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Sample records for 316l stainless steel

  1. Ion nitriding in 316=L stainless steel

    Ion nitriding is a glow discharge process that is used to induce surface modification in metals. It has been applied to 316-L austenitic stainless steel looking for similar benefits already obtained in other steels. An austenitic stainless steel was selected because is not hardenable by heat treatment and is not easy to nitride by gas nitriding. The samples were plastically deformed to 10, 20, 40, 50 AND 70% of their original thickness in order to obtain bulk hardening and to observe nitrogen penetration dependence on it. The results were: an increase of one to two rockwell hardness number (except in 70% deformed sample because of its thickness); an increase of even several hundreds per cent in microhardness knoop number in nitrided surface. The later surely modifies waste resistance which would be worth to quantify in further studies. Microhardness measured in an internal transversal face to nitrided surface had a gradual diminish in its value with depth. Auger microanalysis showed a higher relative concentration rate CN/CFe near the surface giving evidence of nitrogen presence till 250 microns deep. The color metallography etchant used, produced faster corrosion in nitrited regions. Therefore, corrosion studies have to be done before using ion nitrited 316-L under these chemicals. (Author)

  2. Study of Ce-modified antibacterial 316L stainless steel

    Yuan Junping

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available 316L stainless steel is widely used for fashion jewelry, but it can carry a large number of bacteria and bring the risk of infection since the steel has no antimicrobial performance. In this paper, the effects of Ce on the antibacterial property, corrosion resistance and processability of 316L were studied by microscopic observation, thin-film adhering quantitative bacteriostasis, and electrochemical and mechanical tests. The results show that a trace of Ce can distribute uniformly in the matrix of 316L and slightly improve its corrosion resistance in artificial sweat. With an increase in Ce content, the Ce is prone to form clustering, which degrades the corrosion resistance and the processability. The Ce-containing 316L exhibits Hormesis effect against S. aureus. A small Ce addition stimulates the growth of S. aureus. As the Ce content increases, the modified 316L exhibits an improved antibacterial efficacy. The more Ce is added, the better antibacterial capability is achieved. Overall, if the 316L is modified with Ce alone, it is difficult to obtain the optimal combination of corrosion resistance, antibacterial performance and processability. In spite of that, 0.15 wt.%-0.20 wt.% Ce around is inferred to be the best trade-off.

  3. Biomaterial Studies on AISI 316L Stainless Steel after Magnetoelectropolishing

    Massimiliano Filippi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The polarisation characteristics of the electropolishing process in a magnetic field (MEP – magnetoelectropolishing, in comparison with those obtained under standard/conventional process (EP conditions, have been obtained. The occurrence of an EP plateau has been observed in view of the optimization of MEP process. Up-to-date stainless steel surface studies always indicated some amount of free-metal atoms apart from the detected oxides and hydroxides. Such a morphology of the surface film usually affects the thermodynamic stability and corrosion resistance of surface oxide layer and is one of the most important features of stainless steels. With this new MEP process we can improve metal surface properties by making the stainless steel more resistant to halides encountered in a variety of environments. Furthermore, in this paper the stainless steel surface film study results have been presented. The results of the corrosion research carried out by the authors on the behaviour of the most commonly used material - medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel both in Ringer’s body fluid and in aqueous 3% NaCl solution have been investigated and presented earlier elsewhere, though some of these results, concerning the EIS Nyquist plots and polarization curves are also revealed herein. In this paper an attempt to explain this peculiar performance of 316L stainless steel has been undertaken. The SEM studies, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were performed on 316L samples after three treatments: MP – abrasive polishing (800 grit size, EP – conventional electrolytic polishing, and MEP – magnetoelectropolishing. It has been found that the proposed magnetoelectropolishing (MEP process considerably modifies the morphology and the composition of the surface film, thus leading to improved corrosion resistance of the studied 316L SS.

  4. Corrosion of 316L stainless steels MAVL wastes containers

    The long lived and medium activity wastes are conditioned or could be re-conditioned in primary drums of 316L stainless steels. In the framework of wastes storage, these drums will be placed in concrete containers; each containers would contain one or more drums. This document recalls global information on the corrosion of stainless steels, analyzes specific conditions bond to the drums conditioning in concrete containers and the nature of the wastes, and details the consequences on the possible risks of external and internal corrosion of the drums. (A.L.B.)

  5. Hydrogen embrittlement of 316L type stainless steel

    Hydrogen embrittlement tests on type 316L stainless steel are performed including cathodic charging during slow strain rate tests. Brittle multiple cracking is observed and relationships between crack growth rate and diffusion are analysed. The influence of hydrogen on the morphology of ductile fracture is found after fractographic examination. Two aspects of ductile failure are observed in accordance with the hydrogen content of the sample; a reduced density of microvoids for higher hydrogen contents and brittle secondary cracking in addition to ductile fracture surfaces for lower hydrogen contents. (orig.)

  6. The behavior of diffusion and permeation of tritium through 316L stainless steel

    Results on diffusivity, solubility coefficient and permeability of tritium through palladium-plated 316 L stainless steel are described. An empirical formula for the diffusivity, the solubility coefficient and the permeability of tritium through palladium-plated 316 L stainless steel at various temperatures is presented. The influence of tritium pressure on the permeability, and the isotope effect of diffusivity of hydrogen and tritium in 316 L stainless steel is discussed. (orig.)

  7. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    Highlights: → The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. → The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). → High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. → The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or γ-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  8. Microstructural characterization of pulsed plasma nitrided 316L stainless steel

    Asgari, M. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Barnoush, A., E-mail: a.barnoush@matsci.uni-sb.de [Saarland University, Saarbruecken (Germany); Johnsen, R. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Hoel, R. [MOTecH Plasma Company, Oslo (Norway)

    2011-11-25

    Highlights: {yields} The low temperature pulsed plasma nitrided layer of 316 SS was studied. {yields} The plastic deformation induced in the austenite due to nitriding is characterized by EBSD at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). {yields} Nanomechanical properties of the nitride layer was investigated by nanoindentation at different depths (i.e., nitrogen concentration). {yields} High hardness, high nitrogen concentration and high dislocation density is detected in the nitride layer. {yields} The hardness and nitrogen concentration decreased sharply beyond the nitride layer. - Abstract: Pulsed plasma nitriding (PPN) treatment is one of the new processes to improve the surface hardness and tribology behavior of austenitic stainless steels. Through low temperature treatment (<440 deg. C), it is possible to obtain unique combinations of wear and corrosion properties. Such a combination is achieved through the formation of a so-called 'extended austenite phase'. These surface layers are often also referred to as S-phase, m-phase or {gamma}-phase. In this work, nitrided layers on austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L (SS316L) were examined by means of a nanoindentation method at different loads. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the S-phase at different depths were studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the layer showed a high amount of plasticity induced in the layer during its formation. XRD results confirmed the formation of the S-phase, and no deleterious CrN phase was detected.

  9. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on stainless steel 316L using functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    Kruszewski, Kristen M; Nistico, Laura; Mark J Longwell; Hynes, Matthew J; Maurer, Joshua A; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2013-01-01

    Stainless steel 316L (SS316L) is a common material used in orthopedic implants. Bacterial colonization of the surface and subsequent biofilm development can lead to refractory infection of the implant. Since the greatest risk of infection occurs perioperatively, strategies that reduce bacterial adhesion during this time are important. As a strategy to limit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on SS316L, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to modify the SS316L surface. SAMs with lo...

  10. A Study on Stainless Steel 316L Annealed Ultrasonic Consolidation and Linear Welding Density Estimation

    Gonzalez, Raelvim

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonic Consolidation of stainless steel structures is being investigated for potential applications. This study investigates the suitability of Stainless Steel 316L annealed (SS316L annealed) as a building material for Ultrasonic Consolidation (UC), including research on Linear Welding Density (LWD) estimation on micrographs of samples. Experiment results are presented that include the effect of UC process parameters on SS316L annealed UC, optimum levels of these parameters, and bond qual...

  11. Perfluorocarbon thin films and polymer brushes on stainless steel 316L for control of interfacial properties

    Kruszewski, Kristen M; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon thin films and polymer brushes were formed on stainless steel 316L (SS316L) to control the surface properties of the metal oxide. Substrates modified with the films were characterized using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), contact angle analysis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Perfluorooctadecanoic acid (PFOA) was used to form thin films by self-assembly on the surface of SS316L. Polypentafluorostyrene (PFS) poly...

  12. Fractographic studies of hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    This paper concerns a fractographic examination of hydrogen embrittlement of a stable AISI 316L type austenitic stainless steel. The objective is a better understanding of the possible role of hydrogen in stress corrosion cracking processes. (author)

  13. Microstructure of 316L austenite stainless steel after charging with deuterium and tritium

    The microstructure of 316L austenite stainless steel after charging with deuterium and tritium for 6 years at room temperature is studied. The results indicate that the morphology of fracture surface after blasting is ductile rupture with dimple, stress produced by blasting of high pressure leads to the martensite transformation. The deuterium and tritium improve the ε martensite transformation of austenite and reduce the fault energy, which reduce the hydrogen-resistant properties of 316L stainless steel

  14. Linear friction welding of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Research highlights: → Linear friction welding is a feasible process for joining AISI316L. → Most welds had tensile strengths superior to the parent material. → Welding parameters had a significant impact on weld microstructure. → Control of microstructure by controlling welding parameters is a process benefit. - Abstract: Linear friction welding is a solid state joining process established as a niche technology for the joining of aeroengine bladed disks. However, the process is not limited to this application, and therefore the feasibility of joining a common engineering austenitic steel, AISI 316L, has been explored. It was found that mechanically sound linear friction welds could be produced in 316L, with tensile properties in most welds exceeding those of the parent material. The mechanical properties of the welds were also found to be insensitive to relatively large changes in welding parameters. Texture was investigated in one weld using high energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Results showed a strong {1 1 1} type texture at the centre of the weld, which is a typical shear texture in face centre cubic materials. Variations in welding parameters were seen to have a significant impact on the microstructures of welds. This was particularly evident in the variation of the fraction of delta ferrite, in the thermo-mechanically affected zone of the welds, with different process parameters. Analysis of the variation in delta ferrite, with different welding parameters, has produced some interesting insights into heat generation and dissipation during the process. It is hoped that a greater understanding of the process could help to make the parameter optimisation process, when welding 316L as well as other materials, more efficient.

  15. Susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to crevice corrosion in submersible solenoid valve

    Cai, B.P.; Liu, Y.H.; Tian, X.J.; Li, H.; Ji, R.J.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.Z. [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong, 257061 (China)

    2011-08-15

    The susceptibility of 316L stainless steel to crevice corrosion was investigated by using immersion test and electrochemical test. Three kinds of crevices including 316L-to-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) crevice, 316L-to-fluoroelastomeric (FKM) crevice and 316L-to-316L crevice were tested in artificial seawater at 50 C. The results indicate that 316L stainless steel specimen is the most susceptible to crevice corrosion when it is coupled to 316L stainless steel crevice former, while it is the least susceptible when it is coupled to FKM crevice former. It suggests that during submersible solenoid valve design, the crevice of metal-to-metal should be moderately large so that crevice corrosion can not initiate and propagate, and FKM O-ring rather than PTFE O-ring should be selected as obturating ring. The corroded surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Three regions including passive region, active region and variable region can be observed on crevice corrosion sites. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Corrosion protection performance of porous strontium hydroxyapatite coating on polypyrrole coated 316L stainless steel.

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Kavitha, L

    2013-07-01

    Polypyrrole/strontium hydroxyapatite bilayer coatings were achieved on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) by the electropolymerisation of pyrrole from sodium salicylate solution followed by the electrodeposition of porous strontium hydroxyapatite. The formation and the morphology of the bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), respectively. The corrosion resistance of the coated 316L SS specimens was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were substantiated with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The passive film underneath the polypyrrole layer is effective in protecting 316L SS against corrosion in Ringer's solution. Moreover, we believe that the top porous strontium hydroxyapatite layer can provide potential bioactivity to the 316L SS. PMID:23475060

  17. Processing and mechanical properties of porous 316L stainless steel for biomedical applications

    Montasser M.DEWIDAR; Khalil A.KHALIL; J. K. LIM

    2007-01-01

    Highly porous 316L stainless steel parts were produced by using a powder metallurgy process, which includes the selective laser sintering(SLS) and traditional sintering. Porous 316L stainless steel suitable for medical applications was successfully fabricated in the porosity range of 40%-50% (volume fraction) by controlling the SLS parameters and sintering behaviour. The porosity of the sintered compacts was investigated as a function of the SLS parameters and the furnace cycle. Compressive stress and elastic modulus of the 316L stainless steel material were determined. The compressive strength was found to be ranging from 21 to 32 MPa and corresponding elastic modulus ranging from 26 to 43 GPa. The present parts are promising for biomedical applications since the optimal porosity of implant materials for ingrowths of new-bone tissues is in the range of 20%-59% (volume fraction) and mechanical properties are matching with human bone.

  18. Resistance microwelding of 316L stainless steel wire to block

    Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Khan, M.I.; Bay, Niels;

    2011-01-01

    The excellent corrosion resistance of low carbon vacuum melted 316 stainless steel coupled with its non-magnetic properties makes it ideal for biomedical applications. The typical joint geometry for microcomponents, such as medical implants, includes joining of fine wire to a larger block. However......, this type of joint has received little attention in the current literature. The present study was conducted to examine the microstructure and mechanical properties of low carbon vacuum melted 316 stainless steel wire welded to a larger block. Results revealed solid state bonding occurring at low...

  19. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on stainless steel 316L using functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    Kruszewski, Kristen M., E-mail: kruszewskik@duq.edu [Duquesne University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Nistico, Laura, E-mail: lnistico@wpahs.org [Allegheny General Hospital, Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 East North Avenue, 11th floor, South Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Longwell, Mark J., E-mail: mlongwel@wpahs.org [Allegheny General Hospital, Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 East North Avenue, 11th floor, South Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Hynes, Matthew J., E-mail: mjhynes@go.wustl.edu [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Chemistry, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Maurer, Joshua A., E-mail: maurer@wustl.edu [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Chemistry, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hall-Stoodley, Luanne, E-mail: L.Hall-Stoodley@soton.ac.uk [Southampton Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility/NIHR Respiratory BRU, University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, Hampshire SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Duquesne University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Stainless steel 316L (SS316L) is a common material used in orthopedic implants. Bacterial colonization of the surface and subsequent biofilm development can lead to refractory infection of the implant. Since the greatest risk of infection occurs perioperatively, strategies that reduce bacterial adhesion during this time are important. As a strategy to limit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on SS316L, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to modify the SS316L surface. SAMs with long alkyl chains terminated with hydrophobic (− CH{sub 3}) or hydrophilic (oligoethylene glycol) tail groups were used to form coatings and in an orthogonal approach, SAMs were used to immobilize gentamicin or vancomycin on SS316L for the first time to form an “active” antimicrobial coating to inhibit early biofilm development. Modified SS316L surfaces were characterized using surface infrared spectroscopy, contact angles, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. The ability of SAM-modified SS316L to retard biofilm development by Staphylococcus aureus was functionally tested using confocal scanning laser microscopy with COMSTAT image analysis, scanning electron microscopy and colony forming unit analysis. Neither hydrophobic nor hydrophilic SAMs reduced biofilm development. However, gentamicin-linked and vancomycin-linked SAMs significantly reduced S. aureus biofilm formation for up to 24 and 48 h, respectively. - Highlights: ► SS316L was modified with glycol terminated SAMs in order to reduce biofilm growth. ► Antibiotics gentamicin and vancomycin were immobilized on SS316L via SAMs. ► Only the antibiotic modifications reduced biofilm development on SS316L.

  20. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on stainless steel 316L using functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    Stainless steel 316L (SS316L) is a common material used in orthopedic implants. Bacterial colonization of the surface and subsequent biofilm development can lead to refractory infection of the implant. Since the greatest risk of infection occurs perioperatively, strategies that reduce bacterial adhesion during this time are important. As a strategy to limit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on SS316L, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to modify the SS316L surface. SAMs with long alkyl chains terminated with hydrophobic (− CH3) or hydrophilic (oligoethylene glycol) tail groups were used to form coatings and in an orthogonal approach, SAMs were used to immobilize gentamicin or vancomycin on SS316L for the first time to form an “active” antimicrobial coating to inhibit early biofilm development. Modified SS316L surfaces were characterized using surface infrared spectroscopy, contact angles, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. The ability of SAM-modified SS316L to retard biofilm development by Staphylococcus aureus was functionally tested using confocal scanning laser microscopy with COMSTAT image analysis, scanning electron microscopy and colony forming unit analysis. Neither hydrophobic nor hydrophilic SAMs reduced biofilm development. However, gentamicin-linked and vancomycin-linked SAMs significantly reduced S. aureus biofilm formation for up to 24 and 48 h, respectively. - Highlights: ► SS316L was modified with glycol terminated SAMs in order to reduce biofilm growth. ► Antibiotics gentamicin and vancomycin were immobilized on SS316L via SAMs. ► Only the antibiotic modifications reduced biofilm development on SS316L

  1. Nanosized controlled surface pretreatment of biometallic alloy 316L stainless steel.

    Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M; Loftis, Derek; Mahapatro, Anil

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel (AISI 316L) is a medical grade stainless steel alloy used extensively in medical devices and in the biomedical field. 316L stainless steel was successfully electropolished via an ecologically friendly and biocompatible ionic liquid (IL) medium based on Vitamin B4 (NB4) and resulting in nanosized surface roughness and topography. Voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests determined optimum polishing conditions for the stainless steel alloy while atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provided surface morphology comparisons to benchmark success of each electropolishing condition. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) combined with SEM revealed significantly smoother surfaces for each alloy surface while indicating that the constituent metals comprising each alloy effectively electropolished at uniform rates. PMID:22416578

  2. Surface hardening of stainless steel 316L with RF-plasma nitrocarburizing device

    Surface hardening on stainless steel 316L with RF-plasma nitrocarburizing device made by BATAN have been investigated. Some samples was nitrocarburized at 400°C for 2-6 hours. The results show that the hardness of the untreated sample of SS 316L was 230,7 Kgf/mm2 . The hardness increased up to 299,4 Kgf/mm2 for nitrocarburizing at 400°C for 6 hours. Furthermore, the maximum depth of carbon and nitrogen atoms diffused in SS 316L was 73,1 micrometer. Microstructure observation shows that the sample that was nitrocarburized at 400°C for 6 hours produced a very clear image indicating N and C atoms layers in SS 316L. The un-treated sample and the sample that was nitrocarburized at 400°C (t = 6 hours) have the same matrixes, i.e. δ-ferrite and pearlite. (author)

  3. Intragranular cellular segregation network structure strengthening 316L stainless steel prepared by selective laser melting

    Zhong, Yuan; Liu, Leifeng; Wikman, Stefan; Cui, Daqing; Shen, Zhijian

    2016-03-01

    A feasibility study was performed to fabricate ITER In-Vessel components by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) supported by Fusion for Energy (F4E). Almost fully dense 316L stainless steel (SS316L) components were prepared from gas-atomized powder and with optimized SLM processing parameters. Tensile tests and Charpy-V tests were carried out at 22 °C and 250 °C and the results showed that SLM SS316L fulfill the RCC-MR code. Microstructure characterization reveals the presence of hierarchical macro-, micro- and nano-structures in as-built samples that were very different from SS316L microstructures prepared by other established methods. The formation of a characteristic intragranular cellular segregation network microstructure appears to contribute to the increase of yield strength without losing ductility. Silicon oxide nano-inclusions were formed during the SLM process that generated a micro-hardness fluctuation in the building direction. The combined influence of a cellular microstructure and the nano-inclusions constraints the size of ductile dimples to nano-scale. The crack propagation is hindered by a pinning effect that improves the defect-tolerance of the SLM SS316L. This work proves that it was possible to manufacture SS316L with properties suitable for ITER First Wall panels. Further studies on irradiation properties of SLM SS316L and manufacturing of larger real-size components are needed.

  4. Corrosion fatigue of 316L stainless steel in hot LiOH solution

    The corrosion fatigue behavior of AlSl 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel was tested in concentrated aqueous lithium hydroxide solutions at elevated temperature. Fatigue tests were conducted in a 10 g LiOH/100cc H2O solution at 95 C at controlled electrochemical potentials. Experimental conditions met requirements of the aqueous Li salt blanket option for the international and European nuclear fusion reactor programs of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Next European Torus (NET). Results indicated 316L stainless steel was susceptible to corrosion fatigue in a narrow potential range of approximately 100 mV (vs SCE). Tests at lower or higher potentials (e.g., -80 and 200 mV), however, did not show susceptibility to corrosion fatigue cracking. Results were compared with the stress corrosion cracking behavior of 316L in the same environment

  5. Electrochemical polishing as a 316L stainless steel surface treatment method: Towards the improvement of biocompatibility

    Highlights: • Electropolishing of 316L stainless steel increases its corrosion resistance. • New electropolishing electrolyte composition is suggested. • Larger thickness and chromium enrichment of the passive film is obtained. • Electropolishing improves the surface biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. - Abstract: A 316L stainless steel (316L-SS) surface was electrochemically polished (EP) in an electrolyte of a new chemical composition at different cell voltages, with the aim of improving its corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results revealed that the EP-formed oxide films were characterized by a significantly higher atomic Cr/Fe ratio and film thickness, in comparison to the naturally-grown passive oxide film formed on the untreated (control) 316L-SS surface. As a result of the increase in the oxide film thickness and relative Cr enrichment, the EP-treated 316L-SS surfaces offered a notable improvement in general corrosion resistance and pitting potential. In addition, the attachment of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) to the 316L-SS surfaces revealed a positive effect of electropolishing on the preferential attachment of ECs, thus indicating that the EP surfaces could be endothelialized faster than the control (unmodified) 316L-SS surface. Furthermore, the EP surfaces showed a much lower degree of thrombogenicity in experiments with the platelet-rich plasma. Therefore, the use of the electrochemical polishing technique in treating a 316L-SS surface, under the conditions presented in this paper, indicates a significant improvement in the surface’s performance as an implant material

  6. Martensitic transformation in 304L and 316L types stainless steels cathodically hydrogen charged

    This paper reports a TEM study on the role of phase transitions at the crack tip in 304L and 316L types stainless steels cathodically hydrogen charged in the absence of any eternally applied forces. The possible role of α prime and epsilon martensite phases in the fracture mechanism is discussed

  7. Electrochemical behavior of SUS316L stainless steel after surface modification

    梁成浩; 郭亮; 陈婉; 刘敬肖

    2003-01-01

    The surface modification for SUS316L stainless steel was carried out by electroplating Rh, ion beam assisted deposition Ta2O5 and sol-gel-derived TiO2. In Tyrodes stimulated body fluid, the surface modified samples were investigated with electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that the electrochemical stability and dissolution are improved significantly after surface modification. Moreover, as to ion beam assisted deposition Ta2O5 and sol-gel-derived TiO2 film, the metals d orbit electron holes filled up by the oxygen electrons make against the adsorption of hydrogen. Thus the cathode process, which is controlled by the hydrogen reduction, is held back. X-ray diffraction analysis of SUS316L stainless steel after surface modification reveal that each method forms the uniform and compact film on SUS316L stainless steel. These films prevent the dissolving of elements and improve passivation property of the SUS316L stainless steel.

  8. Influence of the surface finishing on electrochemical corrosion characteristics of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Dundeková, S.; Hadzima, B.; Fintová, Stanislava

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2015), s. 77-84. ISSN 1335-0803 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : AISI 316L stainless steel * EIS * Corrosion Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://ojs.mateng.sk/index.php/Mateng/article/view/167/278

  9. Production of Ti-containing 316L stainless steel in a crucible induction furnace

    The production of type 316L stainless steel with titanium was studied. The stainless steel was produced in an induction furnace using 1010 steel as starting material. The carbon and impurities contents of the steel were lowered by means of the addition of iron oxide and lime respectively. Finally, the last slag was removed before adding nickel and ferroalloys. Experimental results showed the wear resistance of the crucibles with different contents of magnamix 363 and the corrosion resistance of the steel obtained caused by a solution of sulfuric acid. (author)

  10. Effect of in site strain on passivated property of the 316L stainless steels.

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Ting, Guo

    2016-04-01

    The effect of the strain of 316L stainless steel on its corrosion resistance in borate buffer solution was investigated by in site tensile test and the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. It was found that the corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel decreased with the increasing of in site strain. The lower corrosion resistance of the stainless steel during in site strain was mainly attributed to the higher doping concentration in passive film. Especially, with the increasing of in site strain, the concentrations of acceptor (i.e., cation vacancies) in the passive films significantly increased. More acceptor concentrations reduced the compactness of the passive film and its corrosion resistance. Moreover, two exponential relationships were found between in site strain and the charge transfer resistance of the passive film and between in site strain and total doping concentrations in passive film, respectively. PMID:26838820

  11. New route to form micro-pores on 316L stainless steel surface

    Ma Xinxin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)], E-mail: maxin@hit.edu.cn; Wang Yujiang; Tang Guangze [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Chen Qingfu [Jiangyin Fasten-PLT Materials Science Co., Ltd (Peier), 998 Changjiang Donglu, Jiangyin, 214434 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In order to seek an effective way for preventing restenosis after coronary stent implantation, a proposal of increasing the amount of loaded drug without changing the size of struts was given. Thereafter, a process of fabricating in-situ formed sub-micro-pores on 316L stainless steel (316L SS) was demonstrated. An aluminum thin film was deposited by magnetron sputtering on a 316L substrate. The aluminum film was then anodized in different acids (0.3 M oxalic and 10 vol.% sulfuric) by regulating direct current power supply. Through an appropriate chemical dissolution, the anodic alumina film was removed and the underlying porous 316L was obtained. The morphology of the porous 316L surface was examined by scanning electron microscope and the composition of the pores was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The corrosion behavior of the porous 316L was evaluated by the polarization measurement. The results indicate that the shape and size of pores could be affected evidently by the acids used in anodization. The pores density is found to change with variation of the applied voltage in anodization. The corrosion current of the anodized specimens decrease and the corrosion voltage increase, compared with the untreated specimens.

  12. Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Laser Additively Manufactured 316L Stainless Steel

    Trelewicz, Jason R.; Halada, Gary P.; Donaldson, Olivia K.; Manogharan, Guha

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of metal alloys to produce complex part designs via powder bed fusion methods such as laser melting promises to be a transformative technology for advanced materials processing. However, effective implementation of AM processes requires a clear understanding of the processing-structure-properties-performance relationships in fabricated components. In this study, we report on the formation of micro and nanoscale structures in 316L stainless steel samples printed by laser AM and their implications for general corrosion resistance. A variety of techniques including x-ray diffraction, optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructure and chemistry of the laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel, which are compared with wrought 316L coupons via electrochemical polarization. Apparent segregation of Mo has been found to contribute to a loss of passivity and an increased anodic current density. While porosity will also likely impact the environmental performance (e.g., facilitating crevice corrosion) of AM alloys, this work demonstrates the critical influence of microstructure and heterogeneous solute distributions on the corrosion resistance of laser additively manufactured 316L stainless steel.

  13. Improvement in the Corrosion Resistance of Austenitic Stainless Steel 316L by Ion Implantation

    Cai, Xun; Feng, Kai

    In the present work, austenitic stainless steel 316L (SS316L) samples were implanted with Ni and Ni-Cr. A nickel-rich layer about 100 nm in thickness and a Ni-Cr enriched layer about 60 nm thick are formed on the surface of SS316L. The effects of ion implantation on the corrosion performance of SS316L are investigated in a 0.5 M H2SO4 with 2 ppm HF solution at 80°C by open circuit potential (OCP), potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests. The samples after the potentiostatic test are analyzed by XPS. The results indicate that the composition of the passive film change from a mixture of Fe oxides and Cr oxide to a Cr oxide dominated passive film after the potentiostatic test. The solutions after the potentiostatic test are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results reveal that Fe is selectively dissolved in all cases and a proper Ni and Ni-Cr implant fluence can greatly improve the corrosion resistance of SS316L in the simulated polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCS) environment. They are in agreement with the electrochemical test results that the bare SS316L has the highest dissolution rate in both cathode and anode environments and the Ni and Ni-Cr implantation reduce markedly the dissolution rate. After the potentiostatic test the interfacial contact resistance (ICR) values are also measured. Ni and Ni-Cr are enriched in the passive film formed in the simulated PEMFC cathode environment after ion implantation thereby providing better conductivity than that formed in the anode one. A significant improvement of ICR is achieved for the SS316L implanted with Ni and Ni-Cr as compared to the bare SS316L, which is attributed to the reduction in passive layer thickness caused by Ni and Ni-Cr implantation. The ICR values for implanted specimens increase with increasing dose.

  14. Experimental Study on Uniaxial and Multiaxial Strain Cyclic Characteristics and Ratcheting of 316L Stainless Steel

    2001-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out on the strain cycliccharacteristics and ratcheting of 316Lstainless steel subjected to uniaxial and multiaxial cyclic loading. The strain cyclic characteristics were researched under the strain-controlled uniaxial tension-compression and multiaxial circular paths of loading. The ratcheting tests were conducted for the stress-controlled uniaxial tensioncompression and multiaxial circular, rhombic and linear paths of loading with different mean stresses, stress amplitudes and histories. The experiment results show that 316L stainless steel features the cyclic hardening, and its strain cyclic characteristics depend on the strain amplitude and its history apparently. The ratcheting of 316L stainless steel depends greatly on the values of mean stress, stress amplitude and their histories. In the meantime, the shape of load path and its history also apparently influence the ratcheting.

