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Sample records for 31p magnetic resonance

  1. Metabolism of perfused pig intercostal muscles evaluated by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Pedersen, Brian Lindegaard; Arendrup, Henrik; Secher, Niels H;

    2006-01-01

    consumption and 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). When perfused at rest with Krebs-Ringer buffer, the preparation maintained physiological levels of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP and pH at a stable oxygen consumption of 0.51 +/- 0.01 micromol min(-1) g(-1) for more than 2 h...

  2. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle in patients with fibromyalgia

    Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C;

    1992-01-01

    31Phosphorous nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy of painful calf muscle was performed in 12 patients with fibromyalgia (FS) and 7 healthy subjects during rest, aerobic and anaerobic exercising conditions, and postexercise recovery. Ratios of inorganic phosphate and creatinine...... phosphate (Pi/PCr) and pH were calculated from the collected 31P NMR spectra. Resting values of Pi/PCr were normal in the patients. Patients delivered only 49% of the muscle power of the controls (p = 0.005). Patients and controls had similar rates of Pi/PCr and pH changes during work and recovery. The...

  3. Feasibility of Rapid-Sequence 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Cardiac Patients

    Purpose: To determine the clinical feasibility of rapid-sequence phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P -MRS) of the heart with cardiac patients using a 5T clinical MR system. Material and Methods: Twenty cardiac patients, i.e. dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)3 cases, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) 3 cases, hypertensive heart diseases (HHD) 3 cases, and aortic regurgitation (AR) case were examined using rapid cardiac 31P-MRS. Complete three-dimensional localization was performed using a two-dimensional phosphorus chemical-shift imaging sequence in combination with 30-mm axial slice-selective excitation. The rapid-sequence 31P-MRS procedure was phase encoded in arrays of 8x8 steps with an average of 4 acquisitions. The total examination time, including proton imaging and shimming, for the rapid cardiac 31P-MRS procedure, ranged from 0 to 5 min, depending on the heart rate. Student's t test was used to compare creatine phosphate (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios from the cardiac patients with those of the control subjects (n≅13). Results: The myocardial PCr/ATP ratio obtained by rapid 31P-MRS was significantly lower (P 31P-MRS may be a valid diagnostic tool for patients with cardiac disease

  4. Monitoring of the insecticide trichlorfon by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is extensively being used for protection of fruit crops. Trichlorfon is a thermal labile compound, which cannot be easily determined by gas chromatography (GC) and has no suitable group for sensitive detection by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this study, a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) has been described for monitoring of trichlorfon without any separation step. The quantitative works of 31P NMR spectroscopy has been performed in the presence of an internal standard (hexamethylphosphoramide). Limit of detection (LOD) for this method has been found to be 55 mg L-1, without any sample preparation, and the linear working range was 150-5500 mg L-1. Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method for three replicates within and between days was obtained ≤9%. The average recovery efficiency was approximately 99-112%. This method was applied for monitoring trichlorfon in a commercial insecticide sample and tomato sample

  5. Bioenergetic Measurements in Children with Bipolar Disorder: A Pilot 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study

    Sikoglu, Elif M.; J. Eric Jensen; Gordana Vitaliano; Liso Navarro, Ana A; Renshaw, Perry F.; Jean A. Frazier; Moore, Constance M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Research exploring Bipolar Disorder (BD) phenotypes and mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in younger subjects, has been insufficient to date. Previous studies have found abnormal cerebral pH levels in adults with BD, which may be directly linked to abnormal mitochondrial activity. To date no such studies have been reported in children with BD. Methods: Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (\\(^{31}\\)P MRS) was used to determine pH, phopshocreatine (PCr) and inorganic ph...

  6. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of erythrocyte extracts in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Extracts freshly prepared from erythrocytes of patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy, their unaffected siblings, and normal control subjects were examined with both 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A moderate variability was found in the relative amounts of various nonphosphorylated compounds among patients and control subjects; however, no significant differences were found between the groups. As for the phosphorylated compounds, the sum of ADP+ATP was found significantly elevated in the myotonic muscular dystrophy patients

  7. In vivo magnetic resonance studies of human brain energy metabolism by 31P-spectroscopy

    Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for obtaining biochemical information from structurally and functionally intact biological tissues. Following the introduction of high field (1.5 Tesla) wholebody systems it is possible to perform spectroscopic studies on human beings. Thus, MR-spectroscopy may become a very important research tool in physiology, clinical diagnosis and treatment follow-up. So far the human studies have concentrated on the phosphorus (31P) and (1H) nuclei. (author)

  8. Advancement of 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Using GRAPPA Reconstruction on a 3D Volume

    Clevenger, Tony

    The overall objective of this research is to improve currently available metabolic imaging techniques for clinical use in monitoring and predicting treatment response to radiation therapy in liver cancer. Liver metabolism correlates with inflammatory and neoplastic liver diseases, which alter the intracellular concentration of phosphorus- 31 (31P) metabolites [1]. It is assumed that such metabolic changes occur prior to physical changes of the tissue. Therefore, information on regional changes of 31P metabolites in the liver, obtained by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI) [1,2], can help in diagnosis and follow-up of various liver diseases. Specifically, there appears to be an immediate need of this technology for both the assessment of tumor response in patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) [3--5], as well as assessment of radiation toxicity, which can result in worsening liver dysfunction [6]. Pilot data from our lab has shown that 31P MRSI has the potential to identify treatment response five months sooner than conventional methods [7], and to assess the biological response of liver tissue to radiation 24 hours post radiation therapy [8]. While this data is very promising, commonly occurring drawbacks for 31P MRSI are patient discomfort due to long scan times and prone positioning within the scanner, as well as reduced data quality due to patient motion and respiration. To further advance the full potential of 31P MRSI as a clinical diagnostic tool in the management of liver cancer, this PhD research project had the following aims: I) Reduce the long acquisition time of 3D 31P MRS by formulating and imple- menting an appropriate GRAPPA undersampling scheme and reconstruction on a clinical MRI scanner II) Testing and quantitative validation of GRAPPA reconstruction on 3D 31P MRSI on developmental phantoms and healthy volunteers At completion, this work should considerably advance 31P MRSI

  9. Feasibility of Rapid-Sequence {sup 31}P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Cardiac Patients

    Chida, K.; Otani, H.; Saito, H.; Nagasaka, T.; Kagaya, Y.; Kohzuki, M.; Zuguchi, M.; Shirato, K. [Tohoku Univ., School of Health Sciences, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiological Technology

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical feasibility of rapid-sequence phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P -MRS) of the heart with cardiac patients using a 5T clinical MR system. Material and Methods: Twenty cardiac patients, i.e. dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)3 cases, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) 3 cases, hypertensive heart diseases (HHD) 3 cases, and aortic regurgitation (AR) case were examined using rapid cardiac {sup 31}P-MRS. Complete three-dimensional localization was performed using a two-dimensional phosphorus chemical-shift imaging sequence in combination with 30-mm axial slice-selective excitation. The rapid-sequence {sup 31}P-MRS procedure was phase encoded in arrays of 8x8 steps with an average of 4 acquisitions. The total examination time, including proton imaging and shimming, for the rapid cardiac {sup 31}P-MRS procedure, ranged from 0 to 5 min, depending on the heart rate. Student's t test was used to compare creatine phosphate (PCr)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios from the cardiac patients with those of the control subjects (n{approx_equal}13). Results: The myocardial PCr/ATP ratio obtained by rapid {sup 31}P-MRS was significantly lower (P <0.001) in DCM patients (1.82{+-}0.33, mean{+-}SD), and in patients with global myocardial dysfunction (combined data for 20 patients:.89{+-}0.32) than in normal volunteers (2.96{+-}0.59). These results are similar to previous studies. Conclusion: Rapid-sequence {sup 31}P-MRS may be a valid diagnostic tool for patients with cardiac disease.

  10. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which lead to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  11. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which leads to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  12. Early effects of radiotherapy in small cell lung cancer xenografts monitored by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, E J; Quistorff, B;

    1990-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) and biochemical analysis of extracts were applied to study the metabolic response to X-irradiation of small cell lung cancer in nude mice. Two small cell lung cancer xenografts, CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, with different radiosensitivity, although derived...

  13. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E;

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  14. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of intracellular pH in giant barnacle muscle

    The accuracy of intracellular pH (pH/sub i/) measurements by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was examined in single muscle fibers from the giant barnacle, Balanus nubilis. The pH/sub i/ was derived from the chemical shifts of 2-deoxy-D-glucose-6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. In fibers superfused with sea water at pH 7.7, pH/sub i/ = 7.30 +/- 0.02 at 200C. Experimentally induced pH/sub i/ changes were followed with a time resolution of 3 min. Intracellular alkalinization was induced by exposure to NH3Cl and intracellular acidification followed when NH3 was removed. Then acid extrusion was stimulated by exposure to bicarbonate containing sea water. In single muscle fibers 31P NMR results were in excellent agreement with microelectrode studies over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0. The initial acid extrusion rate was 1.7 +/- 0.3 mmol x 1-1 x min-1 at pH/sub i/ 6.75. The authors results showed that 31P NMR is a reliable in vivo pH probe

  15. Interleaved localized 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a spectroscopic method in physics and chemistry before it was developed to become a diagnostic imaging tool in medicine. When NMR spectroscopy is applied to human tissue, metabolism can be studied in normal physiological and pathological states in vivo. Metabolite concentrations and rates can be monitored dynamically and with localization of a defined region of interest. The 'window' which is opened for observation, i.e. which quantities are measured, depends on the nucleus used for RF excitation. Mechanisms of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) resynthesis, as a direct source of energy for muscle contraction, are phosphocreatine (PCr) splitting, glycolysis, beta-oxidation and, finally, oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst the dependency of these processes' fractional contribution to muscular energy supply on exercise type and duration is well known, quantitative models of the regulating mechanisms involved are still subject of current research. A large fraction of the established knowledge about metabolism is based on biochemical analysis of tissue acquired invasively (e.g. microdialysis and open-flow microperfusion) or representing averaged metabolic concentrations for the whole body (via serum metabolites or gas exchange analysis). Localized NMR spectroscopy, however, is capable of non-invasively acquiring time-resolved data from a defined volume of interest, in vivo. In contrast to the vast majority of MRS studies investigating metabolism, where spectra of a single nucleus (commonly 1H, 31P or 13C) were acquired or several MR spectra with different nuclei were measured in separate experiments, this work opens an additional 'window' on muscle metabolism by interleaved localized acquisition of 1H and 31P NMR spectra from human calf muscle in vivo, during rest, exercise and recovery, in a single experiment. Using this technique, the time courses of the concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP, total

  16. INVIVO 31P MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY (MRS) OF TENDER POINTS IN PATIENTS WITH PRIMARY FIBROMYALGIA SYNDROME

    DEBLECOURT, AC; WOLF, RF; VANRIJSWIJK, MH; KAMMAN, RL; KNIPPING, AA; MOOYAART, EL

    1991-01-01

    31P Magnetic Resonance-Spectroscopy was performed at the site of tender points in the trapezius muscle of patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome. Earlier, in vitro studies have reported changes in the high energy phosphate-metabolism in biopsies taken from tender points of fibromyalgia patients

  17. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral infarction in rats

    Yamamuro, Manabu; Katayama, Yasuo; Igarashi, Hironaka; Terashi, Akiro [Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-04-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows the noninvasive study of metabolism in vivo. In order to further understand the time course of biochemical changes during cerebral infarction, we performed the MRS study with pathological analysis. The left middle cerebral artery (MCA) was occluded in spontaneously hypertensive male rats (SHR) by the method of Tamura et al. The spectra were obtained from the infarcted hemisphere by placing the surface coils over the left side of the calvarium. {sup 31}P and {sup 1}H-MRS were performed at 3 hours, 24 hours and 7 days after MCA occlusion. Ischemic lesions caused by the left MCA occlusion extended into the parietal lobe and caudate putamen. After 3 hours of ischemia, vacuolated neurophils and shrunken neurons were observed. At 24 hours, these changes were severe. After 7 days, infiltration of monocytes and capillary hyperplasia were seen, and neurons had disappeared. At the acute stage of ischemia the phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi) peak ratio decreased. After 7 days of ischemia, these changes became obscure. The intracellular pH (pHi) decreased after 3 hours of ischemia and recovered almost to the control level at 24 hours post ischemia. Alkalosis was apparent 7 days after ischemia. This alkalosis might be due to increased permeability of the deteriorated blood brain barrier. Although the lactate level was high 24 hours post ischemia, the pHi was almost normal. The N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine ratio decreased significantly from the acute stage of stroke. This decrease correlated with pathological changes. The correlation of the magnetic resonance spectra with the histological results may open aspects for monitoring stroke therapy and a new approach to tissue characterization. (author)

  18. Bioenergetic measurements in children with bipolar disorder: a pilot 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Elif M Sikoglu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Research exploring Bipolar Disorder (BD phenotypes and mitochondrial dysfunction, particularly in younger subjects, has been insufficient to date. Previous studies have found abnormal cerebral pH levels in adults with BD, which may be directly linked to abnormal mitochondrial activity. To date no such studies have been reported in children with BD. METHODS: Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((31P MRS was used to determine pH, phopshocreatine (PCr and inorganic phosphate (Pi levels in 8 subjects with BD and 8 healthy comparison subjects (HCS ages 11 to 20 years old. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pH between the patients and HCS. However, frontal pH values for patients with BD increased with age, contrary to studies of HCS and the pH values in the frontal lobe correlated negatively with the YMRS values. Global Pi was significantly lower in subjects with BD compared with HCS. There were no significant differences in PCr between the groups. Global PCr-to-Pi ratio (PCr/Pi was significantly higher in subjects with BD compared with HCS. CONCLUSIONS: The change in Pi levels for the patients with BD coupled with the no difference in PCr levels, suggest an altered mitochondrial phosphorylation. However, our findings require further investigation of the underlying mechanisms with the notion that a mitochondrial dysfunction may manifest itself differently in children than that in adults. LIMITATIONS: Further investigations with larger patient populations are necessary to draw further conclusions.

  19. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance studies of chronic myocardial ischemia in the Yucatan micropig.

    Rath, D P; Bailey, M; Zhang, H; Jiang, Z; Abduljalil, A M; Weisbrode, S; Hamlin, R L; Robitaille, P M

    1995-01-01

    In this work, an x-irradiation/high fat/high cholesterol diet-induced atherogenic model was invoked to examine the effects of severe diffuse atherosclerosis on myocardial metabolism in the in vivo porcine heart. This model was studied using spatially localized 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to monitor pH and the levels of inorganic phosphate, phosphomonoesters, creatine phosphate, and adenosine triphosphate as a function of workload transmurally in control swine and in animals suffering from chronic ischemic heart disease. These preliminary studies revealed that the development of severe atherosclerosis and the accompanying chronically diseased state produce changes in high energy phosphates and that increases in rate pressure products result in demonstrable signs of ischemia in the myocardium which span the entire left ventricular wall. Ischemic changes include a global increase in inorganic phosphate and corresponding decreases in creatine phosphate, ATP, and pH. Importantly, changes in intracellular pH are noted with even the slightest increase in workload suggesting that these diseased hearts display elevated glycolytic activity. By challenging these animals with increased cardiac workload, we directly visualize how the chronically compromised heart responds to severe oxygen challenges in a clinically relevant model of this situation. PMID:7814609

  20. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance data

    Neutron diffraction and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO)0.5-x(Na2O)x(P2O5)0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q2 phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na2O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases Na+ → Ca2+. In the (CaO)0.5(P2O5)0.5 glass most of the Ca2+ ions are present in isolated CaOx polyhedra whereas in the (Na2O)0.5(P2O5)0.5 glass the NaOx polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO)0.4(Na2O)0.1(P2O5)0.5 biomaterial

  1. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of extracts of vascular smooth muscle

    31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess phosphate metabolites in perchloric acid extracts of rabbit aorta. In addition to the high energy phosphates, several other phosphorus compounds were detected and quantified. Most notable was the presence of a prominent phosphomonoester compound appearing at a chemical shift of 3.86 delta. This compound constituted 26% of the total extractable tissue phosphorus and is tentatively identified as ribose-5-phosphate, a pentose phosphate pathway intermediate. While ATP and phosphocreatine did not change during glucose and oxygen deprivation or during prolonged muscle contraction, the 3.86delta phosphate decreased significantly. Furthermore, theophylline, an agent that increases intracellular cAMP, also decreased the level of the 3.86 delta phosphate. These results are consistent with the concept that intermediate metabolism sustains high energy phosphate pools in vascular smooth muscle in the steady state under various conditions. The pentose phosphate pathway may play an important role in vascular smooth muscle metabolism. (author)

  2. Energetics of acute pressure overload of the porcine right ventricle. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Schwartz, G G; Steinman, S; Garcia, J.; Greyson, C; Massie, B; Weiner, M W

    1992-01-01

    In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the right ventricular (RV) free wall was employed to determine (a) whether phosphorus energy metabolites vary reciprocally with workload in the RV and (b) the mechanisms that limit RV contractile function in acute pressure overload. In 20 open-chest pigs, phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP ratio (an index of energy metabolism inversely related to free ADP concentration), myocardial blood flow (microspheres), and segment shortening (sonomicro...

  3. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of effects of some chlorophenols on Escherichia coli and a pentachlorophenol-degrading bacterium.

    Steiert, J G; Thoma, W J; Ugurbil, K; Crawford, R L

    1988-01-01

    A Flavobacterium sp. that mineralizes pentachlorophenol degrades some, but not all, of the other chlorinated phenols. Whole-cell 31P nuclear magnetic resonance was used to compare and observe transmembrane pH gradients and nucleotide pools in the Flavobacterium sp. and Escherichia coli after pentachlorophenol and 3,4,5-trichlorophenol were added to the cell suspensions. The data suggest that those chlorinated phenols which are not degraded by the Flavobacterium sp. may be resistant to degrada...

  4. Exertional muscle pain in familial Mediterranean fever patients evaluated by MRI and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of physical activity on the structural, morphological, and metabolic characteristics of the gastrocnemius muscle in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) patients, utilizing quantitative 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in order to elucidate the mechanism of their exertional leg pain. Materials and methods: Eleven FMF patients suffering from exertional leg pain (eight male, three female; mean age 33 years) and six healthy individuals (three male, three female; mean age 39 years) constituted the control group. All of the participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-selective 31P MRS (3 T) of the leg muscles before and after graded exercise on a treadmill. Phosphocreatine (PCr):inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr:adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios and the intracellular pH of the leg muscles were measured using 31P MRS. Results: For both groups, normal muscle mass with no signal alterations was observed on the MRI images after exercise. The normal range of pre- and post- exercise MRS muscle parameters was observed in both groups. However, the intracellular pH post-exercise, was significantly higher (less acidic) in the FMF group compared to the control group [pH (FMF) = 7.03 ± 0.02; pH (control) 7.00 ± 0.02; p < 0.0006]. Conclusions: The finding of a less prominent, post-exercise acidification of the gastrocnemius muscle in this FMF patient group suggests a forme fruste of glycogenosis. This preliminary observation should be further investigated in a future, larger-scale study

  5. Cardiac metabolism during exercise in healthy volunteers measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Conway, M A; Bristow, J D; Blackledge, M J; Rajagopalan, B; Radda, G K

    1991-01-01

    A technique was devised for individuals to exercise prone in a magnet during magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the heart and phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra of the heart were obtained by the phase modulated rotating frame imaging technique in six healthy volunteers during steady state dynamic quadriceps exercise. During prone exercise heart rate, blood pressure, and total body oxygen consumption were measured at increasing loads and the results were compared with those during Bruce protocol treadmill exercise. During prone exercise with a 5 kg load the heart rate was similar and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than those during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol. The rate-pressure products were similar but the total body oxygen consumption was lower during prone exercise. There was no difference in the ratio of phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate during rest and exercise.Thus during exercise that produced a local cardiac stress equal to or greater than that during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol treadmill exercise, the energy requirements of the normal human myocardium were adequately supplied by oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:1993127

  6. 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy: Impaired energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism

    31Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows an in vivo examination of energy metabolism. The present study was designed to evaluate whether in patients with latent hyperthyroidism alterations of muscle energy metabolism could be found similar to those observed in patients with overt hyperthyroidism. In 10 patients with overt hyperthyroidism before therapy and 20 with latent hyperthyroidism (also without therapy) and in 24 healthy volunteers magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the calf muscle was performed within a 1.5-Tesla magnet. Muscle concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate, and ATP were quantified compared to an external standard solution of K2HPO4. In the patients with overt hyperthyroidism and with latent hyperthyroidism a significant decrease of phosphocreatine was found. Further, the ATP concentration in patients with latent and manifest hyperthyroidism tended towards lower values. There were no significant differences in the decrease of phosphocreatine and ATP between both patient groups. Therefore, this study for the first time shows that alterations of energy metabolism in latent hyperthyroidism can be measured and that they are similar to those observed in overt hyperthyroidism. (orig.)

