out at CEREGE, on the French 5 MV AMS National Facility ASTER and 14C activities have been analyzed for 17 samples on the French AMS ARTEMIS. Additionally, the stable isotopic composition was measured on the artesian aquifer samples. In the Quaternary aquifer, results show a large scatter with waters having very different isotopic and geochemical signature. In its southern part and in the vicinity of the surface waters, groundwaters are predominantly Ca-Mg-HCO3 type waters with very

  13. Tectonic Geomorphology and 36Cl geochronology of the Camardi Alluvial Fan Complex, Central Anatolia: Implications for Neotectonic activity of the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ)

    Higgins, M.; Schoenbohm, L. M.; Gosse, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Situated between an extensional province to the west and younger, compressional forces to the east, the significance of internal deformation within Central Anatolia, and particularly the Central Anatolian Fault Zone, remains poorly understood. The CAFZ, which records approximately 70+/- 10km of Cenozoic sinistral displacement, was initially described as an active, NE trending, 700km long, major intra-plate shear zone. However, the Cenozoic evolution of the CAFZ and its relevance to the modern tectonic setting of Anatolia are the subject of debate, and the kinematics, geometry and activity levels of the CAFZ remain both poorly documented and understood. The aim of this study is to constrain the extrusion related, neotectonic portion of this total displacement using methods unavailable to previous studies of the area: Terrestrial Cosmogenic Nuclide (TCN) geochronology and newly acquired high-resolution satellite imagery. Focusing on a tectonically offset alluvial fan complex, we apply In situ TCN 36Cl exposure dating to produce new geochronologically constrained quaternary slip rates for the southern, Ecemis Segment of the CAFZ. A combination of field observations, high precision GPS based fault scarp profiles and mapping on high-resolution satellite images are used to document offset geomorphic markers including: deflected streams, terrace edges and shutter ridges. These features show sinistral and normal displacement of 60 and 18 m respectively in the older alluvial surface. Determining the ages of this faulted surface, as well as a younger un-deformed alluvial surface using TCN, will yield a minimum quaternary slip-rate. Additionally, morphological characteristics of 25 drainage basins along the Ecemis Fault are determined using Digital Elevation Model (DEM)data. Key geomorphic indices include: hypsometric integral, basin asymmetry and the valley width-to-height ratio (Vf). The results suggest the morphology of these drainage basins is influenced by the recent

  14. Toward determining the uncertainties associated with the seismic histories retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide fault scarp dating: model reappraisal.

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla

    2016-04-01

    How the past seismic activity of faults has varied over the last 20 ky is a crucial information for seismic hazard assessment and for the understanding of fault-interaction processes. Chlorine 36 in situ produced cosmogenic nuclide is increasingly used to retrieve past earthquakes histories on seismically exhumed limestone normal fault-scarps. Schlagenhauf et al. in 2010 developed a modeling code with a forward approach enabling the test of scenarii generated with a priori constraints (number of events, age and slip of events and pre-exposure time). The main shortcomings of this forward approach were the limited number of testable scenarii and the difficulty to derive the associated uncertainties. We present here a reappraisal methodology with an inverse approach using an optimization algorithm. This modelling approach enables 1-exploring the parameter space (age and slip of events), 2-finding the best scenario without a priori constraints and 3-precisely quantifying the associated uncertainties by determining the range of plausible models. Through a series of synthetic tests, we observed that the algorithm revealed a great capacity to constrain event slips and ages in a short computational time (several hours) with an accuracy that can reach 0.1 ky and 0.5 m for the age and slip of exhumation event, respectively. We also explore the influence of the pre-exposure history (amount of 36Cl accumulated when the sampled fault-plane was still buried under the colluvial wedge) and show that it has an important impact on the generated scenarii. This new modeling also allows now to accurately determining this parameter. Finally, the results show that any given [36Cl] profile results in a unique exhumation solution. We then apply this new model to the Magnola fault (Italy) dataset (Schlgenhauf et al. 2011). In agreement the previously published results, our model also results in 3 intense periods of seismic activity. However, the contribution of the pre-exposure history is

  15. Ion irradiation of {sup 37}Cl implanted nuclear graphite: Effect of the energy deposition on the chlorine behavior and consequences for the mobility of {sup 36}Cl in irradiated graphite

    Toulhoat, N., E-mail: nelly.toulhoat@univ-lyon1.fr [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay (France); Moncoffre, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Bérerd, N.; Pipon, Y. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Université de Lyon, Université Lyon, IUT Lyon-1 département chimie (France); Blondel, A. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Andra, Châtenay-Malabry (France); Galy, N. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL) (France); Sainsot, P. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, LaMCoS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5259 (France); Rouzaud, J.-N.; Deldicque, D. [Laboratoire de Géologie de l’Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS), Paris, UMR CNRS-ENS 8538 (France)

    2015-09-15

    Graphite is used in many types of nuclear reactors due to its ability to slow down fast neutrons without capturing them. Whatever the reactor design, the irradiated graphite waste management has to be faced sooner or later regarding the production of long lived or dose determining radioactive species such as {sup 14}C, {sup 3}H or {sup 36}Cl. The first carbon dioxide cooled, graphite moderated nuclear reactors resulted in a huge quantity of irradiated graphite waste for which the management needs a previous assessment of the radioactive inventory and the radionuclide’s location and speciation. As the detection limits of usual spectroscopic methods are generally not adequate to detect the low concentration levels (<1 ppm) of the radionuclides, we used an indirect approach based on the implantation of {sup 37}Cl, to simulate the presence of {sup 36}Cl. Our previous studies show that temperature is one of the main factors to be considered regarding the structural evolution of nuclear graphite and chlorine mobility during reactor operation. However, thermal release of chlorine cannot be solely responsible for the depletion of the {sup 36}Cl inventory. We propose in this paper to study the impact of irradiation and its synergetic effects with temperature on chlorine release. Indeed, the collision of the impinging neutrons with the graphite matrix carbon atoms induces mainly ballistic collisions. However, a small part of the recoil carbon atom energy is also transferred to the lattice through electronic excitation. This paper aims at elucidating the effects of the different irradiation regimes (ballistic and electronic) using ion irradiation, on the mobility of implanted {sup 37}Cl, taking into account the initial disorder level of the nuclear graphite.

  16. The economic production lot size model with several production rates

    Larsen, Christian

    should be chosen in the interval between the demand rate and the production rate, which minimize unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed form solutions for the optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost. Finally we......We study an extension of the economic production lot size model, where more than one production rate can be used during a cycle. The production rates and their corresponding runtimes are decision variables. We decompose the problem into two subproblems. First, we show that all production rates...... derive a near-optimal solution to the general problem....

  17. TISSUE RESIDUES, METABOLISM, AND EXCRETION OF NA[36CL]O3 IN RATS

    A novel pre-harvest technology that reduces certain pathogenic bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of food animals involves feeding an experimental sodium chlorate-containing product (ECP) to animals 24-72 h prior to slaughter. In order to determine the metabolism and disposition of the active ...

  18. Biological transfer and loss of 36Cl-labeled DDT in an old-field ecosystem

    An enclosed 10-acre old-field plot treated in June 1969, with chlorine-36 labeled DDT was sampled each year from 1969 through 1974 to monitor the fate of the insecticide in the soil and biota. In order to provide data on compartmentalization of DDT in the vegetation, invertebrates and vertebrates inhabiting the plot, sampling was carried out to estimate both body burdens of DDT and biomass of populations. Another aspect of this study, the determination of rates of accumulation of residues by invertebrates and vertebrates, has been reported previously (Forsyth and Peterle 1973; Forsyth et al. 1975; Peterle 1975). This report describes (a) temporal patterns of DDT residues in soil and biota from 1969 through 1974 and (b) quantities of DDT held in the soil and biotic compartments of the ecosystem. Part II of the report is concerned with translocation and accumulation of14C-DDT

  19. Behavior of 32P, 35S, 36Cl and 42K in magnesium oxide

    A separation method of 32P from 35S using magnesium oxide as adsorbent of radiophosphorus is described. The behaviour of 32P and 35S, both carrier-free, on magnesium oxide, individually, in dependence of the amount of the adsorbent, of mixing time, of the pH of the loading solution and of potassium chloride concentration, is studied. The separation of the mentioned radioisotopes, using a misture of them, is also analysed. In order to apply this method to the routine production of carrier-free 35S by potassium chloride irradiation, the adsorption behaviour of the chloride and potassium on magnesium oxide using radioactive tracers of these elements, is studied. The separation of 35S from 32P is analyzed by the maximum range of β- particles in aluminum. The absorption curves are presented and compared. (Author)

  20. NESDIS Blended Rain Rate (RR) Products

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The blended Rain Rate (RR) product is derived from multiple sensors/satellites. The blended products were merged from polar-orbiting and geostationary satellite...

  1. Localization of 45Ca and 36Cl in fruit tissue of apples after post harvest dipping

    Apples of 'Cox's Orange Pippin' and 'Golden Delicious' were post-harvest dipped (2% CaCl2 + 0.3% Keltrol) to study the translocation and deposit of Ca and of Cl in the fruit. Macroautoradiographic studies showed that both ions easily penetrated into the fruit increasingly with time of storage, but that they were distributed differently: After 3 months of storage Ca was found in all parts of the fruit, more pronounced so in the vascular tissue and cortex, contrary to Cl, which mainly accumulated in the cortex tissue. In the area of the calyx and stem end penetration was markedly enhanced. After external application of Ca and other multivalent cations the endogenous fruit Ca was partly translocated into the tissue below. Efflux and exchange experiments with fruit tissue in hypertonic solution showed that 5-10% of the Ca deposited in the cortex after post-harvest dipping was removed within 5 h; however, with addition of EDTA to the solution, more than 80% exchanged. Contrarily, the rate of Cl efflux and that of monovalent cations (K,Na) was only half the amount, independent whether the complexing agent was added to the solution or not. Likewise 64-72% of the Ca deposited after natural transport into the fruit, could be exchanged. After supply of 1 mM 45CaCl2 in hypertonic solution substantial amounts of Ca were absorbed by the fruit tissue, but even after an exchange period with EDTA a remarkable portion was retained. The investigations underline the importance of the high cation binding capacity of the fruit tissue in the region of the membrane and cell wall with respect to the function of Ca. Furthermore, it was shown that the Ca companion ion, Cl, has to be included into the considerations. (orig./MG)

  2. A high-density ammonia storage/delivery system based on Mg(NH3)6Cl2 for SCR-DeNOx in vehicles

    Elmøe, Tobias Dokkedal; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Quaade, Ulrich;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new benchmark for the automobile selective catalytic reduction of NO(x): Mg(NH(3))(6)Cl(2). This solid complex releases ammonia upon heating and can be compacted into a dense shape which is both easy to handle and safe. Furthermore, the material has a high volumetric a...

  3. Eu2+ and Dy3+ codoped (Ca,Sr)7(SiO3)6Cl2 highly efficient yellow phosphor

    刘冯新; 房永征; 张娜; 候京山; 张灵彦; 于圣洁; 刘淑培

    2014-01-01

    Eu2+ and Dy3+ codoped (Ca,Sr)7(SiO3)6Cl2 yellow phosphors were successfully synthesized by self-flux method. The struc-ture, morphology and photoluminescence properties were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence spectra. The as-prepared phosphor showed a broad emission spectrum centered at 550 nm for Eu2+ single-doped phosphor, while located at 548-544 nm for the Eu2+, Dy3+ codoped samples under excitation at 380 nm light. The emis-sion intensity was greatly improved when Dy3+ was doped into the (Ca,Sr)7(SiO3)6Cl2:Eu2+ system. The composition-optimized sam-ple with 3 mol.% of Dy3+ and constant 10 mol.% of Eu2+ exhibited a 220% PL enhancement compared to the phosphor with 10 mol.% Eu2+ single-doped. Meanwhile, it was found that the quantum efficiency of phosphor namely (Ca,Sr)7(SiO3)6Cl2:3 mol.% Dy3+, 10 mol.% Eu2+ could get up to 24.6%. The synthesized yellow-emitting (Ca,Sr)7(SiO3)6Cl2:Dy3+,Eu2+ is a promising candidate as high-efficiency yellow phosphor for NUV-excited white LEDs.

  4. 30 CFR 250.1632 - Production rates.

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production rates. 250.1632 Section 250.1632 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1632 Production rates. Each...

  5. Interest Rate Derivatives : An analysis of interest rate hybrid products

    Chimanga, Taurai

    2011-01-01

    The globilisation phenomena is causing an increasing interaction between different markets and sectors. This has led to the evolution of derivative instruments from ”single asset” instruments to complex derivatives that have underlying assets from different markets, sectors and sub-sectors. These are the so-called hybrid products that have multi-assets as underlying instruments. This article focuses on interest rate hybrid products. In this article an analysis of the application of stochastic...

  6. Synthesis of [6-36Cl]chlorouracil, [6-82Br]bromouracil and [6-123I]iodouracil

    Three C-6 radiohalogenated uracil derivatives were prepared by non-isotopic halogen exchange reactions for evaluation as diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals. [6-36Cl]chlorouracil (radiochemical yield 77%, specific activity 5.66 MBq mmol-1) was prepared via calcium [36Cl]chloride exchange on 6-iodouracil, [6-82Br]bromouracil (27%, 68.4 MBq mmol-1) was prepared via ammonium [82Br]bromide exchange on 6-iodouracil and [6-123I]iodouracil (55.4%, 5.41 GBq mmol-1) was prepared via sodium [123I]iodide exchange on 6-chlorouracil. The specific activities and radiochemical yields were dependent upon the halide-ion concentration. (author)

  7. Methods of Radioactivity Measurement for Beta Emitter Radionuclides of 14C, 36Cl and 90Sr in Area Geometric Using 2π Proportional Counter

    The radioactivity measurement of beta emitter of 14C, 36Cl and 90Sr in area geometric have been carried out by 2π proportional counter in Center for Technology of Safety and Metrology Radiation-BATAN. The measurement is needed to get standard methods for standardized of beta emitter in area geometric without destructing of the sample. The Measurement is carried out by 2π proportional counter using gas flow system of P10 in order that ionization process to be passed continuously. To prevent damage. the sources covered with very thin foil layer. Detection efficiencies are determined by variation of beta discriminator. The activities of sources are determined by extrapolation methods to 100 % of efficiencies. The results measurements are fairly good by (5954 ± 62) Bq for 14C ; (5175 ± 49) Bq for 36Cl and (1619 ± 23) Bq for 90Sr. (author)

  8. X-ray Lβ215 emission spectrum of Ru in Ru(NH3)6Cl3

    One of the broader applications of synchrotron radiation has been to EXAFS studies for material structure determination, i.e., for an analysis of x-ray absorption over an extended energy region beyond a core ionization limit. Studies of the near edge structure (XANES) give a different type of information, characteristic of the local symmetry and electronic configuration of the absorbing atom. This type of information is reflected also in the x-ray emission spectra, in particular for transitions involving the valence levels. Examination of the near edge absorption or the emission spectrum does not require an instrument capable of scanning a wide energy range with high counting statistics, as does EXAFS; the needs are rather for good resolution and a reliable calibration of the energy scale. Some of the problems of near edge spectra were particularly evident in our investigation of Ru-Lβ215 emission from Ru(NH3)6Cl3. The Ru-Lβ215 emission was measured with a laboratory Rowland circle x-ray spectrometer with a curved quartz (1010) crystal (radius = 22 inches) in a fixed position appropriate to the energy range, and a position sensitive detector which can be positioned along the Rowland circle. The Ru spectrum was excited mainly by Sn-L/sub α/ primary radiation from a Sn anode in a demountable x-ray tube operating at 13 kV and 120 mA. The resolution of the instrument in this region is 1.5 eV. An accurate calibration of the energy scale was conveniently obtained by measuring a reference x-ray emission line in the same instrumental configuration. In the present case the Pd-L/sub α/ emission line at 2838 eV was used to establish the energy scale. The energy dispersion of the instrument was determined from the Cl-K/sub β/ emission spectrum of CH3Cl between 2810 eV and 2830 eV and Pd-Lα12 and extrapolated to the energy region of the recorded emission spectrum. 6 references, 1 figure

