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Sample records for 30-mhz ultrasound array

  1. Realtime photoacoustic microscopy in vivo with a 30-MHz ultrasound array transducer

    Zemp, Roger J.; Song, Liang; Bitton, Rachel; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel high-frequency photoacoustic microscopy system capable of imaging the microvasculature of living subjects in realtime to depths of a few mm. The system consists of a high-repetition-rate Q-switched pump laser, a tunable dye laser, a 30-MHz linear ultrasound array transducer, a multichannel high-frequency data acquisition system, and a shared-RAM multi-core-processor computer. Data acquisition, beamforming, scan conversion, and display are implemented in realtime at 50 frame...

  2. All fiber sensor array for ultrasound sensing

    Gabai, Haniel; Steinberg, Idan; Eyal, Avishay

    2016-03-01

    The field of Optical Fiber Sensors (OFS) is gaining tremendous popularity in recent years. OFS natural immunity to electromagnetic disturbances, inherent biocompatibility and compactness making them highly attractive for ultrasound sensing. Moreover, their compatibility with photoacoustics can make them useful in situations where traditional piezoelectric probes are inadequate. However, the issue of multiplexing individual OFS into an array remains a challenging and costly task. In this work, we demonstrate a straightforward approach for multiplexing multiple broadband OFS for ultrasound sensing by exploiting most of the photoreceiver's bandwidth. The design is based on a recently developed system in which all sensing elements are connected to a single interrogator and to a single digitizing circuit. To mitigate aliasing, the system employs I/Q coherent detection. Synchronization of the sensor interrogation with the excitation enables very high repetition rates (kHz) making it ideal for applications where imaging of dynamic processes is desired.

  3. Breast ultrasound tomography with two parallel transducer arrays

    Huang, Lianjie; Shin, Junseob; Chen, Ting; Lin, Youzuo; Gao, Kai; Intrator, Miranda; Hanson, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Breast ultrasound tomography is an emerging imaging modality to reconstruct the sound speed, density, and ultrasound attenuation of the breast in addition to ultrasound reflection/beamforming images for breast cancer detection and characterization. We recently designed and manufactured a new synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography prototype with two parallel transducer arrays consisting of a total of 768 transducer elements. The transducer arrays are translated vertically to scan the breast in a warm water tank from the chest wall/axillary region to the nipple region to acquire ultrasound transmission and reflection data for whole-breast ultrasound tomography imaging. The distance of these two ultrasound transducer arrays is adjustable for scanning breasts with different sizes. We use our breast ultrasound tomography prototype to acquire phantom and in vivo patient ultrasound data to study its feasibility for breast imaging. We apply our recently developed ultrasound imaging and tomography algorithms to ultrasound data acquired using our breast ultrasound tomography system. Our in vivo patient imaging results demonstrate that our breast ultrasound tomography can detect breast lesions shown on clinical ultrasound and mammographic images.

  4. Phased-array ultrasound technology enhances accuracy of dual frequency ultrasound measurements - towards improved ultrasound bone diagnostics.

    Linder, Hans; Malo, Markus K H; Liukkonen, Jukka; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-08-01

    Overlying soft tissues attenuate ultrasound backscattered from bone, complicating diagnostics of osteoporosis at the most important fracture sites. Dual-frequency ultrasound technique (DFUS) has been proposed to solve this problem through determination of thickness and composition of overlying soft tissue. This study applies DFUS technique for the first time with a phased-array transducer to investigate if the thickness of two interfering layers (oil and water) can be accurately determined in a variety of configurations. Results indicate that DFUS may be used with phased-array ultrasound systems, making them a suitable combination to consider in future development of clinical in vivo ultrasound methodologies. PMID:27187271

  5. Sub-array patterns of spherical-section phased array for high intensity focused ultrasound surgery

    WANG Xiaodong; WANG Xufei; LU Mingzhu; WAN Mingxi

    2005-01-01

    The sub-array field patterns of spherical-section phased array were implemented for noninvasive ultrasound surgery of liver-tumor. The sub-array approach included field calculation, pseudo-inverse method and genetic algorithm. The sub-arrays uncovered by ribs according to scanned images normally emitted ultrasound. The results from different sub-arrays demonstrated quite satisfied acoustic performances, which included qualified focus size and intensity level for ultrasound surgery with single-focus and multi-foci patterns. Moreover, the patterns could decrease power accumulation on the ribs, and avoid damaging normal tissues. Thus the sub-array method provides a promising tool for phased array ultrasound propagating through strong obstacles like human rib cage, and it may broaden the therapeutic area, make the surgery safer and more flexible.

  6. High-resolution medical ultrasound arrays using smart materials technology

    Bridger, Keith; Caldwell, Paul J.; Kuhn, Phillip; Winzer, Stephen R.

    1996-05-01

    Current ultrasound images have relatively low contrast (high levels of clutter) and resolution. Image quality could be dramatically improved if 2D ultrasound transducer arrays were available to perform the scans. These improvements would come from reducing clutter by eliminating target echoes that the beam width of a 1D array causes to be superimposed on a scan plane, and enhancing resolution by enabling the use of algorithms which correct the wavefront distortion introduced by propagation through tissue. The advent of 2D arrays would also enable 3D images to be displayed--eventually in real time. The fabrication of 2D ultrasound arrays is, however, very difficult. This stems from the acoustic requirements of the array (aperture, pitch and element size) which combine together to dictate large numbers (> 1000) of very-low capacitance (capacitance and impedance mismatch. This paper will show how the development of composite smart materials involving the integration of electromechanical elements with electronics is being extended to the development of relatively-inexpensive high-sensitivity 2D ultrasound arrays.

  7. High-frequency synthetic ultrasound array incorporating an actuator

    Ritter, Timothy A.; Shrout, Thomas R.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging at frequencies above 20 MHz relies almost exclusively on single-element transducers. IN order to apply array technology at these frequencies, several practical problems must be solved, including spatial scale and fabrication limitations, low device capacitance, and lack of a hardware beamformer. One method of circumventing these problems is to combine an array, an actuator, and a synthetic aperture software beamformer. The array can use relatively wide elements spaced on a coarse pitch. The actuator is used to move the array in short steps (less than the element pitch), and pulse-echo data is acquired at intermediate sample positions. The synthetic aperture beamformer reconstructs the image from the pulse-echo data. A 50 MHz example is analyzed in detail. Estimates of signal-to-noise reveal performance comparable to a standard phased array; furthermore, the actuated array requires half the number of elements, the elements are 8x wider, and only one channel is required. Simulated three-dimensional point spread functions demonstrate side lobe levels approaching - 40dB and main beam widths of 50 to 100 microns. A 50 MHz piezo-composite array design has been tested which displays experimental bandwidth of 70% while maintaining high sensitivity. Individual composite sub-elements are 18 microns wide. Once this array is integrated with a suitable actuator, it is anticipated that a tractable method of imaging with high frequency arrays will result.