  7. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T;

    1992-01-01

    changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used......The electromyogram (EMG) is often used to study human muscle fatigue, but the changes in the electromyographic signals during muscle contraction are not well understood in relation to muscle metabolism. The 31P NMR spectroscopy is a semi-quantitative non-invasive method for studying the metabolic....... The subject had the left foot strapped to the ergometer. The anterior tibial EMG was recorded by bipolar surface electrodes. A surface coil was strapped to the anterior tibial muscle next to the EMG electrodes. Simultaneous measurements of surface EMG and surface coil 31P NMR spectroscopy were...

  8. Cellular applications of 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of cells and purified mitochondria are discussed to show the kind of information that can be obtained in vivo. In suspensions of Escherichia coli both phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 NMR studies of glycolysis of bioenergetics are presented. In rat liver cells the pathways of gluconeogenesis from carbon-13-labeled glycerol are followed by carbon-13 NMR. In the intact liver cells cytosolic and mitochondrial pH's were separately measured by phosphorus-31 NMR. In purified mitochondria the internal and external concentrations of inorganic phosphate, adenosine diphosphate, and adenosine triphosphate were determined by phosphorus-31 while the pH difference across the membrane was measured simultaneously

  9. Intracellular pH in Dictyostelium discoideum: a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    We have used phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance to determine intracellular pH in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. We devised an air-lift circulator to maintain the dense cell suspensions in a well-oxygenated and well-stirred state while causing minimal perturbation to the sample flowing through the detector coils. Cells continued to develop normally in this set-up. Spectra acquired under these conditions typically show two peaks in the inorganic phosphate region corresponding to pH values of 7.16 +/- 0.03 and 6.48 +/- 0.02. These peaks are believed to represent the mitochondrial and cytosolic compartments respectively, based on a comparison of these values with published data and the collapse of the two compartments upon addition of the mitochondrial uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenylhydrazone. Dictyostelium cells show a remarkable degree of intracellular pH homeostasis. Both mitochondrial and cytosolic pH remained unchanged as extracellular pH was varied from 4.3 to 8.1. There was also no apparent change in the pH of either compartment after up to 13.5 hours' development in suspension

  10. 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of white matter signal hyperintensity areas in elderly subjects

    White matter signal hyperintensities (WMSH) are commonly seen on MRI of elderly subjects. The purpose of this study was to characterize metabolic changes in the white matter of elderly subjects with extensive WMSH. We used water-suppressed proton (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) to compare six subjects with extensive WMSH with eight age-matched elderly subjects with minimal or absent WMSH, and phosphorus (31P) MRSI to compare nine subjects with extensive WMSH and seven age-matched elderly subjects without extensive WMSH. Relative to region-matched tissue in elderly controls, extensive WMSH were associated with increased signal from choline-containing metabolites, no significant change of signal from N-acetylaspartate, and a trend to a decreased phosphomonoester (PME) resonance. These findings suggest that WMSH may be associated with an alteration of brain myelin phospholipids in the absence of axonal damage. There were no differences in energy phosphates, consistent with lack of ongoing brain ischemia. Within the group with extensive WMSH, PME resonance measures were significantly lower in WMSH than in contralateral normal-appearing white matter. These results provide information on pathophysiology of WMSH and a basis for comparison with WMSH in Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, multiple sclerosis, and other diseases. (orig.). With 4 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Giesy, John P; He, Zhongqi; Song, Lirong; Fan, Mingle

    2016-04-01

    Debris from aquatic macrophytes and algae are important recycling sources of phosphorus (P), which can result in continuing blooms of algae by recycling bioavailable P in the eutrophic lakes. However, knowledge of forms of P in aquatic macrophytes and algae and their contribution to internal loads of P in lakes is limited. Without such knowledge, it is difficult to develop appropriate strategies to remediate and or restore aquatic ecosystems that have become eutrophic. Therefore, in this work, P was extracted from six types of aquatic macrophytes and algae collected from Tai Lake of China and characterized by use of solution (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. When extracted by 0.5 M NaOH-25 mM EDTA, extraction recovery of total P(TP) and organic P(Po) exceeded 90 %. Concentrations of Po in algae and aquatic macrophytes were 5552 mg kg(-1) and 1005 mg kg(-1) and accounted for 56.0 and 47.2 % of TP, respectively. When Po, including condensed P, was characterized by solution (31)P-NMR Po in algae included orthophosphate monoesters (79.8 %), pyrophosphate (18.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (2.0 %), and Po in aquatic macrophytes included orthophosphate monoesters (90.3 %), pyrophosphate (4.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (5.5 %). Additionally, orthophosphate monoesters in algal debris mainly included β-glycerophosphate (44.1 %), α-glycerophosphate (13.5 %), and glucose 6-phosphate (13.5 %). Orthophosphate monoesters in aquatic macrophytes mainly included β-glycerophosphate (27.9 %), α-glycerophosphate (24.6 %), and adenosine 5' monophosphate (8.2 %). Results derived from this study will be useful in better understanding nutrient cycling, relevant eutrophication processes, and pollution control for freshwater lakes. PMID:26681323

  12. Biochemical metabolic changes assessed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy after radiation-induced hepatic injury in rabbits

    Ri-Sheng Yu; Liang Hao; Fei Dong; Jian-Shan Mao; Jian-Zhong Sun; Ying Chen; Min Lin; Zhi-Kang Wang; Wen-Hong Ding

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To compare the features of biochemical metabolic changes detected by hepatic phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) with the liver damage score (LDS) and pathologic changes in rabbits and to investigate the diagnostic value of 31P MRS in acute hepatic radiation injury.METHODS:A total of 30 rabbits received different radiation doses (ranging 5-20 Gy) to establish acute hepatic injury models.Blood biochemical tests,31P MRS and pathological examinations were carried out 24 h after irradiation.The degree of injury was evaluated according to LDS and pathology.Ten healthy rabbits served as controls.The MR examination was performed on a 1.5 T imager using a 1H/31P surface coil by the 2D chemical shift imaging technique.The relative quantities of phosphomonoesters (PME),phosphodiesters (PDE),inorganic phosphate (Pi) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured.The data were statistically analyzed.RESULTS:(1) Relative quantification of phosphorus metabolites:(a) ATP:there were significant differences (P<0.05) (LDS-groups:control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group,1.83±0.33 vs 1.55±0.24 vs 1.27±0.09 vs 0.98±0.18;pathological groups:control group vs mild group vs moderate group vs severe group,1.83±0.33 vs 1.58±0.25 vs 1.32±0.07 vs 1.02 ± 0.18) of ATP relative quantification among control group,mild injured group,moderate injured group,and severe injured group according to both LDS grading and pathological grading,respectively,and it decreased progressively with the increased degree of injury (r=-0.723,P=0.000).(b) PME and Pi;the relative quantification of PME and Pi decreased significantly in the severe injured group,and the difference between the control group and severe injured group was significant (P<0.05) (PME:LDScontrol group vs LDS-severe group,0.86±0.23 vs 0.58±0.22,P=0.031;pathological control group vs pathological severe group,0.86±0.23 vs 0.60±0.21,P=0.037;Pi:LDS-control group vs LDS-severe group,0.74±0.18 vs

  13. Bevacizumab impairs oxidative energy metabolism and shows antitumoral effects in recurrent glioblastomas: a 31P/1H MRSI and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study

    HATTINGEN, ELKE; Jurcoane, Alina; Bähr, Oliver; Rieger, Johannes; Magerkurth, Jörg; Anti, Sandra; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Bevacizumab shows unprecedented rates of response in recurrent glioblastomas (GBM), but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. We employed in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether bevacizumab alters oxygen and energy metabolism and whether this effect has antitumoral activity in recurrent GBM. 31P and 1H MRSI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and high-resolution T2 and T2′ mapping (indirect marker of ox...

  14. Spin-lattice relaxation time of inorganic phosphate in human tumor xenografts measured in vivo by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Influence of oxygen tension

    Previous 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) studies have suggested that the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) resonance is shorter in well-oxygenated than in poorly oxygenated tumors. Amelanotic human melanoma xenografts were therefore subjected to 31P-MRS to investigate whether the T1 of the Pi resonance might be a useful parameter for assessment of tumor oxygenation status. It was searched for possible correlations between the T1 of the Pi resonance and oxygen tension or parameters closely related to oxygen tension, including 31P-MRS tumor energy status and blood supply per viable tumor cell. Oxygen tension, tumor energy status, and blood supply per viable tumor cell decreased with increasing tumor volume. In contrast to previous suggestions, the T1 of the Pi resonance decreased with increasing tumor volume and decreasing oxygen tension, tumor energy status, and blood supply per viable tumor cell, possibly because the tumors developed necrotic regions concomitantly with the decrease in oxygenation status, resulting in increased concentrations of freely dissolved para-magnetic ions in the tissue. Consequently, the T1 of the Pi resonance can probably not be utilized to estimate the oxygenation status of tumors, at least not in tumors with necrotic regions. (orig.)

  15. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the association of basic proteins with multilayers of diacyl phosphatidylserine.

    Smith, R; Cornell, B A; Keniry, M A; Separovic, F

    1983-08-10

    Lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine), myelin basic protein and ribonuclease were used to form multilayer dispersions containing about 50% protein (by weight) with bovine brain diacyl phosphatidylserine (PS). 31P nuclear magnetic resonance shift anisotropies, spin-spin (T2) and spin-lattice (T1) relaxation times for the lipid headgroup phosphorus were measured at 36.44 MHz. At pH 7.5, lysozyme, cytochrome c, poly(L-lysine) and ribonuclease were shown to increase the chemical shift anisotropy of PS by between 12-20%. Myelin basic protein altered the shape of the phosphate resonance, suggesting the presence of two lipid components, one of which had a modified headgroup conformation. The presence of cytochrome c led to the formation of a narrow spike at the isotropic shift position of the spectrum. Of the various proteins or peptides we have studied, only poly(L-lysine) and cytochrome c had any effect on the T1 of PS (1050 ms). Both caused a 20-30% decrease in T1 of the lamellar-phase phosphate peak. The narrow peak in the presence of cytochrome c had a very short T1 of 156 ms. The possibility is considered that the cytochrome Fe3+ contributes to the phosphate relaxation in this case. The effect of all proteins on the T2 of the phosphorus resonance was to cause an increase from the value for pure PS (1.6 ms) to between 2 and 5 ms. The results obtained with proteins are compared with the effects of small ions and intrinsic membrane proteins on the order and motion of the headgroups of lipids in bilayers. PMID:6191774

  16. Physiological effects of the form of nitrogen on corn root tips: a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    Physiological effects of different N forms (NO−3, NH+4, or a combination of both) on corn (Zea mays L.) root tips and leaves were studied by following 31P signals with a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. With root tips, both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH could be measured, whereas with leaves, only vacuolar pH could be determined. The N treatments did not affect the cytoplasmic pH of corn root tips in contrast to proposals of previous workers. Leaf vacuolar pH was higher and root tip vacuolar pH lower with NO−3 than with NH+4. Under anaerobic conditions, cytoplasmic pH was reduced because of lactic acid fermentation. Nitrate, an electron acceptor, delayed the acidification of the cytoplasm compartment because it represents an alternative way to reoxidize NADH. In conclusion, for the conditions of these experiments, the pH of the cytoplasm of corn root tips was not modified by the form of N absorbed; however, the pH of this compartment was affected by the form of N presented during development anaerobiosi. (author)

  17. Characterization of the phosphoserine of pepsinogen using /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance: corroboration of X-ray crystallographic results

    Williams, S.P.; Bridger, W.A.; James, M.N.G.

    1986-10-21

    The endogenous phosphoserine residue in porcine pepsinogen has been titrated with use of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/P NMR). It has an observed pK/sub a/sub 2// of 6.7 and a narrow line width (approx. =10 Hz). The phosphate can be readily removed by an acid phosphatase from potato; however, it is resistant to hydrolysis by several alkaline phosphatases. The X-ray crystal structure of porcine pepsinogen at 1.8-A resolution shows a rather weak and diffuse region of electron density in the vicinity of the phosphorylated serine residue. This suggests considerable dynamic mobility or conformational disorder of the phosphate. In order to define more fully this behavior the NMR data have been used to corroborate these crystallographic results. All these physical data are consistent with a highly mobile phosphoserine residue on the surface of the zymogen and freely exposed to solvent. In addition, certain properties of this phosphoserine moiety on pepsinogen are similar to those of one of the phosphorylated residues of ovalbumin. The possible significance of this is discussed.

  18. Characterization of the phosphoserine of pepsinogen using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance: corroboration of X-ray crystallographic results

    The endogenous phosphoserine residue in porcine pepsinogen has been titrated with use of phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR). It has an observed pK/sub a2/ of 6.7 and a narrow line width (≅10 Hz). The phosphate can be readily removed by an acid phosphatase from potato; however, it is resistant to hydrolysis by several alkaline phosphatases. The X-ray crystal structure of porcine pepsinogen at 1.8-A resolution shows a rather weak and diffuse region of electron density in the vicinity of the phosphorylated serine residue. This suggests considerable dynamic mobility or conformational disorder of the phosphate. In order to define more fully this behavior the NMR data have been used to corroborate these crystallographic results. All these physical data are consistent with a highly mobile phosphoserine residue on the surface of the zymogen and freely exposed to solvent. In addition, certain properties of this phosphoserine moiety on pepsinogen are similar to those of one of the phosphorylated residues of ovalbumin. The possible significance of this is discussed

  19. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the metabolic pools of adenosine triphosphate in cultured bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells

    31P NMR was used to resolve and determine the relative quantity and mobility of ATP in the cytosolic and vesicular compartments of isolated adrenomedullary chromaffin cells. The cells were cultured on microcarrier beads and superfused with an oxygenated medium-thereby permitting dense suspensions of viable cells to be maintained in the NMR probe for extended time periods. Under these conditions, distinct 31P signals could be seen for ATP within the vesicular and the cytosolic pools. Comparison of the integrated areas of the β-phosphate resonances from the two ATP pools indicated 77% of the endogenous ATP was in the vesicular pool. From this observation and the assumption that the concentration of ATP in the vesicle is 87.5 mM, the concentration of ATP calculated to be in the cytoplasmic pool was ∼ 4 mM. The pH in the vesicle determined from the chemical shift of the γ-phosphate resonance of vesicular ATP was 5.84 ± 0.17, slightly higher than the intragranular pH measured in hypoxic cells. Spin-lattice relaxation times of ATP 31P resonances in the vesicular pool were from 12 to 14 times shorter than the ATP resonances in the cytosol, corresponding to a decrease in molecular mobility due to incorporation of ATP within a catecholamine-storage complex

  20. A retunable surface coil for high field 31P and 1H magnetic resonance evaluations of the living mouse leg

    This study presents a retunable surface coil that can be adjusted to at least two Larmor frequencies sequentially without the need to remove the coil from the magnet and while avoiding interference between channels. A prototype 1H/31P surface coil for the analysis of the in vivo mouse leg under electrical stimulation was designed for operation at 11.75 T. The coil has a high-quality factor of over 100 for both operational frequencies. To demonstrate the capabilities of this simple design, in vivo experiments were conducted to acquire high-resolution 1H images and 31P spectra of the C57BL/6 mouse leg, both with high temporal resolution. Proton diffusion tensor imaging was also performed to evaluate rodent skeletal muscle architecture. This design makes the acquisition of physiological data about both muscle structure and energetics (PCr, ATP and Pi) possible in a single experimental session

  1. Silencing of the glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDPD5 alters the phospholipid metabolite profile in a breast cancer model in vivo as monitored by 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Wijnen, J.P.; Jiang, L.; Greenwood, T.R.; Cheng, M; Döpkens, M.; Cao, M.D.; Bhujwalla, Z M; Krishnamachary, B; Klomp, D. W. J.; Glunde, K.

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal choline phospholipid metabolism is an emerging hallmark of cancer, which is implicated in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. The malignant metabolic phenotype is characterized by high levels of phosphocholine (PC) and relatively low levels of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) in aggressive breast cancer cells. Phosphorus Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P MRS) is able to noninvasively detect these water-soluble metabolites of choline as well as ethanolamine phospholipid metabolism. He...

  2. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows noninvasive studies of cerebral energy-rich phosphorous compounds in humans. In an attempt to characterize the relationship between peripheral blood glucose concentrations and whole-brain phosphate metabolism during insulin...... constant during the experiment. These results show that the integrated brain profile of energy-rich phosphorous compounds is unaffected by experimental insulin-induced hypoglycemia in humans....

  3. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the Sherpa heart: a phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate signature of metabolic defense against hypobaric hypoxia.

    Hochachka, P W; Clark, C M; Holden, J E; Stanley, C; Ugurbil, K; Menon, R S

    1996-01-01

    Of all humans thus far studied, Sherpas are considered by many high-altitude biomedical scientists as most exquisitely adapted for life under continuous hypobaric hypoxia. However, little is known about how the heart is protected in hypoxia. Hypoxia defense mechanisms in the Sherpa heart were explored by in vivo, noninvasive 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Six Sherpas were examined under two experimental conditions [normoxic (21% FiO2) and hypoxic (11% FiO2) and in two adaptational state...

  4. Tumour oxygenation assessed by polarographic needle electrodes and bioenergetic status measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy im human soft tissue tumours

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of polarographic oxygen electrode measurements and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in extravisceral soft tissue tumours, designated to receive preoperative radiotherapy. Pretreatment tumour oxygenation was determined in 41 cases and 31P-MRS was amenable to lesions in 34 patients. Biopsies were characterized histopathologically as 25 primary soft tissue sarcomas (STS), 2 recurrent STS, 9 benign and 5 other malignancies. Evaluation of phosphorus (31P) spectra was possible in 11 cases. The oxygenation status of normal tissue was higher than that of tumours, whereas no difference was found between oxygenation status of benign lesions and that of STS. There was substantial variation between tumours in the median pO2 and the bioenergetic status (β-NTP/Pi). No correlation was found between tumour pO2 and volume (n=25). Moreover, there was no correlation between β-NTP/Pi and the median tumour pO2, the fraction of pO2 values ≤2.5 mm Hg or tumour volume (n=10), respectively. In conclusion, oxygen electrode assessment was found to be a clinically applicable and feasible technique for measuring tumour oxygenation status, whereas the success of 31P-MRS in human neoplasms was limited by a very poor resolution in the phosphorus signal that allowed analysis of 31P spectra in 11 tumours out of 34 cases. (orig.)

  5. Effects of hypo- und hyperthyroidism on skeletal muscle metabolism. A sup 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study. Einfluss von Hyper- und Hypothyreose auf den Energiestoffwechsel der Skelettmuskulatur. Eine Untersuchung mit sup 31 P-Kernspinspektroskopie

    Moka, D.; Theissen, P.; Linden, A.; Waters, W.; Schicha, H. (Koeln Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1991-06-01

    {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy allows non-invasive evaluation of phosphorus metabolism in man. The purpose of the present study was to assess the influence of hyper- and hypothyroidism on the metabolism of resting human skeletal muscle. The present data show that quantitative measurement of phosphate metabolism by NMR is possible as also demonstrated by other studies. Using a quantitative evaluation method with an external standard, significant differences in the levels of phosphocreatine, adenosintriphosphate, and phosphodiesters were found. In hypothyroid patients a TSH-dependent increase in phosphodiesters and a decrease in adenosintriphosphate and phosphocreatine was observed. In hyperthyroidism a similar decrease in adenosintriphosphate but a considerably higher decrease in phosphocreatine occurred. In the light of the results of other studies of muscle matabolism, these changes appear to be non-specific so that further studies are required to assess the clinical value of such measurements. (orig.).