  9. The rock avalanche of the Mt. Peron (Eastern Alps, Italy): new insights from 36Cl exposure dating

    Martin, Silvana; Ivy-ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasili; Vockenhuber, %Christof; Surian, Nicola; Campedel, Paolo; Rigo, Manuel; Viganò, Alfio; De Zorzi, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    In the Late Pleistocene, in the southern side of the Eastern Alps (Veneto region, Italy), when the glacier tongues retreated from the end moraine system areas towards the Dolomitic region, large rock avalanches took place. In the Belluno Valley, occupied by the Piave river, the left side is represented by the Belluno Prealps range, corresponding to the northern flank of a km-scale WSW-ENE oriented alpine syncline formed by rocks from Late Triassic to Late Tertiary in age. The Mt. Peron, belonging to this mountain range, shows its southern lower slope covered by debris cones with scattered boulders and its higher slope, corresponding to the scarp, made of vertical rock strata. At the foot of Mt. Peron, at a distance varying from 500 to 4500 m, there is a 4.5 km2 fan like area delimited by a perimeter of about 15 km. This is a hilly area of poortly sorted, chaotic deposits composed of heterogeneous debris, sandy and silty gravels, angular blocks and very large boulders of carbonatic rocks up to 20 m in diameter. The average thickness of the deposit was estimated to be 80 m, with maximum of 120 m. According to previous works, the main event occurred during the first phases of deglaciation, between 17,000 and 15,000 years BP. Popular stories narrate about two legendary villages destroyed by a mass of stones rolling down in the valley. This is confirmed by archeological findings in the Piave valley which indicate the presence of almost one pre-historic settlement dating 40000-20000 years a B.P., (i.e. before the Last Glacial Maximum).. Recent 36Cl exposure dating have yielded historical ages for both the boulders at the foot of the Mt Peron and those located a few km far from the main scarp. According to these exposure ages we can not exclude the hypothesis that earthquakes related to the Venetian faults could have played a key role for triggering of the rock avalanche and that the main gravitational event took place in historical times rather than during the

  10. The Production Rate of Natural Tritium

    Craig, Harmon; Lal, Devendra

    2011-01-01

    A detailed evaluation is made of the production rate of natural tritium in the pre-thermonuclear epoch. Deuterium and tritium analyses on the same precipitation samples are used to establish the uncontaminated tritium levels in precipitation sampled before the Castle tests, and the tritium balance is calculated for the North American troposphere. The global mean production rate Q?, calculated from the geochemical inventory, is found to be 0.5 ± 0.3 atoms T/cm2 sec. This value is three ...

  11. Production rate analysis of cold heavy oil production wells

    Liu, X. [China National Offshore Oil Corp., Beijing (China); Zhao, G.; Jin, Y.C. [Regina Univ., SK (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This study investigated the performance and production rates of cold heavy oil production (CHOP) wells. CHOP is a non-thermal process where sand is produced to stimulate heavy oil primary production. Studies have demonstrated that wormholes are generated during sand production processes, and provide main conduits for fluid flow in reservoirs. Wormholes and foamy oil flow are responsible for the enhancement of oil production rates in CHOP wells. In this study, a comprehensive model was designed to simulate the production rate behaviour of CHOP wells in order to account for the pressure-dependent apparent viscosity of foamy oil and dynamic wormhole growth. Pressure-dependent viscosity was modelled as a pseudo-pressure form, and dynamic wormhole growth was incorporated in terms of modified source functions. A simple relationship for bubble flow was used due to the unclear mechanisms of foamy oil flow. The model was then compared with field test results from typical CHOP wells. Results of the study showed that wormhole growth velocity and dynamic wormhole growth has a significant impact on production rate profiles. The study will be used to determine infill locations and CHOP well spacings in pool developments. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Towards a model for protein production rates

    Dong, J J; Zia, R K P

    2007-01-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two ``bottlenecks'' (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel ``edge'' effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  13. Towards a Model for Protein Production Rates

    Dong, J. J.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2007-07-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two "bottlenecks" (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel "edge" effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  14. Seismic slip history of the Pizzalto fault (central Apennines, Italy) using in situ-produced 36Cl cosmic ray exposure dating and rare earth element concentrations

    Tesson, J.; Pace, B.; Benedetti, L.; Visini, F.; Delli Rocioli, M.; Arnold, M.; Aumaître, G.; Bourlès, D. L.; Keddadouche, K.

    2016-03-01

    Morphological and geological observations reveal that most Apenninic faults are highly segmented and that the majority of the fault segments are less than 10 km long. Although these faults have undergone numerous paleoseismological investigations, quantitative data remain crucially lacking for a large number of fault segments. Because such data are essential to understanding how these faults have ruptured and interacted in the past and how they might behave in the future, we investigated the Holocene seismic history of the Pizzalto normal fault, a 13 km long fault segment belonging to the Pizzalto-Rotella-Aremogna fault system in the Apennines. We collected 44 samples from the Pizzalto fault plane exhumed during the Holocene and analyzed the 36Cl and rare earth element (REE) contents. Together, the 36Cl and REE concentrations show that at least six events have exhumed 4.4 m of the fault scarp between 3 and 1 ka, with slip per event values ranging from 0.3 to 1.2 m. No major events have been detected over the last 1 kyr. The Rotella-Aremogna-Pizzalto fault system has a clustered earthquake behavior with a mean recurrence time of 1.2 kyr and a low to moderate probability (ranging from 4% to 26%) of earthquake occurrence over the next 50 years.

  15. Diffusion of HTO, 36Cl-, 125I- and 22Na+ in Opalinus Clay: Effect of Confining Pressure, Sample Orientation, Sample Depth and Temperature

    Effective diffusion coefficients (De), rock capacity factors (α) and diffusion-accessible porosities (ε) were measured using the through-diffusion technique. Transport (diffusion) was measured both perpendicular and parallel to the bedding. Special cells that allowed the application of an axial confining pressure were designed. The pressures applied ranged from 1 to 5 MPa for Mont Terri samples and between 4 and 15 MPa for Benken samples, the upper values representing the in-situ confining pressure at both locations. The test solutions used in the experiments were synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water, which has Na and Cl as main components (Mont Terri: I = 0.39 M; Benken: I = 0.20 M). Pressure only had a small effect on the value of the effective diffusion coefficients. In the case of Mont Terri samples, increasing the pressure from 1 to 5 MPa resulted in a decrease of the effective diffusion coefficient of 20% for HTO, 27% for 36Cl-, 29% for 125I- and 17 % for 22Na+. In the case of Benken samples, increasing the pressure from 4 to 15 MPa resulted in a decrease of De of 17% for HTO, 22% for 36Cl-, 32% for 125I- and 17 % for 22Na+. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients for for 36Cl-are smaller than for HTO, which is consistent with an effect arising from anion exclusion. This ion exclusion effect is smaller in samples from Mont Terri than in samples from Benken, which can be explained by the higher ionic strength of the Mont Terri water used in the experiments. The diffusion of 22Na+ is similar to that of HTO in the case of Mont Terri OPA. For Benken OPA, the De value of 22Na+ is a factor of 2 higher than that of HTO. This last observation cannot be explained so far but is comparable to experimental data from ANDRA (1999) on Callovo-Oxfordian claystones from the Meuse/Haute Same site. 125I- is retarded with respect to 36Cl-. This is caused by a weak sorption of 125I- on the Opalinus Clay. The distribution coefficients, calculated from the rock capacity

  16. ATMS Snowfall Rate Product and Its Applications

    Meng, H.; Kongoli, C.; Dong, J.; Wang, N. Y.; Ferraro, R. R.; Zavodsky, B.; Banghua Yan, B.

    2015-12-01

    A snowfall rate (SFR) algorithm has been developed for the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) aboard S-NPP and future JPSS satellites. The product is based on the NOAA/NESDIS operational Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) SFR but with several key advancements. The algorithm has benefited from continuous development to improve accuracy and snowfall detection efficiency. The enhancements also expand the applicable temperature range for the algorithm and allow significantly more snowfall to be detected than the operational SFR. Another major improvement is the drastically reduced product latency by using Direct Broadcast (DB) data. The new developments have also been implemented in the MHS SFR to ensure product consistency across satellites. Currently, there are five satellites that carry either ATMS or MHS: S-NPP, NOAA-18/-19 and Metop-A/-B. The combined satellites deliver up to ten SFR estimates a day at any location over land in mid-latitudes. The product provides much needed winter precipitation estimates for applications such as weather forecasting and hydrology. Both ATMS and MHS SFR serve as input to a global precipitation analysis product, the NOAA/NCEP CMORPH-Snow. SFR is the sole satellite-based snowfall estimates in the blended product. In addition, ATMS and MHS SFR was assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and NESDIS/Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) for its operational values in winter 2015. This is a joint effort among NASA/SPoRT, NOAA/NESDIS, University of Maryland/CICS, and the WFOs. The feedback from the assessment indicated that SFR provides useful information for snowfall forecast. It is especially valuable for areas with poor radar coverage and ground observations. The feedback also identified some limitations of the product such as inadequate detection of shallow snowfall. The algorithm developers will continue to improve product quality as well as developing SFR for new microwave sensors and over ocean in a project

  17. Translocation of 125I, 75Se and 36Cl to edible parts of radish, potato and green bean following wet foliar contamination under field conditions

    Specific translocation factor values (ftr) for 129I, 79Se and 36Cl following foliar transfer are still missing from the IAEA reference databases. The translocation of the short-lived isotopes, 125I, 75Se, and 36Cl, to radish, potato and green bean edible parts was measured under field conditions following acute and chronic wet foliar contamination at various plant growth stages in the absence of leaching caused by rain. The translocation factors obtained for 125I ranged from 0.8 to 2.6% for radish, from 0.1 to 2.3% for potato and from 0.1 to 2.6% for bean. The translocation factors obtained for 75Se ranged from 6.3 to 21% for radish, from 1.6 to 32.6% for potato and from 7.7 to 22.8% for bean (values similar to Cs or even higher). The translocation factors obtained for 36Cl were close to those for 75Se and ranged from 4.3 to 28.8% for radish, from 0.5 to 31.5% for potato and from 4.3 to 16.3% for bean. Iodide showed the lowest apparent mobility because of its preferential fixation in or on the leaves and a significant amount was probably volatilized. Selenite internal transfer was significant and possibly followed the sulfur metabolic pathway. Chloride was very mobile and quickly diffused throughout the plant. The translocation factors varied with the growth stage and depended on the development state of the edible tissue and its associated sink strength for nutrients and assimilates. For radish, translocation was high during the early vegetative stages. For potato, wheat and bean, a major peak in translocation was seen during the flowering growth stage and the concomitant growth of potato tubers. An additive effect of successive contamination events on translocated elements was shown in radish but not in bean and potato. The highest translocation value obtained for an acute contamination event was shown to be an adequate, conservative indicator of chronic contamination in absence of specific values. Due to the absence of rain leaching during the experiment this

  18. EFFECT OF SODIUM [36CL]CHLORATE DOSE ON TOTAL RADIOACTIVE RESIDUES AND RESIDUES OF PARENT CHLORATE IN GROWING SWINE

    An experimental chlorate-based product has shown to be efficacious in eliminating economically important, Gram-negative human pathogens in the gastrointestinal tracts of food animals. Prior to the commercial marketing of such a product, the magnitude and chemical nature of residues remaining in edib...

  19. Mathematical Modeling of Product Rating: Sufficiency, Misbehavior and Aggregation Rules

    Xie, Hong; Lui, John C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Many web services like eBay, Tripadvisor, Epinions, etc, provide historical product ratings so that users can evaluate the quality of products. Product ratings are important since they affect how well a product will be adopted by the market. The challenge is that we only have {\\em "partial information"} on these ratings: Each user provides ratings to only a "{\\em small subset of products}". Under this partial information setting, we explore a number of fundamental questions: What is the "{\\em...

  20. Fuzzy production planning models for an unreliable production system with fuzzy production rate and stochastic/fuzzy demand rate

    K. A. Halim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider a single-unit unreliable production system which produces a single item. During a production run, the production process may shift from the in-control state to the out-of-control state at any random time when it produces some defective items. The defective item production rate is assumed to be imprecise and is characterized by a trapezoidal fuzzy number. The production rate is proportional to the demand rate where the proportionality constant is taken to be a fuzzy number. Two production planning models are developed on the basis of fuzzy and stochastic demand patterns. The expected cost per unit time in the fuzzy sense is derived in each model and defuzzified by using the graded mean integration representation method. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the optimal results of the proposed fuzzy models.

  1. ESTIMATING TRUCK RATES FOR REFRIGERATED FOOD PRODUCTS

    Ward, J. B.; Farris, Donald E.

    1990-01-01

    Food companies and analysts often need transportation rate data to explore market opportunities. In some cases, it may not be practical or necessary to obtain actual rates for all routes under consideration. This study provides analysis of truck rate patterns and alternative rate-estimating equations. The original objective was to provide shipping cost estimates for a national beef-marketing model involving 30 regions of the United States. The data set is 254 rates for refrigerated shipments ...

  2. Biological transfer and loss of /sup 36/Cl-labeled DDT in an old-field ecosystem

    Peterle, T.J.

    1979-04-20

    An enclosed 10-acre old-field plot treated in June 1969, with chlorine-36 labeled DDT was sampled each year from 1969 through 1974 to monitor the fate of the insecticide in the soil and biota. In order to provide data on compartmentalization of DDT in the vegetation, invertebrates and vertebrates inhabiting the plot, sampling was carried out to estimate both body burdens of DDT and biomass of populations. Another aspect of this study, the determination of rates of accumulation of residues by invertebrates and vertebrates, has been reported previously (Forsyth and Peterle 1973; Forsyth et al. 1975; Peterle 1975). This report describes (a) temporal patterns of DDT residues in soil and biota from 1969 through 1974 and (b) quantities of DDT held in the soil and biotic compartments of the ecosystem. Part II of the report is concerned with translocation and accumulation of/sup 14/C-DDT.

  3. Productive Government Spending, Welfare and Exchange Rate Dynamics

    Juha Tervala

    2008-01-01

    This study analyses the consequences of productive government spending on the international transmission of fiscal policy. A standard result in the new open economy macroeconomics literature is that a fiscal shock depreciates the exchange rate. I demonstrate that the response of the exchange rate depends on the productivity of government spending. If productivity is sufficiently high, a fiscal shock appreciates the exchange rate. It is also shown that the introduction of productive government...

  4. Considerations for the maximum production rates of triacylglycerol from microalgae

    In recent years, a wide variety of photobioreactors have emerged for producing triacylglycerol (TAG) from microalgae as a feedstock for biodiesel with wildly varying forecasts of TAG and biomass production rates. This research describes the general photobioreactor concept and the dominating factors that determine microalgal production and the maximum attainable production rate of TAG. The information necessary for such an assessment is obtained from published articles and the results are compared to published photobioreactor production rates. Results indicate that at most 9% conversion of available solar energy to TAG is thermodynamically possible, resulting in an annual areal production rate of no more than 23 l m-2 a-1. Given photosynthetic efficiencies and TAG contents of microalgae currently reported, production rates of no more than 15.8 l m-2 a-1 should be anticipated.