  15. Pitting Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel under Low Stress below Yield Strength

    L(U) Shengjie; CHENG Xuequn; LI Xiaogang

    2012-01-01

    Pitting corrosion of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) under various stress was studied by potentiodynamic polarization,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Mott-Schottky (M-S) analysis in 3.5% NaCl solution.The results of polarization curves show that,with the increase of the stress,the pitting potentials and the passive current density markedly decrease firstly (180 MPa),and then increase greatly (200 MPa).The corresponding surface morphologies of the samples after the polarization test well correspond to the results.Mott-Schottky analysis proved the least Cl- adsorbed to the surface of passive film with more positive flat potential,indicating that a moderate stress could increase the pitting corrosion resistance of 316L SS in 3.5% NaCl solution.

  16. Effect of multiple film on the tritium permeation property in 316L stainless steel

    The films of TiN + TiC + TiN and TiN + TiC + SiO2 were deposited on the surface of 316L stainless steel by physical vapor deposition technology. The characteristics of films are tested by SEM technology, it shows that the films are compact, thermal shock-resistant, oxidation-resistant and have good compatibility with bulk. the SIMS and IR analysis results show that the tritium permeation barrier is formed when TiC and SiO2 films are annealed in hydrogen above 300 degree C. The tritium permeability in 316L with film is measured at various temperature, the results show that the tritium permeability in 316L with TiN + TiC + SiO2 film is 4-6 orders of magnitude lower, and that in 316L with TiN + TiC + TiN film is 4-5 orders of magnitude lower than that in 316L with Pd film at about 200-600 degree C. These films may be used as the surface coating of the first wall, tritium blanket and heat exchanger in fusion reactor

  17. Oxide Formation In Metal Injection Molding Of 316L Stainless Steel

    Jang Jin Man

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sintering condition and powder size on the microstructure of MIMed parts were investigated using water-atomized 316L stainless steel powder. The 316L stainless steel feedstock was injected into micro mold with micro features of various shapes and dimensions. The green parts were debound and pre-sintered at 800°C in hydrogen atmosphere and then sintered at 1300°C and 1350°C in argon atmosphere of 5torr and 760torr, respectively. The oxide particles were formed and distributed homogeneously inside the sample except for the outermost region regardless of sintering condition and powder size. The width of layer without oxide particles are increased with decrease of sintering atmosphere pressure and powder size. The fine oxides act as the obstacle on grain growth and the high sintering temperature causes severe grain growth in micro features due to larger amount of heat gain than that in macro ones.

  18. The effect of hydrogen/helium implantation on the microstructure of 316L stainless steel

    Type 316L stainless steel has been used for first wall material of NET (Next European TOKAMAK). The 316L stainless steel was implanted with helium and hydrogen to investigate the irradiation behavior in the temperature range 120-420 deg C. The strength of implanted material increased at 120, 220 deg C while elongation decreased. At 420 deg C, abrupt decrease in strength and elongation occured due to helium bubbles. Slip bands were well developed during tensile test like channel deformation. Dislocations were along the (111) planes and cell structure was also generated at higher temperature. With 500 appm hydrogen implantation, microstructure did not change much but contained small amount of dislocations and stacking faults. (Author)

  19. Effect of Surface Treatment on the Surface Characteristics of AISI 316L Stainless Steel

    Trigwell, Steve; Selvaduray, Guna

    2005-01-01

    The ability of 316L stainless steel to maintain biocompatibility, which is dependent upon the surface characteristics, is critical to its effectiveness as an implant material. The surfaces of mechanically polished (MP), electropolished (EP) and plasma treated 316L stainless steel coupons were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) for chemical composition, Atomic Force Microscopy for surface roughness, and contact angle measurements for critical surface tension. All surfaces had a Ni concentration that was significantly lower than the bulk concentration of -43%. The Cr content of the surface was increased significantly by electropolishing. The surface roughness was also improved significantly by electropolishing. Plasma treatment had the reverse effect - the surface Cr content was decreased. It was also found that the Cr and Fe in the surface exist in both the oxide and hydroxide states, with the ratios varying according to surface treatment.

  20. Niobium coatings on 316L stainless steel for improving corrosion resistance

    Niobium coatings were deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrates by ion-beam-assisted deposition. The coatings, deposited under 250 eV ion bombardment with [Ar+]/[Nb] ratios ranging from 0.68 to 0.8, were dense and showed no sign of pitting corrosion in a 3% NaCl solution. Also, based on the result of scratch tests, niobium coatings may act as sacrificial anodes and protect substrates. (orig.)

  1. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings

    Jones, John Eric; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20–25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH3/O2 plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC...

  2. Weld process study for 316L stainless steel weld metal for liquid helium service

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of welding process choice on the cryogenic properties of 316L stainless steel welds. Six weldments were impact tested down to 77 K and tensile and fracture toughness tested down to 4 K. The best properties obtained were from a GTA weld, followed by GMA welds; SA welds had the poorest properties. This variation in properties was attributed to the cleanliness of the weld metal, which is dependent on the welding process and parameters selected

  3. Influence of the surface finishing on the corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Dundeková, S.; Zatkalíková, V.; Fintová, Stanislava; Hadzima, B.; Škorík, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 48-53. ISSN 1335-0803 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : AISI 316L stainless steel * Corrosion * Immersion test * Corrosion rate Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials http://ojs.mateng.sk/index.php/Mateng/article/view/166/251

  4. Growth inhibition of cultured smooth muscle cells by corrosion products of 316 L stainless steel wire.

    Shih, C C; Shih, C M; Chen, Y L; Su, Y Y; Shih, J S; Kwok, C F; Lin, S J

    2001-11-01

    The potential cytotoxicity on vascular smooth muscle cells of corrosion products from 316 L stainless steel, one of most popular biomaterials of intravascular stents, has not been highlighted. In this investigation, 316 L stainless steel wires were corroded in Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium with applied constant electrochemical breakdown voltage, and the supernatant and precipitates of corrosion products were prepared as culture media. The effects of different concentrations of corrosion products on the growth of rat aortic smooth muscle cells were conducted with the [3H]-thymidine uptake test and cell cycle sorter. Both the supernatant and precipitates of corrosion products were toxic to the primary culture of smooth muscle cells. The growth inhibition was correlated well with the increased nickel ions in the corrosion products when nickel concentration was above 11.7 ppm. The corrosion products also changed cell morphology and induced cell necrosis. The cell growth inhibition occurred at the G0/G1 to S transition phase. Similar to our recent study of nitinol stent wire, the present investigation also demonstrated the cytotoxicity of corrosion products of 316 L stainless steel stent wire on smooth muscle cells, which might affect the poststenting vascular response. PMID:11484182

  5. Cytotoxicity difference of 316L stainless steel and titanium reconstruction plate

    Ni Putu Mira Sumarta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pure titanium is the most biocompatible material today and used as a gold standard for metallic implants. However, stainless steel is still being used as implants because of its strength, ductility, lower price, corrosion resistant and biocompatibility. Purpose: This study was done to revealed the cytotoxicity difference between reconstruction plate made of 316L stainless steel and of commercially pure (CP titanium in baby hamster kidney-21 (BHK-21 fibroblast culture through MTT assay. Methods: Eight samples were prepared from reconstruction plates made of stainless steel type 316L grade 2 (Coen’s reconstruction plate® that had been cut into cylindrical form of 2 mm in diameter and 3 mm long. The other one were made of CP titanium (STEMA Gmbh® of 2 mm in diameter and 2,2 mm long; and had been cleaned with silica paper and ultrasonic cleaner, and sterilized in autoclave at 121° C for 20 minutes.9 Both samples were bathed into microplate well containing 50 μl of fibroblast cells with 2 x 105 density in Rosewell Park Memorial Institute-1640 (RPMI-1640 media, spinned at 30 rpm for 5 minutes. Microplate well was incubated for 24 and 48 hours in 37° C. After 24 hours, each well that will be read at 24 hour were added with 50 μl solution containing 5mg/ml MTT reagent in phosphate buffer saline (PBS solutions, then reincubated for 4 hours in CO2 10% and 37° C. Colorometric assay with MTT was used to evaluate viability of the cells population after 24 hours. Then, each well were added with 50 μl dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and reincubated for 5 minutes in 37° C. the wells were read using Elisa reader in 620 nm wave length. Same steps were done for the wells that will be read in 48 hours. Each data were tabulated and analyzed using independent T-test with significance of 5%. Results: This study showed that the percentage of living fibroblast after exposure to 316L stainless steel reconstruction plate was 61.58% after 24 hours and 62

  6. Fabrication of antibacterial and hydrophilic electroless Ni-B coating on 316L stainless steel

    Bülbül, Ferhat; Bülbül, Leman Elif

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated bacterial infection is one of the most common complications with medical vehicles and implants made of stainless steel. A surface coating treatment like electroless Ni-B deposition, a new candidate to be used in a broad range of engineering applications owing to many advantages such as low cost, thickness uniformity, good wear resistance, may improve the antibacterial activity and physical properties of biomedical devices made of stainless steel. In this study, the antibacterial property of the electroless Ni-B film coated on AISI 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel is basically investigated. Inhibition halo diameter measurement after incubation at 37 °C and 24 h demonstrates the existence of antimicrobial activity of the electroless Ni-B coating deposited on 316L stainless steel over the Escherichia coli test bacteria. The results of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and microhardness measurement studies confirms that the coating deposited on the substrate has an uniform amorphous and a harder structure. Besides, the wettability property of the uncoated substrate and the coating was measured as the contact angle of water. The water contact angle reduced about from 97.7 to 69.25°.

  7. In vitro biocompatibility of plasma-aided surface-modified 316L stainless steel for intracoronary stents

    Bayram, Cem; Denkbas, Emir Baki [Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division, The Institute For Graduate Studies in Science and Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Mizrak, Alpay Koray [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, UNAM, 06800, Ankara (Turkey); Aktuerk, Selcuk [Department of Physics, Mugla University, 48000 Koetekli, Mugla (Turkey); Kursaklioglu, Hurkan; Iyisoy, Atila [Department of Cardiology, School of Medicine, Gulhane Military Medicine Academy, 06018, Ankara (Turkey); Ifran, Ahmet, E-mail: denkbas@hacettepe.edu.t [Department of Hematology, School of Medicine, Gulhane Military Medicine Academy, 06018, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-10-01

    316L-type stainless steel is a raw material mostly used for manufacturing metallic coronary stents. The purpose of this study was to examine the chemical, wettability, cytotoxic and haemocompatibility properties of 316L stainless steel stents which were modified by plasma polymerization. Six different polymeric compounds, polyethylene glycol, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, ethylenediamine, acrylic acid, hexamethyldisilane and hexamethyldisiloxane, were used in a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization system. As a model antiproliferative drug, mitomycin-C was chosen for covalent coupling onto the stent surface. Modified SS 316L stents were characterized by water contact angle measurements (goniometer) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. C1s binding energies showed a good correlation with the literature. Haemocompatibility tests of coated SS 316L stents showed significant latency (t-test, p < 0.05) with respect to SS 316L and control groups in each test.

  8. Parylene coatings on stainless steel 316L surface for medical applications — Mechanical and protective properties

    The mechanical and protective properties of parylene N and C coatings (2–20 μm) on stainless steel 316L implant materials were investigated. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron and confocal microscopes, microindentation and scratch tests, whereas their protective properties were evaluated in terms of quenching metal ion release from stainless steel to simulated body fluid (Hanks solution). The obtained results revealed that for parylene C coatings, the critical load for initial cracks is 3–5 times higher and the total metal ions release is reduced 3 times more efficiently compared to parylene N. It was thus concluded that parylene C exhibits superior mechanical and protective properties for application as a micrometer coating material for stainless steel implants. - Highlights: ► Parylene biocompatible coating was applied for steel implant surfaces by CVD method. ► Mechanical and protective properties of polymer layers were determined. ► Rival discrimination between parylene N and C on steel 316L was performed. ► Total metal ions release was reduced more efficiently by parylene C coating. ► Critical load for initial cracks was 3–5 times higher for parylene C coating.

  9. Effects of Admixed Titanium on Densification of 316L Stainless Steel Powder during Sintering

    Aslam Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of admixed titanium on powder water atomized (PWA and powder gas atomized (PGA 316L stainless steel (SS have been investigated in terms of densification. PGA and PWA powders, having different shapes and sizes, were cold pressed and sintered in argon atmosphere at 1300°C. The admixed titanium compacts of PGA and PWA have shown significant effect on densification through formation of intermetallic compound and reducing porosity during sintering process. PWA, having particle size 8 μm, blended with 1wt% titanium has exhibited higher sintered density and shrinkage as compared to gas atomized powder compacts. Improved densification of titanium blended PGA and PWA 316L SS at sintering temperature 1300°C is probably due to enhanced diffusion kinetics resulting from stresses induced by concentration gradient in powder compacts.

  10. Damage mechanism at different transpassive potentials of solution-annealed 316 and 316l stainless steels

    Morshed Behbahani, K.; Pakshir, M.; Abbasi, Z.; Najafisayar, P.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), anodic polarization and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to investigate the damage mechanism in the transpassive potential region of AISI 316 and AISI 316L solution-annealed stainless steels (SS) with different degrees of sensitization. Depending on the DC potential applied during EIS tests, the AC responses in the transpassive region included three different regions: the first one associated with anodic dissolution of the passive layer, the second one contributed to the dissolution at the area near grain boundaries, and the last one attributed to pitting corrosion. In addition, the fitting results to experimental data showed that as the DC bias during the EIS test increases the charge transfer resistance ( R ct) decreases. Moreover, the R ct values decreased as the sensitization temperature increases but the AISI 316L SS samples exhibited a higher resistance to intergranular corrosion than 316 SS samples.

  11. Effect of Starch Binders in Alumina Coatings on Aisi 316 L Stainless Steel for Medical Application

    Ghazali, M. J.; Pauzi, A. A.; Azhari, C. H.; Ghani, J. A.; Sulong, A. B.; Mustafa, R.

    A slurry immersion technique of alumina coatings was carried out on several AISI 316 L stainless steels using two types of binding agents; commercial starch and Sarawakian starch (sago), which were also mixed with polyvinylchloride (PVA) for strengthening purposes. The sintering temperatures in this work were varied from 500 to 1000°C. Prior to sintering process, all stainless steels were metallographically ground and polished to approximately 0.6 µm of average roughness. Detailed characterisations on the sintered specimens were carried out with the aid of the secondary electron microscopy (SEM), microhardness and a profilometer. The results revealed that coated steels using sago binder showed improved adhesion and homogenous microstructures with greater hardness of 2642 HV than those found in coated steel with commercial starch after sintering process.

  12. Preparation and characterization of stainless steel 316L/HA biocomposite

    Gilbert Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The austenitic stainless steel 316L is the most used metallic biomaterials in orthopedics applications, especially in the manufacture of articulated prostheses and as structural elements in fracture fixation, since it has high mechanical strength. However, because it is biologically inactive, it does not form chemical bond with bone tissue, it is fixed only by morphology. The development of biocomposites of stainless steel with a bioactive material, such as hydroxyapatite - HA, is presented as an alternative to improve the response in the tissue-implant interface. However significant reductions in mechanical properties of the biocomposite can occur. Different compositions of the biocomposite stainless steel 316L/HA (5, 20 and 50 wt. (% HA were prepared by mechanical alloying. After milling the powders for 10 hours, the different compositions of the biocomposite were compacted isostatically and sintered at 1200 ºC for 2 hours. The mechanical properties of the biocomposites were analyzed by compression tests. The powders and the sintered composites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD.

  13. Preparation and characterization of stainless steel 316L/HA biocomposite

    Gilbert Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The austenitic stainless steel 316L is the most used metallic biomaterials in orthopedics applications, especially in the manufacture of articulated prostheses and as structural elements in fracture fixation, since it has high mechanical strength. However, because it is biologically inactive, it does not form chemical bond with bone tissue, it is fixed only by morphology. The development of biocomposites of stainless steel with a bioactive material, such as hydroxyapatite - HA, is presented as an alternative to improve the response in the tissue-implant interface. However significant reductions in mechanical properties of the biocomposite can occur. Different compositions of the biocomposite stainless steel 316L/HA (5, 20 and 50 wt. (% HA were prepared by mechanical alloying. After milling the powders for 10 hours, the different compositions of the biocomposite were compacted isostatically and sintered at 1200 ºC for 2 hours. The mechanical properties of the biocomposites were analyzed by compression tests. The powders and the sintered composites were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD.

  14. Solute segregation on Σ3 and random grain boundaries in type 316L stainless steel

    Solute segregation and impurity segregation on random and Σ3 grain boundaries in a type 316L stainless steel were investigated by means of atom probe tomography (APT). Segregation of Mo, P, B, and C was observed on random grain boundaries, irrespective of grain boundary misorientation. Two-dimensional concentration maps along the grain boundary plane revealed that the concentrations of all segregated elements were not homogeneous and no co-segregation was observed. In contrast, no segregation was observed on Σ3 grain boundaries

  15. Lattice rotation induced by plasma nitriding in a 316L polycrystalline stainless steel

    Stinville, J.C. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et de Physique des Materiaux, ENSMA, 86961 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite de Poitiers, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil (France); Villechaise, P., E-mail: patrick.villechaise@lmpm.ensma.fr [Laboratoire de Mecanique et de Physique des Materiaux, ENSMA, 86961 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil (France); Templier, C.; Riviere, J.P.; Drouet, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Universite de Poitiers, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil (France)

    2010-05-15

    The introduction at moderate temperature of nitrogen in the 316L austenitic stainless steel by plasma nitriding modifies the crystallographic texture in the very near surface region. The evolution of texture components has been quantitatively characterized by electron backscattered diffraction. The analysis of these experiments shows that the amplitude of the lattice rotation as well as the direction of rotation are directly related to the initial orientation of each grain. The retexturing behaviour is consistent with the lattice rotation upon tensile elongation of polycrystalline materials predicted by the Taylor model.

  16. Surface Nanostructure Formations in an AISI 316L Stainless Steel Induced by Pulsed Electron Beam Treatment

    Yang Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB is an efficient technique for surface modifications of metallic materials. In the present work, the formations of surface nanostructures in an AISI 316L stainless steel induced by direct HCPEB treatment and HCPEB alloying have been investigated. After HCPEB Ti alloying, the sample surface contained a mixture of the ferrite and austenite phases with an average grain size of about 90 nm, because the addition of Ti favors the formation of ferrite. In contrast, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD analyses revealed no structural refinement on the direct HCPEB treated sample. However, transmission electron microscope (TEM observations showed that fine cells having an average size of 150 nm without misorientations, as well as nanosized carbide particles, were formed in the surface layer after the direct HCPEB treatment. The formation of nanostructures in the 316L stainless steel is therefore attributed to the rapid solidification and the generation of different phases other than the steel substrate in the melted layer.

  17. The surface cleanliness of 316 L + N stainless steel studied by SIMS and AES

    Mathewson, A G

    1974-01-01

    Some cleaning methods for 316 L+N stainless steel including solvent cleaning, high temperature treatment in vacuo and gas discharge cleaning have been studied by SIMS and AES with a view to providing a clean vacuum chamber surface with low gas desorption under ion bombardment. After solvent cleaning the main surface contaminant was found to be C and its associated compounds. Laboratory investigations on small samples of stainless steel showed that clean surfaces could be obtained by heating in vacuo to 800 degrees C followed by exposure to air and by argon or argon/10% oxygen discharge cleaning. Due to a cross contamination within the vacuum system, the 800 degrees C treated chamber gave positive desorption coefficients under ion bombardment. The pure argon discharge cleaned chambers proved stable giving negative desorption coefficients up to 2200 eV ion energy even after several weeks storage discharge treatment and installation. (10 refs).

  18. Study of TiC+TiN Multiple Films On Type of 316L Stainless Steel

    XUE Qi; JIN Yong; HU Dong-ping; HUANG Ben-sheng; DENG Bai-quan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the synthesis process of TiC+TiN multiple films on super-low-carbon stainless steels is reported.The TiC layer is coated as the first layer in the multiple film, the change of growth rate of the film on the 316L Stainless steel is not same as the one on carbides substrates, while the mole ratio of CH4 to TiCl4 (mCH4/TiCl4) is changed from 1.2to 2.0. The Ti [C, N], as a kind of inter-layer between TiC and TiN layers, is helpful to improve the adhesion between the TiC and TiN layer. The cooling rate greatly influences the quality of the adhesion between the TiC+TiN film and substrates.

  19. Anisotropy changes in hardness and indentation modulus induced by plasma nitriding of 316L polycrystalline stainless steel

    The changes in anisotropic hardness and indentation modulus induced by plasma nitriding at 400 oC of a 316L polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel are analyzed. The dependence of hardness and elastic modulus modifications on the crystallographic orientation is investigated through instrumented indentation and electron backscattering diffraction. Both hardness and indentation modulus exhibit an inverted anisotropy compared to the untreated 316L, likely associated with the presence of the N atoms in interstitial sites.

  20. Stability of passivated 316L stainless steel oxide films for cardiovascular stents.

    Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Chou, Kuang-Yi; Lin, Shing-Jong; Su, Yea-Yang

    2007-03-15

    Passivated 316L stainless steel is used extensively in cardiovascular stents. The degree of chloride ion attack might increase as the oxide film on the implant degrades from exposure to physiological fluid. Stability of 316L stainless steel stent is a function of the concentration of hydrated and hydrolyated oxide concentration inside the passivated film. A high concentration of hydrated and hydrolyated oxide inside the passivated oxide film is required to maintain the integrity of the passivated oxide film, reduce the chance of chloride ion attack, and prevent any possible leaching of positively charged ions into the surrounding tissue that accelerate the inflammatory process. Leaching of metallic ions from corroded implant surface into surrounding tissue was confirmed by the X-ray mapping technique. The degree of thrombi weight percentage [W(ao): (2.1 +/- 0.9)%; W(ep): (12.5 +/- 4.9)%, p electropolishing (EP) treatment groups was statistically significant in ex-vivo extracorporeal thrombosis experiment of mongrel dog. The thickness of neointima (T(ao): 100 +/- 20 microm; T(ep): 500 +/- 150 microm, p < 0.01) and the area ratio of intimal response at 4 weeks (AR(ao): 0.62 +/- 0.22; AR(ep): 1.15 +/- 0.42, p < 0.001) on the implanted iliac stents of New Zealand rabbit could be a function of the oxide properties. PMID:17072844

  1. Phase transformation of 316L stainless steel from wire to fiber

    In this work, quantitative crystalline phase analysis of 316L stainless steel from wire to fiber using a multi-pass cold drawing process was studied using the Rietveld whole XRD profile fitting technique. The different diameters of the fibers: 179, 112, 75, 50, 34, 20, and 8 μm, were produced from an as-received wire with a diameter of 190 μm. The crystalline phases were identified using MDI Jade 5.0 software. The volume fractions of crystalline phases were estimated using a Materials Analysis Using Diffraction software. XRD analysis revealed that the crystal structure of as-received wire is essentially a γ-austenite crystalline phase. The phase transformation occurred during the 316L stainless steel from wire to fiber. Three crystalline phases such as γ-austenite, α'-martensite, and sigma phase of the fine fiber were observed. A cold drawing accelerates the sigma phase precipitates, particularly during the heat treatment of the fiber.

  2. Dislocation evolution in 316L stainless steel subjected to uniaxial ratchetting deformation

    Dislocation patterns and their evolution in 316L stainless steel subjected to uniaxial stress-controlled cyclic loading with occurrence of ratchetting deformation were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microscopic observations show that the dislocation patterns change from low density patterns such as dislocation lines and pile-ups to those with higher dislocation density such as dislocation tangles, veins, walls, and cells, when the macroscopic ratchetting strain progressively increases with the number of cycles. Although one or two kinds of dislocation patterns mentioned above are prevailing in most of the grains at certain stage of ratchetting deformation, other patterns can be also observed in some grains at the same time. The features of dislocation evolution presented during the uniaxial ratchetting deformation are summarized by comparing with the dislocation patterns observed during monotonic tension and symmetrical uniaxial strain-controlled cyclic loading. The uniaxial ratchetting of 316L stainless steel can be qualitatively explained by the observed dislocation patterns and their variation with the number of cycles.

  3. Hydrogen assisted failure of precracked specimens of 316L stainless steel

    The simultaneous action of cathodic hydrogen charging and slow mechanical loading on precracked samples of 316L stainless steel is examined in order to assess the flaw tolerance of this steel, which has been included in the group of possible structural materials for the first wall of the future fusion reactors. The steel is shown to retain a significant part of its flaw tolerance even in the most severe test conditions, but the loading rate is found to change the damage phenomenology of hydrogen from bifurcated crack extension to multi-cracking and enlargement of the blunted crack tip. This change is explained on the basis of a competition mechanism between hydrogen action and mechanical deformation. (orig.)

  4. Effect of Cold-Rolling on Precipitation Phenomena in Sensitized Type 316L and 340L Austenitic Stainless Steels

    H.Tsubakino; A.Yamamoto; T. Yamada; L.Liu; M.Terasawa; S.Nakahigashi; H.Harada

    2004-01-01

    Precipitation phenomena in Type 316L and 304L stainless steels were studied mainly by transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations after cold-rolling ranging from 0% (as solution annealed) to 80% reduction in thickness,and then by sensitization treatment. Precipitates were identified by electron diffraction analysis and EDS analysis.Precipitates observed in sensitized 316L stainless steel were sigma and chi phases, whereas carbide and sigma were observed in sensitized 304L stainless steel. Recrystallized grains were formed in 30% cold-rolled and sensitized 304L.However, the tendency toward recrystallization in sensitized 316L was much lower than in 304L. Precipitation of sigma and chi phases was accelerated by cold-rolling and they were observed at grain boundaries in lower cold-rolling; they were also seen, in grain interiors in higher cold-rolling. Higher deformation induced partially recrystallization combined with precipitation, resulting in the formation of heterogeneous microstructures.

  5. Surface characterization of stainless steel AISI 316 L in contact with simulated body fluid

    Titanium and cobalt alloys, as well as some stainless steels, are often used in orthopedic surgery. In the more developed countries, stainless steel is used only for temporary implants since it does not hold up as well as other alloys to corrosion in a physiological medium. Nevertheless, stainless steel alloys are frequently used for permanent implants in developing countries. Therefore, more knowledge about its reaction to corrosion is needed as well as the characteristics of the surface layer generated in a physiological medium in order to control potential toxicity from the release of metallic ions into the organism. The surface films usually have a different composition and chemical state from the base material. The surface characterization of alloys used in orthopedic surgery should not be underestimated, since it heavily influences the behavior of the implant through the relationship of the surface film-tissue and the possible migration of metallic ions from the base metal to the surrounding tissue. This work presents a study of the surface composition and resistance to the corrosion of stainless steel AISI 316L in simulated body fluid (SBF) aired at pH 7.25 and 37oC. The resistance to the corrosion was studied with an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and anodic polarization curves (CW)

  6. Hydrogen uptake in 316L stainless steel: Consequences on the tensile properties

    Different charging conditions aimed at introducing significant hydrogen concentrations without microstructural damages in a 316L austenitic stainless steel were investigated. The equivalent hydrogen pressure developed at the surface of the samples during cathodic charging was estimated from hydrogen concentration measurements. A clear hydrogen absorption, controlled by diffusion, was evidenced during the immersion of 316L steel samples in 30% MgCl2 at the open circuit potential at 117 deg. C. Deuterium profiling by SIMS was performed to check the validity of the few literature data on hydrogen diffusivity in the near room temperature range in this material. On the other hand, the macroscopic effects of hydrogen on the tensile characteristics of the steel were investigated and compared at 20 deg. C and at -196 deg. C with samples cathodically pre-charged, charged during tensile straining or pre-charged at high temperature-high pressure in gas phase. Hydrogen is shown to affect both the short range and the long range forces exerted on the strain-induced mobile dislocations. The hydrogen-induced softening effect observed at 20 deg. C and the systematic decrease of the ductility support a mechanism involving the enhanced transport of hydrogen atoms by mobile dislocations. This mechanism is confirmed by the absence of softening and of ductility loss at -196 deg. C and by the strain-enhanced tritium desorption from samples cathodically pre-charged with tritium, measured by β counting during tensile deformation

  7. Wear of plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel

    F.A.P. Fernandes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the purpose of the work is to compare the wear resistance, in dry and lubricated conditions, of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel samples that were plasma nitrided or nitrocarburized at 450°C for 5 and 10 h, respectively.Design/methodology/approach: Hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steel can be increased substantially, without losing corrosion resistance, by plasma nitriding or nitrocarburizing surface treatments. In this work, AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized at 450°C, for 5 and 10 h respectively.Findings: The obtained layers were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, microhardness and micro-wear tests in dry and lubricated conditions. Optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated that the nitrided layer is homogeneous and primarily composed of nitrogen rich expanded austenite with a thickness of about 15 µm. Nitrocarburized samples exhibited an external layer of chromium and iron compounds and a sub-layer of expanded austenite with a total thickness of 45 µm. Microhardness profiles showed that the hardness near to the surface was close to 1100 HV for nitriding and 1300 HV for nitrocarburizing. Plasma nitrided and nitrocarburized layers exhibited substantial wear reduction in dry and lubricated test conditions. The use of a lubricant oil reduces wear by a factor of approximately 200 compared to the dry test results.Research limitations/implications: The plasma nitrided layer yielded the best wear performance in both dry and lubricated conditions.Originality/value: Plasma nitriding resulted in the best wear performance when compared with nitrocarburizing in dry and lubricated sliding which is probably due to reduced layer fragility.

  8. Rapid heating tensile tests of hydrogen-charged high-energy-rate-forged 316L stainless steel

    Mosley, W.C.

    1989-05-19

    316L stainless steel is a candidate material for construction of equipment that will be exposed to tritium. Proper design of the equipment will require an understanding of how tritium and its decay product helium affect mechanical properties. This memorandum describes results of rapid heating tensile testing of hydrogen-charged specimens of high-energy-rate-forged (HERF) 316L stainless steel. These results provide a data base for comparison with uncharged and tritium-charged-and-aged specimens to distinguish the effects of hydrogen and helium. Details of the experimental equipment and procedures and results for uncharged specimens were reported previously. 3 refs., 10 figs.

