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Sample records for 31p-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  1. Metabolism of perfused pig intercostal muscles evaluated by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Pedersen, Brian Lindegaard; Arendrup, Henrik; Secher, Niels H;

    2006-01-01

    consumption and 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). When perfused at rest with Krebs-Ringer buffer, the preparation maintained physiological levels of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP and pH at a stable oxygen consumption of 0.51 +/- 0.01 micromol min(-1) g(-1) for more than 2 h...

  2. Early effects of radiotherapy in small cell lung cancer xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, E J; Quistorff, B;

    1990-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) and biochemical analysis of extracts were applied to study the metabolic response to X-irradiation of small cell lung cancer in nude mice. Two small cell lung cancer xenografts, CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, with different radiosensitivity, although derived...

  3. INVIVO 31P MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY (MRS) OF TENDER POINTS IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY FIBROMYALGIA SYNDROME

    DEBLECOURT, AC; WOLF, RF; VANRIJSWIJK, MH; KAMMAN, RL; KNIPPING, AA; MOOYAART, EL

    1991-01-01

    31P Magnetic Resonance-Spectroscopy was performed at the site of tender points in the trapezius muscle of patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome. Earlier, in vitro studies have reported changes in the high energy phosphate-metabolism in biopsies taken from tender points of fibromyalgia patients

  4. Bioenergetic Measurements in Children with Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Sikoglu, Elif M.; J. Eric Jensen; Gordana Vitaliano; Liso Navarro, Ana A; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jean A. Frazier; Moore, Constance M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research exploring Bipolar Disorder (BD) phenotypes and mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in younger subjects, has been insufficient to date. Previous studies have found abnormal cerebral pH levels in adults with BD, which may be directly linked to abnormal mitochondrial activity. To date no such studies have been reported in children with BD. Methods: Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (\\(^{31}\\)P MRS) was used to determine pH, phopshocreatine (PCr) and inorganic ph...

  5. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle in patients with fibromyalgia

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C;

    1992-01-01

    31Phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy of painful calf muscle was performed in 12 patients with fibromyalgia (FS) and 7 healthy subjects during rest, aerobic and anaerobic exercising conditions, and postexercise recovery. Ratios of inorganic phosphate and creatinine...... phosphate (Pi/PCr) and pH were calculated from the collected 31P NMR spectra. Resting values of Pi/PCr were normal in the patients. Patients delivered only 49% of the muscle power of the controls (p = 0.005). Patients and controls had similar rates of Pi/PCr and pH changes during work and recovery. The...

  6. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Impaired energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism

    31Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows an in vivo examination of energy metabolism. The present study was designed to evaluate whether in patients with latent hyperthyroidism alterations of muscle energy metabolism could be found similar to those observed in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. In 10 patients with overt hyperthyroidism before therapy and 20 with latent hyperthyroidism (also without therapy) and in 24 healthy volunteers magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed within a 1.5-Tesla magnet. Muscle concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and ATP were quantified compared to an external standard solution of K2HPO4. In the patients with overt hyperthyroidism and with latent hyperthyroidism a significant decrease of phosphocreatine was found. Further, the ATP concentration in patients with latent and manifest hyperthyroidism tended towards lower values. There were no significant differences in the decrease of phosphocreatine and ATP between both patient groups. Therefore, this study for the first time shows that alterations of energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism can be measured and that they are similar to those observed in overt hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  7. Cardiac metabolism during exercise in healthy volunteers measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Conway, M A; Bristow, J D; Blackledge, M J; Rajagopalan, B; Radda, G K

    1991-01-01

    A technique was devised for individuals to exercise prone in a magnet during magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the heart and phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra of the heart were obtained by the phase modulated rotating frame imaging technique in six healthy volunteers during steady state dynamic quadriceps exercise. During prone exercise heart rate, blood pressure, and total body oxygen consumption were measured at increasing loads and the results were compared with those during Bruce protocol treadmill exercise. During prone exercise with a 5 kg load the heart rate was similar and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than those during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol. The rate-pressure products were similar but the total body oxygen consumption was lower during prone exercise. There was no difference in the ratio of phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate during rest and exercise.Thus during exercise that produced a local cardiac stress equal to or greater than that during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol treadmill exercise, the energy requirements of the normal human myocardium were adequately supplied by oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:1993127

  8. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral infarction in rats

    Yamamuro, Manabu; Katayama, Yasuo; Igarashi, Hironaka; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the noninvasive study of metabolism in vivo. In order to further understand the time course of biochemical changes during cerebral infarction, we performed the MRS study with pathological analysis. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded in spontaneously hypertensive male rats (SHR) by the method of Tamura et al. The spectra were obtained from the infarcted hemisphere by placing the surface coils over the left side of the calvarium. {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H-MRS were performed at 3 hours, 24 hours and 7 days after MCA occlusion. Ischemic lesions caused by the left MCA occlusion extended into the parietal lobe and caudate putamen. After 3 hours of ischemia, vacuolated neurophils and shrunken neurons were observed. At 24 hours, these changes were severe. After 7 days, infiltration of monocytes and capillary hyperplasia were seen, and neurons had disappeared. At the acute stage of ischemia the phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) peak ratio decreased. After 7 days of ischemia, these changes became obscure. The intracellular pH (pHi) decreased after 3 hours of ischemia and recovered almost to the control level at 24 hours post ischemia. Alkalosis was apparent 7 days after ischemia. This alkalosis might be due to increased permeability of the deteriorated blood brain barrier. Although the lactate level was high 24 hours post ischemia, the pHi was almost normal. The N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine ratio decreased significantly from the acute stage of stroke. This decrease correlated with pathological changes. The correlation of the magnetic resonance spectra with the histological results may open aspects for monitoring stroke therapy and a new approach to tissue characterization. (author)

  9. Feasibility of Rapid-Sequence 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Cardiac Patients

    Purpose: To determine the clinical feasibility of rapid-sequence phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P -MRS) of the heart with cardiac patients using a 5T clinical MR system. Material and Methods: Twenty cardiac patients, i.e. dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)3 cases, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) 3 cases, hypertensive heart diseases (HHD) 3 cases, and aortic regurgitation (AR) case were examined using rapid cardiac 31P-MRS. Complete three-dimensional localization was performed using a two-dimensional phosphorus chemical-shift imaging sequence in combination with 30-mm axial slice-selective excitation. The rapid-sequence 31P-MRS procedure was phase encoded in arrays of 8x8 steps with an average of 4 acquisitions. The total examination time, including proton imaging and shimming, for the rapid cardiac 31P-MRS procedure, ranged from 0 to 5 min, depending on the heart rate. Student's t test was used to compare creatine phosphate (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios from the cardiac patients with those of the control subjects (n≅13). Results: The myocardial PCr/ATP ratio obtained by rapid 31P-MRS was significantly lower (P 31P-MRS may be a valid diagnostic tool for patients with cardiac disease

  10. Bioenergetic measurements in children with bipolar disorder: a pilot 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Elif M Sikoglu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research exploring Bipolar Disorder (BD phenotypes and mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in younger subjects, has been insufficient to date. Previous studies have found abnormal cerebral pH levels in adults with BD, which may be directly linked to abnormal mitochondrial activity. To date no such studies have been reported in children with BD. METHODS: Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31P MRS was used to determine pH, phopshocreatine (PCr and inorganic phosphate (Pi levels in 8 subjects with BD and 8 healthy comparison subjects (HCS ages 11 to 20 years old. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pH between the patients and HCS. However, frontal pH values for patients with BD increased with age, contrary to studies of HCS and the pH values in the frontal lobe correlated negatively with the YMRS values. Global Pi was significantly lower in subjects with BD compared with HCS. There were no significant differences in PCr between the groups. Global PCr-to-Pi ratio (PCr/Pi was significantly higher in subjects with BD compared with HCS. CONCLUSIONS: The change in Pi levels for the patients with BD coupled with the no difference in PCr levels, suggest an altered mitochondrial phosphorylation. However, our findings require further investigation of the underlying mechanisms with the notion that a mitochondrial dysfunction may manifest itself differently in children than that in adults. LIMITATIONS: Further investigations with larger patient populations are necessary to draw further conclusions.

  11. Feasibility of Rapid-Sequence {sup 31}P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Cardiac Patients

    Chida, K.; Otani, H.; Saito, H.; Nagasaka, T.; Kagaya, Y.; Kohzuki, M.; Zuguchi, M.; Shirato, K. [Tohoku Univ., School of Health Sciences, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiological Technology

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical feasibility of rapid-sequence phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P -MRS) of the heart with cardiac patients using a 5T clinical MR system. Material and Methods: Twenty cardiac patients, i.e. dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)3 cases, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) 3 cases, hypertensive heart diseases (HHD) 3 cases, and aortic regurgitation (AR) case were examined using rapid cardiac {sup 31}P-MRS. Complete three-dimensional localization was performed using a two-dimensional phosphorus chemical-shift imaging sequence in combination with 30-mm axial slice-selective excitation. The rapid-sequence {sup 31}P-MRS procedure was phase encoded in arrays of 8x8 steps with an average of 4 acquisitions. The total examination time, including proton imaging and shimming, for the rapid cardiac {sup 31}P-MRS procedure, ranged from 0 to 5 min, depending on the heart rate. Student's t test was used to compare creatine phosphate (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios from the cardiac patients with those of the control subjects (n{approx_equal}13). Results: The myocardial PCr/ATP ratio obtained by rapid {sup 31}P-MRS was significantly lower (P <0.001) in DCM patients (1.82{+-}0.33, mean{+-}SD), and in patients with global myocardial dysfunction (combined data for 20 patients:.89{+-}0.32) than in normal volunteers (2.96{+-}0.59). These results are similar to previous studies. Conclusion: Rapid-sequence {sup 31}P-MRS may be a valid diagnostic tool for patients with cardiac disease.

  12. Advancement of 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Using GRAPPA Reconstruction on a 3D Volume

    Clevenger, Tony

    The overall objective of this research is to improve currently available metabolic imaging techniques for clinical use in monitoring and predicting treatment response to radiation therapy in liver cancer. Liver metabolism correlates with inflammatory and neoplastic liver diseases, which alter the intracellular concentration of phosphorus- 31 (31P) metabolites [1]. It is assumed that such metabolic changes occur prior to physical changes of the tissue. Therefore, information on regional changes of 31P metabolites in the liver, obtained by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) [1,2], can help in diagnosis and follow-up of various liver diseases. Specifically, there appears to be an immediate need of this technology for both the assessment of tumor response in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) [3--5], as well as assessment of radiation toxicity, which can result in worsening liver dysfunction [6]. Pilot data from our lab has shown that 31P MRSI has the potential to identify treatment response five months sooner than conventional methods [7], and to assess the biological response of liver tissue to radiation 24 hours post radiation therapy [8]. While this data is very promising, commonly occurring drawbacks for 31P MRSI are patient discomfort due to long scan times and prone positioning within the scanner, as well as reduced data quality due to patient motion and respiration. To further advance the full potential of 31P MRSI as a clinical diagnostic tool in the management of liver cancer, this PhD research project had the following aims: I) Reduce the long acquisition time of 3D 31P MRS by formulating and imple- menting an appropriate GRAPPA undersampling scheme and reconstruction on a clinical MRI scanner II) Testing and quantitative validation of GRAPPA reconstruction on 3D 31P MRSI on developmental phantoms and healthy volunteers At completion, this work should considerably advance 31P MRSI

  13. Exertional muscle pain in familial Mediterranean fever patients evaluated by MRI and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of physical activity on the structural, morphological, and metabolic characteristics of the gastrocnemius muscle in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, utilizing quantitative 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in order to elucidate the mechanism of their exertional leg pain. Materials and methods: Eleven FMF patients suffering from exertional leg pain (eight male, three female; mean age 33 years) and six healthy individuals (three male, three female; mean age 39 years) constituted the control group. All of the participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-selective 31P MRS (3 T) of the leg muscles before and after graded exercise on a treadmill. Phosphocreatine (PCr):inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr:adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios and the intracellular pH of the leg muscles were measured using 31P MRS. Results: For both groups, normal muscle mass with no signal alterations was observed on the MRI images after exercise. The normal range of pre- and post- exercise MRS muscle parameters was observed in both groups. However, the intracellular pH post-exercise, was significantly higher (less acidic) in the FMF group compared to the control group [pH (FMF) = 7.03 ± 0.02; pH (control) 7.00 ± 0.02; p < 0.0006]. Conclusions: The finding of a less prominent, post-exercise acidification of the gastrocnemius muscle in this FMF patient group suggests a forme fruste of glycogenosis. This preliminary observation should be further investigated in a future, larger-scale study

  14. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Sherpa heart: a phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate signature of metabolic defense against hypobaric hypoxia.

    Hochachka, P W; Clark, C M; Holden, J E; Stanley, C; Ugurbil, K; Menon, R S

    1996-01-01

    Of all humans thus far studied, Sherpas are considered by many high-altitude biomedical scientists as most exquisitely adapted for life under continuous hypobaric hypoxia. However, little is known about how the heart is protected in hypoxia. Hypoxia defense mechanisms in the Sherpa heart were explored by in vivo, noninvasive 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Six Sherpas were examined under two experimental conditions [normoxic (21% FiO2) and hypoxic (11% FiO2) and in two adaptational state...

  15. Spin-lattice relaxation time of inorganic phosphate in human tumor xenografts measured in vivo by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Influence of oxygen tension

    Previous 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) studies have suggested that the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) resonance is shorter in well-oxygenated than in poorly oxygenated tumors. Amelanotic human melanoma xenografts were therefore subjected to 31P-MRS to investigate whether the T1 of the Pi resonance might be a useful parameter for assessment of tumor oxygenation status. It was searched for possible correlations between the T1 of the Pi resonance and oxygen tension or parameters closely related to oxygen tension, including 31P-MRS tumor energy status and blood supply per viable tumor cell. Oxygen tension, tumor energy status, and blood supply per viable tumor cell decreased with increasing tumor volume. In contrast to previous suggestions, the T1 of the Pi resonance decreased with increasing tumor volume and decreasing oxygen tension, tumor energy status, and blood supply per viable tumor cell, possibly because the tumors developed necrotic regions concomitantly with the decrease in oxygenation status, resulting in increased concentrations of freely dissolved para-magnetic ions in the tissue. Consequently, the T1 of the Pi resonance can probably not be utilized to estimate the oxygenation status of tumors, at least not in tumors with necrotic regions. (orig.)

  16. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed

  17. Analysis of energy metabolism of the rabbit liver in obstructive jaundice using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess the changes in hepatic high-energy phosphate metabolites in rabbits with obstructive jaundice. The rabbits, which had undergone operative ligation of the common bile duct, were studied using a 2.0 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imager. Comparison of the peak phosphorus signal values relative to α-ATP showed that the peak phosphodiester and γ-ATP values in the livers of the one-day-after-ligation group were significantly lower than those in the control group, and the peak phosphomonoester and phosphodiester values in the five-days-after-ligation group were larger than those in the control group, but not significantly. Comparison of the peak T1 values in the one-day-after-ligation group with those of the control group revealed that the T1 value of phosphodiester was significantly larger than that in control group. It is suggested that dysfunction of phospholipid metabolism appears in the early phase of hepatic dysfunction due to obstructive jaundice. (author)

  18. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using 31P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using 31P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  19. Biochemical metabolic changes assessed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy after radiation-induced hepatic injury in rabbits

    Ri-Sheng Yu; Liang Hao; Fei Dong; Jian-Shan Mao; Jian-Zhong Sun; Ying Chen; Min Lin; Zhi-Kang Wang; Wen-Hong Ding

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To compare the features of biochemical metabolic changes detected by hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) with the liver damage score (LDS) and pathologic changes in rabbits and to investigate the diagnostic value of 31P MRS in acute hepatic radiation injury.METHODS:A total of 30 rabbits received different radiation doses (ranging 5-20 Gy) to establish acute hepatic injury models.Blood biochemical tests,31P MRS and pathological examinations were carried out 24 h after irradiation.The degree of injury was evaluated according to LDS and pathology.Ten healthy rabbits served as controls.The MR examination was performed on a 1.5 T imager using a 1H/31P surface coil by the 2D chemical shift imaging technique.The relative quantities of phosphomonoesters (PME),phosphodiesters (PDE),inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured.The data were statistically analyzed.RESULTS:(1) Relative quantification of phosphorus metabolites:(a) ATP:there were significant differences (P<0.05) (LDS-groups:control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group,1.83±0.33 vs 1.55±0.24 vs 1.27±0.09 vs 0.98±0.18;pathological groups:control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group,1.83±0.33 vs 1.58±0.25 vs 1.32±0.07 vs 1.02 ± 0.18) of ATP relative quantification among control group,mild injured group,moderate injured group,and severe injured group according to both LDS grading and pathological grading,respectively,and it decreased progressively with the increased degree of injury (r=-0.723,P=0.000).(b) PME and Pi;the relative quantification of PME and Pi decreased significantly in the severe injured group,and the difference between the control group and severe injured group was significant (P<0.05) (PME:LDScontrol group vs LDS-severe group,0.86±0.23 vs 0.58±0.22,P=0.031;pathological control group vs pathological severe group,0.86±0.23 vs 0.60±0.21,P=0.037;Pi:LDS-control group vs LDS-severe group,0.74±0.18 vs

  20. Improved energy kinetics following high protein diet in McArdle's syndrome. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Jensen, K E; Jakobsen, J; Thomsen, C;

    1990-01-01

    A patient with McArdle's syndrome was examined using bicycle ergometry and 31P NMR spectroscopy during exercise. The patients working capacity was approximately half the expected capacity of controls. Muscle energy kinetics improved significantly during intravenous glucose infusion and after 6...

  1. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined by in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, A G; Quistorff, B;

    1992-01-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth...... characteristics, but a different radiosensitivity. The 54A tumors are twice as radiosensitive as the 54B's. In the present study the tumors were treated with 2.5, 10, and 40 Gy. For comparison, nude mice were given cranial irradiation at the same three doses, and the effect was evaluated by in vivo 31P-MRS. No...... effect was observed in brain at any dose level. In contrast, 40 Gy induced a statistically significant reduction in ATP/Pi ratio during the 12-h post-irradiation period. This effect was more pronounced in 54A than in 54B. Some reduction was observed following 10 Gy, whereas 2.5 Gy induced no changes in...

  2. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of influences of cranial irradiation on cerebral energy metabolism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The effect of cranial irradiation on the cerebrum was studied. Energy metabolism in the brain was assessed before and after cranial irradiation using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The subjects were 3 pediatric patients with initial acute lymphotic leukemia (ALL), who underwent induction chemotherapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis according to the ALL high risk 911 protocol of Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group. The patients underwent 31P-MRS within one week before and after prophylactic CNS irradiation with a total dose of 18 Gy (i.e., 0.5 Gy in two fractions, 1.0 Gy in two fractions, and 1.5 Gy in 10 fractions - 4 times a week in 3-4 weeks). All 3 patients showed a decrease in phosphocreatine and ATP levels, which are indicators of energy metabolism, and also in the intracellular pH level in the brain tissue. Cranial irradiation was thus suggested to induce hypoxia in the brain tissue. (S.Y.)

  3. Changes in energy metabolism following roentgen irradiation of in vivo growing Ehrlich ascites tumour cells studied by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The energy metabolism in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells following in vivo irradiation of a dose of 5.0 Gy was studied in vitro in their ascites fluid up to 48 hours using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measuring ATP, ADP and inorganic phosphate (Psub(i)). The results are also related to radiation induced changes in cell cycle composition. ATP was reduced by more than 50 per cent 20 to 24 hours after irradiation but normalized at 48 hours. ADP was reduced to about half the normal level 24 to 48 hours after irradiation. When the ATP and ADP had reduced levels, the inorganic phosphate increased correspondingly. Addition of glucose to the ascites cell suspension at the time of minimum ATP level immediately raised the ATP:Psub(i) ratio. Since the glucose concentrations in blood and in ascites fluid following irradiation were also reduced, lack of glucose for energy production might have been a major contributing factor for the reduced ATP production. (orig.)

  4. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure in vivo cardiac energetics in normal myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Experiences at 3 T

    Background: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows measurement of in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium. While traditionally 31P cardiac spectroscopy is performed at 1.5 T, cardiac MRS at higher field strength can theoretically increase signal to noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution therefore improving sensitivity and specificity of the cardiac spectra. The reproducibility and feasibility of performing cardiac spectroscopy at 3 T is presented here in this study in healthy volunteers and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Cardiac spectroscopy was performed using a Phillips 3T Achieva scanner in 37 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) to test the feasibility of the protocol. To test the reproducibility a single volunteer was scanned eight times on separate occasions. A single voxel 31P MRS was performed using Image Selected In vivo Spectroscopy (ISIS) volume localization. Results: The mean phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio of the eight measurements performed on one individual was 2.11 ± 0.25. Bland Altman plots showed a variance of 12% in the measurement of PCr/ATP ratios. The PCr/ATP ratio was significantly reduced in HCM patients compared to controls, 1.42 ± 0.51 and 2.11 ± 0.57, respectively, P 31P MRS at 3 T is a reliable method of measuring in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium for clinical studies and diagnostics. Based on our data an impairment of cardiac energetic state in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is indisputable.

  5. The effect of gingko biloba extract on energy metabolic status in C3H mouse fibrosarcoma: evaluated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Gingko biloba extract (GBE), a natural product extracted from Gingko leaves, is known to increase the radiosensitivity of tumors. This radiosensitization probably arises from the increase in the peripheral blood flow by decreasing the blood viscosity and relaxing the vasospasm. The influence of a GBE on the metabolic status in fibrosarcoma II (FSall) of a C3H mouse was investigated using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Eighteen C3H mice with fibrosarcoma II (from 100 mm3 to 130 mm3) were prepared for this experiment. The mice were divided into 2 groups; one (9 mice) without a priming dose, and the other (9 mice) with a priming dose of GBE. The GBE priming dose (100 mg/kg) was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 24 hours prior to the measurement. First 31P MRS spectra were measured in the mice from each group as a baseline and test dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) was then administered to each group. One hour later, the 31P MRS spectra were measured again to evaluate the change in the energy metabolic status. In the group without the priming dose, the mean pH, PCr/Pi, PME/ATP, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose were not changed significantly compared to the values at the baseline. However, in the group with the priming dose, the mean PCr/Pi, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose changed from the baseline values of 0.49, 0.77, 0.17 to 0.74, 0.57, 0.28 respectively. According to the paired t-test, the differences were statistically significant. The above findings suggest that the metabolic status is significantly improved after administering GBE if the priming dose is given 24 hours earlier. This shows that the radiosensitizing effect of GBE is based on the increase of tumor blood flow and the improvement in the metabolic status

  6. The effect of gingko biloba extract on energy metabolic status in C3H mouse fibrosarcoma: evaluated by in vivo {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Ha, Sung Whan; Kim, Won Dong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Tae Kuen [Ulsan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    Gingko biloba extract (GBE), a natural product extracted from Gingko leaves, is known to increase the radiosensitivity of tumors. This radiosensitization probably arises from the increase in the peripheral blood flow by decreasing the blood viscosity and relaxing the vasospasm. The influence of a GBE on the metabolic status in fibrosarcoma II (FSall) of a C3H mouse was investigated using {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Eighteen C3H mice with fibrosarcoma II (from 100 mm{sup 3} to 130 mm{sup 3}) were prepared for this experiment. The mice were divided into 2 groups; one (9 mice) without a priming dose, and the other (9 mice) with a priming dose of GBE. The GBE priming dose (100 mg/kg) was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 24 hours prior to the measurement. First {sup 31}P MRS spectra were measured in the mice from each group as a baseline and test dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) was then administered to each group. One hour later, the {sup 31}P MRS spectra were measured again to evaluate the change in the energy metabolic status. In the group without the priming dose, the mean pH, PCr/Pi, PME/ATP, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose were not changed significantly compared to the values at the baseline. However, in the group with the priming dose, the mean PCr/Pi, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose changed from the baseline values of 0.49, 0.77, 0.17 to 0.74, 0.57, 0.28 respectively. According to the paired t-test, the differences were statistically significant. The above findings suggest that the metabolic status is significantly improved after administering GBE if the priming dose is given 24 hours earlier. This shows that the radiosensitizing effect of GBE is based on the increase of tumor blood flow and the improvement in the metabolic status.

  7. Analyzing Ph value, energy and phospholipid metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Wei Tan; Guangyao Wu; Junmo Sun

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) can be used to non-injuredly and dynamicly detect various metabolites including phosphorus in organis and reflect changes of phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism in tissue and pH value in cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe changes of pH value, phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P MRS.DESIGN: Semi-quantitative contrast observation.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 44 patients with cerebral tumor diagnosed with surgery operation were selected from the Department of Magnetic Resonance, Central South Hospital, Wuhan University from September 2004 to June 2006. All the subjects had complete 31P MRS data before steroid and operation. Among them,16 patients had glioma of grade Ⅱ-Ⅲ, 12 spongioblastoma and 16 meningioma. The mean age was (45±6)years. Another 36 subjects without focus on cerebral MRI were regarded as normal group, including 19 males and 18 females, and the mean age was (41±4) years. Included subjects were consent.METHODS: Eclipse1.5T MRS (Philips Company) was used to collect wave spectrum; jMRUI(1.3) was used to analyze experimental data and calculate pH value in voxel and ratios of phosphocreatine (PCr)/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr/phosphodiesterase (PDE) and phosphomonoesterase (PME)/β-adenosine triphosphate (β-ATP) of various metabolites. 31P MRS results were compared with t test between tumor patients and normal subjects.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of phospholipid metabolism (PME/PDE), energy metabolism (PCr/ATP) and pH value of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissues.RESULTS: A total of 44 cases with cerebral tumor and 36 normal subjects were involved in the final analysis. pH value and semi-quantitative measurements of normal brain tissues and various cerebral tumors: ① pH value at top occipital region and temple occipital region of normal brain tissue was 7.04±0.02;PCt/β-ATP was 1.51 ±0.03; PCt/Pi was 2.85

  8. Changes in energy metabolism in the quadriceps femoris after a single bout of acute exhaustive swimming in rats: a 31p-magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Sun Yingwei; Pan Shinong; Chen Zhian; Zhao Heng; Ma Ying; Zheng Liqiang; Li Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the value of 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in in vivo assessment of exhaustive exercise-induced injury in skeletal muscle.We aimed to evaluate the value of a 31P-MRS study using the quadriceps femoris after a single bout of acute exhaustive swimming in rats,and the correlation between 31P-MRS and histological changes.Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to control,half-exhaustive,and exhaustive exercise groups.31P-MRS of the quadriceps femoris of the right lower limb was performed immediately after swimming exercise to detect Pi,PCr,and β-ATP.The Pi/PCr,Pi/β-ATP,PCr/β-ATP,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were calculated and pH measured.Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic potential of 31P-MRS in identifying and distinguishing the three groups.HE staining,electron microscopy and desmin immunostaining after imaging of the muscle were used as a reference standard.The correlation between 31P-MRS and the mean absorbance (A value) of desmin staining were analyzed with the Pearson correlation test.Results Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) showed statistically significant intergroup differences (P<0.05).AUCs of Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were 0.905,0.848,0.930,and 0.930 for the control and half-exhaustive groups,while sensitivity and specificity were 90%/85%,95%/55%,95%/80%,and 90%/85%,respectively.The AUCs of Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were 0.995,0.980,1.000,and 1.000 for the control and exhaustive groups,while sensitivity and specificity were 95%/90%,100%/90%,100%/95%,and 100%/95%,respectively.The AUCs of Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were 0.735,0.865,0.903,and 0.903 for the half-exhaustive and exhaustive groups,while sensitivity and specificity were 80%/60%,90%/75%,95%/65%,and 95%/70%,respectively.In the half-exhaustive group,some muscle fibers exhibited edema in HE staining,and the

  9. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N;

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After...... Gompertzian growth was verified, the estrogen pellet was removed from half of the animals. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the tumors was performed 1 day before and on days 2, 6, and 14 after estrogen removal. Estrogen withdrawal induced a significant increase in the nucleoside triphosphate......:Pi ratio in the two estrogen-dependent xenografts, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the estrogen-independent tumors. In ZR75/LCC-3 tumors a slight decrease in nucleoside triphosphate:Pi was observed following onset of estrogen stimulation after initial growth without estrogen. Extracts of freeze...

  10. Effects of hypo- und hyperthyroidism on skeletal muscle metabolism. A sup 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Einfluss von Hyper- und Hypothyreose auf den Energiestoffwechsel der Skelettmuskulatur. Eine Untersuchung mit sup 31 P-Kernspinspektroskopie

    Moka, D.; Theissen, P.; Linden, A.; Waters, W.; Schicha, H. (Koeln Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-06-01

    {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows non-invasive evaluation of phosphorus metabolism in man. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of hyper- and hypothyroidism on the metabolism of resting human skeletal muscle. The present data show that quantitative measurement of phosphate metabolism by NMR is possible as also demonstrated by other studies. Using a quantitative evaluation method with an external standard, significant differences in the levels of phosphocreatine, adenosintriphosphate, and phosphodiesters were found. In hypothyroid patients a TSH-dependent increase in phosphodiesters and a decrease in adenosintriphosphate and phosphocreatine was observed. In hyperthyroidism a similar decrease in adenosintriphosphate but a considerably higher decrease in phosphocreatine occurred. In the light of the results of other studies of muscle matabolism, these changes appear to be non-specific so that further studies are required to assess the clinical value of such measurements. (orig.).

  11. Silencing of the glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDPD5 alters the phospholipid metabolite profile in a breast cancer model in vivo as monitored by 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Wijnen, J.P.; Jiang, L.; Greenwood, T.R.; Cheng, M; Döpkens, M.; Cao, M.D.; Bhujwalla, Z M; Krishnamachary, B; Klomp, D. W. J.; Glunde, K.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal choline phospholipid metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, which is implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The malignant metabolic phenotype is characterized by high levels of phosphocholine (PC) and relatively low levels of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) in aggressive breast cancer cells. Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P MRS) is able to noninvasively detect these water-soluble metabolites of choline as well as ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism. He...

  12. Tumour oxygenation assessed by polarographic needle electrodes and bioenergetic status measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy im human soft tissue tumours

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of polarographic oxygen electrode measurements and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in extravisceral soft tissue tumours, designated to receive preoperative radiotherapy. Pretreatment tumour oxygenation was determined in 41 cases and 31P-MRS was amenable to lesions in 34 patients. Biopsies were characterized histopathologically as 25 primary soft tissue sarcomas (STS), 2 recurrent STS, 9 benign and 5 other malignancies. Evaluation of phosphorus (31P) spectra was possible in 11 cases. The oxygenation status of normal tissue was higher than that of tumours, whereas no difference was found between oxygenation status of benign lesions and that of STS. There was substantial variation between tumours in the median pO2 and the bioenergetic status (β-NTP/Pi). No correlation was found between tumour pO2 and volume (n=25). Moreover, there was no correlation between β-NTP/Pi and the median tumour pO2, the fraction of pO2 values ≤2.5 mm Hg or tumour volume (n=10), respectively. In conclusion, oxygen electrode assessment was found to be a clinically applicable and feasible technique for measuring tumour oxygenation status, whereas the success of 31P-MRS in human neoplasms was limited by a very poor resolution in the phosphorus signal that allowed analysis of 31P spectra in 11 tumours out of 34 cases. (orig.)

  13. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo.

  14. Value of dynamic 31p magnetic resonance spectroscopy technique in in vivo assessment of the skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetes

    WU Fei-yun; TU Hui-juan; QIN Bin; CHEN Ting; XU Hua-feng; QI Jing; WANG De-hang

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31p-MRS) has been successfully applied to study intracellular membrane compounds and high-energy phosphate metabolism.This study aimed to evaluate the capability of dynamic 31p-MRS for assessing energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Dynamic 31p-MRS was performed on 22 patients with type 2 diabetes and 26 healthy volunteers.Spectra were acquired from quadriceps muscle while subjects were in a state of rest,at exercise and during recovery.The peak areas of inorganic phosphate (Pi),phosphocreatine (PCr),and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured.The concentration of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and the intracellular pH value were calculated from the biochemistry reaction equilibrium.The time constant and recovery rates of Pi,PCr,and ADP were analyzed using exponential curve fitting.Results As compared to healthy controls,type 2 diabetes patients had significantly lower skeletal muscle concentrations of Pi,PCr and β-ATP,and higher levels of ADP and Pi/PCr.During exercise,diabetics experienced a significant Pi peak increase and PCr peak decrease,and once the exercise was completed both Pi and PCr peaks returned to resting levels.Quantitatively,the mean recovery rates of Pi and PCr in diabetes patients were (10.74±1.26) mmol/s and (4.74±2.36) mmol/s,respectively,which was significantly higher than in controls.Conclusions Non-invasive quantitative 31P-MRS is able to detect energy metabolism inefficiency and mitochondrial function impairment in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetics.

  15. 糖尿病大鼠脑能量代谢改变的核磁共振磷谱研究%Studies on Changes of Brain Energy Metabolism in Diabetic Rats by 31 P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    王娜; 郑涌泉; 许翠翠; 苏永超; 赵良才; 叶信健; 高红昌

    2014-01-01

    Considerable attention has been directed toward studying the impact of diabetes on the central nervous system. The current study investigates the biochemical changes in the brain tissue of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). The 31P NMR spectra of the whole brain show no significant changes of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters levels one week after STZ induction, suggesting no apparent structural changes in cell membranes. The results identifies the increased level of adenosine diphosphate, negligible changes of phosphocreatine ( PCr ) and adenosine triphosphate ( ATP) , but the decreased ratio of PCr/ATP, indicating that PCr plays a role of balancing the energy. Moreover, the decreased pH value indicates the changes of the intracellular environment in STZ-diabetic brains in rats. After 15 weeks of STZ injection, the metabolism of phospholipid membrane and brain energy metabolism has been obviously disturbed. Our study successfully shows that 31 P MRS can not only study phospholipid and energy metabolism non-invasively, but also measure intracellular pH and other important biochemical information. All of these spectroscopic characterizations contribute significantly to the understanding of pathogenesis and evolution of diabetes, and provide theoretical basis for early diagnosis and clinical treatment in diabetes.%应用链脲佐菌素( Streptozocin, STZ)制备糖尿病( Diabetes mellitus, DM)大鼠模型,采用离体的核磁共振磷谱(31 P Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MRS)方法检测糖尿病大鼠脑组织的生化改变。全脑的31 P MRS谱图结果显示,STZ诱导1周后,磷酸单酯和磷酸二酯的含量无明显改变,表明糖尿病大鼠脑中并没有发生膜性结构的改变。二磷酸腺苷峰增高,磷酸肌酸( Phosphocreatine, PCr)和三磷酸腺苷( Adenosine triphosphate, ATP)含量无明显改变,但是PCr/ATP降低,说明PCr作为能量缓冲底

  16. The clinical value of 31p magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with lipid storage myopathy%脂质沉积性肌病骨骼肌磁共振31磷波谱的临床价值研究

    李银; 赖鸿; 丁卫江

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨脂质沉积性肌病(LSM)患者骨骼肌磁共振31磷波谱(31P-MRS)改变特征,以及在LSM辅助诊断和疗效评价方面的临床价值.方法 对12例LSM患者在治疗前后和11例对照者分别进行31P-MRS扫描,获取波谱图像,计算谱线中无机磷酸盐(Pi)、磷酸肌酸(PCr)及三磷酸腺苷(ATP)的峰下面积,记录Pi/ATP、PC r/ATP和Pi/PCr的比值,计算Pi、PCr、细胞内pH(pHim)、二磷酸腺苷(ADP)和磷酸化潜能(PP)的值,并比较LSM患者治疗前和对照组、LSM患者治疗前后上述31p-MRS指标的差异.结果 LSM患者治疗前的PCr、PCr/ATP和PP较对照组明显降低(P<0.05),Pi/PCr和ADP较对照组明显升高(P<0.05),Pi、Pi/ATP和pHint与对照组比较无明显差异(P>0.05);LSM患者治疗后的PCr、PCr/ATP和PP较治疗前明显升高(P<0.05),ADP较治疗前明显降低(P<0.05),Pi、Pi/ATP、Pi/PCr和pHint与治疗前比较无明显差异(P>0.05).结论 31P-MRS可无创性检测LSM患者肌肉组织的能量代谢变化,有利于LSM的辅助诊断,并可运用于LSM患者的疗效评价.%Objective To investigate the 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) manifestations of skeletal muscle in patients with lipid storage myopathy( LSM)and evaluate its clinical value in auxiliary diagnosis and therapeutic effect. Methods 31 P-MRS scanning was performed in 12 patients prior to and after treatment and 11 collators. The areas under resonance of inorganic phosphate(Pi) ,phosphocreatine(PCr)and adenosine triphosphate( ATP)were calculated from the 31P-MRS images,then the ratios of Pi/ATP,PCr/ATP and Pi/PCr and the values of Pi,PCr,intracellular pH(pHint) .adenosine diphosphate( ABP)and phosphorylation potential(PP) were calculated at last. The above-mentioned variables were compared among LSM patients prior to treatment and the control group,and variables were also compared in LSM patients prior to and after treatment. Results Compared with the control group,LSM patients prior to

  17. 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of white matter signal hyperintensity areas in elderly subjects

    White matter signal hyperintensities (WMSH) are commonly seen on MRI of elderly subjects. The purpose of this study was to characterize metabolic changes in the white matter of elderly subjects with extensive WMSH. We used water-suppressed proton (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare six subjects with extensive WMSH with eight age-matched elderly subjects with minimal or absent WMSH, and phosphorus (31P) MRSI to compare nine subjects with extensive WMSH and seven age-matched elderly subjects without extensive WMSH. Relative to region-matched tissue in elderly controls, extensive WMSH were associated with increased signal from choline-containing metabolites, no significant change of signal from N-acetylaspartate, and a trend to a decreased phosphomonoester (PME) resonance. These findings suggest that WMSH may be associated with an alteration of brain myelin phospholipids in the absence of axonal damage. There were no differences in energy phosphates, consistent with lack of ongoing brain ischemia. Within the group with extensive WMSH, PME resonance measures were significantly lower in WMSH than in contralateral normal-appearing white matter. These results provide information on pathophysiology of WMSH and a basis for comparison with WMSH in Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Localized Semi-LASER Dynamic 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Soleus During and Following Exercise at 7 T

    Fiedler, Georg B; Schmid, Albrecht I; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Moser, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Object This study demonstrates the applicability of semi-LASER localized dynamic $^{31}$P MRS to deeper lying areas of the exercising human soleus muscle (SOL). The effect of accurate localization and high temporal resolution on data specificity is investigated. Materials and Methods To achieve high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a temporal resolution of 6 s, a custom-built calf coil array was used at 7T. The kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and intracellular pH were quantified separately in SOL and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle of 9 volunteers, during rest, plantar flexion exercise and recovery. Results The average SNR of PCr at rest was 64$\\pm$15 in SOL (83$\\pm$12 in GM). End exercise PCr depletion in SOL (19$\\pm$9%) was far lower than in GM (74$\\pm$14%). pH in SOL increased rapidly and, in contrast to GM, remained elevated until the end of exercise. Conclusion $^{31}$P MRS in single-shots every 6 s localized in the deeper lying SOL enabled quantification of PCr recovery times at low depletions and of...

  19. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle

    Savage, David B.; Williams, Guy B.; Porter, David; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the 31P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. PMID:26744504

  20. Phosphorus metabolites in the human placenta estimated in vivo by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Weindling, A M; Griffiths, R. D.; Garden, A S; P. A. Martin; Edwards, R H

    1991-01-01

    Normal human placental metabolism has been studied in vivo by image localised 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 13 women with anterior placentas; five, however, were too fat for useful spectral signals to be obtained. Magnetic resonance spectra of good quality which were considered to have arisen from the placenta were obtained from seven women with uncomplicated pregnancies (median gestational age 35 weeks, range 28-39). One other woman had a twin pregnancy in which one fetus had died a...

  1. Gluconeogenesis, liver energy metabolism and weight loss in lung cancer : dynamic studies using stable isotope tracers and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    S. Leij-Halfwerk (Susanne)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWeight loss is a major problem in many types of cancer and is associated with reduced quality of life and a poor prognosis. Weight loss can also interfere with potentially curable treatment [41,561. Many uncertainties remain about the mechanisms underlying weight loss in patients with ca

  2. Effects of oral D-tagatose, a stereoisomer of D-fructose, on liver metabolism in man as examined by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Buemann, B; Gesmar, H; Astrup, A;

    2000-01-01

    D-tagatose, which is a stereoisomer of D-fructose, is phosphorylated to D-tagatose-1-phosphate by fructokinase in the liver. Because of a slow degradation rate of D-tagatose-1-phosphate, this substance may accumulate, and ingested D-tagatose may therefore cause a longer lasting reduction in...... concentration were found after D-fructose. These results suggest that a moderate intake of D-tagatose may affect liver metabolism by phosphate trapping despite the fact that the sugar may only be incompletely absorbed in the gut...

  3. Modulation gamma resonance spectroscopy

    Possibility to control dynamic processes in a matter through gamma-resonance modulation by high-frequency external variable fields in excess of inverse lifetimes of the Moessbauer nuclei excited states, that is, within the megahertz frequency range lies in the heart of the modulation gamma-resonance spectroscopy. Through the use of the gamma-resonance process theoretical analysis methods and of the equation solution method for the density matrix with the secondary quantization of gamma-radiation field one attacks the problems dealing with the effect of both variable fields and relaxation on gamma-resonance. One has studied the gamma-radiation ultrasound modulation stages. One points out a peculiar role of the gamma-magnetic resonance effect in modulation gamma resonance spectroscopy formation. One forecasts development of the modulation gamma-resonance spectroscopy into the nonlinear gamma-resonance spectroscopy

  4. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1986

    The paper presents the proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and its Applications, held at the University College of Swansea, Wales, 1986. The Symposium is divided into eight main sections entitled: photophysics and spectroscopy, noble gas atom counting, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, materials and surface analysis, small molecules, medical and environmental applications, resonance ionization and materials separation, and elementary particles and nuclear physics. Thirty papers were chosen for INIS and indexed separately. (U.K.)

  5. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1H magnetic resonance imaging of human bladder carcinoma on nude mice: effects of tumour growth and treatment with cis-dichloro-diamine platinum

    De Certaines, J D; Albrectsen, J; Larsen, V A;

    1992-01-01

    phosphate and phosphomonoesters and a decrease of phosphocreatine. Fast growing tumours and early stage of regrowth after treatment presented a higher phosphocreatine/beta NTP ratio. Following CDDP treatment, 31P metabolite ratios and pH were significantly altered compared with age-matched controls, as...... early as 6 hours after treatment. Although necrotic area was clearly visible in MRI, no treatment effect could be detected on the images of treated tumours....

  6. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1H magnetic resonance imaging of human bladder carcinoma on nude mice: effects of tumour growth and treatment with cis-dichloro-diamine platinum

    De Certaines, J D; Albrectsen, J; Larsen, V A;

    1993-01-01

    phosphate and phosphomonoesters and a decrease of phosphocreatine. Fast growing tumours and early stage of regrowth after treatment presented a higher phosphocreatine/beta NTP ratio. Following CDDP treatment, 31P metabolite ratios and pH were significantly altered compared with age-matched controls, as...... early as 6 hours after treatment. Although necrotic area was clearly visible in MRI, no treatment effect could be detected on the images of treated tumours....

  7. Intracellular Phosphate Dynamics in Muscle Measured by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy during Hemodialysis.

    Lemoine, Sandrine; Fournier, Thomas; Kocevar, Gabriel; Belloi, Amélie; Normand, Gabrielle; Ibarrola, Danielle; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique; Juillard, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    Of the 600-700 mg inorganic phosphate (Pi) removed during a 4-hour hemodialysis session, a maximum of 10% may be extracted from the extracellular space. The origin of the other 90% of removed phosphate is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that the main source of phosphate removed during hemodialysis is the intracellular compartment. Six binephrectomized pigs each underwent one 3-hour hemodialysis session, during which the extracorporeal circulation blood flow was maintained between 100 and 150 ml/min. To determine in vivo phosphate metabolism, we performed phosphorous ((31)P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy using a 1.5-Tesla system and a surface coil placed over the gluteal muscle region. (31)P magnetic resonance spectra (repetition time =10 s; echo time =0.35 ms) were acquired every 160 seconds before, during, and after dialysis. During the dialysis sessions, plasma phosphate concentrations decreased rapidly (-30.4 %; P=0.003) and then, plateaued before increasing approximately 30 minutes before the end of the sessions; 16 mmol phosphate was removed in each session. When extracellular phosphate levels plateaued, intracellular Pi content increased significantly (11%; P<0.001). Moreover, βATP decreased significantly (P<0.001); however, calcium levels remained balanced. Results of this study show that intracellular Pi is the source of Pi removed during dialysis. The intracellular Pi increase may reflect cellular stress induced by hemodialysis and/or strong intracellular phosphate regulation. PMID:26561642

  8. Growth inhibition in response to estrogen withdrawal and tamoxifen therapy of human breast cancer xenografts evaluated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, creatine kinase activity, and apoptotic index

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N;

    1995-01-01

    index, and creatine kinase (CK) activity. Tumors of each line were grown in ovariectomized nude mice during stimulation from a s.c. 17 beta-estradiol pellet. At a tumor size of approximately 350 mm3, the pellet was removed from one-half of the animals. The remaining one-half served as controls. In...

  9. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Gunsing, F

    2005-06-15

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  10. Neutron resonance spectroscopy

    The present document has been written in order to obtain the diploma 'Habilitation a Diriger des Recherches'. Since this diploma is indispensable to supervise thesis students, I had the intention to write a document that can be useful for someone starting in the field of neutron resonance spectroscopy. Although the here described topics are already described elsewhere, and often in more detail, it seemed useful to have most of the relevant information in a single document. A general introduction places the topic of neutron-nucleus interaction in a nuclear physics context. The large variations of several orders of magnitude in neutron-induced reaction cross sections are explained in terms of nuclear level excitations. The random character of the resonances make nuclear model calculation predictions impossible. Then several fields in physics where neutron-induced reactions are important and to which I have contributed in some way or another, are mentioned in a first synthetic chapter. They concern topics like parity nonconservation in certain neutron resonances, stellar nucleosynthesis by neutron capture, and data for nuclear energy applications. The latter item is especially important for the transmutation of nuclear waste and for alternative fuel cycles. Nuclear data libraries are also briefly mentioned. A second chapter details the R-matrix theory. This formalism is the foundation of the description of the neutron-nucleus interaction and is present in all fields of neutron resonance spectroscopy. (author)

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy

    The subject of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) from its inception to the present is summarized. The uses of RIS are principally analytical, and these uses are classified in several different ways for this report. The classifications are: (1) basic ways of counting atoms; (2) RIS applications according to the type of particle detector; (3) applications according to source preparation; (4) applications in chemical physics and chemistry; and (5) applications involving daughter atom detection. Each classification is discussed in some detail, and examples of specific applications are mentioned under each classification. Some other potential applications not necessarily related to these classifications are also mentioned

  12. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  13. Analysis of the bond-valence method for calculating (29) Si and (31) P magnetic shielding in covalent network solids.

    Holmes, Sean T; Alkan, Fahri; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-07-01

    (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding tensors in covalent network solids have been evaluated using periodic and cluster-based calculations. The cluster-based computational methodology employs pseudoatoms to reduce the net charge (resulting from missing co-ordination on the terminal atoms) through valence modification of terminal atoms using bond-valence theory (VMTA/BV). The magnetic-shielding tensors computed with the VMTA/BV method are compared to magnetic-shielding tensors determined with the periodic GIPAW approach. The cluster-based all-electron calculations agree with experiment better than the GIPAW calculations, particularly for predicting absolute magnetic shielding and for predicting chemical shifts. The performance of the DFT functionals CA-PZ, PW91, PBE, rPBE, PBEsol, WC, and PBE0 are assessed for the prediction of (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding constants. Calculations using the hybrid functional PBE0, in combination with the VMTA/BV approach, result in excellent agreement with experiment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117609

  14. Proton resonance spectroscopy

    Work on chaos in low-energy nuclear systems has continued on several fronts. The authors have completed the preparatory stage for their experiments to establish a complete level scheme in 30P, and the first data were taken in December. As an alternative approach to chaos, they are studying suggestions that the transition strengths can be used as an appropriate signature. The first studies are using shell-model calculations for 22Na; a sufficient number of B(E1) and B(M2) values have been calculated that the statistical errors are not the primary limiting factor. They will refine their analysis techniques on this set and then analyze experimental data from 26Al. Details are given in Sects. 1 and 4. They have also continued to study the possibilities of studying both detailed-balance violation and parity violation with charged-particle resonances. They have calculated expected enhancements for a large number of potentially interfering resonances; the results are described in Sects. 2 and 3. They have replaced several control systems in the TUNL High Resolution Laboratory in the past year. Both the electrostatic analyzer and the analyzing magnet are now controlled via a 80486 PC running the software package LABVIEW. General operating procedures are outlined in Sect. 5

  15. Trends in resonance ionization spectroscopy

    The author reviews the history of resonance ionization spectroscopy and then comments on the delineations of RIS with reference to many related laser processes. The substance of the paper deals with the trends in RIS and especially how the needs for sensitive analytical methods have overshadowed the orginal plan to study excited species. 9 refs., 1 fig

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection...

  17. Theory of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can be defined as a state selective detection process in which pulsed tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. In reviews of RIS the subject was treated generally, including the underlying photophysics applications, the ability to use it to count single atoms, and its applications to measurements in atomic and molecular physics. They view resonance ionization spectroscopy as a specific type of multiphoton ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. This goal attained by requiring that the selective excitation steps be resonant in nature and involve only one- or two-photon (only one-photon if at all possible) absorption processes, thereby allowing the entire process to be carried to saturation without loss of spectroscopic selectivity due to laser power induced shifts or broadening

  18. Theory of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can be defined as a state selective detection process in which pulsed tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species

  19. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.;

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a...