  6. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined by in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, A G; Quistorff, B;

    1992-01-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth...... characteristics, but a different radiosensitivity. The 54A tumors are twice as radiosensitive as the 54B's. In the present study the tumors were treated with 2.5, 10, and 40 Gy. For comparison, nude mice were given cranial irradiation at the same three doses, and the effect was evaluated by in vivo 31P-MRS. No...... effect was observed in brain at any dose level. In contrast, 40 Gy induced a statistically significant reduction in ATP/Pi ratio during the 12-h post-irradiation period. This effect was more pronounced in 54A than in 54B. Some reduction was observed following 10 Gy, whereas 2.5 Gy induced no changes in...

  7. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of influences of cranial irradiation on cerebral energy metabolism in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    The effect of cranial irradiation on the cerebrum was studied. Energy metabolism in the brain was assessed before and after cranial irradiation using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The subjects were 3 pediatric patients with initial acute lymphotic leukemia (ALL), who underwent induction chemotherapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis according to the ALL high risk 911 protocol of Children's Cancer and Leukemia Study Group. The patients underwent 31P-MRS within one week before and after prophylactic CNS irradiation with a total dose of 18 Gy (i.e., 0.5 Gy in two fractions, 1.0 Gy in two fractions, and 1.5 Gy in 10 fractions - 4 times a week in 3-4 weeks). All 3 patients showed a decrease in phosphocreatine and ATP levels, which are indicators of energy metabolism, and also in the intracellular pH level in the brain tissue. Cranial irradiation was thus suggested to induce hypoxia in the brain tissue. (S.Y.)

  8. Ex vivo identification of atherosclerotic plaque calcification by a 31P solid-state magnetic resonance imaging technique.

    Hallock, Kevin J; Hamilton, James A

    2006-12-01

    Calcified tissue is a common component of atherosclerotic plaques, and occurs most often in mature plaques. The process of calcification is a poorly understood risk factor that may contribute to a plaque's vulnerability to sudden rupture. In this study a solid-state imaging sequence, termed single-point imaging (SPI), was used to observe calcification directly in ex vivo atherosclerotic plaques. Standards were used to validate the ability of (31)P SPI to detect and differentiate calcification from crystalline cholesterol, phospholipids, and other plaque components. After suitable experimental parameters were found, human carotid specimens obtained by endarterectomy were imaged ex vivo by (31)P solid-state imaging and standard (1)H methods. In contrast to (1)H imaging methods, (31)P imaging detected only the calcification in the plaque. PMID:17089379

  9. Value of dynamic 31p magnetic resonance spectroscopy technique in in vivo assessment of the skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetes

    WU Fei-yun; TU Hui-juan; QIN Bin; CHEN Ting; XU Hua-feng; QI Jing; WANG De-hang

    2012-01-01

    Background Phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31p-MRS) has been successfully applied to study intracellular membrane compounds and high-energy phosphate metabolism.This study aimed to evaluate the capability of dynamic 31p-MRS for assessing energy metabolism and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle from type 2 diabetic patients.Methods Dynamic 31p-MRS was performed on 22 patients with type 2 diabetes and 26 healthy volunteers.Spectra were acquired from quadriceps muscle while subjects were in a state of rest,at exercise and during recovery.The peak areas of inorganic phosphate (Pi),phosphocreatine (PCr),and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured.The concentration of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and the intracellular pH value were calculated from the biochemistry reaction equilibrium.The time constant and recovery rates of Pi,PCr,and ADP were analyzed using exponential curve fitting.Results As compared to healthy controls,type 2 diabetes patients had significantly lower skeletal muscle concentrations of Pi,PCr and β-ATP,and higher levels of ADP and Pi/PCr.During exercise,diabetics experienced a significant Pi peak increase and PCr peak decrease,and once the exercise was completed both Pi and PCr peaks returned to resting levels.Quantitatively,the mean recovery rates of Pi and PCr in diabetes patients were (10.74±1.26) mmol/s and (4.74±2.36) mmol/s,respectively,which was significantly higher than in controls.Conclusions Non-invasive quantitative 31P-MRS is able to detect energy metabolism inefficiency and mitochondrial function impairment in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetics.

  10. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure in vivo cardiac energetics in normal myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Experiences at 3 T

    Background: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows measurement of in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium. While traditionally 31P cardiac spectroscopy is performed at 1.5 T, cardiac MRS at higher field strength can theoretically increase signal to noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution therefore improving sensitivity and specificity of the cardiac spectra. The reproducibility and feasibility of performing cardiac spectroscopy at 3 T is presented here in this study in healthy volunteers and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Cardiac spectroscopy was performed using a Phillips 3T Achieva scanner in 37 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) to test the feasibility of the protocol. To test the reproducibility a single volunteer was scanned eight times on separate occasions. A single voxel 31P MRS was performed using Image Selected In vivo Spectroscopy (ISIS) volume localization. Results: The mean phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio of the eight measurements performed on one individual was 2.11 ± 0.25. Bland Altman plots showed a variance of 12% in the measurement of PCr/ATP ratios. The PCr/ATP ratio was significantly reduced in HCM patients compared to controls, 1.42 ± 0.51 and 2.11 ± 0.57, respectively, P 31P MRS at 3 T is a reliable method of measuring in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium for clinical studies and diagnostics. Based on our data an impairment of cardiac energetic state in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is indisputable.

  11. Improved energy kinetics following high protein diet in McArdle's syndrome. A 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Jensen, K E; Jakobsen, J; Thomsen, C;

    1990-01-01

    A patient with McArdle's syndrome was examined using bicycle ergometry and 31P NMR spectroscopy during exercise. The patients working capacity was approximately half the expected capacity of controls. Muscle energy kinetics improved significantly during intravenous glucose infusion and after 6...

  12. Analysis of metabolites in human brain tumors and cerebral infarctions using 31P- and 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    31P- and 1H-MRS with a 2.0 tesla MRI/S system was used to monitor the cerebral energy levels, phospholipid metabolism, intracellular pH, and lactate and amino acid levels in patients with brain tumors and cerebral infarctions. Studies of human brain tumors have suggested that the 31P-MRS of malignant brain tumors show low concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and β-ATP, high levels of phosphomonoester (PME) and inorganic Pi, and an alkaline pH. The Pi, PME, and intracellular pH of malignant lymphoma were higher than those of other brain tumors. 1H-MRS showed an increase of lactate in malignant brain tumors and epidermoids. After ACNU administration, the tumor 31P-MRS showed transient reduction and elevation of Pi on five patients with malignant gliomas. Intracellular pH also showed a transient reduction during radiotherapy. 1H-MRS showed a reduction of lactate at the beginning of therapy and showed a marked re-elevation of lactate with tumor regrowth. After radiotherapy, the normal brain 31P-MRS showed transient elevation and reduction of Pi. Intracellular pH also showed a transient elevation during radiotherapy. To investigate the mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) in cerebral ischemia, changes of brain lactate level were estimated by 1H-MRS. Although the Lactate/Creatine ratio decreased consistently over time in all patients, it decreased more rapidly in the patients receiving HBO therapy than in those without such therapy. 1H-MRS demonstrated that HBO therapy may improve metabolism in the ischemic brain and reduces the lactate levels. 31P- and 1H-MRS are practical tools for the clinical analysis of cerebral disorders as well as for deciding on therapeutic procedures and evaluating the response. (K.H.)

  13. Analysis of energy metabolism of the rabbit liver in obstructive jaundice using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess the changes in hepatic high-energy phosphate metabolites in rabbits with obstructive jaundice. The rabbits, which had undergone operative ligation of the common bile duct, were studied using a 2.0 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imager. Comparison of the peak phosphorus signal values relative to α-ATP showed that the peak phosphodiester and γ-ATP values in the livers of the one-day-after-ligation group were significantly lower than those in the control group, and the peak phosphomonoester and phosphodiester values in the five-days-after-ligation group were larger than those in the control group, but not significantly. Comparison of the peak T1 values in the one-day-after-ligation group with those of the control group revealed that the T1 value of phosphodiester was significantly larger than that in control group. It is suggested that dysfunction of phospholipid metabolism appears in the early phase of hepatic dysfunction due to obstructive jaundice. (author)

  14. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed

  15. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance saturation transfer measurements of phosphate exchange reactions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    31P saturation transfer techniques have been used to measure phosphate kinetics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phosphate comsumption rate observed in acetate grown mid-log cells was combined with measurements of O2 consumption to yield P/O ratios of 2.2 and 2.9, for cells respiring on glucose and ethanol, respectively. However, no phosphate consumption activity was observed in saturation transfer experiments on anaerobic glucose fed cells. The phosphate consumption rates measured by saturation transfer in cells respiring on glucose and ethanol was attributed to the unidirectional rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. (Auth.)

  16. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of intracellular phosphate pools and polyphosphate metabolism in Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada) Hada (raphidophyceae)

    The effects of starvation and subsequent addition of phosphate-containing medium on the phosphate metabolic intermediates were studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy of perchloric acid extracts and intact cells of Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada) Hada. When orthophosphate in the medium was completely depleted the medium was enriched with orthophosphate (4.5 μM). In the phosphate starved condition, the P cell quota was 76 fmol x cell-1 and the major components of phosphate intermediates were phosphodiester, sugar phosphate and orthophosphate (P/sub i/). After addition of P/sub i/, rapid uptake of P/sub i/ was observed and the P cell quota increased to 108 fmol x cell-1 in 2 h, 134 fmol x cell-1 in 5 h and 222 fmol x cell-1 in 1 day after addition of phosphate. The 31P-NMR spectrum indicated that a major portion of P was stored as polyphosphate, in which the average chain length of polyphosphate increased from 10 to 20 phosphate residues in one day after addition of P/sub i/

  17. Localized Semi-LASER Dynamic 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the Soleus During and Following Exercise at 7 T

    Fiedler, Georg B; Schmid, Albrecht I; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Moser, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Object This study demonstrates the applicability of semi-LASER localized dynamic $^{31}$P MRS to deeper lying areas of the exercising human soleus muscle (SOL). The effect of accurate localization and high temporal resolution on data specificity is investigated. Materials and Methods To achieve high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a temporal resolution of 6 s, a custom-built calf coil array was used at 7T. The kinetics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and intracellular pH were quantified separately in SOL and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle of 9 volunteers, during rest, plantar flexion exercise and recovery. Results The average SNR of PCr at rest was 64$\\pm$15 in SOL (83$\\pm$12 in GM). End exercise PCr depletion in SOL (19$\\pm$9%) was far lower than in GM (74$\\pm$14%). pH in SOL increased rapidly and, in contrast to GM, remained elevated until the end of exercise. Conclusion $^{31}$P MRS in single-shots every 6 s localized in the deeper lying SOL enabled quantification of PCr recovery times at low depletions and of...

  18. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using 31P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using 31P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  19. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the interaction between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and human normal adult hemoglobin

    High-resolution 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to human normal adult hemoglobin and the molecular interactions involved in the allosteric effect of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate molecule on hemoglobin. Individual hydrogen ion NMR titration curves have been obtained for 22-26 histidyl residues of hemoglobin and for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate with hemoglobin in both the deoxy and carbonmonoxy forms. The results indicate that 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binds to deoxyhemoglobin at the central cavity between the two β chains and the binding involves the β2-histidyl residues. Moreover, the results suggest that the binding site of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to carbonmonoxyhemoglobin contains the same (or at least some of the same) amino acid residues responsible for binding in the deoxy form. As a result of the specific interactions with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the β2-histidyl residues make a significant contribution to the alkaline Bohr effect under these experimental conditions. These results give the first experimental demonstration that long-range electrostatic and/or conformation effects of the binding could play an important role in the allosteric effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate on hemoglobin. The 31P nuclear magnetic resonance titration data for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate have been used to calculate the pK values of the phosphate groups in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate bound to deoxy- and carbon-monoxyhemoglobin and the proton uptake by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate upon ligand binding to hemoglobin

  20. Development of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance methods for the study of phosphate metabolisms in E. coli and B. subtilis

    31P NMR experiments were performed on escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis at various temperatures under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The total soluble intracellular phosphate concentration was estimated to be 2 x 10-17 mole/cell, while intracellular orthophosphate concentration was around 1 x 10-17 mole/cell. Addition of glucose resulted in a general decrease in intracellular pH and was accompanied by the formation of sugar monophosphates. The concentrations of soluble intracellular phosphates, both inorganic and organic phosphates, were estimated by integration versus methylene diphosphonic acid (MDPA) standard. Although intracellular and extracellular orthophosphate could be observed, these appear to exchange rapidly on the NMR time scale. (Author)

  1. Changes in energy metabolism in the quadriceps femoris after a single bout of acute exhaustive swimming in rats: a 31p-magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Sun Yingwei; Pan Shinong; Chen Zhian; Zhao Heng; Ma Ying; Zheng Liqiang; Li Qi

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the value of 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) in in vivo assessment of exhaustive exercise-induced injury in skeletal muscle.We aimed to evaluate the value of a 31P-MRS study using the quadriceps femoris after a single bout of acute exhaustive swimming in rats,and the correlation between 31P-MRS and histological changes.Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to control,half-exhaustive,and exhaustive exercise groups.31P-MRS of the quadriceps femoris of the right lower limb was performed immediately after swimming exercise to detect Pi,PCr,and β-ATP.The Pi/PCr,Pi/β-ATP,PCr/β-ATP,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were calculated and pH measured.Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUCs) were calculated to evaluate the diagnostic potential of 31P-MRS in identifying and distinguishing the three groups.HE staining,electron microscopy and desmin immunostaining after imaging of the muscle were used as a reference standard.The correlation between 31P-MRS and the mean absorbance (A value) of desmin staining were analyzed with the Pearson correlation test.Results Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) showed statistically significant intergroup differences (P<0.05).AUCs of Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were 0.905,0.848,0.930,and 0.930 for the control and half-exhaustive groups,while sensitivity and specificity were 90%/85%,95%/55%,95%/80%,and 90%/85%,respectively.The AUCs of Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were 0.995,0.980,1.000,and 1.000 for the control and exhaustive groups,while sensitivity and specificity were 95%/90%,100%/90%,100%/95%,and 100%/95%,respectively.The AUCs of Pi,PCr,Pi/PCr,and PCr/(PCr+Pi) were 0.735,0.865,0.903,and 0.903 for the half-exhaustive and exhaustive groups,while sensitivity and specificity were 80%/60%,90%/75%,95%/65%,and 95%/70%,respectively.In the half-exhaustive group,some muscle fibers exhibited edema in HE staining,and the

  2. Modeling sickle cell vasoocculsion in the rat leg: Quantification of trapped sickle cells and correlation with 31P metabolic and 1H magnetic resonance imaging changes

    The authors have developed an animal model to elucidate the acute effects of perfusion abnormalities on muscle metabolism induced by different density-defined classes of erythrocytes isolated from sickle cell anemia patients. Technetium-99m (99mTc)-labeled, saline-washed normal (AA), homozygous sickle (SS), or high-density SS (SS4) erythrocytes were injected into the femoral artery of the rat and quantitative 99mTc imaging, 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy by surface coil at 2 teslas, and 1H magnetic resonance imaging at 0.15 tesla were performed. Between 5 and 25 μl of SS4 cells was trapped in the microcirculation of the thigh. In contrast, fewer SS discocytes (SS2) or AA cells were trapped. After injection of SS4 cells an initial increase in inorganic phosphate was observed in the region of the thigh served by the femoral artery, intracellular pH decreased, and subsequently the proton relaxation time T1 reached a broad maximum at 18-28 hr. When T1 obtained at this time was plotted against the volume of cells trapped, an increase of T1 over the control value of 411 ± 48 msec was found that was proportional to the number of cells trapped. They conclude that the densest SS cells are most effective at producing vasoocclusion. The extent of the change detected by 1H magnetic resonance imaging is dependent on the amount of cells trapped in the microcirculation and the magnitude of the initial increase of inorganic phosphate

  3. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo.

  4. High-energy phosphate metabolism during incremental calf exercise in humans measured by 31 phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS).

    Schocke, Michael F H; Esterhammer, Regina; Kammerlander, Christian; Rass, Anton; Kremser, Christian; Fraedrich, Gustav; Jaschke, Werner R; Greiner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Several previous 31 phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P MRS) studies performing incremental or progressive muscle exercises have observed that a decrease in pH is accompanied with an acceleration in phosphocreatine (PCr) hydrolysis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between PCr breakdown and pH during isotonic, exhaustive, incremental plantar flexion exercises. We included eight healthy, male volunteers into this study. Using a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner and a self-built exercise bench, we performed serial free induction decay (FID) (31)P MRS measurements with a time resolution of 1 min at rest, isotonic calf muscle exercise, and recovery. The exercise protocol consisted of 5-min intervals with 4.5, 6, 7.5, and 9 W workload followed by 9-min recovery. Changes in PCr and inorganic phosphate (Pi) were determined as percent changes in comparison to the baseline. In addition, pH values were calculated. This study obtained significant decreases in PCr corresponding to the gradual increases in workload. In each workload level that was succeeded by all volunteers, PCr hydrolysis passed into a steady state. After an early biphasic response, we detected a significant decrease in pH from the first to the second minute of the 6-W workload level followed by a further continuous decrease in pH up to the second minute of the recovery phase. The decrease in pH was not accompanied by acceleration in PCr hydrolysis. In conclusion, this study shows that PCr hydrolysis during incremental plantar flexion exercises passes into a steady state at different workload levels. The observed decrease in pH does not result in acceleration of PCr hydrolysis. PMID:14972400

  5. The effect of gingko biloba extract on energy metabolic status in C3H mouse fibrosarcoma: evaluated by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Gingko biloba extract (GBE), a natural product extracted from Gingko leaves, is known to increase the radiosensitivity of tumors. This radiosensitization probably arises from the increase in the peripheral blood flow by decreasing the blood viscosity and relaxing the vasospasm. The influence of a GBE on the metabolic status in fibrosarcoma II (FSall) of a C3H mouse was investigated using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Eighteen C3H mice with fibrosarcoma II (from 100 mm3 to 130 mm3) were prepared for this experiment. The mice were divided into 2 groups; one (9 mice) without a priming dose, and the other (9 mice) with a priming dose of GBE. The GBE priming dose (100 mg/kg) was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 24 hours prior to the measurement. First 31P MRS spectra were measured in the mice from each group as a baseline and test dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) was then administered to each group. One hour later, the 31P MRS spectra were measured again to evaluate the change in the energy metabolic status. In the group without the priming dose, the mean pH, PCr/Pi, PME/ATP, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose were not changed significantly compared to the values at the baseline. However, in the group with the priming dose, the mean PCr/Pi, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose changed from the baseline values of 0.49, 0.77, 0.17 to 0.74, 0.57, 0.28 respectively. According to the paired t-test, the differences were statistically significant. The above findings suggest that the metabolic status is significantly improved after administering GBE if the priming dose is given 24 hours earlier. This shows that the radiosensitizing effect of GBE is based on the increase of tumor blood flow and the improvement in the metabolic status

  6. The effect of gingko biloba extract on energy metabolic status in C3H mouse fibrosarcoma: evaluated by in vivo {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Ha, Sung Whan; Kim, Won Dong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Charn Il [Seoul National University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Tae Kuen [Ulsan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    Gingko biloba extract (GBE), a natural product extracted from Gingko leaves, is known to increase the radiosensitivity of tumors. This radiosensitization probably arises from the increase in the peripheral blood flow by decreasing the blood viscosity and relaxing the vasospasm. The influence of a GBE on the metabolic status in fibrosarcoma II (FSall) of a C3H mouse was investigated using {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Eighteen C3H mice with fibrosarcoma II (from 100 mm{sup 3} to 130 mm{sup 3}) were prepared for this experiment. The mice were divided into 2 groups; one (9 mice) without a priming dose, and the other (9 mice) with a priming dose of GBE. The GBE priming dose (100 mg/kg) was administered by an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection 24 hours prior to the measurement. First {sup 31}P MRS spectra were measured in the mice from each group as a baseline and test dose of GBE (100 mg/kg) was then administered to each group. One hour later, the {sup 31}P MRS spectra were measured again to evaluate the change in the energy metabolic status. In the group without the priming dose, the mean pH, PCr/Pi, PME/ATP, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose were not changed significantly compared to the values at the baseline. However, in the group with the priming dose, the mean PCr/Pi, Pi/ATP, PCr/(Pi + PME) values 1 hour after the test dose changed from the baseline values of 0.49, 0.77, 0.17 to 0.74, 0.57, 0.28 respectively. According to the paired t-test, the differences were statistically significant. The above findings suggest that the metabolic status is significantly improved after administering GBE if the priming dose is given 24 hours earlier. This shows that the radiosensitizing effect of GBE is based on the increase of tumor blood flow and the improvement in the metabolic status.