  9. The Effect of Calcium Treatment on Pitting Corrosion of Type 316L Austenitic Stainless steel

    Pitting in chloride containing aqueous solution occurs mainly on manganese sulphide. Adding a slight amount of Ca as an alloying element prevents the MnS formation, since Ca is a stronger sulphide former than Mn. In this work, calcium treated Type 316L austenitic stainless steels have been investigated electrochemically to evaluate the effect of modified inclusions on pitting corrosion. Staircase polarization measurements were performed in 3.5% NaCl solution, where the occurrence of pits in materials caused current spikes. During staircase polarization test, steels with calcium treatment show low and discontinuous current spikes while those without calcium treatment show high and continuous current spikes. The results show that calcium treatment in Ca/S ratio of 1 ∼ 2 leads to an increase in the pitting potential of several hundred mV. A relationship between the calcium treatment and pit initiation sites was described

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel AISI 316L HAZ in PWR nuclear reactor environment

    In pressurized water reactors (PWRs), low alloy carbon steels and stainless steel are widely used in the primary water circuits. In most cases, Ni alloys are used to joint these materials and form dissimilar welds. These alloys are known to accommodate the differences in composition and thermal expansion of the two materials. Stress corrosion cracking of metals and alloys is caused by synergistic effects of environment, material condition and stress. Over the last thirty years, CST has been observed in dissimilar metal welds. This study presents a comparative work between the CST in the HAZ (Heat Affected Zone) of the AISI 316L in two different temperatures (303 deg C and 325 deg C). The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking was assessed using the slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. The results of the SSRT tests indicated that CST is a thermally-activated mechanism and that brittle fracture caused by the corrosion process was observed at 325 deg C). (author)

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir processed AISI 316L stainless steel

    Highlights: • FSP can be used to produce bulk ultrafine grained structures in AISI 316L SS. • The main mechanism for grain structure refinement of FSP 316L SS is DDRX. • However, some evidences of CDRX and SRX were also observed. • The material flow was found to be near simple shear deformation (A/A‾ and C). • FSP samples have an enhanced hardness and strength compared with the base metal. - Abstract: Friction stir processing was used to refine the grain structure in 2 mm thick AISI 316L stainless steel sheets, with a pinless tool, at a constant traverse speed of 63 mm/min and relatively low rotational speeds of 200 and 315 rpm. Depending on the processing conditions, the initial grain size of 14.8 μm in the base metal was subsequently decreased to 0.8–2.2 μm in the processed areas. The microstructural characterizations by orientation imaging and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the grain structure evolution in the stir zone is primarily dominated by discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. The material flow was found to be near simple shear deformation and the developed textures were composed of a mixture of A/A‾ and C components of ideal simple shear textures. The mechanical properties were also evaluated by the longitudinal tensile tests and microhardness measurements. The obtained results showed that, despite a 50% decrease in ductility, the highest yield and ultimate tensile strength of the friction stir processed samples are respectively about 1.6 and 1.2 times higher than those of the base metal. In good agreement with the tensile properties, the increased hardness of the stir zone was attributed to the grain structure refinement

  12. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding; Nitruration a basse temperature de l`acier inoxydable AISI 316L. Resistance a la corrosion et proprietes tribologiques

    Roux, T.; Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Michel, H. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, 54 - Nancy (France); Lebrun, J.P. [NITRUVID, 95 - Argenteuil (France); Hertz, D. [Framatome, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1995-12-31

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution ({gamma}{sub N}) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs.

  13. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  14. Controlling the electrodeposition, morphology and structure of hydroxyapatite coating on 316L stainless steel

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings were prepared on 316L stainless steel (316LSS) substrates by electrochemical deposition in the solutions containing Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and NH4H2PO4 at different electrolyte concentrations. Along with the effect of precursor concentration, the influence of temperature and H2O2 content on the morphology, structure and composition of the coating was thoroughly discussed with the help of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. The in vitro tests in simulated body fluids (SBF) were carried out and then the morphological and structural changes were estimated by SEM and electrochemical techniques (open circuit potential, polarization curves, Nyquist and Bode spectra measurements). Being simple and cost-effective, this method is advantageous for producing HAp implant materials with good properties/characteristics, aiming towards in vivo biomedical applications. - Highlights: ► Successful electrodeposition of HAp on 316L SS by a simple method ► The influence of some key parameters on the HAP morphology was discussed. ► Morphological and structural changes of HAP layer in SBF were thoroughly investigated

  15. An investigation of the aseptic loosening of an AISI 316L stainless steel hip prosthesis

    The total replacement of joints by the implantation of permanently indwelling prosthetic components has been one of the major successes of modern surgery in terms of relieving pain and correcting deformity. However, the aseptic loosening of a prosthetic-joint component is the most common reason for joint-revision surgery. Furthermore, it is thought that wear particles are one of the major contributors to the development and perpetuation of aseptic loosening. The aim of the present study was to identify the factors related to the aseptic loosening of an AISI 316L stainless steel total hip prosthesis. The stem was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, with polished and rough regions being analyzed in order to establish the differences in the chemical compositions of both regions. Specific areas were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and light microscopy.

  16. Modeling of the lattice rotations induced by plasma nitriding of 316L polycrystalline stainless steel

    The anisotropic lattice rotation of individual grains induced by plasma nitriding of 316L austenitic stainless steel has been analyzed with the aim of identifying correlations between the initial grain’s orientation and the rotation behavior. Due to the quite large nitriding-induced strains (up to 20%), the Taylor–Bishop–Hill model has been chosen for the simulation of the lattice rotations. The model predicts the overall rotations, both amplitude and direction, reasonably well over the entire stereographic triangle. The magnitude of the rotations is in agreement with the level of deformation induced by insertion of nitrogen atoms into an austenitic lattice. With regard to plasticity, parallels between the nitriding process and tensile elongation along the normal surface can be drawn

  17. Influence of annealing on grain boundary segregation of neutron irradiated type 316L stainless steel

    Type 316L stainless steel was neutron irradiated (8x1025 n/m2, E>1MeV) and annealed at 673 K - 973 K for 1 hour. After the annealing, intergranular fracture ratio measurement by SSRT, grain boundary analysis by FE-TEM with EDS and simulation of grain boundary Cr depletion healing were performed in order to consider an effect of segregation healing on IASCC. The intergranular fracture ratio was healed to 0% by annealing above 723 K, but the healing of grain boundary Cr depletion of 723 K annealed specimen was not recognized by EDS analysis. Considering about the EDS analysis result and analysis probe diameter, concentration profiles were calculated. As a result, it was considered that grain boundary segregation which depleted to about 8 mass% by neutron irradiation, healed to about 12 mass% by annealing at 723 K, so that IASCC susceptibility was decreased. (author)

  18. Banded structure and its distribution in friction stir processing of 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Highlights: ► Friction stir processing (FSP) as a repair method. ► Sigma phase formed in the FSP zone. ► Low heat input contributes to restrain sigma phase precipitation. - Abstract: Banded structures, which vary with welding parameters, were observed in friction stir processing of 316L austenite stainless steel. Sigma phase precipitation was detected in banded structures by transmission electron microscopy. The amount of banded structure had direct ratio relations with heat input. The higher the heat input, the larger the area of banded structures. This is attributable to slower cooling rate at high heat input, which results in longer exposure to the temperature range for precipitation. The formation of sigma phase produced Cr depletion, which resulted in largely degraded corrosion resistance. The present study suggests that low heat input (i.e. low rotation speeds, low working loads and high welding speed) contributes to restrain sigma phase precipitation.

  19. Electrochemical and surface study of the oxide growth and conversion on 316L stainless steel

    Oxide formation and conversion mechanism as a function of potential on 316L stainless steel was investigated using electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. All of the results were consistent with the electrochemical thermodynamics. Four potential regions were identified for anodic oxidation. In Ox I, conversion of the defective chromium oxide layer to an iron/chromium spinel phase occurred. This was followed by conversion of the upper Fe3O4 oxide to a passivating γ-Fe2O3 layer in Ox II. At potentials > 0.0 VSCE, Ox III and IV involved the formation of γ-FeOOH and conversion of CrIII to soluble CrVI respectively contributing to film breakdown. (author)

  20. Cyclic deformation behavior of a 316L austenitic stainless steel processed by high pressure torsion

    The influence of severe plastic deformation (SPD) on the fatigue behavior of a modified 316L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Different ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline microstructures are obtained by changing the processing parameters and applying a post heat treatment procedure. Samples are fatigued using both, load and strain controlled experiments. High pressure torsion processing makes it possible to reach a saturation microstructure, which is cyclically stable up to a stress level three times higher than the stress level of the coarse-grained structure. Fracture surface investigations and surface damage clearly show that the failure behavior of the SPD states under cyclic loading is different to their coarse-grained counterparts. For these microstructures, localized deformation in shear bands seems to play a major role for crack initiation and propagation. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. The effect of internal hydrogen on surface slip localisation on polycrystalline AISI 316L stainless steel

    A statistical analysis of the effect of internal hydrogen on the surface slip morphology of relatively high nickel content AISI 316L type austenitic stainless steel was carried out on high resolution data obtained by atomic force microscopy. Surface plastic strain localisation was studied for different hydrogen contents, two grain sizes, and two plastic strain levels. The height and spacing of approximately 8000 slip bands, observed on 12 specimens, are shown to follow log-normal distributions. Hydrogen increased the mean slip-band height and the mean slip-band spacing for the two macroscopic plastic strain levels considered, and for the two hydrogen concentrations in coarse-grained specimens. The hydrogen effect was also observed for fine-grained specimens, but only for the highest hydrogen concentration. In addition, the emerging dislocation velocity increased by a factor 3 for high hydrogen content.

  2. Analysis of deformation induced martensite in AISI 316L stainless steel

    Jagarinec, Darko; Kirbis, Peter; Predan, Jozef; Vuherer, Tomaz; Gubeljak, Nenad [Maribor Univ. (Slovenia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-08-01

    Metastable austenite stainless steel AISI 316L is sensitive to cold deformation, where transformation from austenite to martensite occurred. The bending deformation as the formation process leads to tensile and compression throughout the thickness of the billet. Tensile testing of the specimen causes differences in the true stress-strain along the contraction neck prior to fracture as well. The aim of the paper is to find correlation between microhardness as brief inspection parameters and extension of martensitic transformation. The total equivalent plastic strain extend diagram obtained by numerical simulation of bending was compared with tensile true stress-strain diagram. Results show very good correlation between hardness, true strain and martesite content. Therefore, one can conclude that by hardness measurement, it is possible to measure the level of equivalent plastic strain until ultimate tensile stress as a linear correlation between hardness, true strain and martesite content.

  3. Study of TiC+TiN Multiple Films On Type of 316L Stainless Steel

    XUEQi; JINYong; HUDong-ping; HUANGBen-sheng; DENGBai-quan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the synthesis process of TiC+TiN multiple films on super-low-carbon stainless steels is reported. The TiC layer is coated as the first layer in the multiple film, the change of growth rate of the film on the 316L Stainlesss teel is not same as the one on carbides substrates, while the mole ratio of CH4 to TiCl4 (mCH4/TiCl4) is changed from 1.2 to 2.0. The Ti [C,N], as a kind of inter-layer between TiC and TiN layers, is helpful to improve the adhesion hetween the TiC and TiN layer. The cooling rate greatly influences the quality of the adhesion between the TiC+TiN film and substrates.

  4. Cytocompatibility and mechanical properties of novel porous 316 L stainless steel.

    Kato, Komei; Yamamoto, Akiko; Ochiai, Shojiro; Wada, Masahiro; Daigo, Yuzo; Kita, Koichi; Omori, Kenichi

    2013-07-01

    Novel 316 L stainless steel (SS) foam with 85% porosity and an open pore diameter of 70-440 μm was developed for hard tissue application. The foam sheet with a 200-μm diameter had superior cell proliferation and penetration as identified through in vitro experiments. Calcification of human osteosarcoma cells in the SS foam was observed. Multi-layered foam preparation is a potential alternative technique that satisfies multi-functional requirements such as cell penetration and binding strength to the solid metal. In tensile tests, Young's modulus and the strength of the SS foam were 4.0 GPa and 11.2 MPa respectively, which is comparable with human cancellous bone. PMID:23623090

  5. Anticoagulant surface of 316 L stainless steel modified by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    Guo, Weihua; Zhu, Jian; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhang, Zhengbiao; Zhu, Xiulin

    2011-05-01

    Polished 316 L stainless steel (SS) was first treated with air plasma to enhance surface hydrophilicity and was subsequently allowed to react with 2-(4-chlorosulfonylphenyl)ethyltrimethoxysilane to introduce an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiator. Accordingly, the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of polyethylene glycol methacrylate (PEGMA) was carried out on the surface of the modified SS. The grafting progress was monitored by water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The polymer thickness as a function different polymerization times was characterized using a step profiler. The anticoagulative properties of the PEGMA modified SS surface were investigated. The results showed enhanced anticoagulative to acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) blood after grafting PEGMA on the SS surface. PMID:21528878

  6. Effect of grain refinement and electrochemical nitridation on corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel for bipolar plates in PEMFCs environment

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Hongyun, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The stain-induced nanocrystalline α'-martensite was obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature for 316L stainless steel. The electrochemical results showed nanocrystalline 316L stainless steel deteriorated its corrosion resistance in a typical proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment compared with coarse grained one. However, comparing with electrochemically nitrided coarse grained stainless steel, electrochemically nitrided nanocrystalline stainless steel improved significantly corrosion resistance in the same environment, which was supported further by Mott-Shottky analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the nanocrystalline promoted the enrichment of nitrogen and chromium and inhibited form of NH3 on the surface, which could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel. The present study showed that the electrochemically nitrided 316L stainless steel was more suitable for the bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment than the untreated one, especially for nanocrystalline stainless steel.

  7. Electrochemical deposition of black nickel solar absorber coatings on stainless steel AISI316L for thermal solar cells

    Lira-Cantú, Monica; Morales Sabio, Angel; Brustenga, Alex; Gómez-Romero, P.

    2005-01-01

    We report the electrochemical deposition of nanostructured nickel-based solar absorber coatings on stainless steel AISI type 316L. A sol–gel silica-based antireflection coating, from TEOS, was also applied to the solar surface by the dip-coating method. We report our initial results and analyze the influence of the stainless steel substrate on the final total reflectance properties of the solar absorber. The relation between surface morphology, observed by SEM and AFM, the comp...

  8. Grain boundary character distribution in a hot rolled 316 L stainless steel; Distribuicao de tipos de contornos de grao em um aco inoxidavel 316L laminado a quente

    Lopes, L.C.R. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Metalurgia; Thomson, C.B. [Wales Univ., Swansea (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    The texture and the grain boundary character distribution of a 316 L stainless steel under hot rolled condition have been studied. Electron back-scatter diffraction technique associated to the scanning electron microscopy is used to determine the crystallographic orientation of grains individually. The material presented a random texture. However, the misorientation axis distribution represented by an inverse pole figure showed a non-random distribution with a high proportion <111> misorientation axis. The disorientation angle distribution indicates a proportion of about 60% of boundaries with 60 deg C misorientation angle. A 25% proportion of CSL interfaces of {Sigma} = 3 type was found 17 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Electron stimulated desorption of H3O+ from 316L stainless steel

    Surface ions generated by electron stimulated desorption from mass spectrometer ion source grids are frequently observed, but often misidentified. For example, in the case of mass 19, the source is often assumed to be surface fluorine, but since the metal oxide on grid surfaces has been shown to form water and hydroxides, a more compelling case can be made for the formation of hydronium. Further, fluorine is strongly electronegative, so it is rarely generated as a positive ion. A commonly used metal for ion source grids is 316L stainless steel. Thermal vacuum processing by bakeout or radiation heating from the filament typically alters the surface composition to predominantly Cr2O3. X-ray photoelectron spectral shoulders on the O 1s and Cr 2p3/2 peaks can be attributed to adsorbed water and hydroxides, the intensity of which can be substantially increased by hydrogen dosing. On the other hand, the sub-peak intensities are substantially reduced by heating and/or by electron bombardment. Electron bombardment diode measurements show an initial work function increase corresponding to predominant hydrogen desorption (H2) and a subsequent work function decrease corresponding to predominant oxygen desorption (CO). The fraction of hydroxide concentration on the surface was determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and from the deconvolution of temperature desorption spectra. Electron stimulated desorption yields from the surface show unambiguous H3O+ peaks that can be significantly increased by hydrogen dosing. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry sputter yields show small signals of H3O+, as well as its constituents (H+, O+ and OH+) and a small amount of fluorine as F-, but no F+ or F+ complexes (HF+, etc.). An electron stimulated desorption cross-section of σ + ∼ 1.4 x 10-20 cm2 was determined for H3O+ from 316L stainless steel for hydrogen residing in surface chromium hydroxide

  10. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings

    Jones, John Eric; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20–25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH3/O2 plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC and RF TMS plasma coatings had Si- and C-rich composition, and the O-and N-contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH3/O2 plasma treatment. Surface contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS plasma nanocoating with NH3/O2 plasma treatment generated very hydrophilic surface. The corrosion resistance of TMS plasma coated stents was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization demonstrated that the TMS plasma coated stents imparted higher corrosion potential and pitting potential, as well as lower corrosion current densities as compared with uncoated controls. The surface morphology of stents before and after potentiodynamic polarization testing was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, which indicated less corrosion on coated stents than uncoated controls. It was also noted that, from EIS data, the hydrophobic TMS plasma nanocoatings showed stable impedance modulus at 0.1 Hz after 21 day immersion in an electrolyte solution. These results suggest improved corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel stents by TMS plasma nanocoatings and great promise in reducing and blocking metallic ions releasing into the bloodstream. PMID:24500866

  11. Corrosion resistance improvement for 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents by trimethylsilane plasma nanocoatings.

    Eric Jones, John; Chen, Meng; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-10-01

    To improve their corrosion resistance and thus long-term biocompatibility, 316L stainless steel coronary artery stents were coated with trimethylsilane (TMS) plasma coatings of 20-25 nm in thickness. Both direct current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) glow discharges were utilized for TMS plasma coatings and additional NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment to tailor the surface properties. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the coating surface chemistry. It was found that both DC and RF TMS plasma coatings had Si- and C-rich composition, and the O- and N-contents on the surfaces were substantially increased after NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment. Surface contact angle measurements showed that DC TMS plasma nanocoating with NH₃/O₂ plasma treatment generated very hydrophilic surface. The corrosion resistance of TMS plasma coated stents was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The potentiodynamic polarization demonstrated that the TMS plasma coated stents imparted higher corrosion potential and pitting potential, as well as lower corrosion current densities as compared with uncoated controls. The surface morphology of stents before and after potentiodynamic polarization testing was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy, which indicated less corrosion on coated stents than uncoated controls. It was also noted that, from EIS data, the hydrophobic TMS plasma nanocoatings showed stable impedance modulus at 0.1 Hz after 21 day immersion in an electrolyte solution. These results suggest improved corrosion resistance of the 316L stainless steel stents by TMS plasma nanocoatings and great promise in reducing and blocking metallic ions releasing into the bloodstream. PMID:24500866

  12. Electron stimulated desorption of H 3O + from 316L stainless steel

    Cole, C. R.; Outlaw, R. A.; Champion, R. L.; Holloway, B. C.; Kelly, M. A.

    2007-02-01

    Surface ions generated by electron stimulated desorption from mass spectrometer ion source grids are frequently observed, but often misidentified. For example, in the case of mass 19, the source is often assumed to be surface fluorine, but since the metal oxide on grid surfaces has been shown to form water and hydroxides, a more compelling case can be made for the formation of hydronium. Further, fluorine is strongly electronegative, so it is rarely generated as a positive ion. A commonly used metal for ion source grids is 316L stainless steel. Thermal vacuum processing by bakeout or radiation heating from the filament typically alters the surface composition to predominantly Cr 2O 3. X-ray photoelectron spectral shoulders on the O 1s and Cr 2p 3/2 peaks can be attributed to adsorbed water and hydroxides, the intensity of which can be substantially increased by hydrogen dosing. On the other hand, the sub-peak intensities are substantially reduced by heating and/or by electron bombardment. Electron bombardment diode measurements show an initial work function increase corresponding to predominant hydrogen desorption (H 2) and a subsequent work function decrease corresponding to predominant oxygen desorption (CO). The fraction of hydroxide concentration on the surface was determined from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and from the deconvolution of temperature desorption spectra. Electron stimulated desorption yields from the surface show unambiguous H 3O + peaks that can be significantly increased by hydrogen dosing. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry sputter yields show small signals of H 3O +, as well as its constituents (H +, O + and OH +) and a small amount of fluorine as F -, but no F + or F + complexes (HF +, etc.). An electron stimulated desorption cross-section of σ+ ˜ 1.4 × 10 -20 cm 2 was determined for H 3O + from 316L stainless steel for hydrogen residing in surface chromium hydroxide.

  13. Super austenitic stainless steels - a promising replacement for the currently used type 316L stainless steel as the construction material for flue-gas desulphurization plant

    Rajendran, N.; Rajeswari, S. [University of Madras, Madras (India). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry

    1996-12-15

    Potentiodynamic anodic cyclic polarization experiments on type 316L stainless steel and 6Mo super austenitic stainless steels were carried out in simulated flue-gas desulphurization (FGD) environment in order to assess the localized corrosion resistance. The pitting corrosion resistance was higher in the case of the super austenitic stainless steel containing 6Mo and a higher amount of nitrogen. The accelerated leaching study conducted for the alloys showed that the super austenitic stainless steels have a little tendency for leaching of metal ions such as iron, chromium and nickel at different impressed potentials. This may be due to surface segregation of nitrogen as CrN, which would, in turn, enrich a chromium and molybdenum mixed oxide film and thus impede the release of metal ions. The present study indicates that the 6Mo super austenitics can be adopted as a promising replacement for the currently used type 316L stainless steel as the construction material for FGD plants.

  14. Dislocation structure evolution and its effects on cyclic deformation response of AISI 316L stainless steel

    Research highlights: → The cyclic deformation response of AISI 316L steel is investigated at 20 deg. C. → The corresponding microstructure evolution is characterised by electron microscopy. → A 3D representation of dislocation evolution is proposed based on the observation. → The 3D representation gives a good explanation of the microstructure complexity. → The cyclic deformation response is discussed based on the microstructure evolution. - Abstract: The cyclic deformation response of an austenitic stainless steel is characterised in terms of its cyclic peak tensile stress properties by three stages of behaviour: a hardening stage followed by a softening stage, and finally a stable stress response stage. A series of tests have been performed and interrupted at selected numbers of cycles in the different stages of mechanical response. At each interruption point, specimens have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with different beam directions by means of the tilting function in order to investigate the formation and the development of dislocation structures from the as-received condition until the end of fatigue life. A new 3D representation of dislocation structure evolution during cyclic loading is proposed on the basis of the microstructural observations. The 3D representation provides a deeper insight into the development of dislocation structures in AISI 316L during low cycle fatigue loading at room temperature. By investigating the dislocation evolution, the study shows that the hardening response is mainly associated with an increase of total dislocation density, whereas the softening stage is a result of the formation of dislocation-free regions. Further development of the dislocation structure into a cellular structure is responsible for the stable stress response stage.

  15. Changes of surface layer of nitrogen-implanted AISI316L stainless steel

    The effects of nitrogen ion implantation into AISI316L stainless steel on friction, wear, and microhardness have been investigated at an energy level of 125 keV at a fluence of 1·1017 - 1·1018 N/cm2. The composition of the surface layer was investigated by RBS, XRD (GXRD), SEM and EDX. The friction coefficient and abrasive wear rate of the stainless steel were measured in the atmospheres of air, oxygen, argon, and in vacuum. As follows from the investigations, there is an increase in resistance to frictional wear in the studied samples after implantation; however, these changes are of different characters in various atmospheres. The largest decrease in wear was observed during tests in the air, and the largest reduction in the value of the friction coefficient for all implanted samples was obtained during tests in the argon atmosphere. Tribological tests revealed larger contents of nitrogen, carbon, and oxygen in the products of surface layer wear than in the surface layer itself of the sample directly after implantation

  16. Preparation and properties of enamel barrier on 316L stainless steel for resistance of hydrogen and its isotopes penetration

    In order to solve the problems of the resistance of hydrogen and its isotopes penetration for 316L stainless steel, the enamel coating with a thickness of 90-110 μm was prepared on the stainless steel substrate with the aid of coating and enameling for twice. The microstructure and the interfacial morphology of the samples were characterized respectively by X-ray diffractometer, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, the profiles of main elements at the interface between the coating and the substrate were analyzed by EDS line-scanning. The experimental results indicated that the dense enamel coatings were chemically bonded with 316L stainless steel substrate, and possessed perfect thermal shock and ball-dropping impact properties. Finally, a conclusion was drawn from the results of hydrogen charging in a Sieverts apparatus and the Vickers microhardness test that the as-prepared dense enamel coating exhibited a good barrier effect to hydrogen nad its isotopes penetration. (authors)

  17. Effect of rare earth elements on microstructure and oxidation behaviour in TIG weldments of AISI 316L stainless steel

    The influence of rare earth addition in weld metal, on the microstructure and oxidation behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel in dry air under isothermal condition at 973 K for 240 h is reported. Rare earth metal (REM) doped weld metal zone exhibits better oxidation resistance during isothermal holding as compared to base metal and undoped weld metal zone of 316L. Presence of both Ce and Nb in weld metal shows superior oxidation resistance than with Ce alone. TIG weld microstructures are presented by optical microscopy. The morphologies of the scales and nature of their adherence to the alloy substrates, and scale spallation have been characterized by SEM and EDAX

  18. The effect of repeated repair welding on mechanical and corrosion properties of stainless steel 316L

    Highlights: • Microstructure and properties of the HAZ were analyzed. • Delta ferrite morphology changed, and ferrite content decreased. • Adverse effect on yield and ultimate tensile strength was negligible. • The absorbed energy and hardness decreases with increasing number of weld-repair. • The sensitivity to pitting corrosion was increased. - Abstract: The purpose of this study is to evaluate changes in the mechanical, micro structural and the corrosion properties of stainless steel 316L under repeated repair welding. The welding and the repair welding were conducted by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). The SMAW welding process was performed using E316L filler metals. Specimen of the base metal and different conditions of shielded metal arc welding repairs were studied by looking in the micro structural changes, the chemical composition of the phases, the grain size (in the heat affected zone) and the effect on the mechanical and corrosion properties. The microstructure was investigated using optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical composition of the phases was determined using energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The corrosion behavior in 1 M H2SO4 + 3.5% NaCl solution was evaluated using a potentiodynamic polarization method. Tensile tests, Charpy-V impact resistance and Brinell hardness tests were conducted. Hardness of the heat affected zone decreased as the number of repairs increased. Generally an increase in the yield strength (YS) and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) occurred with welding. After the first repair, a gradual decrease in YS and UTS occurred but the values of YS and UTS were not less than values of the base metal. Significant reduction in Charpy-V impact resistance with the number of weld repairs were observed when the notch location was in the HAZ. The HAZ of welding repair specimen is more sensitive to pitting corrosion. The sensitivity of HAZ to pitting corrosion was increased by

  19. Investigating the correlation between some of the properties of plasma nitrided AISI 316L stainless steel

    M. Olzon-Dionysio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When AISI 316L stainless steels are submitted to the nitriding process at temperatures lower than 450 °C, a high nitrogen content expanded austenite phase is formed, which shows higher hardness and higher pitting corrosion resistance compared to the untreated material. As a result, this material becomes adequate for biomedical application. The conditions of the nitriding technique, such as gas mixture, pressure, time and temperature, play an important role in some properties of the modified layer, including: thickness, hardness and N concentration along the layer. This paper explores a set of six samples of AISI 316L, nitrided at different times and temperatures, whose properties show important differences. The aim of this research is to investigate the correlation between the nitrided layer thickness (in the range of 0.77 to 11 µm with both X-ray patterns characteristics and hardness measurements, which used two distinct loads. The results of this study show that: whereas the 3.6 gf load was suitable to measure the real hardness for four of the nitrided layers showing thickness ≥ 2.9 µm, the 50 gf load measured a substrate contribution, probably even for the highest thickness, 11 µm. Moreover, analyzing different reflections of the X-ray patterns showed evidence of the clear consistency between the X-Ray depths and the nitrided layer thicknesses: if the layer thickness is lower than the penetration depth of X-rays, two phases (austenite and expanded substrate are present. If the layer thickness is higher, only the austenite is observed. Finally, concerning the citotoxicity property, all the samples, nitrided or not, were approved in the test for biocompatibility, indicating their potential use for biomedical applications.

  20. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  1. The Effect of Constant and Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding on Joint Properties of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel to 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Neissi, R.; Shamanian, M.; Hajihashemi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, dissimilar 316L austenitic stainless steel/2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) joints were fabricated by constant and pulsed current gas tungsten arc welding process using ER2209 DSS as a filler metal. Microstructures and joint properties were characterized using optical and electron scanning microscopy, tensile, Charpy V-notch impact and micro-hardness tests, and cyclic polarization measurements. Microstructural observations confirmed the presence of chromium nitride and delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of DSS and 316L, respectively. In addition, there was some deviation in the austenite/ferrite ratio of the surface welding pass in comparison to the root welding pass. Besides having lower pitting potential, welded joints produced by constant current gas tungsten arc welding process, consisted of some brittle sigma phase precipitates, which resulted in some impact energy reduction. The tensile tests showed high tensile strength for the weld joints in which all the specimens were broken in 316L base metal.

  2. Numerical models and experimental simulation of irradiation hardening and damage effects on the fracture toughness of 316L stainless steel

    Cornacchia, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    In nuclear environments, irradiation hardening and damage have a detrimental effect on materials performance. Among others, fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steels decreases under neutron irradiation. Helium arising from transmutation reactions is one source of embrittlement leading to that decrement and it is here assumed as a case study, austenitic steel 316L being the material under investigation. The experimental reproduction of irradiation hardening effect on yield stress is at...