  8. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies

    Melodelima, David [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France); Lafon, Cyril [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France); Prat, Frederic [Centre Hospitalier Bicetre, 78 Avenue General Leclerc, 94275 Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Birer, Alain [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France); Cathignol, Dominique [INSERM, Unite 556, 151 Cours Albert Thomas, 69424 Lyon (France)

    2002-12-07

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm{sup -2}. By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  9. HIFU Monitoring and Control with Dual-Mode Ultrasound Arrays

    Casper, Andrew Jacob

    The biological effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have been known and studied for decades. HIFU has been shown capable of treating a wide variety of diseases and disorders. However, despite its demonstrated potential, HIFU has been slow to gain clinical acceptance. This is due, in part, to the difficulty associated with robustly monitoring and controlling the delivery of the HIFU energy. The non-invasive nature of the surgery makes the assessment of treatment progression difficult, leading to long treatment times and a significant risk of under treatment. This thesis research develops new techniques and systems for robustly monitoring HIFU therapies for the safe and efficacious delivery of the intended treatment. Systems and algorithms were developed for the two most common modes of HIFU delivery systems: single-element and phased array applicators. Delivering HIFU with a single element transducer is a widely used technique in HIFU therapies. The simplicity of a single element offers many benefits in terms of cost and overall system complexity. Typical monitoring schemes rely on an external device (e.g. diagnostic ultrasound or MRI) to assess the progression of therapy. The research presented in this thesis explores using the same element to both deliver and monitor the HIFU therapy. The use of a dual-mode ultrasound transducer (DMUT) required the development of an FPGA based single-channel arbitrary waveform generator and high-speed data acquisition unit. Data collected from initial uncontrolled ablations led to the development of monitoring and control algorithms which were implemented directly on the FPGA. Close integration between the data acquisition and arbitrary waveform units allowed for fast, low latency control over the ablation process. Results are presented that demonstrate control of HIFU therapies over a broad range of intensities and in multiple in vitro tissues. The second area of investigation expands the DMUT research to an

  10. Photoacoustic-guided ultrasound therapy with a dual-mode ultrasound array

    Prost, Amaury; Funke, Arik; Tanter, Mickaël; Aubry, Jean-François; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2012-06-01

    Photoacoustics has recently been proposed as a potential method to guide and/or monitor therapy based on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). We experimentally demonstrate the creation of a HIFU lesion at the location of an optical absorber, by use of photoacoustic signals emitted by the absorber detected on a dual mode transducer array. To do so, a dedicated ultrasound array intended to both detect photoacoustic waves and emit HIFU with the same elements was used. Such a dual-mode array provides automatically coregistered reference frames for photoacoustic detection and HIFU emission, a highly desired feature for methods involving guidance or monitoring of HIFU by use of photoacoustics. The prototype is first characterized in terms of both photoacoustic and HIFU performances. The probe is then used to perform an idealized scenario of photoacoustic-guided therapy, where photoacoustic signals generated by an absorbing thread embedded in a piece of chicken breast are used to automatically refocus a HIFU beam with a time-reversal mirror and necrose the tissue at the location of the absorber.

  11. A nonlinear lumped model for ultrasound systems using CMUT arrays.

    Satir, Sarp; Degertekin, F Levent

    2015-10-01

    We present a nonlinear lumped model that predicts the electrical input-output behavior of an ultrasonic system using CMUTs with arbitrary array/membrane/electrode geometry in different transmit-receive configurations and drive signals. The receive-only operation, where the electrical output signal of the CMUT array in response to incident pressure field is calculated, is included by modifying the boundary elementbased vibroacoustic formulation for a CMUT array in rigid baffle. Along with the accurate large signal transmit model, this formulation covers pitch-catch and pulse-echo operation when transmit and receive signals can be separated in time. In cases when this separation is not valid, such as CMUTs used in continuous wave transmit-receive mode, pulse-echo mode with a nearby hard or soft wall or in a bounded space such as in a microfluidic channel, an efficient formulation based on the method of images is used. Some of these particular applications and the overall modeling approach have been validated through comparison with finite element analysis on specific examples including CMUTs with multiple electrodes. To further demonstrate the capability of the model for imaging applications, the two-way response of a partial dual-ring intravascular ultrasound array is simulated using a parallel computing cluster, where the output currents of individual array elements are calculated for given input pulse and compared with experimental results. With its versatility, the presented model can be a useful tool for rapid iterative CMUT-based system design and simulation for a broad range of ultrasonic applications. PMID:26470049

  12. 30 MHz radar observations of artificial E region field-aligned plasma irregularities

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-01-01

    Artificial E region field aligned irregularities (FAIs) have been observed during heating experiments at the HAARP facility using a new 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager deployed near Homer, Alaska. Irregularities were observed during brief experiments on three quiet days in July and August, 2007, when the daytime E region critical frequency was close to 3 MHz. Irregularities were consistently generated and detected during experiments with O-mode HF pumping on zenith with a 1-min on, 1-min...

  13. Acoustical cross-talk in row–column addressed 2-D transducer arrays for ultrasound imaging

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2015-01-01

    The acoustical cross-talk in row–column addressed 2-D transducer arrays for volumetric ultrasound imaging is investigated. Experimental results from a 2.7 MHz, λ/2-pitch capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array with 62 rows and 62 columns are presented and analyzed in the...

  14. Diffraction and coherence in breast ultrasound tomography: a study with a toroidal array

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simonetti, Francesco [IMPERIAL COLL.; Duric, Neb [KCI; Littrup, Peter [KCI

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound is commonly used as an adjunct to mammography for diagnostic evaluation of suspicions arising from breast cancer screening. As an alternative to conventional sonography that uses hand-held transducers, toroidal array probes that encircle the breast immersed in a water bath have been investigated for ultrasound tomography. In this paper, two sets of experiments performed with a prototype ultrasound scanner on a phantom and a human breast in vivo are used to investigate the effects of diffraction and coherence in ultrasound tomography. Reconstructions obtained with transmission diffraction tomography (TDT) are compared with conventional reflection imaging and computerized ultrasound tomography showing a substantial improvement. The in vivo tests demonstrate that TDT can image the complex boundary of a cancer mass and suggest that it can reveal the anatomy of milk ducts and Cooper's ligaments.

  15. Elastic characterization of swine aorta by scanning acoustic microscopy at 30 MHz

    Blase, Christopher; Shelke, Amit; Kundu, Tribikram; Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical properties of blood vessel walls are important determinants of physiology and pathology of the cardiovascular system. Acoustic imaging (B mode) is routinely used in a clinical setting to determine blood flow and wall distensibility. In this study scanning acoustic microscopy in vitro is used to determine spatially resolved tissue elastic properties. Broadband excitation of 30 MHz has been applied through scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM) for topographical imaging of swine thoracic aorta in reflection mode. Three differently treated tissue samples were investigated with SAM: a) treated with elastase to remove elastin, b) autoclaving for 5 hours to remove collagen and c) fresh controlled untreated sample as control. Experimental investigations are conducted for studying the contribution of individual protein components (elastin and collagen) to the material characteristics of the aortic wall. Conventional tensile testing has been conducted on the tissue samples to study the mechanical behavior. The mechanical properties measured by SAM and tensile testing show qualitative agreement.

  16. Synthetic Aperture Beamforming in Ultrasound using Moving Arrays

    Andresen, Henrik

    significant slice was missed and allows a more precise measurement of organ dimensions [2, 3, 4]. Conventional 3D ultrasound imaging is basically faced with two limitations. It is only able to have a single transmit focus point and each line in a 3D volume has to be created independently. This reduces image......Medical ultrasound (US) is widely used because it allows cheap real-time imaging of soft tissue with no known side-effects or hazards to either patients or operating personnel. US has existed since the 1960s and was originally adapted from the concept of radar and sonar. The development in...... ultrasound has allowed the technology to evolve from a showing a simple echo along a line to fully visualize entire organs. The image changes significantly depending on the orientation of the transducer, making it more difficult to see exact features. This poses challenges since anatomy is three...