  7. Bevacizumab impairs oxidative energy metabolism and shows antitumoral effects in recurrent glioblastomas: a 31P/1H MRSI and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Hattingen, Elke; Jurcoane, Alina; Bähr, Oliver; Rieger, Johannes; Magerkurth, Jörg; Anti, Sandra; Steinbach, Joachim P; Pilatus, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    Bevacizumab shows unprecedented rates of response in recurrent glioblastomas (GBM), but the detailed mechanisms are still unclear. We employed in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether bevacizumab alters oxygen and energy metabolism and whether this effect has antitumoral activity in recurrent GBM. (31)P and (1)H MRSI, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and high-resolution T2 and T2' mapping (indirect marker of oxygen extraction) were investigated in 16 patients with recurrent GBM at 3 Tesla before and 1.5-2 months after initiation of therapy with bevacizumab. Changes of metabolite concentrations and of the quantitative values in the tumor and normal appearing brain tissue were calculated. The Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used to evaluate differences for tumor/edema versus control as well as changes before versus after commencement of therapy. Survival analyses were performed for significant parameters. Tumor T2', pH, ADC, and T2 decreased significantly in patients responding to bevacizumab therapy (n = 10). Patients with at least 25% T2' decrease during treatment showed longer progression-free and overall survival durations. Levels of high-energy metabolites were lower at baseline; these persisted under therapy. Glycerophosphoethanolamine as catabolic phospholipid metabolite increased in responders. The MRSI data support the hypothesis that bevacizumab induces relative tumor hypoxia (T2' decrease) and affects energy homeostasis in recurrent GBM, suggesting that bevacizumab impairs vascular function. The antiangiogenic effect of bevacizumab is predictive of better outcome and seems to induce antitumoral activity in the responding GBMs. PMID:21890539

  8. Analyzing Ph value, energy and phospholipid metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Wei Tan; Guangyao Wu; Junmo Sun

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) can be used to non-injuredly and dynamicly detect various metabolites including phosphorus in organis and reflect changes of phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism in tissue and pH value in cells.OBJECTIVE: To observe changes of pH value, phospholipid metabolism and energy metabolism of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissue with 31P MRS.DESIGN: Semi-quantitative contrast observation.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 44 patients with cerebral tumor diagnosed with surgery operation were selected from the Department of Magnetic Resonance, Central South Hospital, Wuhan University from September 2004 to June 2006. All the subjects had complete 31P MRS data before steroid and operation. Among them,16 patients had glioma of grade Ⅱ-Ⅲ, 12 spongioblastoma and 16 meningioma. The mean age was (45±6)years. Another 36 subjects without focus on cerebral MRI were regarded as normal group, including 19 males and 18 females, and the mean age was (41±4) years. Included subjects were consent.METHODS: Eclipse1.5T MRS (Philips Company) was used to collect wave spectrum; jMRUI(1.3) was used to analyze experimental data and calculate pH value in voxel and ratios of phosphocreatine (PCr)/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PCr/phosphodiesterase (PDE) and phosphomonoesterase (PME)/β-adenosine triphosphate (β-ATP) of various metabolites. 31P MRS results were compared with t test between tumor patients and normal subjects.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of phospholipid metabolism (PME/PDE), energy metabolism (PCr/ATP) and pH value of various cerebral tumors and normal brain tissues.RESULTS: A total of 44 cases with cerebral tumor and 36 normal subjects were involved in the final analysis. pH value and semi-quantitative measurements of normal brain tissues and various cerebral tumors: ① pH value at top occipital region and temple occipital region of normal brain tissue was 7.04±0.02;PCt/β-ATP was 1.51 ±0.03; PCt/Pi was 2.85

  9. Cooperation and competition between adenylate kinase, nucleoside diphosphokinase, electron transport, and ATP synthase in plant mitochondria studied by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    Nucleotide metabolism in potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria was studied using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the O2 electrode. Immediately following the addition of ADP, ATP synthesis exceeded the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, fueled by succinate oxidation, due to mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK) activity two to four times the maximum activity of ATP synthase. Only when the AK reaction approached equilibrium was oxidative phosphorylation the primary mechanism for net ATP synthesis. A pool of sequestered ATP in mitochondria enabled AK and ATP synthase to convert AMP to ATP in the presence of exogenous inorganic phosphate. During this conversion, AK activity can indirectly influence rates of oxidation of both succinate and NADH via changes in mitochondrial ATP. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphokinase, in cooperation with ATP synthase, was found to facilitate phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates other than ADP at rates similar to the maximum rate of oxidative phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that plant mitochondria contain all of the machinery necessary to rapidly regenerate nucleoside triphosphates from AMP and nucleoside diphosphates made during cellular biosynthesis and that AK activity can affect both the amount of ADP available to ATP synthase and the level of ATP regulating electron transport

  10. Changes in energy metabolism following roentgen irradiation of in vivo growing Ehrlich ascites tumour cells studied by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    The energy metabolism in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells following in vivo irradiation of a dose of 5.0 Gy was studied in vitro in their ascites fluid up to 48 hours using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measuring ATP, ADP and inorganic phosphate (Psub(i)). The results are also related to radiation induced changes in cell cycle composition. ATP was reduced by more than 50 per cent 20 to 24 hours after irradiation but normalized at 48 hours. ADP was reduced to about half the normal level 24 to 48 hours after irradiation. When the ATP and ADP had reduced levels, the inorganic phosphate increased correspondingly. Addition of glucose to the ascites cell suspension at the time of minimum ATP level immediately raised the ATP:Psub(i) ratio. Since the glucose concentrations in blood and in ascites fluid following irradiation were also reduced, lack of glucose for energy production might have been a major contributing factor for the reduced ATP production. (orig.)

  11. Therapeutic effect of 15-deoxyspergualin on acute graft rejection detected by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectrography, and its effect on rat heart transplantation

    We investigated the effect of 15-deoxyspergualin (DSG) on graft rejection, starting administration at the onset of rejection and on the induction of immunologic unresponsiveness. Hearts from WKAH rats were transplanted into the neck of ACI rats. The energy metabolism of the grafted hearts was followed by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The day that energy metabolism started to fall was defined as the onset of rejection, and intraperitoneal administration of DSG was initiated at 5 mg/kg/day for 15 days from this day. The grafted heart arrested in 2 of 10 rats 9 and 11 days after transplantation, respectively, but the remaining 8 recovered from rejection and 5 of them showed evidence of immunologic unresponsiveness. Of 10 rats treated with DSG from the day of transplantation, only 1 rat showed evidence of unresponsiveness. The initiation of DSG treatment from the onset of rejection resulted in a higher percentage of induction of unresponsiveness. Therefore, DSG was considered to specifically inhibit lymphocyte clone expansion at the onset of rejection. Spleen cells obtained from recipients 7-10 days after the end of DSG treatment were administered to syngeneic ACI rats grafted with WKAH hearts. Graft survival was significantly prolonged, but long-term unresponsiveness could not be transferred. However, immunologic unresponsiveness could be adoptively transferred in 3 of 5 rats receiving spleen cells from syngeneic rats that had recovered from rejection after DSG treatment and had acquired long-term unresponsiveness. These results suggest that suppressor cells are resistant to DSG and are spared and participate in the maintenance of immunologic unresponsiveness

  12. Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry II. Purity of phosphorus-based agrochemicals glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)-glycine) and profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) measured by 1H and 31P QNMR spectrometry

    The purities of the widely-used herbicide glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine), and the insecticide profenofos (O-(4-bromo-2-chlorophenyl) O-ethyl S-propyl phosphorothioate) were determined by 1H and 31P quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (QNMR) spectrometry using an internal standard. QNMR does not need a standard reference of the same target analyte, in contrast to chromatographic methods, but only a compound containing the nucleus of interest. Sodium acetate and sodium phosphate of known purity were chosen as internal standards for 1H NMR and 31P NMR), respectively for the water soluble glyphosate and a single internal standard, trimethyl phosphate for both 1H and 31P NMR quantitative analysis of the organic soluble profenofos. These standards have NMR peaks that do not interfere with those of the analyte, they are chemically inert and are soluble in the deuterated solvent. The average purity of glyphosate obtained by 1H NMR (97.07%, σ=0.68) agreed with that by 31P NMR (96.53%, σ=0.90; ANOVA, P=0.074) for the five batches provided by the manufacturer according to the procedures for chemical registration in Australia. The standard deviations of seven independent analyses of a single batch by 1H NMR and 31P NMR were σ=0.24% and σ=0.33%, respectively, values which confirm the exceptional precision of the method. The purity of profenofos by 1H NMR (94.63%, σ=0.14) also agreed with that by 31P NMR (94.62%, σ=0.59; ANOVA, P=0.97). Uncertainty budgets for the measured purities of glyphosate and profenofos show that the uncertainty in the purity of the internal standard is a major contributor to the uncertainty of the result. NMR was also used to establish the impurity profile of both compounds, and quantify the impurities present

  13. Metabolism of D-glucose in a wall-less mutant of Neurospora crassa examined by 13C and 31P nuclear magnetic resonances: effects of insulin

    13C NMR and 31P NMR have been used to investigate the metabolism of glucose by a wall-less strain of Neurospora crassa (slime), grown in a supplemented nutritionally defined medium and harvested in the early stationary stage of growth. With D-[1-13C]- or D-[6-13C]glucose as substrates, the major metabolic products identified from 13C NMR spectra were [2-13C]ethanol, [3-13C]alanine, and C1- and C6-labeled trehalose. Several observations suggested the existence of a substantial hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt: (i) a 70% greater yield of ethanol from C6- than from C1-labeled glucose; (ii) C1-labeled glucose yielded 19% C6-labeled trehalose, while C6-labeled glucose yielded only 4% C1-labeled trehalose; (iii) a substantial transfer of 13C from C2-labeled glucose to the C2-position of ethanol. 31P NMR spectra showed millimolar levels of intracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiesters, and diphosphates including sugar diphosphates and polyphosphate. Addition of glucose resulted in a decrease in cytoplasmic Pi and an increase in sugar monophosphates, which continued for at least 30 min. Phosphate resonances corresponding to metabolic intermediates of both the glycolytic and HMP pathways were identified in cell extracts. Addition of insulin (100 nM) with the glucose had the following effects relative to glucose alone: (i) a 24% increase (P less than 0.01) in the rate of ethanol production; (ii) a 38% increase (P less than 0.05) in the rate of alanine production; (iii) a 27% increase (P less than 0.05) in the rate of glucose disappearance. Insulin thus increases the rates of production of ethanol and alanine in these cells, in addition to increasing production of CO2 and glycogen, as previously shown. (author)

  14. Analysis of metabolites in human brain tumors and cerebral infarctions using {sup 31}P- and {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Hirakawa, Wataru [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1996-08-01

    {sup 31}P- and {sup 1}H-MRS with a 2.0 tesla MRI/S system was used to monitor the cerebral energy levels, phospholipid metabolism, intracellular pH, and lactate and amino acid levels in patients with brain tumors and cerebral infarctions. Studies of human brain tumors have suggested that the {sup 31}P-MRS of malignant brain tumors show low concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and {beta}-ATP, high levels of phosphomonoester (PME) and inorganic Pi, and an alkaline pH. The Pi, PME, and intracellular pH of malignant lymphoma were higher than those of other brain tumors. {sup 1}H-MRS showed an increase of lactate in malignant brain tumors and epidermoids. After ACNU administration, the tumor {sup 31}P-MRS showed transient reduction and elevation of Pi on five patients with malignant gliomas. Intracellular pH also showed a transient reduction during radiotherapy. {sup 1}H-MRS showed a reduction of lactate at the beginning of therapy and showed a marked re-elevation of lactate with tumor regrowth. After radiotherapy, the normal brain {sup 31}P-MRS showed transient elevation and reduction of Pi. Intracellular pH also showed a transient elevation during radiotherapy. To investigate the mechanism of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) in cerebral ischemia, changes of brain lactate level were estimated by {sup 1}H-MRS. Although the Lactate/Creatine ratio decreased consistently over time in all patients, it decreased more rapidly in the patients receiving HBO therapy than in those without such therapy. {sup 1}H-MRS demonstrated that HBO therapy may improve metabolism in the ischemic brain and reduces the lactate levels. {sup 31}P- and {sup 1}H-MRS are practical tools for the clinical analysis of cerebral disorders as well as for deciding on therapeutic procedures and evaluating the response. (K.H.)

  15. 糖尿病大鼠脑能量代谢改变的核磁共振磷谱研究%Studies on Changes of Brain Energy Metabolism in Diabetic Rats by 31 P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    王娜; 郑涌泉; 许翠翠; 苏永超; 赵良才; 叶信健; 高红昌

    2014-01-01

    Considerable attention has been directed toward studying the impact of diabetes on the central nervous system. The current study investigates the biochemical changes in the brain tissue of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rat using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS). The 31P NMR spectra of the whole brain show no significant changes of phosphomonoesters and phosphodiesters levels one week after STZ induction, suggesting no apparent structural changes in cell membranes. The results identifies the increased level of adenosine diphosphate, negligible changes of phosphocreatine ( PCr ) and adenosine triphosphate ( ATP) , but the decreased ratio of PCr/ATP, indicating that PCr plays a role of balancing the energy. Moreover, the decreased pH value indicates the changes of the intracellular environment in STZ-diabetic brains in rats. After 15 weeks of STZ injection, the metabolism of phospholipid membrane and brain energy metabolism has been obviously disturbed. Our study successfully shows that 31 P MRS can not only study phospholipid and energy metabolism non-invasively, but also measure intracellular pH and other important biochemical information. All of these spectroscopic characterizations contribute significantly to the understanding of pathogenesis and evolution of diabetes, and provide theoretical basis for early diagnosis and clinical treatment in diabetes.%应用链脲佐菌素( Streptozocin, STZ)制备糖尿病( Diabetes mellitus, DM)大鼠模型,采用离体的核磁共振磷谱(31 P Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, MRS)方法检测糖尿病大鼠脑组织的生化改变。全脑的31 P MRS谱图结果显示,STZ诱导1周后,磷酸单酯和磷酸二酯的含量无明显改变,表明糖尿病大鼠脑中并没有发生膜性结构的改变。二磷酸腺苷峰增高,磷酸肌酸( Phosphocreatine, PCr)和三磷酸腺苷( Adenosine triphosphate, ATP)含量无明显改变,但是PCr/ATP降低,说明PCr作为能量缓冲底

  16. Effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy-rich phosphates and prediction of estrogen dependence monitored by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of four human breast cancer xenografts

    Kristensen, C A; Kristjansen, P E; Brünner, N;

    1995-01-01

    The effect of estrogen withdrawal on energy metabolism was studied in four human breast cancer xenografts: the estrogen-dependent MCF-7 and ZR75-1 and the estrogen-independent ZR75/LCC-3 and MDA-MB-231. The tumors were grown in ovariectomized nude mice with a s.c. implanted estrogen pellet. After...... Gompertzian growth was verified, the estrogen pellet was removed from half of the animals. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the tumors was performed 1 day before and on days 2, 6, and 14 after estrogen removal. Estrogen withdrawal induced a significant increase in the nucleoside triphosphate......:Pi ratio in the two estrogen-dependent xenografts, whereas this ratio remained unchanged in the estrogen-independent tumors. In ZR75/LCC-3 tumors a slight decrease in nucleoside triphosphate:Pi was observed following onset of estrogen stimulation after initial growth without estrogen. Extracts of freeze...

  17. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  18. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1H magnetic resonance imaging of human bladder carcinoma on nude mice: effects of tumour growth and treatment with cis-dichloro-diamine platinum

    De Certaines, J D; Albrectsen, J; Larsen, V A;

    1992-01-01

    phosphate and phosphomonoesters and a decrease of phosphocreatine. Fast growing tumours and early stage of regrowth after treatment presented a higher phosphocreatine/beta NTP ratio. Following CDDP treatment, 31P metabolite ratios and pH were significantly altered compared with age-matched controls, as...... early as 6 hours after treatment. Although necrotic area was clearly visible in MRI, no treatment effect could be detected on the images of treated tumours....

  19. In vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 1H magnetic resonance imaging of human bladder carcinoma on nude mice: effects of tumour growth and treatment with cis-dichloro-diamine platinum

    De Certaines, J D; Albrectsen, J; Larsen, V A;

    1993-01-01

    phosphate and phosphomonoesters and a decrease of phosphocreatine. Fast growing tumours and early stage of regrowth after treatment presented a higher phosphocreatine/beta NTP ratio. Following CDDP treatment, 31P metabolite ratios and pH were significantly altered compared with age-matched controls, as...... early as 6 hours after treatment. Although necrotic area was clearly visible in MRI, no treatment effect could be detected on the images of treated tumours....

  20. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle

    Savage, David B.; Williams, Guy B.; Porter, David; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the 31P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. PMID:26744504

  1. The clinical value of 31p magnetic resonance spectroscopy in patients with lipid storage myopathy%脂质沉积性肌病骨骼肌磁共振31磷波谱的临床价值研究

    李银; 赖鸿; 丁卫江

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨脂质沉积性肌病(LSM)患者骨骼肌磁共振31磷波谱(31P-MRS)改变特征,以及在LSM辅助诊断和疗效评价方面的临床价值.方法 对12例LSM患者在治疗前后和11例对照者分别进行31P-MRS扫描,获取波谱图像,计算谱线中无机磷酸盐(Pi)、磷酸肌酸(PCr)及三磷酸腺苷(ATP)的峰下面积,记录Pi/ATP、PC r/ATP和Pi/PCr的比值,计算Pi、PCr、细胞内pH(pHim)、二磷酸腺苷(ADP)和磷酸化潜能(PP)的值,并比较LSM患者治疗前和对照组、LSM患者治疗前后上述31p-MRS指标的差异.结果 LSM患者治疗前的PCr、PCr/ATP和PP较对照组明显降低(P<0.05),Pi/PCr和ADP较对照组明显升高(P<0.05),Pi、Pi/ATP和pHint与对照组比较无明显差异(P>0.05);LSM患者治疗后的PCr、PCr/ATP和PP较治疗前明显升高(P<0.05),ADP较治疗前明显降低(P<0.05),Pi、Pi/ATP、Pi/PCr和pHint与治疗前比较无明显差异(P>0.05).结论 31P-MRS可无创性检测LSM患者肌肉组织的能量代谢变化,有利于LSM的辅助诊断,并可运用于LSM患者的疗效评价.%Objective To investigate the 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) manifestations of skeletal muscle in patients with lipid storage myopathy( LSM)and evaluate its clinical value in auxiliary diagnosis and therapeutic effect. Methods 31 P-MRS scanning was performed in 12 patients prior to and after treatment and 11 collators. The areas under resonance of inorganic phosphate(Pi) ,phosphocreatine(PCr)and adenosine triphosphate( ATP)were calculated from the 31P-MRS images,then the ratios of Pi/ATP,PCr/ATP and Pi/PCr and the values of Pi,PCr,intracellular pH(pHint) .adenosine diphosphate( ABP)and phosphorylation potential(PP) were calculated at last. The above-mentioned variables were compared among LSM patients prior to treatment and the control group,and variables were also compared in LSM patients prior to and after treatment. Results Compared with the control group,LSM patients prior to

  2. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Measurements of HIV Fusion Peptide 13CO to Lipid 31P Proximities Support Similar Partially Inserted Membrane Locations of the α Helical and β Sheet Peptide Structures

    Gabrys, Charles M.; Qiang, Wei; Sun, Yan; Xie, Li; Schmick, Scott D.; Weliky, David P.