  3. The role of the microstructure and defects on crack initiation in 316L stainless steel under multiaxial high cycle fatigue

    GUERCHAIS, Raphaël; Morel, Franck; Saintier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the influence of both the microstructure and defects on the high cycle fatigue behaviour of the 316L austenitic stainless steel, using finite element simulations of polycrystalline aggregates. High cycle fatigue tests have been conducted on this steel under uniaxial (push-pull) and multiaxial (combined in-phase tension and torsion) loading conditions, with both smooth specimens and specimens containing artificial semi-spherical surface defects. 2D numerical...

  4. SCC crack growth rate of cold worked 316L stainless steel in PWR environment

    Many component failures in nuclear power plants were found to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked austenitic steels. Some of the pressure boundary component materials are even cold worked up to 35% plastic deformation, leaving high residual stress and inducing high growth rate of corrosion crack. Controlling water chemistry is one of the best counter measure to mitigate this problem. In this work, the effects of temperature (200 up to 325 °C) and dissolved oxygen (0 up to 2000 μg/L) on SCC crack growth rates of cold worked austenitic stainless steel type 316L have been tested by using direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The results showed that temperature affected SCC crack growth rates more significantly in oxygenated water than in deaerated water. In argon deaerated water, the crack growth rate exhibited a peak at about 250 °C, which needs further verification. At 325 °C, the SCC crack growth rate increased rapidly with the increase of dissolved oxygen concentration within the range from 0 up to 200 μg/L, while when dissolved oxygen was above 200 μg/L, the crack growth rate followed a shallower dependence on dissolved oxygen concentration

  5. SCC crack growth rate of cold worked 316L stainless steel in PWR environment

    Du, Donghai; Chen, Kai; Yu, Lun; Lu, Hui [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zhang, Lefu, E-mail: lfzhang@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shi, Xiuqiang; Xu, Xuelian [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Many component failures in nuclear power plants were found to be caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of cold worked austenitic steels. Some of the pressure boundary component materials are even cold worked up to 35% plastic deformation, leaving high residual stress and inducing high growth rate of corrosion crack. Controlling water chemistry is one of the best counter measure to mitigate this problem. In this work, the effects of temperature (200 up to 325 °C) and dissolved oxygen (0 up to 2000 μg/L) on SCC crack growth rates of cold worked austenitic stainless steel type 316L have been tested by using direct current potential drop (DCPD) method. The results showed that temperature affected SCC crack growth rates more significantly in oxygenated water than in deaerated water. In argon deaerated water, the crack growth rate exhibited a peak at about 250 °C, which needs further verification. At 325 °C, the SCC crack growth rate increased rapidly with the increase of dissolved oxygen concentration within the range from 0 up to 200 μg/L, while when dissolved oxygen was above 200 μg/L, the crack growth rate followed a shallower dependence on dissolved oxygen concentration.

  6. Study on corrosion resistance of palladium films on 316L stainless steel by electroplating and electroless plating

    Palladium films with good adhesive strength were deposited on 316L stainless steel by electroless plating and electroplating. Scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, weight loss tests and electrochemical methods were used to study the properties of the films. The electroless plated palladium film mainly consisted of palladium, phosphorus and nitrogen, and the electroplated palladium film was almost pure palladium. XPS analysis indicated that palladium was present in the films as metal state. The palladium plated stainless steel samples prepared by both methods showed excellent corrosion resistance in strong reductive corrosion mediums. In boiling 20% dilute sulfuric acid solution, the corrosion rates of the palladium plated 316L stainless steel samples were four orders of magnitude lower than that of the original 316L stainless steel samples. In the solution with 0.01 M NaCl, the palladium plated samples also showed better corrosion resistance. In comparison, the electroplated samples showed slightly better corrosion resistance than electroless plated samples, which may be attributed to less impurities and thereby higher corrosion potential for the former

  7. Surface characterisation and electrochemical behaviour of porous titanium dioxide coated 316L stainless steel for orthopaedic applications

    Nagarajan, S.; Rajendran, N.

    2009-01-01

    Porous titanium dioxide was coated on surgical grade 316L stainless steel (SS) and its role on the corrosion protection and enhanced biocompatibility of the materials was studied. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were carried out to characterise the surface morphology and also to understand the structure of the as synthesised coating on the substrates. The corrosion behaviour of titanium dioxide coated samples in simulated body fluid was evaluated using polarisation and impedance spectroscopy studies. The results reveal that the titanium dioxide coated 316L SS exhibit a higher corrosion resistance than the uncoated 316L SS. The titanium dioxide coated surface is porous, uniform and also it acts as a barrier layer to metallic substrate and the porous titanium dioxide coating induces the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the metal surface.

  8. Surface characterisation and electrochemical behaviour of porous titanium dioxide coated 316L stainless steel for orthopaedic applications

    Porous titanium dioxide was coated on surgical grade 316L stainless steel (SS) and its role on the corrosion protection and enhanced biocompatibility of the materials was studied. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) were carried out to characterise the surface morphology and also to understand the structure of the as synthesised coating on the substrates. The corrosion behaviour of titanium dioxide coated samples in simulated body fluid was evaluated using polarisation and impedance spectroscopy studies. The results reveal that the titanium dioxide coated 316L SS exhibit a higher corrosion resistance than the uncoated 316L SS. The titanium dioxide coated surface is porous, uniform and also it acts as a barrier layer to metallic substrate and the porous titanium dioxide coating induces the formation of hydroxyapatite layer on the metal surface.

  9. Bone-like apatite formation on HA/316L stainless steel composite surface in simulated body fluid

    FAN Xin; CHEN Jian; ZOU Jian-peng; WAN Qian; ZHOU Zhong-cheng; RUAN Jian-ming

    2009-01-01

    HA/316L stainless steel(316L SS) biocomposites were prepared by hot-pressing technique. The formation of bone-like apatite on the biocomposite surfaces in simulated body fluid(SBF) was analyzed by digital pH meter, plasma emission spectrometer, scanning electron microscope(SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray energy spectrometer(EDX). The results indicate that the pH value in SBF varies slightly during the immersion. It is a dynamic process of dissolution-precipitation for the formation of apatite on the surface. With prolonging immersion time, Ca and P ion concentrations increase gradually, and then approach equilibrium. The bone-like apatite layer forms on the composites surface, which possesses benign bioactivity and favorable biocompatibility and achieves osseointegration, and can provide firm fixation between HA60/316L SS composite implants and human body bone.

  10. Neutron irradiation creep at 100 C on 316L, AMCR, and welded 316L stainless steel alloys

    The authors performed measurements on the elongation of many different austenitic stainless steel alloys irradiating at 100 C in a low flux channel of the High Flux Reactor at Petten varying the applied stress between zero and 300 Mpa. They irradiated in total 98 samples in two irradiation rigs. Of these samples only 26 samples could be tested up to a dose of 2.1 dpa, and 13 samples up to a dose of 0.21 dpa. The steels tested are listed in Table 1. In the second irradiation rig four TIG-welded samples and one EB-welded sample were irradiated. They found that the length of the samples increased up to an irradiation dose of 0.11 dpa and then either decreased or increased slightly depending on the magnitude of the applied stress. They attributed the increase in length to the volume change due to the formation of carbides and to the accommodation of carbides to the applied stress. The decrease of the length with irradiation time is attributed to the formation of brittle α-ferrite. The amount of α-ferrite formed increases with decreasing irradiation temperature and increases with decreasing applied stress. Eight samples broke during irradiation in 8 columns or stems in two rigs before the first elongation test at 0.11 or 0.21 dpa could be performed. Irradiation of 343 samples of the same materials in the last fifteen years at temperatures between 300 and 500 C did not cause fracture

  11. Neutron irradiation creep at 100 C on 316L, AMCR, and welded 316L stainless steel alloys

    Hausen, H.; Schuele, W. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik

    1999-10-01

    The authors performed measurements on the elongation of many different austenitic stainless steel alloys irradiating at 100 C in a low flux channel of the High Flux Reactor at Petten varying the applied stress between zero and 300 Mpa. They irradiated in total 98 samples in two irradiation rigs. Of these samples only 26 samples could be tested up to a dose of 2.1 dpa, and 13 samples up to a dose of 0.21 dpa. The steels tested are listed in Table 1. In the second irradiation rig four TIG-welded samples and one EB-welded sample were irradiated. They found that the length of the samples increased up to an irradiation dose of 0.11 dpa and then either decreased or increased slightly depending on the magnitude of the applied stress. They attributed the increase in length to the volume change due to the formation of carbides and to the accommodation of carbides to the applied stress. The decrease of the length with irradiation time is attributed to the formation of brittle {alpha}-ferrite. The amount of {alpha}-ferrite formed increases with decreasing irradiation temperature and increases with decreasing applied stress. Eight samples broke during irradiation in 8 columns or stems in two rigs before the first elongation test at 0.11 or 0.21 dpa could be performed. Irradiation of 343 samples of the same materials in the last fifteen years at temperatures between 300 and 500 C did not cause fracture.

  12. On the fate of tritium in thermally treated stainless steel type 316L

    Several type 316L stainless steel specimens of 6 mm thickness were charged with tritium at 473 K at Joint European Torus (JET) using five sets of conditions. Isothermal tritium release rates were investigated at Hydrogen Isotope Research Centre (HRC) over extended periods of time at 473, 573, or 673 K constant temperature. The HTO/HT ratio of the liberated tritium was generally high, but decreased with decreasing release temperature. Nearly complete release of tritium required additional prolonged heating at 1073 K. Chemical etching and beta-ray-induced X-ray spectrometry measurements carried out at HRC provided complementary information on the tritium distribution in surface and bulk of thermally treated specimens. Whereas the thickness of the material and initial distribution of tritium in its bulk were found to play an important role for expedient thermal decontamination, the influence of the type of purge gas was only minor. Experimental evidence for tritium grain boundary diffusion is provided. Implications of the results for waste conditioning are discussed.

  13. Low-temperature plasma nitriding of sintered PIM 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Mendes, Aecio Fernando; Scheuer, Cristiano Jose; Joanidis, Ioanis Labhardt; Cardoso, Rodrigo Perito; Mafra, Marcio; Klein, Aloisio Nelmo; Brunatto, Silvio Francisco, E-mail: brunatto@ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Grupo de Tecnologia de Fabricacao Assistida pro Plasma e Metalurgia do Po

    2014-08-15

    This work reports experimental results on sintered PIM 316L stainless steel low-temperature plasma nitriding. The effect of treatment temperature and time on process kinetics, microstructure and surface characteristics of the nitrided samples were investigated. Nitriding was carried out at temperatures of 350, 380, 410 and 440 °C , and times of 4, 8 and 16 h, using a gas mixture composed by 60% N2 + 20% H2 + 20% Ar, at a gas flow rate of 5.00 X 10{sup 6} Nm{sup 3-1}, and a pressure of 800 Pa. The treated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and microhardness measurements. Results indicate that low-temperature plasma nitriding is a diffusion controlled process. The calculated activation energy for nitrided layer growth was 111.4 kJmol{sup -1}. Apparently precipitation-free layers were produced in this study. It was also observed that the higher the treatment temperature and time the higher is the obtained surface hardness. Hardness up to 1343 HV{sub 0.025} was verified for samples nitrided at 440 °C. Finally, the characterization of the treated surface indicates the formation of cracks, which were observed in regions adjacent to the original pores after the treatment. (author)

  14. The blistering of 316L stainless steel irradiated with energetic alpha particles at 500 degrees C

    The physical process of blistering is investigated in the 316L stainless steel in both the solid solution and 20% cold-worked states. The material was irradiated with 1.8 MeV alpha particles to various fluences at 500deg C. There is a threshold fluence for blistering in the range of (0.869-1.346)x 1018 α/cm2. The microstructure, determined by TEM observation in the cross-section of irradiated samples, shows that the bubbles are accumulated at the surface layer. There is a bubble size and density distribution along the direction of depth. The bubble size and swelling increase progressively from the edge of the specimen to the damage peak region (DPR), then decrease. After 3 μm there are no bubbles. Due to bubble formation the thermal conductivity of the surface layer becomes lower and the temperature increases due to the irradiation energy deposited. Beyond the threshold fluence, the temperature of the surface layer is high, bubble coalescence at DPR becomes more serious and the bubble pressure becomes high enough that blistering occurs. (orig.)

  15. Mechanical properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel 304L and 316L at elevated temperatures

    Raghuram Karthik Desu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic Stainless Steel grade 304L and 316L are very important alloys used in various high temperature applications, which make it important to study their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. In this work, the mechanical properties such as ultimate tensile strength (UTS, yield strength (YS, % elongation, strain hardening exponent (n and strength coefficient (K are evaluated based on the experimental data obtained from the uniaxial isothermal tensile tests performed at an interval of 50 °C from 50 °C to 650 °C and at three different strain rates (0.0001, 0.001 and 0.01 s−1. Artificial Neural Networks (ANN are trained to predict these mechanical properties. The trained ANN model gives an excellent correlation coefficient and the error values are also significantly low, which represents a good accuracy of the model. The accuracy of the developed ANN model also conforms to the results of mean paired t-test, F-test and Levene's test.

  16. Microstructure characterisation and process optimization of laser assisted rapid fabrication of 316L stainless steel

    In the present study, laser assisted fabrication of 316L stainless steel has been attempted using a high power (1.5 kW) continuous wave diode laser. The main process variables for the present study were applied power density, scan speed and powder feed rate. A detailed microstructural study of the surface and cross-section of the fabricated layer were carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand the influence of laser parameters on microstructure of the surface and interface between the successive layers. The microstructure of the top layer was equiaxed, the near substrate region was fine dendritic, however, at the interface between two successive layers, it was coarsened. The morphology and degree of fineness of the microstructure was found to vary with laser parameters. The range of grain size (maximum grain size-minimum grain size) was taken as a measure of homogeneity. It was found that with increasing the scan speed, the range of grain size was minimized. Micro-porosities were present in the microstructure that reduced with increasing scan speed and found to be minimum at a medium powder feed rate. The optimum processing conditions have been established by correlating the characteristics of the fabricated layer with process parameters

  17. Fatigue crack propagation at high temperature (5500C) in stainless steel type 316 L

    The effect of different parameters such as temperature, stress ratio R, frequency f, have been investigated for fatigue crack propagation in stainless steel type 316 L. At high frequency (20 Hz), increasing temperature from room temperature to 5500C, produced an increase in crack propagation rate. Fractographic analysis of failed specimens indicated no change in failure mode which was transgranular with fatigue striations indicating a ductile failure process. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed a change in the plastic deformation mode which was consisted, at room temperature, of twinning and martensitic transformation, characteristic of a low SFE material, and at high temperature, of a disoriented cellular structure characteristic of a high SFE material. At high temperature, raising stress ratio from 0.1 to 0.5, increased crack propagation rate with no change in the failure mode which was transgranular. At high temperature, decreased frequency from 1200 cpm to 4 cpm increased crack propagation rate. Combined effect of temperature and low frequency led to corrosion, and intergranular failure

  18. An in vitro investigation of the anodic polarization and capacitance behavior of 316-L stainless steel.

    Sutow, E J; Pollack, S R; Korostoff, E

    1976-09-01

    Determinations were made of how the corrosion-resistant properties of the passive film on 316-L stainless steel are influenced by the material's mechanical and surface states, and the variable pH and PO2 conditions of the interstitial fluid. Cold-rolled and annealed specimens were surface-prepared, commercially and in the laboratory, respectively, as if for orthopedic implantation. Passive film behavior was studied by the anodic polarization and pulse-potentiostatic capacitance methods. The pH and PO2 of the Ringer's test solution were varied to include interstitial fluid values occurring postoperatively and onto recovery. The anodic polarization behavior of all specimens was found to be pH- and PO2-independent. Breakdown potentials of annealed specimens were 800-950 mV (SCE), in contrast to previously reported values of approximately 350 mV. This substantial increase is related to the influence of surface preparation and, in particular, to the optimization of electropolishing time which acts to produce a microscopically smooth surface, free of debris and disarrayed material. Capacitance behavior of annealed material for potentials greater than 400 mV was consistent with a model involving the entry of chloride and metal ions (mostly Fe) into the passive film. This entry is related to the onset of pitting. PMID:10307

  19. The influence of electropolishing on the corrosion resistance of 316L stainless steel.

    Sutow, E J

    1980-09-01

    A study was conducted which examined the influence of electropolishing on the corrosion resistance of a cold rolled 316L stainless steel. Test specimens were surface prepared to a final mechanical finish of wetted 600 grit SiC paper, prior to electropolishing. An o-H3PO4/Glycerol/H2O electropolishing solution was employed for times of 15, 20, and 25 min. Control specimens were surface prepared only to the final mechanical finish. Anodic polarization tests were performed in a deaerated Ringer's solution (37 degrees C) which was acidified to pH 1, with HCl. The electropolished specimens demonstrated increased corrosion resistance, when compared to the control specimens. This was evidenced for the former by more anodic corrosion and breakdown potentials, and the absence of a dissolution peak which was observed for the control specimens at the initial polarization potentials. Surface hardness measurements indicated that this increase in corrosion resistance was produced, in part, by the removal of the cold worked surface layer produced by the mechanical finish. In terms of increasing corrosion resistance, no optimum electropolishing time was found within the 15-25 min treatment period. PMID:7349665

  20. Low-temperature plasma nitriding of sintered PIM 316L austenitic stainless steel

    This work reports experimental results on sintered PIM 316L stainless steel low-temperature plasma nitriding. The effect of treatment temperature and time on process kinetics, microstructure and surface characteristics of the nitrided samples were investigated. Nitriding was carried out at temperatures of 350, 380, 410 and 440 °C , and times of 4, 8 and 16 h, using a gas mixture composed by 60% N2 + 20% H2 + 20% Ar, at a gas flow rate of 5.00 X 106 Nm3-1, and a pressure of 800 Pa. The treated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and microhardness measurements. Results indicate that low-temperature plasma nitriding is a diffusion controlled process. The calculated activation energy for nitrided layer growth was 111.4 kJmol-1. Apparently precipitation-free layers were produced in this study. It was also observed that the higher the treatment temperature and time the higher is the obtained surface hardness. Hardness up to 1343 HV0.025 was verified for samples nitrided at 440 °C. Finally, the characterization of the treated surface indicates the formation of cracks, which were observed in regions adjacent to the original pores after the treatment. (author)

  1. Local approach on mixed-mode ductile fracture of an aged stainless steel 316L

    In the frame of the structural integrity of the fast breeder reactor vessel, the local approach of fracture is applied to the ductile crack initiation under mixed-mode I+II loading for a 316L type stainless steel thermally aged for 1000 hours at 700 deg C. Experimental and numerical tests are performed on axisymmetric notched specimens, compact tension specimens and disymmetric four-point bend specimens. From elastoplastic finite element analyses, the damage variables are evaluated with various models: the Beremin model, the McClintock model, the Guennouni-Francois model and the Lemaitre model. The critical values of damage variable obtained on simple tensile specimens and axisymmetric notched specimens are used for the prediction of crack initiation under mixed-mode loading. The damage variable at crack initiation seems to be rather dependent on the fracture mode related to the stress triaxiality and the brittle fracture of banded ferrite of the aged material. The results are compared with those of the J values at crack initiation. (author). 9 ref., 2 figs

  2. Processing conditions and microstructural features of porous 316L stainless steel components by DMLS

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), due to its flexibility in materials and shapes, would be especially interesting to produce complex shaped porous metallic components. In the present work, processing conditions and microstructural characteristics of direct laser sintered porous 316L stainless steel components were studied. It was found that a partial melting mechanism of powders gave a high feasibility in obtaining porous sintered structures possessing porosities of ∼21-∼55%. Linear energy density (LED), which was defined by the ratio of laser power to scan speed, was used to tailor the laser sintering mechanism. A moderate LED of ∼3400-∼6000 J/m and a lower scan speed less than 0.06 m/s proved to be feasible. With the favorable sintering mechanism prevailed, lowering laser power or increasing scan speed, scan line spacing, and powder layer thickness generally led to a higher porosity. Metallurgical mechanisms of pore formation during DMLS were addressed. It showed that the presence of pores was through: (i) the formation of liquid bridges between partially melted particles during laser irradiation; and (ii) the growth of sintering necks during solidification, leaving residual pores between solidified metallic agglomerates.

  3. Laser Surface Alloying of 316L Stainless Steel with Ru and Ni Mixtures

    M. B. Lekala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The surfaces of AISI 316L stainless steel were laser alloyed with ruthenium powder and a mixture of ruthenium and nickel powders using a cw Nd:YAG laser set at fixed operating parameters. The microstructure, elemental composition, and corrosion characteristics of the alloyed zone were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and corrosion potential measurements. The depth of alloyed zone was measured using the AxioVision program and found to be approximately 1.8 mm for all the alloyed specimens. Hardness profile measurements through the surface-substrate interface showed a significant increase from 160 HV for the substrate to a maximum of 247 HV for the alloyed layer. The sample laser alloyed with 80 wt% Ni-20 wt% presented the most noble corrosion potential (Ecorr of −0.18 V and the lowest corrosion current density (icorr.

  4. Galvanic deposition and characterization of brushite/hydroxyapatite coatings on 316L stainless steel.

    Blanda, Giuseppe; Brucato, Valerio; Pavia, Francesco Carfì; Greco, Silvia; Piazza, Salvatore; Sunseri, Carmelo; Inguanta, Rosalinda

    2016-07-01

    In this work, brushite and brushite/hydroxyapatite (BS, CaHPO4·H2O; HA, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) coatings were deposited on 316L stainless steel (316LSS) from a solution containing Ca(NO3)2·4H2O and NH4H2PO4 by a displacement reaction based on a galvanic contact, where zinc acts as sacrificial anode. Driving force for the cementation reaction arises from the difference in the electrochemical standard potentials of two different metallic materials (316LSS and Zn) immersed in an electrolyte, so forming a galvanic contact leading to the deposition of BS/HA on nobler metal. We found that temperature and deposition time affect coating features (morphology, structure, and composition). Deposits were characterized by means of several techniques. The morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, the elemental composition was obtained by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, whilst the structure was identified by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. BS was deposited at all investigated temperatures covering the 316LSS surface. At low and moderate temperature, BS coatings were compact, uniform and with good crystalline degree. On BS layers, HA crystals were obtained at 50°C for all deposition times, while at 25°C, its presence was revealed only after long deposition time. Electrochemical studies show remarkable improvement in corrosion resistance. PMID:27127032

  5. On the fate of tritium in thermally treated stainless steel type 316L

    Penzhorn, R.-D.; Torikai, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Matsuyama, M.; Perevezentsev, A.

    2012-10-01

    Several type 316L stainless steel specimens of 6 mm thickness were charged with tritium at 473 K at Joint European Torus (JET) using five sets of conditions. Isothermal tritium release rates were investigated at Hydrogen Isotope Research Centre (HRC) over extended periods of time at 473, 573, or 673 K constant temperature. The HTO/HT ratio of the liberated tritium was generally high, but decreased with decreasing release temperature. Nearly complete release of tritium required additional prolonged heating at 1073 K. Chemical etching and beta-ray-induced X-ray spectrometry measurements carried out at HRC provided complementary information on the tritium distribution in surface and bulk of thermally treated specimens. Whereas the thickness of the material and initial distribution of tritium in its bulk were found to play an important role for expedient thermal decontamination, the influence of the type of purge gas was only minor. Experimental evidence for tritium grain boundary diffusion is provided. Implications of the results for waste conditioning are discussed.

  6. Study of the Mechanical Properties of a Nanostructured Surface Layer on 316L Stainless Steel

    F. C. Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A nanostructured surface layer (NSSL was generated on a 316L stainless steel plate through surface nanocrystallization (SNC. The grains of the surface layer were refined to nanoscale after SNC treatment. Moreover, the microstructure and mechanical properties of NSSL were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope (TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM, through nanoindentation, and through reverse analysis of finite element method (FEM. TEM results showed that the grains in the NSSL measured 8 nm. In addition, these nanocrystalline grains took the form of random crystallographic orientation and were roughly equiaxed in shape. In situ SEM observations of the tensile process confirmed that the motions of the dislocations were determined from within the material and that the motions were blocked by the NSSL, thus improving overall yielding stress. Meanwhile, the nanohardness and the elastic modulus of the NSSL, as well as those of the matrix, were obtained with nanoindentation technology. The reverse analysis of FEM was conducted with MARC software, and the process of nanoindentation on the NSSL and the matrix was simulated. The plastic mechanical properties of NSSL can be derived from the simulation by comparing the results of the simulation and of actual nanoindentation.

  7. Boron content in type 316 L stainless steel by neutron induced autoradiography

    Boron is effective to the improvement of various properties of alloys, but it is difficult to characterize its behavior during the alloy processing. Neutron induced autoradiography (or called as F.T.E: Fission Track Etching) technique was attempted to quantitatively analyze boron content in type 316 L austenitic stainless steel. Reference samples with nine different boron contents were prepared and analyzed by conventional analysis method as well as by autoradiography technique using 'HANARO', a 30 MW research reactor in K.A.E.R.I. (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Cd ratio of the neutron flux was about 200 and thermal neutron flux was around 2x1013/cm2/sec. A Kodak CN-85TM detector with an alloy sample was irradiated with two different thermal neutron fluences of 1013 and 1014/cm2. Track densities on the autoradiographs were measured using image analyzer. Within the range of 10 to 50 ppm of boron, track densities from autoradiography showed the linear relationship with results from conventional analyses. When complementarily applied with other analysis technique like E.B.S.D. (Electron Backscattered Diffraction) or E.D.S. (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy) neutron induced autoradiography technique was found very useful in distinguishing and identifying phases with the different distribution coefficient of boron. (author)

  8. Stress corrosion cracking and oxidation of austenitic stainless steel 316 L and model alloy in supercritical water reactor

    In this work, an austenitic stainless steel type 316 L was tested in deaerated supercritical water at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and 25 MPa to determine how variations in water conditions influence its stress corrosion cracking behaviour and to make progress in the understanding of mechanisms involved in SCC processes in this environment. Moreover, the influence of plastic deformation in the resistance of the material to SCC was also studied at both temperatures. In addition to this, previous oxidation experiments at 400 deg. C and 500 deg. C and at 25 MPa were taken into account to gain some insight in this kind of processes. Furthermore, a cold worked model alloy based on the stainless steel 316 L with some variations in the chemical composition in order to simulate the composition of the grain boundary after irradiation was tested at 400 deg. C and 25 MPa in deaerated supercritical water. (authors)

  9. Effect of forming technique BixSiyOz coatings obtained by sol- gel and supported on 316L stainless steel

    Bautista Ruiz, J.; Olaya Flórez, J.; Aperador, W.

    2016-02-01

    BixSiyOz type coatings via sol-gel synthesized from bismuth nitrate pentahydrate, and tetraethyl orthosilicate as precursors; glacial acetic acid and 2-ethoxyethanol as solvents, and ethanolamine as complexing. The coatings were supported on AISI 316L stainless steel substrate through dip-coating and spin-coating techniques. The study showed that the spin-coating technique is efficient than dip-coating because it allows more dense and homogeneous films.

  10. Biocompatibility evaluation of surface-treated AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel in human cell cultures.

    Martinesi, M; Bruni, S; Stio, M; Treves, C; Bacci, T; Borgioli, F

    2007-01-01

    The effects of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel, tested in untreated state or subjected to glow-discharge nitriding (at 10 or 20 hPa) and nitriding + post-oxidizing treatments, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were evaluated. All the treated samples showed a better corrosion resistance in PBS and higher surface hardness in comparison with the untreated alloy. In HUVEC put in contact for 72 h with the sample types, proliferation and apoptosis decreased and increased, respectively, in the presence of the nitrided + post-oxidized samples, while only slight differences in cytokine (TNF-alpha, IL-6, and TGF-beta1) release were registered. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) increased in HUVEC incubated with all the treated samples, while vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin increased in the presence of all the sample types. PBMC incubated for 48 h with the samples showed a decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis in the presence of the untreated samples and the nitrided + post-oxidized ones. All the sample types induced a remarkable increase in TNF-alpha and IL-6 release in PBMC culture medium, while only the untreated sample and the nitrided at 10 hPa induced an increase in ICAM-1 expression. In HUVEC cocultured with PBMC, previously put in contact with the treated AISI 316L samples, increased levels of ICAM-1 were detected. In HUVEC coincubated with the culture medium of PBMC, previously put in contact with the samples under study, a noteworthy increase in ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin levels was always registered, with the exception of VCAM-1, which was not affected by the untreated sample. In conclusion, even if the treated samples do not show a marked increase in biocompatibility in comparison with the untreated alloy, their higher corrosion resistance may suggest a better performance as the contact with physiological environment becomes longer. PMID

  11. Nanohardness, corrosion and protein adsorption properties of CuAlO2 films deposited on 316L stainless steel for biomedical applications

    Chang, Shih-Hang; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Hsiao, Sou-Hui; Lin, Guan-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study preliminarily assesses the biomedical applications of CuAlO2 coatings according to nanoindentation, electrochemical, and protein adsorption tests. Nanoindentation results revealed that the surface hardness of 316L stainless steel increased markedly after coating with CuAlO2 films. Electrochemical tests of corrosion potential, breakdown potential, and corrosion current density showed that the corrosion resistance properties of 316L stainless steel are considerably improved by CuAlO2 coatings. Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay results revealed that the protein adsorption behavior of 316L stainless steel did not exhibit notable differences with or without CuAlO2 coatings. A CuAlO2 coating of 100 nm thickness improved the surface nanohardness and corrosion resistance ability of 316L stainless steel. CuAlO2 is a potential candidate for biomaterial coating applications, particularly for surface modification of fine, delicate implants.