  5. The dating of rock surfaces using in situ produced 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl, with examples from Antarctica and the Swiss Alps

    A primary concern today in ice age research is to elucidate the worldwide timing of glacial fluctuations. This information is needed to define the mechanisms by which signals are initiated, and then transferred throughout the various global systems. Because of the importance of integrating the terrestrial records of the former extent of both ice sheets and alpine glaciers, the direct dating of rock surfaces with in situ produced cosmogenic isotopes is an essential tool. These isotopes (e.g. 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl) are produced in the surfaces of rocks due to interactions with cosmic rays. In order to be able to reliably determine exposure ages from rock surfaces with both long and short exposure times, our goal at the onset of this project was to set-up the extraction procedure for Be, Al, Cl from rock samples. 73 separate rock or mineral dissolutions, involving 52 different rock samples, were performed to 1) make sure that meteoric 10Be was being removed, 2) verify the reproducibility of the procedure, and 3) eventually, address several questions on the timing of glacier fluctuations in two specific geographic areas: Antarctica and the Swiss Alps. Exposure dates we have determined from erratic boulders in the Sirius Group sediments at Mount Fleming proved conclusively that this outcrop of the Sirius Group is more than 5.8 million years old. Minimum ages for Sirius Group deposits at Table Mountain and Mount Feather are 2.9 and 2.3 Ma, respectively. Our results have provided support for the idea that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet, a crucial variable in projections of greenhouse scenarios, is a stable feature of Antarctica. We have investigated three key sites in Switzerland related to the timing of glaciations of the Alps. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  6. Reflection of Labour Efficiency (Labour Productivity) within Rates of Return

    CONSTANTIN CĂRUNTU; LOREDANA MIHAELA LĂPĂDUŞI

    2007-01-01

    Within the modern economy, the role of labour acquires primary coordinates, so that the most general and synthetical marker which characterizes the company's efficiency should be measured by labour productivity. The most important role among the multitude of productivity expressions is hold by labour productivity, due to the priority role of labour resource within the range of production factors. The reflection of labour efficiency within rates of return characterizes clearly describes the ex...

  7. ENTROPY PRODUCTION RATE OF THE MINIMAL DIFFUSION PROCESS

    2007-01-01

    The entropy production rate of stationary minimal diffusion processes with smooth coefficients is calculated. As a byproduct, the continuity of paths of the minimal diffusion processes is discussed, and that the point at infinity is absorbing is proved.

  8. Productive Government Spending, Welfare and Exchange Rate Dynamics

    Juha Tervala

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the consequences of productive government spending on the international transmission of fiscal policy. A standard result in the new open economy macroeconomics literature is that a fiscal shock depreciates the exchange rate. I demonstrate that the response of the exchange rate depends on the productivity of government spending. If productivity is sufficiently high, a fiscal shock appreciates the exchange rate. It is also shown that the introduction of productive government spending increases both domestic and foreign welfare, when compared with the case where government spending is wasted. This is because productive government spending has a positive effect on private consumption in both countries in a two country NOEM model.

  9. Kijkwijzer: The Dutch rating system for audiovisual productions

    Valkenburg, P.M.; Beentjes, J.W.J.; Nikken, P.; Tan, E.S.H.

    2002-01-01

    Kijkwijzer is the name of the new Dutch rating system in use since early 2001 to provide information about the possible harmful effects of movies, home videos and television programs on young people. The rating system is meant to provide audiovisual productions with both age-based and content-based

  10. Norwegian resource policy: The production rate for Norwegian petroleum resources

    Petroleum activities have become a large industry in Norway. This has led to extensive changes in Norwegian economy and society. In the public debate on this activity there has been little discussion of what would be the most profitable production rate. However, it is generally agreed that the great wealth implied by the petroleum resources must be managed in ways suitable to both present and coming generations. This report discusses the production rate based on the following questions: (1) How high can the production rate be before the petroleum activities and the expenditure of the income from them influence the remaining Norwegian economy too strongly? (2) How much of this wealth should reasonably be used by present generations and how much should be left for future generations? There is much to gain from a high tempo and from relocating some of the petroleum wealth. The possibilities of influencing the production rate are mainly connected with the allotments of production licences. The consequences of uncertainties in the petroleum activities for the choice of exploitation tempo are unclear. The environment is not much affected by the production rate. The contractor activity has become Norway's largest industry. 42 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Mapping 15O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 (15O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of 15O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of 15O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using 15O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the 15O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of 15O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of 15O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, 15O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy

  12. Mapping {sup 15}O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Min, Chul Hee [Department of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Kangwon (Korea, Republic of); Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Normandin, Marc D. [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); El Fakhri, Georges, E-mail: elfakhri@pet.mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Radiology Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ({sup 15}O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of {sup 15}O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using {sup 15}O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the {sup 15}O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, {sup 15}O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy.

  13. Predicting the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    The production rates of nuclides made by the galactic and solar cosmic rays are important in the interpretations of measurements made with lunar samples, meteorites, and cosmic spherules. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides have been predicted by a variety of methods that are reviewed in this paper, ranging from systematic studies of one or a group of meteorites to purely theoretical calculations. Production rates can vary with the chemical composition and the preatmospheric depth of the sample and with the size and shape of the object. While the production systematics for cosmogenic nuclides are fairly well known, our ability to predict their production rates can be improved, with a corresponding increase in the scientific return. Additional detailed studies of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial objects are needed, especially for fairly small and very large objects. Nuclides made in simulation experiments and cross sections for many major nuclear reactions should be measured. Such studies are especially needed for the long-lived radionuclides that have only recently become readily measurable by accelerator mass spectrometry. 34 refs., 5 figs

  14. RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS

    Clark, E.

    2013-08-31

    Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

  15. Planning Horizon for Production Inventory Models with Production Rate Dependent on Demand and Inventory Level

    Jennifer Lin; Chao, Henry C. J.; Peterson Julian

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses why the selection of a finite planning horizon is preferable to an infinite one for a replenishment policy of production inventory models. In a production inventory model, the production rate is dependent on both the demand rate and the inventory level. When there is an exponentially decreasing demand, the application of an infinite planning horizon model is not suitable. The emphasis of this paper is threefold. First, while pointing out questionable results from a previo...

  16. 5 CFR 532.253 - Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions.

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special rates or rate ranges for leader....253 Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions. (a... shall establish special rates for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions,...

  17. Reaction rate and energy-loss rate for photopair production by relativistic nuclei

    Chodorowski, Michal J.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Sikora, Marek

    1992-01-01

    The process of e(+/-) pair production by relativistic nuclei on ambient photons is considered. The process is important for cosmic-ray nuclei in interstellar and intergalactic space as well as in galactic and extragalactic compact objects. The rate of this process is given by an integral of the cross section over the photon angular and energy distribution. In the case of isotropic photons, the angular integration is performed to provide an expression for the rate at given photon energy in the nucleus rest frame. The total rate then becomes a single integral of that rate over the photon energy distribution. Formulas are also given for the fractional energy loss of a relativistic nucleus colliding with a photon of a given energy in the rest frame. The nucleus energy-loss rate is integrated over the photon angular distribution in the case of isotropic photons, and simple fits are provided.

  18. Modeling Electric Discharges with Entropy Production Rate Principles

    Thomas Christen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Under which circumstances are variational principles based on entropy production rate useful tools for modeling steady states of electric (gas discharge systems far from equilibrium? It is first shown how various different approaches, as Steenbeck’s minimum voltage and Prigogine’s minimum entropy production rate principles are related to the maximum entropy production rate principle (MEPP. Secondly, three typical examples are discussed, which provide a certain insight in the structure of the models that are candidates for MEPP application. It is then thirdly argued that MEPP, although not being an exact physical law, may provide reasonable model parameter estimates, provided the constraints contain the relevant (nonlinear physical effects and the parameters to be determined are related to disregarded weak constraints that affect mainly global entropy production. Finally, it is additionally conjectured that a further reason for the success of MEPP in certain far from equilibrium systems might be based on a hidden linearity of the underlying kinetic equation(s.

  19. Factors affecting production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    Reedy, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Good production rates are needed for cosmic-ray-produced nuclides to interpret their measurements. Rates depend on many factors, especially the pre-atmospheric object's size, the location of the sample in that object (such as near surface or deep inside), and the object's bulk composition. The bulk composition affects rates, especially in objects with very low and very high iron contents. Extraterrestrial materials with high iron contents usually have higher rates for making nuclides made by reactions with energetic particles and lower rates for the capture of thermal neutrons. In small objects and near the surface of objects, the cascade of secondary neutrons is being developed as primary particles are being removed. Deep in large objects, that secondary cascade is fully developed and the fluxes of primary particles are low. Recent work shows that even the shape of an object in space has a small but measureable effect. Work has been done and continues to be done on better understanding those and other factors. More good sets of measurements in meteorites with known exposure geometries in space are needed. With the use of modern Monte Carlo codes for the production and transport of particles, the nature of these effects have been and is being studied. Work needs to be done to improve the results of these calculations, especially the cross sections for making spallogenic nuclides.

  20. Production rate calculations for a secondary beam facility

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Rehm, K.E.

    1995-08-01

    In order to select the most cost-effective method for the production of secondary ion beams, yield calculations for a variety of primary beams were performed ranging in mass from protons to {sup 18}O with energies of 100-200 MeV/u. For comparison, production yields for 600-1000 MeV protons were also calculated. For light ion-(A < {sup 4}He) induced reactions at energies above 50 MeV/u the LAHET code was used while the low energy calculations were performed with LPACE. Heavy-ion-induced production rates were calculated with the ISAPACE program. The results of these codes were checked against each other and wherever possible a comparison with experimental data was performed. These comparisons extended to very exotic reaction channels, such as the production of {sup 100}Sn from {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Xe induced fragmentation reactions. These comparisons indicate that the codes are able to predict production rates to within one order of magnitude.

  1. Diffusion of HTO, {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, {sup 125}I{sup -} and {sup 22}Na{sup +} in Opalinus Clay: Effect of Confining Pressure, Sample Orientation, Sample Depth and Temperature

    Van Loon, L.R.; Soler, J.M

    2004-02-01

    Effective diffusion coefficients (D{sub e}), rock capacity factors ({alpha}) and diffusion-accessible porosities ({epsilon}) were measured using the through-diffusion technique. Transport (diffusion) was measured both perpendicular and parallel to the bedding. Special cells that allowed the application of an axial confining pressure were designed. The pressures applied ranged from 1 to 5 MPa for Mont Terri samples and between 4 and 15 MPa for Benken samples, the upper values representing the in-situ confining pressure at both locations. The test solutions used in the experiments were synthetic Opalinus Clay pore water, which has Na and Cl as main components (Mont Terri: I = 0.39 M; Benken: I = 0.20 M). Pressure only had a small effect on the value of the effective diffusion coefficients. In the case of Mont Terri samples, increasing the pressure from 1 to 5 MPa resulted in a decrease of the effective diffusion coefficient of 20% for HTO, 27% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 29% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. In the case of Benken samples, increasing the pressure from 4 to 15 MPa resulted in a decrease of D{sub e} of 17% for HTO, 22% for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}, 32% for {sup 125}I{sup -} and 17 % for {sup 22}Na{sup +}. Moreover, the effective diffusion coefficients for for {sup 36}Cl{sup -}are smaller than for HTO, which is consistent with an effect arising from anion exclusion. This ion exclusion effect is smaller in samples from Mont Terri than in samples from Benken, which can be explained by the higher ionic strength of the Mont Terri water used in the experiments. The diffusion of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is similar to that of HTO in the case of Mont Terri OPA. For Benken OPA, the D{sub e} value of {sup 22}Na{sup +} is a factor of 2 higher than that of HTO. This last observation cannot be explained so far but is comparable to experimental data from ANDRA (1999) on Callovo-Oxfordian claystones from the Meuse/Haute Same site. {sup 125}I{sup -} is retarded with

  2. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated wit...

  3. Minimizing Entropy Production Rate in Binary Tray Distillation

    Signe Kjelstrup

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available

    In this work we increase the second law efficiency in an ideal binary tray distillation column by allowing heat exchangers on all trays. We find by numerical optimization, the duties of the heat exchangers that give the highest second law efficiency of the column. The entropy production rate was reduced by 30-50% compared to adiabatic operation for two different columns. The numerical optimum was in agreement with the result of an Euler-Lagrange minimization in which the total entropy production rate was described by irreversible thermodynamics. The minimum was not characterized by equipartition of forces.

    • This paper was presented at ECOS'00, Enschede, July 5-7, 2000 

  4. Understanding Real Exchange Rate Movements with Trade in Intermediate Products

    Parsley, David; Popper, Helen

    2009-01-01

    We suggest it may be "too easy" to attribute real exchange rate movements to law of one price deviations. We show that it is immaterial whether one uses seemingly traded goods, nontraded goods, or even just a single, unimportant consumer good, say beer. The ease of attributing the variation to any such deviations is explained using a model with intermediate goods trade. In the model, the stage of production determines the traded/nontraded distinction. We find empirical substantiation for the ...

  5. High-rate fermentative hydrogen production from beverage wastewater

    Highlights: • Hybrid immobilized-bacterial cells show stable operation over 175 days. • Low HRT of 1.5 h shows peak hydrogen production rate of 55 L/L-d. • Electricity generation is 9024 kW-d from 55 L/L-d hydrogen using beverage wastewater. • Granular sludge formed only at 2–3 h HRT with presence of Selenomonas sp. - Abstract: Hydrogen production from beverage industry wastewater (20 g/Lhexose equivalent) using an immobilized cell reactor with a continuous mode of operation was studied at various hydraulic retention times (HRT, 8–1.5 h). Maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) of 55 L/L-d was obtained at HRT 1.5 h (an organic loading of 320 g/L-dhexose equivalent). This HPR value is much higher than those of other industrial wastewaters employed in fermentative hydrogen production. The cell biomass concentration peaked at 3 h HRT with a volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration of 6.31 g/L (with presence of self-flocculating Selenomonas sp.), but it dropped to 3.54 gVSS/L at 1.5 h HRT. With the shortening of HRT, lactate concentration increased but the concentration of the dominant metabolite butyrate did not vary significantly. The Clostridium species dynamics was not significantly affected, but total microbial community structure changed with respect to HRT variation as evident from PCR–DGGE analyses. Analysis of energy production rate suggests that beverage wastewater is a high energy yielding feedstock, and can replace 24% of electricity consumption in a model beverage industry

  6. Cosmogenic Nuclei Production Rate on the Lunar Surface

    Dong, Tie-Kuang; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin; Dong, Wu-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Guo-Long; Ren, Zhong-Zhou

    2013-01-01

    A physical model of Geant4-based simulation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interaction with the lunar surface matter has been developed to investigate the production rate of cosmogenic nuclei. In this model the GCRs, mainly very high energy protons and $\\alpha$ particles, bombard the surface of the Moon and produce many secondary particles such as protons and neutrons. The energies of proton and neutron at different depths are recorded and saved into ROOT files, and the analytical expressions for the differential proton and neutron fluxes are obtained through the best-fit procedure under the ROOT software. To test the validity of this model, we calculate the production rates of long-lived nuclei $^{10}$Be and $^{26}$Al in the Apollo 15 long drill core by combining the above differential fluxes and the newly evaluated spallation reaction cross sections. Numerical results show that the theoretical production rates agree quite well with the measured data. It means that this model works well. Therefore, i...

  7. Photochemical free radical production rates in the eastern Caribbean

    Dister, Brian; Zafiriou, Oliver C.