    2013-10-01

    Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) membrane and the host cell membrane is an initial step of infection of the host cell. Fusion is catalyzed by gp41, which is an integral membrane protein of HIV. The fusion peptide (FP) is the -25 N-terminal residues of gp41 and is a domain of gp41 that plays a key role in fusion catalysis likely through interaction with the host cell membrane. Much of our understanding of the FP domain has been accomplished with studies of -HFP-, i.e., a -25-residue peptide composed of the FP sequence but lacking the rest of gp41. HFP catalyzes fusion between membrane vesicles and serves as a model system to understand fusion catalysis. HFP binds to membranes and the membrane location of HFP is likely a significant determinant of fusion catalysis perhaps because the consequent membrane perturbation reduces the fusion activation energy. In the present study, many HFPs were synthesized and differed in the residue position that was 13CO backbone labeled. Samples were then prepared that each contained a singly 13CO labeled HFP incorporated into membranes that lacked cholesterol. HFP had distinct molecular populations with either α helical or oligomeric - sheet structure. Proximity between the HFP 13CO nuclei and 31P nuclei in the membrane headgroups was probed by solid-state NMR (SSNMR) rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) measurements. For many samples, there were distinct 13CO shifts for the α helical and - sheet structures so that the proximities to 31P nuclei could be determined for each structure. Data from several differently labeled HFPs were then incorporated into a membrane location model for the particular structure. In addition to the 13CO labeled residue position, the HFPs also differed in sequence and/or chemical structure. -HFPmn- was a linear peptide that contained the 23 N-terminal residues of gp41. -HFPmn_V2E- contained the V2E mutation that for HIV leads to greatly reduced extent of fusion and infection. The

  3. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31P, 13C, 1H (and possibly 19F and 23Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  4. Phosphorus-doped thin silica films characterized by magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Jacobsen, H.J.; Skibsted, J.; Kristensen, Martin;

    2001-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of 31P and 29Si have been achieved for a thin silica film doped with only 1.8% 31P and deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on a pure silicon wafer. The observation of a symmetric 31P chemical shift tensor is consistent...

  5. Analysis of the bond-valence method for calculating (29) Si and (31) P magnetic shielding in covalent network solids.

    Holmes, Sean T; Alkan, Fahri; Iuliucci, Robbie J; Mueller, Karl T; Dybowski, Cecil

    2016-07-01

    (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding tensors in covalent network solids have been evaluated using periodic and cluster-based calculations. The cluster-based computational methodology employs pseudoatoms to reduce the net charge (resulting from missing co-ordination on the terminal atoms) through valence modification of terminal atoms using bond-valence theory (VMTA/BV). The magnetic-shielding tensors computed with the VMTA/BV method are compared to magnetic-shielding tensors determined with the periodic GIPAW approach. The cluster-based all-electron calculations agree with experiment better than the GIPAW calculations, particularly for predicting absolute magnetic shielding and for predicting chemical shifts. The performance of the DFT functionals CA-PZ, PW91, PBE, rPBE, PBEsol, WC, and PBE0 are assessed for the prediction of (29) Si and (31) P magnetic-shielding constants. Calculations using the hybrid functional PBE0, in combination with the VMTA/BV approach, result in excellent agreement with experiment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117609

  6. Conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to magnetically oriented lipid bilayers by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy.

    Naito, A.; T. Nagao; Norisada, K; Mizuno, T; Tuzi, S.; Saitô, H.

    2000-01-01

    The conformation and dynamics of melittin bound to the dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer and the magnetic orientation in the lipid bilayer systems were investigated by solid-state (31)P and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Using (31)P NMR, it was found that melittin-lipid bilayers form magnetically oriented elongated vesicles with the long axis parallel to the magnetic field above the liquid crystalline-gel phase transition temperature (T(m) = 24 degrees C). The conformation, orientation, ...

  7. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  8. 31P NMR study of magnetic phase transitions of MnP single crystal under 2 GPa pressure

    Fan, GuoZhi; Zhao, Bo; Wu, Wei; Zheng, Ping; Luo, JianLin

    2016-05-01

    Superconductivity on the border of the long-range magnetic order has been discovered in MnP under high pressures. In order to investigate the nature of the magnetic properties adjacent to the superconducting state, we performed zero-field 31P NMR for MnP single crystal under ambient and hydrostatic pressure of 2 GPa, respectively. Radio frequency power level was used to determine whether NMR signal originates from a helical state or not. When 2 GPa pressure was applied, the signal from helical state exists even above 160 K, while that from the ferromagnetic phase was not observed. Our NMR results indicate that the magnetic phase which is adjacent to the superconducting state is in a helical magnetic structure.

  9. Magnetic resonance angiography

    MRA; Angiography - magnetic resonance ... Kwong RY. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . ...

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  11. Early detection of cerebral infarction by 31P spectroscopic imaging

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance spectroscopy permit noninvasive study of brain metabolism in vivo, 31P spectroscopic imaging being the method for evaluation of localized phosphorous metabolism. Experimentally, an ischemic-hypoxic brain insult is characterized by depletion of high energy metabolites. These changes are seen immediately after an ischemic insult. We had the opportunity of carrying out 31P spectroscopic imaging of hyperacute cerebral infarction, while MRI and CT were negative. Cerebral infarction of the middle cerebral artery territory was suggested by 31P spectroscopic imaging, which was closely consistent with a later-developing region of low density on CT. In cerebral infarction, early detection of the lesion is a useful pointer to the patient's prognosis, making 31P spectroscopic imaging a potential tool. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important ... MRI is often used for diagnosis or for monitoring disease. For example, if someone is having severe ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection...

  14. Efficient isotropic magnetic resonators

    Martin, O. J. F.; Gay-Balmaz, P.

    2002-01-01

    We study experimentally and numerically a novel three-dimensional magnetic resonator structure with high isotropy. It is formed by crossed split-ring resonators and has a response independent of the illumination direction in a specific plane. The utilization of such elements to build a finite left-handed medium is discussed. (C) 2002 American Institute of Physics.

  15. SQUID-detected magnetic resonance imaging in microtesla magnetic fields

    We describe studies of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of liquid samples at room temperature in microtesla magnetic fields. The nuclear spins are prepolarized in a strong transient field. The magnetic signals generated by the precessing spins, which range in frequency from tens of Hz to several kHz, are detected by a low-transition temperature dc SQUID (Superconducting QUantum Interference Device) coupled to an untuned, superconducting flux transformer configured as an axial gradiometer. The combination of prepolarization and frequency-independent detector sensitivity results in a high signal-to-noise ratio and high spectral resolution (∼1 Hz) even in grossly inhomogeneous magnetic fields. In the NMR experiments, the high spectral resolution enables us to detect the 10-Hz splitting of the spectrum of protons due to their scalar coupling to a 31P nucleus. Furthermore, the broadband detection scheme combined with a non-resonant field-reversal spin echo allows the simultaneous observation of signals from protons and 31P nuclei, even though their NMR resonance frequencies differ by a factor of 2.5. We extend our methodology to MRI in microtesla fields, where the high spectral resolution translates into high spatial resolution. We demonstrate two-dimensional images of a mineral oil phantom and slices of peppers, with a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We also image an intact pepper using slice selection, again with 1-mm resolution. In further experiments we demonstrate T1-contrast imaging of a water phantom, some parts of which were doped with a paramagnetic salt to reduce the longitudinal relaxation time T1. Possible applications of this MRI technique include screening for tumors and integration with existing multichannel SQUID systems for brain imaging

  16. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical application in neuroradiology

    Full text: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) provides a non-invasive method of studying metabolism in vivo. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) defines neuro chemistry on a regional basis by acquiring a radiofrequency signal with chemical shift from one or many voxels or volumes previously selected on MRI. The tissue's chemical environment determines the frequency of a metabolite peak in an MRS spectrum. Candidates for MRS include: 1H, 31P, 13C, 23Na, 7Li, 19F, 14N, 15N, 17O, 39K The most commonly studied nuclei are 1H and 31P. This lecture is focused on Proton (1H) Spectroscopy. Proton MRS can be added on to conventional MR imaging protocols. It can be used to serially monitor biochemical changes in tumors, stroke, epilepsy, metabolic disorders, infections, and neurodegenerative diseases.The MR spectra do not come labeled with diagnoses. They require interpretation and should always be correlated with the MR images before making a final diagnosis. As a general rule, the single voxel, short TE technique is used to make the initial diagnosis, because the signal-to-noise is high and all metabolites are represented. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are used to further characterize different regions of a mass and to assess brain parenchyma around or adjacent to the mass. Multi-voxel, long TE techniques are also used to assess response to therapy and to search for tumor recurrence. Each metabolite appears at a specific ppm, and each one reflects specific cellular and biochemical processes

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  18. Characterization of human breast disease using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance imaging

    This thesis provides the fundamental characterization and differentiation of breast tissues using in vivo and ex vivo MR techniques in the hope that these techniques and experimental findings will be used on a larger scale and in a predictive manner in order to improve the specificity of diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. In this dissertation, clinical studies were performed using proton magnetic resonance imaging and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectro-scopy (31P MRS) to characterize and differentiate malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues in vivo. These studies were carried out following the methodical characterization of chemical extracts of malignant breast tumor, benign breast tumor and normal breast parenchymal surgical tissue specimens using high resolution 31P MRS. Alterations in breast tissue metabolism, as a result of pathological processes, were postulated to be responsible for measurable differences between malignant breast tumors, benign breast tumors and normal breast tissues using magnetic resonance techniques. (author). 365 refs.; 37 figs.; 25 tabs

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  20. 13C and 31P NMR [Nuclear Magnetic Resonance] studies of prostate tumor metabolism

    The current research on prostate cancer by NMR spectroscopy and microscopy will most significantly contribute to tumor diagnosis and characterization only if sound biochemical models of tumor metabolism are established and tested. Prior searches focused on universal markers of malignancy, have to date, revealed no universal markers by any method. It is unlikely that NMRS will succeed where other methods have failed, however, NMR spectroscopy does provide a non-invasive means to analyze multiple compounds simultaneously in vivo. In order to fully evaluate the ability of NMRS to differentiate non-malignant from malignant tissues it is necessary to determine sufficient multiple parameters from specific, well-diagnosed, histological tumor types that, in comparison to normal tissue and non-neoplastic, non-normal pathologies from which the given neoplasm must be differentiated, one has enough degrees of freedom to make a mathematically and statistically significant determination. Confounding factors may consist of tumor heterogeneity arising from regional variations in differentiation, ischemia, necrosis, hemorrhage, inflammation and the presence of intermingled normal tissue. One related aspect of our work is the development of {13C}-1H metabolic imaging of 13C for metabolic characterization, with enhanced spatial localization (46). This should markedly extend the range of potential clinical NMR uses because the spatial variation in prostate metabolism may prove to be just as important in tumor diagnoses as bulk (volume-averaged) properties themselves. It is our hope that NMRS and spectroscopic imaging will reveal a sound correlation between prostate metabolism and tumor properties that will be clinically straightforward and useful for diagnosis

  1. Resonant magnetic vortices

    By using the complex angular momentum method, we provide a semiclassical analysis of electron scattering by a magnetic vortex of Aharonov-Bohm type. Regge poles of the S matrix are associated with surface waves orbiting around the vortex and supported by a magnetic field discontinuity. Rapid variations of sharp characteristic shapes can be observed on scattering cross sections. They correspond to quasibound states which are Breit-Wigner-type resonances associated with surface waves and which can be considered as quantum analogues of acoustic whispering-gallery modes. Such a resonant magnetic vortex could provide a different kind of artificial atom while the semiclassical approach developed here could be profitably extended in various areas of the physics of vortices

  2. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... during MRI, but this is rarely a problem. Tooth fillings and braces usually are not affected by ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... conditions such as: brain tumors stroke infections developmental anomalies hydrocephalus — dilatation of fluid spaces within the brain ( ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  5. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...

  9. Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Uecker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The main disadvantage of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are its long scan times and, in consequence, its sensitivity to motion. Exploiting the complementary information from multiple receive coils, parallel imaging is able to recover images from under-sampled k-space data and to accelerate the measurement. Because parallel magnetic resonance imaging can be used to accelerate basically any imaging sequence it has many important applications. Parallel imaging brought a fundamental shift in image reconstruction: Image reconstruction changed from a simple direct Fourier transform to the solution of an ill-conditioned inverse problem. This work gives an overview of image reconstruction from the perspective of inverse problems. After introducing basic concepts such as regularization, discretization, and iterative reconstruction, advanced topics are discussed including algorithms for auto-calibration, the connection to approximation theory, and the combination with compressed sensing.

  10. Cavity- and waveguide-resonators in electron paramagnetic resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Webb, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Cavity resonators are widely used in electron paramagnetic resonance, very high field magnetic resonance microimaging and also in high field human imaging. The basic principles and designs of different forms of cavity resonators including rectangular, cylindrical, re-entrant, cavity magnetrons, toroidal cavities and dielectric resonators are reviewed. Applications in EPR and MRI are summarized, and finally the topic of traveling wave MRI using the magnet bore as a waveguide is discussed. PMID:25456314

  11. Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful magnetic ... that are clearer and more detailed than other imaging methods. This exam does not use ionizing radiation ...

  14. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  15. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging equipments

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new examination technique used in diagnostic medicine. Its use has increased notably during the last few years in Finland, too. The biological effects of electromagnetic fields used in MRI are quite different from the effects of x-rays. This report introduces the physics and the techniques of MRI; the biological effects of magnetic fields and the hazards associated with the use of MRI systems are briefly discussed. The major national and international recommendations are summarized, too. Furthermore, a description is given how safety aspects are considered in Finnish MRI units. Finally, recommendations are given to restrict the exposure caused by MRI and to ensure the safe use of MRI. Diagnostic applications and clinical or economic aspects fall outside the scope of this report. (orig.)

  17. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  18. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... or cause problems during an MRI exam. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is currently a recognized, but rare, complication ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... the same effect. A very irregular heartbeat may affect the quality of images obtained using techniques that ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in pancreatic disorders

    Ofer Kaplan

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS is a powerful technique that enables continuous monitoring of biochemical processes in tissues and organs in a non-invasive manner. A model of isolated perfused rat pancreas, suitable for NMRS studies, was developed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injections of either 0.5 ml 5% sodium taurocholate (TC into the bile duets, or 1.0 ml 10% TC injections into the pancreatic parenchyma. Phosphorous (31P NMRS of experimental pancreatitis were characterized by a transient signal at -0.18±0.04 ppm which was assigned as solubilized lecithin, and can be used as an indicator of the early phases of the discase. Depletion of the high energy phosphorous compounds, phosphocreatine and ATP, were also found during acute pancreatitis, and paralleled the extension of the pathological damage. The role of NMRS in pancreatic cancer diagnosis and its treatment were assessed in three models of pancreatic neoplasms. Perfused MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells, subcutancously implanted pancreatic tumors in hamsters, and pancreatic tumors induced in-situ in rats by direct appiication of the carcinogen 7,12-dimethyl benzanthracene, were studied by phosphorous (31P, sodium (23Na and proton (¹H NMRS. 31P spectra of pancreatic cancer were qualitatively similar to those of intact organs. However, 31P NMRS was found to be useful for monitoring the effects of treatment. Total (infra- and extracellular sodium concentrations, measured in the solid tumors, were similar in both the normal pancreas and the pancreatic tumors (39-40 mmol/g wet weight. Proton spectra of perchloric acid extracts revealed several differences between tumors and control pancreases. The principal findings were elevated levels of the amino acid taurine, from I.17±O.39 mmol/g wet weight in healthy pancreases, to 2.79±0.71 mmol/g wet weight in pancreatic carcinoma in rats, and lactate levels which increased from 0.92±0.2 to 6.19±1.93 mmol/g wet weight

  2. Phosphorus metabolites in the human placenta estimated in vivo by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Weindling, A M; Griffiths, R. D.; Garden, A S; P. A. Martin; Edwards, R H

    1991-01-01

    Normal human placental metabolism has been studied in vivo by image localised 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 13 women with anterior placentas; five, however, were too fat for useful spectral signals to be obtained. Magnetic resonance spectra of good quality which were considered to have arisen from the placenta were obtained from seven women with uncomplicated pregnancies (median gestational age 35 weeks, range 28-39). One other woman had a twin pregnancy in which one fetus had died a...

  3. Accurate calculation of (31)P NMR chemical shifts in polyoxometalates.

    Pascual-Borràs, Magda; López, Xavier; Poblet, Josep M

    2015-04-14

    We search for the best density functional theory strategy for the determination of (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts, δ((31)P), in polyoxometalates. Among the variables governing the quality of the quantum modelling, we tackle herein the influence of the functional and the basis set. The spin-orbit and solvent effects were routinely included. To do so we analysed the family of structures α-[P2W18-xMxO62](n-) with M = Mo(VI), V(V) or Nb(V); [P2W17O62(M'R)](n-) with M' = Sn(IV), Ge(IV) and Ru(II) and [PW12-xMxO40](n-) with M = Pd(IV), Nb(V) and Ti(IV). The main results suggest that, to date, the best procedure for the accurate calculation of δ((31)P) in polyoxometalates is the combination of TZP/PBE//TZ2P/OPBE (for NMR//optimization step). The hybrid functionals (PBE0, B3LYP) tested herein were applied to the NMR step, besides being more CPU-consuming, do not outperform pure GGA functionals. Although previous studies on (183)W NMR suggested that the use of very large basis sets like QZ4P were needed for geometry optimization, the present results indicate that TZ2P suffices if the functional is optimal. Moreover, scaling corrections were applied to the results providing low mean absolute errors below 1 ppm for δ((31)P), which is a step forward in order to confirm or predict chemical shifts in polyoxometalates. Finally, via a simplified molecular model, we establish how the small variations in δ((31)P) arise from energy changes in the occupied and virtual orbitals of the PO4 group. PMID:25738630

  4. High-field small animal magnetic resonance oncology studies

    Bokacheva, Louisa; Ackerstaff, Ellen; LeKaye, H. Carl; Zakian, Kristen; Koutcher, Jason A.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the applications of high magnetic field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) to cancer studies in small animals. High-field MRI can provide information about tumor physiology, the microenvironment, metabolism, vascularity and cellularity. Such studies are invaluable for understanding tumor growth and proliferation, response to treatment and drug development. The MR techniques reviewed here include 1H, 31P, chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging and hyperpolarized 13C MRS as well as diffusion-weighted, blood oxygen level dependent contrast imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. These methods have been proven effective in animal studies and are highly relevant to human clinical studies.

  5. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a ...

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic Resonance angiography. Pt 1

    The objective of this paper is to describe the basic physical principles important in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). The data used were obtained from recent articles on MRA and direct experience working with prototype MRA sequence. The information is presented in a manner suitable for those unfamiliar with the principles of MRA and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Magnetic resonance angiography is an important method that can be used to obtain angiograms without the injection of intravascular contrast medium. It is already proving to be of clinical use in the assessment of vascular disease. 11 refs., 5 figs

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  11. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Buchbinder, Bradley R

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the spatiotemporal distribution of neural activity in the brain under varying cognitive conditions. Since its inception in 1991, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI has rapidly become a vital methodology in basic and applied neuroscience research. In the clinical realm, it has become an established tool for presurgical functional brain mapping. This chapter has three principal aims. First, we review key physiologic, biophysical, and methodologic principles that underlie BOLD fMRI, regardless of its particular area of application. These principles inform a nuanced interpretation of the BOLD fMRI signal, along with its neurophysiologic significance and pitfalls. Second, we illustrate the clinical application of task-based fMRI to presurgical motor, language, and memory mapping in patients with lesions near eloquent brain areas. Integration of BOLD fMRI and diffusion tensor white-matter tractography provides a road map for presurgical planning and intraoperative navigation that helps to maximize the extent of lesion resection while minimizing the risk of postoperative neurologic deficits. Finally, we highlight several basic principles of resting-state fMRI and its emerging translational clinical applications. Resting-state fMRI represents an important paradigm shift, focusing attention on functional connectivity within intrinsic cognitive networks. PMID:27432660

  13. Magnetic resonance energy and topological resonance energy.

    Aihara, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-28

    Ring-current diamagnetism of a polycyclic π-system is closely associated with thermodynamic stability due to the individual circuits. Magnetic resonance energy (MRE), derived from the ring-current diamagnetic susceptibility, was explored in conjunction with graph-theoretically defined topological resonance energy (TRE). For many aromatic molecules, MRE is highly correlative with TRE with a correlation coefficient of 0.996. For all π-systems studied, MRE has the same sign as TRE. The only trouble with MRE may be that some antiaromatic and non-alternant species exhibit unusually large MRE-to-TRE ratios. This kind of difficulty can in principle be overcome by prior geometry-optimisation or by changing spin multiplicity. Apart from the semi-empirical resonance-theory resonance energy, MRE is considered as the first aromatic stabilisation energy (ASE) defined without referring to any hypothetical polyene reference. PMID:26878709

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose and treat medical ... CD. Currently, MRI is the most sensitive imaging test of the head (particularly the brain) in routine ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Connectome Automated Pipeline

    Gray, William R.; Bogovic, John A.; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Landman, Bennett A.; Prince, Jerry L.; Vogelstein, R. Jacob

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript presents a novel, tightly integrated pipeline for estimating a connectome, which is a comprehensive description of the neural circuits in the brain. The pipeline utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to produce a high-level estimate of the structural connectivity in the human brain. The Magnetic Resonance Connectome Automated Pipeline (MRCAP) is efficient and its modular construction allows researchers to modify algorithms to meet their specific requirements. The pipe...