  12. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    Wilbraham, Richard J.; Boxall, Colin; Goddard, David T.; Taylor, Robin J.; Woodbury, Simon E.

    2015-09-01

    For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H2O2-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H2O2] ⩽ 100 μmol dm-3 the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H2O2 concentrations between 1 mmol dm-3 and 0.1 mol dm-3, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H2O2] > 0.1 mol dm-3 the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO2 films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms of corrosion processes or otherwise. Through consideration of thermodynamic solubility product and complex formation constant data, we attribute the transition to the formation of soluble uranyl-peroxide complexes under mildly alkaline, high [H2O2] conditions - a conclusion that has implications for the design of both acid minimal, metal ion oxidant-free decontamination strategies with low secondary waste arisings, and single step processes for spent nuclear fuel dissolution such as the Carbonate-based Oxidative Leaching (COL) process.

  13. Hydrophilic property of 316L stainless steel after treatment by atmospheric pressure corona streamer plasma using surface-sensitive analyses

    Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim, E-mail: hamarnehibrahim@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Al-Balqa Applied University, Salt 19117 (Jordan); Pedrow, Patrick [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Eskhan, Asma; Abu-Lail, Nehal [Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface hydrophilic property of surgical-grade 316L stainless steel was enhanced by Ar-O{sub 2} corona streamer plasma treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrophilicity, surface morphology, roughness, and chemical composition before and after plasma treatment were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contact angle measurements and surface-sensitive analyses techniques, including XPS and AFM, were carried out. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum plasma treatment conditions of the SS 316L surface were determined. - Abstract: Surgical-grade 316L stainless steel (SS 316L) had its surface hydrophilic property enhanced by processing in a corona streamer plasma reactor using O{sub 2} gas mixed with Ar at atmospheric pressure. Reactor excitation was 60 Hz ac high-voltage (0-10 kV{sub RMS}) applied to a multi-needle-to-grounded screen electrode configuration. The treated surface was characterized with a contact angle tester. Surface free energy (SFE) for the treated stainless steel increased measurably compared to the untreated surface. The Ar-O{sub 2} plasma was more effective in enhancing the SFE than Ar-only plasma. Optimum conditions for the plasma treatment system used in this study were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization of the chemical composition of the treated surfaces confirms the existence of new oxygen-containing functional groups contributing to the change in the hydrophilic nature of the surface. These new functional groups were generated by surface reactions caused by reactive oxidation of substrate species. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images were generated to investigate morphological and roughness changes on the plasma treated surfaces. The aging effect in air after treatment was also studied.

  14. Investigation of oxide film formation on 316L stainless steel in high-temperature aqueous environments

    Highlights: → Oxide films formed in high temperature and high pressure aqueous environment (250 deg. C and 7 MPa) is much thicker than air-formed films (25 deg. C). → Oxide films formed at 250 deg. C have higher charge transfer resistance and smaller passive current density than air-formed films. → Fe exists in the form of FeO, Fe2O3 and FeOOH, Cr of Cr2O3, Cr(OH)3 and CrO3 and Ni of Ni(OH)2 in oxide films formed at 250 deg. C. - Abstract: Oxide films were grown on the surface of 316L stainless steel subjected to high temperatures and a high-pressure aqueous environment (250 deg. C and 7 MPa). The morphology, chemical compositions and corrosion properties of oxide films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The results indicated that oxide films formed at 250 deg. C were more corrosion resistant and thicker than were oxide films formed in air at room temperature (25 deg. C). These distinctions are correlated with the structure and chemical compositions of oxide films. It was found that both films contained a double-layer structure comprised of mixed iron-nickel oxides and chromium oxides. Iron was present as FeO, Fe2O3 and FeOOH; Cr was present as Cr2O3, Cr(OH)3 and CrO3; and Ni existed as Ni(OH)2 within the oxide films formed at 250 deg. C.

  15. Prediction of microcracking in laser overly welds of alloy 690 to type 316L stainless steel

    The occurrence of ductility-dip crack in the laser overlay welds of alloy 690 to type 316L stainless steel was predicted by the mechanical and metallurgical approaches. Ductility-dip temperature ranges (DTRs) of alloy 690 laser overlay welds were estimated by Varestraint test during GTA welding. The grain boundary segregation of impurity elements such as P and S was numerically analyzed based on the non-equilibrium cosegregation theory when the welding speed and the amounts of P and S in the weld metal were varied. In accordance with the repression approximation between the DTR and the calculated grain boundary concentrations of P and S, the DTRs of alloy 690 were computed in laser overlay welding. The estimated DTR in laser overlay welds was reduced with an increase in welding speed and with a decrease in the amounts of P and S in the weld metal. Ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds was predicted by the plastic strain-temperature curve intersected the DTR. The plastic strain in laser overlay welding was numerically analyzed using the thermo elasto-plastic finite element method. The plastic strain-temperature curve in laser overlay welds intersected the DTR at decreased welding speed and increased (P+S) content in the weld metal. The predicted results of ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds were approximately consistent with experiment results. It follows that ductility-dip cracking in laser overlay welds could be successfully predicted based on the estimated DTR from grain boundary segregation analysis combined with the computed plastic strain by FEM analysis. (author)

  16. Fracture under mixed-mode I+II of the austenitic stainless steel 316L

    The stability of cracks under mixed-mode l+ll in an aged stainless steel type 316L is investigated using four-points bent specimens. The formulas of the bending moment, the shearing force, the mode mixity, the limit load and the J estimations are established and compared with the numerical results from elastoplastic finite element calculations. From the experimental and numerical tests results, the application and the validation of the R6 method and various local criteria (Beremin, McClintock, Guennouni-Francois and Lemaitre models) are carried out. For the R6 method, it is noted that the FAD (Failure Assessment Diagram) is nearly independent of the loading mode and the specimen geometry. The FAD of the option 1 is conservative for all the test results, but the option 3 seems to be non-conservative, especially in the cases near to the mode I. This apparent non-conservatism is probably due to the different definition of the crack initiation of the CT specimens and the 4-point bend specimens. According to the applied local criteria, the values of the damage variables at crack initiation are sufficiently stable, particularly for the Beremin model and the Guennouni-Francois model but not in the cases nearer to the mode I. The use of these local criteria is questionable in the case of axisymmetric notched specimens because of the influence of the fracture of transformed ferrite. A fractographic investigation is also discussed for different fracture modes. (author). 85 refs., 99 figs., 14 tabs

  17. Corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel and anti-corrosion materials in a high acidified chloride solution

    Jin, Z.H. [Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Energy-Saving in Heat Exchange Systems, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Colleges and Universities for Corrosion Control in Electric Power System and Applied Electrochemistry, 2103 Pingliang Road, Shanghai 200090 (China); Ge, H.H., E-mail: gehonghua@shiep.edu.cn [Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Energy-Saving in Heat Exchange Systems, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Colleges and Universities for Corrosion Control in Electric Power System and Applied Electrochemistry, 2103 Pingliang Road, Shanghai 200090 (China); Lin, W.W. [Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Energy-Saving in Heat Exchange Systems, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Colleges and Universities for Corrosion Control in Electric Power System and Applied Electrochemistry, 2103 Pingliang Road, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zong, Y.W.; Liu, S.J. [Power Plant of Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd, Tieli Road, Shanghai 200941 (China); Shi, J.M. [Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Severe general corrosion accompanied by localized pitting occurred on 316L SS surface in a high acidified chloride solution. • Surface roughness, surface potential difference and the electrochemical non-homogeneity of 316L SS in the test solution were investigated. • TA2, type 2507 SS and type 254SMo SS exhibit good corrosion resistance in the test solution. - Abstract: The corrosion behaviour of a type 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel (SS) expansion joint in a simulated leaching solution of sediment on blast furnace gas pipeline in a power plant is investigated by using dynamic potential polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM) and Scan Kelvin Probe (SKP). Severe general corrosion accompanied by pitting corrosion occurs on the type 316L SS surface in this solution. As the immersion period increases, the charge transfer resistance R{sub ct} decreases, the dissolution rate accelerates, the surface roughness increases and the surface potential difference enhances significantly. Then eight corrosion-resistant materials are tested, the corrosion rates of type 254SMo SS, type 2507 SS and TA2 are relatively minor in the solution. The corrosion resistance properties of TA2 is most excellent, indicating it would be the superior material choice for blast furnace gas pipeline.

  18. Corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel and anti-corrosion materials in a high acidified chloride solution

    Highlights: • Severe general corrosion accompanied by localized pitting occurred on 316L SS surface in a high acidified chloride solution. • Surface roughness, surface potential difference and the electrochemical non-homogeneity of 316L SS in the test solution were investigated. • TA2, type 2507 SS and type 254SMo SS exhibit good corrosion resistance in the test solution. - Abstract: The corrosion behaviour of a type 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel (SS) expansion joint in a simulated leaching solution of sediment on blast furnace gas pipeline in a power plant is investigated by using dynamic potential polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM) and Scan Kelvin Probe (SKP). Severe general corrosion accompanied by pitting corrosion occurs on the type 316L SS surface in this solution. As the immersion period increases, the charge transfer resistance Rct decreases, the dissolution rate accelerates, the surface roughness increases and the surface potential difference enhances significantly. Then eight corrosion-resistant materials are tested, the corrosion rates of type 254SMo SS, type 2507 SS and TA2 are relatively minor in the solution. The corrosion resistance properties of TA2 is most excellent, indicating it would be the superior material choice for blast furnace gas pipeline

  19. Resistance spot welding joints of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets: Phase transformations, mechanical properties and microstructure characterizations

    Highlights: • Resistance spot welding of AISI 316L stainless steel sheets. • Microstructure prediction by the use of Schaeffler and Pseudo-binary diagrams. • Non-equilibrium phases including skeletal, acicular and lathy delta ferrite formed. • Mechanical characterization of weld nuggets including peak load and failure energy. • Different failure modes were found at various welding currents. - Abstract: In this paper, we aim to optimize welding parameters namely welding current and time in resistance spot welding (RSW) of the austenitic stainless steel sheets grade AISI 316L. Afterward, effect of optimum welding parameters on the resistance spot welding properties and microstructure of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets has been investigated. Effect of welding current at constant welding time was considered on the weld properties such as weld nugget size, tensile–shear load bearing capacity of welded materials, failure modes, failure energy, ductility, and microstructure of weld nuggets as well. Phase transformations that took place during weld thermal cycle were analyzed in more details including metallographic studies of welding of the austenitic stainless steels. Metallographic images, mechanical properties, electron microscopy photographs and micro-hardness measurements showed that the region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. Backscattered electron scanning microscopic images (BE-SEM) showed various types of delta ferrite in weld nuggets. Three delta ferrite morphologies consist of skeletal, acicular and lathy delta ferrite morphologies formed in resistance spot welded regions as a result of non-equilibrium phases which can be attributed to the fast cooling rate in RSW process and consequently, prediction and explanation of the obtained morphologies based on Schaeffler, WRC-1992 and Pseudo-binary phase diagrams would be a difficult task

  20. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    Highlights: • The first report of the presence of both UO2 and polymeric UO22+ in the same electrodeposited U oxide sample. • The action of H2O2 on electrodeposited U oxides is described using corrosion based concepts. • Electrodeposited U oxide freely dissolves at hydrogen peroxide concentrations <100 μmol dm−3. • At [H2O2] > 0.1 mmol dm−3 dissolution is inhibited by formation of a studtite passivation layer. • At [H2O2] ⩾ 1 mol dm−3 studtite formation competes with uranyl–peroxide complex formation. - Abstract: For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H2O2-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H2O2] ⩽ 100 μmol dm−3 the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H2O2 concentrations between 1 mmol dm−3 and 0.1 mol dm−3, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H2O2] > 0.1 mol dm−3 the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO2 films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms of corrosion processes or otherwise. Through consideration of thermodynamic solubility product and complex formation constant data, we attribute the

  1. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  2. Analysis of a premature failure of welded AISI316L stainless steel pipes originated by microbial induced corrosion

    Otero, E.; Bastidas, J.M.; Lopez, V. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-07-01

    This paper analyses the causes of the premature failure of welded AISI 316L stainless steel (ss) pipes which formed part of a sea water cooling circuit. The service time of the pipes was 8 months. The laboratory tests carried out consisted of metallography tests, {delta}-ferrite determination, intergranular corrosion susceptibility, cyclic anodic polarization curves, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS). The study presents typical forms of microbial induced corrosion (MIC) in AISI 308L and 316L ss in contact with natural sea water. The research is completed with the performance of bacteriological tests which demonstrate that the bacteria which cause the localized corrosion are of the sulphate-reducing genus ``desulfovibrio`` and the sulphide-oxidizing genus ``thiocapsa``. (orig.) 17 refs.

  3. Effects of grain size and specimen size on small punch test of type 316L austenitic stainless steel

    Miniature specimen test technique has been extensively studied for quantifying the properties of bulk materials. In this paper small punch test (SPT) is used to clarify the effects of specimen thickness (t), grain size (d) and ratio of thickness to grain size (t/d) on mechanical properties of 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS). Five sheet of 316L SS with the same texture but different thicknesses and grain sizes were prepared using rolling and heating treatment technique. Effective SPT yield strength was measured, and then used to correlate with conventional tensile test by empirical equation. The results show that the SPT is sensitive not only to differences in the thickness, but also to changes in the grain size and value of t/d. The present work provides information that enhance the understanding of reliability of SPT in analysis of the mechanical properties of small specimens and bulk materials. (author)

  4. Corrosion behaviour of 316L stainless steel and anti-corrosion materials in a high acidified chloride solution

    Jin, Z. H.; Ge, H. H.; Lin, W. W.; Zong, Y. W.; Liu, S. J.; Shi, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of a type 316L (UNS S31603) stainless steel (SS) expansion joint in a simulated leaching solution of sediment on blast furnace gas pipeline in a power plant is investigated by using dynamic potential polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM) and Scan Kelvin Probe (SKP). Severe general corrosion accompanied by pitting corrosion occurs on the type 316L SS surface in this solution. As the immersion period increases, the charge transfer resistance Rct decreases, the dissolution rate accelerates, the surface roughness increases and the surface potential difference enhances significantly. Then eight corrosion-resistant materials are tested, the corrosion rates of type 254SMo SS, type 2507 SS and TA2 are relatively minor in the solution. The corrosion resistance properties of TA2 is most excellent, indicating it would be the superior material choice for blast furnace gas pipeline.

  5. Surface analysis of localized corrosion of austenitic 316L and duplex 2205 stainless steels in simulated body solutions

    Conradi, Marjetka, E-mail: marjetka.conradi@imt.si [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schoen, Peter M. [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers and MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Kocijan, Aleksandra; Jenko, M. [Institute of Metals and Technology, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Vancso, G. Julius [Materials Science and Technology of Polymers and MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} In situ steel surface morphology observations in simulated body solutions. {yields} Pitting, square-like and elliptic-like corrosion products. {yields} Corrosion products' shapes related to the growth of Cr and Fe oxides. {yields} Direct relation of the size of the deposition products to surface roughness. - Abstract: We report on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) studies of localized corrosion of duplex 2205 stainless steel (DSS 2205) and austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316L in two model solutions, including artificial saliva (AS) and a simulated physiological solution known as - Hank's solution (PS). The AFM topography analysis illustrated the higher corrosion resistance of DSS 2205 steel for the chosen range of electrochemical potentials that were applied to the steel surface in both solutions. In contrast, pitting corrosion was observed at the surface of AISI 316L steel, with the pits becoming more evident, larger and deeper, when the sample was electrochemically treated in the PS. On both surfaces the growth of corrosion products formed during the oxidation process was observed. As a result, depending on the sample's metallurgical structure, different types of oxides covered the surface close to the breakdown potential. We distinguished between the square-like type of oxides on the surface of the DSS 2205, and the AISI 316L with its ellipse-like oxide deposits. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed the chemical composition of the deposition products, which consisted of two main elements, Fe and Cr. However, the oxides of the alloying elements Ni and Mo were negligible compared to the bulk.

  6. Surface analysis of localized corrosion of austenitic 316L and duplex 2205 stainless steels in simulated body solutions

    Highlights: → In situ steel surface morphology observations in simulated body solutions. → Pitting, square-like and elliptic-like corrosion products. → Corrosion products' shapes related to the growth of Cr and Fe oxides. → Direct relation of the size of the deposition products to surface roughness. - Abstract: We report on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) studies of localized corrosion of duplex 2205 stainless steel (DSS 2205) and austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316L in two model solutions, including artificial saliva (AS) and a simulated physiological solution known as - Hank's solution (PS). The AFM topography analysis illustrated the higher corrosion resistance of DSS 2205 steel for the chosen range of electrochemical potentials that were applied to the steel surface in both solutions. In contrast, pitting corrosion was observed at the surface of AISI 316L steel, with the pits becoming more evident, larger and deeper, when the sample was electrochemically treated in the PS. On both surfaces the growth of corrosion products formed during the oxidation process was observed. As a result, depending on the sample's metallurgical structure, different types of oxides covered the surface close to the breakdown potential. We distinguished between the square-like type of oxides on the surface of the DSS 2205, and the AISI 316L with its ellipse-like oxide deposits. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed the chemical composition of the deposition products, which consisted of two main elements, Fe and Cr. However, the oxides of the alloying elements Ni and Mo were negligible compared to the bulk.

  7. Tearing-fatigue interactions in 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel

    Sherry, A.H. [University of Manchester, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United States)]. E-mail: andrew.sherry@manchester.ac.uk; Wardle, G. [Warhelle Consulting Ltd, 79 Garton Drive, Lowton, Cheshire WA3 2TR (United States); Jacques, S. [Serco Assurance, Birchwood Park, Risley, Warrington WA3 6AT (United States); Hayes, J.P. [Serco Assurance, Birchwood Park, Risley, Warrington WA3 6AT (United States)

    2005-11-01

    This paper presents the results from a programme of tearing, fatigue and tearing-fatigue tests performed on specimens from a 316L(N) stainless steel plate. All tests were carried out at ambient temperature. The experimental results have been compared with assessments performed using current guidance within the R6 defect assessment method. The work has shown that there is some evidence that fatigue cycling modifies the JR-curve behaviour of this material. In most cases, the data lie approximately 20-30% above the base-line JR-curve. However, whilst there may be a modest influence of fatigue crack growth on the ductile tearing characteristics, it is difficult to separate this from experimental scatter. In tearing-fatigue tests performed at a stress ratio, R=0.2, ductile tearing reduces the fatigue crack growth rates by up to 50%. This is likely to result from the presence of a residual compressive zone at the crack-tip, and increased crack closure due to the irregular and non-matching fracture surfaces generated by the ductile crack growth mechanisms. For R=0.1 tearing-fatigue tests, fatigue crack growth rates are apparently enhanced by a factor up to of 10, particularly during the latter stages of the tests when {delta}K>60 MPam. This is likely to result from: (i) loading being in the elastic-plastic regime where the J-integral (rather than K) characterises the crack-tip fields (ii) increments of ductile tearing which may occur during each fatigue cycle, and (iii) crack blunting which reduces crack closure effects. For the R=0.2 tearing-fatigue tests, the linear summation approach described in R6 provides a consistently conservative prediction of ductile, fatigue and total crack growth during the tests. However, for the R=0.1 tearing-fatigue tests, the Paris law under-predicts fatigue crack growth rates. This may be corrected by using the Kaiser equation, which acknowledges loading in the elastic-plastic regime and incorporates incremental growth due to tearing as

  8. Tearing-fatigue interactions in 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel

    This paper presents the results from a programme of tearing, fatigue and tearing-fatigue tests performed on specimens from a 316L(N) stainless steel plate. All tests were carried out at ambient temperature. The experimental results have been compared with assessments performed using current guidance within the R6 defect assessment method. The work has shown that there is some evidence that fatigue cycling modifies the JR-curve behaviour of this material. In most cases, the data lie approximately 20-30% above the base-line JR-curve. However, whilst there may be a modest influence of fatigue crack growth on the ductile tearing characteristics, it is difficult to separate this from experimental scatter. In tearing-fatigue tests performed at a stress ratio, R=0.2, ductile tearing reduces the fatigue crack growth rates by up to 50%. This is likely to result from the presence of a residual compressive zone at the crack-tip, and increased crack closure due to the irregular and non-matching fracture surfaces generated by the ductile crack growth mechanisms. For R=0.1 tearing-fatigue tests, fatigue crack growth rates are apparently enhanced by a factor up to of 10, particularly during the latter stages of the tests when ΔK>60 MPam. This is likely to result from: (i) loading being in the elastic-plastic regime where the J-integral (rather than K) characterises the crack-tip fields (ii) increments of ductile tearing which may occur during each fatigue cycle, and (iii) crack blunting which reduces crack closure effects. For the R=0.2 tearing-fatigue tests, the linear summation approach described in R6 provides a consistently conservative prediction of ductile, fatigue and total crack growth during the tests. However, for the R=0.1 tearing-fatigue tests, the Paris law under-predicts fatigue crack growth rates. This may be corrected by using the Kaiser equation, which acknowledges loading in the elastic-plastic regime and incorporates incremental growth due to tearing as well

  9. Comparative electrochemical study of 08H18N10T, AISI 304 and AISI 316L stainless steels

    The aim of this work was to determine the main characteristics of the passivation and surface oxidation of 08H18N10T, AISI304 and AISI316L stainless steels, which serve as structural materials of VVER and PWR nuclear reactors. With the help of electrochemical experiments these materials were ranked according to their resistance against uniform corrosion. The measurements were done as a function of temperature in the range between room temperature and 80 deg. C. A sample of 08H18N10T steel was irradiated in the Budapest research reactor. With cyclic voltammetry we found that AISI 304 exhibits a very large passivation peak as a classical example for passivation. The peak is much smaller for AISI 316L and it is very small for 08H18N10T. This implies that the native oxide layer on AISI 316L and 08H18N10T is more protective than on AISI 304. The 08H18N10T steel has the best protective passive oxide layer which forms already in air and it is very difficult to remove it even at negative potentials. By comparing impedance spectra of the various stainless steels results lead to the same conclusions we obtained from cyclic voltammetry. Our experimental results of the irradiated steel are in accord with the fact that neutron irradiation increases the number of defect sites within the oxide layer. We found that irradiation has no considerable effect on the active-to-passive transition process. The small variations in the alloy composition do not alter the transition process significantly, as well

  10. Comparative electrochemical study of 08H18N10T, AISI 304 and AISI 316L stainless steels

    Kerner, Zsolt; Horvath, Akos [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Nagy, Gabor [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary)], E-mail: nagyg@sunserv.kfki.hu

    2007-10-10

    The aim of this work was to determine the main characteristics of the passivation and surface oxidation of 08H18N10T, AISI304 and AISI316L stainless steels, which serve as structural materials of VVER and PWR nuclear reactors. With the help of electrochemical experiments these materials were ranked according to their resistance against uniform corrosion. The measurements were done as a function of temperature in the range between room temperature and 80 deg. C. A sample of 08H18N10T steel was irradiated in the Budapest research reactor. With cyclic voltammetry we found that AISI 304 exhibits a very large passivation peak as a classical example for passivation. The peak is much smaller for AISI 316L and it is very small for 08H18N10T. This implies that the native oxide layer on AISI 316L and 08H18N10T is more protective than on AISI 304. The 08H18N10T steel has the best protective passive oxide layer which forms already in air and it is very difficult to remove it even at negative potentials. By comparing impedance spectra of the various stainless steels results lead to the same conclusions we obtained from cyclic voltammetry. Our experimental results of the irradiated steel are in accord with the fact that neutron irradiation increases the number of defect sites within the oxide layer. We found that irradiation has no considerable effect on the active-to-passive transition process. The small variations in the alloy composition do not alter the transition process significantly, as well.

  11. Cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel laser surface-modified with NiTi

    Chiu, K.Y. [Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Cheng, F.T. [Department of Applied Physics, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: apaftche@polyu.edu.hk; Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2005-02-15

    The present study is part of a project on the surface modification of AISI 316 stainless steel using various forms of NiTi for enhancing cavitation erosion resistance. In this study, NiTi powder was preplaced on the AISI 316L substrate and melted with a high-power CW Nd:YAG laser. With appropriate laser processing parameters, an alloyed layer of a few hundred micrometers thick was formed and fusion bonded to the substrate without the formation of a brittle interface. EDS analysis showed that the layer contained Fe as the major constituent element while the XRD patterns of the surface showed an austenitic structure, similar to that of 316 stainless steel. The cavitation erosion resistance of the modified layer (316-NiTi-Laser) could reach about 29 times that of AISI 316L stainless steel. The improvement could be attributed to a much higher surface hardness and elasticity as revealed by instrumented nanoindentation tests. Among various types of samples, the cavitation erosion resistance was ranked in descending order as: NiTi plate > 316-NiTi-Laser > 316-NiTi-TIG > AISI 316L, where 316-NiTi-TIG stands for samples surfaced with the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using NiTi wire. Though the laser-surfaced samples and the TIG-surfaced samples had similar indentation properties, the former exhibited a higher erosion resistance mainly because of a more homogeneous alloyed layer with much less defects. In both the laser-surfaced and TIG-surfaced samples, the superelastic behavior typical of austenitic NiTi was only partially retained and the superior cavitation erosion resistance was thus still not fully attained.

  12. Cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel laser surface-modified with NiTi

    The present study is part of a project on the surface modification of AISI 316 stainless steel using various forms of NiTi for enhancing cavitation erosion resistance. In this study, NiTi powder was preplaced on the AISI 316L substrate and melted with a high-power CW Nd:YAG laser. With appropriate laser processing parameters, an alloyed layer of a few hundred micrometers thick was formed and fusion bonded to the substrate without the formation of a brittle interface. EDS analysis showed that the layer contained Fe as the major constituent element while the XRD patterns of the surface showed an austenitic structure, similar to that of 316 stainless steel. The cavitation erosion resistance of the modified layer (316-NiTi-Laser) could reach about 29 times that of AISI 316L stainless steel. The improvement could be attributed to a much higher surface hardness and elasticity as revealed by instrumented nanoindentation tests. Among various types of samples, the cavitation erosion resistance was ranked in descending order as: NiTi plate > 316-NiTi-Laser > 316-NiTi-TIG > AISI 316L, where 316-NiTi-TIG stands for samples surfaced with the tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using NiTi wire. Though the laser-surfaced samples and the TIG-surfaced samples had similar indentation properties, the former exhibited a higher erosion resistance mainly because of a more homogeneous alloyed layer with much less defects. In both the laser-surfaced and TIG-surfaced samples, the superelastic behavior typical of austenitic NiTi was only partially retained and the superior cavitation erosion resistance was thus still not fully attained

  13. Mechanical and physical behavior of newly developed functionally graded materials and composites of stainless steel 316L with calcium silicate and hydroxyapatite.

    Ataollahi Oshkour, Azim; Pramanik, Sumit; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yau, Yat Huang; Tarlochan, Faris; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the structural, physical and mechanical behavior of composites and functionally graded materials (FGMs) made of stainless steel (SS-316L)/hydroxyapatite (HA) and SS-316L/calcium silicate (CS) employing powder metallurgical solid state sintering. The structural analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the sintering at high temperature led to the reaction between compounds of the SS-316L and HA, while SS-316L and CS remained intact during the sintering process in composites of SS-316L/CS. A dimensional expansion was found in the composites made of 40 and 50 wt% HA. The minimum shrinkage was emerged in 50 wt% CS composite, while the maximum shrinkage was revealed in samples with pure SS-316L, HA and CS. Compressive mechanical properties of SS-316L/HA decreased sharply with increasing of HA content up to 20 wt% and gradually with CS content up to 50 wt% for SS-316L/CS composites. The mechanical properties of the FGM of SS-316L/HA dropped with increase in temperature, while it was improved for the FGM of SS-316L/CS with temperature enhancement. It has been found that the FGMs emerged a better compressive mechanical properties compared to both the composite systems. Therefore, the SS-316L/CS composites and their FGMs have superior compressive mechanical properties to the SS-316L/HA composites and their FGMs and also the newly developed FGMs of SS-316L/CS with improved mechanical and enhanced gradation in physical and structural properties can potentially be utilized in the components with load-bearing application. PMID:26072197

  14. Characteristics of sulfide corrosion products on 316L stainless steel surfaces in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    It has been found that microbial communities play a significant role in the corrosion process of steels exposed in aquatic and soil environments. Biomineralization influenced by microorganisms is believed to be responsible for the formation of corrosion products via complicated pathways of electron transfer between microbial cells and the metal. In this study, sulfide corrosion products were investigated for 316L stainless steel exposed to media with sulfate-reducing bacteria media for 7 weeks. The species of inorganic and organic sulfides in the passive film on the stainless steel were observed by epifluorescence microscope, environmental scanning electron microscope combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The transformation from metal oxides to metal sulfides influenced by sulfate-reducing bacteria is emphasized in this paper

  15. Probing the deterioration of 316L stainless steel welds due to ageing and creep by indentation creep tests

    Authors have probed into the creep behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel welds through the indentation creep test methodology and assessed the deterioration effects of these welds under different ageing conditions subjecting them to different test conditions. Comparison is made between the parent metal and the weld metal for integrity at different levels of ageing and test loads. It is concluded that although the aged weld's deteriorated status is not revealed at low temperature and low load test conditions, it is explicitly revealed when tested at higher temperature and higher loads. Microstructural evidences have been given by the authors and they have suggested mechanisms of creep at different test conditions.

  16. Improving the oxidation resistance of 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water by electropolishing treatment

    Han, Guangdong; Lu, Zhanpeng; Ru, Xiangkun; Chen, Junjie; Xiao, Qian; Tian, Yongwu

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of 316L stainless steel specimens after emery paper grounding, mechanical polishing, and electropolishing were investigated in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water at 310 °C for 120 and 500 h. Electropolishing afforded improved oxidation resistance especially during the early immersion stages. Duplex oxide films comprising a coarse Fe-rich outer layer and a fine Cr-rich inner layer formed on all specimens after 500 h of immersion. Only a compact layer was observed on the electropolished specimen after 120 h of immersion. The enrichment of chromium in the electropolished layer contributed to the passivity and protectiveness of the specimen.