    1993-02-01

    Potential photochemical production rates of total (NO-scavengeable) free radicals were surveyed underway (> 900 points) in the eastern Caribbean and Orinoco delta in spring and fall 1988. These data document seasonal trends and large-scale (˜ 10-1000 km) variability in the pools of sunlight-generated reactive transients, which probably mediate a major portion of marine photoredox transformations. Radical production potential was detectable in all waters and was reasonably quantifiable at rates above 0.25 nmol L-1 min-1 sun-1. Radical production rates varied from ˜ 0.1-0.5 nmol L-1 min-1 of full-sun illumination in "blue water" to > 60 nmol L-1 min-1 in some estuarine waters in the high-flow season. Qualitatively, spatiotemporal potential rate distributions strikingly resembled that of "chlorophyll" (a riverine-influence tracer of uncertain specificity) in 1979-1981 CZCS images of the region [Müller-Karger et al., 1988] at all scales. Basin-scale occurrence of greatly enhanced rates in fall compared to spring is attributed to terrestrial chromophore inputs, primarily from the Orinoco River, any contributions from Amazon water and nutrient-stimulus effects could not be resolved. A major part of the functionally photoreactive colored organic matter (COM) involved in radical formation clearly mixes without massive loss out into high-salinity waters, although humic acids may flocculate in estuaries. A similar conclusion applies over smaller scales for COM as measured optically [Blough et al., this issue]. Furthermore, optical absorption and radical production rates were positively correlated in the estuarine region in fall. These cruises demonstrated that photochemical techniques are now adequate to treat terrestrial photochemical chromophore inputs as an estuarine mixing problem on a large scale, though the ancillary data base does not currently support such an analysis in this region. Eastern Caribbean waters are not markedly more reactive at comparable salinities

  8. Relating Productivity Events to Holocene Bivalve Shell Growth Rates

    Huntley, J. W.; Krause, R. A.; Kowalewski, M.; Romanek, C. S.; Kaufman, D. S.; Simoes, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth rate of a bivalve can be influenced by many environmental factors that can change during the life of the organism. In this contribution we present initial data from a millennium scale chronology to assess the relationship between ontogenetic growth in the bivalve Semele casali and paleoenvironmental conditions preserved in the shell using growth increment analysis, radiocarbon-calibrated amino acid racemization dating techniques, stable isotopes (C and O) and high spatial resolution (125-150 samples per cm of shell profile) trace element (Ba, Mn) analysis (LA-ICPMS). Time-averaged specimens of S. casali were dredged from two sites at 10 meters and 30 meters depth along the inner continental shelf at Ubatuba Bay in the Southeast Brazilian Bight, an area influenced by productivity pulses triggered by coastal runoff events and coastal upwelling. Seventy-five individual valves were dated using amino acid racemization (aspartic acid). Dates were calculated using an expanded version of a previously published relationship (Barbour Wood et al., 2006 Quaternary Research 323- 331) between aspartic acid ratios and AMS radiocarbon dates of twelve S. casali individuals from the same sampling locations. The resulting time series has complete coverage for the past three thousand years at centennial resolution. From this time series, a sub-sample of dated valves was selected for more detailed growth increment, stable isotope and high-resolution trace element (Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca) analyses. Oceanic productivity is expressed differentially in the trace element profiles of S. casali with elevated Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios capturing nutrient input through coastal runoff events while elevated Ba/Ca and depressed Mn/Ca ratios represent input through coastal upwelling. Fluctuations in Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca are not correlated to fluctuations in relative growth throughout the ontogeny of an individual bivalve, nor are they expected to be as periods of increased productivity are transient

  9. Semiclassical pair production rate for rotating electric fields

    Strobel, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    We semiclassically investigate Schwinger pair production for pulsed rotating electric fields depending on time. To do so we solve the Dirac equation for two-component fields in a WKB-like approximation. The result shows that for two-component fields the spin distribution of produced pairs is generally not $1:1$. As a result the pair creation rates of spinor and scalar quantum electro dynamics (QED) are different even for one pair of turning points. For rotating electric fields the pair creation rate is dominated by particles with a specific spin depending on the sense of rotation. We present an analytical solution for the momentum spectrum of the constant rotating field. We find interference effects not only in the momentum spectrum but also in the total particle number of rotating electric fields.

  10. Lifetime and production rate of beauty baryons from Z decays

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Daum, A; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fürstenau, H; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gillespie, D; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haedinger, U; Hahn, F; Hahn, M; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Ioannou, P; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kalmus, George Ernest; Kapusta, F; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köhne, J H; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, M; McNulty, M; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Ostankov, A P; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Squarcia, S; Stäck, H; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stepaniak, K; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Torassa, E; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Überschär, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Wehr, A; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1995-01-01

    The production and decay of beauty baryons (b-baryons) have been studied using 1.7 \\times 10^6 Z hadronic decays collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP. Three different techniques were used to identify the b-baryons. The first method used pairs of a \\Lambda and a lepton to tag the b-baryon decay. The second method associated fully reconstructed \\Lambda_c baryons with leptons. The third analysis reconstructed the b-baryon decay points by forming secondary vertices from identified protons and muons of opposite sign. Using these methods the following production rates were measured: \\begin{eqnarray*} f(\\qb \\ra \\Bb) \\times \\BR(\\Bb \\ra \\mLs \\ell\\bar{\

  11. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-05-01

    As in many sciences, the production rate of new Ph.D. astronomers is decoupled from the global demand for trained scientists. As noted by Thronson (1991, PASP, 103, 90), overproduction appears to be built into the system, making the mathematical formulation of surplus astronomer production similar to that for industrial pollution models -- an unintended side effect of the process. Following Harris (1994, ASP Conf., 57, 12), I document the production of Ph.D. astronomers from 1990 to 2005 using the online Dissertation Abstracts database. To monitor the changing patterns of employment, I examine the number of postdoctoral, tenure-track, and other jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register during this same period. Although the current situation is clearly unsustainable, it was much worse a decade ago with nearly 7 new Ph.D. astronomers in 1995 for every new tenure-track job. While the number of new permanent positions steadily increased throughout the late 1990's, the number of new Ph.D. recipients gradually declined. After the turn of the century, the production of new astronomers leveled off, but new postdoctoral positions grew dramatically. There has also been recent growth in the number of non-tenure-track lecturer, research, and support positions. This is just one example of a larger cultural shift to temporary employment that is happening throughout society -- it is not unique to astronomy.

  12. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  13. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    Metcalfe, Travis S

    2007-01-01

    In an effort to promote self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astr...

  14. Buyer-vendor coordination for fixed lifetime product with quantity discount under finite production rate

    Zhang, Qinghong; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yongrui

    2016-03-01

    Buyer-vendor coordination has been widely addressed; however, the fixed lifetime of the product is seldom considered. In this paper, we study the coordination of an integrated production-inventory system with quantity discount for a fixed lifetime product under finite production rate and deterministic demand. We first derive the buyer's ordering policy and the vendor's production batch size in decentralised and centralised systems. We then compare the two systems and show the non-coordination of the ordering policies and the production batch sizes. To improve the supply chain efficiency, we propose quantity discount contract and prove that the contract can coordinate the buyer-vendor supply chain. Finally, we present analytically tractable solutions and give a numerical example to illustrate the benefits of the proposed quantity discount strategy.

  15. Hydrogen production rate from comet Austin 1982g

    Shih, P.; Scherb, F.; Roesler, F. L.

    1984-01-01

    Meaningful measurements with respect to the cometary Balmer-alpha (H-alpha) emission are difficult and require the use of special equipment. The first ground-based observations of H-alpha emission from a cometary hydrogen corona were conducted on comet Kohoutek 1973 XII with a large-aperture Fabry-Perot spectrometer installed at the McMath solar telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. The present investigation is concerned with the second ground-based observations of cometary H-alpha emission carried out during the apparition of comet Austin 1982g. A 150 mm dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer was employed in the experiment. Use was made of an observatory which is designed for the high spectral resolution study of faint extended sources such as interstellar and geocoronal emission lines. The investigation demonstrates that hydrogen production rates from comets as faint as about 7th magnitude can be routinely measured from the ground at minimal cost.

  16. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  17. A Deterministic Inventory/Production Model with General Inventory Cost Rate Function and Concave Production Costs

    S.I. Birbil (Ilker); J.B.G. Frenk (Hans); Z.P. Bayindir (Pelin)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe present a thorough analysis of the economic order quantity model with shortages under a general inventory cost rate function and concave production costs. By using some standard results from convex analysis, we show that the model exhibits a composite concave-convex structure. Consequ

  18. Modeling gallic acid production rate by empirical and statistical analysis

    Bratati Kar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available For predicting the rate of enzymatic reaction empirical correlation based on the experimental results obtained under various operating conditions have been developed. Models represent both the activation as well as deactivation conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis and the results have been analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA. The tannase activity was found maximum at incubation time 5 min, reaction temperature 40ºC, pH 4.0, initial enzyme concentration 0.12 v/v, initial substrate concentration 0.42 mg/ml, ionic strength 0.2 M and under these optimal conditions, the maximum rate of gallic acid production was 33.49 mumoles/ml/min.Para predizer a taxa das reações enzimaticas uma correlação empírica baseada nos resultados experimentais foi desenvolvida. Os modelos representam a ativação e a desativativação da hydrolise enzimatica. Os resultados foram avaliados pela análise de variança (ANOVA. A atividade máxima da tannase foi obtida após 5 minutos de incubação, temperatura 40ºC, pH 4,0, concentração inicial da enzima de 0,12 v/v, concentração inicial do substrato 0,42 mg/ml, força iônica 0,2 M. Sob essas condições a taxa máxima de produção ácido galico foi de 33,49 µmoles/ml/min.

  19. Cosmogenic 36Cl exposure ages reveal a 9.3 ka BP glacier advance and the Late Weichselian-Early Holocene glacial history of the Drangajökull region, northwest Iceland

    Brynjólfsson, Skafti; Schomacker, Anders; Ingólfsson, Ólafur; Keiding, Jakob K.

    2015-10-01

    We present twenty-four new cosmogenic isotope (36Cl) surface exposure ages from erratic boulders, moraine boulders and glacially eroded bedrock that constrain the late Weichselian to Holocene glacial history of the Drangajökull region, northwest Iceland. The results suggest a topographically controlled ice sheet over the Vestfirðir (Westfjords) peninsula during the last glaciation. Cold based non-erosive sectors of the ice sheet covered most of the mountains while fjords and valleys were occupied with erosive, warm-based ice. Old36Cl exposure ages from highlands and mountain plateaux (L8; 76.5 ka and H1; 41.6 ka) in combination with younger erratic boulders (L7; 26.2 and K1-K4; 15.0-13.8 ka) superimposed on such surfaces suggest the presence of non-erosive ice over uplands and plateaux in the Vestfirðir peninsula during the last glaciation. Glacially scoured terrain and erratic boulders yielding younger exposure ages (L1-L6; 11.3-9.1 ka and R1, R6-R7; 10.6-9.4 ka) in the lowland areas indicate that the valleys and fjords of the Vestfirðir peninsula were occupied by warm-based, dynamic ice during the last glaciation. The deglaciation of mountain Leirufjall by 26.2 ka BP suggests that ice thinning and deglaciation of some mountains and plateaux preceded any significant lateral retreat of the ice sheet. Subsequently this initial ice thinning was followed by break-up of the shelf based ice sheet off Vestfirðir about 15 ka BP. Hence, the new exposure ages suggest a stepwise asynchronous deglaciation on land, following the shelf break-up with some valleys and most of the highlands, ice free by 14-15 ka BP. The outermost moraine at the mouth of Leirufjörður is dated to 9.3 ka BP, and we suggest the moraine to be formed by a glacier re-advance in response to a cooler climate forced by the reduced Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at around 9.3 ka BP. A system of moraines proximal to the 9.3 ka moraine in Leirufjörður as well as a 9.4 ka deglaciation age

  20. The Rate-of-Return Regulated Firm: Cost and Production Duality

    Rolf Fare; James Logan

    1983-01-01

    A duality between cost and production is established for a firm subject to rate-of-return regulation. To this end, a rate-of-return regulated production function is defined and shown to exist. It is then shown how information regarding the unregulated technology can be obtained from the rate-of-return regulated cost function. With knowledge of the rate-of-return constraint, the rate-of-return regulated production function can be reconstructed.

  1. Determination of optimal lot size and production rate for multi-production channels with limited capacity

    Huang, Yeu-Shiang; Wang, Ruei-Pei; Ho, Jyh-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Due to the constantly changing business environment, producers often have to deal with customers by adopting different procurement policies. That is, manufacturers confront not only predictable and regular orders, but also unpredictable and irregular orders. In this study, from the perspective of upstream manufacturers, both regular and irregular orders are considered in coping with the situation in which an uncertain demand is faced by the manufacturer, and a capacity confirming mechanism is used to examine such demand. If the demand is less than or equal to the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the general supply channel is utilised to fully account for the manufacturing process, but if the demand is greater than the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the contingency production channel would be activated along with the ordinary channel to satisfy the upcoming high demand. Besides, the reproductive property of the probability distribution is employed to represent the order quantity of the two types of demand. Accordingly, the optimal production rates and lot sizes for both channels are derived to provide managers with insights for further production planning.

  2. Improved estimates of environmental copper release rates from antifouling products.

    Finnie, Alistair A

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy Dome method for measuring copper release rates from antifouling paint in-service on ships' hulls can be considered to be the most reliable indicator of environmental release rates. In this paper, the relationship between the apparent copper release rate and the environmental release rate is established for a number of antifouling coating types using data from a variety of available laboratory, field and calculation methods. Apart from a modified Dome method using panels, all laboratory, field and calculation methods significantly overestimate the environmental release rate of copper from antifouling coatings. The difference is greatest for self-polishing copolymer antifoulings (SPCs) and smallest for certain erodible/ablative antifoulings, where the ASTM/ISO standard and the CEPE calculation method are seen to typically overestimate environmental release rates by factors of about 10 and 4, respectively. Where ASTM/ISO or CEPE copper release rate data are used for environmental risk assessment or regulatory purposes, it is proposed that the release rate values should be divided by a correction factor to enable more reliable generic environmental risk assessments to be made. Using a conservative approach based on a realistic worst case and accounting for experimental uncertainty in the data that are currently available, proposed default correction factors for use with all paint types are 5.4 for the ASTM/ISO method and 2.9 for the CEPE calculation method. Further work is required to expand this data-set and refine the correction factors through correlation of laboratory measured and calculated copper release rates with the direct in situ environmental release rate for different antifouling paints under a range of environmental conditions. PMID:17110352

  3. Enhance Production Rate of Braiding Machine Using Speed Reduction Technique

    Manoj A. Kumbhalkar; Sachin V. Mate; Sushama Dhote; Mudra Gondane

    2013-01-01

    Textile designing is a technical process which includes different methods for production of textile, surface design and structural design of a textile. Braid is the textile product having various types like round and flat braid made by using textile threads or wires which are alternatively interwoven in braiding machine. A small scale industry in Nagpur produces each type of cotton braids using 16 spindle braiding machines on the single line shaft acquired power from 0.50 HP motor runs at 144...

  4. Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

    Jerry L. Jensen; Larry W. Lake; Ali Al-Yousef; Dan Weber; Ximing Liang; T.F. Edgar; Nazli Demiroren; Danial Kaviani

    2007-03-31

    This report details progress and results on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project was to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Yousef and others (2006a,b), and herein referred to as the 'capacitance model', is the primary product of this research project. The capacitance model (CM) produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. For the CM, we have focused on the following items: (1) Methods to estimate {lambda} and {tau} from simulated and field well rates. The original method uses both non-linear and linear regression and lacks the ability to include constraints on {lambda} and {tau}. The revised method uses only non-linear regression, permitting constraints to be included as well as accelerating the solution so that problems with large numbers of wells are more tractable. (2) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (3) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the CM and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of {lambda} and {tau} estimates. Human interventions, such as workovers, also cause rate fluctuations and can be misinterpreted by the model if bottom hole pressure data are not available. A

  5. High biomass sorghum production across tillage systems and nitrogen rates

    Bioenergy production has traditionally focused on perennial crops; however, these crops require an establishment period before they can be utilized. High biomass sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) grown as an annual crop can be used during this establishment period, but typical yields and nutrient...

  6. Modeling gallic acid production rate by empirical and statistical analysis

    Kar Bratati; Banerjee Rintu; Bhattacharyya Bimal Chandra

    2000-01-01

    For predicting the rate of enzymatic reaction empirical correlation based on the experimental results obtained under various operating conditions have been developed. Models represent both the activation as well as deactivation conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis and the results have been analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). The tannase activity was found maximum at incubation time 5 min, reaction temperature 40ºC, pH 4.0, initial enzyme concentration 0.12 v/v, initial substrate concentra...