  20. Resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy of picogram samples with microstring resonator

    Yamada, Shoko; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a demonstration of resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy using microstrings in mid-infrared region providing rapid identification of picogram samples. In our microelectromechanical resonant photothermal IR spectroscopy system, samples are deposited directly on microstrings using a...... spectra, obtained from picogram samples, suggest promising future applications of this approach....

  1. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  2. The electronic paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy - Applications

    This collective book addresses the various applications of electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The addressed issues (and chapters) are: the dosimetry of ionizing radiation, the tracing of natural organic matter within drainage basins, the detection and characterisation of free radicals after spin trapping, copper complexation by peptides involved in neuro-degenerative diseases, crystal chemistry of clay minerals and alteration process and evolution of continental surfaces, structure and catalytic mechanism of redox enzymes, the primitive carbonated matter, use of paramagnetic probes to study structural transitions within proteins, organic radicals and molecular magnetism, EPR of transient magnetic species, characterization of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, and fundamentals and applications of ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Appendices present the principles of magnetic resonance (Bloch equations and pulse methods), the pulse EPR (ESEEM, HYSCORE and PELDOR experiments), the principle of continuous wave ENDOR (Electron-nuclear double resonance) spectroscopy, and the protein functions

  3. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and ultrafast chemical dynamics

    Biswas, Nandita; Umapathy, Siva

    1998-01-01

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy is normally used to study the excited state structure and dynamics of various photochemical and photophysical processes. In this article. we briefly discuss the various applications of RR spectroscopy and show how experimental RR intensities along with time-dependent wavepacket dynamical calculations can be used to study the excited state structure and ultrafast dynamics (\\sim 10(- 15) secs).

  4. Nanometrology using localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy

    Jeppesen, Claus; Lindstedt, Daniel N.; Laurberg, Asger V.; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2013-01-01

    A novel optical characterization technique called localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectroscopy is presented. LSPR spectroscopy exploits light excited surface plasmons, which are collective coherent electron oscillations at a metal/dielectric interface. The LSPR can be observed in a tra...... dense device layers where the vacant space for test structures is limited.In this work, LSPR spectroscopy is used to evaluate a fabrication process including imprinting, etching and metallisation of gammadion test structures distributed on a 4” wafer....

  5. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn;

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  6. Resonance ionisation spectroscopy of uranium

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry has made tremendous strides in its potential and the diversity of applications. A particularly important application of interest is sensitive and selective detection/trace analysis of various long-lived radio-active isotopes. Investigations on three-color photoionization studies of uranium are reported here

  7. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques and applications

    Cao, Peng; 曹鹏

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a well-known non-invasive technique that provides spectra (by MR spectroscopy, MRS) and images (by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) of the examined tissue with detailed metabolic, structural, and functional information. This doctoral work is focused on advanced methodologies and applications of MRS for probing cellular and molecular changes in vivo. A single-voxel diffusion-weighted (DW) MRS method was first developed for monitoring the size changes of intramyocellu...

  8. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in depression

    Naren P Rao; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Bangalore N Gangadhar

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique technique that can directly assess the concentration of various biochemical metabolites in the brain. Thus, it is used in the study of molecular pathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric disorders, such as, the major depressive disorder and has been an area of active research. We conducted a computer-based literature search using the Pubmed database with ‘magnetic resonance spectroscopy’, ‘MRS’, ‘depression’, and ‘major depressive disorder...

  9. Resonance ionization spectroscopy for AVLIS

    A spectroscopic study of three-step resonance photoionization was carried out for atomic gadolinium and uranium. Over 60 high-lying odd-parity states and about 30 autoionizing states were revealed for gadolinium. J-values and radiative lifetimes were determined by the method based on the electric-dipole transition selection rules and by the delayed coincidence method, respectively. Photo-absorption cross-sections were measured by three different methods, and efficient photoionization schemes for AVLIS were determined. (author)

  10. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  11. Imaging Intelligence with Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Jung, Rex E.; Gasparovic, Charles; Chavez, Robert S.; Caprihan, Arvind; Barrow, Ranee; Yeo, Ronald A.

    2009-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([to the first power]H-MRS) is a technique for the assay of brain neurochemistry "in vivo." N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the most prominent metabolite visible within the [to the first power]H-MRS spectrum, is found primarily within neurons. The current study was designed to further elucidate NAA-cognition…

  12. Photothermal Infrared Spectroscopy of Airborne Samples with Mechanical String Resonators

    Yamada, Shoko; Schmid, Silvan; Larsen, Tom; Hansen, Ole; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    Micromechanical photothermal infrared spectroscopy is a promising technique, where absorption-related heating is detected by frequency detuning of microstring resonators. We present photothermal infrared spectroscopy with mechanical string resonators providing rapid identification of femtogram...

  13. Progress in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Emsley, J W; Sutcliffe, L H

    2013-01-01

    Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Part 1 is a two-chapter text that reviews significant developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) applications.The first chapter discusses NMR studies of molecules physisorbed on homogeneous surfaces. This chapter also describes the phase changes in the adsorbed layer detected by following the variation in the NMR parameters. The second chapter examines the process to obtain a plotted, data reduced Fourier transform NMR spectrum. This chapter highlights the pitfalls that can cause a decrease in information content in a NMR spectrum. The

  14. Sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy

    A new technique, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy (SIRIS), which provides an ultrasensitive analysis of solid samples for all elements except helium and neon is described in this paper. Sensitivities down to 1 part in 1012 should be available in routine SIRIS analysis, and greater sensitivities should be available for special cases. The basic concepts of this technology and early results in the development of the new SIRIS process and apparatus are presented. (Auth.)

  15. Materials characterization by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy method

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, H.K.; Joo, Y.S.; Sim, C.M

    2001-01-01

    A high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy(RUS) was developed. The dynamic elastic constant of RPV weld, which has various different microstructure was determined by RUS. It was confirmed the RUS method is very sensitive to the microstructures of the material. RUS can be used to monitor the degradation of nuclear materials including neutron irradiation embrittlement through the measurement of dynamic elastic constants, elastic anisotropy, high temperature elastic constant and Q-factor.

  16. Materials characterization by resonant ultrasonic spectroscopy method

    A high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy(RUS) was developed. The dynamic elastic constant of RPV weld, which has various different microstructure was determined by RUS. It was confirmed the RUS method is very sensitive to the microstructures of the material. RUS can be used to monitor the degradation of nuclear materials including neutron irradiation embrittlement through the measurement of dynamic elastic constants, elastic anisotropy, high temperature elastic constant and Q-factor

  17. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Barreto, Felipe Rodrigues; Salmon, Carlos Ernesto Garrido, E-mail: garrido@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filisofia, Ciencias e Letras; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FAMUS/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Departamento de Radiologia

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  18. Evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy variability

    Introduction: the intrinsically high sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) causes considerable variability in metabolite quantification. In this study, we evaluated the variability of MRS in two research centers using the same model of magnetic resonance image scanner. Methods: two metabolic phantoms were created to simulate magnetic resonance spectra from in vivo hippocampus. The phantoms were filled with the same basic solution containing the following metabolites: N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, choline, glutamate, glutamine and inositol. Spectra were acquired over 15 months on 26 acquisition dates, resulting in a total of 130 spectra per center. Results: the phantoms did not undergo any physical changes during the 15-month period. Temporal analysis from both centers showed mean metabolic variations of 3.7% in acquisitions on the same day and of 8.7% over the 15-month period. Conclusion: The low deviations demonstrated here, combined with the high specificity of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, confirm that it is feasible to use this technique in multicenter studies in neuroscience research. (author)

  19. Multivoxel Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Gliomatosis Cerebri

    Gliomatosis cerebri is a rare entity with non-specific clinical and conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings; accurate diagnosis is a differential diagnostic challenge. MR spectroscopy has recently been introduced as a useful diagnostic tool for detection of this entity. We present a gliomatosis cerebri case in which we made the radiological diagnosis using the MR spectroscopy findings; the diagnosis was confirmed by subsequent biopsy and histopathologic evaluation. Multivoxel spectroscopy (CSI, PRESS, 1500/135) shows a marked increase in Cho/NAA (6.6), normal to mild increase in Cho/Cr (1.2), and marked decrease in NAA/Cr (0.2) compared with the normally appearing contralateral side (Cho/NAA: 0.8, Cho/Cr: 0.9, NAA/Cr: 1.2)

  20. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1H, 31P, 13C, 23Na, 7Li, 19F, 14N, 15N, 17O, 39K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1H and 31P. This lecture is focused on Proton (1H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  1. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    Montagna, P.; Cortelli, P.; Barbiroli, B. (Inst. of Medical Pathology, Univ. of Bologna (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The authors describe the method of [sup 31]phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  3. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy of uranium

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) has been used for the sensitive detection of uranium. The apparatus consists of a laser system with three dye lasers and two pulsed copper vapour lasers and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The uranium atoms are ionized in a three step excitation with the third step leading to an autoionizing state. Several excitation schemes were investigated and for two schemes all three transitions could be saturated with the available laser power. The hyperfine structure splitting (HFS) of 235U, the isotopic shift (IS) between 235U and 238U as well as isotopic ratios in uranium samples were determined. (Author)

  4. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in migraine

    The authors describe the method of 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and review the results when it is applied to the study of brain and muscle energy metabolism in migraine subjects. Brain energy metabolism appears to be abnormal in all major subtypes of migraine when measured both during and between attacks. Impaired energy metabolism is also documented in skeletal muscle. It is suggested that migraine is associated with a generalized disorder of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and that this may constitute a threshold for the triggering of migraine attacks. 47 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Historical survey of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    We have recently celebrated the 10th birthday of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS), and this seems an appropriate time to review the history of its development. Basically, RIS is a photophysics process in which tunable light sources are used to remove a valence electron from an atom of selected atomic number, Z. If appropriate lasers are used as the light source, one electron can be removed from each atom of the selected Z in the laser pulse. This implies that RIS can be a very efficient, as well as selective, ionization process. In what we normally call RIS, laser schemes are employed which preserve both of these features. In contrast, multiphoton ionization (MPI) is more general, although not necessarily Z selective or very efficient because resonances are often not used. Early research completed in the USSR and described as selective two-step photoionization, employed resonances to ionize the rubidium atom and served to guide work on laser isotope separation. 29 references, 8 figures

  6. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and homogeneity in polycrystals.

    Kaplan, Gunes; Darling, T W; McCall, K R

    2009-01-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is capable of determining the bulk elastic properties of a solid from its characteristic vibration frequencies, given the dimensions, density and shape of the sample. The model used for extracting values of the elastic constants assumes perfect homogeneity, which can be approximated by average-isotropic polycrystals. This approximation is excellent in the small grain regime assumed for most averaging procedures, but for real samples with indeterminate grain size distributions, it is not clear where the approximation breaks down. RUS measurements were made on pure copper samples where the grain size distribution was changed by progressive heat treatments in order to find a quantitative limit for the loss of homogeneity. It is found that when a measure of the largest grains is 15% of the sample's smallest dimension, the deviation in RUS fits indicates elastic inhomogeneity. PMID:18804831

  7. Conceptual basis of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can b defined as a state-selective detection process in which tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species. Counting of individual atoms has special meaning for detection of rare events. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. We view RIS as a specific type of multi-photon ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. 16 references

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as an imaging method

    An experimental Magnetic Resonance (MR) system with 4 tesla flux density was set up. For that purpose a data acquisition system and RF coils for resonance frequencies up to 170 MHz were developed. Methods for image guided spectroscopy as well as spectroscopic imaging focussing on the nuclei 1H and 13C were developed and tested on volunteers and selected patients. The advantages of the high field strength with respect to spectroscopic studies were demonstrated. Developments of a new fast imaging technique for the acquisition of scout images as well as a method for mapping and displaying the magnetic field inhomogeneity in-vivo represent contributions to the optimisation of the experimental procedure in spectroscopic studies. Investigations on the interaction of RF radiation with the exposed tissue allowed conclusions regarding the applicability of MR methods at high field strengths. Methods for display and processing of multi-dimensional spectroscopic imaging data sets were developed and existing methods for real-time image synthesis were extended. Results achieved in the field of computer aided analysis of MR images comprised new techniques for image background detection, contour detection and automatic image interpretation as well as knowledge bases for textural representation of medical knowledge for diagnosis. (orig.) With 82 refs., 3 tabs., 75 figs

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid

    Gupta, Nikhil [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)], E-mail: nikhil_ms26@yahoo.co.in; Kakar, Arun K. [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Chowdhury, Veena [Department of Radiodiagnosis, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India); Gulati, Praveen [MR Centre, A-23 Green Park, New Delhi (India); Shankar, L. Ravi [Department of Radioiodine Uptake and Imaging, Institute of Nucler Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), Timarpur, New Delhi (India); Vindal, Anubhav [Department of Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, New Delhi (India)

    2007-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy of solitary thyroid nodules and its correlation with histopathology. Materials and methods: In this study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was carried out on 26 patients having solitary thyroid nodules. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was performed on a 1.5 T super conductive system with gradient strength of 33 mTs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done after MRS. All 26 patients underwent surgery either because of cytopathologically proven malignancy or because of cosmetic reasons. Findings of magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared with histopathology of thyroid specimens. Results and conclusion: It was seen that presence or absence of choline peak correlates very well with presence or absence of malignant foci with in the nodule (sensitivity = 100%; specificity = 88.88%). These results indicate that magnetic resonance spectroscopy may prove to be an useful diagnostic modality for carcinoma thyroid.

  10. Neutron resonance spectroscopy at n-TOF at CERN

    Gunsing, F.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvar, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calvino, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapic, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Kappeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krticka, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P.M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O' Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M.T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J.L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M.C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K

    2008-07-01

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy plays an important role in the investigation of neutron induced reaction cross sections and nuclear structure in the MeV excitation range. Neutron time-of-flight facilities are the most used installations to explore neutron resonances. In this paper we describe the basic features of neutron resonance spectroscopy together with recent results from the time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN. (authors)

  11. Neutron resonance spectroscopy at n TOF at CERN

    Calviño Tavares, Francisco; Cortés Rossell, Guillem Pere; Poch Parés, Agustí; Pretel Sánchez, Carme

    2007-01-01

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy plays an important role in the investigation of neutron induced reaction cross sections and nuclear structure in the MeV excitation range. Neutron time-of-flight facilities are the most used installations to explore neutron resonances. In this paper we describe the basic features of neutron resonance spectroscopy together with recent results from the time-of-flight facility n TOF at CERN.

  12. Neutron resonance spectroscopy at n-TOF at CERN

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy plays an important role in the investigation of neutron induced reaction cross sections and nuclear structure in the MeV excitation range. Neutron time-of-flight facilities are the most used installations to explore neutron resonances. In this paper we describe the basic features of neutron resonance spectroscopy together with recent results from the time-of-flight facility n-TOF at CERN. (authors)

  13. Can magnetic resonance spectroscopy differentiate endometrial cancer?

    Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Han, Xue; Liu, Qingwei; Xin, Yinghui [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Li, Changzhong; Yang, Chunrun [Shandong University, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Sun, Xichao; Zong, Yuanyuan [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan (China); Fu, Caixia [Siemens Shenzhen Magnetic Resonance Ltd., Siemens MRI Center, Shenzhen (China)

    2014-10-15

    To investigate whether the choline-containing compounds (Cho) obtained from three-dimensional {sup 1}H magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy can differentiate endometrial cancer (ECa) from benign lesions in endometria or in submucosa (BLs-ESm) and is associated with the aggressiveness of ECa. Fifty-seven patients (ECa, 38; BLs-ESm, 19) underwent preoperative multi-voxel MR spectroscopy at 3.0 T. The ratio of the sum of the Cho peak integral to the sum of the unsuppressed water peak integral (Cho/water) and the coefficient of variation (CV) used to describe the variability of Cho/water in one lesion were calculated. Mean Cho/water (±standard deviation [SD]) was (3.02 ± 1.43) x 10{sup -3} for ECa and (1.68 ± 0.33) x 10{sup -3} for BLs-ESm (p < 0.001). Mean Cho/water was (4.42 ± 1.53) x 10{sup -3} for type II ECa and (2.65 ± 1.17) x 10{sup -3} for type I ECa (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences among different stages of ECa (p = 0.107) or different grades of ECa (p = 0.142). The Cho/water was positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.386, p = 0.017) and size (r = 0.333, p = 0.041). The CV was also positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.537, p = 0.001) and size (r = 0.34, p = 0.037). The Cho/water can differentiate ECa from BLs-ESm and differentiate type II from type I ECa, but cannot differentiate different stages of ECa or different grades of ECa. Cho/water increased with the increase of tumour stage and size. (orig.)

  14. Can magnetic resonance spectroscopy differentiate endometrial cancer?

    To investigate whether the choline-containing compounds (Cho) obtained from three-dimensional 1H magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy can differentiate endometrial cancer (ECa) from benign lesions in endometria or in submucosa (BLs-ESm) and is associated with the aggressiveness of ECa. Fifty-seven patients (ECa, 38; BLs-ESm, 19) underwent preoperative multi-voxel MR spectroscopy at 3.0 T. The ratio of the sum of the Cho peak integral to the sum of the unsuppressed water peak integral (Cho/water) and the coefficient of variation (CV) used to describe the variability of Cho/water in one lesion were calculated. Mean Cho/water (±standard deviation [SD]) was (3.02 ± 1.43) x 10-3 for ECa and (1.68 ± 0.33) x 10-3 for BLs-ESm (p -3 for type II ECa and (2.65 ± 1.17) x 10-3 for type I ECa (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences among different stages of ECa (p = 0.107) or different grades of ECa (p = 0.142). The Cho/water was positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.386, p = 0.017) and size (r = 0.333, p = 0.041). The CV was also positively correlated with tumour stage (r = 0.537, p = 0.001) and size (r = 0.34, p = 0.037). The Cho/water can differentiate ECa from BLs-ESm and differentiate type II from type I ECa, but cannot differentiate different stages of ECa or different grades of ECa. Cho/water increased with the increase of tumour stage and size. (orig.)

  15. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of radium ions

    We propose to study the neutron-decient radium isotopes with high-resolution collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. Probing the hyperne structure of the $7{s}\\,^2\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{1/2}$ and $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transitions in Ra II will provide atomic-structure measurements that have not been achieved for $^{{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the $7{s}\\,^{2}\\!{S}\\!_{1/2}\\,\\rightarrow\\,7{p}\\,^{2}\\!{P}\\!_{3/2}$ transition in $^{{A}<214}$Ra will allow the spectroscopic quadrupole moments to be directly measured for the first time. In addition, the technique will allow tentative spin assignments to be conrmed and the magnetic dipole moments measured for $^{\\textit{A}<208}$Ra. Measurement of the hyperne structure (in particular the isotope shifts) of the neutron-decient radium will provide information to further constrain the nuclear models away from the N=126 shell closure.

  16. Computer Assisted Instruction (Cain) For Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    A computer assisted instruction program for nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was developed by using Author ware 5.0, Adobe Image Styler 1.0, Adobe Photo shop 7.0 and Flash MX. The contents included the basic theory of 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the instrumentation of NMR spectroscopy, the two dimensional (2D) NMR spectroscopy and the interpretation of NMR spectra. The program was also provided examples, and exercises, with emphasis on NMR spectra interpretation to determine the structure of unknown compounds and solutions for self study. The questionnaire from students showed that they were very satisfied with the software

  17. Application of resonance ionization spectroscopy in particle physics

    The use of resonance ionization spectroscopy in the measurement of the solar neutrino flux, baryon conservation and double beta decay in the search for fractional charge, superheavy ions and magnetic monopoles is discussed. (U.K.)

  18. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  19. Fast Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Short-Lived Radicals

    Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Hansen, Karina Benthin;

    1976-01-01

    We report the first application of pulsed resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by pulse radiolysis. A single pulse from a flash-lamp pumped tunable dye laser is used to excite the resonance Raman spectrum of the p-terphenyl anion radical with an initial...

  20. High energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy

    Wojciech, Blachucki [Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics

    2015-10-16

    This work treats of the high energy resolution off-resonant X-ray spectroscopy (HEROS) method of determining the density of unoccupied electronic states in the vicinity of the absorption edge. HEROS is an alternative to the existing X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) methods and opens the way for new studies not achievable before.

  1. Neutron resonance spectroscopy for the characterisation of materials and objects

    Schillebeeckx, Peter; BECKER BJÖRN; Harada, Hiroshi; Kopecky, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The use of neutron resonance spectroscopy to investigate and study properties of materials and objects is the basis of neutron resonance transmission analysis (NRTA) and neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA). NRTA and NRCA are non-destructive methods to determine the elemental and isotopic composition without the need of any sample preparation and resulting in a negligible residual activity. The basic principles of NRTA and NRCA are explained. The use of NRTA and NRCA to determine the ele...

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pancreatic disorders

    Ofer Kaplan

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS is a powerful technique that enables continuous monitoring of biochemical processes in tissues and organs in a non-invasive manner. A model of isolated perfused rat pancreas, suitable for NMRS studies, was developed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injections of either 0.5 ml 5% sodium taurocholate (TC into the bile duets, or 1.0 ml 10% TC injections into the pancreatic parenchyma. Phosphorous (31P NMRS of experimental pancreatitis were characterized by a transient signal at -0.18±0.04 ppm which was assigned as solubilized lecithin, and can be used as an indicator of the early phases of the discase. Depletion of the high energy phosphorous compounds, phosphocreatine and ATP, were also found during acute pancreatitis, and paralleled the extension of the pathological damage. The role of NMRS in pancreatic cancer diagnosis and its treatment were assessed in three models of pancreatic neoplasms. Perfused MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells, subcutancously implanted pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and pancreatic tumors induced in-situ in rats by direct appiication of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene, were studied by phosphorous (31P, sodium (23Na and proton (¹H NMRS. 31P spectra of pancreatic cancer were qualitatively similar to those of intact organs. However, 31P NMRS was found to be useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Total (infra- and extracellular sodium concentrations, measured in the solid tumors, were similar in both the normal pancreas and the pancreatic tumors (39-40 mmol/g wet weight. Proton spectra of perchloric acid extracts revealed several differences between tumors and control pancreases. The principal findings were elevated levels of the amino acid taurine, from I.17±O.39 mmol/g wet weight in healthy pancreases, to 2.79±0.71 mmol/g wet weight in pancreatic carcinoma in rats, and lactate levels which increased from 0.92±0.2 to 6.19±1.93 mmol/g wet weight

  3. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  4. Proton resonance spectroscopy in 36Ar

    Excitation functions for proton elastic scattering and for proton-induced reactions on 35Cl were measured with the KN Van de Graaff accelerator and associated high resolution system at TUNL. Differential cross sections for 35Cl(p,p0), (p,p1), (p,p2), (p, α0), and (p, α1) were measured in the range Ep = 0.6 to 4.0 MeV. The data were measured at five angles with an overall resolution of about 350 eV. The measured excitation functions were analyzed with a multi-level, multi-channel R-matrix formalism for approximately 200 levels. Resonance parameters were extracted. The resonance parameters included resonance energy, total angular momentum, parity, partial elastic and reaction widths, channel spin or orbital angular momentum mixing ratios, and for some resonances the relative signs of width amplitudes. A number of resonances have strong level-level interference effects. Comparison of these data with the Porter-Thomas distribution resulted in good agreement of almost all channels which had a statistically significant number of resonances. These comparisons indicate that nearly all the proton and alpha strength in 36Ar for this energy range was seen in the present study. The s-wave proton strength function ratio for s = 1 and s = 2 resonances was found to be consistent with previous measurements for 4N nuclei

  5. Resonance scattering spectroscopy of gold nanoparticle

    JIANG; Zhiliang; FENG; Zhongwei; LI; Tingsheng; LI; Fang; ZHONG; Fuxin; XIE; Jiyun; YI; Xianghui

    2001-01-01

    The gold nanoparticles in diameter of 10-95 nm have been prepared by Frens procedure, all of which exhibit a resonance scattering peak at 580 nm. The mechanism of resonance scattering for gold nanoparticle has been considered according to the wave motion theory of nanoparticle in liquid. The principle of superamolecular interface energy band(SIEB) has been set up and utilized to explain the relationship between the diameter and colors for gold nanoparticle in liquid. A novel spectrophotometric ruler for the determination of the diameter has been proposed according to the relationship of the maximum absorption wavelength and diameter.

  6. Waveguide volume probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    2015-01-01

    The present disclosure relates to a probe for use within the field of nuclear magnetic resonance, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)). One embodiment relates to an RF probe for magnetic resonance imaging and/or spectroscopy comprising a conductive...... non-magnetic hollow waveguide having an internal volume and at least one open end, one or more capacitors and at least a first conductive non-magnetic wire, wherein said first conductive wire connects at least one of said one or more capacitors to opposite walls of one open end of the waveguide and...... wherein said first conductive wire and said one or more capacitors are located outside of said internal volume, wherein the internal volume of the hollow waveguide defines an imaging volume or sample volume....

  7. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy to ultralow-level counting and mass spectroscopy

    The ability to directly detect a daughter atom, using resonance ionization spectroscopy, in delayed time coincidence with the decay of a parent species promises to drastically reduce the background in low-level counting experiments. Resonance ionization can also be used as an ion source for a mass spectrometer system that is capable of discriminating between isobars

  8. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-01-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at fr...

  9. Implementation of Quantum Logic Gates by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DU Jiang-Feng; WU Ji-Hui; SHI Ming-Jun; HAN Liang; ZHOU Xian-Yi; YE Bang-Jiao; WENG Hui-Ming; HAN Rong-Dian

    2000-01-01

    Using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques with a solution of cytosine molecules, we show an implementation of certain quantum logic gates (including NOT gate, square-root of NOT gate and controlled-NOT gate), which have central importance in quantum computing. In addition, experimental results show that nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can efficiently measure the result of quantum computing without attendant wave-function collapse.

  10. Clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: a review

    The advantages and present limitations of the clinical applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy are reviewed in outline, with passing references to skeletal muscular studies, in particular a group of children with advanced Duchenne dystrophy, and the applications to the study of cerebral metabolism of neonates, excised kidneys, biopsy studies of breast and axillary lymph node samples, and NMR spectroscopy performed during chemotherapy of a secondary rhabdomyosarcoma in the skin. (U.K.)

  11. Weak interaction studies using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Important developments in laser sources for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum are making it possible to carry out resonance ionization of some of the noble gases. It has already been shown that xenon can be ionized in a two-photon allowed excitation from the ground state. Recently a new method of generating radiation by four-wave mixing in mercury vapor enables excitation of xenon in a one-photon resonance process. With these new laser sources we expect to have effective ionization volumes of 10-3 to 10-2 cm3 for the cases of argon, krypton, and xenon. This has important consequences in weak interaction physics and environmental research

  12. Quality assurance in magnetic resonance spectroscopy system

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic clinical evaluation of metabolic changes in the human body has distinct advantages over Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT and Nuclear Medicine, as it allows early detection of disease and monitoring of therapeutic processes through repeated procedures. To ensure reliable and reproducible results for spectroscopic examinations, the quality of MRS system should be controlled. Apart from the instrumental contribution in spectroscopic examinations, there are number of other variables such as tissue state and patient motion, severely affecting the image quality. The subject and instrumental contributions to the spectrum are closely related in MRS than in rest of medical imaging. Instrumental contribution in the quality of spectrum has been measured and presented

  13. New methods in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The advantages of the NMR-spectroscopy at high fields are particularly obvious in structure determination of natural compounds. Only small amounts of substance are necessary today and in most cases classical NMR-techniques are sufficient to get the relevant structure parameters chemical shift and J-coupling. For the examination of smallest amounts, new one dimensional (1D) pulse sequences have been introduced in the last few years. They also allow the observation of weak nuclei e.g. 13C, 15N. The greatest advances are observed in the field of two dimensional (2D) NMR-spectroscopy. There is no doubt that this technique is of general importance for chemists, especially in the determination of complex natural compounds. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance spectroscopy: potential clinical applications

    MR spectroscopy is the only method for non-invasive detection of various aspects of cardiac metabolism in humans. While the 1H nucleus of water and fat molecules is the signal source for MR imaging, the MR spectroscopic technique allows for the study of a number of other nuclei, such as 13C, 19F, 23Na, 31P, 39K and 87Rb. Clinical applications presently are confined to the 31P nucleus. 31P-MR spectroscopy allows the non-invasive study of cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolites ATP and phosphocreatine. The phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is considered an index of the energetic state of the heart. Possible clinical indications include heart failure, valve disease and coronary artery disease. In heart failure, the phosphocreatine/ATP ratio is reduced and correlates with clinical severity, ejection fraction and prognosis. In mitral and aortic valve disease, a reduced phosphocreatine/ATP ratio may indicate the optimum timing for valve replacement. In coronary artery disease, a regional decrease of phosphocreatine during stress (''biochemical ergometry'') may indicate local ischemia. Furthermore, absolute quantification of high-energy phosphates may allow diagnosis of myocardial viability. Major technical developments, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution will be necessary to establish MR spectroscopy as a routine clinical tool. (orig.)

  15. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  16. Proton resonance spectroscopy in 40Ca

    The differential cross sections for the 39K(p,po)39K and 39K-(p,αo)36Ar reactions have been measured for Ep = 1.90 to 4.02 MeV at laboratory angles θ = 90 degree, 108 degree, 150 degree and 165 degree. Data were taken with the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) KN Van de Graaff accelerator and the associated high resolution system. The targets consisted of 1-2 μg/cm2 of potassium carbonate (K2CO3), enriched to 99.97% 39K, evaporated onto gold coated carbon backings. Excitation functions were measured in proton energy steps varying from 100 to 400 3V. The energy region studied corresponds to an excitation energy range in the 40Ca nucleus of Ex = 10.2 to 12.3 MeV. A multi-level multi-channel R-matrix based computer code was used to fit the experimental excitation functions. Resonance parameters obtained include resonance energy, spin, parity, partial widths, and channel spin and orbital angular momentum mixing ratios. Of the 248 resonances observed in the proton channel, 148 were also observed in the alpha channel. A fit to the observed level density yielded a nuclear temperature of 1.5 MeV. The data were compared with predictions of statistical theories of energy levels for both level spacing and reduced width distributions. The alpha reduced widths agree with the Porter-Thomas distribution and suggest that only 5-10% of the states with alpha widths were not observed. The summed strength in each of the alpha channels represents a significant fraction of the Wigner limit for these channels. The proton channels, on the other hand, generally have much smaller fractions. The two proton s-wave strength functions are equal and thus show no evidence for spin-exchange forces in the nucleon-nucleus interaction

  17. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Biryukova, T.; Tsvetkov, M.; Bagratashvily, V.

    2013-07-01

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm-1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva.

  18. Periodontitis diagnostics using resonance Raman spectroscopy on saliva

    In view of its wealth of molecular information, Raman spectroscopy has been the subject of active biomedical research. The aim of this work is Raman spectroscopy (RS) application for the determination of molecular biomarkers in saliva with the objective of early periodontitis detection. As was shown in our previous study, carotenoids contained in saliva can be molecular fingerprint information for the periodontitis level. It is shown here that the carotenoid RS lines at wavenumbers of 1156 and 1524 cm−1 can be easily detected and serve as reliable biomarkers of periodontitis using resonance Raman spectroscopy of dry saliva. (letter)

  19. Weak interaction studies using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Important developments in laser sources for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of the spectrum are making it possible to carry out resonance ionization of some of the noble gases. It has already been shown that xenon can be ionized in a two-photon allowed excitation from the ground state. Recently a new method of generating radiation by four-wave mixing in mercury vapor enables excitation of xenon in a one-photon resonance process. With these new laser sources they expect to have effective ionization volumes of 10-3-10-2 cm3 for the cases of argon, krypton, and xenon. This has important consequences in weak interaction physics and environmental research. Widespread applications of noble gas detectors are due to the fact that small numbers of the chemically inert atoms can be recovered from very large targets of materials where they may be generated by rare events. In this lecture they show how lasers can be combined with mass spectrometers to detect a few noble gas atoms of one isotope in the presence of very large numbers of atoms of a neighboring isotope. This technique (which they have called Maxwell's demon because of the atom-sorting functions performed in the apparatus) is described and then followed with a brief discussion of two applications in weak interaction physics - double-beta decay and the solar neutrino problem

  20. Nonlinear spectroscopy of superconducting anharmonic resonators

    We formulate a model for the steady state response of a nonlinear quantum oscillator structure, such as those used in a variety of superconducting qubit experiments, when excited by a steady, but not necessarily small, ac tone. We show that this model can be derived directly from a circuit description of some recent qubit experiments in which the state of the qubit is read out directly, without a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. The excitation profile has a rich structure depending on the detuning of the tone from the small-signal resonant frequency, on the degree of damping and on the excitation amplitude. We explore two regions in detail. Firstly, at high damping there is a trough in the excitation response as a function of detuning, near where the classical Duffing bifurcation occurs. This trough has been understood as a classical interference between two metastable responses with opposite phase. We use Wigner function studies to show that while this picture is roughly correct, there are also more quantum mechanical aspects to this feature. Secondly, at low damping we study the emergence of sharp, discrete spectral features from a continuum response. We show that these the structures, associated with discrete transitions between different excited-state eigenstates of the oscillator, provide an interesting example of a quantum Fano resonance. The trough in the Fano response evolves continuously from the ‘classical’ trough at high damping. (paper)

  1. Photodissociation dynamics of dimethylnitrosamine studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Lenderink, Egbert; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1994-01-01

    The initial molecular dynamics in the dissociative S1 (n, pi*) state of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) is investigated using resonance Raman spectroscopy. We find that photochemical N-N bond cleavage in DMN proceeds via a bent conformation around the amine N atom, which supports the outcome of ab initio

  2. INVIVO PHOSPHORUS MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS

    MINDERHOUD, JM; MOOYAART, EL; KAMMAN, RL; TEELKEN, AW; HOOGSTRATEN, MC; VENCKEN, LM; GRAVENMADE, EJ; VANDENBURG, W

    1992-01-01

    Localized phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 T was performed in 39 patients with multiple sclerosis and in 15 healthy controls. The multiple sclerosis spectra showed increased creatine phosphate levels. This increase was correlated with the severity of the handicap and was greater in

  3. Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of Free Radicals Produced by Ionizing Radiation

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    1984-01-01

    Applications of time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy to the study of short-lived free radicals produced by ionizing radiation are briefly reviewed. Potential advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed in the light of given examples. The reduction of p-nitrobenzylchloride and...

  4. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Notre Dame); (Northeastern Univ.)

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  5. Resonant Dipole Nanoantenna Arrays for Enhanced Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Toma, A.

    2015-08-04

    Our recent studies on dipole nanoantenna arrays resonating in the terahertz frequency range (0.1 – 10 THz) will be presented. The main near- and far-field properties of these nanostructures will be shown and their application in enhanced terahertz spectroscopy of tiny quantities of nanomaterials will be discussed.

  6. Spectroscopy of hadron resonances on the lattice

    The reproduction of the hadron mass spectrum from first principles is an important task for lattice QCD. While ground state spectroscopy, especially in the quenched approximation, is by now well understood, a clean extraction of excited hadron masses from a lattice QCD simulation still is a serious challenge. We discuss the relevant techniques for spectroscopy calculations on the lattice, in particular the variational technique which is needed for separating the different excited states from the ground state. Using this method we study three different sectors of the hadron spectrum. In the light quark sector we present hadron masses obtained from simulations with dynamical approximately chiral fermions, so-called Chirally Improved Fermions. For charmonium, we are able to extract masses for a number of excited states including ones with higher spin and exotic quantum numbers. The heavy-light hadron sector is investigated in the static-light approximation, i.e., the heavy quark is treated as infinitely heavy. Also here we are able to determine a large number of excitations.

  7. Photon cooperative effect in resonance spectroscopy

    A systematic method is proposed for calculating the density matrix of subsystems interacting with their environment under conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium. The density matrix of photons resonantly interacting with a surrounding gas is calculated. It is shown that use of the Gibbs distribution allows one to completely eliminate inelastic processes from the calculations. A correct account of photon-photon correlators indicates the presence of new cooperative effects. A new branch of the polariton spectrum is predicted, which is due to the presence of excited atoms in the medium. With the help of the density matrix the mean filling numbers of the photon modes are calculated. In terms of wavelengths, we have obtained a generalization of the Planck formula which accounts for photon cooperative phenomena. The manifestation of these effects in kinetic processes is discussed

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in current medicine

    The first MR scanning methods have been developed to a maturity allowing application for clinical MRI. Essentially reduced measuring periods are possible now in connection with three-dimensional and multi-layer methods, and this certainly will have a positive effect towards enhanced use of MRI. Still shorter measuring periods is the future goal with regard to so important examinations as chest studies. MR angiography without contrast agent is applicable now for clinical examination of larger vessels. For small vessels, size-adjusted surface coils are required. A number of specially tailored surface coils is available now for achieving high spatial resolution in the regions of interest. This trend will continue. In-vivo MR spectroscopy now offers methods of selection of the volume of interest that encourage clinical trial application. Due to the rapidly growing experience obtained by in-vivo animal experiments, correlations can now be revealed between MRS data and pathologic conditions. Despite the still unresolved sensitivity problems, clinical applicability can be expected in a not too far future. (orig./SHA)

  9. Resonant cavity spectroscopy of radical species

    Ritchie, Grant

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH, with contributions from Cl atoms, and at night by either NO3 radicals or ozone. Chemical oxidation cycles, which couple OH, HO2 and peroxy (RO2) radical species, remove primary emitted trace species which are harmful to humans or to the wider environment. However, many of the secondary products produced by atmospheric photo-oxidation are also directly harmful, for example O3, NO2, acidic and multifunctional species, many of which are of low volatility and are able to partition effectively to the condensed phase, creating secondary organic aerosol (SOA), which contributes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol, with associated impacts on climate and human health. The accuracy of atmospheric models to predict these impacts necessarily requires accurate knowledge of the chemical oxidative cycling. Two of the simplest intermediates are the hydroperoxy radical, HO2, and the smallest and dominant organic peroxy radical, CH3O2, formed directly by the reactions of OH with CO/O2 and CH4/O2, respectively, and indirectly following the oxidation of larger VOCs. OH, HO2 and RO2 (collectively known as ROx) are rapidly cycled, being at the centre of tropospheric oxidation, and hence are some of the best targets for models to compare with field data. The reaction of HO2 and RO2 with NO constitutes the only tropospheric in-situ source of O3. Despite their importance, neither HO2 nor CH3O2 is measured directly in the atmosphere. HO2 is only measured indirectly following its conversion to OH and CH3O2 is not measured at all. Typically only the sum of RO2 radicals is measured, making no distinction between different organic peroxy radicals. This contribution will detail recent studies using (i) optical feedback cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with both quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-IR, and (ii

  10. Nonlinear spectroscopy of superconducting anharmonic resonators

    DiVincenzo, David P

    2011-01-01

    We formulate a model for the steady state response of a nonlinear quantum oscillator structure, such as those used in a variety of superconducting qubit experiments, when excited by a steady, but not necessarily small, ac tone. We show that this model can be derived directly from a circuit description of some recent qubit experiments in which the state of the qubit is read out directly, without a SQUID magnetometer. The excitation profile has a rich structure depending on the detuning of the tone from the small-signal resonant frequency, on the degree of damping, and on the excitation amplitude. We explore two regions in detail: First, at high damping there is a trough in the excitation response as a function of detuning, near where the classical Duffing bifurcation occurs. This trough has been understood as a classical interference between two metastable responses with opposite phase. We use Wigner function studies to show that while this picture is roughly correct, there are also more quantum mechanical asp...

  11. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS), a laser is tuned to a wavelength that will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or non-resonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms: and because detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples of one-atom detection are given, including that of the noble gases, to show complementarity with accelerator mass spectrometry AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr by using RIS has interesting applications for solar-neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. (author)

  12. In vivo H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in investigation of fetus brain metabolism

    The capabilities of in vivo H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in investigation of the fetal brain metabolism was studied. In vivo H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to in investigate 36 women with single pregnancy

  13. Applications of resonance ionization spectroscopy to ultralow-level counting and mass spectroscopy

    In this paper it is shown that the ability to directly detect a daughter atom, using resonance ionization spectroscopy, in delayed time coincidence with the decay of a parent species promises to drastically reduce the background in low-level counting experiments. In addition, resonance ionization can also be used as an ion source for a mass spectrometer system that is capable of discriminating between isobars

  14. Development of the CRIS (Collinear Resonant Ionisation Spectroscopy) beam line

    The CRIS (Collinear Resonant Ionisation Spectroscopy) beam line is a new experimental set up at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. CRIS is being constructed for high-resolution laser spectroscopy measurements on radioactive isotopes. These measurements can be used to extract nuclear properties of isotopes far from stability. The CRIS beam line has been under construction since 2009 and testing of its constituent parts have been performed using stable and radioactive ion beams, in preparation for its first on-line run. This paper will present the current status of the CRIS experiment and highlight results from the recent tests.

  15. Experiments on statistical mechanics using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Five different fluctuation phenomena at the atomic and molecular levels have been studied by resonance ionization spectroscopy techniques with one-atom detection sensitivity. The Poisson distribution described the observed frequency distributions suggesting random behavior. In addition, a gedanken experiment suggested by Einstein and Furth on the diffusion of atoms was performed in order to test the equality between time and ensemble averages. The obtained results confirmed the ergodicity of the studied system

  16. What are we measuring with GABA magnetic resonance spectroscopy?

    Stagg, Charlotte J.; Bachtiar, Velicia; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    A number of recent papers1–3 have demonstrated a relationship between in vivo concentration of GABA, as assessed using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), and an individual's task performance, giving a unique insight into the relationship between physiology and behavior. However, interpretation of the functional significance of the MRS GABA measure is not straightforward. Here we discuss some of the outstanding questions as to how total concentration of GABA within a cortical region relate...

  17. Gravity Resonance Spectroscopy and Einstein-Cartan Gravity

    Abele, Hartmut; Ivanov, Andrei; Jenke, Tobias; Pitschmann, Mario; Geltenbort, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The qBounce experiment offers a new way of looking at gravitation based on quantum interference. An ultracold neutron is reflected in well-defined quantum states in the gravity potential of the Earth by a mirror, which allows to apply the concept of gravity resonance spectroscopy (GRS). This experiment with neutrons gives access to all gravity parameters as the dependences on distance, mass, curvature, energy-momentum as well as on torsion. Here, we concentrate on torsion.

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy studies of proteins-glycoconjugates interactions

    Marchetti, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    This PhD thesis work has been focused on the analysis of the structural requisites for recognition and binding between proteins and glycoconjugates, essential for the comprehension of mechanisms of paramount importance in chemistry, biology and biomedicine. A large variety of techniques, such as crystallographic analysis, titration microcalorimetry (ITC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy, allows the elucidation of molecular recognition events. In the last years...

  19. Free-Electron Laser-Powered Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Takahashi, S.; Brunel, L.-C.; Edwards, D. T.; Tol, J.; Ramian, G.; Han, S.; Sherwin, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that have resisted all other techniques in structural biology. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the develop...

  20. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy (and electron spin-echo envelope modulation spectroscopy) in bioinorganic chemistry

    Hoffman, Brian M.

    2003-01-01

    This perspective discusses the ways that advanced paramagnetic resonance techniques, namely electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopies, can help us understand how metal ions function in biological systems.

  1. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy with neptunium and plutonium

    The resonance ionization mass spectroscopy was one of the methods used for detection of the actinides. The principles of the method are: atoms of the elements to be measured are excited step by step through resonant irradiation with laser light, and are thus ionized. The ions are accelerated by electrical fields and can then be detected. The equipment for this process comprised a pulsed laser system consisting of two copper vapor lasers and three dye lasers, and a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a mass resolution M/ΔM of approx. 1500. Due to a two-step resonant excitation of atomic energy levels and subsequent population of an autoionized state, the three-step ionization method is particularly element-selective. Use of powerful lasers with a high pulse repetition rate yield a high sensitivity and thus allow low detection limits. (orig./BBR)

  2. High resolution spectroscopy in solids by nuclear magnetic resonance

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for High Resolution Spectroscopy in Solids are described. Also the construction project of a partially home made spectrometer and its applications in the characterization of solid samples are shown in detail. The high resolution spectrometer used is implemented with the double resonance multiple pulses sequences and magic angle spinning (MAS) and can be used with solid and liquid samples. The maximum spinning frequency for the MAS experiment is in excess of 5 Khz, the double resonance sequences can be performed with any type of nucleus, in the variable temperature operating range with nitrogen gas: -1200 C to +1600 C, and is fully controlled by a Macintosh IIci microcomputer. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging for the study of fossils.

    Giovannetti, Giulio; Guerrini, Andrea; Salvadori, Piero A

    2016-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has long been used for investigating palaeontological specimens, as it is a nondestructive technique which avoids the need to dissolve or ionize the fossil sample. However, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have recently gained ground as analytical tools for examination of palaeontological samples, by nondestructively providing information about the structure and composition of fossils. While MRI techniques are able to reveal the three-dimensional geometry of the trace fossil, MRS can provide information on the chemical composition of the samples. The multidimensional nature of MR (magnetic resonance) signals has potential to provide rich three-dimensional data on the palaeontological specimens and also to help in elucidating paleopathological and paleoecological questions. In this work the verified applications and the emerging uses of MRI and MRS in paleontology are reviewed, with particular attention to fossil spores, fossil plants, ambers, fossil invertebrates, and fossil vertebrate studies. PMID:26979538

  4. Ultrasonic Resonance Spectroscopy of Composite Rings for Flywheel Rotors

    Harmon, Laura M.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage devices comprising multilayered composite rotor systems are being studied extensively for utilization in the International Space Station. These composite material systems were investigated with a recently developed ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy technique. The system employs a swept frequency approach and performs a fast Fourier transform on the frequency spectrum of the response signal. In addition. the system allows for equalization of the frequency spectrum, providing all frequencies with equal amounts of energy to excite higher order resonant harmonics. Interpretation of the second fast Fourier transform, along with equalization of the frequency spectrum, offers greater assurance in acquiring and analyzing the fundamental frequency, or spectrum resonance spacing. The range of frequencies swept in a pitch-catch mode was varied up to 8 MHz, depending on the material and geometry of the component. Single and multilayered material samples, with and without known defects, were evaluated to determine how the constituents of a composite material system affect the resonant frequency. Amplitude and frequency changes in the spectrum and spectrum resonance spacing domains were examined from ultrasonic responses of a flat composite coupon, thin composite rings, and thick composite rings. Also, the ultrasonic spectroscopy responses from areas with an intentional delamination and a foreign material insert, similar to defects that may occur during manufacturing malfunctions, were compared with those from defect-free areas in thin composite rings. A thick composite ring with varying thickness was tested to investigate the full-thickness resonant frequency and any possible bulk interfacial bond issues. Finally, the effect on the frequency response of naturally occurring single and clustered voids in a composite ring was established.

  5. Scanning micro-resonator direct-comb absolute spectroscopy

    Gambetta, Alessio; Gatti, Davide; Laporta, Paolo; Galzerano, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    Direct optical frequency Comb Spectroscopy (DCS) is proving to be a fundamental tool in many areas of science and technology thanks to its unique performance in terms of ultra-broadband, high-speed detection and frequency accuracy, allowing for high-fidelity mapping of atomic and molecular energy structure. Here we present a novel DCS approach based on a scanning Fabry-Perot micro-cavity resonator (SMART) providing a simple, compact and accurate method to resolve the mode structure of an optical frequency comb. The SMART approach, while drastically reducing system complexity, allows for a straightforward absolute calibration of the optical-frequency axis with an ultimate resolution limited by the micro-resonator resonance linewidth and can be used in any spectral region from XUV to THz. An application to high-precision spectroscopy of acetylene at 1.54 um is presented, demonstrating frequency resolution as low as 20 MHz with a single-scan optical bandwidth up to 1 THz in 20-ms measurement time and a noise-equ...

  6. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  7. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the study of esophageal cancer

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common reasons of human death, the prognosis is closely related to the diagnosed stages. Early esophageal cancer usually has a better prognosis, while the middle -advanced stage has a poor five-year survival rate. The early diagnosis of esophageal cancer is important. In the recent years, magnetic resonance technology develops very fast the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to study the biochemistry and physiology of tumors or tissue in vivo by detecting several trace metabolites, energy metabolism and quantitatively analysing the compounds changes. Most studies focused on specimens or secretions in vivo or m vitro experiments in the literatures. We summarized the MRS studies on esophageal cancer in this article. (authors)

  9. Application of neutron resonance spectroscopy for explosive material accuracy detection

    To determine the chemical composition of materials in baggage or cargo at bus stations, ports or airports is conventionally using the X-ray technique, which is base on the density-specific transmission probability, but not a very good probe to detect explosive materials. However, Neutron Resonance Spectroscopy (NRS) as the element-specific transmission case, can be used to detect the accuracy chemical contentment of the materials. Carbon, Hydrogen, Nitrogen and Oxygen as the main components of the explosive material, appear prominent neutron resonance features during 0.5-7.5 MeV energy section of the injected neutrons. By solving the equation involving the differences of neutron current strength between prior to and behind the sample, the accuracy chemical contentment of these isotopes, consequently, the material are determined finally. Such explosive material detection can be used in military, anti-terrorist and civil security. (authors)

  10. Resonance Raman spectroscopy in one-dimensional carbon materials

    Dresselhaus Mildred S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has played an important role in the development and use of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a powerful characterization tool for materials science. Here we present a short history of Raman scattering research in Brazil, highlighting the important contributions to the field coming from Brazilian researchers in the past. Next we discuss recent and important contributions where Brazil has become a worldwide leader, that is on the physics of quasi-one dimensional carbon nanotubes. We conclude this article by presenting results from a very recent resonance Raman study of exciting new materials, that are strictly one-dimensional carbon chains formed by the heat treatment of very pure double-wall carbon nanotube samples.

  11. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    Oberrath, J.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe-plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe-plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe-plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe.