  17. The Effect of pH and Temperature on Corrosion Rate Stainless Steel 316L Used as Biomaterial

    Zainab R. Muslim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The weight loss of stainless steel 316L on corrosion rate was studied using two different temperatures (25 and 37oC and different pH (1,3, 6.3 and 7.4. It was shown that the weight loss was decreased with the increasing in pH ,this effect on the corrosion rate which decrease with increasing in pH . Temperature effect on weight loss, an increasing in weight loss was observed with the increasing in temperature.

  18. STATISTICAL MODELING OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REACTIVATION CONDITIONS FOR DETECTING SENSITIZATION TO IGC OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL TYPE 316L

    Kriaa, A.; Hamdi, N.; K. Jbali; H. Sidhom

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine optimum conditions of the DL EPR test in order to evaluate the highest values of the degree of sensitization (DOS) of a forged austenitic stainless steel type 316L, evaluated by the ratio Ir/Ia or Qr/Qa in %. The criteria of sensitization to the IGC corresponds to Ir/Ia >1% and Qr/Qa >1%. A model using a full factorial design has been established and the selected factors were the sweep rate (dE/dt), sulphuric acid concentration (H2SO4), ammonium th...

  19. Application of dynamical ion mixing techniques to the improvement of the fatigue resistance of a 316L stainless steel

    In the last years new techniques involving ion implantation combined with a simultaneous deposition method in a sputtering evaporator have been developed at the University of Poitiers. These techniques have been employed to elaborate NiTi amorphous coatings in order to improve the fatigue resistance of a 316 L austenitic stainless steel at room temperature and 573 K. It has been shown that a significant improvement of the fatigue life is obtained by this way at 293 K and at 573 K due to a considerable modification of surface damage leading to an important delay for crack initiation. (orig.)

  20. Corrosion of stainless steel 316L in simulated formation water environment with CO2-H2S-Cl-

    A synergistic effect of high concentration of chloride and H2S on oxide formation and metal dissolution has been studied on 316L stainless steel by electrochemical measurements, inductive coupled plasma (ICP) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Chloride concentration had a significant effect on semiconductor properties of the oxide film, while the gases had little effect. A relatively high concentration of sulphur was found inside the oxide formed in a high chloride concentration electrolyte with high H2S compared to the oxide formed in low concentrations, which indicates that sulphur entered the oxide film through local weakening of the oxide by the chloride.

  1. Creep deformation and fracture behavior of types 316 and 316L(N) stainless steels and their weld metals

    Sasikala, G.; Mannan, S. L.; Mathew, M. D.; Rao, K. Bhanu

    2000-04-01

    The creep properties of a nuclear-grade type 316(L) stainless steel (SS) alloyed with nitrogen (316L(N) SS) and its weld metal were studied at 873 and 923 K in the range of applied stresses from 100 to 335 MPa. The results were compared with those obtained on a nuclear-grade type 316 SS, which is lean in nitrogen. The creep rupture lives of the weld metals were found to be lower than those of the respective base metals by a factor of 5 to 10. Both the base and weld metals of 316L(N) SS exhibited better resistance to creep deformation compared to their 316 SS counterparts at identical test conditions. A power-law relationship between the minimum creep rate and applied stress was found to be obeyed for both the base and weld metals. Both the weld metals generally exhibited lower rupture elongation than the respective base metals; however, at 873 K, the 316 SS base and weld metals had similar rupture elongation at identical applied stresses. Comparison of the rupture lives of the two steels to the ASME curves for the expected minimum stress to rupture for 316 SS base and weld metals showed that, for 316L(N) SS, the specifications for maximum allowable stresses based on data for 316 SS could prove overconservative. The influence of nitrogen on the creep deformation and fracture behavior, especially in terms of its modifying the precipitation kinetics, is discussed in light of the microstructural observations. In welds containing δ ferrite, the kinetics of its transformation and the nature of the transformation products control the deformation and fracture behavior. The influence of nitrogen on the δ ferrite transformation behavior and coarsening kinetics is also discussed, on the basis of extensive characterization by metallographic techniques.

  2. Repassivation behavior of 316L stainless steel in borate buffer solution: Kinetics analysis of anodic dissolution and film formation

    Xu, Haisong; Sun, Dongbai; Yu, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The repassivation behavior of metals or alloys after oxide film damage determines the development of local corrosion and corrosion resistance. In this work, the repassivation kinetics of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) are investigated in borate buffer solution (pH 9.1) by using the abrading electrode technique. The current densities flowing from bare 316L SS surface are measured by potentiostatic method and analyzed to characterize repassivation kinetics. The initial stages of current decay (t Avrami kinetics. Then the two independent components are analyzed individually. The film formation rate and the thickness of film are compared in different applied potential. It is shown that anodic dissolution dominates the repassivation for a short time during the early times, and a higher applied potential will promote the anodic dissolution of metal. The film growth rate increases slightly with increasing in potential. Correspondingly, increase in applied potential from 0 VSCE to 0.8 VSCE results in thicker monolayer, which covers the whole bare surface at the time of θ = 1. The electric field strengths through the thin passive film could reach 3.97 × 106 V cm-1.

  3. The high temperature three point bend testing of proton irradiated 316L stainless steel and Mod 9Cr 1Mo

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Zubelewicz, A.; Romero, T.; James, M. R.; Sommer, W. F.; Dai, Y.

    2005-08-01

    The predicted operating conditions for a lead-bismuth eutectic target to be used in an accelerator driven system for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative span a temperature range of 300-600 °C while being irradiated by a high energy (˜600 MeV) proton beam. Such spallation conditions lead to high displacement rates coupled with high accumulation rates of helium and hydrogen up to 150 appm/dpa. Some candidate materials for these applications include Mod9Cr-1Mo and 316L stainless steel. To investigate the effect of irradiation on these materials, the mechanical properties are being measured through three point bend testing on Mod 9Cr-1Mo and 316L at 25, 250, 350 and 500 °C after irradiation in a high energy proton beam (500-800 MeV) to a dose of 9.8 dpa at temperatures from 200 to 320 °C. By comparing measurements made in bending to tensile measurements measured on identically irradiated materials, a measurement of 0.2% offset yield stress was obtained from 0.05% offset yield stress measured in three point bend testing. Yield stress increased by more than a factor of two after irradiation to 9.8 dpa. Observation of the outer fiber surface of 316L showed very localized deformation when tested after irradiation at 70 °C and deformation on multiple slip systems when tested after irradiation at 250-320 °C.

  4. Comparative study of mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel between traditional production methods and selective laser melting

    Lackey, Alton Dale

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is a technology which has recently seen expanding use, as well as expansion of the materials and methods able to be used. This thesis looks at the comparison of mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel manufactured by both traditional methods and selective laser melting found by tensile testing. The traditional method used here involved cold rolled 316L steel being machined to the desired part geometry. Selective laser melting used additive manufacturing to produce the parts from powdered 316L stainless steel, doing so in two different build orientations, flat and on edge with regards to the build plate. Solid test specimens, as well as specimens containing a circular stress concentration in the center of the parts, were manufactured and tensile tested. The tensile tests of the specimens were used to find the mechanical properties of the material; including yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and Young's modulus of elasticity; where statistical analyses were performed to determine if the different manufacturing processes caused significant differences in the mechanical properties of the material. These analysis consisting of f-tests, to test for variance, and t-test, testing for significant difference of means. Through this study it was found that there were statistically significant differences existing between the mechanical properties of selective laser melting, and its orientations, and cold roll forming of production of parts. Even with a statistical difference, it was found that the results were reasonably close between flat oriented SLM parts and purchased parts. So it can be concluded that, with regards to strength, SLM methods produce parts similar to traditional production methods.

  5. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  6. Evaluation of weld defects in stainless steel 316L pipe using guided wave

    Lee, Joon Hyun [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Stainless steel is a popular structural materials for liquid-hydrogen storage containers and piping components for transporting high-temperature fluids because of its superior material properties such as high strength and high corrosion resistance at elevated temperatures. In general, tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding is used for bonding stainless steel. However, it is often reported that the thermal fatigue cracks or initial defects in stainless steel after welding decreases the reliability of the material. The objective of this paper is to clarify the characteristics of ultrasonic guided wave propagation in relation to a change in the initial crack length in the welding zone of stainless steel. For this purpose, three specimens with different artificial defects of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm in stainless steel welds were prepared. By considering the thickness of s stainless steel pipe, special attention was given to both the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode in this study. It was clearly found that the L(0,2) mode was more sensitive to defects than the L(0,1) mode. Based on the results of the L(0,1) and L(0,2) mode analyses, the magnitude ratio of the two modes was more effective than studying each mode when evaluating defects near the welded zone of stainless steel because of its linear relationship with the length of the artificial defect.

  7. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel

    Wilbraham, Richard J., E-mail: r.wilbraham@lancaster.ac.uk [The Lloyd’s Register Foundation Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Boxall, Colin, E-mail: c.boxall@lancaster.ac.uk [The Lloyd’s Register Foundation Centre for Nuclear Engineering, Engineering Department, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Goddard, David T., E-mail: dave.t.goddard@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Preston, Lancashire PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Robin J., E-mail: robin.j.taylor@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Woodbury, Simon E., E-mail: simon.woodbury@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The first report of the presence of both UO{sub 2} and polymeric UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in the same electrodeposited U oxide sample. • The action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on electrodeposited U oxides is described using corrosion based concepts. • Electrodeposited U oxide freely dissolves at hydrogen peroxide concentrations <100 μmol dm{sup −3}. • At [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] > 0.1 mmol dm{sup −3} dissolution is inhibited by formation of a studtite passivation layer. • At [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] ⩾ 1 mol dm{sup −3} studtite formation competes with uranyl–peroxide complex formation. - Abstract: For the first time the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the dissolution of electrodeposited uranium oxide films on 316L stainless steel planchets (acting as simulant uranium-contaminated metal surfaces) has been studied. Analysis of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated film dissolution processes via open circuit potentiometry, alpha counting and SEM/EDX imaging has shown that in near-neutral solutions of pH 6.1 and at [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] ⩽ 100 μmol dm{sup −3} the electrodeposited uranium oxide layer is freely dissolving, the associated rate of film dissolution being significantly increased over leaching of similar films in pH 6.1 peroxide-free water. At H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations between 1 mmol dm{sup −3} and 0.1 mol dm{sup −3}, formation of an insoluble studtite product layer occurs at the surface of the uranium oxide film. In analogy to corrosion processes on common metal substrates such as steel, the studtite layer effectively passivates the underlying uranium oxide layer against subsequent dissolution. Finally, at [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] > 0.1 mol dm{sup −3} the uranium oxide film, again in analogy to common corrosion processes, behaves as if in a transpassive state and begins to dissolve. This transition from passive to transpassive behaviour in the effect of peroxide concentration on UO{sub 2} films has not hitherto been observed or explored, either in terms

  8. Low temperature plasma carburizing of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel and AISI F51 duplex stainless steel Cementação sob plasma à baixa temperatura do aço inoxidável austenítico AISI 316L e do aço inoxidável duplex AISI F51

    Carlos Eduardo Pinedo; André Paulo Tschiptschin

    2013-01-01

    In this work an austenitic AISI 316L and a duplex AISI F51 (EN 1.4462) stainless steel were DC-Plasma carburized at 480ºC, using CH4 as carbon carrier gas. For the austenitic AISI 316L stainless steel, low temperature plasma carburizing induced a strong carbon supersaturation in the austenitic lattice and the formation of carbon expanded austenite (γC) without any precipitation of carbides. The hardness of the carburized AISI 316L steel reached a maximum of 1000 HV due to ∼13 at% c...

  9. Hardness and elastic modulus gradients in plasma-nitrided 316L polycrystalline stainless steel investigated by nanoindentation tomography

    Graphical abstract: - Abstract: Correlations between the grain orientations and elastic properties of plasma-nitrided polycrystalline 316L austenitic stainless steel are investigated. The grain orientations (h k l) in a delimited area were obtained from electron backscatter diffraction and related to hardness (Hhkl) and elastic modulus (Ehkl) maps obtained from large nanoindentation matrices. The influence of nitrogen concentration on the local mechanical properties has been studied by repeating these indentation matrices in the same area after successive partial removals of the nitrided layer. This nanoindentation tomography allowed the orientation, the shape and the surroundings of individual grains to be taken into account. The results show that plasma nitriding leads to a complete reversal of the elastic behaviour anisotropy: while the non-nitrided 316L austenitic stainless steel shows the typical elastic anisotropy of face-centred-cubic-type metals with a maximum of Ehkl for the 〈111〉 oriented grains, the maximum of Ehkl is observed for the 〈001〉 oriented grains in the nitrided layer. A similar anisotropy reversal is observed for the hardness Hhkl. These observations are discussed on the basis of the microstructural changes induced by the nitrogen incorporation.

  10. Effect of the hydrogen absorption on the positioning of the plastic deformation of a stainless steel-316L

    The aim of this work is to quantify the absorbed hydrogen effects on the plastic deformation (at the grain scale) of stainless steel-316L polycrystals. Tensile tests in air have been carried out on specimens previously cathodically loaded in hydrogen (135 wt.ppm) and unloaded polycrystals. After the tensile tests, a number statistically representative of gliding bands emergent in surface has been observed. In parallel to this experimental study, the plastic gliding level in each grain has been obtained by a finite element method from the polycrystalline microstructure modeled with the EBSD cartography. The Zebulon code developed by the Ecole des Mines de Paris allows to account for the plastic behaviour of the studied polycrystals using the crystalline plasticity model. The coupled analysis of the numerical and experimental results allows to know the gliding plan having produced the gliding steps observed in each grain by AFM. This allows then to quantify the number of emergent dislocations to create the average gliding band. It is then possible to compare the modifications of the positioning of the plastic deformation of the stainless steel-316L induced by hydrogen absorption. (O.M.)

  11. A New Vacuum Brazing Route for Niobium-316L Stainless Steel Transition Joints for Superconducting RF Cavities

    Kumar, Abhay; Ganesh, P.; Kaul, R.; Bhatnagar, V. K.; Yedle, K.; Ram Sankar, P.; Sindal, B. K.; Kumar, K. V. A. N. P. S.; Singh, M. K.; Rai, S. K.; Bose, A.; Veerbhadraiah, T.; Ramteke, S.; Sridhar, R.; Mundra, G.; Joshi, S. C.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2015-02-01

    The paper describes a new approach for vacuum brazing of niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints for application in superconducting radiofrequency cavities. The study exploited good wettability of titanium-activated silver-base brazing alloy (CuSil-ABA®), along with nickel as a diffusion barrier, to suppress brittle Fe-Nb intermetallic formation, which is well reported during the established vacuum brazing practice using pure copper filler. The brazed specimens displayed no brittle intermetallic layers on any of its interfaces, but instead carried well-distributed intermetallic particles in the ductile matrix. The transition joints displayed room temperature tensile and shear strengths of 122-143 MPa and 80-113 MPa, respectively. The joints not only exhibited required hermeticity (helium leak rate ultra-high vacuum but also withstood twelve hour degassing heat treatment at 873 K (suppresses Q-disease in niobium cavities), without any noticeable degradation in the microstructure and the hermeticity. The joints retained their leak tightness even after undergoing ten thermal cycles between the room temperature and the liquid nitrogen temperature, thereby establishing their ability to withstand service-induced low cycle fatigue conditions. The study proposes a new lower temperature brazing route to form niobium-316L stainless steel transition joints, with improved microstructural characteristics and acceptable hermeticity and mechanical properties.

  12. Preliminary studies of the welding zone of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel capsules, for Cs137 sealed sources

    Currently, the treatment for cervix, endometrium and vaginal cancer, uses radioactive seeds, shaped like spheres, seeds or threads, with the brachytherapy technique. The brachytherapy sources are encased in surgical grade stainless steel cylinders. This geometry aims to contain the radioactive material, by providing safe barriers, thereby reducing other undesirable radiations from the radioisotopes during their disintegration and by providing rigidity to the source. The properties of the stainless steels are greatly influenced by their chemical composition, which also determines the microstructural characteristics of these alloys. AISI 316L steel is one of the raw materials used most frequently for surgical use, due to its stability and inert character when in contact with the human organism. Small stainless steel cylindrical capsules (about 10 mm long, 2mm diameter) were prepared for this work, with caps welded at both ends using the TIG process, producing an airtight closure. The welds are described by cut, surface, grain-revealing chemical attack, and chemical analysis using dispersive energy spectroscopy and metallographic analysis. Vickers hardness measurements are also presented in the zones affected by the welding. The dendritic-granular interface of the welded stainless matrix under the TIG process, shows resistance to corrosion from human plasma at 36.5oC

  13. Fundamental distribution of stress corrosion crack depth on Type 316L stainless steels induced by creviced bent beam test

    The creviced bent beam (CBB) test has been applied for many materials such as nickel base alloys and low carbon austenitic stainless steels. For sensitized austenitic stainless steels, fundamental distribution of crack depth induced by CBB tests was evaluated to establish SCC initiation model and lifetime prediction method. On the other hand, there are a few studies about distribution of crack depth on low carbon austenitic stainless steels. In this study, statistical analysis of crack depth was conducted in Type 316L stainless steels after CBB tests. The results are summarized as follows, (1) Distribution of grain boundary depth designated as distance from surface to triple point of grain boundary fit lognormal probability distribution and exponential probability distribution. (2) Distribution of crack depth approaches lognormal or exponential probability distribution with passage of test duration. Distribution of plastic strain on the specimen surface is not affect to type of crack depth distribution. (3) Inflection or bent point appears on the probability plot at depth of the median of grain boundary depth distribution. (4) Less than median of grain boundary depth, distribution of crack depth is identical to grain boundary depth distribution. More than median + standard deviation of grain boundary depth, crack depth distribution is described by the exponential distribution. (author)

  14. Effects of strain rate and notch geometry on hydrogen embrittlement of AISI type 316L austenitic stainless steel

    This paper presents the first results of the work which the author has been performing for the European Fusion Technology Programme. The contribution deals with the effects of strain rate and notch geometry on hydrogen embrittlement of 316L austenitic stainless steel, which will be used for the first wall of the next European fusion reactor. Slow strain rate fracture tests on round notched specimens of 316L steel were carried out under cathodic polarization during the mechanical loading. A wide range of strain rates was covered in the tests, in order to obtain very different degrees of damage produced by the hydrogen. Two notch geometries with very different radii were used, to analyze the influence of the stress state in the vicinity of the notch tip on hydrogen embrittlement. Samples were machined in two directions (the rolling direction and the perpendicular one), thus permitting a study of anisotropy effects. Results are compared with those for a high-strength pearlitic steel tested with the same technique under the same electrochemical potential. (orig.)

  15. STUDIES ON WETTABILITY OF STAINLESS STEEL 316L POWDER IN LASER MELTING PROCESS

    KURIAN ANTONY

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser sintering is one of the techniques used in additive manufacturing processes. The main objective of the work is to study the effects of process parameters on wetting phenomenon and interfacial energy during laser melting of stainless steel powder. This paper reports wetting of laser melted powder particles and its use for the determination of surface energy of stainless steel powder under laser beam exposure. Process parameters such as laser power, scan speed and beam diameter are considered for study. This study also identifies the process parameters for better wettability which produces smooth surfaces.

  16. Vacuum brazing of OFE Copper-316L stainless steel transition joints without electroplating stainless steel part for application in particle accelerators

    Brazed transition Joints between OFE copper and type 316L austenitic stainless steel (SS) find extensive applications in particle accelerators all over the world. In contrast to excellent wettability of OFE copper, austenitic SS is well known for its poor wettability for BVAg-8 (72Ag/28Cu; melting point: 1052 K) braze filler metal (BFM). High surface wettability is believed to be necessary to drag molten BFM into the capillary gap between mating metallic surfaces. Therefore, the widely accepted practice for vacuum brazing of such transition joints involves electroplating of SS parts with nickel or copper to enhance its wettability. A recently concluded in-house study, involving Nb to Ni-plated 316L SS brazing, has demonstrated that satisfactory ingress of BFM into a capillary joint between two dissimilar metals is possible if the poor wettability of one of the mating surfaces is compensated by good wettability of its counterpart. In the light of these observations, the present study was undertaken to explicitly evaluate the requirement of electroplating the SS part for establishment of sound OFE copper-316L SS brazed joints suitable for service in ultra-high vacuum (UHV) of particle accelerators

  17. Effects of the inner mould material on the aluminium–316L stainless steel explosive clad pipe

    Highlights: ► Different mould materials were adopted to evaluate the effect of the constraint on the clad quality. ► The interface characteristics of clad pipe were analyzed for the different clad pipe. ► The clad pipes possess excellent bonding quality. - Abstract: The clad pipe played an important part in the pipeline system of the nuclear power industry. To prepare the clad pipe with even macrosize and excellent bonding quality, in this work, different mould materials were adopted to evaluate the effect of the constraint on the clad quality of the bimetal pipe prepared by explosive cladding. The experiment results indicated that, the dimension uniformity and bonding interface of clad pipe were poor by using low melting point alloy as mould material; the local bulge or the cracking of the clad pipe existed when the SiC powder was utilized. When the steel mould was adopted, the outer diameter of the clad pipe was uniform from head to tail. In addition, the metallurgical bonding was formed. Furthermore, the results of shear test, bending test and flattening test showed that the bonding quality was excellent. Therefore, the Al–316L SS clad pipe could endure the second plastic forming

  18. Influence of the tritium in type 316L stainless steel on corrosion

    It is shown that the tritium in stainless steel induces stress corrosion by the effects of embrittlement due to both the tritium itself and the helium formed by its decay. These also cause local breakdown of the oxide layer, though this breakdown is also brought about by the β- ray energy, which can be estimated to be between 4 X 103 and 105 MeV/cm2 of the steel surface per second. 19 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  19. Enzymatic mechanism in low chloride media: influence of glucose oxidase on the electrochemical behaviour of AISI 316L stainless steel

    The open circuit potential (OCP) of stainless steels immersed in natural waters generally increases with time. This phenomenon is strongly linked to the formation of a bio-film on the surface. Several studies have proved that the bio-film modifies the reaction of reduction of dissolved oxygen and that it acts mainly on the cathodic processes. One of the hypotheses explaining the action of the bio-film involves certain bacteria which use dissolved oxygen and extracellular enzymes to produce reactive oxygen species. Among this kind of metabolites is hydrogen peroxide H2O2. This compound interacts with the passive layer of stainless steels and affects their electrochemical behaviour, even when the chloride concentration is low. The aim of this work is to study the influence of an enzymatic reaction (of the oxidoreductase type) on anodic and cathodic processes on AISI 316L stainless steel. Experiments are carried out in two artificial electrolytes simulating natural fresh waters, with two different chloride concentrations. The role of enzymatically-produced hydrogen peroxide is shown by OCP measurements and volt-amperometric methods. (authors)

  20. Radiation defects formed in ion-irradiated 316L stainless steel model alloys with different Si additions

    The 304/316 series of austenite stainless steels are used in light water reactors as structural materials. As a result of the high temperatures and neutron irradiation in reactor, dislocation defects will form in stainless steel, causing an increase in the hardness and a decrease in the ductility of the material. In this work, high purity 316L stainless steel model alloys with three different Si contents were ion irradiated at 290°C or 400°C to investigate the black dot and Frank loop formation mechanism influenced by Si addition. Black dot defect formation mainly occurs at 290°C. It is Frank loop in nature with its formation not affected by Si addition. Frank loop is the main defect at 400°C, and both loop density and the average size are substantially suppressed by Si addition. This may be caused by silicon’s role in enhancing effective vacancy diffusivity and thus promoting recombination. The trend of irradiation hardening measured verses temperature matches the microstructure observed. (author)

  1. Characterization of passive film formed on AISI 316L stainless steel after magnetoelectropolishing in a broad range of polarization parameters

    Rokosz, Krzysztof; Hryniewicz, Tadeusz [Politechnika Koszalinska, Division of Surface Electrochemistry, Raclawicka 15-17, PL 75-620 Koszalin (Poland); Raaen, Steiner [NTNU Trondheim, Institute of Physics, Trondheim (Norway)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of the paper is to present the changes in the surface film composition on AISI 316L stainless steel (SS) after electropolishing (EP) and magnetoelectropolishing (MEP) in a broad range of the process conditions. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface analyses were performed to reveal the effect of MEP. The EP process has been performed under natural convection (in a stagnant electrolyte), much above the polarization plateau. A series of experiments were carried out on AISI 316L SS samples in accordance with the five-level composite rotary statistical plan with the variables being the magnetic field intensity B (mT), and the anodic current density i (A dm{sup -2}). XP high resolution spectra have been obtained on AISI 316L SS surface concerning Fe 2p, Cr 2p, O 1s, S 2p, P 2p, and C 1s, respectively. The Cr:Fe ratio regarding both metallic M and compound X was also studied and calculated. At the end, the summary results of Cr/Fe = f(B, i) in relation to the corrosion potential, have been compared. The conclusions, concerning the selection of MEP process conditions, regarding the optimum Cr/Fe ratio and corrosion behavior, have been formulated. It was found the Cr:Fe ratio well correlates with the pitting corrosion potential. MEP process can modify not only the rate of dissolution to a determined extent, but also control the corrosion behavior and Cr:Fe ratio results. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Transformation of austenite to duplex austenite-ferrite assembly in annealed stainless steel 316L consolidated by laser melting

    Saeidi, K.; Gao, X. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Lofaj, F. [Institute of Materials Research of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Košice (Slovakia); Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 916 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Kvetková, L. [Institute of Materials Research of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, Košice (Slovakia); Shen, Z.J. [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Mechanical properties, phase and microstructure stability of laser melted steel was studied. • Duplex austenite-ferrite assembly with improved mechanical properties was formed. • Dissolution of Mo in the steel matrix resulted in ferrite stabilization and stress relief. • Enhanced mechanical properties were achieved compared to conventionally casted and annealed steel. - Abstract: Laser melting (LM), with a focused Nd:YAG laser beam, was used to form solid bodies from 316L austenite stainless steel powder and the laser melted samples were heat treated at various temperatures. The phase changes in heat treated samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples heat treated at 800 °C and 900 °C remained single austenite while in samples heat treated at 1100 °C and 1400 °C a dual austenite-ferrite phase assembly was formed. The ferrite formation was further verified by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) and selective area diffraction (SAD). Microstructural changes were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). In samples heat treated up to 900 °C, coalescence of the cellular-sub grains was noticed, whereas in sample heat treated at and above 1100 °C the formation of ferrite phase was observed. The correlation between the microstructure/phase assembly and the measured strength/microhardness were investigated, which indicated that the tensile strength of the laser melted material was significantly higher than that of the conventional 316L steel even after heat treatment whereas caution has to be taken when laser melted material will be exposed to an application temperature above 900 °C.

  3. Transformation of austenite to duplex austenite-ferrite assembly in annealed stainless steel 316L consolidated by laser melting

    Highlights: • Mechanical properties, phase and microstructure stability of laser melted steel was studied. • Duplex austenite-ferrite assembly with improved mechanical properties was formed. • Dissolution of Mo in the steel matrix resulted in ferrite stabilization and stress relief. • Enhanced mechanical properties were achieved compared to conventionally casted and annealed steel. - Abstract: Laser melting (LM), with a focused Nd:YAG laser beam, was used to form solid bodies from 316L austenite stainless steel powder and the laser melted samples were heat treated at various temperatures. The phase changes in heat treated samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Samples heat treated at 800 °C and 900 °C remained single austenite while in samples heat treated at 1100 °C and 1400 °C a dual austenite-ferrite phase assembly was formed. The ferrite formation was further verified by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) and selective area diffraction (SAD). Microstructural changes were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM, TEM). In samples heat treated up to 900 °C, coalescence of the cellular-sub grains was noticed, whereas in sample heat treated at and above 1100 °C the formation of ferrite phase was observed. The correlation between the microstructure/phase assembly and the measured strength/microhardness were investigated, which indicated that the tensile strength of the laser melted material was significantly higher than that of the conventional 316L steel even after heat treatment whereas caution has to be taken when laser melted material will be exposed to an application temperature above 900 °C

  4. Effect of Zr, Nb and Ti addition on injection molded 316L stainless steel for bio-applications: Mechanical, electrochemical and biocompatibility properties.