  7. r-Process Lanthanide Production and Heating Rates in Kilonovae

    Lippuner, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    r-Process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during neutron star mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients depend on the composition of the material after nuclear burning ceases, which determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. Kasen et al. (2013, ApJ, 774, 25) and Tanaka & Hotokezaka (2013, ApJ, 775, 113) pointed out that lanthanides can drastically increase the opacity in these outflows. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to carry out a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions $Y_e$, initial specific entropies $s$, and expansion timescales $\\tau$. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for $Y_e \\gtrsim 0.22 - 0.30$, depending on $s$ and $\\tau$. The heating rate is insensitive to $s$ and $\\tau$, but certain, larger values of $Y_e$ lead to reduced heating rates, due to individual nuclides dominating the heating. With a...

  8. Effects of culture (China vs. US) and task on perceived hazard: Evidence from product ratings, label ratings, and product to label matching.

    Lesch, Mary F; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Choi, YoonSun

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, 44 Chinese and 40 US college students rated their perceived hazard in response to warning labels and products and attempted to match products with warning labels communicating the same level of hazard. Chinese participants tended to provide lower ratings of hazard in response to labels, but hazard perceived in response to products did not significantly differ as a function of culture. When asked to match a product with a warning label, Chinese participants' hazard perceptions appeared to be better calibrated, than did US participants', across products and labels. The results are interpreted in terms of constructivist theory which suggests that risk perceptions vary depending on the "frame of mind" evoked by the environment/context. Designers of warnings must be sensitive to the fact that product users' cognitive representations develop within a culture and that risk perceptions will vary based on the context in which they are derived. PMID:26360193

  9. Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

    Jerry L. Jensen; Larry W. Lake; Ali Al-Yousef; Pablo Gentil; Nazli Demiroren

    2005-05-31

    This report details progress on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project is to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Jensen et al. (2005) and Yousef et al. (2005), and herein referred to as the ''capacitance model'', produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. We have focused on the following items: (1) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (2) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the capacitance model and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Initial tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (3) Spectral analysis of injection and production data to estimate interwell connectivity and to assess the effects of near-wellbore gas on the results. Development of methods and analysis are ongoing. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of the capacitance method. These methods include revising the solution method to simultaneously estimate {lambda} and {tau} for each well pair. This approach allows for further constraints to be imposed during the computation, such as limiting {tau} to a range of values defined by the sampling interval and duration of the field data. This work is proceeding. Further work on this project includes the following: (1) Refinement and testing

  10. Continuous biohydrogen production using cheese whey: Improving the hydrogen production rate

    Davila-Vazquez, Gustavo; Cota-Navarro, Ciria Berenice; Razo-Flores, Elias [Division de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a seccion, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P (Mexico); Rosales-Colunga, Luis Manuel; de Leon-Rodriguez, Antonio [Division de Biologia Molecular, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Camino a la Presa San Jose 2055, Lomas 4a seccion, C.P. 78216, San Luis Potosi, S.L.P (Mexico)

    2009-05-15

    Due to the renewed interest in finding sustainable fuels or energy carriers, biohydrogen (Bio-H{sub 2}) from biomass is a promising alternative. Fermentative Bio-H{sub 2} production was studied in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) operated during 65.6 d with cheese whey (CW) as substrate. Three hydraulic retention times (HRTs) were tested (10, 6 and 4 h) and the highest volumetric hydrogen production rate (VHPR) was attained with HRT of 6 h. Therefore, four organic loading rates (OLRs) at a fixed HRT of 6 h were tested thereafter, being: 92.4, 115.5, 138.6 and 184.4 g lactose/L/d. The highest VHPR (46.61 mmol H{sub 2}/L/h) and hydrogen molar yield (HMY) of 2.8 mol H{sub 2}/mol lactose were found at an OLR of 138.6 g lactose/L/d; a sharp fall in VHPR occurred at an OLR of 184.4 g lactose/L/d. Butyric, propionic and acetic acids were the main soluble metabolites found, with butyric-to-acetic ratios ranging from 1.0 to 2.4. Bacterial community was identified by partial sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). The results showed that at HRT of 10 h and 6 h were dominated by the Clostridium genus. The VHPR attained in this study is the highest reported value for a CSTR system using CW as substrate with anaerobic sludge as inoculum and represents a 33-fold increase compared to a previous study. Thus, it was demonstrated that continuous fermentative Bio-H{sub 2} production from CW can be significantly enhanced by an appropriate selection of parameters such as HRT and OLR. Enhancements in VHPR are significant because it is a critical parameter to determine the full-scale practical application of fermentation technologies that will be used for sustainable and clean energy generation. (author)

  11. Impact of Declining Proposal Success Rates on Scientific Productivity

    Cushman, Priscilla; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lowenthal, James; Peterson, Bradley; Stassun, Keivan G; von Hippel, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade proposal success rates in the fundamental sciences have dropped significantly. Astronomy and related fields funded by NASA and NSF are no exception. Data across agencies show that this is not principally the result of a decline in proposal merit (the proportion of proposals receiving high rankings is largely unchanged), nor of a shift in proposer demographics (seniority, gender, and institutional affiliation have all remained unchanged), nor of an increase (beyond inflation) in the average requested funding per proposal, nor of an increase in the number of proposals per investigator in any one year. Rather, the statistics are consistent with a scenario in which agency budgets for competed research are flat or decreasing in inflation-adjusted dollars, the overall population of investigators has grown, and a larger proportion of these investigators are resubmitting meritorious but unfunded proposals. This White Paper presents statistics which support this conclusion, as well as recent resea...

  12. Bounding $f(R)$ gravity by particle production rate

    Capozziello, S; Paolella, M

    2016-01-01

    Several models of $f(R)$ gravity have been proposed in order to address the dark side problem in cosmology. However, these models should be constrained also at ultraviolet scales in order to achieve some correct fundamental interpretation. Here we analyze this possibility comparing quantum vacuum states in given $f(R)$ cosmological backgrounds. Specifically, we compare the Bogolubov transformations associated to different vacuum states for some $f(R)$ models. The procedure consists in fixing the $f(R)$ free parameters and requiring that the Bogolubov coefficients can be correspondingly minimized. In such a way, the particle production is related to the value of the Hubble parameter and then to the given $f(R)$ model. The approach is developed in both metric and Palatini formalism.

  13. Learning control for riser-slug elimination and production-rate optimization for an offshore oil and gas production process

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Slugging flow in the offshore oil & gas production attracts lot of attention due to it's limitation of production rate, periodic overload on processing facilities, and even direct cause of emergency shutdown. This work aims at two correlated objectives: (i) Preventing slugging flow; and meanwhile......, (ii) maximizing the production rate at the riser of an offshore production platform, by manipulating a topside choke valve through a learning switching model-free PID controller. The results show good steady-state performance, though a long settling time due to the unknown reference for no slugging...

  14. Correlation of gene expression and protein production rate - a system wide study

    Arvas Mikko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth rate is a major determinant of intracellular function. However its effects can only be properly dissected with technically demanding chemostat cultivations in which it can be controlled. Recent work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultivations provided the first analysis on genome wide effects of growth rate. In this work we study the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina that is an industrial protein production host known for its exceptional protein secretion capability. Interestingly, it exhibits a low growth rate protein production phenotype. Results We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to study the effect of growth rate and cell density on protein production in chemostat cultivations of T. reesei. Use of chemostat allowed control of growth rate and exact estimation of the extracellular specific protein production rate (SPPR. We find that major biosynthetic activities are all negatively correlated with SPPR. We also find that expression of many genes of secreted proteins and secondary metabolism, as well as various lineage specific, mostly unknown genes are positively correlated with SPPR. Finally, we enumerate possible regulators and regulatory mechanisms, arising from the data, for this response. Conclusions Based on these results it appears that in low growth rate protein production energy is very efficiently used primarly for protein production. Also, we propose that flux through early glycolysis or the TCA cycle is a more fundamental determining factor than growth rate for low growth rate protein production and we propose a novel eukaryotic response to this i.e. the lineage specific response (LSR.

  15. Optimal integrated maintenance/production policy for randomly failing systems with variable failure rate

    Zied, Hajej; Dellagi, Sofiene; Rezg, Nidhal

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper deals with combined production and maintenance plans for a manufacturing system satisfying a random demand. We first establish an optimal production plan which minimizes the average total inventory and production cost. Secondly, using this optimal production plan, and taking into account the deterioration of the machine according to its production rate, we derive an optimal maintenance schedule which minimizes the maintenance cost. A numerical example illustrate...

  16. In Situ Production of Chlorine-36 in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho: Implications for Describing Ground-Water Contamination Near a Nuclear Facility

    The purpose of this report is to describe the calculated contribution to ground water of natural, in situ produced 36Cl in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and to compare these concentrations in ground water with measured concentrations near a nuclear facility in southeastern Idaho. The scope focused on isotopic and chemical analyses and associated 36Cl in situ production calculations on 25 whole-rock samples from 6 major water-bearing rock types present in the eastern Snake River Plain. The rock types investigated were basalt, rhyolite, limestone, dolomite, shale, and quartzite. Determining the contribution of in situ production to 36Cl inventories in ground water facilitated the identification of the source for this radionuclide in environmental samples. On the basis of calculations reported here, in situ production of 36Cl was determined to be insignificant compared to concentrations measured in ground water near buried and injected nuclear waste at the INEEL. Maximum estimated 36Cl concentrations in ground water from in situ production are on the same order of magnitude as natural concentrations in meteoric water

  17. Production rate of Morus Alba pollen grains in an abandoned M. Alba plantation

    Kiyonaga, Jota

    2016-01-01

    As a basic study for pollen analysis, the production rate of Morus alba (white mulberry) pollen grains in an abandoned M. alba plantation was determined over a three-year period from 1997 to 1999. The number of pollen grains per male catkin was assessed and the fall rate of male catkins was measured using five litter traps. The mean production rate was 2.6 × 10^ grains ha^yr^ (range = 2.2-3.4 × 10^ grains ha^yr^). This is near the lower end of the range of pollen production rates that have be...

  18. Engineering Mathematical Analysis Method for Productivity Rate in Linear Arrangement Serial Structure Automated Flow Assembly Line

    Tan Chan Sin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Productivity rate (Q or production rate is one of the important indicator criteria for industrial engineer to improve the system and finish good output in production or assembly line. Mathematical and statistical analysis method is required to be applied for productivity rate in industry visual overviews of the failure factors and further improvement within the production line especially for automated flow line since it is complicated. Mathematical model of productivity rate in linear arrangement serial structure automated flow line with different failure rate and bottleneck machining time parameters becomes the basic model for this productivity analysis. This paper presents the engineering mathematical analysis method which is applied in an automotive company which possesses automated flow assembly line in final assembly line to produce motorcycle in Malaysia. DCAS engineering and mathematical analysis method that consists of four stages known as data collection, calculation and comparison, analysis, and sustainable improvement is used to analyze productivity in automated flow assembly line based on particular mathematical model. Variety of failure rate that causes loss of productivity and bottleneck machining time is shown specifically in mathematic figure and presents the sustainable solution for productivity improvement for this final assembly automated flow line.

  19. Entropy Production Rate Changes in Lysogeny/Lysis Switch Regulation of Bacteriophage Lambda

    According to the chemical kinetic model of lysogeny/lysis switch in Escherichia coli (E. coli) infected by bacteriophage λ, the entropy production rates of steady states are calculated. The results show that the lysogenic state has lower entropy production rate than lytic state, which provides an explanation on why the lysogenic state of λ phage is so stable. We also notice that the entropy production rates of both lysogenic state and lytic state are lower than that of saddle-point and bifurcation state, which is consistent with the principle of minimum entropy production for living organism in nonequilibrium stationary state. Subsequently, the relations between CI and Cro degradation rates at two bifurcations and the changes of entropy production rate with CI and Cro degradation are deduced. The theory and method can be used to calculate entropy change in other molecular network. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  20. Manufacturing production and non-agricultural employment rate in South Africa: Time series analysis

    Paul-Francois Muzindutsi; Magdeline M. Maepa

    2014-01-01

    South African is faced with a high unemployment rate; however, the country's manufacturing sector is one of the sectors that have been linked with job creation. Nevertheless, the growth in manufacturing production may not increase employment opportunities if this sector continues to shift to technology-intensive methods of production, which displace labour. This study uses a vector autoregressive (VAR) model to estimate the interaction between manufacturing production and the employment rate ...

  1. Studies of jet production rates in e+e- annihilation at Ecm=29 GeV

    Production rates of multijet hadronic final states are studied in e+e- annihilation at 29 GeV center of mass energy. QCD shower model calculations with exact first order matrix element weighting at the first gluon vertex are capable of reproducing the observed multijet event rates over a large range of jet pair masses. The method used to reconstruct jets is well suited for directly comparing experimental jet rates with parton rates calculated in perturbative QCD. Evidence for the energy dependence of αs is obtained by comparing the observed production rates of 3-jet events with results of similar studies performed at higher center of mass energies. (orig.)

  2. 78 FR 41129 - Market Test of Experimental Product - International Merchandise Return Service-Non-Published Rates

    2013-07-09

    ... will begin a market test of its International Merchandise Return Service (IMRS) Non-published Rate (NPR... of Experimental Product -- International Merchandise Return Service--Non-Published Rates AGENCY: U.S... International Merchandise Return Service--Non-Published Rates in accordance with statutory requirements....

  3. Product adjustments: A firm-level analysis of the impact of a real exchange rate shock

    Moxnes, Andreas; Ulltveit-Moe, Karen-Helene

    2010-01-01

    Using a new and extensive micro data set we investigate the impact of a change in international competitive pressure following a real exchange shock on multi-product firms’ product mix. We only find weak evidence for the core competencies hypothesis, according to which, we would expect the exposed firms to reduce their product portfolio in response to the shock. But firms exposed to the shock significantly reduced their rate of product churning, relative to the control group of nonexposed fir...

  4. Dose rate distribution for products irradiated in a semi-industrial irradiation plant. 1st stage

    The model of the bulk product absorbed dose rate distribution in a semi industrial irradiation plant is presented. In this plant the products are subject to a dynamic irradiation process: single-plaque, single-direction, four-passes. The additional two passes, also one on each side of the plaque, serve to minimize the lateral dose variation as well as the depth-dose non-uniformity. The first stage of this model takes only into account the direct absorbed dose rate; the model outputs are the depth-dose distribution and the lateral-dose distribution. The calculated absorbed dose in the bulk product and its uniformity-ratio after the dynamic irradiation process for different products is compared. The model results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements in a bulk of irradiated product; and the air absorbed dose rate in the irradiation chamber behind the product subject to the dynamic irradiation process. (author)

  5. A quantitative model of water radiolysis and chemical production rates near radionuclide-containing solids

    Dzaugis, Mary E.; Spivack, Arthur J.; D'Hondt, Steven

    2015-10-01

    We present a mathematical model that quantifies the rate of water radiolysis near radionuclide-containing solids. Our model incorporates the radioactivity of the solid along with the energies and attenuation properties for alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ) radiation to calculate volume normalized dose rate profiles. In the model, these dose rate profiles are then used to calculate radiolytic hydrogen (H2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production rates as a function of distance from the solid-water interface. It expands on previous water radiolysis models by incorporating planar or cylindrical solid-water interfaces and by explicitly including γ radiation in dose rate calculations. To illustrate our model's utility, we quantify radiolytic H2 and H2O2 production rates surrounding spent nuclear fuel under different conditions (at 20 years and 1000 years of storage, as well as before and after barrier failure). These examples demonstrate the extent to which α, β and γ radiation contributes to total absorbed dose rate and radiolytic production rates. The different cases also illustrate how H2 and H2O2 yields depend on initial composition, shielding and age of the solid. In this way, the examples demonstrate the importance of including all three types of radiation in a general model of total radiolytic production rates.