  12. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe–plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe–plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe–plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe. (paper)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single subnanoliter ova

    Grisi, Marco; Guidetti, Roberto; Harris, Nicola; Boero, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is, in principle, a promising candidate to study the intracellular chemistry of single microscopic living entities. However, due to sensitivity limitations, NMR experiments were reported only on very few and relatively large single cells down to a minimum volume of 10 nl. Here we show NMR spectroscopy of single ova at volume scales (0.1 and 0.5 nl) where life development begins for a broad variety of animals, humans included. We demonstrate that the sensitivity achieved by miniaturized inductive NMR probes (few pmol of 1H nuclei in some hours at 7 T) is sufficient to observe chemical heterogeneities among subnanoliter ova of tardigrades. Such sensitivities should allow to non-invasively monitor variations of concentrated intracellular compounds, such as glutathione, in single mammalian zygotes.

  14. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step excitation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1·10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2·106 atoms of 239Pu

  15. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    Erdmann, N.; Albus, F.; Deiβenberger, R.; Eberhardt, K.; Funk, H.; Hasse, H.-U.; Herrmann, G.; Huber, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; Köhler, S.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Urban, F.-J.

    1995-04-01

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step exciation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1ṡ10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2ṡ106 atoms of 239Pu.

  16. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to certifiable food colors

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for the identification of individual colours, for distinguishing individual colours from colour mixtures, for the identification and semi-quantitative determination of the individual colours in mixtures and for proofs of the adulteration of certified colours adding noncertified colours. The method is well suited for observing the purity of colours and may also be used as the control method in the manufacture of colours and in assessing their stability and their resistance to increased temperature and light. (M.K.)

  17. Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium Isotopes

    Flanagan, K T; Ruiz, R F Garcia; Budincevic, I; Procter, T J; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Cocolios, T E; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Rossel, R E; Heylen, H; Billowes, J; Rothe, S; Bissell, M L; Wendt, K D A; de Groote, R P; De Schepper, S

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic moments and isotope shifts of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-205 were measured at ISOLDE-CERN with use of collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. A production-to-detection efficiency of 1\\% was measured for Fr-202. The background from nonresonant and collisional ionization was maintained below one ion in 10(5) beam particles. Through a comparison of the measured charge radii with predictions from the spherical droplet model, it is concluded that the ground-state wave function remains spherical down to Fr-205, with a departure observed in Fr-203 (N = 116).

  18. Double-resonance spectroscopy of autoionizing states of ammonia

    Raptis, C. A.; Bacon, J. A.; Pratt, S. T.

    2000-02-01

    New double-resonance ionization data are presented on the autoionizing Rydberg states of NH3 excited via selected rotational levels of the C˜' 1A1(0100) and (0200) states. Extrapolation of the Rydberg series provides a determination of the adiabatic ionization energy of NH3 that is in excellent agreement with that obtained by using zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy (ZEKE-PES). A comparison is presented between the field-free spectrum obtained by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the 1-Tesla-spectrum obtained by using a magnetic-bottle electron spectrometer. Finally, the rotational and vibrational autoionization mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  20. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  1. Double-Resonance g Factor Measurements by Quantum Jump Spectroscopy

    Quint, W; Nikoobakht, B.; Jentschura, U. D.

    2007-01-01

    With the advent of high-precision frequency combs that can bridge large frequency intervals, new possibilities have opened up for the laser spectroscopy of atomic transitions. Here, we show that laser spectroscopic techniques can also be used to determine the ground-state g factor of a bound electron: Our proposal is based on a double-resonance experiment, where the spin state of a ground-state electron is constantly being read out by laser excitation to the atomic L shell, while the spin fli...

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia. Possibilities and limitations

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a noninvasive investigative technique for in vivo detection of biochemical changes in neuropsychiatric disorders for which especially proton (1H-MRS) and phosphorus (31P-MRS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used. In this review we explain the principles of MRS and summarize the studies in schizophrenia. A systematic literature review was carried out for 1H-MRS studies investigating schizophrenic patients compared to controls. The inconsistent results in the cited studies may be due to different study population, specific neuroimaging technique, and selected brain regions. Frequent findings are decreased PME and increased PDE concentrations (31P-MRS) linked to altered metabolism of membrane phospholipids and decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) or NAA/choline ratio (1H-MRS) linked to neuronal damage in frontal (DLPFC) or temporal regions in patients with schizophrenia. These results contribute to the disturbed frontotemporal-thalamic network assumed in schizophrenia and are supported by additional functional neuroimaging, MRI morphometry, and neuropsychological evaluation. The combination of the described investigative techniques with MRS in follow-up studies may provide more specific clues for understanding the pathogenesis and disease course in schizophrenia. (orig.)

  3. Sub-terahertz resonance spectroscopy of biological macromolecules and cells

    Globus, Tatiana; Moyer, Aaron; Gelmont, Boris; Khromova, Tatyana; Sizov, Igor; Ferrance, Jerome

    2013-05-01

    Recently we introduced a Sub-THz spectroscopic system for characterizing vibrational resonance features from biological materials. This new, continuous-wave, frequency-domain spectroscopic sensor operates at room temperature between 315 and 480 GHz with spectral resolution of at least 1 GHz and utilizes the source and detector components from Virginia Diode, Inc. In this work we present experimental results and interpretation of spectroscopic signatures from bacterial cells and their biological macromolecule structural components. Transmission and absorption spectra of the bacterial protein thioredoxin, DNA and lyophilized cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as well as spores of Bacillus subtillis and B. atrophaeus have been characterized. Experimental results for biomolecules are compared with absorption spectra calculated using molecular dynamics simulation, and confirm the underlying physics for resonance spectroscopy based on interactions between THz radiation and vibrational modes or groups of modes of atomic motions. Such interactions result in multiple intense and narrow specific resonances in transmission/absorption spectra from nano-gram samples with spectral line widths as small as 3 GHz. The results of this study indicate diverse relaxation dynamic mechanisms relevant to sub-THz vibrational spectroscopy, including long-lasting processes. We demonstrate that high sensitivity in resolved specific absorption fingerprints provides conditions for reliable detection, identification and discrimination capability, to the level of strains of the same bacteria, and for monitoring interactions between biomaterials and reagents in near real-time. Additionally, it creates the basis for the development of new types of advanced biological sensors through integrating the developed system with a microfluidic platform for biomaterial samples.

  4. Recent developments in diagnostic magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. Pt. 2

    This overview shows very clearly that the development of diagnostic magnetic-resonance spectroscopy is currently in a phase of expansion. As nearly all pathological processes are associated with chemical alterations in certain regions of the body, it is a long way yet until the theoretical limits of applicability of MR-spectroscopy in vivo will be discernible. At the same time the paper makes plain, however, that most studies currently conducted cannot yet be evaluated for their clinical value as they are still in the animal-experiment or in-vitro stage. Among the approaches described in this paper, the phosphorus-31 studies may soonest harbour a claim to be reflected in radiological diagnostics in the near future. This is due first of all to the universal part played by phosphor in the most different metabolic processes. The individual signals of phosphor are clearly distinct from each other as to their chemical displacement and provide detailed information on the energetical condition of the cells. Considerable efforts are made to attain a more precise spatial localization of spectra recorded. At the pace at which this problem can be adequately solved by technical improvement of the transmitting and especially the receiving coils, phosphor-31 spectroscopy may be expected to make its way into diagnostics rapidly. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy at ultra high fields

    Neuberger, Thomas

    2009-06-23

    The goal of the work presented in this thesis was to explore the possibilities and limitations of MRI / MRS using an ultra high field of 17.6 tesla. A broad range of specific applications and MR methods, from MRI to MRSI and MRS were investigated. The main foci were on sodium magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of rodents, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the mouse brain, and the detection of small amounts of iron labeled stem cells in the rat brain using MRI Sodium spectroscopic imaging was explored since it benefits tremendously from the high magnetic field. Due to the intrinsically low signal in vivo, originating from the low concentrations and short transverse relaxation times, only limited results have been achieved by other researchers until now. Results in the literature include studies conducted on large animals such as dogs to animals as small as rats. No studies performed on mice have been reported, despite the fact that the mouse is the most important laboratory animal due to the ready availability of transgenic strains. Hence, this study concentrated on sodium MRSI of small rodents, mostly mice (brain, heart, and kidney), and in the case of the brain on young rats. The second part of this work concentrated on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the rodent brain. Due to the high magnetic field strength not only the increasing signal but also the extended spectral resolution was advantageous for such kind of studies. The difficulties/limitations of ultra high field MRS were also investigated. In the last part of the presented work detection limits of iron labeled stem cells in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging were explored. The studies provided very useful benchmarks for future researchers in terms of the number of labeled stem cells that are required for high-field MRI studies. Overall this work has shown many of the benefits and the areas that need special attention of ultra high fields in MR. Three topics in MRI, MRS and MRSI were

  7. Review: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    Douglas G. Kondo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper focuses on the application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS to the study of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD in children and adolescents. Method. A literature search using the National Institutes of Health's PubMed database was conducted to identify indexed peer-reviewed MRS studies in pediatric patients with MDD. Results. The literature search yielded 18 articles reporting original MRS data in pediatric MDD. Neurochemical alterations in Choline, Glutamate, and N-Acetyl Aspartate are associated with pediatric MDD, suggesting pathophysiologic continuity with adult MDD. Conclusions. The MRS literature in pediatric MDD is modest but growing. In studies that are methodologically comparable, the results have been consistent. Because it offers a noninvasive and repeatable measurement of relevant in vivo brain chemistry, MRS has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiology of MDD as well as the mediators and moderators of treatment response.

  8. Authentication of Medicines Using Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Fengchao; Barras, Jamie; Althoefer, Kaspar; Bhunia, Swarup; Mandal, Soumyajit

    2016-01-01

    The production and sale of counterfeit and substandard pharmaceutical products, such as essential medicines, is an important global public health problem. We describe a chemometric passport-based approach to improve the security of the pharmaceutical supply chain. Our method is based on applying nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy to authenticate the contents of medicine packets. NQR is a non-invasive, non-destructive, and quantitative radio frequency (RF) spectroscopic technique. It is sensitive to subtle features of the solid-state chemical environment and thus generates unique chemical fingerprints that are intrinsically difficult to replicate. We describe several advanced NQR techniques, including two-dimensional measurements, polarization enhancement, and spin density imaging, that further improve the security of our authentication approach. We also present experimental results that confirm the specificity and sensitivity of NQR and its ability to detect counterfeit medicines. PMID:26841409

  9. Identification of irradiated chicken meat using electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Studies were carried out on detection of irradiation treatment in chicken using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The effect of gamma- irradiation treatment on radiation induced signal in different types of chicken namely, broiler, deshi and layers was studied. Irradiation treatment induced a characteristic ESR signal that was not detected in non-irradiated samples. The shape of the signal was not affected by type of the bone. The intensity of radiation induced ESR signal was affected by factors such as absorbed radiation dose, bone type irradiation temperature, post-irradiation storage, post-irradiation cooking and age of the bird. Deep-frying resulted in the formation of a symmetric signal that had a different shape and was weaker than the radiation induced signal. This technique can be effectively used to detect irradiation treatment in bone-in chicken meat even if stored and/or subjected to various traditional cooking procedures. (author)

  10. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  11. Simultaneous surface plasmon resonance and x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Serrano, A. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez de la Fuente, O. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Collado, V.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG Beamline at the ESRF, F-38043 Grenoble, Cedex 09, France and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Monton, C. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Garcia, M. A. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Nanociencia, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    We present an experimental setup for the simultaneous measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) on metallic thin films at a synchrotron beamline. The system allows measuring in situ and in real time the effect of x-ray irradiation on the SPR curves to explore the interaction of x-rays with matter. It is also possible to record XAS spectra while exciting SPR in order to study changes in the films induced by the excitation of surface plasmons. Combined experiments recording simultaneously SPR and XAS curves while scanning different parameters can be also carried out. The relative variations in the SPR and XAS spectra that can be detected with this setup range from 10{sup -3} to 10{sup -5}, depending on the particular experiment.

  12. Sturge-Weber Syndrome: Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Findings

    We report on the diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton MR spectroscopy findings of a 26-year-old female patient with Sturge-Weber syndrome. Echo-planar trace diffusion MRI revealed mildly high signal intensity changes at parieto-occipital lobes on b≅1000 s/mm2 images, suggesting restricted diffusion. On corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient maps, those areas had moderately high signal intensity and high apparent diffusion coefficient values (around 0.9x10-3 mm2 /s) compared with the contralateral symmetrical normal side of the brain (0.776x10-3 mm2/s). This finding was consistent with increased motion of water molecules (disintegration of the neural tissue) in these regions. Proton MR spectroscopy revealed decreased N-acetyl aspartate and increased choline peaks, indicating disintegration of neural tissue associated with neuronal loss as well

  13. Basic study on FP gas monitoring with Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) has recently got into the spotlight as an innovative technology for ultra high sensitive trace element analysis and/or efficient isotope separation and is being developed into more extensive application in various engineering fields with improvement of tunable laser performance. The present study is aiming to develop a new and advanced Failed Fuel Detection and Location (FFDL) technique based on fission product (FP) gas (such as Kr and Xe) monitoring with Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS), which combines RIS with mass spectrometry. Under collaborative works of advanced basic engineering research with JNC over four years since 1996, the feasibility study on the RIMS-FFDL have been made through basic experiments to detect Xe and Kr by using a RIMS system for common utilization installed at the Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory of the University of Tokyo. This report describes the basic performance necessary to the design of RIMS-FFDL such as the detection limit, the elemental selectivity, etc. obtained from experiments and their theoretical analyses and also the successful results on the detection and isotopic ratio analysis of ppb level Xe/Kr tag gas in the cover gas sampled from the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO', which would lead to the conclusion that the RIMS-FFDL can satisfy all the requirements for conventional FFDL methods in addition to a novel function of no-line isotopic ratio analysis useful for the tag gas method adopted in the prototype fast reactor 'MONJU'. (author)

  14. Gravity resonance spectroscopy constrains dark energy and dark matter scenarios.

    Jenke, T; Cronenberg, G; Burgdörfer, J; Chizhova, L A; Geltenbort, P; Ivanov, A N; Lauer, T; Lins, T; Rotter, S; Saul, H; Schmidt, U; Abele, H

    2014-04-18

    We report on precision resonance spectroscopy measurements of quantum states of ultracold neutrons confined above the surface of a horizontal mirror by the gravity potential of Earth. Resonant transitions between several of the lowest quantum states are observed for the first time. These measurements demonstrate that Newton's inverse square law of gravity is understood at micron distances on an energy scale of 10-14  eV. At this level of precision, we are able to provide constraints on any possible gravitylike interaction. In particular, a dark energy chameleon field is excluded for values of the coupling constant β>5.8×108 at 95% confidence level (C.L.), and an attractive (repulsive) dark matter axionlike spin-mass coupling is excluded for the coupling strength gsgp>3.7×10-16 (5.3×10-16) at a Yukawa length of λ=20  μm (95% C.L.). PMID:24785025

  15. Ultrasonic Resonance Spectroscopy of Composite Rims for Flywheel Rotors

    Harmon, Laura M.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage devices comprising multilayered composite rotor systems are being studied extensively for utilization in the International Space Station. These composite material systems were investigated with a recently developed ultrasonic resonance spectroscopy technique. The ultrasonic system employs a continuous swept-sine waveform and performs a fast Fourier transform (FFT) on the frequency response spectrum. In addition, the system is capable of equalizing the amount of energy at each frequency. Equalization of the frequency spectrum, along with interpretation of the second FFT, aids in the evaluation of the fundamental frequency. The frequency responses from multilayered material samples, with and without known defects, were analyzed to assess the capabilities and limitations of this nondestructive evaluation technique for material characterization and defect detection. Amplitude and frequency changes were studied from ultrasonic responses of thick composite rings and a multiring composite rim. A composite ring varying in thickness was evaluated to investigate the full thickness resonance. The frequency response characteristics from naturally occurring voids in a composite ring were investigated. Ultrasonic responses were compared from regions with and without machined voids in a composite ring and a multiring composite rim. Finally, ultrasonic responses from the multiring composite rim were compared before and after proof spin testing to 63,000 rpm.

  16. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy; In vivo magnetisk resonansspektroskopi

    Bakken, Inger Johanne; Skjetne, Tore; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Kvistad, Kjell Arne

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic resonance tomography (MR) has become a highly useful tool for diagnostic imaging. The technology is in a process of rapid development with new and better methods emerging for the imaging of anatomic and pathologic aspects. With some additional equipment, the MR instrument may also be used for in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS provides biochemical information about metabolites in a given tissue volume. This type of biochemical information can be extracted from volumes the size of a sugar lump within a recording period of about five minutes. New technologies also allow extracting such information from several volumes during one recording in which the information is processed as metabolic pictures. The method has found clinical applications in several fields, including the evaluation of brain tumours and epilepsy. The use of in vivo MRS will probably increase in the years ahead, especially, perhaps, for the follow-up of various therapeutic regimens. All suppliers of MR equipment now provide in vivo MRS sets and routines for recording and data analysis have become very user-friendly. (author)

  17. The resonant detector and its application to epithermal neutron spectroscopy

    Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Andreani, C.; D'Angelo, A.; Pietropaolo, A.; Senesi, R.; Imberti, S.; Bracco, A.; Previtali, E.; Pessina, G.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2004-08-01

    New perspectives for epithermal neutron spectroscopy are being opened by the development of the resonant detector (RD) and its use on inverse geometry time of flight spectrometers at spallation sources. The RD was first proposed in the 1980s and was recently brought to a performance level exceeding conventional neutron-sensitive Li-glass scintillator detectors. It features a photon counter coupled to a neutron analyzer foil. Resonant neutron absorption in the foil results in the emission of prompt gamma rays that are detected in the photon counter. The dimensions of the RD set the spatial resolution that can be achieved, ranging from a fraction of a cm to several cm. It can thus be tailored to the construction of detector arrays of different geometry. The main results of the research on this kind of detector are reported leading to the present optimized RD design based on a combination of YAP scintillation photon counter and uranium or gold analyzer foils. This detector has already been selected for application in the upgrade of the VESUVIO spectrometer on ISIS. A special application is the Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank, which will extend the kinematical region for neutron scattering to low momentum transfer (1 eV, thus allowing new experimental studies in condensed matter systems. The first results of tests made with prototype VLAD detectors are presented, confirming the usefulness of the RD for measurements at scattering angles as low as 2-5°.

  18. Frequency-selective analysis of multichannel magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.

    Sandgren, Niclas; Stoica, Petre

    2005-01-01

    In several practical magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) applications the user is interested only in the spectral content of a specific frequency band of the spectrum. A frequency-selective (or sub-band) method estimates only the parameters of those spectroscopic components that lie in a pre-selected frequency band of the spectrum in a computationally efficient manner. Multichannel MRS is a technique that employs phased-array receive coils to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the spectra by combining several simultaneous measurements of the magnetic resonance (MR) relaxation of an excited sample. In this paper we suggest a frequency-selective multichannel parameter estimation approach that combines the appealing features (high speed and improved SNR) of the two techniques above. The presented method shows parameter estimation accuracies comparable to those of existing fullband multichannel techniques in the high SNR case, but at a considerably lower computational complexity, and significantly better parameter estimation accuracies in low SNR scenarios. PMID:17282712

  19. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in malformations of cortical development

    Celi Santos Andrade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Malformations of cortical development (MCD result from disruptions in the dynamic process of cerebral corticogenesis and are important causes of epilepsy, motor deficits and cognitive impairment. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate phospholipids metabolism in vivo in a series of patients with epilepsy and MCD. Methods Thirty-seven patients with MCD and 31 control subjects were studied using three-dimensional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS at a 3.0 T scanner. Quantification methods were applied to the following resonances: phosphoethanolamine (PE, phosphocholine (PC, glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, inorganic phosphate (Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr, and a-, b-, and g-adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The magnesium (Mg2+ levels and pH were calculated based on PCr, Pi and b-ATP chemical shifts. Results Compared to controls, the MCD lesions exhibited lower pH values and higher Mg2+ levels (p<0.05. The lesions also presented significant reduction of GPC and PDE, and an increased PME/PDE ratio. The otherwise normal appearing parenchyma also demonstrated lower pH values in the frontoparietal cortex and bilateral centrum semiovale. Conclusions Our data support the idea that metabolic impairments occur in the lesions of MCD, with propagation to remote normal appearing parenchyma. The results also suggest that there are membrane turnover disturbances in MCD lesions.

  20. Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the central nervous system.

    Ratai, Eva-Maria; Gilberto González, R

    2016-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is a noninvasive imaging technique that can easily be added to the conventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequences. Using MRS one can directly compare spectra from pathologic or abnormal tissue and normal tissue. Metabolic changes arising from pathology that can be visualized by MRS may not be apparent from anatomy that can be visualized by conventional MR imaging. In addition, metabolic changes may precede anatomic changes. Thus, MRS is used for diagnostics, to observe disease progression, monitor therapeutic treatments, and to understand the pathogenesis of diseases. MRS may have an important impact on patient management. The purpose of this chapter is to provide practical guidance in the clinical application of MRS of the brain. This chapter provides an overview of MRS-detectable metabolites and their significance. In addition some specific current clinical applications of MRS will be discussed, including brain tumors, inborn errors of metabolism, leukodystrophies, ischemia, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. The chapter concludes with technical considerations and challenges of clinical MRS. PMID:27432661

  1. Recent advances and future trends in neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy contributes primarily to two areas of nuclear physics: 1.) in medium weight and heavy nuclei with a high level density it tests their statistical properties, and 2.) in nuclei with a sufficiently low level density, i.e. light nuclei (A ≤ 50) and nuclei around /sup 208/Pb, it investigates nuclear structure at several MeV excitation energy. In the first field, recent years have seen growing knowledge and understanding of nuclear level densities and their spin and parity dependence. Several questions basic to the statistical properties of nuclei, although extensively studied in the past, are still open: the statistical distribution of partial widths; possible narrow energy variations of the average partial widths; and correlations between partial widths for different reaction channels. The major progress has occurred and will continue to take place in the field of light nuclei: improved resolution of neutron time-of-flight spectrometers yields detailed resonance data over an extended energy range, and model calculations become possible which will allow detailed comparison to experimental data. The main subjects of interest are the distributions of neutron, as well as radiative strengths and their interpretation in terms of nuclear structure

  2. Recent advances and future trends in neutron resonance spectroscopy

    Neutron resonance spectroscopy contributes primarily to two areas of nuclear physics: In medium weight and heavy nuclei with a high level density it tests their statistical properties; in nuclei with a sufficiently low level density, i.e. light nuclei (A 208Pb, it investigates nuclear structure at several MeV excitation energy. In the first field, recent years have seen growing knowledge and understanding of nuclear level densities and their spin and parity dependence. Several questions basic to the statistical properties of nuclei, although extensively studied in the past, are still open: the statistical distribution of partial widths; possible narrow energy variations of the average partial widths; and correlations between partial widths for different reaction channels. The major progress has occured and will continue to take place in the field of light nuclei: Improved resolution of neutron time-of-flight spectrometers yields detailed resonance data over an extended energy range, and model calculations become possible which will allow detailed comparison to experimental data. The main subjects of interest are the distributions of neutron- as well as radiative strengths and their interpretation in terms of nuclear structure. (author)

  3. Collinear resonant ionization laser spectroscopy of rare francium isotopes

    Neyens, G; Flanagan, K; Rajabali, M M; Le blanc, F M; Ware, T; Procter, T J

    2008-01-01

    We propose a programme of collinear resonant ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) of the francium isotopes up to and including $^{201}$Fr and $^{218,219}$Fr. This work aims at answering questions on the ordering of quantum states, and effect of the ($\\pi s_{1/2}^{-1}$)1/2$^{+}$ intruder state, which is currently believed to be the ground state of $^{199}$Fr. This work will also study the edge of the region of reflection asymmetry through measurement of the moments and radii of $^{218,219}$Fr. This proposal forms the first part of a series of experiments that will study nuclei in this region of the nuclear chart. Based on the success of this initial proposal it is the intention of the collaboration to perform high resolution measurements on the isotopes of radium and radon that surround $^{201}$Fr and $^{218}$Fr and thus providing a comprehensive description of the ground state properties of this region of the nuclear chart. Recent in-source spectroscopy measurements of lead, bismuth and polonium have demonstrated a...

  4. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique

  5. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy of liver tumors and metastases

    EGW ter Voert; L Heijmen; HWM van Laarhoven; A Heerschap

    2011-01-01

    Primary liver cancer is the fifth most common malignancy in men and the eighth in women worldwide. The liver is also the second most common site for metastatic spread of cancer. To assist in the diagnosis of these liver lesions non-invasive advanced imaging techniques are desirable. Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used to identify anatomical lesions, but it is a very versatile technique and also can provide specific information on tumor pathophysiology and metabolism,in particular with the application of MR spectroscopy (MRS). This may include data on the type, grade and stage of tumors, and thus assist in further management of the disease. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the available literature on proton, phosphorus and carbon-13-MRS as performed on primary liver tumors and metastases, with human applications as the main perspective. Upcoming MRS approaches with potential applications to liver tumors are also included. Since knowledge of some technical background is indispensable to understand the results, a basic introduction of MRS and some technical issues of MRS as applied to tumors and metastases in the liver are described as well. In vivo MR spectroscopy of tumors in a metabolically active organ such as the liver has been demonstrated to provide important information on tumor metabolism, but it also is challenging as compared to applications on some other tissues, in particular in humans, mostly because of its abdominal location where movement may be a disturbing factor.

  6. Discrete decoding based ultrafast multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Wei, Zhiliang; Lin, Liangjie; Ye, Qimiao; Li, Jing; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy constitutes an important and powerful tool in analyzing chemical and biological systems. However, the abundant 3D information arrives at the expense of long acquisition times lasting hours or even days. Therefore, there has been a continuous interest in developing techniques to accelerate recordings of 3D NMR spectra, among which the ultrafast spatiotemporal encoding technique supplies impressive acquisition speed by compressing a multidimensional spectrum in a single scan. However, it tends to suffer from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions, which deteriorates in cases of NMR spectroscopy with more dimensions. In this study, the discrete decoding is proposed to liberate the ultrafast technique from tradeoffs among spectral widths in different dimensions by focusing decoding on signal-bearing sites. For verifying its feasibility and effectiveness, we utilized the method to generate two different types of 3D spectra. The proposed method is also applicable to cases with more than three dimensions, which, based on the experimental results, may widen applications of the ultrafast technique.

  7. Characterization of human breast disease using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance imaging

    This thesis provides the fundamental characterization and differentiation of breast tissues using in vivo and ex vivo MR techniques in the hope that these techniques and experimental findings will be used on a larger scale and in a predictive manner in order to improve the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this dissertation, clinical studies were performed using proton magnetic resonance imaging and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectro-scopy (31P MRS) to characterize and differentiate malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues in vivo. These studies were carried out following the methodical characterization of chemical extracts of malignant breast tumor, benign breast tumor and normal breast parenchymal surgical tissue specimens using high resolution 31P MRS. Alterations in breast tissue metabolism, as a result of pathological processes, were postulated to be responsible for measurable differences between malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues using magnetic resonance techniques. (author). 365 refs.; 37 figs.; 25 tabs

  8. Arsenic hydride radicals studied by laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Arsenic hydride radicals have been studied by Laser Magnetic Resonance (LMR) spectroscopy. Their spectra have been analysed to give molecular parameters whose interpretation has provided information on the molecular and electronic structure of these species. In LMR spectroscopy an applied magnetic field removes the degeneracy of the MJ levels of a paramagnetic species. Scanning the magnetic field tunes rotational transitions between these levels into resonance with a nearby laser line leading to the observation of absorption signals. Two LMR spectrometers were used in this work: the mid-IR CO LMR spectrometer in Oxford and the far-IR LMR spectrometer at NIST, Boulder. Vibration-rotation transitions in the υ = 1 - 0 band and the υ = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 hot bands of AsH in its ground electronic state (X3Σ-) have been recorded by MIR LMR. As υ = 2 - 1 and 3 - 2 transitions have been observed for the first time, the vibrational dependences of several parameters have been determined. In particular, the vibrational anharmonicity, wexe, has been measured very accurately; the parameter weye has also been determined. The precision and accuracy of the band origin have been improved and the observation of transitions between different spin-states has allowed a direct determination, therefore more accurate values, of the spin-spin coupling constant λ0 and spin-rotation coupling constant γ0. Pure rotational transitions in the υ = 0 level of AsH in its first excited electronic state (a1Δ) have been recorded by FIR LMR. The rotational constants have been determined much more precisely than previously; hyperfine parameters for 75As and 1H, and the Zeeman parameters, have also been determined. FIR LMR has also been used to record pure rotational transitions in the υ = 0 level of AsH2 in its ground electronic state (X-tilde2 B1). AsH2 is an asymmetric top and a good spread of N and Kc values are involved in the observed transitions, giving an expanded and more reliable set of

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging characteristics of cerebral Blastomycosis

    Jay A Vachhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blastomycosis is a dimorphic fungus that is endemic to the midwest and southwestern United States. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is thought to only represent 5-10% of cases of disseminated Blastomycosis. Case Description: A 54-year-old Caucasian female presented to the Neurosurgery service with a 1-day history of progressive right sided hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated a 2 × 4 cm heterogeneous intracranial mass lesion involving the left motor cortex and extending into the ipsilateral parietal lobe. Single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS over the enhancing area demonstrated diminished N-acetyl aspartate (NAA to creatine ratio (1.10, normal choline to NAA ratio (0.82, normal choline to creatine ratio (0.9, and a diminished myoinositol to creatine ratio (0.39. There appeared to be peaks between 3.6 and 3.8 ppm over the enhancing area that were not present in the contralateral normal brain and thought to represent a "trehalose" peak. Due to worsening symptoms and uncertain preoperative diagnosis, the patient underwent a left fronto-parietal craniotomy for open surgical biopsy with possible resection approximately one month after presentation. Pathological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of Blastomycosis. Conclusion: We present the second documented case of intracranial Blastomycosis with MRS imaging. There appears to be a characteristic peak between 3.6 and 3.8 ppm that is thought to represent a "trehalose" peak. This peak is rather specific to fungi and can be helpful in differentiating fungal abscesses from pyogenic abscesses and malignant neoplasms.

  10. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the prostate

    To provide a brief summary of important technical and biochemical aspects and current clinical applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the prostate.Material and methods Pertinent radiological and biochemical literature was searched and retrieved via electronic media (medline trademark, pubmed trademark). Basic concepts of MRS of the prostate and its clinical applications were extracted to provide an overview. The prostate lends itself to MRS due to its unique production, storage, and secretion of citrate. While healthy prostate tissue demonstrates high levels of citrate and low levels of choline that marks cell wall turnover, prostate cancer (PCA) utilizes citrate for energy metabolism and shows high levels of choline. The ratio of (choline + creatine)/citrate differentiates healthy prostate tissue and PCA. The combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3-dimensional MRS (3D-MRSI or 3D-CSI) of the prostate localizes PCA to a sextant of the peripheral zone of the prostate with sensitivity/specificity of up to 80/80%. Combined MRI and 3D-MRSI exceed the sensitivity and specificity of sextant biopsy of the prostate. When MRS and MRI agree on PCA presence, the positive predictive value is about 90%. In principle, combined MRI and 3D-MRSI recognize and localize remnant or recurrent cancer after hormone therapy, radiation therapy and cryo-surgery. Since it is non-invasive and radiation-free, combined MRI and 3D-MRSI lends itself to the planning of prostate biopsy and therapy as well as to post-therapeutic follow-up. For broad clinical application, it will be necessary to facilitate MRS examinations and their evaluation and make MRS available to a wider range of institutions. (orig.)

  11. Resolution Improvement in Multidimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with both liquid-state and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of this work is devoted to the investigation by solid-state NMR of C13-enriched compounds with the principal aim of presenting techniques devised for further improving the spectral resolution in multidimensional NMR of microcrystalline proteins. In fully C13-labelled compounds, the J-coupling induces a broadening of the carbon lineshapes. We show that spin-state-selective technique called IPAP can be successfully combined with standard polarisation transfer schemes in order to remove the J-broadening in multidimensional solid-state NMR correlation experiments of fully C13-enriched proteins. We present subsequently two techniques tailored for liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. The carbon directly detected techniques provide chemical shift information for all backbone hetero-nuclei. They are very attracting for the study of large bio-molecular systems or for the investigation of paramagnetic proteins. In the last part of this thesis, we study the spin-echo J-modulation for homonuclear two-spin 1/2 systems. Under magic-angle spinning, the theory of J-induced spin-echo modulation allows to derive a set of modulation regimes which give a spin-echo modulation exactly equal to the J-coupling. We show that the chemical-shift anisotropy and the dipolar interaction tend to stabilize the spin-echo J-modulation. The theoretical conclusions are supported by numerical simulations and experimental results obtained for three representative samples containing C13 spin pairs. (author)

  12. Identification of irradiated rice noodles by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been applied to the identification of the irradiation of a wide variety of foods. In this study, ESR was applied to identify irradiated rice noodles. A detailed ESR investigation of irradiated noodles was carried out in the dose range 0.5–3 kGy. The stability of the radiation-induced ESR signal at cold (−4 °C) and room (25 °C) temperatures was studied over a storage period of 24 weeks. Irradiated rice noodle samples exhibited a strong, symmetric doublet ESR signal centered at g = 2.0, whereas unirradiated noodle exhibited a very weak signal. The ESR signal intensity increased linearly with radiation dose ranging from 0.5 to 3 kGy. Keeping the samples at −4 °C and 25 °C for 24 weeks caused decreases of 50% and 90% in the ESR signal intensities, respectively. However, long-term decay data at room temperature showed that the ESR technique could be used to identify irradiated rice noodles up to 24 weeks following irradiation.

  13. RIS [Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy] applications to particle physics

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy, RIS, is a process in which valence electrons can be removed from a laser wavelength selected atom with nearly unit efficiency. The selectivity-sensitivity of RIS is an important joint property, making possible a range of new analytical capabilities. Thus, RIS has been combined with mass spectrometers for the Z-selective and A-selective counting of individual noble gas atoms or atoms ejected from solids by ion or laser sputtering. This presentation will concentrate on the noble gas analysis and describe the capability at Atom Sciences for counting Kr atoms with isotopic selectivity. An update will be given on the feasibility of a proposed solar neutrino experiment, in which 81Kr is produced by interaction with 81Br. Double beta-decay can product 82Kr from the decay of 82Se, and this experiment may also be feasible. Finally, 81Kr is useful for dating old groundwater, since the half-life is 200,000 years

  14. Tetrachloridocuprates(II—Synthesis and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR Spectroscopy

    Peter Strauch

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ionic liquids (ILs on the basis of metal containing anions and/or cations are of interest for a variety of technical applications e.g., synthesis of particles, magnetic or thermochromic materials. We present the synthesis and the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopic analyses of a series of some new potential ionic liquids based on tetrachloridocuprates(II, [CuCl4]2−, with different sterically demanding cations: hexadecyltrimethylammonium 1, tetradecyltrimethylammonium 2, tetrabutylammonium 3 and benzyltriethylammonium 4. The cations in the new compounds were used to achieve a reasonable separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II ions for EPR spectroscopy. The EPR hyperfine structure was not resolved. This is due to the exchange broadening, resulting from still incomplete separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II centers. Nevertheless, the principal values of the electron Zeemann tensor (g║ and g┴ of the complexes could be determined. Even though the solid substances show slightly different colors, the UV/Vis spectra are nearly identical, indicating structural changes of the tetrachloridocuprate moieties between solid state and solution. The complexes have a promising potential e.g., as high temperature ionic liquids, as precursors for the formation of copper chloride particles or as catalytic paramagnetic ionic liquids.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS in Breast Cancer

    Uma Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a major health problem in women and early detection is of prime importance. Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides both physical and physiologic tissue features that are useful in discriminating malignant from benign lesions. Contrast enhanced MRI is valuable for diagnosis of small tumors in dense breast and the structural and kinetic parameters improved the specificity of diagnosing benign from malignant lesions. It is a complimentary modality for preoperative staging, to follow response to therapy, to detect recurrences and for screening high risk women. Diffusion, perfusion and MR elastography have been applied to breast lesion characterization and show promise.In-vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS is a valuable method to obtain the biochemical status of normal and diseased tissues. Malignant tissues contain high concentration of choline containing compounds that can be used as a biochemical marker. MRS helps to increase the specificity of MRI in lesions larger than 1cm and to monitor the tumor response. Various MR techniques show promise primarily as adjunct to the existing standard detection techniques, and its acceptability as a screening method will increase if specificity can be improved. This review presents the progress made in different MRI and MRS techniques in breast cancer management.

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reflects cellular proliferative activity in astrocytomas

    We examined whether proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) could provide accurate information on histological grade and cell proliferation in astrocytomas. We studied 23 patients with astrocytomas: five grade II, 10 grade III and eight with grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme). We performed proton MRS and determined the Ki-67 labeling index (LI), a tumour proliferation marker, in the same areas of the astrocytomas, and examined the statistical relationship between proton MRS and Ki-67 LI. The N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine-phosphocreatine (Cr) and NAA/choline (Cho)-containing compound ratios were always significantly lower and the Cho/Cr ratios significantly higher than those for normal brain. The Cho/Cr ratio correlated positively and the NAA/Cho ratio inversely with Ki-67 LI. These findings suggest that the Cho signal in proton MRS reflects cellular proliferation. In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there was no significant difference between high (> 2.0, 14 cases) and low (< 2.0, 9 cases) Cho/cr ratio groups. (orig.)

  17. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy changes after antipsychotic treatment.

    Szulc, Agata; Galinska-Skok, Beata; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Bibulowicz, Daniel; Konarzewska, Beata; Tarasow, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) enables the observation of brain function in vivo. Several brain metabolites can be measured by the means of (1)H MRS: N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol (mI) and glutamate (Glu), glutamine (Gln) and GABA (together as Glx complex or separately). (1)H MRS measures have been found to be abnormal in psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Here we specifically review the influence exerted by antipsychotic drugs on brain metabolism, as detected by (1)H MRS. We systematically reviewed the available literature and uncovered 27 studies, 16 before-after treatment and 11 cross-sectional. Most of them addressed the effects of antipsychotics in schizophrenia and mainly focusing on NAA alterations. Follow up studies indicated antipsychotic drugs may act by increasing NAA levels in selected brain areas (the frontal lobe and thalamus), especially during the short-time observation. This phenomenon seems to vanish after longer observation. Other studies indicated that glutamate measures are decreasing along with the duration of the disease, suggesting both a neurodegenerative process present in schizophrenic brain as well as an influence of antipsychotics. The above results were reviewed according to the most recent theories in the field accounting for the impact of antipsychotics (1)HMRS measures. PMID:23157634

  18. High-resolution inverse Raman and resonant-wave-mixing spectroscopy

    Rahn, L.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    These research activities consist of high-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy (IRS) and resonant wave-mixing spectroscopy to support the development of nonlinear-optical techniques for temperature and concentration measurements in combustion research. Objectives of this work include development of spectral models of important molecular species needed to perform coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements and the investigation of new nonlinear-optical processes as potential diagnostic techniques. Some of the techniques being investigated include frequency-degenerate and nearly frequency-degenerate resonant four-wave-mixing (DFWM and NDFWM), and resonant multi-wave mixing (RMWM).

  19. Multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in heat stroke

    Aim: To assess the role of proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) in the detection of changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after heat stroke (HS). Materials and methods: The study group consisted of eight patients after HS, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3–9. The MR studies were performed with a 1.5 T system. MR spectra were recorded from a normal-appearing cerebellum region. Spectra from patients were compared with a control group including seven age-matched healthy volunteers recorded with the same techniques. Metabolites ratios including N-acetyl aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr), N-acetyl aspartate/creatine2 (NAA/Cr2), choline/creatine (Cho/Cr), choline/creatine2 (Cho/Cr2), and N-acetyl aspartate/choline (NAA/Cho) were calculated and the differences between the two groups were evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Pearson correlation analysis was used to analyse the relationship between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS. Results: In the cerebellum of the patients after HS, NAA/Cr ratios were found to be significantly decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.004) and Cho/Cr ratios were found to be decreased compared to normal controls (p = 0.032). Significant positive correlation was found between NAA/Cr ratios and GCS scores for eight patients after HS (r = 0.748, p = 0.033). Conclusions: Metabolite abnormalities were seen in normal-appearing cerebellum structures in patients after HS. Proton MRS is a useful tool for evaluating major changes in metabolite levels of the cerebellum after HS and the severity of the disease can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios. - Highlights: • Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers important information in patients with heat stroke. • Significantly different NAA/Cr ratios were found between heat stroke and controls. • The severity of heat stroke can be effectively evaluated by NAA/Cr ratios

  20. Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) Munition Classification System enhancements. Final report

    Vela, O.A.; Huggard, J.C.

    1997-09-18

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a non-destructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This technology has resulted in three generations of instrumentation, funded by the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), specifically designed for field identification of chemical weapon (CW) munitions. Each generation of ARS instrumentation was developed with a specific user in mind. The ARS1OO was built for use by the U.N. Inspection Teams going into Iraq immediately after the Persian Gulf War. The ARS200 was built for use in the US-Russia Bilateral Chemical Weapons Treaty (the primary users for this system are the US Onsite Inspection Agency (OSIA) and their Russian counterparts). The ARS300 was built with the requirements of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) in mind. Each successive system is an improved version of the previous system based on learning the weaknesses of each and, coincidentally, on the fact that more time was available to do a requirements analysis and the necessary engineering development. The ARS300 is at a level of development that warrants transferring the technology to a commercial vendor. Since LANL will supply the computer software to the selected vendor, it is possible for LANL to continue to improve the decision algorithms, add features where necessary, and adjust the user interface before the final transfer occurs. This paper describes the current system, ARS system enhancements, and software enhancements. Appendices contain the Operations Manual (software Version 3.01), and two earlier reports on enhancements.

  1. Krypton isotope analysis using near-resonant stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    A method for measuring low relative abundances of 85Kr in one liter or less samples of air has been under development here at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is to measure ratios of 10-10 or less of 85Kr to more abundant stable krypton. Mass spectrometry and beta counting are the main competing technologies used in rare-gas trace analysis and are limited in application by such factors as sample size, counting times, and selectivity. The use of high-resolution lasers to probe hyperfine levels to determine isotopic abundance has received much attention recently. In this study, we report our progress on identifying and implementing techniques for trace 85Kr analysis on small gas samples in a static cell as well as limitations on sensitivity and selectivity for the technique. High-resolution pulsed and cw lasers are employed in a laser-induced fluorescence technique that preserves the original sample. This technique, is based on resonant isotopic depletion spectroscopy (RIDS) in which one isotope is optically depleted while preserving the population of a less abundant isotope. The KILA method consists of three steps. In the first step, the 1s5 metastable level of krypton is populated via radiative cascade following two-photon excitation of the 2p6 energy level. Next, using RBDS, the stable krypton isotopes are optically depleted to the ground state through the 1s4 level with the bulk of the 85Kr population being preserved. Finally, the remaining metastable population is probed to determine 85Kr concentration. The experimental requirements for each of these steps are outlined below

  2. A Multidisciplinary Approach to High Throughput Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Pourmodheji, Hossein; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Magierowski, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a non-contact, powerful structure-elucidation technique for biochemical analysis. NMR spectroscopy is used extensively in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. However, existing NMR technology is limited in that it cannot run a large number of experiments simultaneously in one unit. Recent advances in micro-fabrication technologies have attracted the attention of researchers to overcome these limitations and significantly accelerate the drug discovery process by developing the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS). In this paper, we examine this paradigm shift and explore new design strategies for the development of the next generation of high-throughput NMR spectrometers using CMOS technology. A CMOS NMR system consists of an array of high sensitivity micro-coils integrated with interfacing radio-frequency circuits on the same chip. Herein, we first discuss the key challenges and recent advances in the field of CMOS NMR technology, and then a new design strategy is put forward for the design and implementation of highly sensitive and high-throughput CMOS NMR spectrometers. We thereafter discuss the functionality and applicability of the proposed techniques by demonstrating the results. For microelectronic researchers starting to work in the field of CMOS NMR technology, this paper serves as a tutorial with comprehensive review of state-of-the-art technologies and their performance levels. Based on these levels, the CMOS NMR approach offers unique advantages for high resolution, time-sensitive and high-throughput bimolecular analysis required in a variety of life science applications including drug discovery. PMID:27294925

  3. 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain in paediatrics: The diagnosis of creatine deficiencies

    Sijens, P.E.; Oudkerk, M.

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of creatine deficiencies, a paediatric application of magnetic resonance spectroscopy that has already become a diagnostic tool in clinical practice, is reviewed and illustrated with results from recent examinations

  4. High-resolution laser spectroscopy with the Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN-ISOLDE

    Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Day Goodacre, T.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Gins, W.; Heylen, H.; Kron, T.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Smith, A. J.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2016-06-01

    The Collinear Resonance Ionisation Spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at CERN has achieved high-resolution resonance ionisation laser spectroscopy with a full width at half maximum linewidth of 20(1) MHz for 219,221 Fr, and has measured isotopes as short lived as 5 ms with 214 Fr. This development allows for greater precision in the study of hyperfine structures and isotope shifts, as well as a higher selectivity of single-isotope, even single-isomer, beams. These achievements are linked with the development of a new laser laboratory and new data-acquisition systems.

  5. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm-1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  6. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  7. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    Raeder, Sebastian, E-mail: raeder@uni-mainz.de; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Rothe, Sebastian [CERN, Engineering Department (Switzerland); Wendt, Klaus [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm{sup -1} were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  8. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY IN A MOUSE MODEL OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Torres, German; Hallas, Brian H.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Spernyak, Joseph A.; Horowitz, Judith M.

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic brain abnormalities, as demonstrated by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques, are common occurrences in adult schizophrenia. As mice share important biochemical and genomic similarities with humans, we tested whether brain metabolic abnormalities also occur in a transgenic mouse model of schizophrenia. In vivo 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4.7 T of the chakragati mouse brain revealed abnormalities in relative levels of choline 3.20 ppm and N-acetylaspartate 2.01 ppm...

  9. Human cerebral osmolytes during chronic hyponatremia. A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Videen, J S; Michaelis, T.; Pinto, P; Ross, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of morbidity associated with hyponatremia is postulated to be determined by the state of intracellular cerebral osmolytes. Previously inaccessible, these metabolites can now be quantitated by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An in vivo quantitative assay of osmolytes was performed in 12 chronic hyponatremic patients (mean serum sodium 120 meq/liter) and 10 normal controls. Short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of occipital gray and parietal white matte...

  10. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy evaluation

    YU Ai-hong; CHEN Li; LI Yong-jie; ZHANG Guo-jun; LI Kun-cheng; WANG Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) is a rare benign neoplasm of the central nervous system affecting young people. A correct preoperative diagnosis is helpful for planning surgical strategies and improving prognosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize DNTs using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to analyze the value of these two techniques in the diagnosis of DNTs.Methods MR images of 13 patients with DNTs were reviewed retrospectively; and five of the patients also underwent MRS. Tumors were confirmed by surgery. The distribution, extension and signal features of the lesions were assessed,and the MRS results were analyzed.Results All tumors were supratentorial. The cortex was the main area involved, with nine tumors located in the temporal lobe, three in the frontal lobe, and one on the boundary between the temporal and occipital lobes. All cases had decreased signal intensity on T1-weighted MR images and increased signal intensity on T2-weighted images. On fluid attenuated inversion recovery weighted images, the hyperintense "ring sign" and internal septation of the lesion were seen in 9 cases. Eight tumors had well-demarcated borders. Peritumoral edema or mass effect was absent in all cases. A contrast enhancement examination was performed in 9 cases. Contrast enhancement was absent in five cases, and four cases showed significant enhancement. The MRS showed a low N-acetylaspartate peak and a lack of elevated choline-containing component (Cho) or Cho-Cr ratio (Cho/Cr) in five patients.Conclusions The MRI findings of DNTs were stereotypical. The combination of MRI and MRS techniques were helpful in making a correct presurgical diagnosis.

  11. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Murugesan; Cook; Devasahayam;

    1997-01-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 μs, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species, Rec...

  12. Breathers in Josephson junction ladders: Resonances and electromagnetic wave spectroscopy

    Miroshnichenko, A. E.; Flach, S.; Fistul, M.;

    2001-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the resonant interaction between dynamical localized states (discrete breathers) and linear electromagnetic excitations (EE's) in Josephson junction ladders. By making use of direct numerical simulations we find that such an interaction manifests itself by resonant...

  13. Bithiophene radical cation: Resonance Raman spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    Grage, M.M.-L.; Keszthelyi, T.; Offersgaard, J.F.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1998-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the photogenerated radical cation of bithiophene is reported. The bithiophene radical cation was produced via a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between excited bithiophene and the electron acceptor fumaronitrile in a room temperature acetonitrile solution a...... the Raman spectrum excited in resonance with the absorption band at 425 nm. The spectrum was interpreted with the help of density functional theory calculations. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.......The resonance Raman spectrum of the photogenerated radical cation of bithiophene is reported. The bithiophene radical cation was produced via a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between excited bithiophene and the electron acceptor fumaronitrile in a room temperature acetonitrile solution and...

  14. Bithiophene radical cation: Resonance Raman spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    Grage, M.M.-L.; Keszthelyi, T.; Offersgaard, J.F.;

    1998-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the photogenerated radical cation of bithiophene is reported. The bithiophene radical cation was produced via a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between excited bithiophene and the electron acceptor fumaronitrile in a room temperature acetonitrile solution a...... the Raman spectrum excited in resonance with the absorption band at 425 nm. The spectrum was interpreted with the help of density functional theory calculations. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V....

  15. Detection of irradiated lamb meat by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    Present paper describes the potential of ESR spectroscopy for identification of radical ions in irradiated lamb meat containing bone. Irradiation induced a characteristic ESR signal due to CO2- in the bone tissue which was not detected in the non-irradiated samples. Intensity of ESR signal was proportional to irradiation dose up to 5 kGy. These results have shown that ESR spectroscopy can be effectively used to detect irradiated lamb meat containing bone tissue. (author). 2 refs., 2 figs

  16. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  17. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of plasmon resonances in titanium nitride thin films

    Herzing, Andrew A.; Guler, Urcan; Zhou, Xiuli; Boltasseva, Alexandra; Shalaev, Vladimir; Norris, Theodore B.