  17. Improved beamforming using curved sparse 2D arrays in ultrasound.

    Kirkebø, Jan Egil; Austeng, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    In this work we have investigated the effect of curving phase-steered sparse periodic two-dimensional arrays in one direction, and relate this effect to the geometry of the arrays. We have shown that curving is equivalent to removing some of the element periodicity, thus adding some "randomness" to the layout. Compared to flat phase-steered periodically sparse two-dimensional arrays, curving offers an even greater suppression of grating lobes located at directions along the curvature. The class of arrays yielding improved performance due to this suppression of grating lobes has been characterized. The point spread functions of some previously proposed array layouts, shown to be promising for ultrasonic imaging, have been simulated. The arrays have been simulated with various number of elements as well as various focal points, with array and field parameters typical to those in volumetric cardiac imaging. On a 48 x 48 element grid with a transducer center frequency of 3 MHz and the target at 40 mm, reductions in the peak sidelobe level of up to 12dB were recorded for some critical steering directions, without significant differences in the beamwidth. The integrated sidelobe ratio was also examined, showing an almost equivalent performance as the flat array. This study shows that, without adding any complexity to the system, the overall image quality of a volumetric imaging system can be improved significantly by curving the array in one direction. PMID:17313966

  18. Electric Field Signatures in Wideband, 3 MHz and 30 MHz of Negative Ground Flashes Pertinent to Swedish Thunderstorms

    Mohd Muzafar Ismail

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the electric field signatures of negative ground flashes pertinent to the Swedish thunderstorms were recorded simultaneously during the summer of 2014 using wide (up to 100 MHz and narrow (at 3 MHz and 30 MHz as central frequencies bandwidth antenna systems. The electric field signatures were recorded for a time duration of 250 ms. In the analysis, the whole flash was considered and a total of 98 flashes were chosen where electric field signatures of all wideband, 3 MHz and 30 MHz signals were present. It is observed that preliminary breakdown pulses are stronger radiators at 3 and 30 MHz compared to the return strokes. A comparison of our results with those of the previous studies obtained from different geographical regions clearly shows that the strength of preliminary breakdown pulses is higher in the temperate region (Sweden for instance and is a function of latitude.

  19. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  20. Genomic SNP array as a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of foetal ultrasound abnormalities

    M. Srebniak (Malgorzata); M. Boter (Marjan); G.G. Oudesluijs (Grétel); T.E. Cohen-Overbeek (Titia); L.C. Govaerts (Lutgarde); K.E.M. Diderich (Karin); R. Oegema (Renske); M.F.C.M. Knapen (Maarten); I.M.B.H. van de Laar (Ingrid); M. Joosten (Marieke); A.R.M. van Opstal (Diane); R-J.H. Galjaard (Robert-Jan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We have investigated whether replacing conventional karyotyping by SNP array analysis in cases of foetal ultrasound abnormalities would increase the diagnostic yield and speed of prenatal diagnosis in clinical practice. Findings/results. From May 2009 till June 2011 we perfor

  1. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  2. 30 MHz hardware digital filter for signals of the ZEUS forward tracking detector

    Here we describe the FADC modules for the 5184 channels of the forward tracking detector of the ZEUS experiment at HERA (DESY), which convert the incoming analogue signals on a 104 MHz clock and apply a hardware digital filtering and zero suppression procedure on the acquired data. A module works on 32 input channels, nine boards are grouped in a 9HU crate. On a given trigger, the data are sequentially transferred to an output buffer for final acquisition, passing a 30 MHz digital filter and zero suppression hardware. The module uses a 9 bit signed FIR filter with eight tabs, where the eight filter coefficients are freely programmable. Only signals with two successive filtered values above a certain threshold are stored for output. Due to the filter procedure the data reduction rate is greater than 95%. The system provides a processing power of 600 mops per board for the foreseen application. In addition to the data reduction the main benefit of the filtering process is the significantly improved separation of double signals. ((orig.))

  3. 30 MHz radar observations of artificial E region field-aligned plasma irregularities

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial E region field aligned irregularities (FAIs have been observed during heating experiments at the HAARP facility using a new 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager deployed near Homer, Alaska. Irregularities were observed during brief experiments on three quiet days in July and August, 2007, when the daytime E region critical frequency was close to 3 MHz. Irregularities were consistently generated and detected during experiments with O-mode HF pumping on zenith with a 1-min on, 1-min off CW modulation. The scattering cross sections, rise, and fall times of the echoes were observed as well as their spectral properties. Results were found to be mainly in agreement with observations from other mid- and high-latitude sites with some discrepancies. Radar images of the irregularity-filled volume on one case exhibited clear variations in backscatter power and Doppler shift across the volume. The images furthermore show the emergence of a small irregularity-filled region to the south southwest of the main region in the approximate direction of magnetic zenith.

  4. SOUND-SPEED TOMOGRAPHY USING FIRST-ARRIVAL TRANSMISSION ULTRASOUND FOR A RING ARRAY

    HUANG, LIANJIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; QUAN, YOULI [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-31

    Sound-speed tomography images can be used for cancer detection and diagnosis. Tumors have generally higher sound speeds than the surrounding tissue. Quality and resolution of tomography images are primarily determined by the insonification/illumination aperture of ultrasound and the capability of the tomography method for accurately handling heterogeneous nature of the breast. We investigate the capability of an efficient time-of-flight tomography method using transmission ultrasound from a ring array for reconstructing sound-speed images of the breast. The method uses first arrival times of transmitted ultrasonic signals emerging from non-beamforming ultrasound transducers located around a ring. It properly accounts for ray bending within the breast by solving the eikonal equation using a finite-difference scheme. We test and validate the time-of-flight transmission tomography method using synthetic data for numerical breast phantoms containing various objects. In our simulation, the objects are immersed in water within a ring array. Two-dimensional synthetic data are generated using a finite-difference scheme to solve acoustic-wave equation in heterogeneous media. We study the reconstruction accuracy of the tomography method for objects with different sizes and shapes as well as different perturbations from the surrounding medium. In addition, we also address some specific data processing issues related to the tomography. Our tomography results demonstrate that the first-arrival transmission tomography method can accurately reconstruct objects larger than approximately five wavelengths of the incident ultrasound using a ring array.

  5. Real-time photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging: a simple solution for clinical ultrasound systems with linear arrays

    Montilla, Leonardo G.; Olafsson, Ragnar; Bauer, Daniel R.; Witte, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical studies have demonstrated that photoacoustic imaging (PAI) provides important diagnostic information during a routine breast exam for cancer. PAI enhances contrast between blood vessels and background tissue, which can help characterize suspicious lesions. However, most PAI systems are either not compatible with commercial ultrasound systems or inefficiently deliver light to the region of interest, effectively reducing the sensitivity of the technique. To address and potentially overcome these limitations, we developed an accessory for a standard linear ultrasound array that optimizes light delivery for PAI. The photoacoustic enabling device (PED) exploits an optically transparent acoustic reflector to help direct laser illumination to the region of interest. This study compares the PED with standard fiber bundle illumination in scattering and non-scattering media. In scattering media with the same incident fluence, the PED enhanced the photoacoustic signal by 18 dB at a depth of 5 mm and 6 dB at a depth of 20 mm. To demonstrate in vivo feasibility, we also used the device to image a mouse with a pancreatic tumor. The PED identified blood vessels at the periphery of the tumor, suggesting that PAI provides complementary contrast to standard pulse echo ultrasound. The PED is a simple and inexpensive solution that facilitates the translation of PAI technology to the clinic for routine screening of breast cancer.