  19. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  20. Advances in magnetic resonance 4

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 4 deals with the relaxation, irradiation, and other dynamical effects that is specific to systems having resolved structure in their magnetic resonance spectra. This book discusses the anisotropic rotation of molecules in liquids by NMR quadrupolar relaxation; rotational diffusion constants; alternating linewidth effect; and theoretical formulations of the problem. The line shapes in high-resolution NMR; matrix representations of the equations of motion; matrix representations of the equations of motion; and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are also delibera

  1. Nuclear magnetic gamma double resonance

    A number of problems corresponding to different variants of experiments using nuclear magnetic-gamma double resonance (NMGDR) are theoretically investigated. Calculation is carried out and its results are compared to experimental ones concerning NMGDR for tantalum. Time dynamics of the source or scatterer nucleus sublevel populations under double resonance conditions with non-uniform initial population of this nucleus sublevels is studied

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging; Imagerie par resonance magnetique

    Fontanel, F. [Centre Hospitalier, 40 - Mont-de -Marsan (France); Clerc, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Theolier, S. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 - Lyon (France); Verdenet, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-04-01

    The last improvements in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are detailed here, society by society with an expose of their different devices. In the future the different technological evolutions will be on a faster acquisition, allowing to reduce the examination time, on the development of a more acute cardiac imaging, of a functional neuro-imaging and an interactive imaging for intervention. With the contrast products, staying a longer time in the vascular area, the angiography will find its place. Finally, the studies on magnetic fields should allow to increase the volume to examine. (N.C.).

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    Sax, Steven L.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent noninvasive method for evaluating thoracic aortic dissections. A variety of magnetic resonance scans of aortic dissections are shown, documenting the ability of magnetic resonance to image the true lumen, the false channel, and the intimal septum. Detail is provided on magnetic resonance imaging techniques and findings. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:262-70)

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 5

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 5 deals with the interpretation of ESR spectra and provides descriptions of experimental apparatus. This book discusses the halogen hyperfine interactions; organic radicals in single crystals; pulsed-Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer; and inhomogenizer and decoupler. The spectrometers for multiple-pulse NMR; weak collision theory of relaxation in the rotating frame; and spin Hamiltonian for the electron spin resonance of irradiated organic single crystals are also deliberated. This text likewise covers the NMR in helium three and m

  5. 2012 Rose Site 31P

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  6. 2004 Rose Site 31P

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  7. 2005 Rose Site 31P

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish (5) = between meters 4 and 5). Quantitative analysis of the...

  8. 1999 Rose Site 31P

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  9. 2006 Rose Site 31P

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Underwater Site 31P was established off Rose Atoll, American Samoa by Dr. James Maragos, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, on August 22, 1999. The site was...

  10. 31P-MRS of skeletal muscle is not a sensitive diagnostic test for mitochondrial myopathy

    Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Quistorff, Bjørn; Wibrand, Flemming;

    2007-01-01

    Clinical phenotypes of persons with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations vary considerably. Therefore, diagnosing mitochondrial myopathy (MM) patients can be challenging and warrants diagnostic guidelines. (31)phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) have been included as a minor...... investigated for the following: 1) (31)P-MRS of lower arm and leg muscles before and after exercise, 2) resting and peak-exercise induced increases of plasma lactate, 3) muscle morphology and -mitochondrial enzyme activity, 4) maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), 5) venous oxygen desaturation during handgrip...... impaired citrate synthase-corrected complex I activity. Resting PCr/P(i) ratio and leg P(i) recovery were lower in MM patients vs. healthy subjects. PCr and ATP production after exercise were similar in patients and healthy subjects. Although the specificity for MM of some (31)P-MRS variables was as high...

  11. A comparison of MR elastography and 31P MR spectroscopy with histological staging of liver fibrosis

    Conventional imaging techniques are insensitive to liver fibrosis. This study assesses the diagnostic accuracy of MR elastography (MRE) stiffness values and the ratio of phosphomonoesters (PME)/phosphodiesters (PDE) measured using 31P spectroscopy against histological fibrosis staging. The local research ethics committee approved this prospective, blinded study. A total of 77 consecutive patients (55 male, aged 49 ± 11.5 years) with a clinical suspicion of liver fibrosis underwent an MR examination with a liver biopsy later the same day. Patients underwent MRE and 31P spectroscopy on a 1.5 T whole body system. The liver biopsies were staged using an Ishak score for chronic hepatitis or a modified NAS fibrosis score for fatty liver disease. MRE increased with and was positively associated with fibrosis stage (Spearman's rank = 0.622, P 31P MR spectroscopy and fibrosis stage. circle Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) and MR spectroscopy can both assess the liver. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  13. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  14. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia. Possibilities and limitations

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is a noninvasive investigative technique for in vivo detection of biochemical changes in neuropsychiatric disorders for which especially proton (1H-MRS) and phosphorus (31P-MRS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy have been used. In this review we explain the principles of MRS and summarize the studies in schizophrenia. A systematic literature review was carried out for 1H-MRS studies investigating schizophrenic patients compared to controls. The inconsistent results in the cited studies may be due to different study population, specific neuroimaging technique, and selected brain regions. Frequent findings are decreased PME and increased PDE concentrations (31P-MRS) linked to altered metabolism of membrane phospholipids and decreased N-acetylaspartate (NAA) or NAA/choline ratio (1H-MRS) linked to neuronal damage in frontal (DLPFC) or temporal regions in patients with schizophrenia. These results contribute to the disturbed frontotemporal-thalamic network assumed in schizophrenia and are supported by additional functional neuroimaging, MRI morphometry, and neuropsychological evaluation. The combination of the described investigative techniques with MRS in follow-up studies may provide more specific clues for understanding the pathogenesis and disease course in schizophrenia. (orig.)

  15. magnetic resonance imaging,etc.

    张福基

    1998-01-01

    magnetic resonance imaging n.[1984] a noninvasive diagnostic technique that produces computerized images of internal body tissues and is based on nuclear magnetic resonance of atoms within he body induced by the application of radio waves磁共振成像(指一种非侵害 性诊断技术,能生成内部身体组织的计算机化影像,其依据是应用无线电波 感生体内原子并使之产磁共振)

  16. Molecular neurodevelopment: An in vivo31P-1H MRSI study

    Goldstein, Gerald; Panchalingam, Kanagasabai; McClure, Richard J.; Stanley, Jeffrey A.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Pettegrew, Jay W.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic development and elimination are normal neurodevelopmental processes which if altered could contribute to various neuropsychiatric disorders. 31P-1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging and structural MRI exams were conducted on 106 healthy children ages 6–18 years in order to identify neuromolecular indices of synaptic development and elimination. Over the age range studied, age-related changes in high-energy phosphate (phosphocreatine), membrane phospholipid metabolism (precurso...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ... into the bloodstream. The radiologist , technologist or a nurse may ask if you have allergies of any ...

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance ... allergic reaction than iodinated contrast material. Tell your doctor about any health problems, recent surgeries or allergies ...

  20. Magnetometer of nuclear magnetic resonance

    We present a nuclear magnetic resonance magnetometer that measures magnetic fields, between 2,500 gauss and 5,000 gauss, with an accuracy of a few parts per million. The circuit of the magnetometer, based on a marginal oscillator, permits a continuous tunning in the frequency range comprised between 10.0 MHz, with a signal to noise ratio of about 20. The radiofrequency amplifier is of the cascode type in integrated circuit and it operates with two 9V batteries. The modulation is at 35 Hz and it is provided by an external oscillator. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and easy to operate; it can also be used for didactic purposes to show the phenomenon of magnetic nuclear resonance and its main characteristics. (author)

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  2. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  3. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors

  4. Resonant magnetic fields from inflation

    We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of O(10−15 Gauss) today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing

  5. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information. PMID:26916887

  6. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad;

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to char...... a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging....

  7. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Aquatic macrophytes and algae are important sources of phosphorus (P) in the lake environment that cause blooms of algae under certain biogeochemical conditions. However, the knowledge of forms of P in these plants and algae and their contribution to internal loads of lake P is very limited. Witho...

  8. Tomography by nuclear magnetic resonance

    Imaging methods based on nuclear magnetic resonance allow the production of sectional images of the human body without ionizing radiation. It is possible to measure the density and relaxation times of the water protons in body fluids or tissue. This allows not only to obtain morphological information but also to get some insight into the spatial distribution of physiological data. Starting with a review of the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance it is explained how the measured signal can be associated with an image point; it is also explained what type of apparatus is necessary and what the physical limitations are. Possible risks the patient may be exposed to in an examination using nuclear magnetic resonance are discussed. The present state of the technical development enables the production of whole-body sectional images of a living person within about one minute. By means of some typical examples the nature and properties of these images are explained. Although extensive clinical studies will be necessary before a more general assessment can be made of this method, an outlook is provided on expected further developments and possible future fields of application. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Detection using a Membrane Resonator

    Scozzaro, Nicolas; Ruchotzke, Will; Belding, Amanda; Cardellino, Jeremy D.; Blomberg, Erick C.; McCullian, Brendan A.; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2016-01-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost magnetic resonance imaging instruments would further broaden the substantial impact of this technology. We report highly sensitive detection of magnetic resonance using low-stress silicon nitride (SiN$_x$) membranes. We use these membranes as low-loss, high-frequency mechanical oscillators and find they are able to mechanically detect spin-dependent forces with high sensitivity enabling ultrasensitive magnetic resonance detection. The high force detection...

  10. Ultra-high frequency magnetic resonance imaging

    Magill, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of radiofrequency probe design for Ultra High Frequency Magnetic Resonance Imaging (7T). The signal-to-noise ratio available in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is determined by the static magnetic field strength, causing a continued drive toward higher fields to enable faster image acquisition at finer spatial resolution. The resonant frequency increases linearly with static field strength. At 7T the proton resonant frequency is 300MHz, with a wavelength...

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in oncology

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) employs radio-frequency radiation in the presence of a static magnetic field to produce signals from naturally occurring nuclei in biological tissue. The information in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be derived from these signals in any orthogonal plane. Hydrogen is the most abundant of such nuclei, occurring naturally in water and lipid, and can be detected at relatively low magnetic field strength (0.04 tesla (T) upwards). The MR signal from hydrogen depends not only on the proton density and the T1 and T2 relaxation times of those protons following radio-frequency pulse disturbances, but also on the timing parameters of the radio-frequency pulse sequences employed. Image contrast depends on the interaction between all these factors; not simply as in X-ray computed tomography (CT) on the properties of the tissue itself. Therefore an understanding of both the imaging process and the pathology under investigation is essential in the proper use of MRI

  12. Phosphatidylcholine contributes to in vivo 31P MRS signal from the human liver

    To demonstrate the overlap of the hepatic and bile phosphorus (31P) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra and provide evidence of phosphatidylcholine (PtdC) contribution to the in vivo hepatic 31P MRS phosphodiester (PDE) signal, suggested in previous reports to be phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Phantom measurements to assess the chemical shifts of PEP and PtdC signals were performed at 7 T. A retrospective analysis of hepatic 3D 31P MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from 18 and five volunteers at 3 T and 7 T, respectively, was performed. Axial images were inspected for the presence of gallbladder, and PDE signals in representative spectra were quantified. Phantom experiments demonstrated the strong pH-dependence of the PEP chemical shift and proved the overlap of PtdC and PEP (∝2 ppm relative to phosphocreatine) at hepatic pH. Gallbladder was covered in seven of 23 in vivo 3D-MRSI datasets. The PDEgall/γ-ATPliver ratio was 4.8-fold higher (p = 0.001) in the gallbladder (PDEgall/γ-ATPliver = 3.61 ± 0.79) than in the liver (PDEliver/γ-ATPliver = 0.75 ± 0.15). In vivo 7 T 31P MRSI allowed good separation of PDE components. The gallbladder is a strong source of contamination in adjacent 31P MR hepatic spectra due to biliary phosphatidylcholine. In vivo 31P MR hepatic signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate, with a higher phosphatidylcholine contribution due to its higher concentration. (orig.)

  13. Phosphatidylcholine contributes to in vivo {sup 31}P MRS signal from the human liver

    Chmelik, Marek; Bogner, Wolfgang; Gajdosik, Martin; Gruber, Stephan; Trattnig, Siegfried [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Institute of Measurement Science, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Bratislava (Slovakia); Wolf, Peter; Krebs, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Halilbasic, Emina; Trauner, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria); Krssak, Martin [Medical University of Vienna, MR Centre of Excellence, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine III, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-07-15

    To demonstrate the overlap of the hepatic and bile phosphorus ({sup 31}P) magnetic resonance (MR) spectra and provide evidence of phosphatidylcholine (PtdC) contribution to the in vivo hepatic {sup 31}P MRS phosphodiester (PDE) signal, suggested in previous reports to be phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Phantom measurements to assess the chemical shifts of PEP and PtdC signals were performed at 7 T. A retrospective analysis of hepatic 3D {sup 31}P MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data from 18 and five volunteers at 3 T and 7 T, respectively, was performed. Axial images were inspected for the presence of gallbladder, and PDE signals in representative spectra were quantified. Phantom experiments demonstrated the strong pH-dependence of the PEP chemical shift and proved the overlap of PtdC and PEP (∝2 ppm relative to phosphocreatine) at hepatic pH. Gallbladder was covered in seven of 23 in vivo 3D-MRSI datasets. The PDE{sub gall}/γ-ATP{sub liver} ratio was 4.8-fold higher (p = 0.001) in the gallbladder (PDE{sub gall}/γ-ATP{sub liver} = 3.61 ± 0.79) than in the liver (PDE{sub liver}/γ-ATP{sub liver} = 0.75 ± 0.15). In vivo 7 T {sup 31}P MRSI allowed good separation of PDE components. The gallbladder is a strong source of contamination in adjacent {sup 31}P MR hepatic spectra due to biliary phosphatidylcholine. In vivo {sup 31}P MR hepatic signal at 2.06 ppm may represent both phosphatidylcholine and phosphoenolpyruvate, with a higher phosphatidylcholine contribution due to its higher concentration. (orig.)

  14. Clinical protocols for 31P MRS of the brain and their use in evaluating optic pathway gliomas in children

    Introduction: In vivo 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) measures phosphorus-containing metabolites that play an essential role in many disease processes. An advantage over 1H MRS is that total choline can be separated into phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine which have opposite associations with tumour grade. We demonstrate 31P MRS can provide robust metabolic information on an acceptable timescale to yield information of clinical importance. Methods: All MRI examinations were carried out on a 3T whole body scanner with all 31P MRS scans conducted using a dual-tuned 1H/31P head coil. Once optimised on phantoms, the protocol was tested in six healthy volunteers (four male and two female, mean age: 25 ± 2.7). 31P MRS was then implemented on three children with optic pathway gliomas. Results: 31P MRS on volunteers showed that a number of metabolite ratios varied significantly (p < 0.05 ANOVA) across different structures of the brain, whereas PC/GPC did not. Standard imaging showed the optic pathway gliomas were enhancing on T1-weighted imaging after contrast injection and have high tCho on 1H MRS, both of which are associated with high grade lesions. 31P MRS showed the phosphocholine/glycerophosphocholine ratio to be low (<0.6) which suggests low grade tumours in keeping with their clinical behaviour and the histology of most biopsied optic pathway gliomas. Conclusion: 31P MRS can be implemented in the brain as part of a clinical protocol to provide robust measurement of important metabolites, in particular providing a greater understanding of cases where tCho is raised on 1H MRS

  15. Organic matter and pH affect the analysis efficiency of (31)P-NMR.

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Jin, Xin; Rong, Nan; Li, Jie; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-05-01

    Solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) is a useful method to analyze organic phosphorus (Po), but a general procedure for the analysis method is lacking. The authors used solution (31)P-NMR, which was found to be an effective method for analysis of Po in Haihe River sediment, to analyze the Po in the surface sediment in Eastern China at the regional scale, and found that the NaOH-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) extraction rate was affected by environmental factors. At the regional scale, the extraction rate showed a positive relationship with loss on ignition, when the extraction rate was lower than 60%. The extraction rate had no relationship with the loss on ignition when the extraction rate was higher than 60%. The extraction rate showed a negative relationship with pH, which means that the extraction rate was higher in acidic sediment and lower in alkaline sediment. The ratio of TC/TN (the ratio of total carbon to total nitrogen) was considered to represent the origin of organic matter in the sediment. The extraction rate was high when the TC/TN ratio was lower than 20, meanwhile the extraction rate decreased as the TC/TN ratio increased. The results show that the origin of organic matter in sediment significantly affects the NaOH-EDTA extraction rate. This study will give theoretical support for building an effective and general solution (31)P-NMR analysis method. PMID:27155430

  16. Synthesis and physical studies of thiophospholipids using nuclear magnetic resonance

    1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thiophosphocholine, DPPsC, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-thiophospho-L-serine, DPPsS, were synthesized and used to probe bilayer structural properties and enzymatic stereoselectivity. Using resolved diastereomers of DPPsC, the effect of a chiral phosphorus center on the thermotropic properties of lipid dispersions was probed. 31P and 2H nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR, were utilized to confirm the thermotropic phase assignments for DPPsC diastereomers observed by differential scanning calorimetry. 31P NMR of the thiophosphate analogs revealed a more rigid subgel and Lβ' gel phase than DPPC, in regard to the phosphate rotational motion. In the Pβ' gel phase, the degree of motion of Sp and (Rp+Sp) was similar to DPPC. The tiophosphate analogs in the liquid crystalline phase experienced a freer rotational environment compared to DPPC. 2H NMR was performed on DPPsC diastereomers deuterated at the three choline carbons, α, β, γ. The liquid crystalline phase was used to detect differences between the diastereomers along the choline moiety. The diastereomeric mixture of DPPsS was used as a substrate for two stereoselective enzymes, phospholipases A2 and C. Phospholipase A2 hydrolyzed (Rp)-DPPsS, while no apparent reaction was detected for the hydrolysis of (Sp)-DPPsS with phospholipase C

  17. Fast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters in resonator

    Yukalov, V. I.; Yukalova, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    An effective method for ultrafast magnetization reversal of nanoclusters is suggested. The method is based on coupling a nanocluster to a resonant electric circuit. This coupling causes the appearance of a magnetic feedback field acting on the cluster, which drastically shortens the magnetization reversal time. The influence of the resonator properties, nanocluster parameters, and external fields on the magnetization dynamics and reversal time is analyzed. The magnetization reversal time can ...

  18. Wide-range nuclear magnetic resonance detector

    Sturman, J. C.; Jirberg, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Compact and easy to use solid state nuclear magnetic resonance detector is designed for measuring field strength to 20 teslas in cryogenically cooled magnets. Extremely low noise and high sensitivity make detector applicable to nearly all types of analytical nuclear magnetic resonance measurements and can be used in high temperature and radiation environments.