    2016-04-01

    The plasmon resonance characteristics of refractory TiN thin films were analyzed using electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). A bulk plasmon resonance was observed at 2.81 eV and a weaker surface plasmon resonance peak was detected at 2.05 eV. These findings are compared to finite-difference time-domain simulations based on measured optical data. The calculated values for both the bulk and surface resonances (2.74 eV and 2.15 eV, respectively) show reasonable agreement with those measured via EELS. The amplitude of the experimentally observed surface resonance was weaker than that typically encountered in noble metal nanostructures, and this is discussed in the context of electron density and reduced spatial confinement of the resonance mode in the thin-film geometry.

  18. Quantification of liver fat using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Thomsen, C; Becker, Povl Ulrik; Winkler, K;

    1994-01-01

    Localized proton MR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes was used to quantify the liver fat concentration in patients with various degrees of fatty liver due to alcohol abuse. Ten patients underwent a liver biopsy followed by chemical triglyceride estimation of the fatty content. A statistically...... significant correlation was found between the fat concentration measured in the liver biopsies, and the concentration calculated from the spectroscopic experiments (r = 0.9, p < .001). Quantitative assessment of liver fat concentrations using localized spectroscopy is superior to methods based on differences...

  19. Methylmercury chloride damage to the adult rat hippocampus cannot be detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Zhiyan Lu; Jinwei Wu; Guangyuan Cheng; Jianying Tian; Zeqing Lu; Yongyi Bi

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have found that methylmercury can damage hippocampal neurons and accord-ingly cause cognitive dysfunction. However, a non-invasive, safe and accurate detection method for detecting hippocampal injury has yet to be developed. This study aimed to detect methylmer-cury-induced damage on hippocampal tissue using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats were given a subcutaneous injection of 4 and 2 mg/kg methylmercury into the neck for 50 consecutive days. Water maze and pathology tests confirmed that cognitive function had been impaired and that the ultrastructure of hippocampal tissue was altered after injection. The results of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-acetyl aspartate/creatine, choline complex/creatine and myoinositol/creatine ratio in rat hippocampal tissue were unchanged. Therefore, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy can not be used to determine structural damage in the adult rat hippocampus caused by methylmercury chloride.

  20. New method for tissue indentification: resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Neu, Walter

    1991-11-01

    The method proposed in this paper is based on the detection of resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser. First test on anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution demonstrate the potential of this technique. A XeCl excimer-laser ((lambda) equals308 nm) pulse, guided by quartz fibers, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The specific species to be detected in the ablation plume determines the wavelength of the narrow-band dye-laser radiation. Preferably, it is set to a strong transition of the selected ablation product. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye-laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the chosen species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence is then guided by optical fibers to an OMA system. Compared to the broad-band excimer-laser-indiced fluorescence during the ablation process, the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude. The achieved increase in sensitivity as well as selectivity is for the benefit of a reliable identification of ablated tissue.

  1. Diagnosis of atherosclerotic tissue by resonance fluorescence spectroscopy

    Neu, Walter; Haase, Karl K.; Tischler, Christian; Nyga, Ralf; Karsch, Karl R.

    1991-05-01

    Resonantly enhanced fluorescence emission induced by a tunable dye laser can be used for the identification of ablated atherosclerotic tissue. This method has been tested with anorganic samples exposed to air and to saline solution. A XeCl excimer laser pulse ((lambda) = 308 nm), delivered by a fused silica optical fiber, causes an efficient ablation of the irradiated samples. The wavelength of the narrow-band dye laser radiation is set to a strong transition of a specific species to be detected in the ablation plume. Taking into account the formation of the plume, the dye laser pulse is applied with a certain delay in order to excite resonantly the selected species in the plume. The resulting resonance fluorescence then is guided by optical fibers to an optical multi-channel analyzer system. Compared to the broad-band fluorescence during excimer laser ablation the resonance fluorescence signal shows a distinct and easily detectable sharp peak. The signal-to-background ratio is improved by one order of magnitude.

  2. UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy of amino acids

    Höhl, Martin; Meinhardt-Wollweber, Merve; Schmitt, Heike; Lenarz, Thomas; Morgner, Uwe

    2016-03-01

    Resonant enhancement of Raman signals is a useful method to increase sensitivity in samples with low concentration such as biological tissue. The investigation of resonance profiles shows the optimal excitation wavelength and yields valuable information about the molecules themselves. However careful characterization and calibration of all experimental parameters affecting quantum yield is required in order to achieve comparability of the single spectra recorded. We present an experimental technique for measuring the resonance profiles of different amino acids. The absorption lines of these molecules are located in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength range. One limitation for broadband measurement of resonance profiles is the limited availability of Raman filters in certain regions of the UV for blocking the Rayleigh scattered light. Here, a wavelength range from 244.8 nm to 266.0 nm was chosen. The profiles reveal the optimal wavelength for recording the Raman spectra of amino acids in aqueous solutions in this range. This study provides the basis for measurements on more complex molecules such as proteins in the human perilymph. The composition of this liquid in the inner ear is essential for hearing and cannot be analyzed non-invasively so far. The long term aim is to implement this technique as a fiber based endoscope for non-invasive measurements during surgeries (e. g. cochlear implants) making it available as a diagnostic tool for physicians. This project is embedded in the interdisciplinary cluster of excellence "Hearing for all" (H4A).

  3. Fast Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of a Free Radical

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn; Hansen, K. B.;

    1975-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of a 10−3 molar solution of the stable diphenyl-pikryl-hydrazyl radical in benzene was obtained using a single laser pulse of 10 mJ energy and 600 ns duration from a flashlamp pumped tunable dye laser. Spectra were recorded using an image intensifier coupled to a TV...

  4. Optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of stimulated recombination processes in defect studies

    Optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy is widely used in the investigation of radiation-induced processes in wide-gap solids. This paper discusses the present understanding of applications of the experimental methods of optical and thermoactivation spectroscopy in the research of new materials, for applications in radiation dosimetry and digital imaging and in the basic research into the fundamental physics and chemistry of radiation. The advantages of the simultaneous use of optical and magnetic resonance techniques for the investigation of stimulated processes are considered

  5. Hitchhiker's Guide to Voxel Segmentation for Partial Volume Correction of In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Quadrelli, Scott; Mountford, Carolyn; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2016-01-01

    Partial volume effects have the potential to cause inaccuracies when quantifying metabolites using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In order to correct for cerebrospinal fluid content, a spectroscopic voxel needs to be segmented according to different tissue contents. This article aims to detail how automated partial volume segmentation can be undertaken and provides a software framework for researchers to develop their own tools. While many studies have detailed the impact of partial volume correction on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification, there is a paucity of literature explaining how voxel segmentation can be achieved using freely available neuroimaging packages. PMID:27147822

  6. Precise shear waves absorption measurements by the Elasto-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy method

    Klinkosz, T

    2003-01-01

    The essential feature of the method is the employment of elasto-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (EMRS) for precise measurement of the absorption of transverse elastic waves introduced into a biological sample. Such a measurement can be accomplished by combining the EMRS method with such methods, in which collective dislocations of spins are induced by external physical factors, e.g. variable electric field, strong magnetic field gradient or longitudinal elastic wave. This has been illustrated herein on the example of Electrical Mobility Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (EMMRS).

  7. Investigation of Fat Metabolism during Antiobesity Interventions by Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    Arunima Pola; Suresh An; Sadananthan; Venkatesh Gopalan; Min-Li Sandra Tan; Terry Yew Keong; Zhihong Zhou; Seigo Ishino; Yoshihide Nakano; Masanori Watanabe; Takashi Horiguchi; Tomoyuki Nishimoto; Bin Zhu; S. Sendhil Velan

    2014-01-01

    The focus of current treatments for obesity is to reduce the body weight or visceral fat, which requires longer duration to show effect. In this study, we investigated the short-term changes in fat metabolism in liver, abdomen, and skeletal muscle during antiobesity interventions including Sibutra mine treatment and diet restriction in obese rats using magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and blood chemistry. Sibutramine is an antiobesity drug that results in weight lo...

  8. Accessing molecule-metal and hetero-molecular interfaces with direct and resonant photoelectron spectroscopy

    Sauer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts of original experimental work, its evaluation, and in- terpretation. Its final goal is to investigate dynamical charge transfer (CT) at a hetero- molecular interface with resonant photoelectron spectroscopy (RPES). In order to achieve this goal preliminary studies have been necessary. First two hetero-molecular inter- faces that exhibit adequate structural properties as well as an appropriate photoelec- tron spectroscopy (PES) spectrum of the valence regime h...

  9. In vivo magnetic resonance studies of human brain energy metabolism by 31P-spectroscopy

    Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for obtaining biochemical information from structurally and functionally intact biological tissues. Following the introduction of high field (1.5 Tesla) wholebody systems it is possible to perform spectroscopic studies on human beings. Thus, MR-spectroscopy may become a very important research tool in physiology, clinical diagnosis and treatment follow-up. So far the human studies have concentrated on the phosphorus (31P) and (1H) nuclei. (author)

  10. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Resonance Spectra of Caged Stringy Black Hole and Its Spectroscopy

    Sakalli, I

    2015-01-01

    The Maggiore's method (MM), which evaluates the transition frequency that appears in the adiabatic invariant from the highly damped quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies, is used to investigate the entropy/area spectra of the Garfinkle--Horowitz--Strominger black hole (GHSBH). Instead of the ordinary QNMs, we compute the boxed QNMs (BQNMs) that are the characteristic resonance spectra of the confined scalar fields in the GHSBH geometry. For this purpose, we assume that the GHSBH has a confining cavity (mirror) placed in the vicinity of the event horizon. We then show how the complex resonant frequencies of the caged GHSBH are computed using the Bessel differential equation that arises when the scalar perturbations around the event horizon are considered. Although the entropy/area is characterized by the GHSBH parameters, their quantization is shown to be independent of those parameters. However, both spectra are equally spaced.

  12. The application of resonance ultrasound spectroscopy to bearing rollers

    Rhodes, G.W. [Dynamic Resonance Systems, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31

    If one applies continuous sweep of vibrational frequencies to a solid, the object will resonate, or ring just like a bell, provided the applied sound frequency matches one of the samples natural vibrational frequencies. The resonances of a solid are affected by its elastic properties, shape, size and density. Any deviation, from the ideal, (crack, grinding burn, dent, dimensional change, hardness difference, etc.) changes the resonance spectrum. This technique is being used to rapidly sort axially symmetric roller bearing elements containing any of several flaws, independent of part orientation. The flaws of concern include: cracks (down to 1mm {times} 50 {micro}m), dimensional and hardness deviations. Industrial bearing manufacturers have found that RUS was able to reliably find cracks which were missed by Eddy Current, whether the defects occurred on the body or end, and without appreciable false rejects. Simultaneous with crack examinations, RUS is able to measure the length of 15 mm tapered rolling elements to {+-}5 {micro}m. Specific data on crack determinations along with dimensional measurements will be presented.

  13. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE(011) cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Mett, Richard R; Sidabras, Jason W; Golovina, Iryna S; Hyde, James S

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE(011) cavity and the TE(01delta) dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Lambda for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Lambda than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE(01delta) mode dielectric resonator alone, Lambda congruent with40 G/W(1/2) at X-band for a KTaO(3) crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone. PMID:19044441

  14. Dielectric microwave resonators in TE011 cavities for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Mett, Richard R.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Golovina, Iryna S.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-09-01

    The coupled system of the microwave cylindrical TE011 cavity and the TE01δ dielectric modes has been analyzed in order to determine the maximum achievable resonator efficiency parameter of a dielectric inserted into a cavity, and whether this value can exceed that of a dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator. The frequency, Q value, and resonator efficiency parameter Λ for each mode of the coupled system were calculated as the size of the dielectric was varied. Other output parameters include the relative field magnitudes and phases. Two modes are found: one with fields in the dielectric parallel to the fields in the cavity center and the other with antiparallel fields. Results closely match those from a computer program that solves Maxwell's equations by finite element methods. Depending on the relative natural resonance frequencies of the cavity and dielectric, one mode has a higher Q value and correspondingly lower Λ than the other. The mode with the higher Q value is preferentially excited by a coupling iris or loop in or near the cavity wall. However, depending on the frequency separation between modes, either can be excited in this way. A relatively narrow optimum is found for the size of the insert that produces maximum signal for both modes simultaneously. It occurs when the self-resonance frequencies of the two resonators are nearly equal. The maximum signal is almost the same as that of the dedicated TE01δ mode dielectric resonator alone, Λ ≅40 G/W1/2 at X-band for a KTaO3 crystal. The cavity is analogous to the second stage of a two-stage coupler. In general, there is no electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal benefit by use of a second stage. However, there is a benefit of convenience. A properly designed sample-mounted resonator inserted into a cavity can give EPR signals as large as what one would expect from the dielectric resonator alone.

  15. Resonantly excited high-density exciton gas studiedvia broadbandTHz spectroscopy

    Huber, Rupert; Kaindl, Robert A.; Schmid, Ben A.; Chemla, Daniel S.

    2005-06-25

    We report the density-dependent crossover of a resonantly photoexcited exciton gas from insulating to conducting phases. Broadband terahertz spectroscopy gives direct access to the exciton binding energy via intra-excitonic 1s-2p transitions. A strong shift, broadening, and ultimately the disappearance of this resonance occurs with decreasing inter-particle distance. Densities of excitons and unbound electron-hole pairs are followed quantitatively using a model of the composite free-carrier and exciton terahertz conductivity. Comparison with near-infrared absorption changes illustrates a significantly enhanced energy shift and broadening of the intra-excitonic resonance.

  16. Noise spectroscopy of non-linear magneto optical resonances in Rb vapor

    Martinelli, M; P. Valente; Failache, H; Felinto, D.; Cruz, L. S.; Nussenzveig, P.; Lezama, A.

    2003-01-01

    Nonlinear magneto-optical (NMO) resonances occurring for near-zero magnetic field are studied in Rb vapor using light-noise spectroscopy. With a balanced detection polarimeter, we observe high contrast variations of the noise power (at fixed analysis frequency) carried by diode laser light resonant with the 5S$_{1/2}(F=2) \\to 5$P$_{1/2}(F=1) $ transition of $^{87}$Rb and transmitted through a rubidium vapor cell, as a function of magnetic field $B$. A symmetric resonance doublet of anti-corre...

  17. Observation of Strong Resonant Behavior in the Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Ce Oxide

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S W; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D; Damian, E; Duda, L; Nordgren, J

    2009-12-15

    X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and Resonant Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy (RIPES) have been used to investigate the photon emission associated with the Ce3d5/2 and Ce3d3/2 thresholds. Strong resonant behavior has been observed in the RIPES of Ce Oxide near the 5/2 and 3/2 edges. Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy (IPES) and its high energy variant, Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (BIS), are powerful techniques that permit a direct interrogation of the low-lying unoccupied electronic structure of a variety of materials. Despite being handicapped by counting rates that are approximately four orders of magnitude less that the corresponding electron spectroscopies (Photoelectron Spectroscopy, PES, and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS) both IPES and BIS have a long history of important contributions. Over time, an additional variant of this technique has appeared, where the kinetic energy (KE) of the incoming electron and photon energy (hv) of the emitted electron are roughly the same magnitude as the binding energy of a core level of the material in question. Under these circumstances and in analogy to Resonant Photoelectron Spectroscopy, a cross section resonance can occur, giving rise to Resonant Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy or RIPES. Here, we report the observation of RIPES in an f electron system, specifically the at the 3d{sub 5/2} and 3d{sub 3/2} thresholds of Ce Oxide. The resonant behavior of the Ce4f structure at the 3d thresholds has been addressed before, including studies of the utilization of the technique as a probe of electron correlation in a variety of Ce compounds. Interestingly, the first RIPES work on rare earths dates back to 1974, although under conditions which left the state of the surface and near surface regions undefined. Although they did not use the more modern terminology of 'RIPES,' it is clear that RIPES was actually first performed in 1974 by Liefeld, Burr and Chamberlain on both La and Ce based

  18. Temperature dependency of elastic properties of RPV steel using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Cheong, Yong Moo; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Joo Hag; Hong, Jun Hwa [Nuclear Materials Technology Team, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-15

    The temperature dependency of dynamic elastic constants of the SA 508 Class 3 RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steel were investigated by using the RUS (resonant ultrasound spectroscopy). The resonant frequencies of rectangular parallelepiped samples were measured using a couple of Alumina wave-guides and wide-band ultrasonic transducers into a small furnace. Also the resonance frequencies were calculated from the initial estimates of elastic stiffness, c{sub 11}, c{sub 12} and c{sub 44} with an assumption of isotropic property, dimension and density. Through the comparison of calculated resonant frequencies with the measured resonant frequencies by RUS, very accurate elastic constants of SA 508 Class steel were determined by iteration and convergence processes. The Young's modulus and shear modulus decreases linearly as the temperature increases from room temperature to 400 degrees C. The similar trends were observed for the longitudinal wave velocity as well as shear wave velocity.

  19. Temperature dependency of elastic properties of RPV steel using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    The temperature dependency of dynamic elastic constants of the SA 508 Class 3 RPV (reactor pressure vessel) steel were investigated by using the RUS (resonant ultrasound spectroscopy). The resonant frequencies of rectangular parallelepiped samples were measured using a couple of Alumina wave-guides and wide-band ultrasonic transducers into a small furnace. Also the resonance frequencies were calculated from the initial estimates of elastic stiffness, c11, c12 and c44 with an assumption of isotropic property, dimension and density. Through the comparison of calculated resonant frequencies with the measured resonant frequencies by RUS, very accurate elastic constants of SA 508 Class steel were determined by iteration and convergence processes. The Young's modulus and shear modulus decreases linearly as the temperature increases from room temperature to 400 degrees C. The similar trends were observed for the longitudinal wave velocity as well as shear wave velocity.

  20. Frequency-scanning marginal oscillator for ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy

    Kemper, Paul R.; Bowers, Michael T.

    1982-07-01

    A number of ion cyclotron resonance applications have arisen in the past few years which require a frequency-scanned detection system. Since the traditional marginal oscillator detector has always been a fixed-frequency detector, alternative detection techniques such as bridge circuit detectors have become widely used. In this paper we present an alternative to the bridge detector, namely, a frequency-scanning marginal oscillator. Requirements and modifications necessary to convert a marginal oscillator to frequency scanning operation are discussed in detail and the necessary circuit diagrams presented. Finally, a theoretical comparison is made between bridge circuit and marginal oscillator sensitivities.

  1. Signal processing in magnetic resonance spectroscopy with biomedical applications

    Belkic, Dzevad

    2010-01-01

    ""a useful addition to the fields of both magnetic resonance (MR) as well as signal processing. … immensely useful as a practical resource handbook to dip into from time to time and to find specific advice on issues faced during the course of work in MR techniques for cancer research. … the best feature of this book is how it positions the very practical area of digital signal processing in the contextual framework of a much more esoteric and fundamental field-that of quantum mechanics. The direct link between quantum-mechanical spectral analysis and rational response functions and the gene

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in brain tumours: clinical applications

    Parallel to the rapid development of clinical MRI, MR spectroscopy (MRS) has, after starting as an analytical tool used in chemistry and physics, evolved to a noninvasive clinical examination. Most common neuroradiological diagnostic indications for MRS are functional inborn errors, neonatal hypoxia, ischaemia, metabolic diseases, white matter and degenerative diseases, epilepsy, inflammation, infections and intracranial neoplasm. Compared to CT and MRI, well-established morphological diagnostic tools, MRS provides information on the metabolic state of brain tissue. We review the clinical impact of MRS in diagnosis of tumours and their differentiation from non-neoplastic lesions. (orig.)

  3. Nanostructured surfaces for surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Petefish, Joseph W.

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has achieved widespread recognition as a sensitive, label-free, and versatile optical method for monitoring changes in refractive index at a metal-dielectric interface. Refractive index deviations of 10-6 RIU are resolvable using SPR, and the method can be used in real-time or ex-situ. Instruments based on carboxymethyl dextran coated SPR chips have achieved commercial success in biological detection, while SPR sensors can also be found in other fields as varied as food safety and gas sensing. Chapter 1 provides a physical background of SPR sensing. A brief history of the technology is presented, and publication data are included that demonstrate the large and growing interest in surface plasmons. Numerous applications of SPR sensors are listed to illustrate the broad appeal of the method. Surface plasmons (SPs) and surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) are formally defined, and important parameters governing their spatial behavior are derived from Maxwell's equations and appropriate boundary conditions. Physical requirements for exciting SPs with incident light are discussed, and SPR imaging is used to illustrate the operating principle of SPR-based detection. Angle-tunable surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) of polymer vibrational modes via grating-coupled SPR is demonstrated in Chapter 2. Over 10-fold enhancement of C-H stretching modes was found relative to the absorbance of the same film in the absence of plasmon excitation. Modeling results are used to support and explain experimental observations. Improvements to the grating coupler SEIRA platform in Chapter 2 are explored in Chapters 3 and 4. Chapter 3 displays data for two sets of multipitch gratings: one set with broadly distributed resonances with the potential for multiband IR enhancement and the other with finely spaced, overlapping resonances to form a broadband IR enhancement device. Diffraction gratings having multiple periods were fabricated using a Lloyd

  4. Magnetic resonance microscopy and spectroscopy reveal kinetics of cryoprotectant permeation in a multicompartmental biological system.

    Hagedorn, M; Hsu, E. W.; Pilatus, U; Wildt, D E; Rall, W R; Blackband, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Successful cryopreservation of most multicompartmental biological systems has not been achieved. One prerequisite for success is quantitative information on cryoprotectant permeation into and amongst the compartments. This report describes direct measurements of cryoprotectant permeation into a multicompartmental system using chemical shift selective magnetic resonance (MR) microscopy and MR spectroscopy. We used the developing zebrafish embryo as a model for studying these complex systems be...

  5. Monitoring temozolomide treatment of low-grade glioma with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Murphy, P. S.; Viviers, L; Abson, C;

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of low-grade glioma treatment response remains as much of a challenge as the treatment itself. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and imaging were incorporated into a study of patients receiving temozolomide therapy for low-grade glioma in order to evaluate and monitor...

  6. Reproducibility of 3.0 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Measuring Hepatic Fat Content

    van Werven, Jochem R.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; van Vliet, Andre A.; Wajs, Ewa; Vandenberk, Petra; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Stoker, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (H-1-MRS) to measure hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC). Materials and Methods: In 24 subjects, HTGC was evaluated using H-1-MRS at 3.0 Tesla. We studied "between-weeks" reproducibility and reproducibility of H-1-MRS

  7. Reproducibility of 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy for measuring hepatic fat content

    J.R. van Werven; J.M. Hoogduin; A.J. Nederveen; A.A. van Vliet; E. Wajs; P. Vandenberk; E.S.G. Stroes; J. Stoker

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to measure hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 24 subjects, HTGC was evaluated using (1)H-MRS at 3.0 Tesla. We studied "between-weeks" reproducibility and reproducibility of (1)H-M

  8. Quantitative Analysis of Nail Polish Remover Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Revisited

    Hoffmann, Markus M.; Caccamis, Joshua T.; Heitz, Mark P.; Schlecht, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    Substantial modifications are presented for a previously described experiment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to quantitatively determine analytes in commercial nail polish remover. The revised experiment is intended for a second- or third-year laboratory course in analytical chemistry and can be conducted for larger laboratory…

  9. Development of resonance ionization spectroscopy system for fusion material surface analysis

    Iguchi, Tetsuo [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.; Satoh, Yasushi; Nakazawa, Masaharu

    1996-10-01

    A Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) system is now under development aiming at in-situ observation and analysis neutral particles emitted from fusion material surfaces under irradiation of charged particles and neutrons. The basic performance of the RIS system was checked through a preliminary experiment on Xe atom detection. (author)

  10. Research Applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) to Investigate Psychiatric Disorders

    Dager, SR; Oskin, NM; Richards, TL; Posse, S.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methodology and related analytic strategies allow sophisticated testing of neurobiological models of disease pathology in psychiatric disorders. An overview of principles underlying MRS, methodological considerations and investigative approaches is presented. A review of recent research is presented that highlights innovative approaches applying MRS, in particular 1H MRS, to systematically investigate specific psychiatric disorders, including ...

  11. Advances and Challenges in Optical Molecular Spectroscopy Including Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Methods for Bioanalysis

    Matějka, P.; Vlčková, B.; Bednárová, Lucie; Maloň, Petr

    Hoboken : Wiley, 2014 - (Havlíček, V.; Spížek, J.), s. 163-238 ISBN 978-1-118-46661-2 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : electronic circular dichroism * optical molecular spectroscopy * surface plasmon resonance * surface-enhanced infrared absorption * surface-enhanced Raman scattering * ultraviolet * vibrational circular dichroism Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  12. Glutamatergic Effects of Divalproex in Adolescents with Mania: A Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Patel, Nick C.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Lee, Jing-Huei; Adler, Caleb M.; Kim, Mi Jung; Bryan, Holly S.; Alfieri, David C.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Blom, Thomas J.; Nandagopal, Jayasree J.; Strakowski, Stephen M.; DelBello, Melissa P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([superscript 1]H MRS) to evaluate the in vivo effects of extended-release divalproex sodium on the glutamatergic system in adolescents with bipolar disorder, and to identify baseline neurochemical predictors of clinical remission. Method: Adolescents with bipolar disorder who were…

  13. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Thalamus in Patients with Typical Absence Epilepsy

    Fojtíková, D.; Brázdil, M.; Horký, Jaroslav; Mikl, M.; Kuba, R.; Krupa, P.; Rektor, I.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, 2/Suppl. B (2006), B30. ISSN 1335-9592. [International Danube Symposium for Neurological Sciences and Continuing Education /38./. 06.04.2006-08.04.2006, Brno] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : typical absence epilepsy * idiopathic generalized epilepsy * proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy * thalamus Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment

  14. Quantification of brain metabolites in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Gredal, O; Rosenbaum, S; Topp, S;

    1997-01-01

    We performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in patients with motor neuron disease (MND) to determine the absolute in vivo concentrations in the brain of the metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr/PCr). We examined the spectra acquired from a 20 x 20 x...

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, analytical chemistry by open learning

    This elementary text on NMR spectroscopy is designed for self-study, primarily by those studying to be chemical technicians. The style is informal and direct. The basic elements of chemical shifts, spin-spin coupling, integrated intensities, and relaxation times are discussed briefly, with examples, but the emphasis is much more on this is the way it is than on providing a satisfying rationale. Quick introduction to sample preparation, NMR instrumentation, and signal enhancement techniques are included, but these are very sketchy. Only four pages are devoted to the Fourier Transform technique, hardly enough to give anyone a reasonable basis for understanding the technique and its power. About a third of the main part of the text is devoted to practical applications of 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including structural assignments of peaks in the spectra of simple molecules and quantitative measurements of simple mixtures. The author provides a variety of questions and problems throughout the book, some of the simple memory-retention type but some more thought-provoking. The last 90 pages of the book are devoted to answering the questions and problems posed in the five chapters

  16. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  17. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm−1 for the ionization potential of iron. (paper)

  18. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Mattolat, C. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Vane, C Randy [ORNL; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  19. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Li, Du.

    High-field NMR experiments were used to determine the full structures of six new natural products extracted from plants. These are: four saponins (PT-2, P1, P2 and P3) from the plant Alphitonia zizyphoides found in Samoa; one sesquiterpene (DF-4) from Douglas fir and one diterpene derivative (E-2) from a Chinese medicinal herb. By concerted use of various 1D and 2D NMR techniques, the structures of the above compounds were established and complete resonance assignments were achieved. The 2D INADEQUATE technique coupled with a computerized spectral analysis was extensively used. When carried out on concentrations as low as 60 mg of sample, this technique provided absolute confirmation of the assignments for 35 of the possible 53 C-C bonds for PT-2. On 30 mg of sample of E-21, it revealed 22 of 28 possible C-C bonds.

  20. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Yulong; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of six types of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro. Forty-three RR spectra from seven subjects are investigated. The spectral peaks from malignant meningioma, stage III (cancer), benign meningioma (benign), normal meningeal tissues (normal), glioblastoma multiforme grade IV (cancer), acoustic neuroma (benign), and pituitary adenoma (benign) are analyzed. Using a 532-nm excitation, the resonance-enhanced peak at 1548 cm-1 (amide II) is observed in all of the tissue specimens, but is not observed in the spectra collected using the nonresonance Raman system. An increase in the intensity ratio of 1587 to 1605 cm-1 is observed in the RR spectra collected from meningeal cancer tissue as compared with the spectra collected from the benign and normal meningeal tissue. The peak around 1732 cm-1 attributed to fatty acids (lipids) are diminished in the spectra collected from the meningeal cancer tumors as compared with the spectra from normal and benign tissues. The characteristic band of spectral peaks observed between 2800 and 3100 cm-1 are attributed to the vibrations of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) groups. The ratio of the intensities of the spectral peaks of 2935 to 2880 cm-1 from the meningeal cancer tissues is found to be lower in comparison with that of the spectral peaks from normal, and benign tissues, which may be used as a distinct marker for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal meningeal tissues. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and the support vector machine are used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from meningeal tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% when two principal components are used.

  1. Automated microwave double resonance spectroscopy: A tool to identify and characterize chemical compounds

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C.; Patterson, David; McGuire, Brett A.; Crabtree, Kyle N.

    2016-03-01

    Owing to its unparalleled structural specificity, rotational spectroscopy is a powerful technique to unambiguously identify and characterize volatile, polar molecules. We present here a new experimental approach, automated microwave double resonance (AMDOR) spectroscopy, to rapidly determine the rotational constants of these compounds without a priori knowledge of elemental composition or molecular structure. This task is achieved by rapidly acquiring the classical (frequency vs. intensity) broadband spectrum of a molecule using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy and subsequently analyzing it in near real-time using complementary cavity FTMW detection and double resonance. AMDOR measurements provide a unique "barcode" for each compound from which rotational constants can be extracted. To illustrate the power of this approach, AMDOR spectra of three aroma compounds — trans-cinnamaldehyde, α-, and β-ionone — have been recorded and analyzed. The prospects to extend this approach to mixture characterization and purity assessment are described.

  2. Automated microwave double resonance spectroscopy: A tool to identify and characterize chemical compounds.

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; McCarthy, Michael C; Patterson, David; McGuire, Brett A; Crabtree, Kyle N

    2016-03-28

    Owing to its unparalleled structural specificity, rotational spectroscopy is a powerful technique to unambiguously identify and characterize volatile, polar molecules. We present here a new experimental approach, automated microwave double resonance (AMDOR) spectroscopy, to rapidly determine the rotational constants of these compounds without a priori knowledge of elemental composition or molecular structure. This task is achieved by rapidly acquiring the classical (frequency vs. intensity) broadband spectrum of a molecule using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy and subsequently analyzing it in near real-time using complementary cavity FTMW detection and double resonance. AMDOR measurements provide a unique "barcode" for each compound from which rotational constants can be extracted. To illustrate the power of this approach, AMDOR spectra of three aroma compounds - trans-cinnamaldehyde, α-, and β-ionone - have been recorded and analyzed. The prospects to extend this approach to mixture characterization and purity assessment are described. PMID:27036441

  3. Waveguide-type optical passive ring resonator gyro using frequency modulation spectroscopy technique

    Liang, Ning; Lijun, Guo; Mei, Kong; Tuoyuan, Chen

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports the experimental results of silica on a silicon ring resonator in a resonator micro optic gyroscope based on the frequency modulation spectroscopy technique by our research group. The ring resonator is composed of a 4 cm diameter silica waveguide. By testing at λ = 1550 nm, the FSR, FWHM and the depth of resonance are 3122 MHz, 103.07 MHz and 0.8 respectively. By using a polarization controller, the resonance curve under the TM mode can be inhibited. The depth of resonance increased from 0.8 to 0.8913, namely the finesse increase from 30.33 to 33.05. In the experiments, there is an acoustic-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) in each light loop. We lock the lasing frequency at the resonance frequency of the silica waveguide ring resonator for the counterclockwise lightwave; the frequency difference between the driving frequencies of the two AOFS is equivalent to the Sagnac frequency difference caused by gyro rotation. Thus, the gyro output is observed. The slope of the linear fit is about 0.330 mV/(°/s) based on the -900 to 900 kHz equivalent frequency and the gyro dynamic range is ±2.0 × 103 rad/s.

  4. Waveguide-type optical passive ring resonator gyro using frequency modulation spectroscopy technique

    This paper reports the experimental results of silica on a silicon ring resonator in a resonator micro optic gyroscope based on the frequency modulation spectroscopy technique by our research group. The ring resonator is composed of a 4 cm diameter silica waveguide. By testing at λ = 1550 nm, the FSR, FWHM and the depth of resonance are 3122 MHz, 103.07 MHz and 0.8 respectively. By using a polarization controller, the resonance curve under the TM mode can be inhibited. The depth of resonance increased from 0.8 to 0.8913, namely the finesse increase from 30.33 to 33.05. In the experiments, there is an acoustic-optical frequency shifter (AOFS) in each light loop. We lock the lasing frequency at the resonance frequency of the silica waveguide ring resonator for the counterclockwise lightwave; the frequency difference between the driving frequencies of the two AOFS is equivalent to the Sagnac frequency difference caused by gyro rotation. Thus, the gyro output is observed. The slope of the linear fit is about 0.330 mV/(°/s) based on the −900 to 900 kHz equivalent frequency and the gyro dynamic range is ±2.0 × 103 rad/s. (semiconductor devices)

  5. New Approaches to Quantum Computing using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    The power of a quantum computer (QC) relies on the fundamental concept of the superposition in quantum mechanics and thus allowing an inherent large-scale parallelization of computation. In a QC, binary information embodied in a quantum system, such as spin degrees of freedom of a spin-1/2 particle forms the qubits (quantum mechanical bits), over which appropriate logical gates perform the computation. In classical computers, the basic unit of information is the bit, which can take a value of either 0 or 1. Bits are connected together by logic gates to form logic circuits to implement complex logical operations. The expansion of modern computers has been driven by the developments of faster, smaller and cheaper logic gates. As the size of the logic gates become smaller toward the level of atomic dimensions, the performance of such a system is no longer considered classical but is rather governed by quantum mechanics. Quantum computers offer the potentially superior prospect of solving computational problems that are intractable to classical computers such as efficient database searches and cryptography. A variety of algorithms have been developed recently, most notably Shor's algorithm for factorizing long numbers into prime factors in polynomial time and Grover's quantum search algorithm. The algorithms that were of only theoretical interest as recently, until several methods were proposed to build an experimental QC. These methods include, trapped ions, cavity-QED, coupled quantum dots, Josephson junctions, spin resonance transistors, linear optics and nuclear magnetic resonance. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is uniquely capable of constructing small QCs and several algorithms have been implemented successfully. NMR-QC differs from other implementations in one important way that it is not a single QC, but a statistical ensemble of them. Thus, quantum computing based on NMR is considered as ensemble quantum computing. In NMR quantum computing, the spins with

  6. Application of 31P MR spectroscopy to the brain tumors

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility and obtain useful parameters of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study for making the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Twenty-eight patients with brain tumorous lesions (22 cases of brain tumor and 6 cases of abscess) and 11 normal volunteers were included. The patients were classified into the astrocytoma group, lymphoma group, metastasis group and the abscess group. We obtained the intracellular pH and the metabolite ratios of phosphomonoesters/phosophodiesters (PME/PDE), PME/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PDE/Pi, PME/adenosine triphosphate (ATP), PDE/ATP, PME/phosphocreatine (PCr), PDE/PCr, PCr/ATP, PCr/Pi, and ATP/Pi, and evaluated the statistical significances. The brain tumors had a tendency of alkalization (pH = 7.28 ± 0.27, p = 0.090), especially the pH of the lymphoma was significantly increased (pH = 7.45 ± 0.32, p = 0.013). The brain tumor group showed increased PME/PDE ratio compared with that in the normal control group (p 0.012). The ratios of PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr and PDE/PCr showed statistically significant differences between each brain lesion groups (p 1'P MRS, and the pH, PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr, and PDE/PCr ratios are helpful for differentiating among the different types of brain tumors.

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with Fabry and Gaucher disease

    Gruber, S., E-mail: stephan@nmr.at [Department of Radiology, MR-Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bogner, W. [Department of Radiology, MR-Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Stadlbauer, A. [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten (Austria); Krssak, M. [Department of Radiology, MR-Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodamer, O. [Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: Fabry and Gaucher diseases are rare progressive inherited disorders of glycosphingolipid metabolism that affect multiple organ systems. The aim of this study was to investigate evidence for metabolic changes in the central nervous system involvement using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Seven Fabry and eight Gaucher patients were included into this study. A two-dimensional, spectroscopic imaging method with an ultra-short echo-time of 11 ms was used at a 3 T whole body magnet. Absolute metabolic values were retrieved using internal water scaling. Results were compared, with sex- and age-matched controls. Results: In contrast to previous findings, absolute and relative metabolite values of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) or NAA/Creatine (Cr), Cr, Choline (Cho) or Cho/Cr and myo-Inositol (mI) or mI/Cr revealed no, differences between Fabry and Gaucher Type 1 (GD1) patients and controls. Average values were, 10.22, 6.32, 2.15 and 5.39 mMol/kg wet weight for NAA, Cr, Cho and mI, respectively. In this study, we found significantly decreasing NAA/Cho with increasing age in all three groups (Fabry, GD1, patients and healthy controls) (between 5 and 8% per decade). Conclusions: There were no changes of the quantified metabolites detected by MRS in normal appearing white matter. This study shows the importance of sex- and age-matched controls.

  8. Three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy of Zr in Si

    It has been proposed that the composition of the solar wind could be measured directly by transporting ultrapure collectors into space, exposing them to the solar wind, and returning them to earth for analysis. In a study to help assess the applicability of present and future postionization secondary neutral mass spectrometers for measuring solar wind implanted samples, measurements of Zr in Si were performed. A three-color resonant ionization scheme proved to be efficient while producing a background count rate limited by secondary ion signal (5x10-4 counts/laser pulse). This lowered the detection limit for these measurements to below 500 ppt for 450,000 averages. Unexpectedly, the Zr concentration in the Si was measured to be over 4 ppb, well above the detection limit of the analysis. This high concentration is thought to result from contamination during sample preparation, since a series of tests were performed that rule out memory effects during the analysis. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  9. Characterizing nitrilimines with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A theoretical study.

    Mawhinney, Robert C; Peslherbe, Gilles H; Muchall, Heidi M

    2008-01-17

    The 13C chemical shifts in selected nitrilimines, nitriles, acetylenes, allenes, and singlet carbenes have been calculated using density-functional theory [PBE0/6-311++G(2df,pd)] and the gauge including atomic orbital (GIAO) method. The effects of substitution on the 13C chemical shifts in nitrilimines, R1-CNN-R2, have been examined. The carbon nucleus is generally found to be deshielded by substituents in the order CH3 effect is related to the presence of the cumulated functionality, C=N=N. Terminal N-substitution is found to have a larger effect than C-substitution due to a large increase in chemical shielding anisotropy. The electronic structure of nitrilimines has recently been shown to possess a carbene component whose resonance contribution varies widely with substitution, and, as previously reported, insight into the electronic structure can be gained by an analysis of the shielding tensor, especially for carbenes. Accordingly, the components of the diagonalized 13C shielding tensor for nitrilimines and stable singlet carbenes have been examined. This analysis suggests that diaminonitrilimine, H2N-CNN-NH2, may be a stable carbene, and, to the best of our knowledge, it would be the first acyclic, unsaturated stable carbene ever reported. Finally, a detailed analysis of the 13C chemical shifts shows that an increase in the dipolar character of nitrilimines induces a shielding at the carbon nucleus, while an increase in allenic or carbenic character tends to cause a deshielding. PMID:18062684

  10. Characterization of different cassava samples by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Cassava root (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is grown in all Brazilian states, being an important product in the diet of Brazilians. For many families of the North and Northeast states, it may represent the main energy source. The cassava root flour has high levels of starch, in addition to containing fiber, lipids and some minerals. There is, however, great genetic variability, which results in differentiation in its chemical composition and structural aspect. Motivated by the economic, nutritional and pharmacological importance of this product, this work is aimed at characterizing six cassava flour samples by NMR spectroscopy. The spectra revealed the main chemical groups. Furthermore, the results confirmed differences on chemical and structural aspect of the samples. For instance, the F1 sample is richer in carbohydrates, while the F4 sample has higher proportion of glycolipids, the F2 sample has higher amylose content and the F6 sample exhibits a greater diversity of glycolipid types. Regarding the molecular structure, the NMR spectra indicated that the F1 sample is more organized at the molecular level, while the F3 and F5 samples are similar in amorphicity and in the molecular packing. (author)

  11. In-vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in adnexal lesions

    Cho, Seong Whi; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lim, Myung Kwan; Suh, Chang Hae; Suh, Chang Hae [Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Hee [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-01

    To explore the in-vivo {sup 1}H- MR spectral features of adnexal lesions and to characterize the spectral patterns of various pathologic entities. Thirty-one patients with surgically and histopathologically confirmed adnexal lesions underwent short echo-time STEAM (stimulated echo acquisition method) {sup 1}H- MR spectroscopy, and the results obtained were analysed. The methylene present in fatty acid chains gave rise to a lipid peak of 1.3 ppm in the {sup 1}H- MR spectra of most malignant tumors and benign teratomas. This same peak was not observed, however, in the spectra of benign ovarian epithelial tumors: in a number of these, a peak of 5.2 ppm, due to the presence of the olefine group (-CH=CH-) was noted. The ratios of lipid peak at 1.3 ppm to water peak (lipid/water ratios) varied between disease groups, and in some benign teratomas was characteristically high. An intense lipid peak at 1.3 ppm is observed in malignant ovarian tumors but not in benign epithelial tumors. {sup 1}H- MRS may therefore be helpful in the differential diagnosis of adnexal lesions.

  12. Resonantspectroscopy of solid-density aluminum plasmas

    Cho, B.I.; Engelhorn, K.; Vinko, S.M.; Chung, H.-K.; Ciricosta, O.; Rackstraw, D.S.; Falcone, R.W.; Brown, C.R.D.; Burian, Tomáš; Chalupský, Jaromír; Graves, C.; Hájková, Věra; Higginbotham, A.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, H.J.; Messersmidt, M.; Murphy, C.; Ping, Y.; Rohringer, N.; Scherz, A.; Schlotter, W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J.J.; Vyšín, Luděk; Wang, T.; Wu, B.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Lee, R. W.; Nagler, B.; Wark, J. S.; Heimann, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 24 (2012), "245003-1"-"245003-6". ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA MŠk LA08024; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10046; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087; GA MŠk EE2.3.30.0057 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087; OP VK 4 POSTDOK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0057; AVČR(CZ) M100101221 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : Kα spectroscopy * free-electron lasers * solid-density aluminum plasmas Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 7.943, year: 2012

  13. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS): ARS300 operations manual, software version 2.01

    NONE

    1996-07-25

    Acoustic Resonance Spectroscopy (ARS) is a nondestructive evaluation technology developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The ARS technique is a fast, safe, and nonintrusive technique that is particularly useful when a large number of objects need to be tested. Any physical object, whether solid, hollow, or fluid filled, has many modes of vibration. These modes of vibration, commonly referred to as the natural resonant modes or resonant frequencies, are determined by the object`s shape, size, and physical properties, such as elastic moduli, speed of sound, and density. If the object is mechanically excited at frequencies corresponding to its characteristic natural vibrational modes, a resonance effect can be observed when small excitation energies produce large amplitude vibrations in the object. At other excitation frequencies, i.e., vibrational response of the object is minimal.

  14. Studies in protein dynamics using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Vugmeyster, Liliya

    Dynamic processes in proteins are important for their biological function. Several issues in protein dynamics are addressed by applying existing NMR methodologies to investigate dynamics of several small proteins. Amide H/D exchange rates have been measured for the N-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L9, residues 1--56. The results suggest that the structure of the domain is preserved in isolation and that the stability of the isolated domain is comparable to the stability of this domain in intact L9. Single domain proteins can fold in vitro at rates in excess of 1 x 104 s-1. Measurement of folding rates of this magnitude poses a considerable technical challenge. Off-resonance 15N R1rho measurements are shown to be capable of measuring such fast protein folding rates. The measurements were performed on a sample of the peripheral subunit-binding domain from the dihydrolopoamide acetyltransferase component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex from Bacillus stearothermophilus 15N labeled at Ala 11. Fast intramolecular motions (on ps-ns time scale) can be studied by heteronuclear laboratory frame NMR relaxation. The temperature dependence of the backbone dynamics of the 36-resiude subdomain of the F-actin bundling protein villin has been investigated by studying the temperature dependence of order parameters obtained from 15N relaxation measurements. The results support the hypothesis that one of the possible mechanisms of thermostability is to lower the heat capacity difference between the folded and unfolded states by lowering the contribution from the backbone dynamics. A commonly used model-free approach for the interpretation of the relaxation data for macromolecules in solution is modified to correct for the decoupling approximation between the overall and internal motions.

  15. Neuroimaging in Parkinsonism: a study with magnetic resonance and spectroscopy as tools in the differential diagnosis

    Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe Rocha [1Hospital dos Servidores do Estado, Rio de Janeiro RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: luizneurol@terra.com.br; Novis, Sergio A. Pereira; Rosso, Ana Lucia Z. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Moreira, Denise Madeira [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Neurologia Deolindo Couto; Leite, Ana Claudia C.B. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism based on clinical features, sometimes may be difficult. Diagnostic tests in these cases might be useful, especially magnetic resonance imaging, a noninvasive exam, not as expensive as positron emission tomography, and provides a good basis for anatomical analysis. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyzes cerebral metabolism, yielding inconsistent results in parkinsonian disorders. We selected 40 individuals for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis, 12 with Parkinson's disease, 11 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 7 with multiple system atrophy (parkinsonian type), and 10 individuals without any psychiatric or neurological disorders (controls). Clinical scales included Hoenh and Yahr, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and mini mental status examination. The results showed that patients with Parkinson's disease and controls presented the same aspects on neuroimaging, with few or absence of abnormalities, and supranuclear progressive palsy and multiple system atrophy showed abnormalities, some of which statistically significant. Thus, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy could be useful as a tool in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  16. Neuroimaging in Parkinsonism: a study with magnetic resonance and spectroscopy as tools in the differential diagnosis

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism based on clinical features, sometimes may be difficult. Diagnostic tests in these cases might be useful, especially magnetic resonance imaging, a noninvasive exam, not as expensive as positron emission tomography, and provides a good basis for anatomical analysis. The magnetic resonance spectroscopy analyzes cerebral metabolism, yielding inconsistent results in parkinsonian disorders. We selected 40 individuals for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy analysis, 12 with Parkinson's disease, 11 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 7 with multiple system atrophy (parkinsonian type), and 10 individuals without any psychiatric or neurological disorders (controls). Clinical scales included Hoenh and Yahr, unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and mini mental status examination. The results showed that patients with Parkinson's disease and controls presented the same aspects on neuroimaging, with few or absence of abnormalities, and supranuclear progressive palsy and multiple system atrophy showed abnormalities, some of which statistically significant. Thus, magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy could be useful as a tool in differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism. (author)

  17. Radiosterilization dosimetry by electron-spin resonance spectroscopy. Cefotetan

    Basly, J.P.; Longy, I. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Bromatologie, UFR de Pharmacie, Limoges (France); Bernard, M. [Laboratoire de Physique et Biophysique Pharmaceutique, UFR de Pharmacie, Limoges (France)

    1998-02-19

    As an alternative to heat and gas exposure sterilization, ionizing radiation is gaining interest as a sterilization process for medicinal products. Nevertheless, essentially for economic profit, unauthorized and uncontrolled use of radiation processes may be expected. In this context, it is necessary to find methods of distinguishing between irradiated and nonirradiated pharmaceuticals. In the absence of suitable detection methods, our attention was focused on electron-spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. A third generation cephalosporin, cefotetan, was chosen as a model; this antibiotic is a potential candidate for radiation treatment due to its thermosensitivity. While the ESR spectra of a nonirradiated sample presents no signal, a nonsymmetrical signal, dependent on the irradiation dose, is found in irradiated samples. The number of free radicals was estimated by comparing the second integral from radiosterilized samples and a diphenylpicryl hydrazyl reference. Estimation of the number of free radicals gives 7x10{sup 17} radicals g{sup -1} at 20kGy (1.1x10{sup 16} radicals in 15mg). From this result, the G-value (number of radicals (100eV){sup -1}) could be estimated as 0.6. Decay of radicals upon storage were modeled using a bi-exponential function. The limit of detection of free radicals after irradiation at 25kGy is up to two years. This result agrees with those obtained on other cephalosporins. Aside from qualitative detection, ESR spectrometry can be used for dose estimation. Linear regression is applicable for doses lower than 20kGy. Since the radiation dose selected must always be based upon the bioburden of the products and the degree of sterility required (EN 552 and ANSI/AAMI/ISO 11137), 25kGy could no longer be accepted as a `routine` dose for sterilizing a pharmaceutical. Doses in the 5-20kGy range could be investigated and linear regression appeared to be the least expensive route to follow. The best results for the integration of the curves were

  18. Neutron resonance spectroscopy on 113Cd to En=15 keV

    The results of a study of the compound nucleus 114Cd by neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy methods are presented. Targets of both natural cadmium and cadmium enriched in the 113 isotope were used. The neutron total capture and neutron transmission were both measured. A total of 275 new resonances were located. In addition, 102 other resonances which were previously known but not assigned to a particular cadmium isotope were definitively assigned to 113Cd. Resonance parameters E0 and gΓn were obtained for both newly identified and previously known resonances. Of the 437 resonances now known in 113Cd, we identify 104 of them as l=1 based on their small widths. Strength functions and level spacings are obtained for both l=0 and l=1 resonances. Comparisons of the data with Porter-Thomas reduced width distributions, Wigner nearest neighbor spacing distributions, and the Dyson-Metha Δ3 statistic are given. The linear correlation coefficient between adjacent spacings is also discussed. The spectroscopic information obtained is of importance for planning and interpretation of parity violation measurements on the p-wave resonances of 113Cd

  19. Hypothalamic metabolic compartmentation during appetite regulation as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy methods

    Blanca eLizarbe

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of neuroglial compartmentation and transcellular neurotransmitter cycling during hypothalamic appetite regulation as detected by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Spectroscopy (MRS methods. We address first the neurochemical basis of neuroendocrine regulation in the hypothalamus and the orexigenic and anorexigenic feed-back loops that control appetite. Then we examine the main Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy strategies that have been used to investigate appetite regulation. Manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI, Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD and Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI have revealed Mn2+accumulations, augmented oxygen consumptions and astrocytic swelling in the hypothalamus under fasting conditions, respectively. High field 1H magnetic resonance in vivo, showed increased hypothalamic myo-inositol concentrations as compared to other cerebral structures. 1H and 13C high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS revealed increased neuroglial oxidative and glycolytic metabolism, as well as increased hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmissions under orexigenic stimulation. We propose here an integrative interpretation of all these findings suggesting that the neuroendocrine regulation of appetite is supported by important ionic and metabolic transcellular fluxes which begin at the tripartite orexigenic clefts and become extended spatially in the hypothalamus through astrocytic networks, becoming eventually MRI and MRS detectable.