  6. Predicting the sky from 30 MHz to 800 GHz: the extended Global Sky Model

    Liu, Adrian

    We propose to construct the extended Global Sky Model (eGSM), a software package and associated data products that are capable of generating maps of the sky at any frequency within a broad range (30 MHz to 800 GHz). The eGSM is constructed from archival data, and its outputs will include not only "best estimate" sky maps, but also accurate error bars and the ability to generate random realizations of missing modes in the input data. Such views of the sky are crucial in the practice of precision cosmology, where our ability to constrain cosmological parameters and detect new phenomena (such as B-mode signatures from primordial gravitational waves, or spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background; CMB) rests crucially on our ability to remove systematic foreground contamination. Doing so requires empirical measurements of the foreground sky brightness (such as that arising from Galactic synchrotron radiation, among other sources), which are typically performed only at select narrow wavelength ranges. We aim to transcend traditional wavelength limits by optimally combining existing data to provide a comprehensive view of the foreground sky at any frequency within the broad range of 30 MHz to 800 GHz. Previous efforts to interpolate between multi-frequency maps resulted in the Global Sky Model (GSM) of de Oliveira-Costa et al. (2008), a software package that outputs foreground maps at any frequency of the user's choosing between 10 MHz and 100 GHz. However, the GSM has a number of shortcomings. First and foremost, the GSM does not include the latest archival data from the Planck satellite. Multi-frequency models depend crucially on data from Planck, WMAP, and COBE to provide high-frequency "anchor" maps. Another crucial shortcoming is the lack of error bars in the output maps. Finally, the GSM is only able to predict temperature (i.e., total intensity) maps, and not polarization information. With the recent release of Planck's polarized data products, the

  7. Solar U- and J- Bursts at the Frequencies 10-30MHz

    Dorovskyy, V. V.; Melnik, V. N.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Abranin, E. P.; Rucker, H. O.; Lecacheux, A.

    2006-08-01

    In the present report we discuss the results of observations of solar U- and J- bursts over the frequency range 10-30MHz, which have been obtained within the framework of an international observational campaign in June - August, 2004 at the radio telescope UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine). We succeed to observe these types of bursts for the first time at such a low frequencies due to combination of large effective area of the radio telescope and high sensitivity of the new back-end. During June - August, 2004 about 30 U- and J- bursts were registered, and only 5 of them were confidently identified as U-bursts that may speak about the relative sparsity of the latter at mentioned frequencies. Both the isolated bursts and their sequences were observed. On average the turning frequencies lay in the range 10-22 MHz that corresponds to the arches heliocentric heights of 1.6-2.2 solar radii. In some sequences the bursts turning frequency was stable that may indicate the arch stability, while in others the turning frequency had tendency to vary from burst to burst. Durations of U- and J- bursts did not differ from those of usual Type III bursts (3-7s), while the drift rates of an ascending arm (on the average -1MHz/ s) was a little bit lower, than those of ordinary Type III bursts in this range. The harmonic structure of U- and J- bursts, and also Jb-J pairs (analogous to IIIb-III pairs) were registered. Also L-shaped bursts (Leblanc and Hoyos, 1985) were recorded. A specific feature of L-shaped bursts is prolonged zero-drift region on their dynamic spectra. The sizes and configurations of the arches were estimated on the base of obtained data. Possible explanations of the observed properties of U- and J- bursts are discussed.

  8. Design, development, and evaluation of focused ultrasound arrays for transesophageal cardiac ablations

    Lee, Hotaik

    The ultimate purpose of this dissertation is the evaluation of the feasibility of transesophageal cardiac surgery in arrhythmia treatment, using therapeutic ultrasound energy without the requirement for surgical incisions or blood contact. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting over 2.2 million Americans. One effective treatment is cardiac ablation, which shows a high rate of success in treating paroxysmal AF. As a prevailing modality for this treatment, catheter ablation using radiofrequency has been effective, but there is measurable morbidity and significant costs and time associated with this invasive procedure for permanent or persistent AF. To address these issues, a transesophageal ultrasound applicator for noninvasive cardiac ablations has been designed, developed and evaluated in this dissertation. Focused ultrasound for thermal ablation has gained interest for decades due to its noninvasive characteristics. Since the esophagus is close to the posterior of the left atrium, its position makes it attractive for the incision-less surgery of the selected area of the heart using ultrasound. The overall goal of this study is to bring an applicator as closely as possible to the heart in order to effectively deliver ultrasound energy, and create electrically isolating lesions in myocardial tissue, replicating the currently used Maze procedure. The Maze procedure is a surgical operation that treats AF by creating a grid of incisions resulting in non-conductive scar tissue in the atria. The initial design of an ultrasound applicator capable of creating atrial lesions from the esophagus, involved evaluating sound pressure fields within layers of the esophagus and myocardium. Based on the multiple factors of the simulation results of transducer arrays, current transesophageal medical devices, and the throat anatomy, a focused ultrasound transducer that can be inserted into the esophagus has been designed and tested. In this study, a

  9. Multiple-frequency phased array patterns for therapeutic ultrasound

    Ballard, John R.; Liu, Dalong; Casper, Andrew J.; Wan, Yayun; Almekkawy, Mohamed; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2012-10-01

    Modern transducer technology allows for the design and implementation of therapeutic arrays with relatively wide bandwidths (>50%) and low cross coupling between elements. We present results from a 3.5 MHz, 64-element prototype designed for small-animal and superficial therapeutic HIFU applications (Imasonic, Inc.) This transducer has a 58% 6-dB fractional BW average on its elements allowing for therapeutic output in the frequency range of 2.7 - 4.6 MHz. We present a simulation/experimental study to evaluate and optimize the focusing capabilities of the phased array prototype when excited by multiple-frequency components. Preliminary results have shown that multiple-frequency excitation may be beneficial in enhancing the therapeutic effects of HIFU beams. A multiple-focus pattern synthesis algorithm for arrays excited by multiple-frequency signals has been developed and tested using linear pressure field simulations. The algorithm maintains the precise phase relationship between the frequency components at each focal spot to achieve a desirable outcome. Hydrophone measurements to validate the approach show that nonlinear effects at the focal location are more prominent with the frequency mixing compared to conventional single frequency excitation. An in vitro study of lesion formation in freshly excised porcine liver was investigated.