  6. Enhancing product quantity by controlling the specific growth rate of Pichia pastoris expressing human serum albumin

    Hama, Adel; Eyer, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Establish a fed-batch process to culture a Pichia pastoris strain producing a recombinant protein (hSA), highlighting the relationship between the specific growth rate and the protein quality, as well as seeking for enhanced productivity.

  7. Relationship between Selected Properties of Starchy Vegetables on Grating and Slicing Production Rate

    Lok Chung Yee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction on the output of grating and slicing of starchy vegetables are important prior to design or develop the particular food plant. The production rate of grating and slicing products could be affected by the properties of starchy vegetables. In this study, two selected properties which hardness and moisture content are studied. Hardness of selected starchy vegetables was measured using a destructive testing method of texture analyzer. A testing machine of the texture analyzer applied a specific blade to shear the vegetables and automatically generate data. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between starchy vegetables hardness and moisture content which influenced the production rate in grating and slicing products. The selected starchy vegetables used for this study were white potato, sweet potato, tapioca and yam. The maximum hardness was computed and analyzed using the texture analyzer. It was found that the maximum hardness of white potato, yam, sweet potato and tapioca were 6.67, 12.01, 16.98 and 20.08 kg respectively. It was determined that white potato had the highest moisture content among the vegetables, which was 78.14%. In conclusion, the lower value of hardness and higher value of moisture content are significantly correlated to higher production rate of grating and slicing products. Results presented may help the food industry to initially predict the production rate of agricultural products such as food chips and finger products."

  8. Firm Productivity, Exchange Rate Movements, Sources of Finance and Export Orientation

    Demir, Firat; Caglayan, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the level and volatility effects of real exchange rates on the productivity growth of manufacturing firms with heterogeneous access to debt, and domestic and foreign equity markets in Turkey. We find that while exchange rate volatility affects productivity growth negatively, having access to foreign or domestic equity, or debt markets does not alleviate these effects. Furthermore, foreign owned or publicly traded companies do not appear to perform significantly better than the ...

  9. A quantitative model of water radiolysis and chemical production rates near radionuclide-containing solids

    We present a mathematical model that quantifies the rate of water radiolysis near radionuclide-containing solids. Our model incorporates the radioactivity of the solid along with the energies and attenuation properties for alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ) radiation to calculate volume normalized dose rate profiles. In the model, these dose rate profiles are then used to calculate radiolytic hydrogen (H2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production rates as a function of distance from the solid–water interface. It expands on previous water radiolysis models by incorporating planar or cylindrical solid–water interfaces and by explicitly including γ radiation in dose rate calculations. To illustrate our model's utility, we quantify radiolytic H2 and H2O2 production rates surrounding spent nuclear fuel under different conditions (at 20 years and 1000 years of storage, as well as before and after barrier failure). These examples demonstrate the extent to which α, β and γ radiation contributes to total absorbed dose rate and radiolytic production rates. The different cases also illustrate how H2 and H2O2 yields depend on initial composition, shielding and age of the solid. In this way, the examples demonstrate the importance of including all three types of radiation in a general model of total radiolytic production rates. - Highlights: • Our model quantifies radiolytic chemical production near solid–water interfaces. • The model accounts for chemical production by α, β and γ radiation. • The model is applicable to both planar and curved surfaces. • Relative production by α, β and γ radiation strongly depends on solid composition. • We apply the model to young and old spent nuclear fuel, with and without cladding

  10. Effects of time and other variables on fission product release rates

    The releases of krypton and cesium from highly irradiated LWR fuel have been examined in detail. The main interest has been the effect of time on the rate of release and the effects of heatup and cooldown cycles. The minute-by-minute release rates for fission product 85Kr from commercial fuel irradiated in the H.B. Robinson PWR are shown. The release rate, fraction per minute, is calculated in the same manner as release rates given in NUREG-0772; the fission gas, cesium, and iodine release rate curve from that report is also shown

  11. Enhanced bit rate-distance product impulse radio ultra-wideband over fiber link

    Rodes Lopez, Roberto; Jensen, Jesper Bevensee; Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Yu, Xianbin; Pivnenko, Sergey; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    We report on a record distance and bit rate-wireless impulse radio (IR) ultra-wideband (UWB) link with combined transmission over a 20 km long fiber link. We are able to improve the compliance with the regulated frequency emission mask and achieve bit rate-distance products as high as 16 Gbit/s·m....

  12. A comparison of cardiac rate-pressure product and pressure-rate quotient in healthy and medically compromised patients.

    Campbell, R L; Langston, W G

    1995-08-01

    Healthy and medically compromised patients were studied to compare blood pressure and heart rate changes in response to stress of routine dental extractions performed while they were under local anesthesia. Thirty-nine patients divided into American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I and II groups were noninvasively monitored every 5 minutes. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate were recorded. Rate pressure products (RPP) and pressure rate (PRQ) quotients were calculated and compared in each group. Significant results were measures of RPP greater than 12,000 and PRQ less than one. Of the 24 patients in the ASA I category, 50% demonstrated elevated RPP values, but only two of 24 had coincidental PRQ abnormalities. Of the 15 patients in the ASA II category, 80% demonstrated elevated RPP values, but two of 15 had coincidental PRQ abnormalities. Patients in the ASA II category had a higher incidence of RPP and PRQ abnormalities, as was expected. However, it is not known which of these two measures is a more sensitive indicator of increased risk associated with stimulation of the sympathetic-adrenergic axis during oral surgery performed with patients under local anesthesia. Correlation studies with continuous Holter monitoring for ST-T wave changes on electrocardiography are forthcoming. PMID:7552876

  13. Automated Production Flow Line Failure Rate Mathematical Analysis with Probability Theory

    Tan Chan Sin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Automated lines have been widely used in the industries especially for mass production and to customize product. Productivity of automated line is a crucial indicator to show the output and performance of the production. Failure or breakdown of station or mechanisms is commonly occurs in the automated line in real condition due to the technological and technical problem which is highly affect the productivity. The failure rates of automated line are not express or analyse in terms of mathematic form. This paper presents the mathematic analysis by using probability theory towards the failure condition in automated line. The mathematic express for failure rates can produce and forecast the output of productivity accurately

  14. Precommitment and random exchange rates in symmetric duopoly: a new theory of multinational production

    David Nickerson; Marsha Courchane; Venkatraman Sadanand

    1990-01-01

    Recent volatility in real exchange rates has renewed interest in the nature of multinational firms. One increasingly common phenomenon involves the foreign sourcing of production, in which certain domestic firms choose to produce part or all of their product abroad and then export the commodity for domestic sale. Multinational production has been rationalized on the basis of inherent asymmetries between firms, such as the possession of certain firm-specific assets or differences between firms...

  15. Integrated Strategic Planning of Global Production Networks and Financial Hedging under Uncertain Demands and Exchange Rates

    Achim Koberstein; Elmar Lukas; Marc Naumann

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multi-stage stochastic programming model that integrates financial hedging decisions into the planning of strategic production networks under uncertain exchange rates and product demands. This model considers the expenses of production plants and the revenues of markets in different currency areas. Financial portfolio planning decisions for two types of financial instruments, forward contracts and options, are represented explicitly by multi-period decision variabl...

  16. Atomic hydrogen production rates for comet P/Halley from observations with Dynamics Explorer I

    Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    Newly analyzed observations of the Dynamics Explorer I (DE1), launched on August 3, 1981, were used to determine the hydrogen production rate for Comet Halley at heliocentric distances, r, less than about 1.5 AU from measurements of the total Lyman-alpha flux at earth due to the cometary neutral hydrogen distribution. The production rates, determined as a function of r, were found to be consistent with in situ measurements from the Giotto and Vega spacecraft. The calculated rates are also consistent with remote observations using two sounding rockets and with the Pioneer-Venus and IUE spacecraft.

  17. The Rate-Distortion Function for Product of Two Sources with Side-Information at Decoders

    Watanabe, Shun

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates a lossy source coding problem in which two decoders can access their side-information respectively. The correlated sources are a product of two component correlated sources, and we exclusively investigate the case such that each component is degraded. We show the rate-distortion function for that case, and give the following observations. When the components are degraded in matched order, the rate distortion function of the product sources is equal to the sum of the component-wise rate distortion functions. On the otherhand, the former is strictly smaller than the latter when the component sources are degraded in mismatched order.

  18. Norwegian resource policy: The production rate for Norwegian petroleum resources; Norsk ressurspolitikk: Utvinningstempoet for norske petroleumsressurser

    Schreiner, P.

    1995-12-31

    Petroleum activities have become a large industry in Norway. This has led to extensive changes in Norwegian economy and society. In the public debate on this activity there has been little discussion of what would be the most profitable production rate. However, it is generally agreed that the great wealth implied by the petroleum resources must be managed in ways suitable to both present and coming generations. This report discusses the production rate based on the following questions: (1) How high can the production rate be before the petroleum activities and the expenditure of the income from them influence the remaining Norwegian economy too strongly? (2) How much of this wealth should reasonably be used by present generations and how much should be left for future generations? There is much to gain from a high tempo and from relocating some of the petroleum wealth. The possibilities of influencing the production rate are mainly connected with the allotments of production licences. The consequences of uncertainties in the petroleum activities for the choice of exploitation tempo are unclear. The environment is not much affected by the production rate. The contractor activity has become Norway`s largest industry. 42 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Hydrogen and hydroxyl production rates of Comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka /1969 IX/

    Keller, H. U.; Lillie, C. F.

    1978-01-01

    Comet Tago-Sato-Kosaka (1969 IX) was observed with the ultraviolet photometers on OAO 2 from January 16.41 to January 29.89, 1970, while its heliocentric distance increased from 0.78 to 1.03 AU. The production rates of hydrogen and hydroxyl are derived from Lyman-alpha (1216 A) and OH (0-0) band (3090 A) emission. The variations of the hydrogen and hydroxyl production ran parallel to one another, while their ratio was about 3:1. These results are consistent with the assumption that vaporization of water ice controlled the production rate of gas during this interval. The hydrogen production rates of four nonperiodic comets are compared.

  20. Development of Copper Corrosion Products and Relation between Surface Appearance and Corrosion Rate

    Lan, Tran Thi Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh [Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Tru, Nguyen Nhi [Vietnam Institute for Tropical Technology and Environmental Protection, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Yoshino, Tsujino [Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan); Yasuki, Maeda [Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan)

    2008-04-15

    Copper was exposed unsheltered and sheltered in four humid tropical sites, representing urban, urban-industrial, urban-marine and rural environments. The corrosion rates and the sequence of corrosion product formation are presented and discussed in relation with climatic and atmospheric pollution parameters. Chemical compositions of corrosion products were found to depend on environments and duration of exposure. In all environments, cuprite was the predominating corrosion product that formed first and continuously increased during the exposure. Among the sulphur-containing corrosion products, posnjakite and brochantite were more frequently found and the first formed earlier. Nantokite was the most common chlorine-containing products for most cases, except the high-chloride environment, where atacamite was detected instead. The corrosion rate of copper was well indicated by the colour of patina. The red-purple colour corresponded to the high corrosion rate and the greenish grey colour corresponded to the low corrosion rate. Corrosion rate of sheltered copper in urban-marine environment increased with the exposure time.

  1. A study of the release rate of corrosion products for nuclear SG tubing

    Out-of-core radiation fields mainly are caused by activated corrosion product released from nuclear heat supply system. It is very important to minimize the generation of radioactive corrosion products which become a radiation source, in order to meet the needs of operation and maintenance. A study was conducted on determining the general corrosion rate and metal release rate for Inconel 690 (Japan), Inconel 690 (China), Inconel 600 and Incoloy 800 tubes on the primary water side of nuclear power plant simulation. The results show that the release rates of corrosion products of Alloy 690 on the primary water side is very low and that they decrease with the increase of chromium content in the alloys. (8 refs, 9 figs., 4 tabs.)

  2. Rate of germanium-isotope production by background processes in the SAGE experiment

    Data on a direct determination of systematic uncertainties caused by the background production of germanium isotopes in the radiochemical SAGE experiment measuring the solar-neutrino flux are analyzed. The result obtained for the rate of 68Ge production is 6.5(1±1.0) times greater than the expected one; the rate of 69Ge production does not exceed preliminary estimates. The above result for 68Ge corresponds to the systematic uncertainty that is caused by the interaction of cosmic-ray muons and which is equal to 5.8% (4.5 SNU) at a solar-neutrino-capture rate of 77.0 SNU. An experiment is proposed that would test the effect of cosmic-ray muon influence on the SAGE systematic uncertainty and which would be performed at the location of the underground scintillation telescope facilities of the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences)

  3. Fines stabilizing agent reduces production decline rates in steam injected wells

    Castillo de Castillo, Milagros; Fernandez Andrades, Jarvi [PDVSA - Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., Caracas (Venezuela); Navarro Cornejo, Willian; Curtis, James [BJ Services do Brasil Ltda., RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The Bachaquero Lago heavy oil field, located in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela, with an area of 9800 ha, in which more than 1800 wells have been drilled. The Lagunillas formation in this field is a mature, clastic, unconsolidated sandstone of Miocene age with good permeability. Clays are present, in laminated form or dispersed within the productive sandstones. Heavy oil, less than 12 deg API, is produced by cyclic steam injection. Wells are completed with cased-hole gravel packs to prevent sand and fines production. Rapid production decline rates are typically observed after the steam injection cycles, due to fines migration and plugging of the reservoir and gravel pack. This paper describes the methodology used to treat the wells with a fines stabilizing agent during the steam injection cycles in order to successfully reduce the subsequent production decline rate. Results from a multi-well pilot project are presented and analyzed. (author)

  4. On-line tritium production and heat deposition rate measurements at the Lotus facility

    Integral tritium production and heat deposition measurement in a prototype fusion blanket would enable verification of the computational codes and the data based employed for the calculations. A large number of tritium production rate measurements have been reported for different type of blankets, whereas the direct heat deposition due to the mixed radiation field in the fusion environment, is still in its infancy. In order to ascertain the kerma factors and the photon production libraries, suitable techniques must be developed to directly measure the nuclear heat deposition rates in the materials required for the fusion systems. In this context, at the Lotus facility, we have developed an extremely efficient double ionizing chamber, for the on-line tritium production measurements and employed a pure graphite calorimeter to measure the nuclear heat deposition due to the mixed radiation field of the 14 MeV, Haefely neutron generator. This paper presents both systems and some of the recent measurements. (authors). 8 refs., 13 figs

  5. Price of recreational products and the exchange rate: an empirical investigation on US data

    Cellini, Roberto; Alessandro PAOLINO

    2007-01-01

    The paper analyses the cointegration relationships and the causal links between the exchange rate of the US Dollar, on the one side, and different price indices of US products on the other side. Data are of monthly frequency and cover a period of two or three decades. We show that the exchange rate cointegrate with the Consumer Price Index and with the prices indices of several agricultural, manufactured and service goods; moreover a one-direction causal link is present, running from price ...

  6. Propagation of Localization Optimal Entropy Production and Convergence rates for the Central Limit Theorem

    Carlen, E

    2011-01-01

    We prove for the rescaled convolution map $f\\to f\\circledast f$ propagation of polynomial, exponential and gaussian localization. The gaussian localization is then used to prove an optimal bound on the rate of entropy production by this map. As an application we prove the convergence of the CLT to be at the optimal rate $1/\\sqrt{n}$ in the entropy (and $L^1$) sense, for distributions with finite 4th moment.

  7. Pressure effect on rate of production of glucose-equivalent in plant cells

    Anirban Panda; Surjendu Bhattacharyya; Sambhu N Datta

    2009-07-01

    The rate of glucose equivalent production in C4 green plants is investigated as a function of the intercellular partial pressure of CO2, so as to find the precise physical chemistry of photosynthesis. Expressions are first formulated for the dependence of photochemical efficiency and of rubisco activation on pressure. Then a pressure-dependent rate law is derived. The latter is successfully tested for two specific C4 plants, namely, Panicum antidotale and Panicum coloratum.