  20. Hybrid Electron Spin Resonance and Whispering Gallery Mode Resonance Spectroscopy of Fe3+ in Sapphire

    Benmessai, Karim; Farr, Warrick G.; Creedon, Daniel L.; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Floch, Jean-Michel Le; Duty, Timothy; Tobar, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new era of quantum devices requires an understanding of how paramagnetic dopants or impurity spins behave in crystal hosts. Here, we describe a new spectroscopic technique which uses traditional Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) combined with the measurement of a large population of electromagnetic Whispering Gallery (WG) modes. This allows the characterization of the physical parameters of paramagnetic impurity ions in the crystal at low temperatures. We present measurements...

  1. Determination of Ionization Potential of Calcium by High-Resolution Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Geppert, Christopher; Kato, Masaaki; Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Wendt, Klaus D. A.

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance excitation with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20--150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20) cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones.

  2. Determination of ionization potential of calcium by high-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20-150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20)cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones. (author)

  3. Optical fiber strain sensor using fiber resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy

    Zhang, Liang; Lu, Ping; Chen, Li;

    2012-01-01

    A novel (to our best knowledge) optical fiber strain sensor using a fiber ring resonator based on frequency comb Vernier spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. A passively mode-locked optical fiber laser is employed to generate a phased-locked frequency comb. Strain applied to the optical fiber...... of the fiber ring resonator can be measured with the transmission spectrum. A good linearity is obtained between displacement and the inverse of wavelength spacing with an R2 of 0.9989, and high sensitivities better than 40  pm/με within the range of 0 to 10  με are achieved. The sensitivity can be...

  4. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosynthetic routes of natural products

    During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies. (author)

  5. First on-line results from the CRIS (Collinear Resonant Ionisation Spectroscopy) beam line at ISOLDE

    The CRIS (Collinear Resonant Ionisation Spectroscopy) experiment at the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, CERN, has been constructed for high-sensitivity laser spectroscopy measurements on radioactive isotopes. The technique determines the magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments, nuclear spin and changes in mean-square charge radii of exotic nuclei via measurement of their hyperfine structures and isotope shifts. In November 2011 the first on-line run was performed using the CRIS beam line, when the hyperfine structure of 207Fr was successfully measured. This paper will describe the technique and experimental setup of CRIS and present the results from the first on-line experiment.

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of single proteins using quantum logic

    Lovchinsky, I.; Sushkov, A. O.; Urbach, E.; de Leon, N. P.; Choi, S.; De Greve, K.; Evans, R.; Gertner, R.; Bersin, E.; Müller, C.; McGuinness, L.; Jelezko, F.; Walsworth, R. L.; Park, H.; Lukin, M. D.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the structural analysis of organic compounds and biomolecules but typically requires macroscopic sample quantities. We use a sensor, which consists of two quantum bits corresponding to an electronic spin and an ancillary nuclear spin, to demonstrate room temperature magnetic resonance detection and spectroscopy of multiple nuclear species within individual ubiquitin proteins attached to the diamond surface. Using quantum logic to improve readout fidelity and a surface-treatment technique to extend the spin coherence time of shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers, we demonstrate magnetic field sensitivity sufficient to detect individual proton spins within 1 second of integration. This gain in sensitivity enables high-confidence detection of individual proteins and allows us to observe spectral features that reveal information about their chemical composition.

  7. Neurochemical metabolites in the medial prefrontal cortex in bipolar disorder A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Osman (O)zdel; Demet Kalayci; Gülfizar S(o)zeri-Varma; Yilmaz Kiro(g)lu; Selim Tümkaya; Tu(g)(c)e Toker-U(g)urlu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolite values in the medial prefrontal cortex of individuals with euthymic bipolar disorder. The subjects consisted of 15 patients with euthymic bipolar disorder type I and 15 healthy controls. We performed proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and measured levels of N-acetyl aspartate, choline and creatine. Levels of these three metabolites in the medial prefrontal cortex were found to be lower in patients with bipolar disorder compared with healthy controls. A positive correlation was found between illness duration and choline levels in the right medial prefrontal cortex. Our study suggests that during the euthymic period, there are abnormalities in cellular energy and membrane phospholipid metabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex, and that this may impair neuronal activity and integrity.

  8. Application of 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cerebral infection

    Objective: To study the application of single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of cerebral infection according to manifestations of the 8 patients with cerebritis and 13 patients with gliomas. Methods: The patients including 8 cerebral abscess and 13 gliomas were examined with MRS. And the quantity of the NAA, Cho, Cr, Lip, Lac, AA were measured and compared. Results: There were differences between cerebral abscess and tumors on MRS. NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr of abscess were 4.114±3.637 and 3.084±0.933. NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr of tumors were 1.064±0.823 and 5.987±4.380. There was amino acids (AA) could be seen in some of cerebral abscess. Conclusion: 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy can supply important information in diagnosis cerebral infection and differentiate information with tumor. (authors)

  9. Billion-fold enhancement in sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for magnesium ions in solution.

    Gottberg, Alexander; Stachura, Monika; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-12-15

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. (31)Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 10(7) magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry. PMID:25303164

  10. Billion-Fold Enhancement in Sensitivity of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Magnesium Ions in Solution

    Gottberg, Alexander; Kowalska, Magdalena; Bissell, Mark L; Arcisauskaite, Vaida; Blaum, Klaus; Helmke, Alexander; Johnston, Karl; Kreim, Kim; Larsen, Flemming H; Neugart, Rainer; Neyens, Gerda; Garcia Ruiz, Ronald F; Szunyogh, Daniel; Thulstrup, Peter W; Yordanov, Deyan T; Hemmingsen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    β-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is highly sensitive compared to conventional NMR spectroscopy, and may be applied for several elements across the periodic table. β-NMR has previously been successfully applied in the fields of nuclear and solid-state physics. In this work, β-NMR is applied, for the first time, to record an NMR spectrum for a species in solution. 31Mg β-NMR spectra are measured for as few as 107 magnesium ions in ionic liquid (EMIM-Ac) within minutes, as a prototypical test case. Resonances are observed at 3882.9 and 3887.2 kHz in an external field of 0.3 T. The key achievement of the current work is to demonstrate that β-NMR is applicable for the analysis of species in solution, and thus represents a novel spectroscopic technique for use in general chemistry and potentially in biochemistry.

  11. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. (author)

  12. An application of resonant ionisation spectroscopy to accelerator based high energy physics

    The simulation of charged particle tracks by pulsed UV lasers is now used extensively in the calibration of multiwire drift chambers. The identity of the trace quantities of low ionisation potential impurities responsible for the laser induced ionisation in conventional chamber gases has caused much discussion. Using two photon resonant ionisation spectroscopy two of the major sources of ionisation in proportional counters have been identified as phenol and toluene. (author)

  13. Isotopically selective counting of noble gas atoms, using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    The technique of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is being extended to develop a means for counting individual atoms of a selected isotope of a noble gas. In this method, lasers are used for RIS to obtain atomic species (Z) selectivity and a small quadrupole mass spectrometer provides isotopic (A) selectivity. A progress report on the objective of counting each atom of a particular isotope of a noble gas is given. 10 references, 4 figures

  14. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet Suat; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Acar, SelÇuk; Kokal, İlkin; Haessler, Wolfgang; Weber, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp(3)-hybridized carbon r...

  15. Role of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging in Cerebral Alveolar Echinococcosis

    Guocai Yang; Qingxin Zhang; Guibo Tang; Hui Xu; Zhen Yang; Jianzhong Guo; Lin Liang; Yonghong Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background: To analyze the characteristic performance of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) in cerebral alveolar echinococcosis (CAE). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 10 clinical-identified CAE cases MR performance, and summarized the MRS and SWI performance of CAE. Results: The 10 cases of CAE all had the history of primary HAE, among who 6 cases had single lesion (60%), while the rest 4 cases had multiple lesions (40%); and 4 cases were conc...

  16. Quantum Computation Based on Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Ding, Shangwu; McDowell, Charles A.; Ye, Chaohui; Zhan, Mingsheng; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Sun, Xianping; Mao, Xi-An; Liu, Maili

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is shown to be a promising technique for implementing quantum computing. The theory underlying the principles of quantum computing with nuclear spin systems undergoing MAS is formulated in the framework of formalized quantum Floquet theory. The procedures for realizing state labeling, state transformation and coherence selection in Floquet space are given. It suggests that by this method, the largest number o...

  17. Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy: Application to Proof of Structure of Organic Ketones.

    Russell, G A; Talaty, E R

    1965-05-28

    Many ketones containing an alpha-methylene group can be converted to alpha-diketone radical anions in dimethyl sulfoxide solution. The resulting radical anions can usually be unambiguously identified by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and the structure of the starting ketone may be deduced, often without reference to model compounds. The technique is also applicable to alpha-diketones, alpha-bromoketones, and alpha-hydroxyketones. PMID:17748118

  18. H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomic study in patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy

    Dabos, Konstantinos John; Parkinson, John Andrew; Sadler, Ian Howard; Plevris, John Nicholas; Hayes, Peter Clive

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify plasma metabolites used as biomarkers in order to distinguish cirrhotics from controls and encephalopathics. METHODS: A clinical study involving stable cirrhotic patients with and without overt hepatic encephalopathy was designed. A control group of healthy volunteers was used. Plasma from those patients was analysed using 1H - nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We used the Carr Purcell Meiboom Gill sequence to process the sample spectra at ambient probe temperature. We...

  19. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of erythrocyte extracts in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Extracts freshly prepared from erythrocytes of patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy, their unaffected siblings, and normal control subjects were examined with both 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A moderate variability was found in the relative amounts of various nonphosphorylated compounds among patients and control subjects; however, no significant differences were found between the groups. As for the phosphorylated compounds, the sum of ADP+ATP was found significantly elevated in the myotonic muscular dystrophy patients

  20. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    Antonio Sacco; Gino Vonghia; Francesco Giannico; Daniela Sacco; Vincenzo di Martino; Anna Caputi Jambrenghi; Maria Antonietta Brescia

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS), for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes ...

  1. Bone microdamage monitoring by nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy : towards quantitative measurements

    Haupert, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Bone microdamage characterization as well as its involvement in bone metabolism or bone fragility remains a challenge, especially because no existing techniques are well suited to its measurement. Non invasive techniques for detecting and monitoring bone microcracks accumulation and propagation are thus highly desirable. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate the sensitivity of nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) measurements to the accumulation of damage in cortical bone ...

  2. Non Destructive Characterization of Cortical Bone MicroDamage by Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    Haupert, Sylvain; GUERARD, Sandra; Peyrin, Françoise; Mitton, David; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of a nonlinear ultrasound technique, the so-called nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) technique, for detecting early microdamage accumulation in cortical bone induced by four-point bending fatigue. Small parallelepiped beam-shaped human cortical bone specimens were subjected to cyclic four-point bending fatigue in several steps. The specimens were prepared to control damage localization during four-point bending fatigue cyc...

  3. Instruments and Domains of Knowledge: The Case of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, 1956-1969

    Roberts, Jody Alan

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, I traced the development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy through the pages of the Journal of Organic Chemistry (JOC) from the year 1956 to 1969 to understand how organic chemists and Varian Associates?the makers of the first commercial NMR spectrometers?negotiated the identity of the NMR spectrometer. The work of the organic chemists was examined through their publications in the JOC. Examining the abstracts from the JOC between the years 1956 and 1969 devel...

  4. Resonant Andreev Spectroscopy in normal-Metal/thin-Ferromagnet/Superconductor Device: Theory and Application.

    Romeo, Francesco; Giubileo, Filippo; Citro, Roberta; Di Bartolomeo, Antonio; Attanasio, Carmine; Cirillo, Carla; Polcari, Albino; Romano, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model to describe the transport properties of normal-metal/thin-ferromagnet/superconductor device. We perform experimental test of the model using a gold tip on PdNi/Nb bilayer. The resonant proximity effect causes conductance features very sensitive to the local ferromagnetic properties, enabling accurate measurement of polarization and thickness of the ferromagnet by point contact spectroscopy. PMID:26626046

  5. Evaluation of elastic properties of DLC layers using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and AFM nanoindentation

    Kocourek, Tomáš; Růžek, Michal; Landa, Michal; Jelínek, Miroslav; Mikšovský, Jan; Kopeček, Jaromír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 2 (2011), S67-S70. ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : RUS-resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * PLD * diamond-like carbon * elastic properties * AFM nanoindentation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.867, year: 2011

  6. A magnetic resonance spectroscopy driven initialization scheme for active shape model based prostate segmentation

    Toth, Robert; Tiwari, Pallavi; Rosen, Mark; Reed, Galen; Kurhanewicz, John; Kalyanpur, Arjun; Pungavkar, Sona; Madabhushi, Anant

    2010-01-01

    Segmentation of the prostate boundary on clinical images is useful in a large number of applications including calculation of prostate volume pre- and post-treatment, to detect extra-capsular spread, and for creating patient-specific anatomical models. Manual segmentation of the prostate boundary is, however, time consuming and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. T2-weighted (T2-w) magnetic resonance (MR) structural imaging (MRI) and MR spectroscopy (MRS) have recently emerged as ...

  7. Multiclass imbalance learning:Improving classification of pediatric brain tumors from magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Zarinabad, Niloufar; Wilson, Martin P; Gill, Simrandip K.; Manias, Karen A; Davies, Nigel P; Peet, Andrew C

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Classification of pediatric brain tumors from (1) H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can aid diagnosis and management of brain tumors. However, varied incidence of the different tumor types leads to imbalanced class sizes and introduces difficulties in classifying rare tumor groups. This study assessed different imbalanced multiclass learning techniques and compared the use of complete spectra and quantified metabolite profiles for classification of three main childhood brain tu...

  8. Novel Approaches to Material Evaluation of thin Surface Layers by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    Landa, Michal; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Růžek, Michal; Bicanová, Lucie; Janovská, Michaela

    Leuven : Katholieke Universiteit - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Acoustics and Thermal Physics Section, 2009. s. 209-209. ISBN N. [International Conference on Photoacoustic and Photothermal Phenomena /15./. 19.07.2009-23.07.2009, Leuven] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : elastic properties * thin films * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  9. A Review of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies in Marijuana using Adolescents and Adults

    Sneider, Jennifer T; Mashhoon, Yasmin; Silveri, Marisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Marijuana (MJ) remains the most widely used illicit drug of abuse, and accordingly, is associated with adverse effects on mental and physical health, and neurocognitive decline. Studies investigating the neurobiology of underlying MJ effects have demonstrated structural and functional alterations in brain areas that contain moderate to high concentrations of cannabinoid (CB1) receptors and that are implicated in MJ-related cognitive decrements. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS),...

  10. Cryogenic resonance-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy with a helium-filled proportional counter

    As studied in our previous works,a proportional counter filled with pure helium gas works well at low temperatures near 4.2 K. The helium-filled proportional counter (HFPC) provides us with method to detect nuclear radiations at low temperatures. A typical application of this counter is resonance-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (REMS) at low temperatures (<∼30 K). In this article some examples of REMS measurements with HFPC are given. (author)

  11. Elastic constants of α Ti-7Al measured using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Adebisi, R. A.; Sathish, S.; Pilchak, A. L.; Shade, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The five independent elastic constants of a single-phase (α, HCP crystal structure) titanium alloy, Ti-7Al, have been measured for the first time using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). RUS is a nondestructive evaluation method that mea-sures the mechanical resonance of solids and uses the resonance frequencies to extract a complete set of elastic constants of the solid material. The elastic constants of titanium alloys vary substantially depending on manufacturing history and composition. In addition, available data on the elastic constants of titanium alloys is limited. The elastic constants data for Ti-7Al are presented in this paper and the results are compared to the available data for other titanium alloys that are similar in composition.

  12. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty, a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for determining the functional content of organic aerosols: A review

    The knowledge deficit of organic aerosol (OA) composition has been identified as the most important factor limiting our understanding of the atmospheric fate and implications of aerosol. The efforts to chemically characterize OA include the increasing utilization of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Since 1998, the functional composition of different types, sizes and fractions of OA has been studied with one-dimensional, two-dimensional and solid state proton and carbon-13 NMR. This led to the use of functional group ratios to reconcile the most important sources of OA, including secondary organic aerosol and initial source apportionment using positive matrix factorization. Future research efforts may be directed towards the optimization of experimental parameters, detailed NMR experiments and analysis by pattern recognition methods to identify the chemical components, determination of the NMR fingerprints of OA sources and solid state NMR to study the content of OA as a whole. - Highlights: • Organic aerosol composition by 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. • NMR fingerprints of specific sources, types and sizes of organic aerosol. • Source reconciliation and apportionment using NMR spectroscopy. • Research priorities towards understanding organic aerosol composition and origin. - This review presents the recent advances on the characterization of organic aerosol composition using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

  14. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spin-Trapping with Iron-Dithiocarbamates.

    Maia, Luisa B; Moura, José J G

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is the ideal methodology to identify radicals (detection and characterization of molecular structure) and to study their kinetics, in both simple and complex biological systems. The very low concentration and short life-time of NO and of many other radicals do not favor its direct detection and spin-traps are needed to produce a new and persistent radical that can be subsequently detected by EPR spectroscopy.In this chapter, we present the basic concepts of EPR spectroscopy and of some spin-trapping methodologies to study NO. The "strengths and weaknesses" of iron-dithiocarbamates utilization, the NO traps of choice for the authors, are thoroughly discussed and a detailed description of the method to quantify the NO formation by molybdoenzymes is provided. PMID:27094413

  15. Determination of molecular spectroscopic parameters and energy-transfer rates by double-resonance spectroscopy

    Steinfeld, J. I.; Foy, B.; Hetzler, J.; Flannery, C.; Klaassen, J.; Mizugai, Y.; Coy, S.

    1990-01-01

    The spectroscopy of small to medium-size polyatomic molecules can be extremely complex, especially in higher-lying overtone and combination vibrational levels. The high density of levels also complicates the understanding of inelastic collision processes, which is required to model energy transfer and collision broadening of spectral lines. Both of these problems can be addressed by double-resonance spectroscopy, i.e., time-resolved pump-probe measurements using microwave, infrared, near-infrared, and visible-wavelength sources. Information on excited-state spectroscopy, transition moments, inelastic energy transfer rates and propensity rules, and pressure-broadening parameters may be obtained from such experiments. Examples are given for several species of importance in planetary atmospheres, including ozone, silane, ethane, and ammonia.

  16. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    Kudryavtsev, Yu; Ferrer, R; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.(KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, Celestijnenlaan 200D, Leuven, 3001, Belgium)

    2012-01-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the In-Gas Laser Ionization and Spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-g...

  17. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry

    Remillieux, Marcel C.; Ulrich, T. J.; Payan, Cédric; Rivière, Jacques; Lake, Colton R.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves

    2015-07-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is a powerful and established technique for measuring elastic constants of a material with general anisotropy. The first step of this technique consists of extracting resonance frequencies and damping from the vibrational frequency spectrum measured on a sample with free boundary conditions. An inversion technique is then used to retrieve the elastic tensor from the measured resonance frequencies. As originally developed, RUS has been mostly applicable to (i) materials with small damping such that the resonances of the sample are well separated and (ii) samples with simple geometries for which analytical solutions exist. In this paper, these limitations are addressed with a new RUS approach adapted to materials with high damping and samples of arbitrary geometry. Resonances are extracted by fitting a sum of exponentially damped sinusoids to the measured frequency spectrum. The inversion of the elastic tensor is achieved with a genetic algorithm, which allows searching for a global minimum within a discrete and relatively wide solution space. First, the accuracy of the proposed approach is evaluated against numerical data simulated for samples with isotropic symmetry and transversely isotropic symmetry. Subsequently, the applicability of the approach is demonstrated using experimental data collected on a composite structure consisting of a cylindrical sample of Berea sandstone glued to a large piezoelectric disk. In the proposed experiments, RUS is further enhanced by the use of a 3-D laser vibrometer allowing the visualization of most of the modes in the frequency band studied.

  18. Dynamics of Rhodobacter capsulatus [2Fe-2S] Ferredoxin VI and Aquifex aeolicus Ferredoxin 5 Via Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) and Resonance Raman Spectroscopy.

    Xiao, Yuming; Tan, Ming-Liang; Ichiye, Toshiko; Wang, Hongxin; Guo, Yisong; Smith, Matt C.; Meyer, Jacques; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2008-06-24

    We have used (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) to study the Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) sites in oxidized and reduced [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins from Rhodobacter capsulatus (Rc FdVI) and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa Fd5). In the oxidized forms, nearly identical NRVS patterns are observed, with strong bands from Fe-S stretching modes peaking around 335 cm(-1), and additional features observed as high as the B(2u) mode at approximately 421 cm(-1). Both forms of Rc FdVI have also been investigated by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. There is good correspondence between NRVS and Raman frequencies, but because of different selection rules, intensities vary dramatically between the two kinds of spectra. For example, the B(3u) mode at approximately 288 cm(-1), attributed to an asymmetric combination of the two FeS(4) breathing modes, is often the strongest resonance Raman feature. In contrast, it is nearly invisible in the NRVS, as there is almost no Fe motion in such FeS(4) breathing. NRVS and RR analysis of isotope shifts with (36)S-substituted into bridging S(2-) ions in Rc FdVI allowed quantitation of S(2-) motion in different normal modes. We observed the symmetric Fe-Fe stretching mode at approximately 190 cm(-1) in both NRVS and RR spectra. At still lower energies, the NRVS presents a complex envelope of bending, torsion, and protein modes, with a maximum at 78 cm(-1). The (57)Fe partial vibrational densities of states (PVDOS) were interpreted by normal-mode analysis with optimization of Urey-Bradley force fields. Progressively more complex D(2h) Fe(2)S(2)S'(4), C(2h) Fe(2)S(2)(SCC)(4), and C(1) Fe(2)S(2)(Cys)(4) models were optimized by comparison with the experimental spectra. After modification of the CHARMM22 all-atom force field by the addition of refined Fe-S force constants, a simulation employing the complete protein structure was used to reproduce the PVDOS, with better results in the low frequency protein mode region. This process was then repeated

  19. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E;

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  20. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on Explosives Vapor at Standoff Distances

    Anneli Ehlerding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonance-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has been used to perform standoff measurements on nitromethane (NM, 2,4-DNT, and 2,4,6-TNT in vapor phase. The Raman cross sections for NM, DNT, and TNT in vapor phase have been measured in the wavelength range 210–300 nm under laboratory conditions, in order to estimate how large resonance enhancement factors can be achieved for these explosives. The results show that the signal is enhanced up to 250,000 times for 2,4-DNT and up to 60,000 times for 2,4,6-TNT compared to the nonresonant signal at 532 nm. Realistic outdoor measurements on NM in vapor phase at 13 m distance were also performed, which indicate a potential for resonance Raman spectroscopy as a standoff technique for detection of vapor phase explosives. In addition, the Raman spectra of acetone, ethanol, and methanol were measured at the same wavelengths, and their influence on the spectrum from NM was investigated.

  1. Elucidation of reactive wavepackets by two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Traditional second-order kinetic theories fail to describe sub-picosecond photochemical reactions when solvation and vibrational dephasing undermine the assumption of equilibrium initial conditions. Four-wave mixing spectroscopies may reveal insights into such non-equilibrium processes but are limited by the single “population time” available in these types of experiments. Here, we use two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy to expose correlations between coherent nuclear motions of the reactant and product in the photodissociation reaction of triiodide. It is shown that the transition of a nuclear wavepacket from the reactant (triiodide) to product (diiodide) states gives rise to a unique pattern of 2DRR resonances. Peaks associated with this coherent reaction mechanism are readily assigned, because they are isolated in particular quadrants of the 2DRR spectrum. A theoretical model in which the chemical reaction is treated as a vibronic coherence transfer transition from triiodide to diiodide reproduces the patterns of 2DRR resonances detected in experiments. These signal components reveal correlation between the nonequilibrium geometry of triiodide and the vibrational coherence frequency of diiodide. The 2DRR signatures of coherent reaction mechanisms established in this work may generalize to studies of ultrafast energy and charge transfer processes

  2. Scientific opportunities in nuclear resonance spectroscopy from source-driven revolution

    From the beginning of its discovery the Moessbauer effect has continued to be one of the most powerful tools with broad applications in diverse areas of science and technology. With the advent of synchrotron radiation sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Super Photon Ring-8 (SPring-8), the tool has enlarged its scope and delivered new capabilities. The popular techniques most generally used in the field of materials physics, chemical physics, geoscience, and biology are hyperfine spectroscopy via elastic nuclear forward scattering (NFS), vibrational spectroscopy via nuclear inelastic scattering (NRIXS), and, to a lesser extent, diffusional dynamics from quasielastic nuclear forward scattering (QNFS). As we look ahead, new storage rings with enhanced brilliance such as PETRA-III under construction at DESY, Hamburg, and PEP-III in its early design stage at SLAC, Stanford, will provide new and unique science opportunities. In the next two decades, x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), based both on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE-XFELs) and a seed (SXFELs), with unique time structure, coherence and a five to six orders higher average brilliance will truly revolutionize nuclear resonance applications in a major way. This overview is intended to briefly address the unique radiation characteristics of new sources on the horizon and to provide a glimpse of scientific prospects and dreams in the nuclear resonance field from the new radiation sources. We anticipate an expanded nuclear resonance research activity with applications such as spin and phonon mapping of a single nanostructure and their assemblies, interfaces, and surfaces; spin dynamics; nonequilibrium dynamics; photochemical reactions; excited-state spectroscopy; and nonlinear phenomena.

  3. Double resonant absorption measurement of acetylene symmetric vibrational states probed with cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Karhu, J; Vainio, M; Metsälä, M; Hoekstra, S; Halonen, L

    2016-01-01

    A novel mid-infrared/near-infrared double resonant absorption setup for studying infrared-inactive vibrational states is presented. A strong vibrational transition in the mid-infrared region is excited using an idler beam from a singly resonant continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator, to populate an intermediate vibrational state. High output power of the optical parametric oscillator and the strength of the mid-infrared transition result in efficient population transfer to the intermediate state, which allows measuring secondary transitions from this state with a high signal-to-noise ratio. A secondary, near-infrared transition from the intermediate state is probed using cavity ring down spectroscopy, which provides high sensitivity in this wavelength region. Due to the narrow linewidths of the excitation sources, the rovibrational lines of the secondary transition are measured with sub-Doppler resolution. The setup is used to access a previously unreported symmetric vibrational state of acetylene, $\

  4. Fundamental investigations of supported monometallic and bimetallic catalysts by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Wu, Xi.

    1990-09-21

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of hydrogen, has been applied to investigate silica-supported Group VIII monometallic and Group VIII-Group IB bimetallic catalysts and alumina- and silica-supported platinum-rhenium bimetallic catalysts. Two adsorbed states of hydrogen, i.e., irreversible and reversible hydrogen, on the surfaces of monometallic Ru, Pt, and Cu particles and bimetallic Ru-Group Ib, Pt-Group Ib, and Pt-Re particles were observed directly via proton NMR. The same amounts of the irreversible hydrogen adsorbed on pure Ru catalysts were measured by both proton NMR and the volumetric technique. The electronic environments on surfaces of monometallic catalysts are sensitive to changes in metal dispersion, state of adsorbed hydrogen, and residual chlorine. Surface compositions for the Ru--Cu and Pt--Cu bimetallic catalysts were determined by NMR of adsorbed hydrogen. 297 refs., 96 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Nanoplasmonic biosensor: coupling electrochemistry to localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on nanocup arrays.

    Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Yao, Yao; Wang, Ping; Chen, Bilian; Cheng, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2015-05-15

    The nanoscale Lycurgus cup arrays were hybrid structures of nanocups and nanoparticles with ultrasensitivity to refractive index change. In this study, an electrochemical localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor was developed by coupling electrochemistry to LSPR spectroscopy measurement on the nanoscale cup arrays (nanoCA). Based on the combination of electrochemistry and LSPR measurement, the electrochemical LSPR on nanoCA was observed with significant resonance wavelength shifts in electrochemical modulation. The synchronous implementation of cyclic voltammetry and optical transmission spectrum can be used to obtain multiply sensing information and investigate the enhancement for LSPR from electrochemical scanning. The electrochemical enhanced LSPR was utilized as biosensor to detect biomolecules. The electrochemical LSPR biosensor with synchronous electrochemical and optical implement showed higher sensitivity than that of conventional optical LSPR measurement. Detecting with multi-transducer parameters and high sensitivity, the electrochemical LSPR provided a promising approach for chemical and biological detection. PMID:25172029

  6. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  7. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experimental setup at CERN-ISOLDE

    Cocolios, T E; Procter, T J; Rothe, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Stroke, H H; Rossel, R E; Heylen, H; Franchoo, S; Marsh, B A; Verney, D; Papuga, J; Strashnov, I; Billowes, J; de Groote, R P; Le Blanc, F; Simpson, G S; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Wood, R T; Budincevic, I; Mason, P J R; Wendt, K D A; Flanagan, K T; De Schepper, S; Rajabali, M M; Al Suradi, H H; Walker, P M; Smith, A J

    2013-01-01

    The CRIS setup at CERN-ISOLDE is a laser spectroscopy experiment dedicated to the high-resolution study of the spin, hyperfine structure and isotope shift of radioactive nuclei with low production rates (a few per second). It combines the Doppler-free resolution of the in-flight collinear geometry with the high detection efficiency of resonant ionisation. A recent commissioning campaign has demonstrated a 1\\% experimental efficiency, and as low as a 0.001\\% non-resonant ionisation. The current status of the experiment and its recent achievements with beams of francium isotopes are reported. The first identified systematic effects are discussed. (C) 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Resonance Raman spectroscopy with chemical state selectivity on histidine and acetamide using synchrotron radiation

    We report on ultraviolet resonance Raman scattering experiments carried out on two model substances: histidine and acetamide using a UV synchrotron radiation source. In the case of aqueous histidine solution each protonated state of histidine tautomers was selectively excited by tuning the incident wavelength and the vibrational state of each protonated state was studied. We also demonstrated that the local pH condition of histidine can be identified directly from the spectra above pH 9. In the case of acetamide, the resonance Raman bands of acetamide with a stronger hydrogen bond at the NH2 site and weaker hydrogen bond at the C=O site were selectively observed. These findings will extend the selectivity and sensitivity of RR spectroscopy that is helpful to understanding protein functionality. (author)

  9. Assessment of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase mutational status in cerebral gliomas by in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Tietze, Anna; Oettingen, Gorm von; Sangill, Ryan;

    concentrations in normal tissue or in gliomas with wildtype IDH. It has recently been shown that 2-HG is detectable non-invasively by clinical Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) [2]. The aim of our study is to establish 2-HG MRS in patients suspected for cerebral gliomas on a clinical Magnetic Resonance (MR...... and has the potential to open up for more personalized treatment approaches. It is usually assessed by immunohistochemistry or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in tumor tissue obtained by surgical biopsies. IDH-mutated tumor cells accumulate 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) that is present in very low...... overall acquisition duration was about 30 min. IDH mutational status in the tissue samples was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (3 cases) and PCR (1 case). Results: Two cases harbored IDH mutations, two had wildtype IDH, as assessed by immunohistochemistry or PCR. MRS detected IDH mutational status...

  10. Neutron resonance spectroscopy on 113Cd: The p-wave levels

    Weak levels in the compound nucleus 114Cd were located by neutron time-of-flight spectroscopy techniques. Neutron capture measurements were performed with both a natural cadmium target and a highly enriched 113Cd target. A total of 22 new resonances were located in the neutron energy interval 20-500 eV and were assumed to be p-wave. Resonance parameters, E0 and gΓn, are given for the newly identified levels. The p-wave strength function was determined to be 104S1=2.8±0.8 and the average level spacing left-angle D1 right-angle=14 eV. Comparison of the reduced widths with a Porter-Thomas distribution is consistent with having missed 15% of the p-wave levels

  11. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms

  12. Temperature dependency of ultrasonic velocity of SA 106 Gr. B material using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    The dynamic elastic constants of the feeder pipe materials were determined by a high temperature resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS). The resonance frequencies were measured using a couple of Alumina wave guides and wide-band ultrasonic transducers into a small furnace. The resonance frequencies of rectangular parallelepiped specimen were calculated from the initial estimates of elastic stiffiness c11, c12 and c44 with an assumption of isotropic property, dimension and density. Through the comparison of calculated resonance frequencies with the measured frequencies by RUS, very accurate elastic constants of SA 106 Gr. B material were determined by iteration and convergence processes. As the temperature increases, the Young's modulus and shear modulus decreases linearly. The ultrasonic velocities also decreases as increasing temperature in the range of room temperature ∼ 300 .deg. C. The temperature dependency of longitudinal wave velocity and transverse wave velocity were calculated accurately. The difference of 3.1% of longitudinal wave velocity between room temperature and 300 .deg. C should be calibrated when measuring the thickness of the feeder pipe at 300 .deg. C

  13. A portable blood plasma clot micro-elastometry device based on resonant acoustic spectroscopy

    Krebs, C. R.; Li, Ling; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal blood clot stiffness is an important indicator of coagulation disorders arising from a variety of cardiovascular diseases and drug treatments. Here, we present a portable instrument for elastometry of microliter volume blood samples based upon the principle of resonant acoustic spectroscopy, where a sample of well-defined dimensions exhibits a fundamental longitudinal resonance mode proportional to the square root of the Young's modulus. In contrast to commercial thromboelastography, the resonant acoustic method offers improved repeatability and accuracy due to the high signal-to-noise ratio of the resonant vibration. We review the measurement principles and the design of a magnetically actuated microbead force transducer applying between 23 pN and 6.7 nN, providing a wide dynamic range of elastic moduli (3 Pa-27 kPa) appropriate for measurement of clot elastic modulus (CEM). An automated and portable device, the CEMport, is introduced and implemented using a 2 nm resolution displacement sensor with demonstrated accuracy and precision of 3% and 2%, respectively, of CEM in biogels. Importantly, the small strains (disorders, potentially leading to improved diagnostics and therapeutic monitoring.

  14. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy for the study of nanomaterial-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    Weiwei He

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biological applications and effects of nanomaterials are attributed to their ability to facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy is a direct and reliable method to identify and quantify free radicals in both chemical and biological environments. In this review, we discuss the use of ESR spectroscopy to study ROS generation mediated by nanomaterials, which have various applications in biological, chemical, and materials science. In addition to introducing the theory of ESR, we present some modifications of the method such as spin trapping and spin labeling, which ultimately aid in the detection of short-lived free radicals. The capability of metal nanoparticles in mediating ROS generation and the related mechanisms are also presented.

  15. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    Guo, Yisong [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); Brecht, Eric [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Aznavour, Kristen [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Nix, Jay C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States); George, Simon J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physical Biosciences Division (United States); Bau, Robert [University of Southern California, Department of Chemistry (United States); Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W. [Montana State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Adams, Michael W. W. [University of Georgia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States); Jenney, Francis E. Jr. [Georgia Campus, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (United States); Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source (United States); Yoda, Yoshitaka [JASRI (Japan); Cramer, Stephen P., E-mail: spcramer@lbl.gov [University of California, Department of Applied Science (United States)

    2013-12-15

    We have applied {sup 57}Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  16. Physical Basis of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and its Application to Central Nervous System Diseases

    Nicolás Fayed

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is based on the chemical shift property of the atom nuclei when a magnetic field is applied. This technique offers invaluable information about living tissues with special contribution to the diagnosis and prognosis of the central nervous system diseases. Concentration of several metabolites can be assessed in a reproducible manner by means of modern clinical scanners. N-acetyl-aspartate is regarded as a neuronal marker and its levels reflect the neuronal density with significant decreases in degenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease. Choline-compounds reflect the cell's membrane turnover and degradation. Myo-inositol has emerged as a glial marker with increases in degenerative diseases. The major usefulness of MRS has been reported in brain tumors, degenerative disorders, myelination defects and encephalopathies. In this review we report the physical basis and the contribution of MR spectroscopy to the diagnosis and prognosis of several diseases of the Central Nervous System.

  17. A search for new elementary particles using sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy

    Sputter-Initiated Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy is being used to search for new elementary particles which may exist at very low concentrations in stable matter, perhaps as relics of the Big Bang. Details of developments which have reduced backgrounds in the method to the parts-per-trillion level are discussed in detail. The latest results in the search for heavy fractional- and integer-charged species are reported. Preliminary concentration limits of 2 x 10-11 and 5 x 10-?12, respectively, have been obtained. (author)

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of plasma resonances in highly excited silicon and germanium

    The dynamics of the electron-hole plasma in silicon and germanium samples irradiated by 20 ps. 532 nm laser pulses has been investigated in the near infrared by the time-resolved picosecond optical spectroscopy. The experimental reflectivities and transmission are compared with the predictions of the thermal model for degenerate carrier distributions through the Drude formalism. Above a certain fluence, a significant deviation between measured and calculated values indicates a strong increase of the recombination rate as soon as the plasma resonances become comparable with the band gaps. These new plasmon-aided recombination channels are particularly pronounced in germanium. 15 refs., 8 figs

  19. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  20. Progress of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in chronic renal failure patients with vertebral bone change

    Bone changes caused by kidney diseases affect the quality of life in the patients with chronic renal failure. How to improve evaluation of the bone change, and consequently start early intervention and treatment is an important topic. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been successfully used in the evaluations of central nervous system, breast and prostate, etc. Evaluation of bone changes with MRS is under studied. This article reviewed the MRS in evaluation of vertebral body bone changes in patients with chronic renal failure. (authors)

  1. A survey on quantitative analysis of organic compounds by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is known as a powerful analytical technique, which is used to determine the structure of small and macro organic compounds. In recent years, 1H NMR is being recognized more and more as a quantitative analytical method, which is based on the principle where the area under a 1H NMR signal peak in solution state is proportional to the number of nuclei contributing to the peak. In this report, the basic concepts, developmental history and current state of the quantitative 1H NMR (qNMR) method are described. Furthermore, future prospect of the qNMR method is presented. (author)

  2. Correlation spectroscopy in cold atoms: light sidebands resonances in electromagnetically induced transparency condition

    Florez, H M; Theophilo, K; Nussenzveig, P; Martinelli, M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation spectroscopy has been successfully employed in the measurement of the intrinsic linewidth of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in time and frequency domain. We study the role of the sidebands of the intense fields in the measured spectra, analyzing the information that can be recovered working with different analysis frequencies. In this case, the non-zero one-photon detuning appears as a necessary condition for spectrally resolving the sideband resonances in the correlation coefficient. Our experimental findings are supported by the perturbative model defined in the frequency domain.

  3. Vitamin D and Caudal Primary Motor Cortex: A Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Bartha, Robert; Hachinski, Vladimir; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; ,

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is involved in brain physiology and lower-extremity function. We investigated spectroscopy in a cohort of older adults to explore the hypothesis that lower vitamin D status was associated with impaired neuronal function in caudal primary motor cortex (cPMC) measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. Methods Twenty Caucasian community-dwellers (mean±standard deviation, 74.6±6.2 years; 35.0% female) from the ‘Gait and Brain Study’ were included in this ana...

  4. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy - a tool to probe magneto-elastic properties of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Heczko, Oleg; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Kopeček, Jaromír; Kopecký, Vít; Landa, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2013), s. 1-5. ISSN 1434-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GAP107/10/0824; GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : elastic properties of ferromagnetic martensite * ferromagnetic shape memory alloys * Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * Ni-Mn-Ga Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2013

  5. Gamma-irradiated ExtraVit M nutritive supplement studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Petrisor, Dina [Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, 1A Kogalniceanu Street, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)], E-mail: dinapetrisor@yahoo.co.uk; Damian, Grigore; Simon, Simion [Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, 1A Kogalniceanu Street, 400084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2008-04-15

    An unirradiated and {gamma}-irradiated nutritive supplement named ExtraVit M was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to detect stable paramagnetic species following improvement of hygienic quality by {gamma}-radiation. Free radicals were induced by {gamma}-radiation in the studied samples from low absorbed doses, showing a certain sensibility of these samples to the radiation treatment. The EPR spectrum of irradiated ExtraVit M is typical for drugs or nutritive supplements containing high levels of sugars, vitamin C and cellulose.

  6. Case control study: magnetic resonance spectroscopy of brain in HIV infected patients

    Bairwa, Devender; Kumar, Virendra; Vyas, Surabhi; Das, Bimal Kumar; Srivastava, Achal Kumar; Pandey, Ravinder M.; Sharma, Surendra K; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R.; Sinha, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) studies on brain in HIV infected patients have shown significant alteration in neuro-biochemicals. Methods In this study, we measured the neuro-biochemical metabolites from the left frontal white matter (FWM) and left basal ganglia (BG) caudate head nucleus in 71 subjects that include 30 healthy controls, 20 asymptomatic HIV and 21 HIV patients with CNS lesion. Proton MR spectra were acquired at 3 T MRI system and the concentr...

  7. Stability of succinylcholine solutions stored at room temperature studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Adnet, Frederic; Moyec, Laurence Le; Smith, Charles E.; Galinski, Michel; Jabre, Patricia; Lapostolle, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    The effect of storage temperature on the stability of two succinylcholine chloride solutions (20 and 50 mg/ml) was evaluated. Molecular composition was analysed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At room temperature, the degradation rate constant was 1.2%/month for the 20 mg/ml solution and 2.1%/month for the 50 mg/ml solution. The corresponding monthly degradation rates for the two solutions were 0.18% and 0.30% when stored at 4°C, and 5.4% and 8.1% when stored at 37°C. If a 10% ...

  8. Cerebral metabolism, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive dysfunction in early multiple sclerosis: an exploratory study

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Mathiesen, Henrik K; Tscherning, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown that cortical cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) is reduced in multiple sclerosis (MS). Quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measures of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) normalized to creatine (NAA/Cr) assess neuronal...... deterioration, and several studies have shown reductions in MS. Furthermore, both PET and MRS reductions correlate with cognitive dysfunction in MS. Our aim was to determine if changes in cortical CMRglc in early MS correlate with NAA/Cr measurements of neuronal deterioration, as well as cognitive dysfunction...

  9. Sensitivity of the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy to weak gradients of elastic properties

    Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Bodnárová, Lucie; Kruisová, Alena; Landa, Michal; Pablos, A.; Belmonte, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 5 (2012), s. 3775-3785. ISSN 0001-4966 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GA106/09/1573 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * functionally graded materials * elastic constants Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2012 http://asadl.org/jasa/resource/1/jasman/v131/i5/p3775_s1?isAuthorized=no

  10. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  11. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir [BioPlasma Research Group, Dublin Institute of Technology, Sackville Place, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland and Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); MacGearailt, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Turner, Miles M. [NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Cullen, P. J. [BioPlasma Research Group, Dublin Institute of Technology, Sackville Place, Dublin 1 (Ireland)

    2013-04-28

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  12. Investigation of treatment related neurotoxicity following childhood cancer by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Davidson, A

    1999-05-01

    Children who survive treatment for cancer may suffer late effects, and neurotoxicity is a particular problem following central nervous system (CNS) directed therapy. Conventionally, this is assessed by neuropsychological assessments and neuroimaging. Cognitive deficits cannot be detected until several years after therapy, and although neuroimaging abnormalities are frequent they do not appear to be predictive of late problems. Thus, this study evaluated the role of localised proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), a non-invasive method of quantifying metabolites in-vivo, which has the potential to be a sensitive, and quantifiable, means of detecting neurotoxicity and predicting clinical outcome.

  13. Qualitative characterization of free polyamines in ethyleneamines epoxide hardeners by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The qualitative characterization of two commercial ethyneamines epoxide hardeners marketed by ACROS (U.S.A.) was carried out by using carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The products were triethylenetetramine (TETA) and tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA). TETA had four components, the most important one being triethylenetetramine, an ethyleneamine of lineal structure, in a concentration of 60 mol%. Another component had ramified structure, while the other two exhibited recurrent structures of the piperazina type. TEPA had five components with similar structures. The major component was tetraethylenepentamine in an approximate concentration of 55 mol%. These results agree with the composition of similar products marketed by Dow Chemical Company, namely DEH 24 and DEH 26, respectively. (author)

  14. Hydride bridge in [NiFe]-hydrogenase observed by nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy

    Ogata, Hideaki; Krämer, Tobias; Wang, Hongxin; Schilter, David; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; van Gastel, Maurice; Neese, Frank; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Gee, Leland B.; Scott, Aubrey D.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of many anaerobes relies on [NiFe]-hydrogenases, whose characterization when bound to substrates has proven non-trivial. Presented here is direct evidence for a hydride bridge in the active site of the 57Fe-labeled fully reduced Ni-R form of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) [NiFe]-hydrogenase. A unique ‘wagging’ mode involving H− motion perpendicular to the Ni(μ-H)57Fe plane was studied using 57Fe-specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) and density fu...

  15. Two-dimensional resonance Raman spectroscopy of oxygen- and water-ligated myoglobins

    Molesky, Brian P.; Guo, Zhenkun; Cheshire, Thomas P.; Moran, Andrew M.

    2016-07-01

    Two-dimensional resonance Raman (2DRR) spectroscopy has recently been developed as a tool for studies of structural heterogeneity and photochemical dynamics in condensed phases. In this paper, 2DRR spectroscopy is used to investigate line broadening mechanisms of both oxygen- and water-ligated myoglobins. General signatures of anharmonicity and inhomogeneous line broadening are first established with model calculations to facilitate signal interpretation. It is shown that the present quasi-degenerate version of 2DRR spectroscopy is insensitive to anharmonicity, because signal generation is allowed for harmonic modes. Rather, the key information to be gained from 2DRR spectroscopy pertains to the line broadening mechanisms, which are fairly obvious by inspection of the data. 2DRR signals acquired for both heme protein systems reveal significant heterogeneity in the vibrational modes local to the heme's propionic acid side chains. These side chains are known to interact with solvent, because they protrude from the hydrophobic pocket that encloses the heme. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the heterogeneity detected in our 2DRR experiments reflects fluctuations in the geometries of the side chains. Knowledge of such thermal motions will be useful for understanding protein function (e.g., ligand binding) because the side chains are an effective "gateway" for the exchange of thermal energy between the heme and solvent.

  16. Lorentzian sparsity based spectroscopic reconstruction for fast high-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Jiang, Boyu; Hu, Xiaoping; Gao, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D MRS) is challenging, even with state-of-art compressive sensing methods, such as L1-sparsity method. In this work, using the prior that the 2D MRS can be regarded as a series of Lorentzian functions, we aim to develop a robust Lorentzian-sparsity based spectroscopy reconstruction method for high-dimensional MRS. The proposed method sparsifies 2D MRS in Lorentzian functions. Instead of thousands of pixel-wise variables, this Lorentzian-sparsity method significantly reduces the number of unknowns to several geometric variables, such as the center, magnitude and shape parameters for each Lorentzian function. The spectroscopy reconstruction is formulated as a nonlinear and nonconvex optimization problem, and the simulated annealing algorithm is developed to solve the problem. The proposed method was compared with inverse FFT method and L1-sparsity method, under various undersampling factors. While FFT and L1 results contained severe artifacts, the Lorentzian-sparsity results provided significantly improved spectroscopy. A new 2D MRS reconstruction method is proposed using the Lorentzian sparsity, with significantly improved MRS reconstruction quality, in comparison with standard inverse FFT method or state-of-art L1-sparsity method. PMID:26630321

  17. Lorentzian sparsity based spectroscopic reconstruction for fast high-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Jiang, Boyu; Hu, Xiaoping; Gao, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D MRS) is challenging, even with state-of-art compressive sensing methods, such as L1-sparsity method. In this work, using the prior that the 2D MRS can be regarded as a series of Lorentzian functions, we aim to develop a robust Lorentzian-sparsity based spectroscopy reconstruction method for high-dimensional MRS. The proposed method sparsifies 2D MRS in Lorentzian functions. Instead of thousands of pixel-wise variables, this Lorentzian-sparsity method significantly reduces the number of unknowns to several geometric variables, such as the center, magnitude and shape parameters for each Lorentzian function. The spectroscopy reconstruction is formulated as a nonlinear and nonconvex optimization problem, and the simulated annealing algorithm is developed to solve the problem. The proposed method was compared with inverse FFT method and L1-sparsity method, under various undersampling factors. While FFT and L1 results contained severe artifacts, the Lorentzian-sparsity results provided significantly improved spectroscopy. A new 2D MRS reconstruction method is proposed using the Lorentzian sparsity, with significantly improved MRS reconstruction quality, in comparison with standard inverse FFT method or state-of-art L1-sparsity method.

  18. Characterization of the pigment xanthomonadin in the bacterial genus Xanthomonas using micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Paret, Mathews L.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Misra, Anupam K.; Acosta, Tayro; deSilva, Asoka S.; Vowell, Tomie; Alvarez, Anne M.