  10. High-Frequency Ultrasound Array Designed for Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy.

    Cummins, Thomas; Eliahoo, Payam; Kirk Shung, K

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the development of a miniaturized high-frequency linear array that can be integrated within a core biopsy needle to improve tissue sampling accuracy during breast cancer biopsy procedures. The 64-element linear array has an element width of [Formula: see text], kerf width of [Formula: see text], element length of 1 mm, and element thickness of [Formula: see text]. The 2-2 array composite was fabricated using deep reactive ion etching of lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal material. The array composite fabrication process as well as a novel high-density electrical interconnect solution are presented and discussed. Array performance measurements show that the array had a center frequency and fractional bandwidth ([Formula: see text]) of 59.1 MHz and 29.4%, respectively. Insertion loss and adjacent element crosstalk at the center frequency were -41.0 and [Formula: see text], respectively. A B-mode image of a tungsten wire target phantom was captured using a synthetic aperture imaging system and the imaging test results demonstrate axial and lateral resolutions of 33.2 and [Formula: see text], respectively. PMID:27046895

  11. In vivo visualization of robotically implemented synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging system using curvilinear array

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic aperture for ultrasound is a technique utilizing a wide aperture in both transmit and receive to enhance the ultrasound image quality. The limitation of synthetic aperture is the maximum available aperture size limit determined by the physical size of ultrasound probe. We propose Synthetic-Tracked Aperture Ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging system to overcome the limitation by extending the beamforming aperture size through ultrasound probe tracking. With a setup involving a robotic arm, the ultrasound probe is moved using the robotic arm, while the positions on a scanning trajectory are tracked in real-time. Data from each pose are synthesized to construct a high resolution image. In previous studies, we have demonstrated the feasibility through phantom experiments. However, various additional factors such as real-time data collection or motion artifacts should be taken into account when the in vivo target becomes the subject. In this work, we build a robot-based STRATUS imaging system with continuous data collection capability considering the practical implementation. A curvilinear array is used instead of a linear array to benefit from its wider capture angle. We scanned human forearms under two scenarios: one submerged the arm in the water tank under 10 cm depth, and the other directly scanned the arm from the surface. The image contrast improved 5.51 dB, and 9.96 dB for the underwater scan and the direct scan, respectively. The result indicates the practical feasibility of STRATUS imaging system, and the technique can be potentially applied to the wide range of human body.

  12. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100x100x80 mm3 with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  13. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100×100×80 mm3 with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  14. Genomic SNP array as a gold standard for prenatal diagnosis of foetal ultrasound abnormalities

    Srebniak Malgorzata I

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have investigated whether replacing conventional karyotyping by SNP array analysis in cases of foetal ultrasound abnormalities would increase the diagnostic yield and speed of prenatal diagnosis in clinical practice. Findings/results From May 2009 till June 2011 we performed HumanCytoSNP-12 array (HCS (http://www.Illumina.com analysis in 207 cases of foetal structural abnormalities. HCS allows detecting unbalanced genomic abnormalities with a resolution of about 150/200 kb. All cases were selected by a clinical geneticist after excluding the most common aneuploidies by RAD (rapid aneuploidy detection. Pre-test genetic counselling was offered in all cases. In 24/207 (11,6% foetuses a clinically relevant genetic abnormality was detected. Only 8/24 abnormalities would have been detected if only routine karyotyping was performed. Submicroscopic abnormalities were found in 16/207 (7,7% cases. The array results were achieved within 1-2 weeks after amniocentesis. Conclusions Prenatal SNP array testing is faster than karyotyping and allows detecting much smaller aberrations (~0.15 Mb in addition to the microscopic unbalanced chromosome abnormalities detectable with karyotyping (~ > 5 Mb. Since karyotyping would have missed 66% (16/24 of genomic abnormalities in our cohort, we propose to perform genomic high resolution array testing assisted by pre-test counselling as a primary prenatal diagnostic test in cases of foetal ultrasound abnormalities.

  15. Validity and reliability of rectus femoris ultrasound measurements: Comparison of curved-array and linear-array transducers

    Kendra Hammond, MD

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscle-mass loss augers increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Muscle-mass loss can be assessed by wide linear-array ultrasound transducers connected to cumbersome, expensive console units. Whether cheaper, hand-carried units equipped with curved-array transducers can be used as alternatives is unknown. Accordingly, our primary aim was to investigate in 15 nondisabled subjects the validity of measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area by using a curved-array transducer against a linear-array transducer—the reference-standard technique. In these subjects, we also determined the reliability of measurements obtained by a novice operator versus measurements obtained by an experienced operator. Lastly, the relationship between quadriceps strength and rectus area recorded by two experienced operators with a curved-array transducer was assessed in 17 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In nondisabled subjects, the rectus cross-sectional area measured with the curved-array transducer by the novice and experienced operators was valid (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]: 0.98, typical percentage error [%TE]: 3.7% and reliable (ICC: 0.79, %TE: 9.7%. In the subjects with COPD, both reliability (ICC: 0.99 and repeatability (%TE: 7.6% and 9.8% were high. Rectus area was related to quadriceps strength in COPD for both experienced operators (coefficient of determination: 0.67 and 0.70. In conclusion, measurements of rectus femoris cross-sectional area recorded with a curved-array transducer connected to a hand-carried unit are valid, reliable, and reproducible, leading us to contend that this technique is suitable for cross-sectional and longitudinal studies.

  16. Piezoelectric Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer (PMUT Arrays for Integrated Sensing, Actuation and Imaging

    Yongqiang Qiu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Many applications of ultrasound for sensing, actuation and imaging require miniaturized and low power transducers and transducer arrays integrated with electronic systems. Piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers (PMUTs, diaphragm-like thin film flexural transducers typically formed on silicon substrates, are a potential solution for integrated transducer arrays. This paper presents an overview of the current development status of PMUTs and a discussion of their suitability for miniaturized and integrated devices. The thin film piezoelectric materials required to functionalize these devices are discussed, followed by the microfabrication techniques used to create PMUT elements and the constraints the fabrication imposes on device design. Approaches for electrical interconnection and integration with on-chip electronics are discussed. Electrical and acoustic measurements from fabricated PMUT arrays with up to 320 diaphragm elements are presented. The PMUTs are shown to be broadband devices with an operating frequency which is tunable by tailoring the lateral dimensions of the flexural membrane or the thicknesses of the constituent layers. Finally, the outlook for future development of PMUT technology and the potential applications made feasible by integrated PMUT devices are discussed.

  17. MR thermometry characterization of a hyperthermia ultrasound array designed using the k-space computational method

    Lee Hotaik

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound induced hyperthermia is a useful adjuvant to radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. A uniform thermal dose (43°C for 30 minutes is required within the targeted cancerous volume for effective therapy. This requires specific ultrasound phased array design and appropriate thermometry method. Inhomogeneous, acoustical, three-dimensional (3D prostate models and economical computational methods provide necessary tools to predict the appropriate shape of hyperthermia phased arrays for better focusing. This research utilizes the k-space computational method and a 3D human prostate model to design an intracavitary ultrasound probe for hyperthermia treatment of prostate cancer. Evaluation of the probe includes ex vivo and in vivo controlled hyperthermia experiments using the noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI thermometry. Methods A 3D acoustical prostate model was created using photographic data from the Visible Human Project®. The k-space computational method was used on this coarse grid and inhomogeneous tissue model to simulate the steady state pressure wavefield of the designed phased array using the linear acoustic wave equation. To ensure the uniformity and spread of the pressure in the length of the array, and the focusing capability in the width of the array, the equally-sized elements of the 4 × 20 elements phased array were 1 × 14 mm. A probe was constructed according to the design in simulation using lead zerconate titanate (PZT-8 ceramic and a Delrin® plastic housing. Noninvasive MRI thermometry and a switching feedback controller were used to accomplish ex vivo and in vivo hyperthermia evaluations of the probe. Results Both exposimetry and k-space simulation results demonstrated acceptable agreement within 9%. With a desired temperature plateau of 43.0°C, ex vivo and in vivo controlled hyperthermia experiments showed that the MRI temperature at the steady state was 42.9 ± 0.38