    Gulsoy, H Ozkan; Pazarlioglu, Serdar; Gulsoy, Nagihan; Gundede, Busra; Mutlu, Ozal

    2015-11-01

    The research investigated the effect of Zr, Nb and Ti additions on mechanical, electrochemical properties and biocompatibility of injection molded 316L stainless steel. Addition of elemental powder is promoted to get high performance of sintered 316L stainless steels. The amount of additive powder plays a role in determining the sintered microstructure and all properties. In this study, 316L stainless steel powders used with the elemental Zr, Nb and Ti powders. A feedstock containing 62.5 wt% powders loading was molded at different injection molded temperature. The binders were completely removed from molded components by solvent and thermal debinding at different temperatures. The debinded samples were sintered at 1350°C for 60 min. Mechanical, electrochemical property and biocompatibility of the sintered samples were performed mechanical, electrochemical, SBF immersion tests and cell culture experiments. Results of study showed that sintered 316L and 316L with additives samples exhibited high corrosion properties and biocompatibility in a physiological environment. PMID:26275484

  5. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S

  6. Effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting of molten multi-component oxides ceramic

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wangjinustb@gmail.com [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Matsuda, Nozomu [Bar and Wire Product Unit, Nippon steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Fukuoka, 802-8686 (Japan); Shinozaki, Nobuya [Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 808-0196 (Japan); Miyoshi, Noriko [The Center for Instrumental Analysis, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka, 804-8550 (Japan); Shiraishi, Takanobu [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, 852-8588 (Japan)

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • Multi-component oxides had a good wetting on stainless substrates with pretreatments. • Various substrates surface roughness caused the difference of final contact angles. • The wetting rate was slow on polished substrate due to the slow surface oxidation. - Abstract: A study on the effect of SUS316L stainless steel surface conditions on the wetting behavior of molten multi-component oxides ceramic was performed and aimed to contribute to the further understanding of the application of oxides ceramic in penetration treatment of stainless steel coatings and the deposition of stainless steel cermet coatings. The results show that at 1273 K, different surface pre-treatments (polishing and heating) had an important effect on the wetting behavior. The molten multi-component oxides showed good wettability on both stainless steel substrates, however, the wetting process on the polished substrate was significantly slower than that on the heated substrates. The mechanism of the interfacial reactions was discussed based on the microscopic and thermodynamic analysis, the substrates reacted with oxygen generated from the decomposition of the molten multi-component oxides and oxygen contained in the argon atmosphere, and the oxide film caused the molten multi-component oxides ceramic to spread on the substrates surfaces. For the polished substrate, more time was required for the surface oxidation to reach the surface composition of Heated-S, which resulted in relatively slow spreading and wetting rates. Moreover, the variance of the surface roughness drove the final contact angles to slightly different values following the sequence Polished-S > Heated-S.

  7. Helium dilution effect on hydrogen permeation in 316L stainless steel and nickel-base heat-resistant alloys

    Effects of inert-gas dilution on hydrogen permeation have been investigated in 316L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Inconel 750, Nimonic 80A and Hastelloy X at 1173 K and 1073 K, by employing a gas-flow system. We used gas mixtures of hydrogen and helium, whose hydrogen concentration ranged from 10-5 to 10-1. For the steady-state permeation, the dilution of hydrogen caused no anomalous effects and the permeation rate conformed to Sieverts' law. However, for the transient state, the hydrogen permeation was retarded by the dilution with helium. The retardation effect is discussed in terms of an adsorption model and explained by a decrease in sticking probability at the alloy surface with the dissociative adsorption of hydrogen. (orig.)

  8. Microstructural characteristics and creep rupture behavior of electron beam and laser welded AISI 316L stainless steel

    AISI 316L stainless steel was welded by the electron beam (EB) and laser techniques. Microstructural characteristics, hardness profile, creep rupture properties and creep damage of the welds were investigated. Fully austenitic microstructure was obtained in the two welds. The solidification structure of the welds consisted of the cellular and equiaxed dendrites. The creep rupture lives of the two welds were almost the same, and they were reduced by a factor of about two compared to the base metal. Moreover, the rupture elongation of the welds was lower than that of the base metal. Creep damage was observed in the ''parting'' region of the welds and in the heat-affected zone (HAZ), respectively. Final creep fracture occurred in the ''parting'' region of the welds. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of notch strengthening of 316L stainless steel with and without irradiation-induced hardening using EBSD and FEM

    Wu, Xianglin; Pan, Xiao; Stubbins, James F.

    2007-04-01

    Notch strengthening analysis of 316L stainless steel was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and the finite element modeling (FEM) techniques. The influence of exposure to irradiation was examined by employing irradiated tensile properties in the FEM analyses. The major issue of interest is the possibility that low ductility, often found following irradiation exposure, will translate into low notch toughness. It was found that notch depth plays an important role in notch strengthening and mechanical properties degradation. Differences in notch depth and shape result in various sizes of deformation and twinning zones. Experimental results and FEM modeling results correlate well over the range of notch conditions examined here. It is found that notch ductility and plastic deformation can be highly localized for irradiated materials, exacerbating the flow localization problem. Thus irradiation exposure can also lead to flow localization problems with components with notches or stress concentrators, but notch constraints can limit the extent of localized flow.

  10. Methodology for optimizing the electropolishing of stainless steel AISI 316L combining criteria of surface finish and dimensional precision

    Núñez, P. J.; García-Plaza, E.; Martín, A. R.; Trujillo, R.; De la Cruz, C.

    2009-11-01

    This work examines a methodology for optimizing electrochemical polishing conditions bearing in mind the criteria that enhance minimum surface roughness and dimensional precision (minimum loss of thickness). The study consisted in electrochemically polishing stainless steel AISI 316L (ISO 4954 X2CrNiMo17133E) under a combination of different temperatures (T) baths and current densities (J), and application times (t). The surface finish (ΔRa) and dimensional variations (Δh) of the electrochemically polished workpieces were assessed, and the experimental data of the variables was correlated as can be seen by the response surfaces. This methodology enables optimum working areas to be specified using the sole criteria of surface finish, or by using a combination of both criteria (minimum roughness and maximum precision). The methodology has proven to be an optimum method for selecting electrochemical polishing conditions using the combined criteria of surface finish and dimensional precision in accordance with design requirements.

  11. Effect of tool geometry on tool wear characterization and weld formation in friction stir welding of 316L stainless steel

    316L stainless steel plate was friction stir welded using PCBN tools. The effect of tool shoulder profile and tool probe profile on tool wear characterization and weld formation was investigated. Two different shoulder profiles (screw with different pitches) with four different tool probe profiles (two different probe end shapes and two different probe lengths) have been used to fabricate FSW zone. Experimental results show that the tools with narrow pitch screw shoulder profile produce deeper FSW zone compared to the tools with wide pitch. The tools with spiral probe profile produce deeper FSW zone compared to the tools with chamber probe profile. The tools with wide pitch screw shoulder profile is apt to produce lower working loads. The wear resistant of tools with chamber probe profile is significantly higher than that of tools with spiral probe profile. The relation between tool geometries and tool wear and weld formation is discussed. (author)

  12. Full 3D spatially resolved mapping of residual strain in a 316L austenitic stainless steel weld specimen

    A three-pass slot weld specimen in austenitic stainless steel 316L, manufactured for the purpose of benchmarking Finite Element weld residual stress simulation codes, is currently undergoing extensive characterization within a research network. A comprehensive data set from non-destructive full three-dimensional spatially resolved macro-strain mapping in this specimen is presented here. Focussed high-energy synchrotron radiation together with the spiral slit technique was used to obtain depth-resolved information about the variation of lattice parameters. A novel full-pattern analysis approach, based on the evaluation of distinct diffraction spots from individual grains, was developed. The results show high tensile transverse stresses within the bead deposited first. The maximum longitudinal stresses were found beneath the slot. Furthermore significant weld start- and stop-effects were observed. The validity of the results is discussed with respect to the possible impact of intergranular strains due to plastic deformation.

  13. Evaluation of the electromagnetic characteristics of type 316L stainless steel welds from the viewpoint of eddy current inspections

    This study evaluated the electromagnetic characteristics of austenitic stainless steel welds from the viewpoint of eddy current testing. Seven welded plate specimens, which were welded using JIS Z3221:2010 YS316L welding metals, were prepared. Two welding metals and several welding conditions were adopted to discuss the generality. The results of eddy current examination of the specimens using three different types of eddy current probes, that is, an absolute pancake probe, a differential plus-point probe, and a uniform eddy current probe, confirmed that the welds cause a large noise especially when the absolute pancake probe was used. The analysis of the signals through finite element simulations revealed that the magnetic property of the welds is not negligible from the viewpoint of eddy current testing. Complementary experiments were conducted using a vibrating sample magnetometer to validate the results. (author)

  14. Microstructural aspects of creep-rupture life of type 316L(N) stainless steel in liquid sodium environment

    The influence of flowing sodium on creep-rupture properties of AISI Type 316L(N) stainless steel base material has been investigated at 550 and 660 C. In sodium test results were compared with reference creep-rupture data generated in air. The creep-rupture lives were longer in air than in sodium environment at 550 C, however, at 600 C, creep-rupture lives were longer in the latter than in the former environment. Microstructural studies showed the presence of sensitization and χ phase on longer duration test specimens at both temperatures. Surface cracks in sodium tested specimens were sharp and relatively more in numbers than in air where cracks were blunted. Cracks seem to follow the intergranular mode. Cavities were formed in long duration tests and propagated ahead of the χ phase. (orig.)

  15. Microstructural aspects of creep-rupture life of Type 316L(N) stainless steel in liquid sodium environment

    Mishra, M. P.; Borgstedt, H. U.; Frees, G.; Seith, B.; Mannan, S. L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1993-04-01

    The influence of flowing sodium on creep-rupture properties of AISI Type 316L(N) stainless steel base material has been investigated at 550 and 600°C. In sodium test results were compared with reference creep-rupture data generated in air. The creep-rupture lives were longer in air than in sodium environment at 550°C, however, at 600°C, creep-rupture lives were longer in the latter than in the former environment. Microstructural studies showed the presence of sensitization and χ phase on longer duration test specimens at both temperatures. Surface cracks in sodium tested specimens were sharp and relatively more in numbers than in air where cracks were blunted. Cracks seem to follow the intergranular mode. Cavities were formed in long duration tests and propagated ahead of the χ phase.

  16. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  17. The Effect of Surface Finish on Low-Temperature Acetylene-Based Carburization of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Ge, Yindong; Ernst, Frank; Kahn, Harold; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-12-01

    We observed a strong influence of surface finish on the efficacy of low-temperature acetylene-based carburization of AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel. Steel coupons were prepared with different surface finishes prior to carburization, from P400 SiC grit paper to 1- µm-diameter-diamond-paste. The samples with the finer surface finish developed a thicker "case" (a carbon-rich hardened surface layer) and a larger surface carbon concentration. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the differences arose mainly from the nature of the deformation-induced disturbed layer on the steel surface. A thick (>400 nm) disturbed layer consisting of nano-crystalline grains (≈10 nm diameter) inhibits acetylene-based carburization. The experimental observations can be explained by assuming that during machining or coarse polishing, the surface oxide layer is broken up and becomes incorporated into the deformation-induced disturbed layer. The incorporated oxide-rich films retard or completely prevent the ingress of carbon into the stainless steel.

  18. Re-weldability tests of irradiated 316L(N) stainless steel using laser welding technique

    SS316L(N)-IG is the candidate material for the in-vessel and ex-vessel components of fusion reactors such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). This paper describes a study on re-weldability of un-irradiated and/or irradiated SS316L(N)-IG and the effect of helium generation on the mechanical properties of the weld joint. The laser welding process is used for re-welding of the water cooling branch pipeline repairs. It is clarified that re-welding of SS316L(N)-IG irradiated up to about 0.2 dpa (3.3 appm He) can be carried out without a serious deterioration of tensile properties due to helium accumulation. Therefore, repair of the ITER blanket cooling pipes can be performed by the laser welding process

  19. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics

  20. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu, E-mail: wangjianqiu@imr.ac.cn

    2014-03-15

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  1. Effect of dissolved oxygen content on stress corrosion cracking of a cold worked 316L stainless steel in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environment

    Zhang, Litao; Wang, Jianqiu

    2014-03-01

    Stress corrosion crack growth tests of a cold worked nuclear grade 316L stainless steel were conducted in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environment containing various dissolved oxygen (DO) contents but no dissolved hydrogen. The crack growth rate (CGR) increased with increasing DO content in the simulated PWR primary water. The fracture surface exhibited typical intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics.

  2. Effect of the hydrogen peroxide formed in tritiated water on the behavior of 316L stainless steel

    The tritiated water used (at a concentration of 20 mg cm-3) contains radiolytic hydrogen peroxide and dissolved oxygen. In the plants for the reprocessing of this water, the pH necessarily has various values, and consequently we used two different pH, 4 and 11, in our studies. The free corrosion potential of the stainless steel, as well as the redox potential of the tritiated water taken immediately from stock are in the transpassive region. This results from the concentrations of the dissolved radiolytic species. If these are decomposed in the voltametric scans, these potentials shift to the prepassive region. This will show the importance of the concentration of radiolytic H2O2 on the corrosion of 316L stainless steel. Scanning electron microscope examinations show, that at the free corrosion potential of the steel located in transpassive region, small cracks are formed over all of the oxidized surface. Pits and cavities are also found, the latter tend to be located on the grain boundaries. ((orig.))

  3. Effects of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide on the corrosion potential of 316L stainless steel in hot lithium hydroxide solution

    In the present work, the effects of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide on corrosion potential have been studied on type 316L stainless steel in a hot lithium hydroxide solution. The results indicate that the corrosion potential will remain at around -850 mV vs SCE if the dissolved oxygen in the solution is controlled at a level of less than 10 ppb. However, 316L stainless steel will become completely passivated when about 650 ppb of oxygen exists in the solution. As a result, the corrosion potential of 316L steel will rise to around -400 mV vs SCE, and eventually, with longer immersion times, to even higher values, e.g. -300 mV vs SCE. However, the presence of less than 500 ppb H2O2 has no significant effect on the corrosion potential. A potential jump (from -850 to -500 mV vs SCE) is observed only when a large amount of H2O2, for instance 1 ppm, is present in the solution. Related to radiolysis of water and with potential-dependent stress corrosion cracking, the effects of dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide on the corrosion potential of 316L stainless steel in the hot lithium hydroxide solution have been discussed. ((orig.))

  4. Behaviour in aqueous H2S of austenitic stainless steels AISI 316L and AISI 304

    Embrittlement by hydrogen in aqueous H2S medium of austenitic stainless steels was studied. Embrittlement in the hyper-quenched and sensitized state was characterized by slow traction tests. The susceptibility to hydrogen increases with the decrease of the charging speed and the increase of the sensitization time. The value of the piling defect energy, the presence of martensite ε and the transportation of hydrogen through dislocations seem to be very determining parameters for embrittlement by hydrogen in H2S medium. (authors). 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Evaluation of Mid-IR Laser radiation effect on 316l stainless steel corrosion resistance in physiological saline

    The effects of a short pulsed (∼ 400 ns ) multi line hydrogen fluoride laser radiation operating on average at 2.8 μm has been studied on 316l stainless steel in terms of optical and physical parameters. At low fluences ≤ 8 Jcm-2 (phase l) no morphological changes occurred at the surface and melting began at ∼ 8.8 Jcm-2 (phase l l) which continued up to about 30 Jcm-2 . In this range the melting zone was effectively produced by high temperature surface centres growth which subsequently joined these centres together. Thermal ablation via surface vaporization began at ∼ 33 Jcm-2 (phase lll). The results of scanning electron microscopy evaluation and corrosion resistance experiment which was carried out using Eg and G device with cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method in a physiological (Hank's) solution indicated that pitting corrosion sensitivity was decreased i.e.. enhancement of corrosion resistance. Also, the x-ray diffraction results showed a double increase of γ (lll) at microstructure, thus in effect a super austenite stainless steel was obtained at an optimized melting fluence

  6. Biocompatibility studies of low temperature nitrided and collagen-I coated AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    Martinesi, M; Stio, M; Treves, C; Borgioli, F

    2013-06-01

    The biocompatibility of austenitic stainless steels can be improved by means of surface engineering techniques. In the present research it was investigated if low temperature nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel may be a suitable substrate for bioactive protein coating consisting of collagen-I. The biocompatibility of surface modified alloy was studied using as experimental model endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) in culture. Low temperature nitriding produces modified surface layers consisting mainly of S phase, the supersaturated interstitial solid solution of nitrogen in the austenite lattice, which allows to enhance surface microhardness and corrosion resistance in PBS solution. The nitriding treatment seems to promote the coating with collagen-I, without chemical coupling agents, in respect of the untreated alloy. For biocompatibility studies, proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and secretion of two metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were determined. Experimental results suggest that the collagen protection may be favourable for endothelial cell proliferation and for the control of MMP-2 release. PMID:23471501

  7. Sensitization behaviour of modified 316N and 316L stainless steel weld metals after complex annealing and stress relieving cycles

    Parvathavarthini, N. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Materials Characterisation Group, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Dayal, R.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Materials Characterisation Group, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: rkd@igcar.gov.in; Khatak, H.S. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Corrosion Science and Technology Division, Materials Characterisation Group, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603 102 (India); Shankar, V. [Materials Technology Division, Materials Development Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603 102 Tamil Nadu (India); Shanmugam, V. [Materials Technology Division, Materials Development Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603 102 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2006-09-01

    Sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steel weld metals prepared using indigenously developed modified 316N (C = 0.05%; N = 0.12%) and 316L (C = 0.02%; N = 0.07%) electrodes was studied. Detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examination was carried out to understand the microstructural changes occurring in the weld metal during isothermal exposure at various temperatures ranging from 500 deg. C to 850 deg. C (773-1123 K). Based on these studies the mechanism of sensitization in the austenite-ferrite weld metal has been explained. Time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams were established using ASTM A262 Practice E test. From the TTS diagrams, critical cooling rate (CCR) above which there is no risk of sensitization was calculated for both materials. The heating/cooling rates to be followed for avoiding sensitization during heat treatment cycles consisting of solution-annealing and stress-relieving in fabrication of welded components of AISI 316LN stainless steel (SS) were estimated taking into account the soaking time and the number of times the component undergoes thermal excursions in the sensitization regime. The results were validated by performing controlled heating and cooling heat treatment trials on welded specimens.

  8. Sensitization behaviour of modified 316N and 316L stainless steel weld metals after complex annealing and stress relieving cycles

    Sensitization behaviour of austenitic stainless steel weld metals prepared using indigenously developed modified 316N (C = 0.05%; N = 0.12%) and 316L (C = 0.02%; N = 0.07%) electrodes was studied. Detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examination was carried out to understand the microstructural changes occurring in the weld metal during isothermal exposure at various temperatures ranging from 500 deg. C to 850 deg. C (773-1123 K). Based on these studies the mechanism of sensitization in the austenite-ferrite weld metal has been explained. Time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams were established using ASTM A262 Practice E test. From the TTS diagrams, critical cooling rate (CCR) above which there is no risk of sensitization was calculated for both materials. The heating/cooling rates to be followed for avoiding sensitization during heat treatment cycles consisting of solution-annealing and stress-relieving in fabrication of welded components of AISI 316LN stainless steel (SS) were estimated taking into account the soaking time and the number of times the component undergoes thermal excursions in the sensitization regime. The results were validated by performing controlled heating and cooling heat treatment trials on welded specimens

  9. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    Jiao, Y.; Zheng, W.; Guzonas, D. A.; Cook, W. G.; Kish, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe-Cr-Ni-Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M23C6), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  10. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M23C6), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance

  11. Effect of thermal treatment on the corrosion resistance of Type 316L stainless steel exposed in supercritical water

    Jiao, Y. [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, W. [CanmetMATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Guzonas, D.A. [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Chalk River Laboratories, ON (Canada); Cook, W.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Kish, J.R., E-mail: kishjr@mcmaster.ca [Department of Materials Science & Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    There are still unknown aspects about the growth mechanism of oxide scales formed on candidate stainless steel fuel cladding materials during exposure in supercritical water (SCW) under the conditions relevant to the Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR). The tendency for intermetallic precipitates to form within the grains and on grain boundaries during prolonged exposure at high temperatures represents an unknown factor to corrosion resistance, since they tend to bind alloyed Cr. The objective of this study was to better understand the extent to which intermetallic precipitates affects the mode and extent of corrosion in SCW. Type 316L stainless steel, used as a model Fe–Cr–Ni–Mo alloy, was exposed to 25 MPa SCW at 550 °C for 500 h in a static autoclave for this purpose. Mechanically-abraded samples were tested in the mill-annealed (MA) and a thermally-treated (TT) condition. The thermal treatment was conducted at 815 °C for 1000 h to precipitate the carbide (M{sub 23}C{sub 6}), chi (χ), laves (η) and sigma (σ) phases. It was found that although relatively large intermetallic precipitates formed at the scale/alloy interface locally affected the oxide scale formation, their discontinuous formation did not affect the short-term overall apparent corrosion resistance.

  12. Characterization of hydroxyapatite coating by pulse laser deposition technique on stainless steel 316 L by varying laser energy

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite coating was successfully deposited on stainless steel substrate by pulse laser deposition at different energy levels (i.e. 300 mJ and 500 mJ, respectively). ► Variation in laser energy affects the surface characteristic of hydroxyapatite coating (particle size, surface roughness, uniformity, Ca/P ratio). ► Laser energy between 300 mJ and 500 mJ is the optimal choice for obtaining ideal Ca/P ratio. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite is an attractive biomaterial mainly used in bone and tooth implants because it closely resembles human tooth and bone mineral and has proven to be biologically compatible with these tissues. In spite of this advantage of hydroxyapatite it has also certain limitation like inferior mechanical properties which do not make it suitable for long term load bearing applications; hence a lot of research is going on in the development of hydroxyapatite coating over various metallic implants. These metallic implants have good biocompatibility and mechanical properties. The aim of the present work is to deposit hydroxyapatite coating over stainless steel grade 316 L by pulse laser deposition technique by varying laser energy. To know the effect of this variation, the coatings were than characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, finite emission-scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  13. Investigation into the joining of MoSi{sub 2} to 316L stainless steel

    Vaidya, R.U.; Bartlett, A.H.; Conzone, S.D.; Butt, D.P.

    1996-10-01

    Partial transient liquid phase joining and low temperature brazing were applied in joining MoSi{sub 2} to 316L ss. Exploratory studies were carried out on various interlayer materials. Mechanical, physical, and chemical compatibilities between various interlayers, brazing material, and substrate materials were investigated. Effect of thermal expansion mismatch between various components of the joint on the overall joint integrity was also studied. Preliminary findings are outlined.

  14. MC3T3-E1 cell response to stainless steel 316L with different surface treatments

    In the present study, stainless steel 316L samples with polishing, aluminum oxide blasting, and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating were prepared and characterized through a scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical interferometer (surface roughness, Sq), contact angle, surface composition and phase composition analyses. Osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion on the samples was investigated by cell morphology using a SEM (4 h, 1 d, 3 d, 7 d), and cell proliferation was assessed by MTT method at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d. In addition, adsorption of bovine serum albumin on the samples was evaluated at 1 h. The polished sample was smooth (Sq: 1.8 nm), and the blasted and HA coated samples were much rougher (Sq: 3.2 μm and 7.8 μm). Within 1 d of incubation, the HA coated samples showed the best cell morphology (e.g., flattened shape and complete spread), but there was no significant difference after 3 d and 7 d of incubation for all the samples. The absorbance value for the HA coated samples was the highest after 1 d and 3 d of incubation, indicating better cell viability. However, it reduced to the lowest value at 7 d. Protein adsorption on the HA coated samples was the highest at 1 h. The results indicate that rough stainless steel surface improves cell adhesion and morphology, and HA coating contributes to superior cell adhesion, but inhibits cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Rough stainless steel surface improves cell adhesion and proliferation. • HA coating results in superior cell morphology and cell attachment. • HA coating inhibits osteoblast cell proliferation after 7 d of incubation

  15. MC3T3-E1 cell response to stainless steel 316L with different surface treatments

    Zhang, Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Han, Jianmin, E-mail: siyanghan@163.com [Dental Materials Laboratory, National Engineering Laboratory for Digital and Material Technology of Stomatology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing 100081 (China); Sun, Yulong [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Huang, Yongling [Jinghang Biomedicine Engineering Division, Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Material, Beijing 100095 (China); Zhou, Ming [State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, stainless steel 316L samples with polishing, aluminum oxide blasting, and hydroxyapatite (HA) coating were prepared and characterized through a scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical interferometer (surface roughness, Sq), contact angle, surface composition and phase composition analyses. Osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell adhesion on the samples was investigated by cell morphology using a SEM (4 h, 1 d, 3 d, 7 d), and cell proliferation was assessed by MTT method at 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d. In addition, adsorption of bovine serum albumin on the samples was evaluated at 1 h. The polished sample was smooth (Sq: 1.8 nm), and the blasted and HA coated samples were much rougher (Sq: 3.2 μm and 7.8 μm). Within 1 d of incubation, the HA coated samples showed the best cell morphology (e.g., flattened shape and complete spread), but there was no significant difference after 3 d and 7 d of incubation for all the samples. The absorbance value for the HA coated samples was the highest after 1 d and 3 d of incubation, indicating better cell viability. However, it reduced to the lowest value at 7 d. Protein adsorption on the HA coated samples was the highest at 1 h. The results indicate that rough stainless steel surface improves cell adhesion and morphology, and HA coating contributes to superior cell adhesion, but inhibits cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Rough stainless steel surface improves cell adhesion and proliferation. • HA coating results in superior cell morphology and cell attachment. • HA coating inhibits osteoblast cell proliferation after 7 d of incubation.

  16. Thermo-mechanical and isothermal fatigue behavior of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L

    Škorík, Viktor; Šulák, Ivo; Obrtlík, Karel; Polák, Jaroslav

    Ostrava: TANGER Ltd, 2015. ISBN 978-80-87294-58-1. [METAL 2015 - International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials /24./. Brno (CZ), 03.06.2015-05.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20991S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) * In-phase cycling (IP) * Isothermal fatigue (IF) * AISI 316L * Fatigue life Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  17. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Hajian, M.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Rezaei-Nejad, S. S.; Assadi, H.; Hadavi, S. M. M.; Chung, K.; Shokouhimehr, M.

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3-6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  18. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Hajian, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollah-zadeh, A., E-mail: zadeh@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaei-Nejad, S.S.; Assadi, H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadavi, S.M.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MA University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chung, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Research Institute of Advanced Materials, Engineering Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shokouhimehr, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  19. Improvement in cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel by friction stir processing

    Commercial AISI 316L plates with the initial grain size of 14.8 μm were friction stir processed (FSP) with different processing parameters, resulting in two fine-grained microstructures with the grain sizes of 4.6 and 1.7 μm. The cavitation erosion behavior, before and after FSP, was evaluated in terms of incubation time, cumulative mass loss and mean depth of erosion. A separate cavitation erosion test was performed on the transverse cross section of a FSP sample to reveal the effect of grain structure. It was observed that FSP samples, depending on their grain size, are at least 3–6 times more resistant than the base material against cavitation erosion. The improvement in cavitation erosion resistance is attributed to smaller grain structure, lower fraction of twin boundaries, and favorable crystallographic orientation of grains in FSP samples. The finer the grain size, the more cavitation erosion resistance was achieved. Moreover, the microstructures of eroded surfaces were studied using a scanning electron microscope equipped with EBSD, and an atomic force microscope. The mechanisms controlling the cavitation erosion damage in friction stir processed AISI 316L are also discussed.

  20. HIP of stainless steel 316L considered at the mesoscopic scale: Numerical modelling and experimental characterization

    A two and three-dimensional finite element simulation of HIP (Hot Isostatic Pressing) at mesoscopic scale is proposed, in view of an in-depth understanding of the different physical mechanisms involved in powder densification. The model is formulated in a Eulerian framework, using level set formulation and adaptive meshing and re-meshing strategy to identify particle interactions inside a representative elementary volume (REV). A statistical generator is in charge of the definition of the initial configuration under the constraint of accounting for the real particle size distribution. Mechanical boundary conditions are applied to the REV, resulting in the deformation of particles and densification of the REV. As a first approach, the power-law creep of particles is considered as the unique densification mechanism. Starting from data issued from macroscopic simulations of the HIPping of a part made of 316L powder, mesoscopic simulations in different locations of the part have been carried out (macro-to-meso approach). The results of these simulations are presented and discussed in the light of experimental studies (optical microscopy and SEM, EBSD, EPMA) of the structure and microstructure of the compact, which were obtained from interrupted compactions. Mechanical tests on fully densified 316L were also conducted. (author)

  1. Comparative MRI compatibility of 316 L stainless steel alloy and nickel-titanium alloy stents.

    Holton, Andrea; Walsh, Edward; Anayiotos, Andreas; Pohost, Gerald; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna

    2002-01-01

    The initial success of coronary stenting is leading to a proliferation in peripheral stenting. A significant portion of the stents used in a clinical setting are made of 316 low carbon stainless steel (SS). Other alloys that have been used for stent manufacture include tantalum, MP35N, and nickel-titanium (NiTi). The ferromagnetic properties of SS cause the production of artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The NiTi alloys, in addition to being known for their shape memory or superelastic properties, have been shown to exhibit reduced interference in MRI. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the comparative MRI compatibility of SS and NiTi stents. Both gradient echo and spin-echo images were obtained at 1.5 and 4.1 T field strengths. The imaging of stents of identical geometry but differing compositions permitted the quantification of artifacts produced due to device composition by normalizing the radio frequency shielding effects. These images were analyzed for magnitude and spatial extent of signal loss within the lumen and outside the stent. B1 mapping was used to quantify the attenuation throughout the image. The SS stent caused significant signal loss and did not allow for visibility of the lumen. However, the NiTi stent caused only minor artifacting and even allowed for visualization of the signal from within the lumen. In addition, adjustments to the flip angle of standard imaging protocols were shown to improve the quality of signal from within the lumen. PMID:12549230

  2. In situ monitoring the pulse CO 2 laser interaction with 316-L stainless steel using acoustical signals and plasma analysis

    Khosroshahi, M. E.; pour, F. Anoosheh; Hadavi, M.; Mahmoodi, M.

    2010-10-01

    In most laser material processing, material removal by different mechanisms is involved. Here, application of acoustic signals with thermoelastic (below threshold) and breakdown origin (above threshold) together with plasma plume analysis as a simple monitoring system of interaction process is suggested. In this research the interaction of pulse CO 2 laser with 200 ns duration and maximum energy of 1.3 J operating at 1 Hz with austenitic stainless steel (316-L) is reported. The results showed that the non-linear point of the curve can serve as a useful indicator of melting fluence threshold (in this case ≈830 J cm -2) with corresponding temperature calculated using plasma plume analysis. Higher acoustic amplitudes and larger plasma plume volume indicates more intense interaction. Also, analysis showed that a phase explosion process with material removal (ejecta) in the form of non-adiabatic (i.e., dt ≫ α-1) is at play after laser pulse is ended. Also, SEM photographs show different surface quality medication at different laser intensities, which indicates the importance of recoil momentum pressure and possibly electrons and ions densities in heat transfer. Finally, electrochemical test indicate an improved corrosion resistance for laser treated samples compared to untreated ones.