  8. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production

    Catlett, Jennie L.; Ortiz, Alicia M.; Buan, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron trans...

  9. A production inventory model with exponential demand rate and reverse logistics

    Ritu Raj

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated production inventory model for reworkable items with exponential demand rate. This is a three-layer supply chain model with perspectives of supplier, producer and retailer. Supplier delivers raw material to the producer and finished goods to the retailer. We consider perfect and imperfect quality products, product reliability and reworking of imperfect items. After screening, defective items reworked at a cost just after the regular manufacturing schedule. At the beginning, the manufacturing system starts produce perfect items, after some time the manufacturing system can undergo into “out-of-control” situation from “in-control” situation, which is controlled by reverse logistic technique. This paper deliberates the effects of business strategies like optimum order size of raw material, exponential demand rate, production rate is demand dependent, idle times and reverse logistics for an integrated marketing system. Mathematica is used to develop the optimal solution of production rate and raw material order for maximum expected average profit. A numerical example and sensitivity analysis is illustrated to validate the model.

  10. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  11. The rate of visitation by Amazilia fimbriata (Apodiformes: Trochilidae) influences seed production in Tillandsia stricta (Bromeliaceae)

    Caio C.C. Missagia; Maria Alice S. Alves

    2015-01-01

    Legitimate flowers visitors pollinate the flower during the visit and thus influence the production of fruits and seeds. We tested whether the visitation rate of potential pollinators is associated with the amount of seeds per fruit produced by the self-compatible bromeliad Tillandsia stricta (Bromeliaceae). We determined whether hummingbirds are legitimate visitors by testing for a correlation between visits and pollination (seed production) at the Guapiaçú Ecological Reserve (Reserva Ecológ...

  12. FORECASTING OF COMPETITIVE PRODUCT PRICE WITH DUE ACCOUNT OF QUALITY RATE

    I. V. Ваrysevich

    2011-01-01

    Terminology of  such concepts as «competitiveness» and «competitive price» is specified and capacity of a potential market segment for positioning innovative production is estimated in the paper. The paper analyzes a method for estimation of a quality rate on the basis of product consumer attractiveness. An improved  methodology for forecasting of a competitive price has been put on an evaluation test  while using actual data.  

  13. ANALYSIS OF CORRELATION BETWEEN THE UNEMPLOYMENT RATE AND GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT IN THE EUROPEAN UNION

    Cioca Ionela Cornelia

    2013-01-01

    Vacancies, unemployment, wage levels and labor costs do not only affect a country's economy by lowering the Gross Domestic Product, but every person’s life. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the Gross Domestic Product and unemployment rate in the European countries for the period 2005-2011. To perform the analysis, official data from Eurostat, National Statistical Institute and the National Agency for Employment in Romania were taken. The research objectives are to analyze the two indic...

  14. Subterranean production of neutrons, $^{39}$Ar and $^{21}$Ne: Rates and uncertainties

    Šrámek, Ondřej; Stevens, Lauren; William F. McDonough; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Peterson, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the subsurface production of radionuclide $^{39}$Ar rate is necessary for argon dating techniques and noble gas geochemistry of the shallow and the deep Earth, and is also of interest to the WIMP dark matter experimental particle physics community. Our new calculations of subsurface production of neutrons, $^{21}$Ne, and $^{39}$Ar take advantage of the best available tools of nuclear physics to obtain reaction cross sections and spectra (TALYS) and to evaluate neutro...

  15. Evaluation of fission product release rates during postulated core meltdown accidents

    An investigation of fission product release rates under severe accident conditions is presented for a pressurized water reactor with a large dry containment. In the calculation of fission product source terms, the numeical scheme by using core node temperatures during heatup and meltdown is introduced and incorporated into the MARCH code. The results indicated that the significant differences between the numerical integration method and WASH-1400 method are observed, especially Ru and La release categories. (Author)

  16. Relationship between Selected Properties of Starchy Vegetables on Grating and Slicing Production Rate

    Lok Chung Yee; M. K.S. Mazlina; B. T.H. Tuah

    2012-01-01

    Prediction on the output of grating and slicing of starchy vegetables are important prior to design or develop the particular food plant. The production rate of grating and slicing products could be affected by the properties of starchy vegetables. In this study, two selected properties which hardness and moisture content are studied. Hardness of selected starchy vegetables was measured using a destructive testing method of texture analyzer. A testing machine of the texture analyzer applied a...

  17. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm/sup -2/. Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures.

  18. IMPACT OF MARKET-DETERMINED EXCHANGE RATES ON RICE PRODUCTION AND IMPORT IN NIGERIA

    Aliyu Aishat Ammani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice is an economically important food security crop, cultivated in almost all of Nigeria’s 36 States. Nigeria spends more than 356 billion naira (2.24 billion US dollars annually on rice import. This paper set out to analyze the trend in rice production, productivity, import, value of import and consumption that follows the adoption of the Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP in Nigeria, with emphasis on the effects of exchange rate (ER deregulation on domestic rice production and rice imports over the period 1986-2010. Relevant time series data were collected and used. A semi-log growth rate model and 2simple linear regression models were developed and estimated. Highlights of the findings include (i accelerated rate of growth in rice production (Instantaneous Growth Rate (IGR 2.2%; Cumulative Growth Rate (CGR 2.2%; rice hectarage (IGR 3.7%; CGR 3.8%; rice importation (IGR 8.5%; CGR8.9%; expenditure on rice importation (IGR 10.6%; CGR 11.2% and rice consumption (IGR 3.4%; CGR 3.5% alongside a significant deceleration in rice yield (IGR -1.4%; CGR -201.4% (ii The observed significant increase in domestic rice production cannot be confidently attributed to ER deregulation alone because it does not lead to a decrease in rice importation into Nigeria. (iii The significant increase in domestic rice importation as observed contradicts a priori expectation that ER deregulation will lead to significant decrease in rice importation. The study concluded that free market approach alone cannot stimulate local agricultural production in countries where farmers producing under low-technology-agriculture are put in direct competition with farmers from advancedtechnology-agriculture; hence governments need to restrict importation to protect local producers.

  19. Efficient methane production from Lipid-Rich Wastewater in high-rate anaerobic treatment

    Anaerobic digestion allows, simultaneously, wastewater treatment and production of biogas, a renewable energy source. The energy yield of this process is higher for more reduced compounds, such as long chain fatty acids (LCFA), the main products of lipids hydrolysis. However, LCFA conversion to biogas is not always complete, and tends to decrease with the increase of the organic loading rate applied (OLR). Recent results obtained in our research group showed that efficient methane production from lipid-rich wastewater can be accomplished if acclimation of the inoculum is performed through discontinuous or pulsed feeding of fat. (Author)

  20. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence pr...

  1. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O 2 - ) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O 2 - were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescen...

  2. "Effects of agitation rate on the growth of Mycena SP and production of antifungal agents "

    Vahidi H

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Impeller speed or agitation rate plays a significant role in the growth of microorganism especially basidiomycetes and production of bioactive compounds via transfer of oxygen and mass. In this investigation the efferent impeller speeds on morphology, biomass concentration and production of bioactive compounds with antifungal activity were studied using a 5-liter fermenter. It was found that use of different impeller speeds (300 , 450 and 600 rpm resulted in various growth pattern and productivity. Impeller speed of 600 rpm gave a tow biomass concentration and low production of antifungal agent and the best result was obtained when impeller speed was adjusted to 450 rpm. Biomass concentration and productivity in the case of 300 rpm was less than that of 450 but higher than of 600 rpm.

  3. Second international comparison on measuring techniques of tritium production rate for fusion neutronics experiments (ICMT-2)

    An second international comparison on measuring techniques of tritium production rates for fusion neutronics experiments (ICMT-2) has been performed. The purpose is to evaluate the measurement accuracy of tritium production rates in the current measurement techniques. Two 14 MeV neutron source facilities, FNS at JAERI-Japan and LOTUS at EPFL-Switzerland, were used for this purpose. Nine groups out of seven countries participated in this program. A fusion simulated blanket assembly of simple-geometry was served as the test bed at each facility, in which Li-containing samples from the participants were irradiated in an uniform neutron field. The tritium production rates were determined by the participants using their own ways by using the liquid scintillation counting method. Tritiated water sample with unknown but the same concentration was also distributed and its concentration was measured to make a common reference. The standard deviation of measured tritium production rates among participants was about 10 % for both FNS and LOTUS irradiation levels: 4x10-13 T-atoms/Li-atom and 1.6x10-12 T-atoms/Li-atom at a sample, respectively. This standard deviation exceeds the expected deviation of 5 % in this program. It is presumed that the deviation of 10 % is caused mainly by the systematic and unknown errors in a process of tritium extraction from the irradiated samples depending on each organization. (author)

  4. The autonomic and rate pressure product responses of Tai Chi practitioners

    Michael A Figueroa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spectral analysis of autonomic nervous system activity can provide insight into cardiovascular function. Rate pressure product is the parameter often targeted pharmacologically to decrease the incidence of myocardial events. Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether or not Tai Chi Chuan practitioners would demonstrate autonomic responses that would be more cardioprotective when compared to non-trained controls. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that measured the autonomic responses and rate pressure product of 2 groups of subjects; a Tai Chi Chuan trained (n = 13 and non-trained sedentary controls (n = 13 at rest and during 2 stressor phases that simulated functional activities of daily living. Results: The Tai Chi group maintained a greater parasympathetic outflow at rest and during the isometric grip stressor phase (P<0.05. Sympathetic outflow, systolic blood pressure and rate pressure product were significantly lower in the Tai Chi group at rest, during the isometric grip and standing stressor phases (P<0.05. Conclusion: Although a cause-and-effect relationship cannot be concluded in this study, the Tai Chi group was able to demonstrate efficiency of the myocardium with suppressed rate pressure product values and autonomic responses that favored parasympathetic outflow. This type of training may complement non-pharmacological anti-hypertensive therapy.

  5. The effect of soil moisture on nitrous oxide production rates in large enclosed ecosystems

    van Haren, J.; Colodner, D.; Lin, G.; Murthy, R.

    2001-12-01

    On land, nitrous oxide (N2O) is mainly produced in soils by bacterial processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Once in the atmosphere N2O contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone destruction. Nitrification and denitrification are strongly dependent on soil moisture content, amongst other soil parameters. At Biosphere 2 Center we have begun to test the utility of meso-scale closed systems for understanding the relationship between soil properties and trace gas production at larger scales. We investigated the relationship between soil moisture content and soil N2O efflux in two large experimental closed systems (Tropical Rainforest (TR) and Intensive Forestry (IF) Mesocosms) at Biosphere 2 Center. N2O was measured every hour with an automated GC system. The daily N2O production rate was calculated as the rate of increase of N2O during the daytime, when the mesocosm was materially closed. We furthermore measured N2O and nitrate concentrations in the soil, as well as nitrate and N2O production rates in local areas. In the Rainforest Mesocosm, we found a very reproducible relationship between soil moisture content and N2O efflux, including the transient spikes in production rate upon wetting. In the Forestry Mesocosm the relation between soil moisture and N2O efflux was less clearcut.

  6. Reduced rates and alternatives to methyl bromide for snapdragon production in Florida

    A field trial was conducted to evaluate soil solarization, Midas™ (iodomethane:chloropicrin 50:50, Arysta LifeScience Corp., Cary, NC) and different rates and formulations of methyl bromide under standard and metalized films for the production of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) in Martin County, Flor...

  7. Development of variable-rate precision spraying systems for tree crop production

    Excessive pesticides are often applied to target and non-target areas in orchards and nurseries, resulting in greater production costs, worker exposure to unnecessary pesticide risks, and adverse contamination of the environment. To improve spray application efficiency, two types of variable-rate pr...

  8. Electrostatic levitation, control and transport in high rate, low cost production of inertial confinement fusion targets

    Inertial confinement fusion requires production of power plant grade targets at high rates and process yield. A review of present project specifications and techniques to produce targets is discussed with special emphasis on automating the processes and combining them with an electrostatic transport and suspension system through the power plant target factory

  9. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    L. Laakso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1 cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2 external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  10. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    Laakso, L.; Petäjä, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kulmala, M.; Paatero, J.; Hõrrak, U.; Tammet, H.; Joutsensaari, J.

    2004-09-01

    In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1) cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2) external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  11. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    L. Laakso

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest are studied based on two different methods: 1 cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2 external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produce reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 cm−3s−1 and based on external radiation and radon measurements 4.5 cm−3s−1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3 nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. Another reason is that the possible fogs, which caused an extra sink of small ions are not taken into account in the calculations. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. A fourth possible reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions were somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days. On the other hand, not all the radiation energy is converted to ions and the possible effect of alpha recoil is also omitted.

  12. Investigation of OxProduction Rates in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during MILAGRO

    Dusanter, S.; Molina, L. T.; Stevens, P. S.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and the formation of secondary pollutants are important issues in atmospheric chemistry. For instance, the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone (O3) is of particular interest due to its detrimental effects on both human health and agricultural ecosystems. A detailed characterization of tropospheric O3 production rates will help in the development of effective control strategies. The 2006 Mexico City Metropolitan Area field campaign (MCMA-2006) was one of four components of MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations) intended to collect information on the impact of megacity emissions on local, regional and global scales. In this presentation, rates of production of Ox (Ox = O3 + NO2) species during MCMA-2006 at the supersite T0 (Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo) will be presented using different approaches based on measured and modeled concentrations of ROx (OH + HO2 + RO2) radicals. In addition, we will examine both the reactivity of OH and the contribution of specific peroxy radicals to the oxidation rate of NO to estimate the contribution of groups of VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, oxygenated and biogenic VOCs) to the total production rate of Ox species.

  13. Construction of the rating of competitiveness of facilities of light aircraft of Ukrainian and Russian production

    А.I. Yakovlev

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Methodical approaches to determination of level of competitiveness of the small flying machines made in the various countries are considered. The valuation method of coefficients of weightiness of indicators of competitiveness is developed. The market rating of small airplanes of Ukrainian and Russian production is built.

  14. Implications of two Holocene time-dependent geomagnetic models for cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    Lifton, Nathaniel

    2016-01-01

    The geomagnetic field is a major influence on in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates at a given location (in addition to atmospheric pressure and, to a lesser extent, solar modulation effects). A better understanding of how past fluctuations in these influences affected production rates should allow more accurate application of cosmogenic nuclides. As such, this work explores the cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter.188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models with new paleomagnetic data from sediment cores in addition to new archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved resolution and accuracy over the previous versions, in part due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. In addition, Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109) developed another time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field, based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data from the same underlying paleomagnetic database as the Korte et al. models, but extending to 14 ka. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC - the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to each other and to results using the earlier models. In addition, predictions of each new model using RC are tested empirically using recently published production rate calibration data for both 10Be and 3He, and compared to predictions using corresponding time-varying geocentric dipolar RC formulations and a static geocentric axial dipole (GAD) model. Results for the few calibration sites from geomagnetically sensitive regions suggest that the

  15. Supply chain coordination for a deteriorating product under stock-dependent consumption rate and unreliable production process

    B. C. Giri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article develops a supply chain coordination model with a single-vendor and a single-buyer. The vendor manufactures the product in lots and delivers to the buyer in equal shipments. However, the vendor’s production process is not perfectly reliable. During a production run, the process may shift from an in-control state to an out-of-control state at any random time and produces some defective items. The buyer whose demand is assumed to be linear function of the on-hand inventory performs a screening process immediately after each replenishment. Moreover, the buyer’s inventory is deteriorated at a constant rate over time. The vendor-buyer coordination policy is determined by minimizing the average cost of the supply chain. It is observed from the numerical study that channel coordination earns significant cost savings over the non-coordinated policy.

  16. Production rates of strange vector mesons at the Z{sup 0} resonance

    Dima, M.O.