  18. Comparison of 3-D Synthetic Aperture Phased-Array Ultrasound Imaging and Parallel Beamforming

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that synthetic apertureimaging (SAI) can be used to achieve real-time 3-D ultra-sound phased-array imaging. It investigates whether SAI in-creases the image quality compared with the parallel beam-forming (PB) technique for real-time 3-D imaging. Data areobtained using both...... simulations and measurements with anultrasound research scanner and a commercially available 3.5-MHz 1024-element 2-D transducer array. To limit the probecable thickness, 256 active elements are used in transmit andreceive for both techniques. The two imaging techniques weredesigned for cardiac imaging, which...... requires sequences de-signed for imaging down to 15cm of depth and a frame rateof at least 20Hz. The imaging quality of the two techniquesis investigated through simulations as a function of depth andangle. SAI improved the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) at low steering angles by 35%, and the 20-d...

  19. Sample volume misregistration in linear array-based dual beam Doppler ultrasound systems.

    Steel, Robin; Fish, Peter J

    2003-07-01

    Large velocity estimation errors can occur in dual beam Doppler ultrasound velocity measurement systems when there is left/right sample volume misregistration, particularly when the interbeam angle is small. Such misregistration will occur when there is tissue inhomogeneity. This is investigated for a typical type of inhomogeneity--a layer of fat--by calculating the amount of both angle and translation misregistration occurring in such a system realized using a single linear array transducer. The complex sample volume sensitivity is calculated using a modified time domain approach, combining the spatial impulse response method with ray tracing. The effects on these misregistrations of altering the aperture sizes and their relative positions on the array is then investigated to derive an improved aperture configuration for dual beam velocity estimation. Arrangements with transmit apertures wider than the receive apertures are shown to be preferable in this context. PMID:12894917

  20. The design of a focused ultrasound transducer array for the treatment of stroke: a simulation study

    Pajek, Daniel; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-08-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of mechanically disintegrating blood clots at high pressures. Safe thrombolysis may require frequencies higher than those currently utilized by transcranial HIFU. Since the attenuation and focal distortion of ultrasound in bone increases at higher frequencies, resulting focal pressures are diminished. This study investigated the feasibility of using transcranial HIFU for the non-invasive treatment of ischemic stroke. The use of large aperture, 1.1-1.5 MHz phased arrays in targeting four clinically relevant vessel locations was simulated. Resulting focal sizes decreased with frequency, producing a maximum -3 dB depth of field and lateral width of 2.0 and 1.2 mm, respectively. Mean focal gains above an order of magnitude were observed in three of four targets and transducer intensities required to achieve thrombolysis were determined. Required transducer element counts are about an order of magnitude higher than what currently exists and so, although technically feasible, new arrays would need to be developed to realize this as a treatment modality for stroke.

  1. The design of a focused ultrasound transducer array for the treatment of stroke: a simulation study

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is capable of mechanically disintegrating blood clots at high pressures. Safe thrombolysis may require frequencies higher than those currently utilized by transcranial HIFU. Since the attenuation and focal distortion of ultrasound in bone increases at higher frequencies, resulting focal pressures are diminished. This study investigated the feasibility of using transcranial HIFU for the non-invasive treatment of ischemic stroke. The use of large aperture, 1.1–1.5 MHz phased arrays in targeting four clinically relevant vessel locations was simulated. Resulting focal sizes decreased with frequency, producing a maximum –3 dB depth of field and lateral width of 2.0 and 1.2 mm, respectively. Mean focal gains above an order of magnitude were observed in three of four targets and transducer intensities required to achieve thrombolysis were determined. Required transducer element counts are about an order of magnitude higher than what currently exists and so, although technically feasible, new arrays would need to be developed to realize this as a treatment modality for stroke. (paper)

  2. A random phased array device for delivery of high intensity focused ultrasound

    Hand, J W [Radiological Sciences Unit, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Hammersmith Hospital, London W12 0HS (United Kingdom); Shaw, A; Sadhoo, N; Rajagopal, S [Acoustics Group, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Dickinson, R J [Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gavrilov, L R [N.N. Andreev Acoustics Institute, 117036 Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: j.hand@imperial.ac.uk

    2009-10-07

    Randomized phased arrays can offer electronic steering of a single focus and simultaneous multiple foci concomitant with low levels of secondary maxima and are potentially useful as sources of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). This work describes laboratory testing of a 1 MHz random phased array consisting of 254 elements on a spherical shell of radius of curvature 130 mm and diameter 170 mm. Acoustic output power and efficiency are measured for a range of input electrical powers, and field distributions for various single- and multiple-focus conditions are evaluated by a novel technique using an infrared camera to provide rapid imaging of temperature changes on the surface of an absorbing target. Experimental results show that the array can steer a single focus laterally to at least {+-}15 mm off axis and axially to more than {+-}15 mm from the centre of curvature of the array and patterns of four and five simultaneous foci {+-}10 mm laterally and axially whilst maintaining low intensity levels in secondary maxima away from the targeted area in good agreement with linear theoretical predictions. Experiments in which pork meat was thermally ablated indicate that contiguous lesions several cm{sup 3} in volume can be produced using the patterns of multiple foci.

  3. Thermal therapy for breast tumors by using a cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning: a preliminary numerical study

    Ho, Cheng-Shiao; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a 1 MHz cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning to produce uniform heating for breast tumor thermal therapy. The breast was submerged in water and surrounded by the cylindrical ultrasound phased array. A multifocus pattern was generated and electrically scanned by the phased array to enlarge the treatment lesion in single heating. To prevent overheating normal tissues, a large planning target volume (PTV) would be divided into several planes with several subunits on each plane and sequentially treated with a cooling phase between two successive heatings of the subunit. Heating results for different target temperatures (Ttgt), blood perfusion rates and sizes of the PTV have been studied. Furthermore, a superficial breast tumor with different water temperatures was also studied. Results indicated that a higher target temperature would produce a slightly larger thermal lesion, and a higher blood perfusion rate would not affect the heating lesion size but increase the heating time significantly. The acoustic power deposition and temperature elevations in ribs can be minimized by orienting the acoustic beam from the ultrasound phased array approximately parallel to the ribs. In addition, a large acoustic window on the convex-shaped breast surface for the proposed ultrasound phased array and the cooling effect of water would prevent the skin overheating for the production of a lesion at any desired location. This study demonstrated that the proposed cylindrical ultrasound phased array can provide effective heating for breast tumor thermal therapy without overheating the skin and ribs within a reasonable treatment time.

  4. 3-D Ultrasound Imaging Performance of a Row-Column Addressed 2-D Array Transducer: A Measurement Study

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    A real-time 3-D ultrasound measurement using only 32 elements and 32 emissions is presented. The imaging quality is compared to a conventionally fully addressed array using 1024 elements and 256 emissions. The main-lobe of the measured line spread function is almost identical, but the side...