  3. Hydrogen effects on the passive film formation and pitting susceptibility of nitrogen containing type 316L stainless steels

    The effects of hydrogen on the passivity and pitting susceptibility of type 316L stainless steels have been investigated with alloys containing different nitrogen contents (0.015, 0.198 and 0.556 wt.% N). The study revealed that electrochemically pre-charged hydrogen significantly reduced the pitting resistance of alloys conatining 0.015 and 0.198 wt.% nitrogen contents. In alloy with highest nitrogen content (0.556 wt.% N), an increase in the passive film current density with hydrogen was observed without affecting breakdown potential. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis of the passive film indicated the presence of nitrogen in the passive film. On other hand, for hydrogen charged samples, nitrogen was found to be significantly less in the passive film. In Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement, the decrease in semi-circle radius of Nyquist plot, and the polarization resistance, R P associated with the resistance of the passive film was observed with hydrogen, indicating that hydrogen decreased the stability of the passive film. The present investigation indicated that precharged hydrogen deteriorated the passive film stability and pitting corrosion resistance in these alloys, and the increase in nitrogen content of the alloy offsets the deleterious effect of precharged hydrogen

  4. Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue on 316L stainless steel in boric acid concentrated media at 320 C

    Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) and Corrosion-Fatigue (CF) tests were performed in autoclave at 320 C in concentrated boric acid chlorinated media in presence of oxygen or hydrogen on type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Crack Growth Rates (CGR) are higher in non deaerated solutions for both SCC and CF than in hydrogenated solutions. CGR are relatively similar in CF and in SCC, excepted for high load ratio in CF where CGR are higher than in SCC. Detailed analysis of the fracture surface shows some distinct features between SCC and CF. Intergranular and transgranular mode of fracture are observed on SCC and CF. Fracture modes depend on the chemistry of solution in SCC and on frequency in CF. Traces of slip bands and crack front marking associated with oxide scale present on fracture surfaces exist in SCC and CF. Fatigue striations appear for low load ratio and high frequency. Secondary intergranular and transgranular cracking is observed only on SCC fracture surfaces and ligament morphology can be different in SCC relative to FC

  5. Hydrogen diffusion and solution at high temperatures in 316L stainless steel and nickel-base heat-resistant alloys

    Hydrogen-permeation behaviors of 316L stainless steel, Inconel 600, Inconel 750, Nimonic 80A and Hastelloy X at 873 K-1173 K have been investigated under a pressure range of 0.1 MPa-0.7 MPa by using a gas-flow system. Measurements have been carried out by use of a helium-carrier-gas method. It has been proved that this method is good for examining transient-permeation behaviors as well as steady-state permeation if the instrumental time-lag is taken into account. Diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen for the alloys are derived from the transient and steady-state permeation. The γ'-precipitation strengthened alloys - Inconel 750 and Nimonic 80A - show a larger activation energy of diffusion and a smaller solution heat than the other nickel-base alloys. This result is ascribed to the trapping effect due to titanium in the former alloys, i.e. solute titanium atoms and/or γ'-precipitations. (orig.)

  6. Hydrogen absorption associated with the corrosion mechanism of 316L stainless steels in primary medium of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Highlights: • Samples of stainless steel were oxidized in isotopically labelled primary water. • Hydrogen and oxygen diffusion in the oxide layer were studied. • A mechanism for the inner oxide growth in primary water is proposed. • The proposed mechanism links the hydrogen absorption and oxidation processes. - Abstract: Samples of 316L were exposed at 325 °C to PWR primary water labelled with deuterium and oxygen 18. The SIMS and GD-OES analysis has revealed the presence of deuterium in the internal oxide layer and in the underlying alloy. Two-stage corrosion experiments have shown that the oxygen and hydrogen transport in the oxide layer is not coupled and that the short-circuit diffusion coefficient of 18O in the oxide scale: Dsc = (9 ± 1)·10−17 cm2 s−1. These results are used to propose a mechanism describing the anionic growth of the protective oxide layer and the concomitant adsorption of hydrogen in the alloy

  7. Residual stress and microstructure evolution by manufacturing processes for welded pipe joint in austenitic stainless steel type 316L

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the heat affected zone (HAZ) of welded pipe joint made of austenitic stainless steel type 316L, even though sensitization is not observed. Therefore, It can be considered that the effect of residual stress on SCC is more important. In the joining process of pipes, butt-welding is conducted after machining. Residual stress is generated by both processes. In case of welding after machining, it can be considered that residual stress due to machining is changed by welding thermal cycle. In this study, residual stress and microstructure evolution due to manufacturing processes is investigated. Change of residual stress distribution caused by processing history is examined by X-ray diffraction method. Residual stress distribution has a local maximum stress in the middle temperature range of the HAZ caused by processing history. Hardness measurement result also has a local maximum hardness in the same range of the HAZ. By using FE-SEM/EBSD, it is clarified that microstructure shows recovery in the high temperature range of HAZ. Therefore, residual stress distribution is determined by microstructure evolution and superposition effect of processing history. In summary, not only any part of manufacturing processes such as welding or machining but also treating all processes as processing history of pipes are important to evaluate SCC. (author)

  8. Modelling hydrogen embrittlement in 316L austenitic stainless steel for the first wall of the Next European Torus

    This paper presents the final results of the work which the authors have been performing for the European Fusion Technology Programme (the NET Team). The contribution deals with the modelling of hydrogen embrittlement in AISI type 316L solution-annealed austenitic stainless steel, to be used for the first wall of NET (Next European Torus). Numerical modelling of hydrogen diffusion in the samples was performed on the basis of a set of non-conventional diffusion equations, in which hydrogen diffuses not only to the points of minimum concentration, but also towards those places of maximum hydrostatic stress. The diffusion computer program was coupled with an elastic-plastic finite element program to allow the calculation of both the stress state and the distribution of hydrogen concentration at the sample points step by step. Hydrogen penetration rates due to diffusion were extremely low in the unaltered material, even under mechanical loading. However, a clear loss of load bearing capacity of the notched specimens in hydrogen environment was observed even for extremely short tests. A possible explanation is that hydrogen embrittlement might not be associated with bulk diffusion through the specimen (there was not enough time for this) but rather with a localized degrading action, due to hydrogen, on the area surrounding the notch. In particular, hydrogen enhanced multi-cracking is a possibility which must be taken into account. (orig.)

  9. Effect of strain-induced martensite on the formation of nanocrystalline 316L stainless steel after cold rolling and annealing

    Eskandari, M.; Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A., E-mail: ahmad_k@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-08-30

    This work aimed to study the effects of cold rolling temperature and pre-strain on the volume fraction of strain-induced martensite in order to obtain nanocrystalline structures of 316L stainless steel. Hot rolling and cold rolling followed by annealing treatments were conducted under different conditions. The microstructures and the volume fraction of phases were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and feritscope tests, respectively. The hardness and tensile properties of the specimens were also measured. The results showed that decreasing the rolling temperature while increasing pre-strain leads to increased the volume fraction of martensite accompanied by decreased saturating strain and, further, that this behavior affects the degree of grain refinement. The smallest grain size of about 30-40 nm was obtained via 30% pre-strain at 523 K and subsequent conventional cold rolling at 258 K with a strain and a strain rate of 95% and 0.5 s{sup -1}, respectively, followed by annealing at 1023 K for 300 s. Uniaxial tensile tests at room temperature showed that this specimen exhibits very high tensile strength of about 1385 MPa.

  10. TEM study of the nucleation of bubbles induced by He implantation in 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel

    Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Lescoat, M.-L.; Fortuna, F.; Legras, L.; Li, X.; Gentils, A.

    2015-11-01

    10 keV He ions were implanted in-situ in a TEM into thin foils of 316L industrial austenitic stainless steel at temperatures ranging from 200 to 550 °C. As a result, overpressurized nanometric bubbles are created with density and size depending strongly on both the temperature and fluence of implantation. An investigation on their nucleation and growth is reported through a rigorous statistical analysis whose procedure, including the consideration of free surface effects, is detailed. In the parameter range considered, the results show that an increase of fluence promotes both the nucleation and growth of the bubbles whilst an increase of temperature enhances the growth of the bubbles at the expense of their nucleation. The confrontation of resulting activation energies with existing models for bubble nucleation enables the identification of the underlying mechanisms. In spite of slight differences resulting from different conditions of implantation among which the He concentration, He production rate and He/dpa ratio, it appears that the dominating mechanisms are the same as those obtained in metals in previous studies, which, in addition to corroborating literature results, shows the suitability of in-situ TEM experiments to simulate the production of helium in nuclear materials.

  11. Electrochemical and In Vitro Behavior of Nanostructure Sol-Gel Coated 316L Stainless Steel Incorporated with Rosemary Extract

    Motalebi, Abolfazl; Nasr-Esfahani, Mojtaba

    2013-06-01

    The corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel for biomedical applications, was significantly enhanced by means of hybrid organic-inorganic sol-gel thin films deposited by spin-coating. Thin films of less than 100 nm with different hybrid characters were obtained by incorporating rosemary extract as green corrosion inhibitor. The morphology, composition, and adhesion of hybrid sol-gel coatings have been examined by SEM, EDX, and pull-off test, respectively. Addition of high additive concentrations (0.1%) did not disorganize the sol-gel network. Direct pull-off test recorded a mean coating-substrate bonding strength larger than 21.2 MPa for the hybrid sol-gel coating. The effect of rosemary extract, with various added concentrations from 0.012 to 0.1%, on the anticorrosion properties of sol-gel films have been characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution and has been compared to the bare metal. Rosemary extract additions (0.05%) have significantly increased the corrosion protection of the sol-gel thin film to higher than 90%. The in vitro bioactivity of prepared films indicates that hydroxyapatite nuclei can form and grow on the surface of the doped sol-gel thin films. The present study shows that due to their excellent anticorrosion properties, bioactivity and bonding strength to substrate, doped sol-gel thin films are practical hybrid films in biomedical applications.

  12. Effect of strain-induced martensite on the formation of nanocrystalline 316L stainless steel after cold rolling and annealing

    This work aimed to study the effects of cold rolling temperature and pre-strain on the volume fraction of strain-induced martensite in order to obtain nanocrystalline structures of 316L stainless steel. Hot rolling and cold rolling followed by annealing treatments were conducted under different conditions. The microstructures and the volume fraction of phases were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and feritscope tests, respectively. The hardness and tensile properties of the specimens were also measured. The results showed that decreasing the rolling temperature while increasing pre-strain leads to increased the volume fraction of martensite accompanied by decreased saturating strain and, further, that this behavior affects the degree of grain refinement. The smallest grain size of about 30-40 nm was obtained via 30% pre-strain at 523 K and subsequent conventional cold rolling at 258 K with a strain and a strain rate of 95% and 0.5 s-1, respectively, followed by annealing at 1023 K for 300 s. Uniaxial tensile tests at room temperature showed that this specimen exhibits very high tensile strength of about 1385 MPa.

  13. In situ monitoring the pulse CO2 laser interaction with 316-L stainless steel using acoustical signals and plasma analysis

    In most laser material processing, material removal by different mechanisms is involved. Here, application of acoustic signals with thermoelastic (below threshold) and breakdown origin (above threshold) together with plasma plume analysis as a simple monitoring system of interaction process is suggested. In this research the interaction of pulse CO2 laser with 200 ns duration and maximum energy of 1.3 J operating at 1 Hz with austenitic stainless steel (316-L) is reported. The results showed that the non-linear point of the curve can serve as a useful indicator of melting fluence threshold (in this case ∼830 J cm-2) with corresponding temperature calculated using plasma plume analysis. Higher acoustic amplitudes and larger plasma plume volume indicates more intense interaction. Also, analysis showed that a phase explosion process with material removal (ejecta) in the form of non-adiabatic (i.e., dt >> α-1) is at play after laser pulse is ended. Also, SEM photographs show different surface quality medication at different laser intensities, which indicates the importance of recoil momentum pressure and possibly electrons and ions densities in heat transfer. Finally, electrochemical test indicate an improved corrosion resistance for laser treated samples compared to untreated ones.

  14. Shielding gas effects on flux cored arc welding of AISI 316L (N) austenitic stainless steel joints

    Highlights: ► The effects of shielding gasses are analyzed. ► The impact strength increases with increasing of percentage of CO2 in shielding gas mixtures. ► The ferrite percentage decreases with increasing of percentage of CO2 in shielding gas mixtures. ► Microhardness values increases with increasing of ferrite percentage in the weld metal. -- Abstract: This paper deals with the flux cored arc welding (FCAW) of AISI 316L (N) austenitic stainless steel with 1.2 mm diameter of flux cored 316LT filler wire. The welding was carried out with different shielding gas mixtures like 100% Ar, 95% Ar + 05% CO2, 90% Ar + 10% CO2, 80% Ar + 20% CO2, 75% Ar + 23% CO2 + 2% O2 and 70% Ar + 25% CO2 + 5% O2 and 100% CO2. The main aim of the work is to study the effect of various shielding gas mixtures on mechanical properties and metallurgical characters. The microstructures and ferrite content of the welds were analyzed. The mechanical characteristics such as impact test, microhardness and ductility of welds were carried out. The fracture surface impact samples were analyzed through scanning electron microscope (SEM). The fracture surface revealed a ductile rupture at room temperature and ductile rupture with a few cleavages at lower temperatures occurred. The toughness and ferrite percentages of the welds were decreased for increase of the CO2 in shielding gas mixtures.

  15. Effects of Hydrogen Gas Environment on Fatigue Strength at 107 cycles in Plain Specimen of Type 316L Stainless Steel

    Kawamoto, Kyohei; Ochi, Kazuhiko; Oda, Yasuji; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    In order to clarify the hydrogen effect on the fatigue strength at 107 cycles in a plain specimen of type 316L austenitic stainless steel, rotating bending fatigue tests in laboratory air and plane bending fatigue tests in 1.0 MPa dry hydrogen gas and in air at 313 K were carried out. The main results obtained are as follows. The observed fatigue behavior showed that the fatigue strength at 107 cycles in both environments is determined by the non-propagation of a fatigue crack of the order of the grain size. Also, the strength at 107 cycles in hydrogen gas is slightly higher than that in air. In the region of high-cycle fatigue, the fatigue life in hydrogen gas is longer than that in air, which is mainly caused by the longer crack initiation life in hydrogen gas. The crack propagation life in hydrogen gas is shorter than that in air but has only a small ratio to the fatigue life in this region.

  16. Dynamic strain aging in stress controlled creep-fatigue tests of 316L stainless steel under different loading conditions

    Stress controlled fatigue-creep tests were carried out for 316L stainless steel under different loading conditions, i.e. different loading levels at the fixed temperature (loading condition 1, LC1) and different temperatures at the fixed loading level (loading condition 2, LC2). Cyclic deformation behaviors were investigated with respect to the evolutions of strain amplitude and mean strain. Abrupt mean strain jumps were found during cyclic deformation, which was in response to the dynamic strain aging effect. Moreover, as to LC1, when the minimum stress is negative at 550 deg. C, abrupt mean strain jumps occur at the early stage of cyclic deformation and there are many jumps during the whole process. While the minimum stress is positive, mean strain only jumps once at the end of deformation. Similar results were also found in LC2, when the loading level is fixed at -100 to 385 MPa, at higher temperatures (560, 575 deg. C), abrupt mean strain jumps occur at the early stage of cyclic deformation and there are many jumps during the whole process. While at lower temperature (540 deg. C), mean strain only jumps once at the end of deformation.

  17. Study on cerium-doped nano-TiO2 coatings for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel

    Li, Suning; Wang, Qian; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Zhihua; Wang, Ying; Fu, Jiajun

    2012-04-01

    Many methods have been reported on improving the photogenerated cathodic protection of nano-TiO2 coatings for metals. In this work, nano-TiO2 coatings doped with cerium nitrate have been developed by sol-gel method for corrosion protection of 316 L stainless steel. Surface morphology, structure, and properties of the prepared coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The corrosion protection performance of the prepared coatings was evaluated in 3 wt% NaCl solution by using electrochemical techniques in the presence and absence of simulated sunlight illumination. The results indicated that the 1.2% Ce-TiO2 coating with three layers exhibited an excellent photogenerated cathodic protection under illumination attributed to the higher separation efficiency of electron-hole pairs and higher photoelectric conversion efficiency. The results also showed that after doping with an appropriate concentration of cerium nitrate, the anti-corrosion performance of the TiO2 coating was improved even without irradiation due to the self-healing property of cerium ions.

  18. The Influence of Post Weld Heat Treatment in Alloy 82/182 Dissimilar Metal Weld between Low Alloy Steel and 316L Stainless Steel

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) using an Alloy 82/182 are widely used to join low alloy steel components and stainless steel pipes in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It has been reported that tensile residual stress would be generated within DMWs during the welding processes. It is thought as main reason for primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) resulting in deterioration of long-term integrity. The application of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) has been considered to reduce the tensile residual stress after welding process. Meanwhile, the PWHT could affect the changes in microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion resistance. Therefore, in this study, the effects of PWHT on the microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviors of base metals of low alloy steel and stainless steel and welding materials of Alloy 82/182 are evaluated. The influence of PWHT in DMW has been investigated. SA 508 and 316L SS exhibited tempered bainite and austenitic grains with a few residual stringer type ferrite. Grain boundary carbides are not precipitated owing to low carbon and insufficient exposure time in 316L SS. The change of mechanicals properties in base metals is not observed. In case of Alloy 182, after PWHT, grain boundaries are covered with film-like continuous Cr-rich carbides

  19. Plasma nitriding of AISI 304L and AISI 316L stainless steels: effect of time in the formation of S phase and the chromium nitrides

    Plasma nitriding can improve hardness and wear resistance of austenitic stainless steels without losses in corrosion resistance. This fact relies on a nitrided layer constituted only by S phase, without chromium nitrides precipitation. In this work, the effect of nitriding time on phases formed on nitrided layer was investigated in two austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304L e AISI 316L. The samples were nitrided at 420 deg C, using a mixture of 60 % N2 and 40% H2, during 5, 7 and 9 hours. It was noted that chromium nitrides were formed on samples of AISI 304L, nitrided for 7 e 9 hours, while all nitrided samples of AISI 316L showed only formation of S phase. The nitrided layers were characterized using optical microscope and x-ray diffraction. (author)

  20. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    Sharifnabi, A., E-mail: sharifnabi@yahoo.com [Biomaterials Group, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, M.H. [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eftekhari Yekta, B.; Hossainalipour, M. [Biomaterials Group, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-01

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol–gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  1. Effects of X-rays Radiation on AISI 304 Stainless Steel Weldings with AISI 316L Filler Material: A Study of Resistance and Pitting Corrosion Behavior

    Francisco Javier Cárcel-Carrasco; Manuel Pascual-Guillamón; Miguel Angel Pérez-Puig

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of low-level ionizing radiation, namely X-rays, on the micro structural characteristics, resistance, and corrosion resistance of TIG-welded joints of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel made using AISI 316L filler rods. The welds were made in two different environments: natural atmospheric conditions and a closed chamber filled with inert argon gas. The influence of different doses of radiation on the resistance and corrosion characteristics of the welds i...

  2. The structural and bio-corrosion barrier performance of Mg-substituted fluorapatite coating on 316L stainless steel human body implant

    In this study, Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings were deposited on medical grade AISI 316L stainless steel via sol–gel dip coating method. Phase composition, crystallite size and degree of crystallinity of the obtained coatings were evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was also used to evaluate functional groups of the obtained coatings. The surface morphology and cross-section of the final coatings were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy was used to determine elemental chemical composition of the obtained coatings. In order to determine and compare the corrosion behavior of uncoated and Mg-substituted fluorapatite coated 316L stainless steel, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed in physiological solutions at 37 ± 1 °C. Moreover, the released metallic ions from uncoated and coated substrates were measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) within 2 months of immersing in Ringer's solution at 36.5 ± 1 °C as an indication of biocompatibility. The results showed that fluoride and magnesium were successfully incorporated into apatite lattice structure and the prepared coatings were nanostructured with crystallinity of about 70%. Obtained coatings were totally crack-free and uniform and led to decrease in corrosion current densities of 316L stainless steel in physiological solutions. In addition, coated sample released much less ions such as Fe, Cr and Ni in physiological media. Therefore, it was concluded that Mg-substituted fluorapatite coatings could improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of 316L stainless steel human body implants.

  3. Effect of temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the electrochemical properties of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water

    2008-01-01

    The influence of temperature, chloride ions and sulfide ions on the anticorrosion behavior of 316L stainless steel in simulated cooling water was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and anodic polarization curves. The results show that the film resistance increases with the solution temperature but decreases after 8 days' immersion, which indicates that the film formed at higher temperature has inferior anticorrosion behavior; Chloride ions and sulfide ions have remarkable effects on the elect...

  4. Hydrogen effects on pitting corrosion and semiconducting properties of nitrogen-containing type 316L stainless steel

    The effects of hydrogen pre-charging on pitting corrosion resistance and semiconducting nature of passive film formed on two different nitrogen-containing type 316L stainless steel (0.076 and 0.086 wt% N) have been studied. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis of the alloys after passivation indicated weak nitrogen peak, but the presence of nitrogen and NH3/NH4+ was confirmed by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results of pitting corrosion in 0.5 M NaCl (pH ∼ 5.7) solution revealed that hydrogen increased the passive current density and significantly reduced the pitting resistance. In 0.3 M H3BO3 + 0.075 M Na2B4O7.10H2O (pH ∼ 8.45) solution, increase in passive current density without affecting the breakdown or transpassive potential was observed for both the alloys. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement after hydrogen pre-charging showed decrease in semi-circle radius of Nyquist plot, and the polarization resistance, RP associated with the resistance of the passive film. The decrease was significant with increasing hydrogen-charging current density (-50 to -100 mA/cm2). The results of the capacitance measurement and Mott-Schottky plots revealed that passive films exhibit n-type and p-type semiconductivity films for both the uncharged and hydrogen charged specimens of the investigated alloys. Doping densities obtained from Mott-Schottky plots increased with hydrogen pre-charging. The overall results indicated that hydrogen pre-charging deteriorated the passive film stability and lowered pitting corrosion resistance. The effects of hydrogen pre-charging on pitting corrosion, passive film and semiconducting properties are discussed in light of the above results.

  5. Corrosion resistance improvement in Gas Tungsten Arc Welded 316L stainless steel joints through controlled preheat treatment

    Highlights: → Though the preheat treatment reduced the cooling rate, no sensitization occurred. → The delta ferrite content of welds reduced due to cooling retardment in welds. → Reduction in δ/γ boundaries was accompanied by decrement of passivation current. → Preheat treatment improved pitting resistance characteristics. → Increment of preheat temperature increased breakdown and repassivation potential. -- Abstract: In the present study, an attempt has been made to improve the corrosion characteristics of 316L stainless steel weldments through preheating at 450 oC and 650 oC. The infrared and Tungsten-Rhenium thermocouples were utilized to probe the cooling trend of heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld pool, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, optical microscopy, electron microscopy, Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS) and ferritscope were also used to investigate the effect of preheating on microstructural characteristics within the weld and HAZ. Moreover, cyclic potentiodynamic test was carried out to evaluate the corrosion features of welds such as corrosion current, passivation current (IPP), breakdown potential (EB) and repassivation potential (Ere). Results revealed that preheating reduces the cooling rate of weld pool, accompanied by reduction of delta ferrite content of weldments. Moreover, it was observed that increment of preheat temperature improves corrosion behavior of weldments, including a lower passivation current and a more pitting resistance. These outcomes were mainly ascribed to decrease of austenite/delta ferrite interfaces as vulnerable sites to corrosion attacks, through preheat treatment. Observations showed no evidence of sensitization in preheated samples, which guaranteed the feasibility of suggested heat treatment.

  6. Analysis of bi-layer oxide on austenitic stainless steel, 316L, exposed to Lead–Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS)

    Koury, D., E-mail: dan@physics.unlv.edu [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, MS 4002, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Johnson, A.L. [Harry Reid Center, MS 4009, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Ho, T. [Dept. of Chemistry, MS 4002, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Farley, J.W. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, MS 4002, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, 4505 S. Maryland Pkwy, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel alloy 316L by Lead–Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) was studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) with Sputter-Depth Profiling (SDP), and compared to data taken by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-rays (EDXs). Exposed and unexposed samples were compared. Annealed 316L samples, exposed to LBE for durations of 1000, 2000 and 3000 h, developed bi-layer oxides up to 30 μm thick. Analysis of the charge-states of the 2p{sub 3/2} peaks of iron, chromium, and nickel in the oxide layers reveal an inner layer consisting of iron and chromium oxides (likely spinel-structured) and an outer layer consisting of iron oxides (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Cold-rolled 316L samples, exposed for the same durations, form a chromium-rich, thin (⩽1 μm) oxide with some oxidized iron in the outermost ∼200 nm of the oxide layer. This is the first experiment to investigate what components of the 316L are oxidized by LBE exposure. It is shown here that nickel is metallic in the inner layer.

  7. In vitro response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel subjected to nitriding and collagen coating treatments.

    Stio, Maria; Martinesi, Maria; Treves, Cristina; Borgioli, Francesca

    2015-02-01

    Surface modification treatments can be used to improve the biocompatibility of austenitic stainless steels. In the present research two different modifications of AISI 316L stainless steel were considered, low temperature nitriding and collagen-I coating, applied as single treatment or in conjunction. Low temperature nitriding produced modified surface layers consisting mainly of S phase, which enhanced corrosion resistance in PBS solution. Biocompatibility was assessed using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in culture. Proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, release of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-10), secretion of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and its inhibitor TIMP-1, and the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 were determined. While the 48-h incubation of PBMC with all the sample types did not negatively influence cell proliferation, LDH and MMP-9 levels, suggesting therefore a good biocompatibility, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines was always remarkable when compared to that of control cells. However, in the presence of the nitrided and collagen coated samples, the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β decreased, while that of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 increased, in comparison with the untreated AISI 316L samples. Our results suggest that some biological parameters were ameliorated by these surface treatments of AISI 316L. PMID:25655502

  8. Effect of Surface Condition and Heat Treatment on Corrosion of Type 316L Stainless Steel in a Mercury Thermal Convection Loop; FINAL

    Two thermal convection loops (TCLs) fabricated from 316L stainless steel and containing mercury and a variety of 316L coupons representing variable surface conditions and heat treatments have been operated continuously for 2000 h. Surface conditions included surface ground, polished, gold-coated, chemically etched, bombarded with Fe to simulate radiation damage, and oxidized. Heat treatments included solution treated, welded, and sensitized. In addition, a nitrogen doped 316L material, termed 316LN, was also examined in the solution treated condition. Duplicate TCLs were operated in this experiment-both were operated with a 305 C peak temperature, a 65 C temperature gradient, and mercury velocity of 1.2 m/min-but only one included a 36 h soak in Hg at 310 C just prior to operation to encourage wetting. Results indicate that the soak in Hg at 310 C had no lasting effect on wetting or compatibility with Hg. Further, based on examination of post-test wetting and coupon weight loss, only the gold-coated surfaces revealed significant interaction with Hg. In areas wetted significantly by Hg, the extreme surface of the stainless steel (ca 10(micro)m) was depleted in Ni and Cr compared to the bulk composition

  9. Multilayered Zr-C/a-C film on stainless steel 316L as bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Bi, Feifei; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin

    2016-05-01

    A multilayered zirconium-carbon/amorphous carbon (Zr-C/a-C) coating is synthesized by magnetron sputtering in order to improve the corrosion resistance and interfacial conductivity of stainless steel 316L (SS316L) as bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Zr-C/a-C film contains an outmost pure amorphous carbon layer and a sub zirconium containing carbon layer. Interfacial contact resistance (ICR) between carbon paper and coated SS316L decreases to 3.63 mΩ cm2 at 1.4 MPa. Potentiodynamic polarization results reveal that the corrosion potential of Zr-C/a-C coated sample is more positive than pure a-C coated sample and the current density is only 0.49 μA cm-2 at the cathode applied potential 0.6 V. Electrochemical impendence spectroscopy also indicates that multilayered Zr-C/a-C film coated SS316L has much higher charge transfer resistance than the bare sample. After potentiostatic polarization, ICR values are 3.92 mΩ cm2 and 3.82 mΩ cm2 in the simulated PEMFCs cathode and anode environment, respectively. Moreover, XPS analysis of the coated samples before and after potential holding tests shows little difference, which disclose the chemical stability of multilayered Zr-C/a-C film. Therefore, the multilayered Zr-C/a-C coating exhibits excellent performance in various aspects and is preferred for the application of stainless steel bipolar plates.

  10. The hardiness of numerical simulation of TIG welding. Application to stainless steel 316L structures; La robustesse de la simulation numerique du soudage TIG. Application sur des structures en acier 316L

    El-Ahmar, Walid; Jullien, Jean-Francois [INSA-Lyon, LaMCoS, CNRS UMR 551, 20 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne, (France); Gilles, Philippe [AREVA NP, 92084 Paris La Defense, (France); Taheri, Said [EDF, 92141 Clamart, (France); Boitout, Frederic [ESI-GROUP, 69458 Lyon, (France)

    2006-07-01

    The welding numerical simulation is considered as one of the mechanics problems the most un-linear on account of the great number of the parameters required. The analysis of the hardiness of the welding numerical simulation is a current questioning whose expectation is to specify welding numerical simulation procedures allowing to guarantee the reliability of the numerical result. In this work has been quantified the aspect 'uncertainties-sensitivity' imputable to different parameters which occur in the simulation of stainless steel 316L structures welded by the TIG process: that is to say the mechanical and thermophysical parameters, the types of modeling, the adopted behaviour laws, the modeling of the heat contribution.. (O.M.)