  19. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad; Kenouche, Samir; Coillot, Christophe; Alibert, Eric; Jabakhanji, Bilal; Schimpf, Remy; Zanca, Michel; Stein, Paul; Goze-Bac, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order to characterize and model evanescent electromagnetic fields originating from NMR phenomenon. We report that in this experimental configuration the available NMR signal is one order of magnitude larger and follows an exponential decay inversely proportional to the size of the emitters. Those investigations open a new road to a better understanding of the evanescent waves component in NMR with the opportunity to perform localized spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:26751800

  20. Hyperpolarized Renal Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (d-DNP) technology has enabled a new paradigm for renal imaging investigations. It allows standard magnetic resonance imaging complementary renal metabolic and functional fingerprints within seconds without the use of ionizing radiation....... Increasing evidence supports its utility in preclinical research in which the real-time interrogation of metabolic turnover can aid the physiological and pathophysiological metabolic and functional effects in ex vivo and in vivo models. The method has already been translated to humans, although the clinical...

  1. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  2. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  3. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma: magnetic resonance findings

    To characterize the results of magnetic resonance imaging in cerebellar hemangioblastoma. This retrospective study deals with seven cases of histologically-confirmed cerebellar hemangioblastoma after surgery. Another patient, diagnosed as having Von Hippel-Lindau disease, also developed this lesions, but the finding was not histologically confirmed. In all, there were 2 women and 6 men. Three of these patients presented Von Hippel-Lindaus disease. All were studied on a 0.5 T imager with T1, T2 and PD-weighted spin-echo axial planes; T1-weighted sequences were repeated after intravenous gadolinium administration. According to their aspects, the lesions were divided into three groups as follows: cyst containing a mural nodule (n=3)solid tumor (n=3) and cavitated tumor (n=1). In one patient, the lesion was initially solid and was found to present cavitation two years later. Abnormal vascularization was observed in all the tumors except for two small solid tumors, and the findings were not clear in one of the cysts containing a mural nodule. In the differential diagnosis it may be difficult to rule out other tumors, such as cystic astrocytoma. However, magnetic resonance imaging, together with the clinical data, is of diagnostic value in the three morphological types of cerebellar hemangioblastoma. (Author) 15 refs

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of hemochromatosis arthropathy

    This study was undertaken to compare plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of hemochromatosis arthropathy of the knees of ten patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis. Both modalities enabled visualisation of bony degenerative changes; magnetic resonance imaging enabled additional visualization of deformity of both cartilage and menisci. Magnetic resonance imaging failed reliably to confirm the presence of intra-articular iron in the patients studied. No correlation was observed between synovial fluid magnetic resonance signal values, corresponding serum ferritin levels, or the severity of the observed degenerative changes. (orig.)

  5. Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance guidelines for reporting cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations

    van Rossum Albert C; Raman Subha V; McConnell Michael V; Lawson Mark A; Higgins Charles B; Friedrich Matthias G; Bogaert Jan G; Bluemke David; Hundley W Gregory; Flamm Scott; Kramer Christopher M; Nagel Eike; Neubauer Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract These reporting guidelines are recommended by the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) to provide a framework for healthcare delivery systems to disseminate cardiac and vascular imaging findings related to the performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) examinations.

  6. Brief Report: Approaches to [Superscript 31]P-MRS in Awake, Non-Sedated Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Erickson, Laura C.; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Hamilton, Gavin; Lincoln, Alan; Golomb, Beatrice A.

    2012-01-01

    We piloted a suite of approaches aimed to facilitate a successful series of up to four brain and muscle [superscript 31]Phosphorus-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ([superscript 31]P-MRS) scans performed in one session in 12 "awake", non-sedated subjects (ages 6-18), 6 with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 6 controls. We targeted advanced…

  7. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...

  8. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electrolysis.

    Meir, Arie; Hjouj, Mohammad; Rubinsky, Liel; Rubinsky, Boris

    2015-02-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can image the process of electrolysis by detecting pH fronts. The study has relevance to real time control of cell ablation with electrolysis. To investigate the hypothesis we compare the following MR imaging sequences: T1 weighted, T2 weighted and Proton Density (PD), with optical images acquired using pH-sensitive dyes embedded in a physiological saline agar solution phantom treated with electrolysis and discrete measurements with a pH microprobe. We further demonstrate the biological relevance of our work using a bacterial E. Coli model, grown on the phantom. The results demonstrate the ability of MRI to image electrolysis produced pH changes in a physiological saline phantom and show that these changes correlate with cell death in the E. Coli model grown on the phantom. The results are promising and invite further experimental research.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Neurosarcoidosis

    Daniel T Ginat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosarcoidosis is an uncommon condition with protean manifestations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is often used in the diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of patients with neurosarcoidosis. Therefore, familiarity with the variety of MRI appearances is important. In this pictorial essay, the range of possible patterns of involvement in neurosarcoidosis are depicted and discussed. These include intracranial and spine leptomeningeal involvement, cortical and cerebral white matter lesions, corpus callosum involvement, sellar and suprasellar involvement, periventricular involvement, cranial nerve involvement, cavernous sinus involvement, hydrocephalus, dural involvement, ischemic lesions, perivascular involvement, orbit lesions, osseous involvement, nerve root involvement, and spinal cord intramedullary involvement. Differential diagnoses for each pattern of involvement of neurosarcoidosis are also provided.

  11. Synovial pathology: Magnetic resonance study

    The synovial membrane lines the inner surface of the entire joint capsule of the so-called synovial, or diarthrosis, joints. It also constitutes the lining synovial bursa and tendon sheaths. It is lubricated at all these sites by the synovial fluid secreted by the membrane itself. The identification of this structure is bases on the correct knowledge of its anatomical locations. Synovial membrane pathology includes lesions produced by tumors, inflammation, degeneration and trauma. In this report, we classify them as benign (cysts, chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, inflammatory synovitis and hemangioma) or malignant (synovial sarcoma and hemangiosarcoma). Magnetic resonance (MR) constitutes a useful and reliable method for diagnosis synovial lesions, providing a means of determining their origin and identifying distinctive features of some types. We present our experience in 12 cases of synovial pathology studied by MR over the past year, all of which were confirmed by histopathological study. 13 refs

  12. Fetal abdominal magnetic resonance imaging

    Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, 1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: peter.brugger@meduniwien.ac.at; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringerguertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-02-15

    This review deals with the in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance of the human fetal abdomen. Imaging findings are correlated with current knowledge of human fetal anatomy and physiology, which are crucial to understand and interpret fetal abdominal MRI scans. As fetal MRI covers a period of more than 20 weeks, which is characterized not only by organ growth, but also by changes and maturation of organ function, a different MR appearance of the fetal abdomen results. This not only applies to the fetal intestines, but also to the fetal liver, spleen, and adrenal glands. Choosing the appropriate sequences, various aspects of age-related and organ-specific function can be visualized with fetal MRI, as these are mirrored by changes in signal intensities. Knowledge of normal development is essential to delineate normal from pathological findings in the respective developmental stages.

  13. {sup 31}P-MR spectroscopy in children and adolescents with a familial risk of schizophrenia

    Rzanny, R.; Reichenbach, J.R.; Pfleiderer, S.O.R.; Kaiser, W.A. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Abteilung MT, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Philosophenweg 3, 07741 Jena (Germany); Klemm, S.; Blanz, B. [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07741 Jena (Germany); Schmidt, B.; Volz, H.-P. [Klinik fuer Psychiatrie, Klinikum der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Bachstrasse 18, 07741 Jena (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Based on a previous report [9] on alterations of membrane phosphorus metabolism in asymptomatic family members of schizophrenic patients, the aim of the present study was to extend and improve the evaluation and data processing of {sup 31}P spectroscopic data obtained from a larger study population by including an analysis of the broad spectral component (BC) of membrane phospholipids (PL). Eighteen children and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and a gender- and age-matched control group of 18 healthy subjects without familial schizophrenia were investigated with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 31}P-MRS) by using image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) in the dorsolateral prefrontal regions (DLPFR) of the brain. Spectral analysis was performed by using both the full and truncated FID to estimate metabolic peak ratios of different {sup 31}P metabolites and the intensity and linewidth of the broad component. A significantly higher PDE level (p<0.01) and increased linewidth of the PDE components were observed for the high-risk group compared with the control group (p=0.02). No significant differences were observed for PME as well as for other {sup 31}P-metabolites. No differences were observed between the left and right hemispheres for different normalised {sup 31}P-metabolic levels. Decreased intensities (p=0.03) and smaller linewidths (p=0.01) were obtained for the broad component in the high-risk group. Impairments of membrane metabolism that are typical for schizophrenic patients are partially observed in adolescent asymptomatic family members of schizophrenics, including increased levels of low molecular PDE compounds indicating increased membrane degradation processes, no changes for PME, and decreased intensities and linewidths of the BC indicating changes in the composition and fluidity of membrane phospholipids. Despite limitations to completely suppress fast-relaxing components by dismissing initial FID data points, the

  14. 31P-MR spectroscopy in children and adolescents with a familial risk of schizophrenia

    Based on a previous report [9] on alterations of membrane phosphorus metabolism in asymptomatic family members of schizophrenic patients, the aim of the present study was to extend and improve the evaluation and data processing of 31P spectroscopic data obtained from a larger study population by including an analysis of the broad spectral component (BC) of membrane phospholipids (PL). Eighteen children and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and a gender- and age-matched control group of 18 healthy subjects without familial schizophrenia were investigated with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) by using image selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS) in the dorsolateral prefrontal regions (DLPFR) of the brain. Spectral analysis was performed by using both the full and truncated FID to estimate metabolic peak ratios of different 31P metabolites and the intensity and linewidth of the broad component. A significantly higher PDE level (p31P-metabolites. No differences were observed between the left and right hemispheres for different normalised 31P-metabolic levels. Decreased intensities (p=0.03) and smaller linewidths (p=0.01) were obtained for the broad component in the high-risk group. Impairments of membrane metabolism that are typical for schizophrenic patients are partially observed in adolescent asymptomatic family members of schizophrenics, including increased levels of low molecular PDE compounds indicating increased membrane degradation processes, no changes for PME, and decreased intensities and linewidths of the BC indicating changes in the composition and fluidity of membrane phospholipids. Despite limitations to completely suppress fast-relaxing components by dismissing initial FID data points, the spectroscopic results indicate additional changes in the membrane metabolism of high-risk subjects beyond changes of synthesis and degradation. (orig.)

  15. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes

  16. Pituitary tumors: Diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging

    This paper presents a survey of the current status of the diagnosis of pituitary tumors by means of magnetic resonance imaging. It focuses on the clinical and practical aspects. The recommended procedure and the sequences and slice orientations for magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland are presented, and the features that are essential for the diagnosis of pituitary tumors are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance force microscopy: recent results

    Force detection of magnetic resonance has been demonstrated experimentally and used for imaging in EPR. This paper will review the basic principles of Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) and will report some recent results in NMR imaging and the operation of a low-temperature MRFM. (author). 31 refs., 14 figs

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of erythrocyte membranes

    Chapman, D.; Kamat, V.B.; Gier, J. de; Penkett, S.A.

    1968-01-01

    The use of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for studying molecular interactions in biological membranes has been investigated using erythrocyte membrane fragments. Sonic dispersion of these fragments produces a sharp and well-defined high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum. The sp

  19. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  20. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Full Text Available ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot ... I’d like to talk with you about magnetic resonance angiography, or as it’s commonly known, MRA. MRA ...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in the investigation of the prostate. The current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be of value in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate

    Iversen, P; Kjaer, L; Thomsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging offers new possibilities in investigation of the prostate gland. Current results of imaging and tissue discrimination in the evaluation of prostatic disease are reviewed. Magnetic resonance imaging may be useful in the staging of carcinoma of the prostate....

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Pediatric Anxiety

    Pine, Daniel S.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Peterson, Bradley S.; Gerber, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in investigating pediatric anxiety disorders is studied. Functional magnetic resonance imaging can be utilized in demonstrating parallels between the neural architecture of difference in anxiety of humans and the neural architecture of attention-orienting behavior in nonhuman primates or rodents.…

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems: Applications to liver preservation and metabolism in cultured pituitary tumor cells

    This study centers on applications of both 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to two different biological systems. The first application utilizes 31P NMR to study mobile phospholipids in the MMQ cell line, a pituitary tumor cell line. These measurements characterize membrane phospholipids thought to be part of a RNA-proteolipid complex unique to cellular transformation. The second application utilizes both 31P and 13C spectroscopy to study liver preservation and transplantation an a rat model. In this work, several questions were addressed: (1) to what extent do successful preservation solutions slow ATP breakdown? (2) can clinically successful preservation conditions ameliorate total nucleotide breakdown? (3) to what extent is energy reconstitution following cold storage correlated with transport success? and (4) can any spectroscopic parameter be used as a diagnostic indicator of tissue viability?

  5. Magnetic non-collinear neutron wave resonator

    Khaidukov, Yu N

    2009-01-01

    The expression are received for amplitude of neutron reflection from layered magnetic non-collinear structure (neutron wave resonator (NWR)). It is showed the magnetic non-collinear NWR is characterized by the system of pairs of resonances for the spin flipped neutrons. The conditions are defined at which amplifying of spin-flipped neutron flux in wave resonator is multiple increased in comparison with amplifying of neutron absorption.

  6. Magnetic Resonance of the Knee

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been applied to muscoloskeletal pathoanatomy and has proved to be useful in the detection and characterization of knees and 8 normal knees were examined. The images were obtained in the Diagnostic Centre RMRC of Naples on a 0.5 T superconductive magnetic system, using a surface coil and a spin-echo pulse sequence (SE 600/28 ms). The examined limb was immobilized and bent at 8-10 grade, extrarotated for the examination of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) only. Images were obtained on a 256x256 matrix and had a 2 or 4-mm thickness. MRI cleary showed all the anatomical structures. The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PAL) and tha patellar ligament were shown by sagittal SE images through the intercondylar notch; the tibial and fibular collateral ligaments (TCL and FCL) were evaluated on coronal SE images; the articular capsula and menisci on axial transverse SE images. Objective criteria for ACL and PCL tears were: lack of continuity of the signal and change in signal intensity; in meniscal pathology, menisci with small linear regions of increased signal or with grossly truncated shape were interpreted as tears. Preliminary results of this study indicate that MRI together with clinical evaluation may be an useful non-invasive procedure in the assessment of acute injuries of the knee

  7. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    Magusin, P.C.M.M.; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for ...

  8. Stepped Impedance Resonators for High Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Akgun, Can E.; DelaBarre, Lance; Yoo, Hyoungsuk; Sohn, Sung-Min; Snyder, Carl J.; Adriany, Gregor; Ugurbil, Kamil; Gopinath, Anand; Vaughan, J. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multi-element volume radio-frequency (RF) coils are an integral aspect of the growing field of high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In these systems, a popular volume coil of choice has become the transverse electromagnetic (TEM) multi-element transceiver coil consisting of microstrip resonators. In this paper, to further advance this design approach, a new microstrip resonator strategy in which the transmission line is segmented into alternating impedance sections referred to as step...

  9. Magnetic Microparticle Aggregation For Viscosity Determination By Magnetic Resonance

    Hong, Rui; Cima, Michael J; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Micron-sized magnetic particles were induced to aggregate when placed in homogeneous magnetic fields, like those of magnetic resonance (MR) imagers and relaxometers, and then spontaneously returned to their dispersed state when removed from the field. Associated with the aggregation and dispersion of the magnetic particles were time dependent increases and decreases in the spin-spin relaxation time (T2) of the water. Magnetic nanoparticles, with far smaller magnetic moments per particle, did ...

  10. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging; Resonance magnetique nucleaire

    Thibierge, M.; Sevestre, L.; Slupecki, P. [Centre Hospitalier de Charleville-Mezieres, 08 (France)

    1998-06-01

    After many years of low profile business in the USA, MRI is back. Improvements are focused on high field magnets and on low field magnets. The former, are dedicated to high quality imaging. The new scanners are more and more efficient because of the spreading use of real time imaging. They can do now, procedures that just could not be imagined some years ago. Vascular imaging is done routinely. Abdominal imaging in apnea of EPI, perfusion and diffusion imaging, and, last not least, all the field of functional imaging are on the verge of coming out. The new magnets unveiled in 1997 are lighter, smaller, more, user friendly, less impressive for patients subject to claustrophobia. They also need less helium to operate and less space to be sited. The latter, are dedicated to interventional procedures. The new magnets are wide opened and a lot of companies show off. Though Picker unveiled a new light superconductive 0.5 Tesla magnet, it seems that this kind of machines are about to disappear. No significant progress was noticed in the field of dedicated MRI devices. Some features can be highlighted: the new Siemens short bore and its table integrates the Panoramic Array Coil Concept. It will allow simultaneous scanning with up to four coils; the excellent homogeneity of the new Picker magnet that will allow spectroscopy at 1 Tesla; the twin gradients of the Elscint Prisma that will open the field of microscopy MRI; the Philips `floppy gradients` that could speed up 4 or 6 times, the time needed for imaging; some new sequences sensitive to temperature are studied as WIP; a lot of work is achieved on 3 or 4 Tesla scanners etc. (author)

  11. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhanced MR imaging of (31)P-containing metabolites: multipoint-Dixon vs. frequency-selective excitation.

    Rink, Kristian; Berger, Moritz C; Korzowski, Andreas; Breithaupt, Mathies; Biller, Armin; Bachert, Peter; Nagel, Armin M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop nuclear-Overhauser-enhanced (NOE) [(1)H]-(31)P magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based on 3D fully-balanced steady-state free precession (fbSSFP). Therefore, two implementations of a 3D fbSSFP sequence are compared using frequency-selective excitation (FreqSel) and multipoint-Dixon (MP-Dixon). (31)P-containing model solutions and four healthy volunteers were examined at field strengths of B0=3T and 7T. Maps of the distribution of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (Pi), and adenosine 5´-triphosphate (ATP) in the human calf were obtained with an isotropic resolution of 1.5cm (1.0cm) in an acquisition time of 5min (10min). NOE-pulses had the highest impact on the PCr acquisitions enhancing the signal up to (82 ± 13) % at 3T and up to (37 ± 9) % at 7T. An estimation of the level of PCr in muscle tissue from [(1)H]-(31)P MRI data yielded a mean value of (33 ± 8) mM. In conclusion, direct [(1)H]-(31)P imaging using FreqSel as well as MP-Dixon is possible in clinically feasible acquisition times. FreqSel should be preferred for measurements where only a single metabolite resonance is considered. MP-Dixon performs better in terms of SNR if a larger spectral width is of interest. PMID:26248272

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    Nakajima, Seijun; Tanaka, Akemi; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Hattori, Hideji; Matsuoka, Osamu; Murata, Ryosuke; Isshiki, Gen; Inoue, Yuichi

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T/sub 1/-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T/sub 2/-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T/sub 2/-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T/sub 2/ of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in mucopolysaccharidosis

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images in six patients with mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), two with type I S, one with type II A, two with type III B, and one with type VI MPS, were reviewed and compared with reported pathological findings and with CT scans. We used a Picker International MR imager with a 0.5-tesla superconducting magnet. The pulse sequences involved the inversion recovery technique (TR, 2,100 msec ; TI, 600 msec ; TE, 40 msec) for the T1-weighted images and spin echo technique (TR, 1,800 msec ; TE, 120 msec) for the T2-weighted images. The TC scanner was a Somatom 2 or DR3. In the patients with type II A and type VI MPS, there were multi-focal lesions of various sizes that showed prolonged T1 and T2 in the white matter. These lesions, which were not detected by CT, seemed to be correlated with the pathological findings of cavitation and dilated periadventitial space with viscous fluid. In the patients with type II A and type III B MPS, the T2-weighted images showed a reduced contrast between gray and white matters, which may be related to the deposition of glycolipids and mucopolysaccharides in the lysosomes of the neurons and astrocytes of the gray and white matters. These findings seemed to be correlated with the clinical finding of mental retardation. In the patient of type II A MPS, there were lesions that showed prolonged T2 of the periventricular white matter, suggesting periventricular edema. But CT hardly detected these lesions. In the patients with type I S MPS, no abnormal findings were found in MR imaging. It was concluded that MR imaging was far more sensitive for the detection of MPS lesions than CT, and was a useful method for differential diagnosis in MPS. (author)

  14. Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and foreign bodies within the patient’s body may be confused with a pathology or may reduce the quality of examinations. Radiologists are frequently not informed about the medical history of patients and face postoperative/other images they are not familiar with. A gallery of such images was presented in this manuscript. A truncation artifact in the spinal cord could be misinterpreted as a syrinx. Motion artifacts caused by breathing, cardiac movement, CSF pulsation/blood flow create a ghost artifact which can be reduced by patient immobilization, or cardiac/respiratory gating. Aliasing artifacts can be eliminated by increasing the field of view. An artificially hyperintense signal on FLAIR images can result from magnetic susceptibility artifacts, CSF/vascular pulsation, motion, but can also be found in patients undergoing MRI examinations while receiving supplemental oxygen. Metallic and other foreign bodies which may be found on and in patients’ bodies are the main group of artifacts and these are the focus of this study: e.g. make-up, tattoos, hairbands, clothes, endovascular embolization, prostheses, surgical clips, intraorbital and other medical implants, etc. Knowledge of different types of artifacts and their origin, and of possible foreign bodies is necessary to eliminate them or to reduce their negative influence on MR images by adjusting acquisition parameters. It is also necessary to take them into consideration when interpreting the images. Some proposals of reducing artifacts have been mentioned. Describing in detail the procedures to avoid or limit the artifacts would go beyond the scope of this paper but technical ways to reduce them can be found in the cited literature

  15. Interaction of magnetic resonators studied by the magnetic field enhancement

    Yumin Hou

    2013-01-01

    It is the first time that the magnetic field enhancement (MFE) is used to study the interaction of magnetic resonators (MRs), which is more sensitive than previous parameters–shift and damping of resonance frequency. To avoid the coherence of lattice and the effect of Bloch wave, the interaction is simulated between two MRs with same primary phase when the distance is changed in the range of several resonance wavelengths, which is also compared with periodic structure. The calculated MFE osci...