  5. SUPER-RESOLUTION ULTRASOUND TOMOGRAPHY: A PRELIMINARY STUDY WITH A RING ARRAY

    HUANG, LIANJIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SIMONETTI, FRANCESCO [NON LANL; DURIC, NEBOJSA [NON LANL; RAMA, OLSI [NON LANL

    2007-01-18

    Ultrasound tomography attempts to retrieve the structure of an objective by exploiting the interaction of acoustic waves with the object. A fundamental limit of ultrasound tomography is that features cannot be resolved if they are spaced less than {lambda}/2 apart, where {lambda} is wavelength of the probing wave, regardless of the degree of accuracy of the measurements. Therefore, since the attenuation of the probing wave with propagation distance increases as {lambda} decreases, resolution has to be traded against imaging depth. Recently, it has been shown that the {lambda}/2 limit is a consequence of the Born approximation (implicit in the imaging algorithms currently employed) which neglects the distortion of the probing wavefield as it travels through the medium to be imaged. On the other hand, such a distortion, which is due to the multiple scattering phenomenon, can encode unlimited resolution in the radiating component of the scattered field. Previously, a resolution better than {lambda}/3 has been reported in these proceedings [F. Simonetti, pp. 126 (2006)] in the case of elastic wave probing. In this paper, they demonstrate experimentally a resolution better than {lambda}/4 for objects immersed in a water bth probed by means of a ring array which excites and detects pressure waves in a full view configuration.

  6. In vivo imaging of inducible tyrosinase gene expression with an ultrasound array-based photoacoustic system

    Harrison, Tyler; Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosinase, a key enzyme in the production of melanin, has shown promise as a reporter of genetic activity. While green fluorescent protein has been used extensively in this capacity, it is limited in its ability to provide information deep in tissue at a reasonable resolution. As melanin is a strong absorber of light, it is possible to image gene expression using tyrosinase with photoacoustic imaging technologies, resulting in excellent resolutions at multiple-centimeter depths. While our previous work has focused on creating and imaging MCF-7 cells with doxycycline-controlled tyrosinase expression, we have now established the viability of these cells in a murine model. Using an array-based photoacoustic imaging system with 5 MHz center frequency, we capture interleaved ultrasound and photoacoustic images of tyrosinase-expressing MCF-7 tumors both in a tissue mimicking phantom, and in vivo. Images of both the tyrosinase-expressing tumor and a control tumor are presented as both coregistered ultrasound-photoacoustic B-scan images and 3-dimensional photoacoustic volumes created by mechanically scanning the transducer. We find that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible with a signal level 12dB greater than that of the control tumor in vivo. Phantom studies with excised tumors show that the tyrosinase-expressing tumor is visible at depths in excess of 2cm, and have suggested that our imaging system is sensitive to a transfection rate of less than 1%.

  7. Simultaneous positioning of cells into two-dimensional arrays using ultrasound.

    Neild, Adrian; Oberti, Stefano; Radziwill, Gerald; Dual, Jürg

    2007-08-01

    Contactless simultaneous positioning of micrometer-sized particles in suspension (e.g., copolymer beads, living cells, silicon microparts) can be performed using ultrasound. Current devices are capable of collecting particles into planes or lines by exciting a resonance in the fluid by means of a piezoelectric transducer located beneath the fluidic cavity and are designed such that a one-dimensional pressure field is created. The focus of this work is to collect cells in distinct point locations for potential drug screening array applications. A device to create two-dimensional arrays of cells within a micromachined chamber is described. The chamber is etched into a silicon wafer and sealed with glass; on the underside of the silicon layer a piezoelectric actuator is attached. A signal is applied to each of two orthogonally aligned strips electrodes defined on the surface of the piezoelectric plate. These two strip electrodes create independently addressable approximately one-dimensional pressure fields. It is shown that by applying the same signal to each electrode a diagonally aligned grid of cells can be produced. However, the independence of the two electrodes allows the application of two signals with slightly different frequencies to be applied which creates a grid of circular cell clumps highly suitable for the identified application. (c) PMID:17187440

  8. Ultrasound nondestructive evaluation (NDE) imaging with transducer arrays and adaptive processing.

    Li, Minghui; Hayward, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the challenging problem of ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation (NDE) imaging with adaptive transducer arrays. In NDE applications, most materials like concrete, stainless steel and carbon-reinforced composites used extensively in industries and civil engineering exhibit heterogeneous internal structure. When inspected using ultrasound, the signals from defects are significantly corrupted by the echoes form randomly distributed scatterers, even defects that are much larger than these random reflectors are difficult to detect with the conventional delay-and-sum operation. We propose to apply adaptive beamforming to the received data samples to reduce the interference and clutter noise. Beamforming is to manipulate the array beam pattern by appropriately weighting the per-element delayed data samples prior to summing them. The adaptive weights are computed from the statistical analysis of the data samples. This delay-weight-and-sum process can be explained as applying a lateral spatial filter to the signals across the probe aperture. Simulations show that the clutter noise is reduced by more than 30 dB and the lateral resolution is enhanced simultaneously when adaptive beamforming is applied. In experiments inspecting a steel block with side-drilled holes, good quantitative agreement with simulation results is demonstrated. PMID:22368457

  9. Thermoacoustic range verification using a clinical ultrasound array provides perfectly co-registered overlay of the Bragg peak onto an ultrasound image

    Patch, S. K.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Jackson, A.; Qadadha, Y. M.; Campbell, K. S.; Albright, R. A.; Bloemhard, P.; Donoghue, A. P.; Siero, C. R.; Gimpel, T. L.; Small, S. M.; Ninemire, B. F.; Johnson, M. B.; Phair, L.

    2016-08-01

    The potential of particle therapy due to focused dose deposition in the Bragg peak has not yet been fully realized due to inaccuracies in range verification. The purpose of this work was to correlate the Bragg peak location with target structure, by overlaying the location of the Bragg peak onto a standard ultrasound image. Pulsed delivery of 50 MeV protons was accomplished by a fast chopper installed between the ion source and the cyclotron inflector. The chopper limited the train of bunches so that 2 Gy were delivered in 2 μ \\text{s} . The ion pulse generated thermoacoustic pulses that were detected by a cardiac ultrasound array, which also produced a grayscale ultrasound image. A filtered backprojection algorithm focused the received signal to the Bragg peak location with perfect co-registration to the ultrasound images. Data was collected in a room temperature water bath and gelatin phantom with a cavity designed to mimic the intestine, in which gas pockets can displace the Bragg peak. Phantom experiments performed with the cavity both empty and filled with olive oil confirmed that displacement of the Bragg peak due to anatomical change could be detected. Thermoacoustic range measurements in the waterbath agreed with Monte Carlo simulation within 1.2 mm. In the phantom, thermoacoustic range estimates and first-order range estimates from CT images agreed to within 1.5 mm.

  10. Thermoacoustic range verification using a clinical ultrasound array provides perfectly co-registered overlay of the Bragg peak onto an ultrasound image.