    1997-05-01

    This dissertation presents a study of strange vector meson production, {open_quotes}leading particle{close_quotes} effect and a first direct measurement of the strangeness suppression parameter in hadronic decays of the neutral electroweak boson, Z{sup 0}. The measurements were performed in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) with the SLC Large Detector (SLD) experiment. A new generation particle ID system, the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) is used to discriminate kaons from pions, enabling the reconstruction of the vector mesons over a wide momentum range. The inclusive production rates of {phi} and K*{sup 0} and the differential rates versus momentum were measured and are compared with those of other experiments and theoretical predictions. The high longitudinal polarisation of the SLC electron beam is used in conjunction with the electroweak quark production asymmetries to separate quark jets from antiquark jets. K*{sup 0} production is studied separately in these samples, and the results show evidence for the {open_quotes}leading particle{close_quotes} effect. The difference between K*{sup 0} production rates at high momentum in quark and antiquark jets yields a first direct measurement of strangeness suppression in jet fragmentation.

  17. Production rates of strange vector mesons at the Z0 resonance

    This dissertation presents a study of strange vector meson production, open-quotes leading particleclose quotes effect and a first direct measurement of the strangeness suppression parameter in hadronic decays of the neutral electroweak boson, Z0. The measurements were performed in e+e- collisions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) with the SLC Large Detector (SLD) experiment. A new generation particle ID system, the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) is used to discriminate kaons from pions, enabling the reconstruction of the vector mesons over a wide momentum range. The inclusive production rates of φ and K*0 and the differential rates versus momentum were measured and are compared with those of other experiments and theoretical predictions. The high longitudinal polarisation of the SLC electron beam is used in conjunction with the electroweak quark production asymmetries to separate quark jets from antiquark jets. K*0 production is studied separately in these samples, and the results show evidence for the open-quotes leading particleclose quotes effect. The difference between K*0 production rates at high momentum in quark and antiquark jets yields a first direct measurement of strangeness suppression in jet fragmentation

  18. Production rate of pollen grains of castanea crenata in a quercus serrata secondary forest

    Kiyonaga, Jota

    1995-01-01

    The production rate of pollen grains of Castanea crenata in a secondary Quercus serrata forest was determined in 1990-1993, based on the number of pollen grains per male catkin and annual fall rate of male catkins. The latter parameter was measured using six litter traps. The annual production rate of pollen grains in 1990-1992 was 9.7×10^<11>-3.7×10^<12>no.ha^<-1>yr^<-1>. The mean value for the four years was 2.0×10^<12>no.ha^<-1>yr^<-1>. Resumo Produktaĵo de poleneroj (no.ha^<-1>yr^<-1>) de...

  19. Production rate of quercus glauca pollen grains in a quercus glauca secondary forest

    Kiyonaga, Jota

    2002-01-01

    The production rate of pollen grains of Quercus glauca, in a secondary Q. glauca forest was determined over a three-year period, based on the number of pollen grains per male catkin and the fall rate of the male catkins. The latter parameter was measured using six litter traps. The annual production rate of pollen grains from 1996-1998 was 2.0×10^<11> 7.8×10^<11> no. ha^<-1>yr^1. The mean value for the three years is 4.4×10^lt;11> no.ha^<-1>yr^1. This value. which is lower than the results fr...

  20. Effects of alternating magnetic field on the corrosion rate and corrosion products of copper

    GUO Bin; ZHANG Peng; JIN Yongping; CHENG Shukang

    2008-01-01

    The effects of alternating magnetic field on the corrosion morphologies, corrosion rate, and corrosion products of copper in 3.5% NaCl solution, sea water, and magnetized sea water were investigated using electrochemical test, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive analysis system of X-ray (SEM/EDAX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the corrosion rate of copper in magnetized sea water is minimal. Moreover, the surface of the specimen in magnetized sea water is uniform and compact as compared with those in 3.5% NaCl solution and sea water. The corrosion products of copper in magnetized sea water are mainly Cu2O and CuCl2. However, the corrosion products in sea water are CuCl, Cu2Cl(OH)3, and FeCl3·6H2O. The electrochemical corrosion mechanisms of copper in the three media were also discussed.

  1. Cosmogenic nuclide production rate systematics in terrestrial materials: Present knowledge, needs and future actions for improvement

    The growing applications of cosmogenic nuclides produced in the Earth's atmosphere, and in situ in a variety of terrestrial materials, as tracers in a wide ranging Earth science problems, has put a greater demand on accurate determination of the nuclide production rates in a variety of targets exposed in different settings on the Earth in the troposphere. The present state of our knowledge of cosmogenic production rates is reviewed briefly, in conjunction with the phenomenological and theoretical framework for: (i) the cosmic ray flux incident in the near Earth environment, (ii) the nucleonic cascade set off in the Earth's atmosphere by the primary cosmic radiation, and (iii) the rate for production of nuclides in terrestrial materials, in widely different settings. These considerations set the stage for the diverse questions, which must be taken into account for determining the source functions of isotopic changes in terrestrial materials. We discuss the different approaches which have been adopted earlier to obtain the source strengths of nuclear interacting particles of the cosmic radiation, and direct measurements of nuclide production rates made by exposing targets to cosmic radiation at sea level and at mountain altitudes. We show that rapid progress in determining nuclide source functions with sufficient information on temporal variability is indeed expected in the near future as a result of: (i) dramatic improvements in the past 2-3 decades in our understanding of the character of propagation of cosmic radiation within the heliosphere, (ii) experiments now being conducted by a few groups to determine the source strengths of cosmic ray slow neutrons, and nuclide production rates in cosmic ray exposed targets, and finally (iii) the emergence of better nuclear codes which deal with the development of nucleonic cascades in the Earth's atmosphere

  2. Statistical Optimization of Xanthan Gum Production and Influence of Airflow Rates in Lab-scale Fermentor

    S. Moshaf

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate and optimize the possibility of xanthan gum production by Xanthomonas campestris PTCC1473 in 500ml shake flasks on the second grade date palm. Using an experimental response surface methodology (RSM coupled with a central composite design (CCD, three major independent variables (nitrogen source, phosphor source and agitation rate were evaluated for their individual and interactive effects on biomass and xanthan gum production in submerged fermentation. The optimum conditions selected for gum production were 3.15 g.l-1 for nitrogen source, 5.03 g.l-1 for phosphor source, and 394.8 rpm for agitation rate. Reconfirmation test was conducted, and the experimental value obtained for xanthan production under optimum conditions was about 6.72±0.26 g.l-1, which was close to 6.51 g.l-1 as predicted by the model. A higher yield of biomass production was obtained at 13.74 g.l-1 for nitrogen source, 4.66 g.l-1 for phosphor source, and 387.42 rpm for agitation rate. In the next stage, scale-up from the shake flasks to the 1-L batch fermentors was carried. By using the optimum conditions for xanthan gum, the biomass and xanthan gum concentrations after 72h in three levels of air flow rate (0.5, 1 and 1.5 vvm were obtained as 3.98, 5.31 and 6.04 g.l-1,and 11.32, 15.16 and 16.84 g.l-1, respectively. Overall, the second grade date palm seemed to exhibit promising properties that can open new pathways for the production of efficient and cost-effective xanthan gum.

  3. In vitro O 2 fluxes compared with 14C production and other rate terms during the JGOFS Equatorial Pacific experiment

    Bender, Michael; Orchardo, Joe; Dickson, Mary-Lynn; Barber, Richard; Lindley, Steven

    1999-04-01

    We report rates of gross and net O 2 production measured in vitro during JGOFS cruises in the equatorial Pacific in spring and fall, 1992. We scale O 2 productivities to net and gross C production. We then compare the calculated rates with 14C production and with new/export production measured by various techniques. 14C productivities in samples incubated for 24 h are about 45% of gross carbon production rates calculated from gross O 2 production. The difference is compatible with expected rates of the Mehler reaction, photorespiration, excretion, and community mitochondrial respiration. 14C production rates are similar to net carbon production rates in the upper half of the euphotic zone. At lower irradiances, where net C production can be zero or less, 14C productivities lie between net community production and gross primary production. Net carbon production rates in vitro are a factor of =4-20 times greater than estimates from drifting sediment trap and tracer transport studies. This difference probably reflects anomalous accumulation of POC in bottles because of the exclusion of grazers.

  4. High production rate of crystallization process in TFA-MOD method for YBCO coated conductors

    To realize a higher production rate is one of the important issues in the development of the long-tape processing for the YBCO coated conductors by the TFA-MOD process using the reel-to-reel system. Not only scale-up of the furnace and decrease of YBCO thickness with the higher J c value, but higher YBCO growth rates could be effective to achieve a higher traveling rate in this system. It was confirmed that optimization of the process parameters such as high water vapor partial pressure, high diffusion constants due to a low applied total pressure, and a high gas flow rate affect the YBCO growth rate. Consequently, these higher growth rate conditions were simultaneously applied to the reel-to-reel system. As a result, the traveling rate of 1.2 m/h was achieved for fabricating YBCO films in the reel-to-reel system, which is about five times as fast as the previous traveling rate with maintaining high I c value of higher than 200 A/cm-width by controlling above conditions

  5. Absolute production rate measurements of nitric oxide by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ)

    Pipa, A V; Bindemann, T; Foest, R; Kindel, E; Roepcke, J; Weltmann, K-D [Leibniz-Institut fuer Plasmaforschung and Technologie e.V. (INP), Felix-Hausdorff Strasse 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)], E-mail: foest@inp-greifswald.de

    2008-10-07

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has been applied to measure the absolute production rate of NO molecules in the gas phase of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) operating at rf (13.56 MHz) in argon with small (up to 1%) admixtures of air. The resulting NO production rates were found to be in the range (0.1-80) x 10{sup -3} sccm or (0.05-35) x 10{sup 18} molecules s{sup -1} depending on the experimental conditions. Maximum rates were obtained at 0.2% air. For TDLAS measurements the APPJ was arranged inside an astigmatic multi-pass cell of Herriott type with 100 m absorption length. The insertion into a closed volume differs slightly from the normal, open operation with the jet propagating freely into air. Therefore, the measuring results are compared with optical emission of the open jet to verify equivalent experimental conditions. The dependence of the optical emission of NO (237 nm) on power and gas mixture has been measured. The similar shape of the dependence of absorption and emission signals gives evidence that the comparability of experimental conditions is sufficiently satisfied. It is concluded that the NO production rate of the APPJ in ambient air can be characterized using TDLAS and provides reliable results in spite of differing experimental conditions due to the set-up.

  6. Integrated Strategic Planning of Global Production Networks and Financial Hedging under Uncertain Demands and Exchange Rates

    Achim Koberstein

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a multi-stage stochastic programming model that integrates financial hedging decisions into the planning of strategic production networks under uncertain exchange rates and product demands. This model considers the expenses of production plants and the revenues of markets in different currency areas. Financial portfolio planning decisions for two types of financial instruments, forward contracts and options, are represented explicitly by multi-period decision variables and a multi-stage scenario tree. Using an illustrative example, we analyze the impact of exchange-rate and demand volatility, the level of investment expenses and interest rate spreads on capacity location and dimensioning decisions. In particular, we show that, in the illustrative example, the exchange-rate uncertainty cannot be completely eliminated by financial hedging in the presence of demand uncertainty. In this situation, we find that the integrated model can result in better strategic planning decisions for a risk-averse decision maker compared to traditional modeling approaches.

  7. Influence of Production System, Sex and Litter Size on Growth Rates in Turcana Lambs

    Dinu Gavojdian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat production has become the main source of income in the Romanian sheep farming industry, representing over 66% of the total returns. Turcana breed represents over 70% of the national flock, and 92% of the sheep bred in western Romania. However, meat production potential and growth rates of the breed are low, and thus strategies to improve performance of the Turcana lambs need to be identified. Aim of the current research was to evaluate the effects that sex and litter size have on the growth rates of lambs from Turcana breed under extensive and semi-intensive production systems. Weaning weight was significantly (p≤0.001 influenced by the production system, with lambs reared extensively registering a average body weights of 18.23±0.094 kg at the age of 90 days, while the semi-intensively reared lambs registered an average weight of 20.19±0.082 kg. It was concluded that all three factors taken into study significantly influence growth rates in Turcana lambs and that weight of the lamb(s at the age of 28 days should be included as a selection trait within the Turcana breed genetic improvement plan.

  8. Evaluating the effect of exchange rate and labor productivity on import penetration of Brazilian manufacturing sectors

    João Paulo Martin Faleiros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several economists have argued that the sharp loss of competitiveness of the Brazilian industry was caused by a strong exchange rate appreciation. However, other economists have attributed this loss of competitiveness to the dismal growth of labor productivity in the Brazilian industrial sector. The present paper proposes to estimate the differential impacts of variations in exchange rate and labor productivity on the Brazilian market share of imports measured by the coefficient of import penetration of total demand for manufacturing goods. We start by developing a simple theoretical model to investigate under what conditions the impacts of an exchange rate depreciation and an increase in labor productivity would differ. We test the theoretical implications of the model by means of a GMM panel data analysis focusing on 17 manufacturing sectors in the period between 1996 and 2011. Our results suggest that both variables matter to explain the coefficient of import penetration. Nevertheless, labor productivity has the strongest negative impact on the market share of imported goods, even after controlling for sector fixed-effects.

  9. Exposure testing of fasteners in preservative treated wood: Gravimetric corrosion rates and corrosion product analyses

    Research highlights: → The composition of the corrosion products was similar for the nail head and shank. → Reduced copper was not detected on any of the fasteners. → Measured corrosion rates were between 1 and 35 μm year-1. - Abstract: Research was conducted to determine the corrosion rates of metals in preservative treated wood and also understand the mechanism of metal corrosion in treated wood. Steel and hot-dip galvanized steel fasteners were embedded in wood treated with one of six preservative treatments and exposed to 27 oC at 100% relative humidity for 1 year. The corrosion rate was determined gravimetrically and the corrosion products were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Although the accepted mechanism of corrosion in treated wood involves the reduction of cupric ions from the wood preservative, no reduced copper was found on the corrosion surfaces. The galvanized corrosion products contained sulfates, whereas the steel corrosion products consisted of iron oxides and hydroxides. The possible implications and limitations of this research on fasteners used in building applications are discussed.

  10. Optimising stocking rate and grazing management to enhance environmental and production outcomes for native temperate grasslands

    Badgery, Warwick; Zhang, Yingjun; Huang, Ding; Broadfoot, Kim; Kemp, David; Mitchell, David

    2015-04-01

    Stocking rate and grazing management can be altered to enhance the sustainable production of grasslands but the relative influence of each has not often been determined for native temperate grasslands. Grazing management can range from seasonal rests through to intensive rotational grazing involving >30 paddocks. In large scale grazing, it can be difficult to segregate the influence of grazing pressure from the timing of utilisation. Moreover, relative grazing pressure can change between years as seasonal conditions influence grassland production compared to the relative constant requirements of animals. This paper reports on two studies in temperate native grasslands of northern China and south eastern Australia that examined stocking rate and regionally relevant grazing management strategies. In China, the grazing experiment involved combinations of a rest, moderate or heavy grazing pressure of sheep in spring, then moderate or heavy grazing in summer and autumn. Moderate grazing pressure at 50% of the current district average, resulted in the better balance between maintaining productive and diverse grasslands, a profitable livestock system, and mitigation of greenhouse gases through increased soil carbon, methane uptake by the soil, and efficient methane emissions per unit of weight gain. Spring rests best maintained a desirable grassland composition, but had few other benefits and reduced livestock productivity due to lower feed quality from grazing later in the season. In Australia, the grazing experiment compared continuous grazing to flexible 4- and 20-paddock rotational grazing systems with sheep. Stocking rates were adjusted between systems biannually based on the average herbage mass of the grassland. No treatment degraded the perennial pasture composition, but ground cover was maintained at higher levels in the 20-paddock system even though this treatment had a higher stocking rate. Overall there was little difference in livestock production (e.g. kg