  16. Phosphorus-31 and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of glucose and xylose metabolism in Candida tropicalis cell suspensions.

    Lohmeier-Vogel, E M; Hahn-Hägerdal, B.; Vogel, H J

    1995-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose and xylose was studied as a function of oxygenation in suspensions of Candida tropicalis by 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Both the rate of carbohydrate metabolism and the cytoplasmic pH were independent of the rate of oxygenation in cells metabolizing glucose. However, these two parameters were markedly dependent on the rate of oxygenation in C. tropicalis cells metabolizing xylose. For example, the cytoplasmic pH in fully oxygenated xylose-met...

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging by visual stimulation

    We evaluated functional magnetic resonance images obtained in 8 healthy subjects in response to visual stimulation using a conventional clinical magnetic resonance imaging system with multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging. Activation in the visual cortex was clearly demonstrated by the multi-slice experiment with a task-related change in signal intensity. In addition to the primary visual cortex, other areas were also activated by a complicated visual task. Multi-slice spin-echo echo planar imaging offers high temporal resolution and allows the three-dimensional analysis of brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides a useful noninvasive method of mapping brain function. (author)

  18. Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance in multiple sclerosis

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging was performed in more than 200 patients with clinical suspicion or knowledge of Multiple Sclerosis. One hundred and forty-seven (60 males and 87 females) had MR evidence of multiple sclerosis lesions. The MR signal of demyelinating plaques characteristically has prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times and the T2-weighted spin-echo sequences are generally superior to the T1-weighted images because the lesions are better visualized as areas of increased signal intensity. MR is also able to detect plaques in the brainstem, cerebellum and within the cervical spinal cord. MR appears to be an important, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis and has proven to be diagnostically superior to CT, evoked potentials (EP) and CSF examination. In a selected group of 30 patients, with the whole battery of the relevant MS studies, MR was positive in 100%, CT in 33,3%, EP in 56% and CSF examination in 60%. In patients clinically presenting only with signs of spinal cord involvement or optic neuritis or when the clinical presentation is uncertain MR has proven to be a very useful diagnostic tool for diagnosis of MS by demonstrating unsuspected lesions in the cerebral hemispheres. (orig.)

  20. A Magnetic Resonance Measurement Technique for Rapidly Switched Gradient Magnetic Fields in a Magnetic Resonance Tomograph

    K. Bartušek

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a method for measuring of the gradient magnetic field in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR tomography, which is one of the modern medical diagnostic methods. A very important prerequisite for high quality imaging is a gradient magnetic field in the instrument with exactly defined properties. Nuclear magnetic resonance enables us to measure the pulse gradient magnetic field characteristics with high accuracy. These interesting precise methods were designed, realised, and tested at the Institute of Scientific Instruments (ISI of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. The first of them was the Instantaneous Frequency (IF method, which was developed into the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo (IFSE and the Instantaneous Frequency of Spin Echo Series (IFSES methods. The above named methods are described in this paper and their a comparison is also presented.

  1. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    Markovich, Dmitry; Baryshnikova, Kseniia; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2016-03-01

    All-dielectric “magnetic light” nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here an approach for enhancing of magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of the magnetic moment, tailoring the latter in the dynamical range of 100% and delivering enhancement up to 36% relative to performances of standalone spherical particles. The proposed approach provides pathways for designs of all-dielectric metamaterials and metasurfaces with strong magnetic responses.

  2. Phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy in malformations of cortical development

    Celi Santos Andrade

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Malformations of cortical development (MCD result from disruptions in the dynamic process of cerebral corticogenesis and are important causes of epilepsy, motor deficits and cognitive impairment. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate phospholipids metabolism in vivo in a series of patients with epilepsy and MCD. Methods Thirty-seven patients with MCD and 31 control subjects were studied using three-dimensional phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS at a 3.0 T scanner. Quantification methods were applied to the following resonances: phosphoethanolamine (PE, phosphocholine (PC, glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE, glycerophosphocholine (GPC, inorganic phosphate (Pi, phosphocreatine (PCr, and a-, b-, and g-adenosine triphosphate (ATP. The magnesium (Mg2+ levels and pH were calculated based on PCr, Pi and b-ATP chemical shifts. Results Compared to controls, the MCD lesions exhibited lower pH values and higher Mg2+ levels (p<0.05. The lesions also presented significant reduction of GPC and PDE, and an increased PME/PDE ratio. The otherwise normal appearing parenchyma also demonstrated lower pH values in the frontoparietal cortex and bilateral centrum semiovale. Conclusions Our data support the idea that metabolic impairments occur in the lesions of MCD, with propagation to remote normal appearing parenchyma. The results also suggest that there are membrane turnover disturbances in MCD lesions.

  3. Reducing Field Distortion in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2010-01-01

    A concept for a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that would utilize a relatively weak magnetic field provides for several design features that differ significantly from the corresponding features of conventional MRI systems. Notable among these features are a magnetic-field configuration that reduces (relative to the conventional configuration) distortion and blurring of the image, the use of a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer as the detector, and an imaging procedure suited for the unconventional field configuration and sensor. In a typical application of MRI, a radio-frequency pulse is used to excite precession of the magnetic moments of protons in an applied magnetic field, and the decaying precession is detected for a short time following the pulse. The precession occurs at a resonance frequency proportional to the strengths of the magnetic field and the proton magnetic moment. The magnetic field is configured to vary with position in a known way; hence, by virtue of the aforesaid proportionality, the resonance frequency varies with position in a known way. In other words, position is encoded as resonance frequency. MRI using magnetic fields weaker than those of conventional MRI offers several advantages, including cheaper and smaller equipment, greater compatibility with metallic objects, and higher image quality because of low susceptibility distortion and enhanced spin-lattice-relaxation- time contrast. SQUID MRI is being developed into a practical MRI method for applied magnetic flux densities of the order of only 100 T

  4. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of right ventricle in pigs.

    Schwartz, G G; Steinman, S K; Weiner, M W; Matson, G B

    1992-06-01

    The energy metabolism of the right ventricle (RV) in vivo has been largely unexplored. The goal of this study was to develop and implement techniques for in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the RV free wall. A two-turn, crossover-design elliptical surface coil was constructed to provide high sensitivity across the thin RV wall but minimal sensitivity in the blood-filled RV cavity. In 36 open-chest, anesthetized pigs, 31P spectroscopy of the RV free wall was performed with this coil at a field strength of 2 Tesla. Spectra were obtained from 800 acquisitions in 24 min with an average signal-to-noise ratio of 13.2 for phosphocreatine (PCr). The PCr-to-ATP (PCr/ATP) ratio of porcine RV was 1.42 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SE), uncorrected for saturation at a repetition time of 1.8 s. With the use of literature values of the time constant of longitudinal relaxation (T1) to correct for partial saturation, the RV PCr/ATP was estimated to lie between 1.7 and 2.3. Decreased RV PCr/ATP was observed during RV ischemia and pressure overload. Thus in vivo 31P spectroscopy of the RV is readily accomplished with an appropriate surface coil and can provide new information about RV energy metabolism. PMID:1621852

  5. Application of 31P MR spectroscopy to the brain tumors

    To evaluate the clinical feasibility and obtain useful parameters of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study for making the differential diagnosis of brain tumors. Twenty-eight patients with brain tumorous lesions (22 cases of brain tumor and 6 cases of abscess) and 11 normal volunteers were included. The patients were classified into the astrocytoma group, lymphoma group, metastasis group and the abscess group. We obtained the intracellular pH and the metabolite ratios of phosphomonoesters/phosophodiesters (PME/PDE), PME/inorganic phosphate (Pi), PDE/Pi, PME/adenosine triphosphate (ATP), PDE/ATP, PME/phosphocreatine (PCr), PDE/PCr, PCr/ATP, PCr/Pi, and ATP/Pi, and evaluated the statistical significances. The brain tumors had a tendency of alkalization (pH = 7.28 ± 0.27, p = 0.090), especially the pH of the lymphoma was significantly increased (pH = 7.45 ± 0.32, p = 0.013). The brain tumor group showed increased PME/PDE ratio compared with that in the normal control group (p 0.012). The ratios of PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr and PDE/PCr showed statistically significant differences between each brain lesion groups (p 1'P MRS, and the pH, PME/PDE, PDE/Pi, PME/PCr, and PDE/PCr ratios are helpful for differentiating among the different types of brain tumors.

  6. Biliary Ascariasis on Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography

    Hashmi, Mohammad A; Jevan K De

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old girl presented with features of biliary obstruction. Magnetic resonance cholangi-pancreatography revealed typical linear signals in common bile duct, which appears like Ascaris lumbricoides. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic removal of the worm.

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  9. Chronic liver disease: evaluation by magnetic resonance

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging distinguished hepatitis from fatty liver and cirrhosis in a woman with a history of alcohol abuse. Anatomic and physiologic manifestations of portal hypertension were also demonstrated by MR

  10. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

    ... Join the ISMRM Journals History & Mission Central Office Society Award Winners Strategic Plan Policies Corporate Members Contact ... E-Library Virtual Meetings Connect With Us International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 2300 Clayton Road, ...

  11. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    Bauer, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J., E-mail: gegelia@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute of TSU, 0186 Tbilisi, Georgia (United States); Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2012-08-29

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for uterus leiomyoma diagnosis

    The possibilities of a new technique, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in leiomyoma diagnosis was studied. MRI has clear advantages to differentiate adenomyosis from lysosomes and to reveal combination of these processes, which can considerably influence the tactics of the treatment

  13. Magnetic moment of the Roper resonance

    Bauer, T.; Gegelia, J.; Scherer, S.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic moment of the Roper resonance is calculated in the framework of a low-energy effective field theory of the strong interactions. A systematic power-counting procedure is implemented by applying the complex-mass scheme.

  14. Your Radiologist Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA)

    Full Text Available ... Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Video: Contrast Material Radiology and You Take our survey About this Site ... Explains Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello, I’m Dr. Elliot ...

  15. Contribution to nuclear magnetic resonance imager using permanent magnets

    After some recalls of nuclear magnetic resonance, ways to get a stable and homogeneous magnetic field are studied with permanent magnets. Development of correction coils on integrated circuits has been particularly stressed. Gradient coil specific systems have been studied taking in account ferromagnetic material presence. Antenna system has been improved and possibility of image obtention with the prototype realized has been shown

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Current Capabilities

    Davis, Peter L.; Crooks, Lawrence E.; Margulis, Alexander R.; Kaufman, Leon

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging can produce tomographic images of the body without ionizing radiation. Images of the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis and extremities have been obtained and normal structures and pathology have been identified. Soft tissue contrast with this method is superior to that with x-ray computerized tomography and its spatial resolution is approaching that of x-ray computerized tomography. In addition, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging enables us to image along the sag...

  17. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of the right ventricle

    Alpendurada, Francisco Diogo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Whilst most of the attention has been devoted to the left ventricle in cardiovascular disease, the right ventricle has been somewhat neglected. In the last decades, there has been a renewal of interest in the right ventricle, in part driven by advances in cardiovascular imaging. Methods: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance is arguably the best imaging modality for the study of the right ventricle. In this research thesis, cardiovascular magnetic resonance w...

  18. Cat scratch disease: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Cat scratch disease is an infectious lymphadenitis frequently occurring in children and adolescents. We present the magnetic resonance imaging findings of two patients with this disease. In both cases, lymphadenopathy was characterized by extensive stranding of the surrounding soft tissues, consistent with the inflammatory nature of this condition. Magnetic resonance imaging can be diagnostic and may obviate the need for invasive means of evaluation in patients suspected of having cat scratch disease. (orig.)

  19. Advanced magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques and applications

    Cao, Peng; 曹鹏

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is a well-known non-invasive technique that provides spectra (by MR spectroscopy, MRS) and images (by magnetic resonance imaging, MRI) of the examined tissue with detailed metabolic, structural, and functional information. This doctoral work is focused on advanced methodologies and applications of MRS for probing cellular and molecular changes in vivo. A single-voxel diffusion-weighted (DW) MRS method was first developed for monitoring the size changes of intramyocellu...

  20. Concepts and indications of abdominal magnetic resonance

    A literature review and conceptualization was performed of the main indications of magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen and the characteristic findings for each sequence, according to organ and pathology. The radiologist has had in mind main indications for magnetic resonance studies of the abdomen, with the purpose to guide the clinician in the choice of imaging modality that works best for the patient at diagnosis

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Dielectric Lens

    Vazquez, F.; Marrufo, O.; MARTIN,R; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, metamaterials have been introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of magnetic resonance images with very promising results. However, the use polymers in the generation of high quality images in magnetic resonance imaging has not been fully been investigated. These investigations explored the use of a dielectric periodical array as a lens to improve the image SNR generated with single surface coils. Commercial polycarbonate glazing sheets were used together with a circula...

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in depression

    Naren P Rao; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Bangalore N Gangadhar

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique technique that can directly assess the concentration of various biochemical metabolites in the brain. Thus, it is used in the study of molecular pathophysiology of different neuropsychiatric disorders, such as, the major depressive disorder and has been an area of active research. We conducted a computer-based literature search using the Pubmed database with ‘magnetic resonance spectroscopy’, ‘MRS’, ‘depression’, and ‘major depressive disorder...

  3. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  4. Magnetic resonance urography in children

    The imaging methods play an important role in the diagnosing of the urinary tract diseases in children. The magnetic resonance urography (MRU) aids the morphological and functional assessment of the urinary tract as well as the increase of the accuracy of the diagnosing process. Objective: The aim of the study is to assess the capabilities of the MRU for the diagnosing of the urogenital tract in children. Material and methods: In 30 children, age between 20 days and 14 years, suspected for urinary tract pathology MRU is performed. The technique includes a native and contrast examination of the abdomen and the pelvis. The duration, depending on the pathology, is between 20 and 30 min. The axial scans and the 3-dimensional reconstructed images have been processed at different reconstruction angle. The findings have been compared to the other imaging methods applied and the postoperative results. Results: The MRU has allowed to diagnose different types of urogenital diseases in children - 3 with double pyelo-calyx system, 12 with obstructed mega ureter, 5 with obstruction of the pyelo-urinary segment, 5 with accompanying parenchyma anomalies, 6 with renal calculi, 5 with tumors, 1 with extrarenal tumor formation, 3 with bladder anomalies and 1 with kidney transplantation. Most of the children have combined pathology. Conclusions: MRU shows significant advantages in a number of pathological conditions as urinary tract obstruction, renal tumors, transplanted kidney and some congenital anomalies. The technique is safe, non-invasive and relatively fast for children examinations. These features of MRU presents a reason to assume that it will replace a number of conventional radiography techniques, giving more precise diagnostic information

  5. Solid State Multinuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation of Electrolyte Decomposition Products on Lithium Ion Electrodes

    DeSilva, J .H. S. R.; Udinwe, V.; Sideris, P. J.; Smart, M. C.; Krause, F. C.; Hwang, C.; Smith, K. A.; Greenbaum, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    Solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation in lithium ion cells prepared with advanced electrolytes is investigated by solid state multinuclear (7Li, 19F, 31P) magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of electrode materials harvested from cycled cells subjected to an accelerated aging protocol. The electrolyte composition is varied to include the addition of fluorinated carbonates and triphenyl phosphate (TPP, a flame retardant). In addition to species associated with LiPF6 decomposition, cathode NMR spectra are characterized by the presence of compounds originating from the TPP additive. Substantial amounts of LiF are observed in the anodes as well as compounds originating from the fluorinated carbonates.

  6. Complex Response Function of Magnetic Resonance Spectrometers

    Annino, G.; Cassettari, M.; Fittipaldi, M.; M. Martinelli

    2002-01-01

    A vectorial analysis of magnetic resonance spectrometers, based on traveling wave resonators and including the reference arm and the automatic control of frequency, has been developed. The proposed model, valid also for stationary wave resonators, gives the response function of the spectrometer for any working condition, including scalar detectors with arbitrary response law and arbitrary excitation frequency. The purely dispersive and purely absorptive linear responses are discussed in detai...

  7. Enhancement of artificial magnetism via resonant bianisotropy

    Markovich, Dmitry; Shalin, Alexander; Samusev, Anton; Krasnok, Alexander; Belov, Pavel; Ginzburg, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    All-dielectric "magnetic light" nanophotonics based on high refractive index nanoparticles allows controlling magnetic component of light at nanoscale without having high dissipative losses. The artificial magnetic optical response of such nanoparticles originates from circular displacement currents excited inside those structures and strongly depends on geometry and dispersion of optical materials. Here a new approach for increasing magnetic response via resonant bianisotropy effect is proposed and analyzed. The key mechanism of enhancement is based on electric-magnetic interaction between two electrically and magnetically resonant nanoparticles of all-dielectric dimer nanoantenna. It was shown that proper geometrical arrangement of the dimer in respect to the incident illumination direction allows flexible control over all vectorial components of magnetic polarizability, tailoring the later in the dynamical range of 100 % and enhancement up to 36 % relative to performances of standalone spherical particles....

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of biological systems

    The difference between intracellular and extracellular proton relaxation rates provides the basis for the determination of the mean hemoglobin concentration (MHC) in red blood cells. The observed water T1 relaxation data from red blood cell samples under various conditions were fit to the complete equation for the time-dependent decay of magnetization for a two-compartment system including chemical exchange. The MHC for each sample was calculated from the hematocrit and the intracellular water fraction as determined by NMR. The binding of the phosphorylcholine (PC) analogue, 2-(trimethylphosphonio)-ethylphosphate (phosphoryl-phosphocholine, PPC) to the PC binding myeloma proteins TEPC-15, McPC 603, and MOPC 167 was studied by 31P NMR

  9. Nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging: Progress and challenges

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), based on the sensitive detection of nuclear spins, enables three dimensional imaging without radiation damage. Conventional MRI techniques achieve spatial resolution that is at best a few micrometers due to sensitivity limitations of conventional inductive detection. The advent of ultrasensitive nanoscale magnetic sensing opens the possibility of extending MRI to the nanometer scale. If this can be pushed far enough, one can envision taking 3D images of individual biomolecules and, perhaps, even solving molecular structures of proteins. In this talk we will discuss issues related to nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging, especially its implementation using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM). MRFM is based on the detection of ultrasmall (attonewton) magnetic forces. While 3D spatial resolution below 5 nm has been demonstrated, further progress depends on overcoming poorly understood near-surface force noise effects. We also consider the future possibility of using NV centers in diamond for detection of nanoMRI.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Full Text Available ... of the head uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed pictures ... medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...