    2012-06-01

    We used micro- and resonance Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm and 514.5 nm laser excitation, respectively, to characterize a plant pathogenic bacteria, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. dieffenbachiae D150. The bacterial genus Xathomonas is closely related to bacterial genus Stenotrophomonas that causes an infection in humans. This study has identified for the first time the unique Raman spectra of the carotenoid-like pigment xanthomonadin of the Xanthomonas strain. Xanthomonadin is a brominated aryl-polyene pigment molecule similar to carotenoids. Further studies were conducted using resonance Raman spectroscopy with 514.5 nm laser excitation on several strains of the bacterial genus Xanthomonas isolated from numerous plants from various geographical locations. The current study revealed that the Raman bands representing the vibrations (v1, v2, v3) of the polyene chain of xanthomonadin are 1003-1005 (v3), 1135-1138 (v2), and 1530 (v1). Overtone bands representing xanthomonadin were identified as 2264-2275 (2v2), and combinational bands at 2653-2662 (v1+ v2). The findings from this study validate our previous finding that the Raman fingerprints of xanthomonadin are unique for the genus Xanthomonas. This facilitates rapid identification (~5 minutes) of Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial culture plates. The xanthomonadin marker is different from Raman markers of many other bacterial genus including Agrobacterium, Bacillus, Clavibacter, Enterobacter, Erwinia, Microbacterium, Paenibacillus, and Ralstonia. This study also identified Xanthomonas spp. from bacterial strains isolated from a diseased wheat sample on a culture plate.

  19. Pade-Froissart exact signal-noise separation in nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Belkic, Dzevad; Belkic, Karen, E-mail: Dzevad.Belkic@ki.se [Karolinska Institute, PO Box 260, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-06-28

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is one of the key methods for studying the structure of matter on different levels (sub-nuclear, nuclear, atomic, molecular, cellular, etc). Its overall success critically depends upon reliable mathematical analysis and interpretation of the studied data. This is especially aided by parametric signal processing with the ensuing data quantification, which can yield the abundance or concentrations of the constituents in the examined matter. The sought reliability of signal processing rests upon the possibility of an accurate solution of the quantification problem alongside the unambiguous separation of true from false information in the spectrally analysed data. We presently demonstrate that the fast Pade transform (FPT), as the unique ratio of two polynomials for a given Maclaurin series, can yield exact signal-noise separation for a synthesized free induction decay curve built from 25 molecules. This is achieved by using the concept of Froissart doublets or pole-zero cancellations. Unphysical/spurious (noise or noise-like) resonances have coincident or near-coincident poles and zeros. They possess either zero- or near-zero-valued amplitudes. Such spectral structures never converge due to their instability against even the smallest perturbations. By contrast, upon convergence of the FPT, physical/genuine resonances are identified by their persistent stability against external perturbations, such as signal truncation or addition of random noise, etc. In practice, the computation is carried out by gradually and systematically increasing the common degree of the Pade numerator and denominator polynomials in the diagonal FPT. As this degree changes, the reconstructed parameters and spectra fluctuate until stabilization occurs. The polynomial degree at which this full stabilization is achieved represents the sought exact number of resonances. An illustrative set of results is reported in this work to show the exact separation of

  20. IR double-resonance spectroscopy applied to the 4-aminophenol(H2O)1 cluster

    Gerhards, M.; Unterberg, C.

    2001-04-01

    The IR double-resonance techniques IR/R2PI (infrared/resonant 2-photon ionization), IR/PIRI (infrared-photo-induced Rydberg ionization) and IR-photodissociation spectroscopy are valuable tools to investigate structure, vibrations, and dynamical processes of neutral and ionic hydrogen-bonded clusters containing aromatic molecules. In this paper we report on the application of the IR double-resonance techniques to determine the NH and OH stretching vibrations of 4-aminophenol and 4-aminophenol(H2O)1, both in the neutral (S0) and ionic (D0) ground state. All vibrational frequencies obtained for 4-aminophenol and the cluster are compared with the values obtained from ab initio and DFT calculations. In the S0 state, a trans-linear arrangement of 4-aminophenol(H2O)1 is obtained containing an O-H..O hydrogen bond. In the D0 state an overlay of two spectra can be observed resulting from the trans-linear structure and a second structure which contains a N-H..O hydrogen bond. The observation of these two structures within the ion is an interesting example of a rearrangement reaction in the ionic state.

  1. Measurement of Antioxidant Capacity by Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy Based on Copper(II) Reduction.

    Li, Dan; Jiang, Jia; Han, Dandan; Yu, Xinyu; Wang, Kun; Zang, Shuang; Lu, Dayong; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Ziwei

    2016-04-01

    A new method is proposed for measuring the antioxidant capacity by electron spin resonance spectroscopy based on the loss of electron spin resonance signal after Cu(2+) is reduced to Cu(+) with antioxidant. Cu(+) was removed by precipitation in the presence of SCN(-). The remaining Cu(2+) was coordinated with diethyldithiocarbamate, extracted into n-butanol and determined by electron spin resonance spectrometry. Eight standards widely used in antioxidant capacity determination, including Trolox, ascorbic acid, ferulic acid, rutin, caffeic acid, quercetin, chlorogenic acid, and gallic acid were investigated. The standard curves for determining the eight standards were plotted, and results showed that the linear regression correlation coefficients were all high enough (r > 0.99). Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity values for the antioxidant standards were calculated, and a good correlation (r > 0.94) between the values obtained by the present method and cupric reducing antioxidant capacity method was observed. The present method was applied to the analysis of real fruit samples and the evaluation of the antioxidant capacity of these fruits. PMID:26927869

  2. Template-stripped Plasmonic Cup Resonators for Single-Nanohole-Based Sensing and Spectroscopy

    Olson, Stephen Andrew Olaf

    We have designed and tested a new plasmonic biosensor, featuring a centered nanohole in the base of a recessed metallic nanocup. This configuration enables us to perform independent plasmon-resonance-enhanced single-nanohole transmission spectroscopy on femtoliter volumes of solution. In this thesis we will demonstrate the fabrication, characterization, and application of these novel cup resonator plasmonic biosensors. Utilizing plasmonic confinement to enhance and modulate transmission through a nanohole aperture, the resulting transmission spectra can be used to determine changes in the material properties of a dielectric material located inside the sensing volume of the cup. We have determined, through measurements and simulations, the physical mechanisms causing transmission modulation through the structure. Utilizing this information, we have constructed predictive behavior models for the design and customization of these devices for specific purposes. We show that these structures are responsive to refractive index changes in their surroundings, and propose some possible application of these resonators in biological sensing roles which take advantage of their unique geometry.

  3. Microwave-optical double resonance spectroscopy. Progress report, February 1, 1975--January 31, 1976

    Zero-field and high-field optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and optical spectroscopy experiments were performed on several systems in order to further basic knowledge of the structure, reactions, and response to radiation of atoms, molecules, and ions. Results on the following studies are reported: the direct observation of level anticrossing and mixing effects in excited molecular triplet states; anomalous zero-field splittings in the lowest triplet state of 1-iodonaphthalene; evidence for second-order spin-orbit coupling and spin delocalization effects in the lowest triplet state of benzophenone; direct observation of the optical absorption spectra of reactive free radicals at room temperature; measurements of the activation and thermodynamic parameters of several cyclohexenyl and cyclohexanonyl radicals; complete analyses of the level anticrossing and cross relaxation spectra of oriented molecular triplet states; solutions to the spin Hamiltonian for S = 1, I = 5/2 systems in both zero-field and high-field, an improvement by a factor of ten in the resolution of ODMR experiments in high field; and measurements of the optical and magnetic resonance properties of a series of halogenated naphthalenes in their lowest triplet states

  4. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: initial experience

    Objective: to report an experiment involving the introduction of a protocol utilizing commercially available three-dimensional 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (3D 1H MRSI) method in patients diagnosed with prostatic tumors under suspicion of neoplasm. Materials and methods: forty-one patients in the age range between 51 and 80 years (mean, 67 years) were prospectively evaluated. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with one or more biopsies negative for cancer and high specific-prostatic antigen levels (group A), and patients with cancer confirmed by biopsy (group B). The determination of the target area (group A) or the known cancer extent (group B) was based on magnetic resonance imaging and MRSI studies. Results: the specificity of MRSI in the diagnosis of prostate cancer was lower than the specificity reported in the literature (about 47%). On the other hand, for tumor staging, it corresponded to the specificity reported in the literature. Conclusion: the introduction and standardization of 3D 1H MRSI has allowed the obtention of a presumable diagnosis of prostate cancer, by a combined analysis of magnetic resonance imaging and metabolic data from 3D 1H MRSI. (author)

  5. Developments for resonance ionization laser spectroscopy of the heaviest elements at SHIP

    Lautenschläger, F.; Chhetri, P.; Ackermann, D.; Backe, H.; Block, M.; Cheal, B.; Clark, A.; Droese, C.; Ferrer, R.; Giacoppo, F.; Götz, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kaleja, O.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kunz, P.; Mistry, A. K.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lauth, W.; Raeder, S.; Walther, Th.; Wraith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental determination of atomic levels and the first ionization potential of the heaviest elements (Z ⩾ 100) is key to challenge theoretical predictions and to reveal changes in the atomic shell structure. These elements are only artificially produced in complete-fusion evaporation reactions at on-line facilities such as the GSI in Darmstadt at a rate of, at most, a few atoms per second. Hence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are required. Laser spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and valuable tools to investigate atomic properties. In combination with a buffer-gas filled stopping cell, the Radiation Detected Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RADRIS) technique provides the highest sensitivity for laser spectroscopy on the heaviest elements. The RADRIS setup, as well as the measurement procedure, have been optimized and characterized using the α -emitter 155 Yb in on-line conditions, resulting in an overall efficiency well above 1%. This paves the way for a successful search of excited atomic levels in nobelium and heavier elements.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy of single bowtie nano-antennas using a differential reflectivity method.

    Kaniber, M; Schraml, K; Regler, A; Bartl, J; Glashagen, G; Flassig, F; Wierzbowski, J; Finley, J J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the structural and optical properties of individual bowtie nanoantennas both on glass and semiconducting GaAs substrates. The antennas on glass (GaAs) are shown to be of excellent quality and high uniformity reflected by narrow size distributions with standard deviations for the triangle and gap size of = 4.5 nm = 2.6 nm and = 5.4 nm = 3.8 nm, respectively. The corresponding optical properties of individual nanoantennas studied by differential reflection spectroscopy show a strong reduction of the localised surface plasmon polariton resonance linewidth from 0.21 eV to 0.07 eV upon reducing the antenna size from 150 nm to 100 nm. This is attributed to the absence of inhomogeneous broadening as compared to optical measurements on nanoantenna ensembles. The inter-particle coupling of an individual bowtie nanoantenna, which gives rise to strongly localised and enhanced electromagnetic hotspots, is demonstrated using polarization-resolved spectroscopy, yielding a large degree of linear polarization of ρmax ~ 80%. The combination of highly reproducible nanofabrication and fast, non-destructive and non-contaminating optical spectroscopy paves the route towards future semiconductor-based nano-plasmonic circuits, consisting of multiple photonic and plasmonic entities. PMID:27005986

  7. Resonant multi-photon IR dissociation spectroscopy of a trapped and sympathetically cooled biomolecular ion species

    Wellers, Ch; Vasilyev, S; Offenberg, D; Schiller, S

    2011-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate vibrational spectroscopy of polyatomic ions that are trapped and sympathetically cooled by laser-cooled atomic ions. We use the protonated dipeptide tryptophane-alanine (HTyrAla+) as a model system, cooled by Barium ions to less than 800mK secular temperature. The spectroscopy is performed on the fundamental vibrational transition of a local vibrational mode at 2.74 {\\mu}m using a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Resonant multi-photon IR dissociation spectroscopy (without the use of a UV laser) generates charged molecular fragments, which are sympathetically cooled and trapped, and subsequently released from the trap and counted. We measured the cross section for R-IRMPD under conditions of low intensity, and found it to be approximately two orders smaller than the vibrational excitation cross section. The observed rotational bandwidth of the vibrational transition is larger than the one expected from the combined effects of 300 K black-body temperature, conform...

  8. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: novel non-invasive technique for diagnosing brain tumors

    To determine the accuracy of MR Spectroscopy (MRS) in diagnosing brain tumors. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study:Neurosurgery Department, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from November 2010 to April 2011. Methodology: Fifty cases with brain tumors, who presented to Neurosurgery Department of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, during the study period, were included in the study. All patients underwent MRS and later brain. Those with recurrent disease were excluded. Data was collected with the help of proforma. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Comparison of MRS findings and biopsy diagnosis was done. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values (NPV and PPV) were determined keeping histopathology as the gold standard. Results: Out of the 50 patients, there were 20 (40%) females and 30 (60%) males with mean age of 37 13.24 years. The commonest presenting complaint was headache (76%) followed by weakness (62%) and seizures (30%). MRI had diagnosed 27 (51%) as neoplastic lesion. Spectroscopy reported 44 (88%) as neoplasms, while on histopathology, 42 (84%) were confirmed to have neoplasm. The accuracy of MRS was 94%, with 97.6% sensitivity, 71.42% specificity, 95.45% PPV and 83.3% NPV. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy can readily help in differentiating neoplasm from non-neoplastic brain tumors, thus an invasive brain biopsy procedure can be avoided. (author)

  9. Numerical and experimental investigation of a low-frequency measurement technique: differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy

    Yin, Hanjun; Zhao, Jianguo; Tang, Genyang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Wang, Shangxu

    2016-06-01

    Differential acoustic resonance spectroscopy (DARS) has been developed to determine the elastic properties of saturated rocks within the kHz frequency range. This laboratory technique is based on considerations from perturbation theory, wherein the resonance frequencies of the resonant cavity with and without a perturbation sample are used to estimate the acoustic properties of the test sample. In order to better understand the operating mechanism of DARS and therefore optimize the procedure, it is important to develop an accurate and efficient numerical model. Accordingly, this study presents a new multiphysics model by coupling together considerations from acoustics, solid mechanics, and electrostatics. The numerical results reveal that the newly developed model can successfully simulate the acoustic pressure field at different resonance modes, and that it can accurately reflect the measurement process. Based on the understanding of the DARS system afforded by the numerical simulation, we refine the system configuration by utilizing cavities of different lengths and appropriate radii to broaden the frequency bandwidth and ensure testing accuracy. Four synthetic samples are measured to test the performance of the optimized DARS system, in conjunction with ultrasonic and static measurements. For nonporous samples, the estimated bulk moduli are shown to be independent of the different measurement methods (i.e. DARS or ultrasonic techniques). In contrast, for sealed porous samples, the differences in bulk moduli between the low- and high-frequency techniques can be clearly observed; this discrepancy is attributed to frequency dispersion. In summary, the optimized DARS system with an extended frequency range of 500–2000 Hz demonstrates considerable utility in investigating the frequency dependence of the acoustic properties of reservoir rocks.

  10. Tracking Transitions in Spider Wrapping Silk Conformation and Dynamics by (19)F Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Orrell, Kathleen E; Xu, Lingling; Tremblay, Marie-Laurence; Bak, Jessi J; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-05-31

    Aciniform silk protein (AcSp1) is the primary component of wrapping silk, the toughest of the spider silks because of a combination of high tensile strength and extensibility. Argiope trifasciata AcSp1 contains a core repetitive domain with at least 14 homogeneous 200-amino acid units ("W" units). Upon fibrillogenesis, AcSp1 converts from an α-helix-rich soluble state to a mixed α-helical/β-sheet conformation. Solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allowed demonstration of variable local stability within the W unit, but comprehensive characterization was confounded by spectral overlap, which was exacerbated by decreased chemical shift dispersion upon denaturation. Here, (19)F NMR spectroscopy, in the context of a single W unit (W1), is applied to track changes in structure and dynamics. Four strategic positions in the W unit were mutated to tryptophan and biosynthetically labeled with 5-fluorotryptophan (5F-Trp). Simulated annealing-based structure calculations implied that these substitutions should be tolerated, while circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and (1)H-(15)N chemical shift displacements indicated minimal structural perturbation in W1 mutants. Fiber formation by W2 concatemers containing 5F-Trp substitutions in both W units demonstrated retention of functionality, a somewhat surprising finding in light of sequence conservation between species. Each 5F-Trp-labeled W1 exhibited a unique (19)F chemical shift, line width, longitudinal relaxation time constant (T1), and solvent isotope shift. Perturbation to (19)F chemical shift and nuclear spin relaxation parameters reflected changes in the conformation and dynamics at each 5F-Trp site upon addition of urea and dodecylphosphocholine (DPC). (19)F NMR spectroscopy allowed unambiguous localized tracking throughout titration with each perturbant, demonstrating distinct behavior for each perturbant not previously revealed by heteronuclear NMR experiments. PMID:27153372

  11. Hitchhiker’s Guide to Voxel Segmentation for Partial Volume Correction of In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Quadrelli, Scott; Mountford, Carolyn; Ramadan, Saadallah

    2016-01-01

    Partial volume effects have the potential to cause inaccuracies when quantifying metabolites using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In order to correct for cerebrospinal fluid content, a spectroscopic voxel needs to be segmented according to different tissue contents. This article aims to detail how automated partial volume segmentation can be undertaken and provides a software framework for researchers to develop their own tools. While many studies have detailed the impact of partial volume correction on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification, there is a paucity of literature explaining how voxel segmentation can be achieved using freely available neuroimaging packages. PMID:27147822

  12. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of Rydberg states of N2O below the X ionization limit

    Scheper, C.R.; Kuijt, J.; Buma, W.J.; Lange

    1998-01-01

    A three-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopic study on N2O is carried out in the spectral range from 80 000 cm - 1 up to the lowest ionization limit at 103 963 cm - 1. High-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is used to identify and characterize the observed excited states. Eighteen origins are reported which have either not been assigned before or are reassigned now. Moreover, the photoelectron spectra taken at higher-lying resonances often show extensive vibronic ...

  13. Operando electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy – formation of mossy lithium on lithium anodes during charge–discharge cycling

    Wandt, Johannes; Marino, Cyril; Gasteiger, Hubert A.; Jakes, Peter; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Granwehr, Josef

    2015-01-01

    The formation of mossy lithium and lithium dendrites so far prevents the use of lithium metal anodes in lithium ion batteries. To develop solutions for this problem (e.g., electrolyte additives), operando measurement techniques are required to monitor mossy lithium and dendrite formation during electrochemical cycling. Here we present a novel battery cell design that enables operando electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. It is shown that time-resolved operando EPR spectroscopy d...

  14. Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid water: novel instrumentation, high resolution, and the "map" approach

    Weinhardt, L.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques to study the electronic structure of liquids are rare. Most recently, resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has been shown to be an extremely versatile spectroscopy to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states for liquids in thermodynamic equilibrium. However, XES requires high-brilliance soft x-ray synchrotron radiation and poses significant technical challenges to maintain a liquid sample in an ultra-high vacuum environment. Our group has therefore developed and c...

  15. Cavity ring-up spectroscopy for dissipative and dispersive sensing in a whispering gallery mode resonator

    Yang, Yong; Kasumie, Sho; Ward, Jonathan M; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2016-01-01

    In whispering gallery mode resonator sensing applications, the conventional way to detect a change in the parameter to be measured is by observing the steady state transmission spectrum through the coupling waveguide. Alternatively, cavity ring-up spectroscopy (CRUS) sensing can be achieved transiently. In this work, we investigate CRUS using coupled mode equations and find analytical solutions with a large spectral broadening approximation of the input pulse. The relationships between the frequency detuning, coupling gap and ring-up peak height are determined and experimentally verified using an ultrahigh \\textit{Q}-factor silica microsphere. This work shows that distinctive dispersive and dissipative transient sensing can be realised by simply measuring the peak height of the CRUS signal, which might improve the data collection rate.

  16. Long-term follow-up of cerebral infarction patients with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Gideon, P; Sperling, B; Arlien-Søborg, P;

    1994-01-01

    serially from the acute stage to the chronic stage of infarction. Regional cerebral blood flow was also measured within the affected areas. These factors were compared with the clinical outcome. METHODS: Six patients with ischemic stroke were examined serially from the acute stage (< or = 2 days) to the...... chronic stage (> 6 months) with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Cerebral blood flow was measured with single-photon emission-computed tomography with 99mTc-labeled d,l-hexamethylenepropyleneamine oxime as flow tracer. RESULTS: Lactate was found in all patients in the acute stage of stroke. Lactate...... in the acute and chronic stage, whereas hyperemia was found in 4 patients in the subacute stage. CONCLUSIONS: In this preliminary study no clear correlation was found between the level of N-acetylaspartate or lactate in the acute stage of stroke and the clinical outcome; however, there does appear to...

  17. Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder – a brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Margaretha eDramsdahl

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundImpaired cognitive control in individuals with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD may be related to a prefrontal cortical glutamatergic deficit. We assessed the glutamate level in the left and the right midfrontal region including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC in adults with ADHD and healthy controls. MethodsTwenty-nine adults with ADHD and 38 healthy controls were included. We used Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging with single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy to measure the ratio of glutamate to creatine (Glu/Cre in the left and the right midfrontal region in the two groups. ResultsThe ADHD group showed a significant reduction of Glu/Cre in the left midfrontal region compared to the controls. ConclusionsThe reduction of Glu/Cre in the left midfrontal region in the ADHD group may reflect a glutamatergic deficit in prefrontal neuronal circuitry in adults with ADHD, resulting in problems with cognitive control.

  18. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    Wade, Jessica; Wood, Sebastian; Kim, Ji-Seon, E-mail: ji-seon.kim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Beatrup, Daniel; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Durrant, James R. [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Bronstein, Hugo [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AY (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-28

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability.

  19. Quantitation of magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals: the jMRUI software package

    The software package jMRUI with Java-based graphical user interface enables user-friendly time-domain analysis of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and HRMAS-NMR signals. Version 3.x has been distributed in more than 1200 groups or hospitals worldwide. The new version 4.x is a plug-in platform enabling the users to add their own algorithms. Moreover, it offers new functionalities compared to versions 3.x. The quantum-mechanical simulator based on NMR-SCOPE, the quantitation algorithm QUEST and the main MRSI functionalities are described. Quantitation results of signals obtained in vivo from a mouse and a human brain are given

  20. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reflects metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease

    Heindel, W. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Kugel, H. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Wendel, U. [Children`s Hospital, Univ. Duesseldorf (Germany); Roth, B. [Children`s Hospital, Univ. Koeln (Germany); Benz-Bohm, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Koeln (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Using localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), accumulation of branchedchain amino acids (BCAA) and their corresponding 2-oxo acids (BCOA) could be non-invasively demonstrated in the brain of a 9-year-old girl suffering from classical maple syrup urine disease. During acute metabolic decompensation, the compounds caused a signal at a chemical shift of 0.9 ppm which was assigned by in vitro experiments. The brain tissue concentration of the sum of BCAA and BCOA could be estimated as 0.9 mmol/l. Localized {sup 1}H-MRS of the brain appears to be suitable for examining patients suffering from maple syrup urine disease in different metabolic states. (orig.)

  1. Quantum Computation Based on Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Ding, S; Ye, C; Zhan, M S; Zhu, X; Gao, K; Sun, X; Mao, X A; Liu, M; Ding, Shangwu; Dowell, Charles A. Mc; Ye, Chaohui; Zhan, Mingsheng; Zhu, Xiwen; Gao, Kelin; Sun, Xianping; Mao, Xi-An; Liu, Maili

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is shown to be a promising technique for implementing quantum computing. The theory underlying the principles of quantum computing with nuclear spin systems undergoing MAS is formulated in the framework of formalized quantum Floquet theory. The procedures for realizing state labeling, state transformation and coherence selection in Floquet space are given. It suggests that by this method, the largest number of qubits can easily surpass that achievable with other techniques. Unlike other modalities proposed for quantum computing, this method enables one to adjust the dimension of the working state space, meaning the number of qubits can be readily varied. The universality of quantum computing in Floquet space with solid state NMR is discussed and a demonstrative experimental implementation of Grover's search is given.

  2. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a known case of intracranial hydatid cyst

    Chand K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS findings of a known case of hydatid cyst operated twice in the past. A 22-years-old male patient had presented with recurrent symptoms of generalized seizures and raised intracranial tension. MRI with MRS of the lesion was performed that showed a recurrent loculated cystic lesion in right parieto-occipital lobe. MRS through the lesion was performed using repetition time (TR of 1500 ms and time to echo (TE of 135 ms using 2 x 2 x 2 cm voxel, from the margin of the lesion. MRS showed mildly elevated choline (Cho, depressed creatine (Cr and N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, a large peak of lactate, pyruvate and acetate peaks.

  3. Gamma-Irradiated seafoods: identification and dosimetry by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to measure the production of free radicals induced by 60Co γ-rays in shrimp exoskeleton, mussel shells, and fish bones. The EPR spectrum for irradiated shrimp shell was dose dependent and appeared to be derived from more than one radical. The major component of the radiation-induced spectrum resulted from radical formation in chitin, assigned by comparison with irradiated N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Other measurements include the total yield of radicals formed as a function of dose and the longevity of the radiation-induced EPR signal. Similar measurements were made for mussel shells and fish bones, and the results are compared and discussed. It was concluded that irradiated shrimp (with shell attached) could definitely be identified by this technique; however, precise determination of absorbed dose was less straightforward. Positive identification of irradiated fish bones was also clearly distinguishable, and dosimetry by EPR appeared to be feasible. (author)

  4. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a patient with Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease

    Konaka, K.; Kaido, M.; Okuda, Y.; Aoike, F.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T. [Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurology; Kitamoto, T. [Tohoku Univ. Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurological Science

    2000-09-01

    A 23-year-old woman with Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) was investigated by {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS). She developed gait ataxic at 22 years. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA analysis showing a proline-to-leucine point mutation at codon 102 of the prion protein. On {sup 1}H-MRS, she showed a remarkable reduction of the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio in the frontal lobe, cerebellar hemisphere and vermis and putamen. MRI revealed mild atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis and cerebral cortex, but single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 99m}HMPAO showed normal perfusion in the cerebellum. The imaging studies suggest that MRS might be superior to MRI or SPECT for detection of early neuronal degeneration. (orig.)

  5. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a patient with Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease

    A 23-year-old woman with Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) was investigated by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). She developed gait ataxic at 22 years. The diagnosis was confirmed by DNA analysis showing a proline-to-leucine point mutation at codon 102 of the prion protein. On 1H-MRS, she showed a remarkable reduction of the N-acetylaspartate/creatine ratio in the frontal lobe, cerebellar hemisphere and vermis and putamen. MRI revealed mild atrophy of the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis and cerebral cortex, but single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 99mHMPAO showed normal perfusion in the cerebellum. The imaging studies suggest that MRS might be superior to MRI or SPECT for detection of early neuronal degeneration. (orig.)

  6. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–Hen vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm−1). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Aln photoion with n larger than two

  7. Noninvasive detection of temozolomide in brain tumor xenografts by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Kato, Y.; Holm, David Alberg; Okollie, B.;

    2010-01-01

    Poor drug delivery to brain tumors caused by aberrant tumor vasculature and a partly intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) can significantly impair the efficacy of chemotherapy. Determining drug delivery to brain tumors is a challenging problem, and the noninvasive...... detection of drug directly in the tumor can be critically important for accessing, predicting, and eventually improving effectiveness of therapy. In this study, in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to detect an anticancer agent, temozolomide (TMZ), in vivo in murine xenotransplants of U87...... of similar to 140 mg/kg (450 mg/m(2), well within the maximal clinical dose of 1000 mg/m(2) used in humans) during the course of in vivo MRS experiments. Heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) MRS of brain tumors was performed before and after i.p. administration of [C-13]TMZ. Dynamic MRI...

  8. High resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR studies on meat components: potentialities and prospects

    Antonio Sacco

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, increasing application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy in the study of the agricultur-  al food products has been remarked, thanks to the advantages of this technique over other conventional analytical tech-  niques. This preliminary work presents, for the first time, the application of an innovative NMR technique, the  proton  high resolution magic angle spinning (1H HR-MAS, for studying meat features. It stresses that this method makes it pos-  sible to acquire qualitative and quantitative information about chemical composition, both quickly and without any par-  ticular preparation of the sample to be analysed. Finally, the study highlights the potentiality of this method in defining  the origin of meat and the possibility of identifying meat adulteration. 

  9. Monitoring of the insecticide trichlorfon by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is extensively being used for protection of fruit crops. Trichlorfon is a thermal labile compound, which cannot be easily determined by gas chromatography (GC) and has no suitable group for sensitive detection by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this study, a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) has been described for monitoring of trichlorfon without any separation step. The quantitative works of 31P NMR spectroscopy has been performed in the presence of an internal standard (hexamethylphosphoramide). Limit of detection (LOD) for this method has been found to be 55 mg L-1, without any sample preparation, and the linear working range was 150-5500 mg L-1. Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method for three replicates within and between days was obtained ≤9%. The average recovery efficiency was approximately 99-112%. This method was applied for monitoring trichlorfon in a commercial insecticide sample and tomato sample

  10. Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder - a brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Dramsdahl, Margaretha; Ersland, Lars; Plessen, Kerstin J; Haavik, Jan; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Specht, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: Impaired cognitive control in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be related to a prefrontal cortical glutamatergic deficit. We assessed the glutamate level in the left and the right midfrontal region including the anterior cingulate cortex in adults...... with ADHD and healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-nine adults with ADHD and 38 healthy controls were included. We used Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging with single voxel point-resolved spectroscopy to measure the ratio of glutamate to creatine (Glu/Cre) in the left and the right midfrontal region in the...... two groups. Results: The ADHD group showed a significant reduction of Glu/Cre in the left midfrontal region compared to the controls. Conclusion: The reduction of Glu/Cre in the left midfrontal region in the ADHD group may reflect a glutamatergic deficit in prefrontal neuronal circuitry in adults with...

  11. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. High-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy pattern recognition of fish oil capsules.

    Aursand, Marit; Standal, Inger B; Axelson, David E

    2007-01-10

    13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy, in conjunction with multivariate analysis of commercial fish oil-related health food products, have been used to provide discrimination concerning the nature, composition, refinement, and/or adulteration or authentication of the products. Supervised (probabilistic neural networks, PNN) and unsupervised (principal component analysis, PCA; Kohonen neural networks; generative topographic mapping, GTM) pattern recognition techniques were used to visualize and classify samples. Simple PCA score plots demonstrated excellent, but not totally unambiguous, class distinctions, whereas Kohonen and GTM visualization provided better results. Quantitative class predictions with accuracies >95% were achieved with PNN analysis. Trout, salmon, and cod oils were completely and correctly classified. Samples reported to be salmon oils and cod liver oils did not cluster with true salmon and cod liver oil samples, indicating mislabeling or adulteration. PMID:17199311

  13. Stability of succinylcholine solutions stored at room temperature studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Adnet, Frederic; Le Moyec, Laurence; Smith, Charles E; Galinski, Michel; Jabre, Patricia; Lapostolle, Frederic

    2007-03-01

    The effect of storage temperature on the stability of two succinylcholine chloride solutions (20 and 50 mg/ml) was evaluated. Molecular composition was analysed using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At room temperature, the degradation rate constant was 1.2%/month for the 20 mg/ml solution and 2.1%/month for the 50 mg/ml solution. The corresponding monthly degradation rates for the two solutions were 0.18% and 0.30% when stored at 4 degrees C, and 5.4% and 8.1% when stored at 37 degrees C. If a 10% loss of potency is considered acceptable, then the 20 and 50 mg/ml succinylcholine solutions can be stored in emergency resuscitation carts at room temperature for 8.3 and 4.8 months, respectively. PMID:17351219

  14. Operational electrochemical stability of thiophene-thiazole copolymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy

    We report on the electrochemical stability of hole polarons in three conjugated polymers probed by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The materials considered are all isostructural to poly(3-hexyl)thiophene, where thiazole units have been included to systematically deepen the energy level of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO). We demonstrate that increasing the thiazole content planarizes the main conjugated backbone of the polymer and improves the electrochemical stability in the ground state. However, these more planar thiazole containing polymers are increasingly susceptible to electrochemical degradation in the polaronic excited state. We identify the degradation mechanism, which targets the C=N bond in the thiazole units and results in disruption of the main polymer backbone conjugation. The introduction of thiazole units to deepen the HOMO energy level and increase the conjugated backbone planarity can be beneficial for the performance of certain optoelectronic devices, but the reduced electrochemical stability of the hole polaron may compromise their operational stability

  15. Development of electron spin resonance spectroscopy to detect irradiated foods in routine testing

    Electrospin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is a method for the detection of paramagnetic molecules and ions, and can supply information about their structures. ESR signals are specific of a given radical and are determined by the electronical and sterical properties of the radical species. ESR may be used to identify irradiated food if products contain solid and dry zones. If so, radicals will be formed by ionizing radiation in the dry areas which will not dereact or very slowly so by chemical reaction in their environment (mainly with water contained in the sample). Suitability of ESR measurement for doubtless detection is based on the ratio of the life of the formed radical and the general shelf life of the foods involved. The authors present the radicals and paramagnetic compounds observed in foods and report on the progress achieved at the Federal Health Agency (BGA) last year. (orig.UHE)

  16. In vivo assessment of cold adaptation in insect larvae by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Daniel Mietchen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Temperatures below the freezing point of water and the ensuing ice crystal formation pose serious challenges to cell structure and function. Consequently, species living in seasonally cold environments have evolved a multitude of strategies to reorganize their cellular architecture and metabolism, and the underlying mechanisms are crucial to our understanding of life. In multicellular organisms, and poikilotherm animals in particular, our knowledge about these processes is almost exclusively due to invasive studies, thereby limiting the range of conclusions that can be drawn about intact living systems. METHODOLOGY: Given that non-destructive techniques like (1H Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging and spectroscopy have proven useful for in vivo investigations of a wide range of biological systems, we aimed at evaluating their potential to observe cold adaptations in living insect larvae. Specifically, we chose two cold-hardy insect species that frequently serve as cryobiological model systems--the freeze-avoiding gall moth Epiblema scudderiana and the freeze-tolerant gall fly Eurosta solidaginis. RESULTS: In vivo MR images were acquired from autumn-collected larvae at temperatures between 0 degrees C and about -70 degrees C and at spatial resolutions down to 27 microm. These images revealed three-dimensional (3D larval anatomy at a level of detail currently not in reach of other in vivo techniques. Furthermore, they allowed visualization of the 3D distribution of the remaining liquid water and of the endogenous cryoprotectants at subzero temperatures, and temperature-weighted images of these distributions could be derived. Finally, individual fat body cells and their nuclei could be identified in intact frozen Eurosta larvae. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that high resolution MR techniques provide for interesting methodological options in comparative cryobiological investigations, especially in vivo.

  17. Magnetic Coupling and Relaxation at Interfaces Measured by Ferromagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Force Microscopy

    Adur, Rohan

    The emergent field of spintronics, which utilizes the spin of the electron rather than the charge for information processing, relies on an understanding of interfaces and surfaces of ferromagnetic thin films. An interface between a ferromagnetic thin film and a neighboring material can be engineered to provide tuneable static and dynamic couplings, which manifest as effective fields on the ferromagnet. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is a powerful spectroscopic technique for studying these effective fields and couplings. In addition, FMR has been used to generate a pure spin current at these interfaces, which allows for the transfer of angular momentum without an accompanying charge current. The technique of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) has allowed the study of spin dynamics at the nanometer scale and with sensitivity down to single electron spins in paramagnetic materials and it would be illuminating to use this technique to study the spin transport behavior near an interface. MRFM uses the field from a magnetic probe to define a sensitive slice in which the resonance condition is met. The combination of MRFM techniques with FMR spectroscopy has, until recently, been limited to the measurement of global properties of a sample due to strong spin-spin exchange interactions that lead to collective spin wave modes that are defined by the sample and not sensitive to the probe field. Recently, the negative dipole field from a high coercivity probe magnet has been used to strongly perturb the spin wave spectrum of metallic ferromagnetic films, resulting in the localization of precessing magnetization in the 'field well' of the probe magnet into discrete modes, analogous to the discrete modes of a particle in a quantum well. The localized nature of these modes enables their use as a local probe of magnetic properties, and this has been utilized in the demonstration of FMR imaging of a ferromagnetic thin film using ferromagnetic resonance force microscopy

  18. Physiological effects of cigarette smoking in the limbic system revealed by 3 tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Mennecke, Angelika; Gossler, Andrea; Hammen, Thilo; Dörfler, Arnd; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Rösch, Julie; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Dölken, Marc; Thürauf, Norbert

    2014-10-01

    Several studies and recent models of effects of nicotine, the main addictive and psychoactive component in tobacco, point to action of the drug on the limbic system during maintenance of addiction, either direct or indirect via projections from the ventral tegmental area. The objective of this study was to demonstrate physiological effects of cigarette smoking on the hippocampus and the grey matter of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex in the human brain with regard to addiction and withdrawal. This aim was achieved by group comparisons of results of magnetic resonance spectroscopy between non-smokers, smokers and smokers during withdrawal. 12 smokers and 12 non-smokers were measured with single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy for total N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate and glutamine, choline-containing compounds, myo-inositol and total creatine in the right and the left hippocampus and in the right and the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Smokers were examined twice, first during regular cigarette smoking and second on the third day of nicotine withdrawal. The ratios to total creatine were used for better reliability. In our study, Glx/tCr was significantly increased and tCho/tCr was significantly decreased in the left cingulate cortex in smokers compared to non-smokers (p = 0.01, both). Six out of seven smokers showed normalization of the Glx/tCr in the left cingulate cortex during withdrawal. Although these results are preliminary due to the small sample size, our results confirm the assumption that cigarette smoking interferes directly or indirectly with the glutamate circuit in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:24643301

  19. Influence of high energy phosphate metabolism in postischemic myocardial dysfunction using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The recovery of left ventricular function after reperfusion is delayed in general by several hours, days or weeks and this phenomenon is known as myocardial stunning. One of the theories to explain the pathogenesis of this postischemic myocardial dysfunction is the production of not enough energy by mitochondria, leading to decreased adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) levels. We evaluated the influence of high energy phosphate metabolism in postischemic myocardial dysfunction, using magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction, successfully reperfused, within the first six hours from the onset of the symptoms. Twenty-nine patients were studied in the acute phase (on average four days after the onset of myocardial infarction) and 21 repeated the examination in the follow-up phase (average 39 days). Regional left ventricular function was evaluated by cine-resonance and high energy phosphate metabolism by phosphorus-31 spectroscopy, using the phosphocreatine β ATP (P Cr/βATP ratio. The existence of myocardial stunning was suggested by the improvement of the related regional contractility during the follow-up. The contractility improved in the septal wall from 2.46± 0.68 to 1.54 ± 0.78 (p<0.001), in the anteroseptal wall from 2.0 ± 0.89 to 1.40 ± 0.75 (p<0.001) and in the anterior wall from 2.37 ± 0.71 to 1.41 ± 0.59 (p<0.001). The P Cr/βATP ratio did not change from acute to follow-up phase (1.51 ± 0.17 vs. 1.53 ± 0.17; p = 0.6). This study suggests that decreased high energy phosphate metabolism after reperfusion does not have an important role in the genesis of the myocardial stunning in patients with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction. (author)

  20. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy detectable metabolomic fingerprint of response to antineoplastic treatment.

    Alessia Lodi

    Full Text Available Targeted therapeutic approaches are increasingly being implemented in the clinic, but early detection of response frequently presents a challenge as many new therapies lead to inhibition of tumor growth rather than tumor shrinkage. Development of novel non-invasive methods to monitor response to treatment is therefore needed. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging are non-invasive imaging methods that can be employed to monitor metabolism, and previous studies indicate that these methods can be useful for monitoring the metabolic consequences of treatment that are associated with early drug target modulation. However, single-metabolite biomarkers are often not specific to a particular therapy. Here we used an unbiased 1H MRS-based metabolomics approach to investigate the overall metabolic consequences of treatment with the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 and the heat shock protein 90 inhibitor 17AAG in prostate and breast cancer cell lines. LY294002 treatment resulted in decreased intracellular lactate, alanine fumarate, phosphocholine and glutathione. Following 17AAG treatment, decreased intracellular lactate, alanine, fumarate and glutamine were also observed but phosphocholine accumulated in every case. Furthermore, citrate, which is typically observed in normal prostate tissue but not in tumors, increased following 17AAG treatment in prostate cells. This approach is likely to provide further information about the complex interactions between signaling and metabolic pathways. It also highlights the potential of MRS-based metabolomics to identify metabolic signatures that can specifically inform on molecular drug action.

  1. Current and future applications of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the brain in hepatic encephalopathy

    VP Bob Grover; M Alex Dresner; Daniel M Forton; Serena Counsell; David J Larkman; Nayna Patel; Howard C Thomas; Simon D Taylor-Robinson

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease and results from hepatocellular failure and/or portosystemic shunting.The manifestations of HE are widely variable and involve a spectrum from mild subclinical disturbance to deep coma. Research interest has focused on the role of circulating gut-derived toxins, particularly ammonia, the development of brain swelling and changes in cerebral neurotransmitter systems that lead to global CNS depression and disordered function. Until recently the direct investigation of cerebral function has been difficult in man. However, new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide a non-invasive means of assessment of changes in brain volume (coregistered MRI) and impaired brain function (fMRI), while proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) detects changes in brain biochemistry, including direct measurement of cerebral osmolytes, such as myoinositol, glutamate and glutamine which govern processes intrinsic to cellular homeostasis, including the accumulation of intracellular water. The concentrations of these intracellular osmolytes alter with hyperammonaemia. MRS-detected metabolite abnormalities correlate with the severity of neuropsychiatric impairment and since MR spectra return towards normal after treatment, the technique may be of use in objective patient monitoring and in assessing the effectiveness of various treatment regimens.

  2. Resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical gallium arsenide nanowires studied using Raman spectroscopy

    Walia, Jaspreet; Boulanger, Jonathan; Dhindsa, Navneet; LaPierre, Ray; (Shirley Tang, Xiaowu; Saini, Simarjeet S.

    2016-06-01

    Gallium arsenide nanowires have shown considerable promise for use in applications in which the absorption of light is required. When the nanowires are oriented vertically, a considerable amount of light can be absorbed, leading to significant heating effects. Thus, it is important to understand the threshold power densities that vertical GaAs nanowires can support, and how the nanowire morphology is altered under these conditions. Here, resonant photo-thermal modification of vertical GaAs nanowires was studied using both Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques. Resonant waveguiding, and subsequent absorption of the excited optical mode reduces the irradiance vertical GaAs nanowires can support relative to horizontal ones, by three orders of magnitude before the onset of structural changes occur. A power density of only 20 W mm‑2 was sufficient to induce local heating in the nanowires, resulting in the formation of arsenic species. Upon further increasing the power, a hollow nanowire morphology was realized. These findings are pertinent to all optical applications and spectroscopic measurements involving vertically oriented GaAs nanowires. Understanding the optical absorption limitations, and the effects of exceeding these limitations will help improve the development of all III–V nanowire devices.

  3. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe3C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO3 using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe2O3 using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses

  4. Bayesian normal modes identification and estimation of elastic coefficients in resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Bernard, Simon; Marrelec, Guillaume; Laugier, Pascal; Grimal, Quentin

    2015-06-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy is an experimental technique for measuring the stiffness of anisotropic solid materials. The free vibration resonant frequencies of a specimen are measured and the stiffness coefficients of the material adjusted to minimize the difference between experimental and predicted frequencies. An issue of this inverse approach is that the measured frequencies are not easily paired with their predicted counterpart, leading to ambiguities in the definition of the objective function. In the past, this issue has been overcome through trial-and-error methods requiring the experimentalist to find the correct pairing, or through involved experimental methods measuring the shapes of the normal vibration modes in addition to their frequencies. The purpose of this work is to show, through a Bayesian formulation, that the inverse problem can be solved automatically and without requiring additions to the usual experimental setup. The pairing of measured and predicted frequencies is considered unknown, and the joint posterior probability distribution of pairing and stiffness is sampled using Markov chain Monte Carlo. The method is illustrated on two published data sets. The first set includes the exact pairing, allowing validation of the method. The second application deals with attenuative materials, for which many predicted modes cannot be observed, further complicating the inverse problem. In that case, introduction of prior information through Bayesian formulation reduces ambiguities.

  5. Correcting reaction rates measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Gabr, Refaat E.; Weiss, Robert G.; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2008-04-01

    Off-resonance or spillover irradiation and incomplete saturation can introduce significant errors in the estimates of chemical rate constants measured by saturation-transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Existing methods of correction are effective only over a limited parameter range. Here, a general approach of numerically solving the Bloch-McConnell equations to calculate exchange rates, relaxation times and concentrations for the saturation-transfer experiment is investigated, but found to require more measurements and higher signal-to-noise ratios than in vivo studies can practically afford. As an alternative, correction formulae for the reaction rate are provided which account for the expected parameter ranges and limited measurements available in vivo. The correction term is a quadratic function of experimental measurements. In computer simulations, the new formulae showed negligible bias and reduced the maximum error in the rate constants by about 3-fold compared to traditional formulae, and the error scatter by about 4-fold, over a wide range of parameters for conventional saturation transfer employing progressive saturation, and for the four-angle saturation-transfer method applied to the creatine kinase (CK) reaction in the human heart at 1.5 T. In normal in vivo spectra affected by spillover, the correction increases the mean calculated forward CK reaction rate by 6-16% over traditional and prior correction formulae.

  6. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the malignant prostate gland after radiotherapy: a histopathologic study of diagnostic validity

    Purpose: Accurate spatial representation of tumor clearance after conformal radiotherapy is an endpoint of clinical importance. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can diagnose malignancy in the untreated prostate gland through measurements of cellular metabolites. In this study we sought to describe spectral metabolic changes in prostatic tissue after radiotherapy and validate a multivariate analytic strategy (based on MRS) that could identify viable tumor. Methods and Materials: Transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies from 35 patients were obtained 18-36 months after external beam radiotherapy. One hundred sixteen tissue specimens were subjected to 1H MRS, submitted to histopathology, and analyzed for correlation with a multivariate strategy specifically developed for biomedical spectra. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of MRS in identifying a malignant biopsy were 88.9% and 92% respectively, with an overall classification accuracy of 91.4%. The diagnostic spectral regions identified by our algorithm included those due to choline, creatine, glutamine, and lipid. Citrate, an important discriminating resonance in the untreated prostate gland, was invisible in all spectra, regardless of histology. Conclusions: Although the spectral features of prostate tissue markedly change after radiotherapy, MRS combined with multivariate methods of analysis can accurately identify histologically malignant biopsies. MRS shows promise as a modality that could integrate three-dimensional measures of tumor response

  7. Spectroscopy. A new magnetic resonance technique for the diagnosis of epilepsy?

    The technique of magnetic resonance spectroscopy fuses spectroscopic methods with the two-dimensional illustration of the metabolite concentrations by parallel acquisition of multiple single voxels from small tissue compartments. Therefore it is not necessary to define a voxel of interest before data acquisition. The interpretation of metabolite images is much easier than the analysis of single spectra, and metabolite concentrations on the right and left sides can be compared. The method has already proved reliable for brain tumors. The application of the procedure to patients suffering from epilepsy is described here in for the firt time. Even in the temporal region, where most epileptogenic foci have their origin, one can obtain metabolite images of diagnostic quality without susceptibility artifacts. The epileptogenic focus is lateralized correctly, in accordance with electrophysical and surgical evaluation, even in those cases where standard magnetic resonance imaging is normal. According to our preliminary findings the epileptogenic focus is characterized by a signal loss of N-acetyl-aspartate and creatine. (orig.)

  8. Multiprocessing DSP imaging system and instrumentation design for magnetic resonance spectroscopy/imaging

    Bukhari, S. M. H.

    1998-09-01

    The architectural design of an image processing system and its instrumentation is elucidated here in this presentation, based upon the multiprocessing TMS320C82 DSP processors, working under a specially-defined MAEVRISC-DSP (Multidimensional Application-Embedded Vector RISC-DSP) architecture, that blends high-precision and high- performance (120 MFLOPS digital and 100 MSPS analog) data acquisition with efficient signal processing architecture design and prevalent Tagged MRI pulse sequence algorithms, specifically optimized for the medical imaging applications of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Imaging (MRI) tomography, while at the same time giving a low-cost alternative to extremely-expensive MRI systems. Alongside the system definition, the design of a new magneto-optical instrumentation is also presented, named SQUID and LPDA- based Field Equalization and Susceptibility Detection sensing, which works upon the recently-defined Tunneling Photon Resonance effect, mainly devised with non-ionizing human brain tumor diagnosis and localization in perspective, whose brief account is highlighted here.

  9. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    Kupenko, I., E-mail: kupenko@esrf.fr; Strohm, C. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L. [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Glazyrin, K. [Photon Science, DESY, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G. [Laboratory of Crystallography, Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Universität Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R. [ESRF-The European Synchrotron, CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  10. Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Spur, Eva-Margarete [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Decelle, Emily A.; Cheng, Leo L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized noninvasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth in patients with asymptomatic PCa newly diagnosed by biopsy. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, PCa metabolomics is mainly studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates has demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies has uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness noninvasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be applied not only to PCa, but also to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies and metabolic diseases. (orig.)

  11. Double resonance spectroscopy of different conformers of the neurotransmitter amphetamine and its clusters with water

    In this paper the conformational landscape of amphetamine in the neutral ground state is examined by both spectroscopy and theory. Several spectroscopic methods are used: laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (R2PI), dispersed fluorescence and IR/R2PI hole burning spectroscopy. The latter two methods provide for the first time vibrationally resolved spectra of the neutral ground state of dl-amphetamine and the amphetamine-(H2O)1,2 complexes. Nine stable conformers of the monomer were found by DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) and ab initio (MP2/6-311++G(d,p)) calculations. For conformer analysis the vibrations observed in the IR/R2PI hole burning and dispersed fluorescence spectra obtained from single vibronic levels (SVLF) of a selected conformer were compared with the results of an ab initio normal mode analysis. By this procedure three S0→ S1 transitions in the R2PI spectrum were assigned to three different conformer structures. Another weak transition earlier attributed to another conformer could be assigned to a vibronic band of one of the three conformers. Furthermore spectra of amphetamine-(H2O)1,2 are tentatively assigned

  12. The fate of free radicals in a cellulose based hydrogel: detection by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Basumallick, Lipika; Ji, J Andrea; Naber, Nariman; Wang, Y John

    2009-07-01

    Cellulose derivatives are commonly used as gelling agents in topical and ophthalmic drug formulations. During the course of manufacturing, cellulose derivatives are believed to generate free radicals. These free radicals may degrade the gelling agent, leading to lower viscosity. Free radicals also may react with the active ingredient in the product. The formation of radicals in a 3% hydrogel of hypromellose (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose) was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and spin trapping techniques. Radicals were trapped with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) and quantitated by comparing the EPR intensity with 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL), a stable free radical. Typically, the hydrogels showed an initial increase in the radical concentration within 2 days after autoclaving, followed by a drop in radical concentration in 7 days. EDTA prevented the formation of free radicals in the hypromellose (HPMC) hydrogel, suggesting the involvement of metal ions in the generation of free radicals. The oxidizing potential of the hydrogel was estimated by measuring the rate at which methionine (a model for the protein active pharmaceutical ingredient) was degraded, and was consistent with the amount of radicals present in the gel. This study is the first report investigating the application of EPR spectroscopy in detecting and estimating free radical concentration in cellulose based hydrogels. PMID:19090570

  13. Method and apparatus for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy using microstrip transmission line coils

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2006-04-04

    Apparatus and method for MRI imaging using a coil constructed of microstrip transmission line (MTL coil) are disclosed. In one method, a target is positioned to be imaged within the field of a main magnetic field of a magnet resonance imaging (MRI) system, a MTL coil is positioned proximate the target, and a MRI image is obtained using the main magnet and the MTL coil. In another embodiment, the MRI coil is used for spectroscopy. MRI imaging and spectroscopy coils are formed using microstrip transmission line. These MTL coils have the advantageous property of good performance while occupying a relatively small space, thus allowing MTL coils to be used inside restricted areas more easily than some other prior art coils. In addition, the MTL coils are relatively simple to construct of inexpensive components and thus relatively inexpensive compared to other designs. Further, the MTL coils of the present invention can be readily formed in a wide variety of coil configurations, and used in a wide variety of ways. Further, while the MTL coils of the present invention work well at high field strengths and frequencies, they also work at low frequencies and in low field strengths as well.

  14. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. II. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Bock, D.; Kahlau, R.; Pötzschner, B.; Körber, T.; Wagner, E.; Rössler, E. A., E-mail: ernst.roessler@uni-bayreuth.de [Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-03-07

    Various {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene-d{sub 3} (PS) over the full concentration range. The results are quantitatively compared to those of a dielectric spectroscopy (DS) study on the same system previously published [R. Kahlau, D. Bock, B. Schmidtke, and E. A. Rössler, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044509 (2014)]. While the PS dynamics does not significantly change in the mixtures compared to that of neat PS, two fractions of TPP molecules are identified, one joining the glass transition of PS in the mixture (α{sub 1}-process), the second reorienting isotropically (α{sub 2}-process) even in the rigid matrix of PS, although at low concentration resembling a secondary process regarding its manifestation in the DS spectra. Pronounced dynamical heterogeneities are found for the TPP α{sub 2}-process, showing up in extremely stretched, quasi-logarithmic stimulated echo decays. While the time window of NMR is insufficient for recording the full correlation functions, DS results, covering a larger dynamical range, provide a satisfactory interpolation of the NMR data. Two-dimensional {sup 31}P NMR spectra prove exchange within the broadly distributed α{sub 2}-process. As demonstrated by {sup 2}H NMR, the PS matrix reflects the faster α{sub 2}-process of TPP by performing a spatially highly hindered motion on the same timescale.

  15. A nested phosphorus and proton coil array for brain magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

    Brown, Ryan; Lakshmanan, Karthik; Madelin, Guillaume; Parasoglou, Prodromos

    2016-01-01

    A dual-nuclei radiofrequency coil array was constructed for phosphorus and proton magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the human brain at 7T. An eight-channel transceive degenerate birdcage phosphorus module was implemented to provide whole-brain coverage and significant sensitivity improvement over a standard dual-tuned loop coil. A nested eight-channel proton module provided adequate sensitivity for anatomical localization without substantially sacrificing performance on the phosphorus module. The developed array enabled phosphorus spectroscopy, a saturation transfer technique to calculate the global creatine kinase forward reaction rate, and single-metabolite whole-brain imaging with 1.4cm nominal isotropic resolution in 15min (2.3cm actual resolution), while additionally enabling 1mm isotropic proton imaging. This study demonstrates that a multi-channel array can be utilized for phosphorus and proton applications with improved coverage and/or sensitivity over traditional single-channel coils. The efficient multi-channel coil array, time-efficient pulse sequences, and the enhanced signal strength available at ultra-high fields can be combined to allow volumetric assessment of the brain and could provide new insights into the underlying energy metabolism impairment in several neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as mental disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:26375209

  16. Accelerated 2D magnetic resonance spectroscopy of single spins using matrix completion

    Scheuer, Jochen; Stark, Alexander; Kost, Matthias; Plenio, Martin B.; Naydenov, Boris; Jelezko, Fedor

    2015-12-01

    Two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the major tools for analysing the chemical structure of organic molecules and proteins. Despite its power, this technique requires long measurement times, which, particularly in the recently emerging diamond based single molecule NMR, limits its application to stable samples. Here we demonstrate a method which allows to obtain the spectrum by collecting only a small fraction of the experimental data. Our method is based on matrix completion which can recover the full spectral information from randomly sampled data points. We confirm experimentally the applicability of this technique by performing two dimensional electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) experiments on a two spin system consisting of a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond coupled to a single 13C nuclear spin. The signal to noise ratio of the recovered 2D spectrum is compared to the Fourier transform of randomly subsampled data, where we observe a strong suppression of the noise when the matrix completion algorithm is applied. We show that the peaks in the spectrum can be obtained with only 10% of the total number of the data points. We believe that our results reported here can find an application in all types of two dimensional spectroscopy, as long as the measured matrices have a low rank.

  17. Distinguishing Unfolding and Functional Conformational Transitions of Calmodulin Using Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    Jones, Eric M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Squier, Thomas C.; Spiro, Thomas

    2014-06-14

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous moderator protein for calcium signaling in all eukaryotic cells. This small calcium-binding protein exhibits a broad range of structural transitions, including domain opening and folding-unfolding, that allow it to recognize a wide variety of binding partners in vivo. While the static structures of CaM associated with its various binding activities are fairly well known, it has been challenging to examine the dynamics of transition between these structures in real-time, due to a lack of suitable spectroscopic probes of CaM structure. In this paper, we examine the potential of ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy for clarifying the nature of structural transitions in CaM. We find that the UVRR spectral change (with 229 nm excitation) due to thermal unfolding of CaM is qualitatively different from that associated with opening of the C-terminal domain in response to Ca2+ binding. This spectral difference is entirely due to differences in teritary contacts at the inter-domain tyrosine residue Tyr138, toward which other spectroscopic methods are not sensitive. We conclude that UVRR is ideally suited to identifying the different types of structural transitions in CaM and other proteins with conformation-sensitive tyrosine residues, opening a path to time-resolved studies of CaM dynamics using Raman spectroscopy.

  18. Cross-section scanning tunneling spectroscopy on a resonant-tunneling diode structure

    Teichmann, Karen; Wenderoth, Martin; Burbach, Sergej; Ulbrich, Rainer G. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Pierz, Klaus; Schumacher, Hans W. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We investigated a resonant-tunneling diode structure by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy. The diode structure was grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on a n{sup +}-doped GaAs (100) substrate and consists of self-assembled InAs quantum dots embedded in AlAs barriers (both 4 nm) each followed by undoped GaAs prelayers (15 nm). We use a low temperature STM working under UHV conditions at 5 K. The samples are cleaved in UHV to obtain a clean and atomically flat surface perpendicular to the diode-structure. Atomically resolved constant current topography images taken simultaneously at different bias voltages, (both positive and negative voltage) show the high quality of the heterostructure. Local I(V)-spectroscopy resolves the band edge alignment across the heterostructure. On negative bias voltage several peaks in the differential conductivity are observed. The voltage position of these peaks varies with distance from the interface. We attribute the origin of the enhanced differential conductivity peak to an interaction between the potential induced by the tip and the quantum dot layer.

  19. Source attribution of water-soluble organic aerosol by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Decesari, Stefano; Mircea, Mihaiela; Cavalli, Fabrizia; Fuzzi, Sandro; Moretti, Fabio; Tagliavini, Emilio; Facchini, Maria Cristina

    2007-04-01

    The functional group compositions of atmospheric aerosol water-soluble organic compoundswere obtained employing proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy in a series of recent experiments in several areas of the world characterized by different aerosol sources and pollution levels. Here, we discuss the possibility of using 1H NMR functional group distributions to identifythe sources of aerosol in the different areas. Despite the limited variability of functional group compositions of atmospheric aerosol samples, characteristic 1H NMR fingerprints were derived for three major aerosol sources: biomass burning, secondary formation from anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs, and emission from the ocean. The functional group patterns obtained in areas characterized by one of the above dominant source processes were then compared to identify the dominant sources for samples coming from mixed sources. This analysis shows that H NMR spectroscopy can profitably be used as a valuable tool for aerosol source identification. In addition, compared to other existing methodologies, it is able to relate the source fingerprints to integral chemical properties of the organic mixtures, which determine their reactivity and their physicochemical properties and ultimately the fate of the organic particles in the atmosphere. PMID:17438803

  20. A feasibility study on determination of hydrogen concentration in zirconium alloy by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) is used to determine the elastic stiffness for various shapes of samples, i.e. spherical, cylindrical, or rectangular parallelepiped. Theoretically a maximum of 21 tensor elements of elastic stiffness for a triclinic crystal (the lowest-symmetry crystal) can be determined with one specimen. However, for such a low-symmetry crystal, it is difficult to assimilate properties relating to stress waves and elasticity. Practically, RUS can determine 9 tensor elements for orthorhombic symmetry as well as higher-symmetry, such as isotropic, cubic, hexagonal, and tetragonal symmetry. One of the key elements in RUS is to determine the symmetry and the initial estimate of elastic stiffness in advance. The initial estimate should be close to the true value and can be obtained from the literature, experience, other measurements, etc. The test sample should be machined accurately. The calculated resonance frequencies and modes should be matched to the measured values by RUS and the elastic stiffness can be converged by comparison and iteration. The Zr-2.5Nb alloy for the pressure tubes in CANDU (CANadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors have developed a strong texture due to the limited slip system during the extrusion process, leading to anisotropic properties. The material properties strongly depend on the orientation distributions of grains, which result in a directional anisotropy of elastic stiffness, thermal expansion coefficients, etc. To characterize the degree of anisotropy, it is necessary to correctly determine the anisotropic elastic moduli depending on the direction of the tube samples. The anisotropic elastic constant of the Zr-2.5Nb alloy was determined using initial approximated elastic stiffness which had been estimated by the orientation distribution function (ODF) from x-ray pole figure data and the elastic stiffness of single crystal zirconium. In this paper, the temperature dependence of mechanical damping and resonance

  1. Single voxel 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal mass lesions

    Shalini Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS is an established technique for evaluation of malignant tumors in brain, breast, prostate, etc., However, its efficacy in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal (MSK mass lesions is yet to be established. We present our experience with MRS of these lesions. Materials and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI and single-voxel 1 H MRS was performed in 30 consecutive patients with histologically proven benign and malignant MSK tumors/mass lesions each, on a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner. MRS was performed with echo times (TE of 40, 135 and 270 ms. A clearly identifiable peak at 3.2 ppm in at least two of the three spectra acquired at the three TE was taken as positive for choline. MRS imaging and enhancement patterns were compared in these two groups and were analyzed by a Radiologist blinded to the histopathological findings. Results: Ages of patients in the malignant age group ranged from 2 to 65 years (M: F - 19:11 while that of patients in the benign group ranged from 7 months to 56 years (M: F - 17:13. There were two patients with Type I curve, 18 with Type II curve and 10 with Type III curve on dynamic contrast enhanced images in the malignant group while there were no patients with Type I curve, 5 with Type II curve and 25 with Type III curve in the benign group. The sensitivity of MRS for predicting malignancy was 60%, specificity was 93.33%, positive predictive value was 90%, negative predictive value was 70% and accuracy was 76.66%. Conclusion: MRS is a promising technique for evaluation of MSK mass lesions. The accuracy at present remains low. We recommend that it be used as an adjunct to routine MRI.

  2. Analysis of the brain proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy - differences between normal grey and white matter

    Background: The proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HMRS) is a non-invasive diagnostic method that allows for an assessment of the metabolite concentration in tissues. The sources of the strongest resonance signals within the brain are N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), choline (Cho), myoinositol (mI) and water. The aim of our study was to analyse the ratios of metabolite signals within the brain in HMRS in the healthy population, to define the differences between the grey and white matter spectra. Material/Methods: We studied prospectively 90 subjects aged from 8 to 80 years (mean 43.3 years, SD=17.9), without neurological symptoms or abnormalities in magnetic resonance imaging. In all patients, brain HMRS with Signa HDx 1.5 T MR unit (GE Healthcare) was performed with PRESS sequence, using a single voxel method, at TE of 35 ms and TR of 1500 ms. Spectroscopic evaluation involved voxels placed in the white matter of parietal lobe (PWM) and the grey matter of posterior cingulate gyrus (PGM). On the basis of the intensity of NAA, Cr, Cho, mI and water signals, the proportions of these signals were calculated, as well as the ratio of the analyzed metabolite signal to the sum of signals of NAA, Cho, Cr and mI (%Met) in the PGM and PWM voxels. We compared the proportions in the same patients in PGM and PWM voxels. Results: There has been a statistically significant difference between the proportions of a majority of the metabolite ratios evaluated in PGM and PWM, indicating the higher concentration of NAA, Cr and mI in grey matter, and higher concentration of Cho in white matter. Conclusions: HMRS spectra of the brain grey and white matter differ significantly. The concentrations of NAA, Cr and mI are higher in grey matter, while of choline - in the white matter. (authors)

  3. Resonant inelastic scattering in dilute magnetic semiconductors by x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Jia, J.J.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    As modern, technologically important materials have become more complex, element specific techniques have become invaluable in studying the electronic structure of individual components from the system. Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) and absorption (SXA) spectroscopies provide a unique means of measuring element and angular momentum density of electron states, respectively, for the valence and conducting bands in complex materials. X-ray absorption and the decay through x-ray emission are generally assumed to be two independent one-photon processes. Recent studies, however have demonstrated that SXF excited near the absorption threshold generate an array of spectral features that depend on nature of materials, particularly on the localization of excited states in s and d-band solids and that these two processes can no be longer treated as independent. Resonant SXF offers thus the new way to study the dynamics of the distribution of electronic valence states in the presence of a hole which is bound to the electron low lying in the conduction band. This process can simulate the interaction between hole-electron pair in wide gap semiconductors. Therefore such studies can help in understanding of transport and optics phenomena in the wide gap semiconductors. The authors report the result of Mn and S L-resonant emission in Zn{sub 1{minus}x}Mn{sub x}S (with x=0.2 and 0.3) and MnS as the energy of exciting radiation is tuned across the Mn and S L{sub 3,2} absorption edge, along with the resonant excited spectra from elemental Mn as a reference.

  4. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  5. Application of resonance Raman spectroscopy as a nuclear proliferation detection technology

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Chen, C.L.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1993-03-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) potentially possesses many of the characteristics of an ideal verification technology. Some of these ideal traits are: very high selectivity and specificity to allow the deconvolution of a mixture of the chemicals of interest, high sensitivity in order to measure a species at trace levels, high reliability and long-term durability, applicability to a wide range of chemicals capability for sensing in a variety of environmental conditions, independence of the physical state of the chemical capability for quantitative analysis, and finally, but no less important capability for full signal development within seconds. In this presentation, the potential of RRS as a detection/identification technology for chemicals pertinent to nuclear materials production and processing will be assessed. A review of the basic principles behind this technique, both theoretical and experimental, will be discussed along with some recent results obtained in this laboratory. Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon scattering process where an exciting photon of energy hv promotes a molecule to a virtual level and the subsequently emitted photon is shifted in frequency in accordance with the rotational-vibrational structure of the irradiated species, therefore providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. The enhancement of a Raman signal occurs when the excitation frequency is isoenergetic with an allowed electronic transition. Under resonance conditions, scattering cross-sections have been enhanced up to 6 orders of magnitude, thereby allowing the measurement of resonance Raman spectra from concentrations as dilute as 20 ppb for PAHs (with the potential of pptr). In detection/verification programs, this condition translates to increased sensitivity (ppm/ppb) and increased probing distance (m/km).

  6. Cell and membrane lipid analysis by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in five breast cancer cell lines.

    Le Moyec, L; Tatoud, R; Eugène, M; Gauvillé, C; Primot, I; Charlemagne, D; Calvo, F

    1992-10-01

    The lipid composition of five human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, ZR-75-1, SKBR3 and MDA-MB231) was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in whole cells and membrane-enriched fractions. The proportions of the three main lipid resonances in 1D spectra were different for each cell line. These resonances included mobile methyl and methylene functions from fatty acids of triglycerides and phospholipids and N-trimethyl from choline of phospholipids. T47D and ZR-75-1 cells presented a high methylene/methyl ratio (6.02 +/- 0.35 and 6.28 +/- 0.90). This ratio was significantly lower for SKBR3, MCF-7 and MDA-MB231 cells (2.76 +/- 0.22, 2.27 +/- 0.57 and 1.39 +/- 0.39). The N-trimethyl/methyl ratio was high for MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cells (1.38 +/- 0.54 and 0.86 +/- 0.32), but lower for MCF-7, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells (0.49 +/- 0.11, 0.16 +/- 0.07 and 0.07 +/- 0.03). 2D COSY spectra confirmed these different proportions in mobile lipids. From 1D spectra obtained on membrane preparations, T47D and ZR-75-1 were the only cell lines to retain a signal from mobile methylene functions. These differences might be related to the heterogeneity found for several parameters of these cells (tumorigenicity, growth rate, hormone receptors); an extended number of cases from fresh samples might enable clinical correlations. PMID:1329906

  7. In vivo imaging of a stable paramagnetic probe by pulsed-radiofrequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Murugesan, R; Cook, J A; Devasahayam, N; Afeworki, M; Subramanian, S; Tschudin, R; Larsen, J A; Mitchell, J B; Russo, A; Krishna, M C

    1997-09-01

    Imaging of free radicals by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using time domain acquisition as in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has not been attempted because of the short spin-spin relaxation times, typically under 1 microsecond, of most biologically relevant paramagnetic species. Recent advances in radiofrequency (RF) electronics have enabled the generation of pulses of the order of 10-50 ns. Such short pulses provide adequate spectral coverage for EPR studies at 300 MHz resonant frequency. Acquisition of free induction decays (FID) of paramagnetic species possessing inhomogenously broadened narrow lines after pulsed excitation is feasible with an appropriate digitizer/averager. This report describes the use of time-domain RF EPR spectrometry and imaging for in vivo applications. FID responses were collected from a water-soluble, narrow line width spin probe within phantom samples in solution and also when infused intravenously in an anesthetized mouse. Using static magnetic field gradients and back-projection methods of image reconstruction, two-dimensional images of the spin-probe distribution were obtained in phantom samples as well as in a mouse. The resolution in the images was better than 0.7 mm and devoid of motional artifacts in the in vivo study. Results from this study suggest a potential use for pulsed RF EPR imaging (EPRI) for three-dimensional spatial and spectral-spatial imaging applications. In particular, pulsed EPRI may find use in vivo studies to minimize motional artifacts from cardiac and lung motion that cause significant problems in frequency-domain spectral acquisition, such as in continuous wave (cw) EPR techniques. PMID:9339442

  8. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. I. A dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Kahlau, R.; Bock, D.; Schmidtke, B.; Rössler, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Dielectric spectroscopy as well as 2H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene (PS/PS-d3) in the full concentration (cTPP) range. In addition, depolarized light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments are performed. Two glass transition temperatures are found: Tg1(cTPP) reflects PS dynamics and shows a monotonic plasticizer effect, while the lower Tg2(cTPP) exhibits a maximum and is attributed to (faster) TPP dynamics, occurring in a slowly moving or immobilized PS matrix. Dielectric spectroscopy probing solely TPP identifies two different time scales, which are attributed to two sub-ensembles. One of them, again, shows fast TPP dynamics (α2-process), the other (α1-process) displays time constants identical with those of the slow PS matrix. Upon heating the α1-fraction of TPP decreases until above some temperature Tc only a single α2-population exists. Inversely, below Tc a fraction of the TPP molecules is trapped by the PS matrix. At low cTPP the α2-relaxation does not follow frequency-temperature superposition (FTS), instead it is governed by a temperature independent distribution of activation energies leading to correlation times which follow Arrhenius laws, i.e., the α2-relaxation resembles a secondary process. Yet, 31P NMR demonstrates that it involves isotropic reorientations of TPP molecules within a slowly moving or rigid matrix of PS. At high cTPP the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ2(T), as well as FTS are recovered, known as typical of the glass transition in neat systems.

  9. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. I. A dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Kahlau, R.; Bock, D.; Schmidtke, B.; Rössler, E. A., E-mail: ernst.roessler@uni-bayreuth.de [Experimentalphysik II, Universität Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-01-28

    Dielectric spectroscopy as well as {sup 2}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene (PS/PS-d{sub 3}) in the full concentration (c{sub TPP}) range. In addition, depolarized light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments are performed. Two glass transition temperatures are found: T{sub g1}(c{sub TPP}) reflects PS dynamics and shows a monotonic plasticizer effect, while the lower T{sub g2}(c{sub TPP}) exhibits a maximum and is attributed to (faster) TPP dynamics, occurring in a slowly moving or immobilized PS matrix. Dielectric spectroscopy probing solely TPP identifies two different time scales, which are attributed to two sub-ensembles. One of them, again, shows fast TPP dynamics (α{sub 2}-process), the other (α{sub 1}-process) displays time constants identical with those of the slow PS matrix. Upon heating the α{sub 1}-fraction of TPP decreases until above some temperature T{sub c} only a single α{sub 2}-population exists. Inversely, below T{sub c} a fraction of the TPP molecules is trapped by the PS matrix. At low c{sub TPP} the α{sub 2}-relaxation does not follow frequency-temperature superposition (FTS), instead it is governed by a temperature independent distribution of activation energies leading to correlation times which follow Arrhenius laws, i.e., the α{sub 2}-relaxation resembles a secondary process. Yet, {sup 31}P NMR demonstrates that it involves isotropic reorientations of TPP molecules within a slowly moving or rigid matrix of PS. At high c{sub TPP} the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ{sub 2}(T), as well as FTS are recovered, known as typical of the glass transition in neat systems.

  10. Dynamics of asymmetric binary glass formers. I. A dielectric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Dielectric spectroscopy as well as 2H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are applied to probe the component dynamics of the binary glass former tripropyl phosphate (TPP)/polystyrene (PS/PS-d3) in the full concentration (cTPP) range. In addition, depolarized light scattering and differential scanning calorimetry experiments are performed. Two glass transition temperatures are found: Tg1(cTPP) reflects PS dynamics and shows a monotonic plasticizer effect, while the lower Tg2(cTPP) exhibits a maximum and is attributed to (faster) TPP dynamics, occurring in a slowly moving or immobilized PS matrix. Dielectric spectroscopy probing solely TPP identifies two different time scales, which are attributed to two sub-ensembles. One of them, again, shows fast TPP dynamics (α2-process), the other (α1-process) displays time constants identical with those of the slow PS matrix. Upon heating the α1-fraction of TPP decreases until above some temperature Tc only a single α2-population exists. Inversely, below Tc a fraction of the TPP molecules is trapped by the PS matrix. At low cTPP the α2-relaxation does not follow frequency-temperature superposition (FTS), instead it is governed by a temperature independent distribution of activation energies leading to correlation times which follow Arrhenius laws, i.e., the α2-relaxation resembles a secondary process. Yet, 31P NMR demonstrates that it involves isotropic reorientations of TPP molecules within a slowly moving or rigid matrix of PS. At high cTPP the super-Arrhenius temperature dependence of τ2(T), as well as FTS are recovered, known as typical of the glass transition in neat systems

  11. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  12. From raw data to data-analysis for magnetic resonance spectroscopy – the missing link: jMRUI2XML

    Mocioiu, V.; Ortega-Martorell, S.; Olier, I.; Jablonski, Michal; Starčuková, Jana; Lisboa, P.; Arús, C.; Julia-Sapé, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, NOV 9 (2015), s. 378-388. ISSN 1471-2105 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : magnetic resonance spectroscopy * pattern recognition * signal processing, * software development Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 2.576, year: 2014

  13. Cerebellar Volume and Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at Term, and Neurodevelopment at 2 Years of Age in Preterm Infants

    van Kooij, Britt J. M.; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Anbeek, Petronella; van Haastert, Ingrid C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Groenendaal, Floris

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the relation between cerebellar volume and spectroscopy at term equivalent age, and neurodevelopment at 24 months corrected age in preterm infants. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed around term equivalent age in 112 preterm infants (mean gestational age 28wks 3d [SD 1wk 5d]; birthweight 1129g [SD 324g]).…

  14. Determination of All 21 Independent Elastic Coefficients of Generally Anisotropic Solids by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy: Benchmark Examples

    Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Zídek, Jan; Janovská, Michaela; Landa, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2014), s. 1073-1085. ISSN 0014-4851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13616S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : elastic anisotropy * triclinic material * resonant ultrasound spectroscopy * inverse procedure Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.548, year: 2014

  15. Use of spin labels to study membrane proteins by high-frequency electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy

    Orlinkskii, S.B.; Borovykh, I.V.; Zielke, V.; Steinhoff, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The applicability of spin labels to study membrane proteins by high-frequency electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy is demonstrated. With the use of bacteriorhodopsin embedded in a lipid membrane as an example, the spectra of protons of neighboring amino acids are recorded, electric field g

  16. Linearized forward and inverse problems of the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for the evaluation of thin surface layers

    Růžek, M.; Sedlák, Petr; Seiner, Hanuš; Kruisová, Alena; Landa, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 128, č. 6 (2010), s. 3426-3437. ISSN 0001-4966 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) * in-plane elasticity * DLC layers Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.644, year: 2010

  17. A tuneable doubly stacked dielectric resonator housed in an intact TE 102 cavity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Mattar, Saba M.; Emwas, Abdul H.

    2003-01-01

    An EPR resonator is constructed by inserting a pair of dielectric ceramic rings in an unmodified rectangular TE 102 cavity. It is tuneable over the range of 8.0-10.0 GHz. Therefore, existing EPR cavities can be easily converted to resonators with superior signal-to-noise ratios that are at least 24 times larger than the original ones in this extended frequency range. The resonator's performance is tested using DPPH, TEMPONE, MnO and Cu 2+ complexes and displays excellent resolution and sensitivity. Thus EPR spectra of small paramagnetic organic and inorganic samples and spin labeled biomolecules may be obtained without resorting to loop gap resonators.

  18. Electronic structure of Mo1-x Re x alloys studied through resonant photoemission spectroscopy.

    Sundar, Shyam; Banik, Soma; Sharath Chandra, L S; Chattopadhyay, M K; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G S; Pandey, Sudhir K; Phase, D M; Roy, S B

    2016-08-10

    We studied the electronic structure of Mo-rich Mo1-x Re x alloys ([Formula: see text]) using valence band photoemission spectroscopy in the photon energy range 23-70 eV and density of states calculations. Comparison of the photoemission spectra with the density of states calculations suggests that, with respect to the Fermi level E F, the d states lie mostly in the binding energy range 0 to  -6 eV, whereas s states lie in the binding energy range  -4 to  -10 eV. We observed two resonances in the photoemission spectra of each sample, one at about 35 eV photon energy and the other at about 45 eV photon energy. Our analysis suggests that the resonance at 35 eV photon energy is related to the Mo 4p-5s transition and the resonance at 45 eV photon energy is related to the contribution from both the Mo 4p-4d transition (threshold: 42 eV) and the Re 5p-5d transition (threshold: 46 eV). In the constant initial state plot, the resonance at 35 eV incident photon energy for binding energy features in the range E F (BE  =  0) to  -5 eV becomes progressively less prominent with increasing Re concentration x and vanishes for x  >  0.2. The difference plots obtained by subtracting the valence band photoemission spectrum of Mo from that of Mo1-x Re x alloys, measured at 47 eV photon energy, reveal that the Re d-like states appear near E F when Re is alloyed with Mo. These results indicate that interband s-d interaction, which is weak in Mo, increases with increasing x and influences the nature of the superconductivity in alloys with higher x. PMID:27301550

  19. Electronic structure of Mo1‑x Re x alloys studied through resonant photoemission spectroscopy

    Sundar, Shyam; Banik, Soma; Sharath Chandra, L. S.; Chattopadhyay, M. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Pandey, Sudhir K.; Phase, D. M.; Roy, S. B.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the electronic structure of Mo-rich Mo1‑x Re x alloys (0≤slant x≤slant 0.4 ) using valence band photoemission spectroscopy in the photon energy range 23–70 eV and density of states calculations. Comparison of the photoemission spectra with the density of states calculations suggests that, with respect to the Fermi level E F, the d states lie mostly in the binding energy range 0 to  ‑6 eV, whereas s states lie in the binding energy range  ‑4 to  ‑10 eV. We observed two resonances in the photoemission spectra of each sample, one at about 35 eV photon energy and the other at about 45 eV photon energy. Our analysis suggests that the resonance at 35 eV photon energy is related to the Mo 4p–5s transition and the resonance at 45 eV photon energy is related to the contribution from both the Mo 4p–4d transition (threshold: 42 eV) and the Re 5p–5d transition (threshold: 46 eV). In the constant initial state plot, the resonance at 35 eV incident photon energy for binding energy features in the range E F (BE  =  0) to  ‑5 eV becomes progressively less prominent with increasing Re concentration x and vanishes for x  >  0.2. The difference plots obtained by subtracting the valence band photoemission spectrum of Mo from that of Mo1‑x Re x alloys, measured at 47 eV photon energy, reveal that the Re d-like states appear near E F when Re is alloyed with Mo. These results indicate that interband s–d interaction, which is weak in Mo, increases with increasing x and influences the nature of the superconductivity in alloys with higher x.

  20. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia. Possibilities and limitations; Magnetresonanzspektroskopie bei Schizophrenie. Moeglichkeiten und Grenzen

    Wobrock, T. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie; Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Scherk, H.; Falkai, P. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie

    2005-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a noninvasive investigative technique for in vivo detection of biochemical changes in neuropsychiatric disorders for which especially proton ({sup 1}H-MRS) and phosphorus ({sup 31}P-MRS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used. In this review we explain the principles of MRS and summarize the studies in schizophrenia. A systematic literature review was carried out for {sup 1}H-MRS studies investigating schizophrenic patients compared to controls. The inconsistent results in the cited studies may be due to different study population, specific neuroimaging technique, and selected brain regions. Frequent findings are decreased PME and increased PDE concentrations ({sup 31}P-MRS) linked to altered metabolism of membrane phospholipids and decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) or NAA/choline ratio ({sup 1}H-MRS) linked to neuronal damage in frontal (DLPFC) or temporal regions in patients with schizophrenia. These results contribute to the disturbed frontotemporal-thalamic network assumed in schizophrenia and are supported by additional functional neuroimaging, MRI morphometry, and neuropsychological evaluation. The combination of the described investigative techniques with MRS in follow-up studies may provide more specific clues for understanding the pathogenesis and disease course in schizophrenia. (orig.) [German] Die Magnetresonanzspektroskopie (MRS) stellt ein nichtinvasives Verfahren dar, mit dem in vivo biochemische Veraenderungen spezifischer Hirnregionen bei verschiedenen psychiatrischen Erkrankungen untersucht werden koennen. Dabei werden insbesondere die Protonenmagnetresonanzspektroskopie ({sup 1}H-MRS) sowie die Phosphormagnetresonanzspektroskopie ({sup 31}P-MRS) verwendet. In der vorliegenden Uebersichtsarbeit werden die methodischen Grundlagen erlaeutert sowie die Befundlage bei der Schizophrenie referiert. Fuer die Darstellung der Studien zur {sup 1}H-MRS bei schizophrenen Patienten im Vergleich zu einer Kontrollgruppe

  1. Diffusion-weighted imaging and magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy following preterm birth

    Aim: To study the associations between magnetic resonance proton spectroscopy (MRS) data and apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) from the preterm brain with developmental outcome at 18 months corrected age and clinical variables. Materials and methods: A prospective observational cohort study of 67 infants born before 35 weeks gestational age who received both magnetic resonance imaging of the brain between 37 and 44 weeks corrected gestational age and developmental assessment around 18 months corrected age. Results: No relationships were found between ADC values and MRS results or outcome. MRS ratios involving N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) from the posterior white matter were associated with ''severe'' and ''moderate to severe'' difficulties, and fine motor scores were significantly lower in participants with a visible lactate doublet in the posterior white matter. The presence of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) was the only clinical factor related to NAA ratios. Conclusion: Altered NAA levels in the posterior white matter may reflect subtle white matter injury associated with neuro-developmental difficulties, which may be related to a PDA. Further work is needed to assess the longer-term neuro-developmental implications of these findings, and to study the effect of PDAs on developmental outcome in later childhood/adolescence. - Highlights: • ADC values around term corrected age from a wide area of the brain are not associated with developmental outcome. • NAA ratios from the posterior white matter are associated with adverse outcome. • No relationship between MRS data and ADC values exist when measured from the same region of the cerebral white matter. • The presence of a patent ductus arterious was associated with NAA ratios from the posterior white matter, but not outcome

  2. The contribution of the Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in the brain lesions

    Introduction: The Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a non-invasive technique which allows study of the metabolism of lesions or of normal tissue, increasing the method's specificity. In this way, the biochemical information provided by MRS is added to the morphologic information provided by the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Even though the gold standards to determine the definite diagnosis of a brain lesion is still the biopsy, the MRS is a non-invasive method, free of complications which would help determine the type of lesion and avoid unnecessary biopsies in non-tumor processes. The objective of this work is to determine if the monovoxel MRS hydrogen proton (H+) long Eco Time (TE) is capable to differentiating or not the nature of the tumor from the brain lesions and classify them into levels of malignity. Material and Method: This is a retrospective study in which female and male patients of any ages were selected. A standard study of MRI was performed in them and it was completed with monovoxel ERM. Results: 47 lesions were analyzed and 43 (92.9%) were adequately characterized, with a sensibility (S) of 96.8% (IC 89-100), specificity (E) of 89.6% (IC 76-100), positive predictive value (PPV) of 91.1% (IC 80-100) and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 96.3% (IC 87-100). There are many variables that can influence the acquisition of a spectrum capable of being analyzed and from them, inter-observer differences can emerge. However, our results were similar to those in other publications. Conclusion: The MRS together with the MRI proved to be a reliable method to determine whether a brain lesion is a tumor or not, with acceptable statistic values. (authors)

  3. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of metastatic brain tumors. Variations of metabolic profile

    Spectroscopic imaging can be helpful for the noninvasive identification of parenchymal brain tumors. The objective of the present study was the characterization of the metabolic profile of intracranial metastases, based on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). One hundred and four metastatic brain tumors were evaluated by long-echo (TR, 2000 ms; TE, 136 ms) single-voxel volume-selected proton MRS. In 83 patients the tumor fraction within the MRS voxel constituted more than 50%. Compared to normal brain, the tumors showed statistically significant decreases of N-acetylaspartate (P<0.0001), creatine (P<0.0001), and the [NAA]/choline-containing compounds ratio (P<0.0001), increases of [Cho] (P<0.0001) and the mobile lipids/[Cr] ratio (P<0.0001) and the lactate/[Cr] ratio (P<0.05), and the more frequent presence of [Lip] (P<0.0001) and [Lac] (P<0.0001) resonances. However, the majority of these differences were lost when data for patients whose tumor fraction within the MRS voxel constituted less than 50% were analyzed separately. Determination of the predominant metabolite peak on the MR spectrum [NAA, Cho, Lip] permitted us to define three general metabolic patterns of brain metastases, which, showed statistically significant associations with the size of the neoplasm (P<0.001), type of its contrast enhancement (P<0.01), and the extent of perilesional edema (P<0.05). Proton MRS can define metabolically different subsets of metastatic brain tumors, and these characteristics should be taken into consideration during the differential diagnosis of parenchymal brain lesions. (author)

  4. Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Compared with Stereotactic Biopsy of Intra-axial Brain Lesions.

    Abdelaziz, Osama; Eshra, Mohamed; Belal, Ahmed; Elshafei, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Background Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is usually added to conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to refine the diagnosis of different brain lesions. Stereotactic brain biopsy is a well-established method to obtain tissues for histopathologic examination. The purpose of the study is to compare the diagnostic yields of MRS and stereotactic biopsy in the characterization of brain lesions. Material and Methods A prospective study conducted on 27 consecutive patients presenting with multifocal, diffuse, as well as deeply seated intra-axial brain lesions. All patients had both brain MRI and MRS prior to stereotactic biopsy. Histopathologic examinations of the obtained tissue specimens, using appropriate stains including immunostains, were performed. Results MRS diagnosed neoplastic brain lesions in 15 cases (56%) and nonneoplastic brain lesions in 12 (44%). Correlation between the preoperative diagnosis by MRS and the histopathologic diagnosis following stereotactic biopsy of either a neoplastic or nonneoplastic lesion revealed matching in 25 of 27 cases (sensitivity 88%; specificity 100%). Within the group of cases (n = 15) diagnosed preoperatively by MRS as neoplastic, 12 patients were diagnosed with brain gliomas of different grades. The MRS grading of gliomas exactly matched the histopathologic grading following stereotactic biopsy in 10 of the 12 cases (sensitivity 89%; specificity 67%). Conclusions MRS is a useful addition to the management armamentarium, providing molecular information that assists in the characterization of various brain lesions. Multivoxel MRS may increase the diagnostic yield of stereotactic biopsy by guidance to target the higher choline and lower N-acetylaspartate areas, expected to have greater tumor activity. PMID:26935295

  5. Non destructive characterization of cortical bone micro-damage by nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    Sylvain Haupert

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of a nonlinear ultrasound technique, the so-called nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS technique, for detecting early microdamage accumulation in cortical bone induced by four-point bending fatigue. Small parallelepiped beam-shaped human cortical bone specimens were subjected to cyclic four-point bending fatigue in several steps. The specimens were prepared to control damage localization during four-point bending fatigue cycling and to unambiguously identify resonant modes for NRUS measurements. NRUS measurements were achieved to follow the evolution of the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior during fatigue-induced damage. After each fatigue step, a small number of specimens was removed from the protocol and set apart to quantitatively assess the microcrack number density and length using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-µCT. The results showed a significant effect of damage steps on the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior. No significant change in the overall length of microcracks was observed in damaged regions compared to the load-free control regions. Only an increased number of shortest microcracks, those in the lowest quartile, was noticed. This was suggestive of newly formed microcracks during the early phases of damage accumulation. The variation of nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior was significantly correlated to the variation of the density of short microcracks. Our results suggest that the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior is sensitive to early bone microdamage. Therefore NRUS technique can be used to monitor fatigue microdamage progression in in vitro experiments.

  6. Non destructive characterization of cortical bone micro-damage by nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy.

    Haupert, Sylvain; Guérard, Sandra; Peyrin, Françoise; Mitton, David; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of a nonlinear ultrasound technique, the so-called nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) technique, for detecting early microdamage accumulation in cortical bone induced by four-point bending fatigue. Small parallelepiped beam-shaped human cortical bone specimens were subjected to cyclic four-point bending fatigue in several steps. The specimens were prepared to control damage localization during four-point bending fatigue cycling and to unambiguously identify resonant modes for NRUS measurements. NRUS measurements were achieved to follow the evolution of the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior during fatigue-induced damage. After each fatigue step, a small number of specimens was removed from the protocol and set apart to quantitatively assess the microcrack number density and length using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-µCT). The results showed a significant effect of damage steps on the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior. No significant change in the overall length of microcracks was observed in damaged regions compared to the load-free control regions. Only an increased number of shortest microcracks, those in the lowest quartile, was noticed. This was suggestive of newly formed microcracks during the early phases of damage accumulation. The variation of nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior was significantly correlated to the variation of the density of short microcracks. Our results suggest that the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior is sensitive to early bone microdamage. Therefore NRUS technique can be used to monitor fatigue microdamage progression in in vitro experiments. PMID:24392089

  7. Identification of brain metabolites by magnetic resonance spectroscopy in MND/ALS.

    Knight, J M; Jones, A P; Redmond, J P; Shaw, I C

    1996-08-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has provided a novel means of studying the brain biochemistry of motor neurone disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (MND/ALS) patients in vivo in situ. Previous studies have demonstrated changes in the ratios of areas under specific spectral peaks in MND/ALS patients (Jones et al., 1995). However, the significance of such findings cannot be fully elucidated without first ascertaining the biochemical identity of each peak. Each peak in a MRS spectrum corresponds to the resonance of specific protons in a particular chemical environment. Many biochemicals contain similar protons in similar environments so it is possible that a single spectral peak could represent protons from more than one biochemical. In this study of major brain MRS peaks we have demonstrated that peaks are potentially composed of a number of protons from different chemicals. For example, the peak at chemical shift 2.01 ppm, conventionally recognised as the neurotransmitter N-acetyl aspartate, may actually be a result of the protons of the N-acetyl moiety (Frahm et al., 1991). We have consequently shown that other N-acetylated compounds such as N-acetyl glutamate are also capable of producing a peak here, whereas their non-acetylated derivatives are not. We have also shown GABA is capable of producing a peak at chemical shift 3.00 ppm, a peak which is generally assigned to creatine/phosphocreatine. These findings have important implications in the identification of spectral peaks in MRS studies and in the interpretation of spectral differences between MND patients and controls. PMID:8899668

  8. Non Destructive Characterization of Cortical Bone Micro-Damage by Nonlinear Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    Haupert, Sylvain; Guérard, Sandra; Peyrin, Françoise; Mitton, David; Laugier, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the ability of a nonlinear ultrasound technique, the so-called nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) technique, for detecting early microdamage accumulation in cortical bone induced by four-point bending fatigue. Small parallelepiped beam-shaped human cortical bone specimens were subjected to cyclic four-point bending fatigue in several steps. The specimens were prepared to control damage localization during four-point bending fatigue cycling and to unambiguously identify resonant modes for NRUS measurements. NRUS measurements were achieved to follow the evolution of the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior during fatigue-induced damage. After each fatigue step, a small number of specimens was removed from the protocol and set apart to quantitatively assess the microcrack number density and length using synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-µCT). The results showed a significant effect of damage steps on the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior. No significant change in the overall length of microcracks was observed in damaged regions compared to the load-free control regions. Only an increased number of shortest microcracks, those in the lowest quartile, was noticed. This was suggestive of newly formed microcracks during the early phases of damage accumulation. The variation of nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior was significantly correlated to the variation of the density of short microcracks. Our results suggest that the nonlinear hysteretic elastic behavior is sensitive to early bone microdamage. Therefore NRUS technique can be used to monitor fatigue microdamage progression in in vitro experiments. PMID:24392089

  9. Novel aspects of brain metabolism as revealed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Full text: The techniques of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) and Imaging (MRI) are outlined, and compared with Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Invasive PET techniques using 19F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18O2 form the main basis of brain activation studies, and with 19F-fluoroDOPA, make major contributions to studies on neurological disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However the technique has no chemical specificity so can provide no knowledge of intermediary metabolism. Non-invasive MRI is also being applied to brain activation studies but also has no chemical specificity. On the other hand MRS has superb chemical specificity, although it suffers from low sensitivity. A most interesting example of this is the use of 13C-MRS. If glucose is labelled on the no. 1 or no. 2 positions with 13C, the passage of the label through different neuronal and glial metabolic pathways can be followed. If acetate is similarly labelled, metabolic routes through specifically glial pathways can be monitored, since acetate is taken up only by glia. These studies contributed to knowledge on metabolic trafficking, in that glia produce alanine, citrate and lactate in addition to the previously characterised production of glutamine. Studies on the hypoxic brain revealed increased production of alanine, lactate and glycerol 3-phosphate, providing further understanding of the role of the NADH redox state. 'Isotopomer analysis' of 13C resonances provides more information on metabolic pathways, because the chemical shift of a 13C atom is specifically affected by a neighbouring 13C within the same molecule. This approach was used to demonstrate that neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) is partly derived from glial glutamine. Analogous 13C MRS studies are now providing novel information on metabolic flux rates within the human brain, and the most exciting developments are to follow changes in these rates on brain activation which can be

  10. Clinical application of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the diagnosis of intracranial mass lesions

    Diagnosis of primary and secondary brain tumours and other focal intracranial mass lesions based on imaging procedures alone is still a challenging problem. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) gives completely different information related to cell membrane proliferation, neuronal damage, energy metabolism and necrotic transformation of brain or tumour tissues. Our purpose was to evaluate the clinical utility of 1H-MRS added to MRI for the differentiation of intracranial neoplastic and non-neoplastic mass lesions. 176 mostly histologically verified lesions were studied with a constant clinically available single volume 1H-MRS protocol following routine MRI. 12 spectra (6.8%) were not of satisfactory diagnostic quality; 164 spectroscopic data sets were therefore available for definitive evaluation. Our study shows that spectroscopy added to MRI helps in tissue characterization of intracranial mass lesions, thereby leading to an improved diagnosis of focal brain disease. Non-neoplastic lesions such as cerebral infarctions and brain abscesses are marked by decreases in choline (Cho), creatine (Cr) and N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), while tumours generally have elevated Cho and decreased levels of Cr and NAA. Gliomas exhibit significantly increased Cho and lipid formation with higher WHO tumour grading. Metastases have elevated Cho similar to anaplastic astrocytomas, but can be differentiated from high-grade gliomas by their higher lipid levels. Extra-axial tumours, i.e. meningiomas and neurinomas, are characterized by a nearly complete absence of the neuronal marker NAA. The additive information of 1H-MRS led to a 15.4%-higher number of correct diagnoses, to 6.2% fewer incorrect and 16% fewer equivocal diagnoses than with structural MRI data alone. (orig.)

  11. Resonant Raman spectroscopy study of swift heavy ion irradiated MoS2

    Guo, Hang; Sun, Youmei; Zhai, Pengfei; Zeng, Jian; Zhang, Shengxia; Hu, Peipei; Yao, Huijun; Duan, Jinglai; Hou, Mingdong; Liu, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) crystal samples were irradiated by swift heavy ions (209Bi and 56Fe). Hillock-like latent tracks were observed on the surface of irradiated MoS2 by atomic force microscopy. The modifications of properties of irradiated MoS2 were investigated by resonant Raman spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). A new peak (E1u2, ∼385.7 cm-1) occurs near the in-plane E2g1 peak (∼383.7 cm-1) after irradiation. The two peaks shift towards lower frequency and broaden due to structural defects and stress with increasing fluence. When irradiated with high fluence, two other new peaks appear at ∼ 190 and ∼ 230 cm-1. The peak at ∼230 cm-1 is disorder-induced LA(M) mode. The presence of this mode indicates defects induced by irradiation. The feature at ∼460 cm-1 is composed of 2LA(M) (∼458 cm-1) and A2u (∼466 cm-1) mode. With increasing fluence, the integrated intensity ratio between 2LA(M) and A2u increases. The relative enhancement of 2LA(M) mode is in agreement with the appearance of LA(M) mode, which both demonstrate structural disorder in irradiated MoS2. The ∼423-cm-1 peak shifts toward lower frequency due to the decrease in exciton energy of MoS2, and this was demonstrated by the results of UV-Vis spectra. The decrease in exciton energy could be due to introduction of defect levels into band gap.

  12. Interleaved localized 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a spectroscopic method in physics and chemistry before it was developed to become a diagnostic imaging tool in medicine. When NMR spectroscopy is applied to human tissue, metabolism can be studied in normal physiological and pathological states in vivo. Metabolite concentrations and rates can be monitored dynamically and with localization of a defined region of interest. The 'window' which is opened for observation, i.e. which quantities are measured, depends on the nucleus used for RF excitation. Mechanisms of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) resynthesis, as a direct source of energy for muscle contraction, are phosphocreatine (PCr) splitting, glycolysis, beta-oxidation and, finally, oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst the dependency of these processes' fractional contribution to muscular energy supply on exercise type and duration is well known, quantitative models of the regulating mechanisms involved are still subject of current research. A large fraction of the established knowledge about metabolism is based on biochemical analysis of tissue acquired invasively (e.g. microdialysis and open-flow microperfusion) or representing averaged metabolic concentrations for the whole body (via serum metabolites or gas exchange analysis). Localized NMR spectroscopy, however, is capable of non-invasively acquiring time-resolved data from a defined volume of interest, in vivo. In contrast to the vast majority of MRS studies investigating metabolism, where spectra of a single nucleus (commonly 1H, 31P or 13C) were acquired or several MR spectra with different nuclei were measured in separate experiments, this work opens an additional 'window' on muscle metabolism by interleaved localized acquisition of 1H and 31P NMR spectra from human calf muscle in vivo, during rest, exercise and recovery, in a single experiment. Using this technique, the time courses of the concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP, total

  13. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state

  14. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  15. Laser Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopies of natural semiconductor mineral cinnabar, α-HgS, from various mines

    Natural minerals α-HgS from various mines have been studied by laser Raman spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The crystals differ from each other in the content of selenium impurity, included in samples from some mines. Based on the Raman spectra and the factor-group analysis the classification of the first order phonons and then the comparison of the results with the results from other works were carried out. The Raman spectra analysis of minerals from various mines show the selenium impurity gap vibration at 203 cm-1 and 226 cm-1 frequencies, respectively. On the basis of statistical measurements of the Raman spectra one can conclude that impurity frequencies of α-HgS may be generally used for the identification of the mine. Resonance Raman scattering for pure minerals has been studied by a dye laser. Phonon resonance in the indirect semiconductor α-HgS is found to be far more intense than the indirect resonance detected until now in various semiconductors in the proximity of the first indirect band Eg, for instance, in GaP. In our opinion, this may be conditioned by cinnabar band structure peculiarities. Low resonance has also been fixed in 'dirty' minerals at the spectral band frequency of 203 cm-1 characterizing gap vibration of isomorphic impurity Se in cinnabar

  16. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (52S/sub 1/2/ → 62/sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations

  17. Java-based framework for processing and displaying short-echo-time magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals.

    De Neuter, B; Luts, J; Vanhamme, L; Lemmerling, P; Van Huffel, S

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be used to determine in a non-invasive way the concentrations of certain chemical substances, also called metabolites. The spectra of MRS signals contain peaks that correspond to the metabolites of interest. Short-echo-time signals are characterized by heavily overlapping metabolite peaks and require sophisticated processing methods. To be useful in a clinical environment tools are needed that can process those signals in an accurate and fast way. Therefore, we developed novel processing methods and we designed a freely available and open-source framework (http://www.esat.kuleuven.ac.be/sista/members/biomed) in which the processing methods can be integrated. The framework has a set of abstract classes, called hot spots, and its goal is to provide a general structure and determine the control flow of the program. It provides building blocks or components in order to help developers with integrating their methods in the framework via a plug-in system. The framework is designed with the unified modeling language (UML) and implemented in Java. When a developer implements the framework he gets an application that acts like a simple and user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) for processing MRS data. This article describes in detail the structure and implementation of the framework and the integration of our processing methods in it. PMID:17174003

  18. Characterization of Ar/Cu electron-cyclotron-resonance plasmas using optical emission spectroscopy

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate trends with changes in processing parameters for Ar/Cu plasmas in an electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma deposition system. The primary motivation for this work is to monitor trends in ionization fractions for copper deposition plasmas using a noninterfering diagnostic tool. The system, which consists of a solid copper sputter target coupled to a permanent magnet ECR microwave plasma system, is operated in the range of 1 endash 6 mTorr argon with net microwave input power of 500 endash 1500 W. Emission from the following excited states is monitored: Ar neutrals (696.5 nm); Ar ions (488 nm); Cu neutrals (521.8 and 216.5 nm); and Cu ions (213.6 nm). Cu ion emission and Cu neutral emission monotonically increase with net microwave input power but at slightly different rates for different pressures, while argon-ion emission as a function of pressure shows a broad peak around 4 mTorr. The ratio of Cu ion emission to Cu neutral emission is used as an indicator of the relative ionization efficiency for Cu and peaks near 5 mTorr. Spectroscopic estimates of electron temperature differences between pure Ar and Ar/Cu plasmas are also presented

  19. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: An In Vivo Molecular Imaging Biomarker for Parkinson's Disease?

    Ciurleo, Rosella; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Marino, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta which leads to dysfunction of cerebral pathways critical for the control of movements. The diagnosis of PD is based on motor symptoms, such as bradykinesia, akinesia, muscular rigidity, postural instability, and resting tremor, which are evident only after the degeneration of a significant number of dopaminergic neurons. Currently, a marker for early diagnosis of PD is still not available. Consequently, also the development of disease-modifying therapies is a challenge. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a quantitative imaging technique that allows in vivo measurement of certain neurometabolites and may produce biomarkers that reflect metabolic dysfunctions and irreversible neuronal damage. This review summarizes the abnormalities of cerebral metabolites found in MRS studies performed in patients with PD and other forms of parkinsonism. In addition, we discuss the potential role of MRS as in vivo molecular imaging biomarker for early diagnosis of PD and for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. PMID:25302300

  20. Investigation of stroke in sickle cell disease by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Localized proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), obtained with stimulated echo and spin echo sequences, MR imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) were used to study the brain in 13 children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Regions of interest (ROI) studied by MRS included regions appearing normal on MRI as well as regions showing complications of sickle cell disease, including focal deep white matter areas of high signal intensity (deep white matter ischemia, DWMI) seen on long TR images, focal atropic brain areas, and infarcts. The findings in these studies are summarized as follows: Normal-appearing regions on MRI have normal MRS. In ROI including small areas of DWMI, lactate elevation was not detected, but the levels of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) appeared slightly elevated. In areas of DWMI 1-2 cm in size, reduced blood flow could be seen on MRA and lactate elevation could be detected with MRS. When blood flow to a DWMI region was normal, NAA was reduced and there was little lactate elevation, as cell death had already occurred. ROI consisting of atrophic tissue had reduced NAA levels but total creatine levels were not changed. Sometimes lipids, presumably from broken cell membrane, could be detected. In regions of past massive stroke, all metabolites were absent except for small amounts of lactate or lipids. (orig.)

  1. Current Role and Future Perspectives of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Radiation Oncology for Prostate Cancer

    Aleksandra Zapotoczna

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic neoplasms are not uniformly distributed within the prostate volume. With recent developments in three-dimensional intensity-modulated and imageguided radiation therapy, it is possible to treat different volumes within the prostate to different thresholds of doses. This approach has the potential to adapt the dose to the biologic aggressiveness of various clusters of tumor cells within the gland. The definition of tumor burden volume in prostate cancer can be facilitated by the use of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. The increasing sensitivity and specificity of MRS to the prostate is causing new interest in its potential role in the definition of target subvolumes at higher risk of failure following radical radiotherapy. Prostate MRS might also play a role as a noninvasive predictive factor for tumor response and treatment outcome. We review the use of MRS in radiation therapy for prostate cancer by evaluating its accuracy in the classification of aggressive cancer regions and target definition; its current role in the radiotherapy planning process, with special interest in technical issues behind the successful inclusion of MRS in clinical use; and available early experiences as a prognostic tool.

  2. Vibrational Assignments of Six-Coordinate Ferrous Heme Nitrosyls: New Insight From Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Paulat, F.; Berto, T.C.; George, S.DeBeer; Goodrich, L.; Praneeth, V.K.K.; Sulok, C.D.; Lehnert, N.

    2009-05-21

    This Communication addresses a long-standing problem: the exact vibrational assignments of the low-energy modes of the Fe-N-O subunit in six-coordinate ferrous heme nitrosyl model complexes. This problem is addressed using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) coupled to {sup 15}N{sup 18}O isotope labeling and detailed simulations of the obtained data. Two isotope-sensitive features are identified at 437 and 563 cm{sup -1}. Normal coordinate analysis shows that the 437 cm{sup -1} mode corresponds to the Fe-NO stretch, whereas the 563 cm{sup -1} band is identified with the Fe-N-O bend. The relative NRVS intensities of these features determine the degree of vibrational mixing between the stretch and the bend. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the trans effect of imidazole on the bound NO. In addition, a comparison to myoglobin-NO (Mb-NO) is made to determine the effect of the Mb active site pocket on the bound NO.

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, 1H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors

  4. Blend uniformity analysis of pharmaceutical products by Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS).

    Fitzpatrick, Dara; Scanlon, Eoin; Krüse, Jacob; Vos, Bastiaan; Evans-Hurson, Rachel; Fitzpatrick, Eileen; McSweeney, Seán

    2012-11-15

    Blend uniformity analysis (BUA) is a routine and highly regulated aspect of pharmaceutical production. In most instances, it involves quantitative determination of individual components of a blend in order to ascertain the mixture ratio. This approach often entails the use of costly and sophisticated instrumentation and complex statistical methods. In this study, a new and simple qualitative blend confirmatory test is introduced based on a well known acoustic phenomenon. Several over the counter (OTC) product powder blends are analysed and it is shown that each product has a unique and highly reproducible acoustic signature. The acoustic frequency responses generated during the dissolution of the product are measured and recorded in real time. It is shown that intra-batch and inter-batch variation for each product is either insignificant or non-existent when measured in triplicate. This study demonstrates that Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy or BARDS can be used successfully to determine inter-batch variability, stability and uniformity of powder blends. This is just one application of a wide range of BARDS applications which are more cost effective and time efficient than current methods. PMID:22884840

  5. Preclinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy Studies of Memory, Aging, and Cognitive Decline

    Febo, Marcelo; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging provides for non-invasive evaluation of brain structure and activity and has been employed to suggest possible mechanisms for cognitive aging in humans. However, these imaging procedures have limits in terms of defining cellular and molecular mechanisms. In contrast, investigations of cognitive aging in animal models have mostly utilized techniques that have offered insight on synaptic, cellular, genetic, and epigenetic mechanisms affecting memory. Studies employing magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI and MRS, respectively) in animal models have emerged as an integrative set of techniques bridging localized cellular/molecular phenomenon and broader in vivo neural network alterations. MRI methods are remarkably suited to longitudinal tracking of cognitive function over extended periods permitting examination of the trajectory of structural or activity related changes. Combined with molecular and electrophysiological tools to selectively drive activity within specific brain regions, recent studies have begun to unlock the meaning of fMRI signals in terms of the role of neural plasticity and types of neural activity that generate the signals. The techniques provide a unique opportunity to causally determine how memory-relevant synaptic activity is processed and how memories may be distributed or reconsolidated over time. The present review summarizes research employing animal MRI and MRS in the study of brain function, structure, and biochemistry, with a particular focus on age-related cognitive decline.

  6. Chemical shift imaging and localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy in full-term asphyxiated neonates

    Diagnosis of brain lesions after birth anoxia-ischemia is essential for appropriate management. Clinical evaluation is not sufficient. MRI has been proven to provide useful information. To compare abnormalities observed with MRI, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), localised magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and chemical shift imaging (CSI) and correlate these findings with the clinical outcome. Fourteen full-term neonates with birth asphyxia were studied. MRI, MRS and CSI were performed within the first 4 days of life. Lesions observed with DWI were correlated with outcome, but the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) did improve diagnostic confidence. The mean value of Lac/Cr for the neonates with a favourable outcome was statically lower than for those who died (0.22 vs 1.04; P = 0.01). The same results were observed for the Lac/NAA ratio (0.21 vs 1.23; P = 0.01). Data obtained with localised MRS and CSI were correlated for the ratio N-acetyl-aspartate/choline, but not for the other metabolites. No correlation was found between the ADC values and the metabolite ratios. Combination of these techniques could be helpful in our understanding of the physiopathological events occurring in neonates with asphyxia. (orig.)

  7. Soil humic-like organic compounds in prescribed fire emissions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Here we present the chemical characterization of the water-soluble organic carbon fraction of atmospheric aerosol collected during a prescribed fire burn in relation to soil organic matter and biomass combustion. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we observed that humic-like substances in fire emissions have been associated with soil organic matter rather than biomass. Using a chemical mass balance model, we estimated that soil organic matter may contribute up to 41% of organic hydrogen and up to 27% of water-soluble organic carbon in fire emissions. Dust particles, when mixed with fresh combustion emissions, substantially enhances the atmospheric oxidative capacity, particle formation and microphysical properties of clouds influencing the climatic responses of atmospheric aeroso. Owing to the large emissions of combustion aerosol during fires, the release of dust particles from soil surfaces that are subjected to intense heating and shear stress has, so far, been lacking. -- Highlights: •We characterized the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) of fire emissions by NMR. •Distinct patterns were observed for soil dust and vegetation combustion emissions. •Soil organic matter accounted for most of WSOC in early prescribed burn emissions. -- Humic-like soil organic matter may be an important component of particulate emissions in the early stages of wildfires

  8. Metabolic profile of dystrophic mdx mouse muscles analyzed with in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS).

    Martins-Bach, Aurea B; Bloise, Antonio C; Vainzof, Mariz; Rahnamaye Rabbani, Said

    2012-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive X-linked form of muscular dystrophy characterized by progressive and irreversible degeneration of the muscles. The mdx mouse is the classical animal model for DMD, showing similar molecular and protein defects. The mdx mouse, however, does not show significant muscle weakness, and the diaphragm muscle is significantly more degenerated than skeletal muscles. In this work, (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study the metabolic profile of quadriceps and diaphragm muscles from mdx and control mice. Using principal components analysis (PCA), the animals were separated into groups according to age and lineages. The classification was compared to histopathological analysis. Among the 24 metabolites identified from the nuclear MR spectra, only 19 were used by the PCA program for classification purposes. These can be important key biomarkers associated with the progression of degeneration in mdx muscles and with natural aging in control mice. Glutamate, glutamine, succinate, isoleucine, acetate, alanine and glycerol were increased in mdx samples as compared to control mice, in contrast to carnosine, taurine, glycine, methionine and creatine that were decreased. These results suggest that MRS associated with pattern recognition analysis can be a reliable tool to assess the degree of pathological and metabolic alterations in the dystrophic tissue, thereby affording the possibility of evaluation of beneficial effects of putative therapies. PMID:22673895

  9. Study of the metabolism of flucytosine in Aspergillus species by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The metabolism of flucytosine (5FC) in two Aspergillus species (Aspergillus fumigatus and A. niger) was investigated by 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In intact mycelia, 5FC was found to be deaminated to 5-fluorouracil and then transformed into fluoronucleotides; the catabolite alpha-fluoro-beta-alanine was also detected in A. fumigatus. Neither 5-fluoroorotic acid nor 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine-5'-monophosphate was detected in perchloric acid extracts after any incubation with 5FC. 5FC, 5-fluorouracil, and the classical fluoronucleotides 5-fluorouridine-5'-mono-, di-, and triphosphates were identified in the acid-soluble pool. Two hydrolysis products of 5-fluorouracil incorporated into RNA, 5-fluorouridine-2'-monophosphate and 5-fluorouridine-3'-monophosphate, were found in the acid-insoluble pool. No significant differences in the metabolic transformation of 5FC were noted in the two species of Aspergillus. The main pathway of 5FC metabolism in the two species of Aspergillus studied is thus the biotransformation into ribofluoronucleotides and the subsequent incorporation of 5-fluorouridine-5'-triphosphate into RNA

  10. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and its application to biomedical research

    The principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were explained and its application to biomedical research discussed. With 31P-NMR, it is feasible to conduct a continuous, non-invasive measurement of the contents of myocardial high-energy phosphate compounds and the intracellular pH (determined by monitoring the pH dependent shift of the inorganic phosphate peak relative to that of creatine phosphate), and to correlate them with the mechanical function. The determination of the free magnesium concentration is also possible on a similar principle to that for pH determination (the shift of MgATP peaks relative to ATP is utilized in this case). It is estimated to be 0.3 mM and was found not to be changed during ischemia. Several examples of studies including our own conducted to delineate the ischemic derangements of the myocardial energy metabolism and the effects of various interventions thereupon were illustrated. Finally a brief mention was made of the saturation transfer technique. This is the only method with which one can study the kinetics of the enzyme reactions under in vivo conditions. The application of the method for analysis of the creatine kinase reaction and the ATP synthesis was demonstrated. (author) 49 refs

  11. Microcontroller based resonance tracking unit for time resolved continuous wave cavity-ringdown spectroscopy measurements

    Votava, Ondrej; Mašát, Milan; Parker, Alexander E.; Jain, Chaithania; Fittschen, Christa

    2012-04-01

    We present in this work a new tracking servoloop electronics for continuous wave cavity-ringdown absorption spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) and its application to time resolved cw-CRDS measurements by coupling the system with a pulsed laser photolysis set-up. The tracking unit significantly increases the repetition rate of the CRDS events and thus improves effective time resolution (and/or the signal-to-noise ratio) in kinetics studies with cw-CRDS in given data acquisition time. The tracking servoloop uses novel strategy to track the cavity resonances that result in a fast relocking (few ms) after the loss of tracking due to an external disturbance. The microcontroller based design is highly flexible and thus advanced tracking strategies are easy to implement by the firmware modification without the need to modify the hardware. We believe that the performance of many existing cw-CRDS experiments, not only time-resolved, can be improved with such tracking unit without any additional modification to the experiment.

  12. The study of bioenergetics of mouse pregnant uterine muscle by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)

    To investigate the bioenergetics of uterine muscles in vivo, we examined the energy state of mouse preterm uterus by means of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Full-term mouse uterus contained ATP, PCr, phospho-di and mono ester (PDE and PME) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). The oxytocin-induced uterine muscle contraction peaks level and positions changed. Multiple peak analysis indicated a muscle contraction induced increase in the Pi concentration and decrease in the PCr concentration. The peak position of Pi was shifted in the contractive state also, indicating that the intracellular pH was lower than in the non-contractive state and this low pH level was recovered within several minutes. There was no change in the AMP peak neight in the contractive and non-contractive states. These data indicated that the energetics of mouse uterine muscle was maintained by the ATP-PCr system and acidosis of muscle was recovered within several minutes at rest. The constant AMP peak levels may indicate that phosphorylase is not regulated by AMP, but the phosphorylated phosphorylase kinase and pH levels in the contractive and non-contractive states also may indicate that phosphorylase kinase is not regulated by proteolysis or by the intracellular pH level but by the elevated intracellular calcium ion and calmodulin system. (author)

  13. Clinical magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Potentials and methods for whole-body scanners

    MR Spectroscopy offers the unique possibility of monitoring the metabolism of various organs non-invasively. Using examples of 1H and 31P MR spectra, experimental and comercially available techniques are presented and evaluated with regard to their potential clinical application. An example of a 1H human brain spectrum with a pathological lactate level illustrates the requirements for MRS examinations in terms of spatial and spectral resolution. STEAM, Spin-Echo, and Chemical Shift Resolved Imaging (CSI) techniques for 1H MRS are compared. In the field of 31P MRS, typical CSI spectra of the brain and liver are presented. First experimental results with a new double-oblique 3D-CSI technique for measurement of PCr/ATP ratios of different anatomical regions of the human heart are shown. The advantages of using double-resonance techniques for Nuclear Overhauser Enhancement (NOE) and decoupling are shown by the example of the phosphodiesters of the liver. The energy metabolism of skeletal muscle under exercise is resolved with 5 sec/spectrum, showing breakdown and synthesis of photocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). Appropriate instrumentation and technique are available to many clinics today; great interest now is directed towards the diagnostic value of MRS for certain indications. (orig.)

  14. Absolute quantification of carnosine in human calf muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Carnosine has been shown to be present in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of a variety of animals and humans. Despite the various physiological functions assigned to this metabolite, its exact role remains unclear. It has been suggested that carnosine plays a role in buffering in the intracellular physiological pHi range in skeletal muscle as a result of accepting hydrogen ions released in the development of fatigue during intensive exercise. It is thus postulated that the concentration of carnosine is an indicator for the extent of the buffering capacity. However, the determination of the concentration of this metabolite has only been performed by means of muscle biopsy, which is an invasive procedure. In this paper, we utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in order to perform absolute quantification of carnosine in vivo non-invasively. The method was verified by phantom experiments and in vivo measurements in the calf muscles of athletes and untrained volunteers. The measured mean concentrations in the soleus and the gastrocnemius muscles were found to be 2.81 ± 0.57/4.8 ± 1.59 mM (mean ± SD) for athletes and 2.58 ± 0.65/3.3 ± 0.32 mM for untrained volunteers, respectively. These values are in agreement with previously reported biopsy-based results. Our results suggest that 1H MRS can provide an alternative method for non-invasively determining carnosine concentration in human calf muscle in vivo

  15. Medical applications of stable isotopes: mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance

    This report summarizes the content of the Symposium entitled Medical Applications of Stable Isotopes, co-sponsored by the American College of Nuclear Physicians and the U.S. Department of Energy and held on January 25, 1982, in Tucson, Arizon. Within the overall framework of clinical biochemistry and clinical pharmacokinetics, the two technologies of mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance were reviewed and analyzed in terms of their potential in the area of medical applications of stable isotopes. It was observed that nuclear medicine could perhaps be more accurately redefined as diagnostic imaging and functional measurement, utilizing both the traditional unstable (radioactive) isotopes and stable isotopes. This seems appropriate and perhaps necessary because nuclear medicine scientists and physicians have crossed traditional professional lines, promptly adapted to new technologies, stimulated the clinical application of computer techniques, justified and utilized complex and expensive instrumentation, and are quite experienced in the physical and mathematical basis of isotope (stable and unstable) preparation, handling, and use in in vivo clinical applications

  16. Study of fluorine in silicate glass with 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Duncan, T. M.; Douglass, D. C.; Csencsits, R.; Walker, K. L.

    1986-07-01

    We report an application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to the study of fluorine-doped silicate glass prepared by the modified chemical vapor deposition process, prior to drawing the rod into fibers. The silica contains 1.03-wt. % fluorine, as determined by the calibrated intensity of the 19F NMR spectrum. The isotropic chemical shift of the 19F spectrum shows that fluorine bonds only to silicon; there is no evidence of oxyfluorides. Analysis of the distribution of nuclear dipolar couplings between fluorine nuclei reveals that the relative populations of silicon monofluoride sites [Si(O-)3F] and species having near-neighbor fluorines, such as silicon difluoride sites [Si(O-)2F2], are nearly statistically random. That is, to a good approximation, the fluorine substitutes randomly into the oxygen sites of the silica network. There is no evidence of local clusters of fluorine sites, silicon trifluoride sites [Si(O-)F3], or silicon tetrafluoride (SiF4).

  17. Tetrachloridocuprates(II)—Synthesis and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

    Winter, Alette; Zabel, André; Strauch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) on the basis of metal containing anions and/or cations are of interest for a variety of technical applications e.g., synthesis of particles, magnetic or thermochromic materials. We present the synthesis and the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses of a series of some new potential ionic liquids based on tetrachloridocuprates(II), [CuCl4]2−, with different sterically demanding cations: hexadecyltrimethylammonium 1, tetradecyltrimethylammonium 2, tetrabutylammonium 3 and benzyltriethylammonium 4. The cations in the new compounds were used to achieve a reasonable separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR spectroscopy. The EPR hyperfine structure was not resolved. This is due to the exchange broadening, resulting from still incomplete separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II) centers. Nevertheless, the principal values of the electron Zeemann tensor (g║ and g┴) of the complexes could be determined. Even though the solid substances show slightly different colors, the UV/Vis spectra are nearly identical, indicating structural changes of the tetrachloridocuprate moieties between solid state and solution. The complexes have a promising potential e.g., as high temperature ionic liquids, as precursors for the formation of copper chloride particles or as catalytic paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:22408411

  18. Evaluation of nonlinear impact resonance spectroscopy method for detecting delayed ettringite formation

    Rashidi, M. M. N.; Paul, A.; Kim, J.-Y.; Jacobs, L. J.; Kurtis, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    The use of the Nonlinear Impact Resonance Acoustic Spectroscopy (NIRAS) method to monitor the evolution of damage due to delayed ettringite formation (DEF) is examined. In practice, the temperature of concrete during casting of precast concrete members or massive concrete structures may reach higher than 70°C which can provide suitable conditions for damage to occur due to DEF, particularly in concrete which is subsequently exposed to wet environments. While expansion - often in excess of 1% - is characteristic of DEF, the evolution of damage begins with microcracking. Unfortunately, there is no standard to test the susceptibility of materials or material combinations to DEF. On the other hand, NIRAS shows great sensitivity to the detection of microcracks and has been successfully applied to concrete to detect thermal and alkali silica reaction in concrete. In this preliminary research, the NIRAS method is used to discriminate among mortar samples which are relatively undamaged and those in the early stages of DEF. The results show that NIRAS could be a reliable and robust method in the detection of microcracks due to DEF.

  19. Fragile X syndrome: a pilot proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in premutation carriers

    Hallahan, Brian P

    2012-08-30

    AbstractPurposeThere is increasing evidence that neurodevelopmental differences in people with Fragile X syndrome (FraX) may be explained by differences in glutamatergic metabolism. Premutation carriers of FraX were originally considered to be unaffected although several recent reports demonstrate neuroanatomical, cognitive, and emotional differences from controls. However there are few studies on brain metabolism in premutation carriers of FraX.MethodsWe used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare neuronal integrity of a number of brain metabolites including N-Acetyl Aspartate, Creatine + Phosphocreatinine, Choline, myoInositol, and Glutamate containing substances (Glx) in 17 male premutation carriers of FraX and 16 male healthy control individuals.ResultsThere was no significant between-group difference in the concentration of any measured brain metabolites. However there was a differential increase in N-acetyl aspartate with aging in premutation FraX individuals compared to controls.ConclusionsThis is the first 1 H-MRS study to examine premutation FraX individuals. Although we demonstrated no difference in the concentration of any of the metabolites examined between the groups, this may be due to the large age ranges included in the two samples. The differential increase in NAA levels with aging may reflect an abnormal synaptic pruning process.

  20. Lineshape estimation for magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals: self-deconvolution revisited

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is an effective diagnostic technique for monitoring biochemical changes in an organism. The lineshape of MRS signals can deviate from the theoretical Lorentzian lineshape due to inhomogeneities of the magnetic field applied to patients and to tissue heterogeneity. We call this deviation a distortion and study the self-deconvolution method for automatic estimation of the unknown lineshape distortion. The method is embedded within a time-domain metabolite quantitation algorithm for short-echo-time MRS signals. Monte Carlo simulations are used to analyze whether estimation of the unknown lineshape can improve the overall quantitation result. We use a signal with eight metabolic components inspired by typical MRS signals from healthy human brain and allocate special attention to the step of denoising and spike removal in the self-deconvolution technique. To this end, we compare several modeling techniques, based on complex damped exponentials, splines and wavelets. Our results show that self-deconvolution performs well, provided that some unavoidable hyper-parameters of the denoising methods are well chosen. Comparison of the first and last iterations shows an improvement when considering iterations instead of a single step of self-deconvolution

  1. An atypical case of neuro-Whipple: Clinical presentation, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and follow-up.

    Pauletti, Caterina; Pujia, Francesco; Accorinti, Massimo; Pauri, Flavia; Tinelli, Emanuele; Bianco, Federico; Morocutti, Cristoforo; Fattapposta, Francesco

    2010-10-15

    We report a case of a 53-year-old man with a 2-year history of progressive gait and balance disturbance, supranuclear ophthalmoparesis, mild dysarthria and dysmetria. EMG revealed a lower limb axonal sensory-motor neuropathy, while MR imaging demonstrated a small focal lesion in the right frontal lobe, mild diffuse hyperintensity of the periventricular white matter and diffuse brain atrophy. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed a mild decrease in N-acetyl-aspartate peak and an increase in the choline peak in the small right frontal lesion and within 6 voxels of interest in normal appearing cerebral tissue. According to the clinical picture the diagnosis of WD was made by the positivity of PCR for T. whipplei DNA on CSF. After treatment the patient showed a mild clinical improvement although MR images and laboratory test remained unchanged. The MRS findings suggest that the pathological process of the disease diffusely involves the brain. Despite the absence of gastrointestinal involvement WD should be suspected in all complex and atypical neurological pictures, even in presence of peripheral involvement, in order to be able to start treatment promptly. PMID:20674936

  2. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy discriminates the response to microglial stimulation of wild type and Alzheimer's disease models.

    Pardon, Marie-Christine; Yanez Lopez, Maria; Yuchun, Ding; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Prior, Malcolm; Brignell, Christopher; Parhizkar, Samira; Agostini, Alessandra; Bai, Li; Auer, Dorothee P; Faas, Henryk M

    2016-01-01

    Microglia activation has emerged as a potential key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Metabolite levels assessed by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) are used as markers of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, but how they relate to microglial activation in health and chronic disease is incompletely understood. Using MRS, we monitored the brain metabolic response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced microglia activation in vivo in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (APP/PS1) and healthy controls (wild-type (WT) littermates) over 4 hours. We assessed reactive gliosis by immunohistochemistry and correlated metabolic and histological measures. In WT mice, LPS induced a microglial phenotype consistent with activation, associated with a sustained increase in macromolecule and lipid levels (ML9). This effect was not seen in APP/PS1 mice, where LPS did not lead to a microglial response measured by histology, but induced a late increase in the putative inflammation marker myoinositol (mI) and metabolic changes in total creatine and taurine previously reported to be associated with amyloid load. We argue that ML9 and mI distinguish the response of WT and APP/PS1 mice to immune mediators. Lipid and macromolecule levels may represent a biomarker of activation of healthy microglia, while mI may not be a glial marker. PMID:26813748

  3. Application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of human serum to leukaemia clinical study

    To study metabolism of phospholipid and lipoprotein and lactic acid by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and investigate the feasibility in leukaemia clinical study, serum sample of leukaemia patients and healthy controls were collected and measured with MSL-300 MHz spectrometer. The phospholipid contents were known by contrast relatively integral area of PC signal and (PE + SM) signal with 31P-NMRS. A lineshape fitting model was used to analyze various lipoprotein and lactic acid changes by methyl and methylene groups in 1H-NMR spectrum of leukaemia serum. In spectra of serum of leukaemia patients, the phospholipid signals strength were significantly decreased. It reflected lower phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin content in serum of leukemia patients, especially for original un-treatment patient. The various lipoprotein contents were difference and lactic acid was significantly higher than normal control. NMR technique is a convenience method. It can primely reflect the difference of phospholipid and lipoprotein and lactic acid between leukaemia patients and normal control from molecule level. It provided a new method for study of leukaemia and is worthy to further study

  4. Quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in Atlantic salmon by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Ermakov, Igor V.; Ermakova, Maia R.; Gellermann, Werner

    2006-02-01

    Two major carotenoids species found in salmonids muscle tissues are astaxanthin and cantaxanthin. They are taken up from fish food and are responsible for the attractive red-orange color of salmon filet. Since carotenoids are powerful antioxidants and biomarkers of nutrient consumption, they are thought to indicate fish health and resistance to diseases in fish farm environments. Therefore, a rapid, accurate, quantitative optical technique for measuring carotenoid content in salmon tissues is of economic interest. We demonstrate the possibility of using fast, selective, quantitative detection of astaxanthin and cantaxanthin in salmon muscle tissues, employing resonance Raman spectroscopy. Analyzing strong Raman signals originating from the carbon-carbon double bond stretch vibrations of the carotenoid molecules under blue laser excitation, we are able to characterize quantitatively the concentrations of carotenoids in salmon muscle tissue. To validate the technique, we compared Raman data with absorption measurements of carotenoid extracts in acetone. A close correspondence was observed in absorption spectra for tissue extract in acetone and a pure astaxanthin solution. Raman results show a linear dependence between Raman and absorption data. The proposed technique holds promise as a method of rapid screening of carotenoid levels in fish muscle tissues and may be attractive for the fish farm industry to assess the dietary status of salmon, risk for infective diseases, and product quality control.

  5. New sensitive agents for detecting singlet oxygen by electron spin resonance spectroscopy.

    Igarashi, T; Sakurai, K; Oi, T; Obara, H; Ohya, H; Kamada, H

    1999-05-01

    Free radicals are well-established transient intermediates in chemical and biological processes. Singlet oxygen, though not a free radical, is also a fairly common reactive chemical species. It is rare that singlet oxygen is studied with the electron spin resonance (ESR) technique in biological systems, because there are few suitable detecting agents. We have recently researched some semiquinone radicals. Specifically, our focus has been on bipyrazole derivatives, which slowly convert to semiquinone radicals in DMSO solution in the presence of potassium tert-butoxide and oxygen. These bipyrazole derivatives are dimers of 3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one and have anti-ischemic activities and free radical scavenging properties. In this work, we synthesized a new bipyrazole derivative, 4,4'-bis(1p-carboxyphenyl-3-methyl-5-hydroxyl)-pyrazole, DRD156. The resulting semiquinone radical, formed by reaction with singlet oxygen, was characterized by ESR spectroscopy. DRD156 gave no ESR signals from hydroxyl radical, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide. DRD156, though, gives an ESR response with hypochlorite. This agent, nevertheless, has a much higher ability to detect singlet oxygen than traditional agents with the ESR technique. PMID:10381208

  6. Characterization of urban aerosol using aerosol mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Cleveland, M. J.; Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Lefer, B.; Rappenglück, B.

    2012-07-01

    Particulate matter was measured during August and September of 2006 in Houston as part of the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project. Aerosol size and composition were determined using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer. Aerosol was dominated by sulfate (4.1 ± 2.6 μg m-3) and organic material (5.5 ± 4.0 μg m-3), with contributions of organic material from both primary (˜32%) and secondary (˜68%) sources. Secondary organic aerosol appears to be formed locally. In addition, 29 aerosol filter samples were analyzed using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy to determine relative concentrations of organic functional groups. Houston aerosols are less oxidized than those observed elsewhere, with smaller relative contributions of carbon-oxygen double bonds. These particles do not fit 1H NMR source apportionment fingerprints for identification of secondary, marine, and biomass burning organic aerosol, suggesting that a new fingerprint for highly urbanized and industrially influenced locations be established.

  7. Absolute quantification of carnosine in human calf muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Özdemir, Mahir S.; Reyngoudt, Harmen; DeDeene, Yves; Sazak, Hakan S.; Fieremans, Els; Delputte, Steven; D'Asseler, Yves; Derave, Wim; Lemahieu, Ignace; Achten, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Carnosine has been shown to be present in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of a variety of animals and humans. Despite the various physiological functions assigned to this metabolite, its exact role remains unclear. It has been suggested that carnosine plays a role in buffering in the intracellular physiological pHi range in skeletal muscle as a result of accepting hydrogen ions released in the development of fatigue during intensive exercise. It is thus postulated that the concentration of carnosine is an indicator for the extent of the buffering capacity. However, the determination of the concentration of this metabolite has only been performed by means of muscle biopsy, which is an invasive procedure. In this paper, we utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) in order to perform absolute quantification of carnosine in vivo non-invasively. The method was verified by phantom experiments and in vivo measurements in the calf muscles of athletes and untrained volunteers. The measured mean concentrations in the soleus and the gastrocnemius muscles were found to be 2.81 ± 0.57/4.8 ± 1.59 mM (mean ± SD) for athletes and 2.58 ± 0.65/3.3 ± 0.32 mM for untrained volunteers, respectively. These values are in agreement with previously reported biopsy-based results. Our results suggest that 1H MRS can provide an alternative method for non-invasively determining carnosine concentration in human calf muscle in vivo.

  8. Anthocyanin composition of wild Colombian fruits and antioxidant capacity measurement by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Santacruz, Liliana; Carriazo, José G; Almanza, Ovidio; Osorio, Coralia

    2012-02-15

    The qualitative and quantitative anthocyanin composition of four wild tropical fruits from Colombia was studied. Compounds of "mora pequeña" ( Rubus megalococcus Focke.), "uva de árbol" ( Myrciaria aff. cauliflora O. Berg), coral, and motilón ( Hyeronima macrocarpa Mull. Arg.) fruits were separately extracted with methanol-acetic acid (95:5, v/v). The anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) were obtained by selective adsorption on Amberlite XAD-7. Each extract was analyzed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-HRESI-MS(n) with LCMS-IT-TOF equipment in order to characterize the anthocyanin pigments and the coinjection in HPLC using standards allowed identifying the major constituents in each extract. The antioxidant activity was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis spectroscopy, using ABTS and DPPH free radicals. The ARE of motilón ( H. macrocarpa Müll. Arg) exhibited the highest radical scavenging activity in comparison to the other extracts. A second-order kinetic model was followed in all of the cases. These results suggested that the studied fruits are promising not only as source of natural pigments but also as antioxidant materials for food industry. PMID:22242913

  9. Fragile X syndrome: a pilot proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in premutation carriers

    Hallahan Brian P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose There is increasing evidence that neurodevelopmental differences in people with Fragile X syndrome (FraX may be explained by differences in glutamatergic metabolism. Premutation carriers of FraX were originally considered to be unaffected although several recent reports demonstrate neuroanatomical, cognitive, and emotional differences from controls. However there are few studies on brain metabolism in premutation carriers of FraX. Methods We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to compare neuronal integrity of a number of brain metabolites including N-Acetyl Aspartate, Creatine + Phosphocreatinine, Choline, myoInositol, and Glutamate containing substances (Glx in 17 male premutation carriers of FraX and 16 male healthy control individuals. Results There was no significant between-group difference in the concentration of any measured brain metabolites. However there was a differential increase in N-acetyl aspartate with aging in premutation FraX individuals compared to controls. Conclusions This is the first 1 H-MRS study to examine premutation FraX individuals. Although we demonstrated no difference in the concentration of any of the metabolites examined between the groups, this may be due to the large age ranges included in the two samples. The differential increase in NAA levels with aging may reflect an abnormal synaptic pruning process.

  10. ESR (Electronic Spin Resonance Spectroscopy) study of irradiated paper for biomedical material wrapping

    Ionising radiation treatments are used for sterilization, microbiological decontamination, disinfection, insect disinfestation and food preservation. This ionising radiation generates free radicals (FR) in matter, which can be detected by Electronic Spin Resonance Spectroscopy (ESR). For this work it had analysed different kind of irradiated package papers of syringes, surgical gloves and dressings by ESR. These were irradiated with doses between 20 and 35 kGy of gamma radiation (Cobalt 60). The processed samples were measured in a Bruker ECS 106 spectrometer. The obtained results were: 1-) The irritated samples showed a central peak and two satellites induced by the applied radiation; 2-) The non-irradiated samples did not show the characteristic satellite peaks of the irritated ones; 3-) A linear relationship between the signal heights per unit mass and the applied doses was found; and 4-) The signals were highly stable, with half-time values between 240 and 370 days for 20 and 30 kGy, permitting more than one year of monitoring proceedings. In conclusion, the ESR allows the detection, quantification and time monitoring processes of this kind of irradiated materials. (author)

  11. Study of bioenergetics of mouse pregnant uterine muscle by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)

    Negami, Akira; Tominaga, Toshiro

    1989-06-01

    To investigate the bioenergetics of uterine muscles in vivo, we examined the energy state of mouse preterm uterus by means of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Full-term mouse uterus contained ATP, PCr, phospho-di and mono ester (PDE and PME) and inorganic phosphate (Pi). The oxytocin-induced uterine muscle contraction peaks level and positions changed. Multiple peak analysis indicated a muscle contraction induced increase in the Pi concentration and decrease in the PCr concentration. The peak position of Pi was shifted in the contractive state also, indicating that the intracellular pH was lower than in the non-contractive state and this low pH level was recovered within several minutes. There was no change in the AMP peak neight in the contractive and non-contractive states. These data indicated that the energetics of mouse uterine muscle was maintained by the ATP-PCr system and acidosis of muscle was recovered within several minutes at rest. The constant AMP peak levels may indicate that phosphorylase is not regulated by AMP, but the phosphorylated phosphorylase kinase and pH levels in the contractive and non-contractive states also may indicate that phosphorylase kinase is not regulated by proteolysis or by the intracellular pH level but by the elevated intracellular calcium ion and calmodulin system. (author).

  12. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy identifies oncolytic adenovirus responders.

    Hemminki, O; Immonen, R; Närväinen, J; Kipar, A; Paasonen, J; Jokivarsi, K T; Yli-Ollila, H; Soininen, P; Partanen, K; Joensuu, T; Parvianen, S; Pesonen, S K; Koski, A; Vähä-Koskela, M; Cerullo, V; Pesonen, S; Gröhn, O H; Hemminki, A

    2014-06-15

    At present, it is not possible to reliably identify patients who will benefit from oncolytic virus treatments. Conventional modalities such as computed tomography (CT), which measure tumor size, are unreliable owing to inflammation-induced tumor swelling. We hypothesized that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) might be useful in this regard. However, little previous data exist and neither oncolytic adenovirus nor immunocompetent models have been assessed by MRS. Here, we provide evidence that in T2-weighted MRI a hypointense core area, consistent with coagulative necrosis, develops in immunocompetent Syrian hamster carcinomas that respond to oncolytic adenovirus treatment. The same phenomenon was observed in a neuroblastoma patient while he responded to the treatment. With relapse at a later stage, however, the tumor of this patient became moderately hyperintense. We found that MRS of taurine, choline and unsaturated fatty acids can be useful early indicators of response and provide detailed information about tumor growth and degeneration. In hamsters, calprotectin-positive inflammatory cells (heterophils and macrophages) were found in abundance; particularly surrounding necrotic areas in carcinomas and T cells were significantly increased in sarcomas, when these had been treated with a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-producing virus, suggesting a possible link between oncolysis, necrosis (seen as a hypointense core in MRI) and/or immune response. Our study indicates that both MRI and MRS could be useful in the estimation of oncolytic adenovirus efficacy at early time points after treatment. PMID:24248808

  13. Uncertainty quantification in modeling and measuring components with resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Biedermann, Eric; Jauriqui, Leanne; Aldrin, John C.; Mayes, Alexander; Williams, Tom; Mazdiyasni, Siamack

    2016-02-01

    Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method which can be used for material characterization, defect detection, process control and life monitoring for critical components in gas turbine engines, aircraft and other systems. Accurate forward and inverse modeling for RUS requires a proper accounting of the propagation of uncertainty due to the model and measurement sources. A process for quantifying the propagation of uncertainty to RUS frequency results for models and measurements was developed. Epistemic and aleatory sources of uncertainty were identified for forward model parameters, forward model material property and geometry inputs, inverse model parameters, and physical RUS measurements. RUS model parametric studies were then conducted for simple geometric samples to determine the sensitivity of RUS frequencies and model inversion results to the various sources of uncertainty. The results of these parametric studies were used to calculate uncertainty bounds associated with each source. Uncertainty bounds were then compared to assess the relative impact of the various sources of uncertainty, and mitigations were identified. The elastic material property inputs for forward models, such as Young's Modulus, were found to be the most significant source of uncertainty in these studies. The end result of this work was the development of an uncertainty quantification process that can be adapted to a broad range of components and materials.

  14. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of periventricular white matter and hippocampus in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    The purpose of this study was to diagnose the hypoxic impairment by Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), an advanced MR imaging technique, which could not be visualised by routine imaging methods in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). 20 OSA patients and 5 controls were included in this prospective research. MRS was performed on these 25 subjects to examine cerebral hypoxemia in specific regions (periventricular white matter and both hippocampi). Polysomnography was assumed as the gold standard. Statistical analysis was assessed by Mann-Whitney U test and Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve for NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios. In the periventricular white matter, NAA/Cho ratio in OSA patients was significantly lower than in the control group (p<0.05). There were no statistical differences between the OSA and the control group for NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios for both hippocampal regions. Additionally, Cho/Cr ratio in the periventricular white matter region of OSA group was higher than in the control group (p<0.05). Hypoxic impairment induced by repeated episodes of apnea leads to significant neuronal damage in OSA patients. MRS provides valuable information in the assessment of hypoxic ischemic impairment by revealing important metabolite ratios for the specific areas of the brain

  15. Estimation of the absorbed dose in gamma irradiated food containing bone by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    The use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy to accurately evaluate the absorbed dose to radiationprocessed bones (and thus meats) is examined. The exposure of foodstuffs containing bone to a dose of ionizing radiation results in the formation of long lived free radicals which give rise to characteristics ESR signals. The yield of radicals was found to be proportional to absorbed dose. Additive re-irradiation of previously irradiated bone was used to estimate the absorbed dose in the irradiated chicken bone. Simple non-linear rational equation was found to fit to the data and yields good dose estimates for irradiated bone in the range of doses (1.0 - 5.0 kGy). Decay of the ESR signal intensity was monitored at different dose levels (2.0 and 7.0 kGy) up to 22 days. The absorbed dose in irradiated chicken (2.Om 3.0 and 6.0 kGy) was assessed at 2, 6 and 12 days after irradiation. Relatively good results were obtained when measurements were made within the following days (up to 12 days) after irradiation. The ability of the dose additive method to provide accurate dose assessments is tested here

  16. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders

    Goncalves, Rita de Cassia Ferreira; Vasconcelos, Marcio Moacyr; Faleiros, Leticia Oliveira; Brito, Adriana Rocha; Werner Junior, Jairo; Herdy, Gesmar Volga Haddad [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina], e-mail: rcgonc@hotmail.com; Cruz Junior, Luiz Celso Hygino da; Domingues, Romeu Cortes [Multi-Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-06-15

    To analyze the metabolic constitution of brain areas through proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in children affected with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder compared with normal children. Method: The sample of this case-control study included eight boys with epidemiologic history of in utero exposure to alcohol (median age 13.6{+-}3.8 years) who were diagnosed with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, and eight controls (median age 12.1{+-}3,4 years). An 8 cm{sup 3} single voxel approach was used, with echo time 30 ms, repetition time 1500 ms, and 128 acquisitions in a 1.5T scanner, and four brain areas were analyzed: anterior cingulate, left frontal lobe, left striatum, and left cerebellar hemisphere. Peaks and ratios of metabolites N-acetylaspartate, choline, creatine, and myo-inositol were measured. Results: Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder showed a decrease in choline/creatine ratio (p=0.020) in left striatum and an increase in myo-inositol/creatine ratio (p=0.048) in left cerebellum compared with controls. There was no statistically significant difference in all peaks and ratios from the anterior cingulate and frontal lobe between the two groups. Conclusion: This study found evidence that the left striatum and left cerebellum are affected by intrauterine exposure to alcohol. Additional studies with larger samples are necessary to expand our knowledge of the effects of fetal exposure to alcohol. (author)

  17. An Experimental Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Analysis on Early Stage of Acute Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    易黎; 张苏明; 张新江

    2002-01-01

    Summary: Using different models of focal cerebral ischemia, the temporal and spatial rules ofmetabolism and energy changes in the post-ischemia brain tissue were measured by proton magnet-ic resonance spectroscopy(1HMRS) to provide valuable information for judging the prognosis of a-cute focal cerebral ischemia and carrying out effective therapy. Nine healthy Sprague-Dawly rats(both sexes) were randomly divided into two groups: The rats in the group A (n=4) were occlud-ed with self-thrombus for 1 h; The rats in the group B (n=5) were occluded with thread-embolifor 1 h. The 1H MRS at 30, 40, 50, 60 min respectively was examined and the metabolicchanges of NAA, Cho and Lac in the regions of interest were semiquantitatively analyzed. Thespectrum intregral calculus area ratio of NAA, Cho, Lac to Pcr+Ct was set as the criterion. Thevalues of NAA ~ Cho in the regions of interest were declined gradually within 1 h after ischemia,especially, the ratio of Cho/(Pcr+Cr), NAA/(Pcr+Cr) at 60 min had significant difference withthat at 50 min (P<0. 05). The ratio of Lac/(Pcr+Cr) began to decrease at 40 min from initial in-crease of Lac in both A and B groups. MR proton spectrum analysis was a non-invasive, direct andcomprehensive tool for the study of cellular metabolism and the status of the biochemical energy inacute ischemia stroke.

  18. Posterior cingulate metabolic changes in frontotemporal lobar degeneration detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Differences in prognosis and symptomatic treatment have highlighted the importance of the differential diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and other dementias, but the variable clinical features make diagnosis difficult. We studied metabolic changes using multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in regions of FTLD, including the posterior cingulate gyrus, which is also the area most affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the early stages. We examined six patients with FTLD, six with presumed AD, and five healthy volunteers using repetition and echo times of 2000 and 135 ms. We analysed peak ratios of choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) from frontal and temporoparietal regions, basal ganglia, and posterior cingulate gyrus in both hemispheres. A decreased NAA/Cr ratio was observed in the posterior cingulate gyri in presumed AD (right: 1.56±0.44, P =0.011; left: 1.46±0.25, P =0.008) and FTD (right: 1.47±0.40, P =0.005; left: 1.36±0.32, P =0.002). No statistically significant changes in Cho/Cr were identified in the posterior cingulate gyri in presumed AD or FTLD, and no differences were observed in peak ratios in other regions. Decreased NAA may reflect neuronal activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus, and this study may contirbute to insights into the pathophysiology of FTLD. (orig.)

  19. Posterior cingulate metabolic changes in frontotemporal lobar degeneration detected by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Kizu, O.; Yamada, K.; Ito, H.; Nishimura, T. [Department of Radiology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 456 Kajiicho, Kamigyoku, 602-8566, Kyoto (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    Differences in prognosis and symptomatic treatment have highlighted the importance of the differential diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and other dementias, but the variable clinical features make diagnosis difficult. We studied metabolic changes using multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in regions of FTLD, including the posterior cingulate gyrus, which is also the area most affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the early stages. We examined six patients with FTLD, six with presumed AD, and five healthy volunteers using repetition and echo times of 2000 and 135 ms. We analysed peak ratios of choline (Cho), creatine (Cr), and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) from frontal and temporoparietal regions, basal ganglia, and posterior cingulate gyrus in both hemispheres. A decreased NAA/Cr ratio was observed in the posterior cingulate gyri in presumed AD (right: 1.56{+-}0.44, P =0.011; left: 1.46{+-}0.25, P =0.008) and FTD (right: 1.47{+-}0.40, P =0.005; left: 1.36{+-}0.32, P =0.002). No statistically significant changes in Cho/Cr were identified in the posterior cingulate gyri in presumed AD or FTLD, and no differences were observed in peak ratios in other regions. Decreased NAA may reflect neuronal activity in the posterior cingulate gyrus, and this study may contirbute to insights into the pathophysiology of FTLD. (orig.)

  20. Absolute quantification of carnosine in human calf muscle by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Oezdemir, Mahir S [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, MEDISIP, Ghent University-IBBT-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Reyngoudt, Harmen [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium); Deene, Yves de [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium); Sazak, Hakan S [Department of Statistics, Ege University, 35100 Bornova, Izmir (Turkey); Fieremans, Els [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, MEDISIP, Ghent University-IBBT-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Delputte, Steven [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, MEDISIP, Ghent University-IBBT-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); D' Asseler, Yves [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, MEDISIP, Ghent University-IBBT-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Derave, Wim [Department of Movement and Sports Science, Ghent University, Watersportlaan 2, Ghent (Belgium); Lemahieu, Ignace [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, MEDISIP, Ghent University-IBBT-IBiTech, De Pintelaan 185 block B, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Achten, Eric [Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, Ghent (Belgium)

    2007-12-07

    Carnosine has been shown to be present in the skeletal muscle and in the brain of a variety of animals and humans. Despite the various physiological functions assigned to this metabolite, its exact role remains unclear. It has been suggested that carnosine plays a role in buffering in the intracellular physiological pH{sub i} range in skeletal muscle as a result of accepting hydrogen ions released in the development of fatigue during intensive exercise. It is thus postulated that the concentration of carnosine is an indicator for the extent of the buffering capacity. However, the determination of the concentration of this metabolite has only been performed by means of muscle biopsy, which is an invasive procedure. In this paper, we utilized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) in order to perform absolute quantification of carnosine in vivo non-invasively. The method was verified by phantom experiments and in vivo measurements in the calf muscles of athletes and untrained volunteers. The measured mean concentrations in the soleus and the gastrocnemius muscles were found to be 2.81 {+-} 0.57/4.8 {+-} 1.59 mM (mean {+-} SD) for athletes and 2.58 {+-} 0.65/3.3 {+-} 0.32 mM for untrained volunteers, respectively. These values are in agreement with previously reported biopsy-based results. Our results suggest that {sup 1}H MRS can provide an alternative method for non-invasively determining carnosine concentration in human calf muscle in vivo.