    Patch, S K; Kireeff Covo, M; Jackson, A; Qadadha, Y M; Campbell, K S; Albright, R A; Bloemhard, P; Donoghue, A P; Siero, C R; Gimpel, T L; Small, S M; Ninemire, B F; Johnson, M B; Phair, L

    2016-08-01

    The potential of particle therapy due to focused dose deposition in the Bragg peak has not yet been fully realized due to inaccuracies in range verification. The purpose of this work was to correlate the Bragg peak location with target structure, by overlaying the location of the Bragg peak onto a standard ultrasound image. Pulsed delivery of 50 MeV protons was accomplished by a fast chopper installed between the ion source and the cyclotron inflector. The chopper limited the train of bunches so that 2 Gy were delivered in [Formula: see text]. The ion pulse generated thermoacoustic pulses that were detected by a cardiac ultrasound array, which also produced a grayscale ultrasound image. A filtered backprojection algorithm focused the received signal to the Bragg peak location with perfect co-registration to the ultrasound images. Data was collected in a room temperature water bath and gelatin phantom with a cavity designed to mimic the intestine, in which gas pockets can displace the Bragg peak. Phantom experiments performed with the cavity both empty and filled with olive oil confirmed that displacement of the Bragg peak due to anatomical change could be detected. Thermoacoustic range measurements in the waterbath agreed with Monte Carlo simulation within 1.2 mm. In the phantom, thermoacoustic range estimates and first-order range estimates from CT images agreed to within 1.5 mm. PMID:27385261

  11. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind the rib cage using high intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path, and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of...

  12. The correlation of the 10 to 30 MeV proton flux from the NOAA satellites and the Thule 30 MHz riometer. Technical memo

    There is a requirement for realtime specification of riometer absorption in the polar cap region using proton flux measured with satellite-borne detectors. The proton flux data from the NOAA series of satellites and the Thule 30 MHz riometer data satisfy this requirement. A study was done to correlate these two parameters within state-of-the-art theoretical reasoning

  13. A preliminary evaluation work on a 3D ultrasound imaging system for 2D array transducer

    Zhong, Xiaoli; Li, Xu; Yang, Jiali; Li, Chunyu; Song, Junjie; Ding, Mingyue; Yuchi, Ming

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a preliminary evaluation work on a pre-designed 3-D ultrasound imaging system. The system mainly consists of four parts, a 7.5MHz, 24×24 2-D array transducer, the transmit/receive circuit, power supply, data acquisition and real-time imaging module. The row-column addressing scheme is adopted for the transducer fabrication, which greatly reduces the number of active channels . The element area of the transducer is 4.6mm by 4.6mm. Four kinds of tests were carried out to evaluate the imaging performance, including the penetration depth range, axial and lateral resolution, positioning accuracy and 3-D imaging frame rate. Several strong reflection metal objects , fixed in a water tank, were selected for the purpose of imaging due to a low signal-to-noise ratio of the transducer. The distance between the transducer and the tested objects , the thickness of aluminum, and the seam width of the aluminum sheet were measured by a calibrated micrometer to evaluate the penetration depth, the axial and lateral resolution, respectively. The experiment al results showed that the imaging penetration depth range was from 1.0cm to 6.2cm, the axial and lateral resolution were 0.32mm and 1.37mm respectively, the imaging speed was up to 27 frames per second and the positioning accuracy was 9.2%.

  14. A 63 element 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Smith Nadine

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are very common diseases in older American men, thus having a reliable treatment modality for both diseases is of great importance. The currently used treating options, mainly surgical ones, have numerous complications, which include the many side effects that accompany such procedures, besides the invasive nature of such techniques. Focused ultrasound is a relatively new treating modality that is showing promising results in treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Thus this technique is gaining more attention in the past decade as a non-invasive method to treat both diseases. Methods In this paper, the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array to be used for treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is presented. With this array, the position of the focus can be controlled by changing the electrical power and phase to the individual elements for electronically focusing and steering in a three dimensional volume. The array was designed with a maximum steering angle of ± 13.5° in the transverse direction and a maximum depth of penetration of 11 cm, which allows the treatment of large prostates. The transducer piezoelectric ceramic, matching layers and cable impedance have been designed for maximum power transfer to tissue. Results To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated field. Ex vivo experiments using bovine tissue were performed with various lesion sizes and indicated the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. Conclusion A 1.75 dimensional array, that overcame the drawbacks associated with one-dimensional arrays, has been designed, built and successfully tested. Design issues, such as cable and ceramic capacitances, were taken into account when designing this

  15. Targeted hyperthermia in prostate with an MR-guided endorectal ultrasound phased array: patient specific modeling and preliminary experiments

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Prakash, Punit; Plata, Juan; Holbrook, Andrew; Rieke, Viola; Kurhanewicz, John; Hsu, I.-C.; Diederich, Chris J.

    2013-02-01

    Feasibility of hyperthermia delivery to the prostate with a commercially available MR-guided endorectal ultrasound (ERUS) phased array ablation system (ExAblate 2100, Insightec, LTD) was assessed through computer simulations and ex vivo experiments. The simulations included a 3D FEM-based biothermal model, and acoustic field calculations for the ExAblate phased array (2.3 MHz, 2.3x4.0 cm2) using the rectangular radiator method. Array beamforming strategies were investigated to deliver 30-min hyperthermia (prostate cancer, identified from MR images in representative patient cases. Constraints on power densities, sonication durations and switching speeds imposed by ExAblate hardware and software were incorporated in the models. THIFU systems can be controlled for continuous hyperthermia in prostate to augment radiotherapy and drug delivery. [FUS Foundation, NIH R01 122276, 111981].

  16. A Flexible Ultrasound Transducer Array with Micro-Machined Bulk PZT

    Zhe Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel flexible piezoelectric micro-machined ultrasound transducer, which is based on PZT and a polyimide substrate. The transducer is made on the polyimide substrate and packaged with medical polydimethylsiloxane. Instead of etching the PZT ceramic, this paper proposes a method of putting diced PZT blocks into holes on the polyimide which are pre-etched. The device works in d31 mode and the electromechanical coupling factor is 22.25%. Its flexibility, good conformal contacting with skin surfaces and proper resonant frequency make the device suitable for heart imaging. The flexible packaging ultrasound transducer also has a good waterproof performance after hundreds of ultrasonic electric tests in water. It is a promising ultrasound transducer and will be an effective supplementary ultrasound imaging method in the practical applications.

  17. Quantitative shear-wave optical coherence elastography with a programmable phased array ultrasound as the wave source.

    Song, Shaozhen; Le, Nhan Minh; Huang, Zhihong; Shen, Tueng; Wang, Ruikang K

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to implement a beam-steering ultrasound as the wave source for shear-wave optical coherence elastography (SW-OCE) to achieve an extended range of elastic imaging of the tissue sample. We introduce a linear phased array ultrasound transducer (LPAUT) as the remote and programmable wave source and a phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography (OCT) as the sensitive shear-wave detector. The LPAUT is programmed to launch acoustic radiation force impulses (ARFI) focused at desired locations within the range of OCT imaging, upon which the elasticity map of the entire OCT B-scan cross section is recovered by spatial compounding of the elastic maps derived from each launch of AFRIs. We also propose a directional filter to separate the shear-wave propagation at different directions in order to reduce the effect of tissue heterogeneity on the shear-wave propagation within tissue. The feasibility of this proposed approach is then demonstrated by determining the stiffness of tissue-mimicking phantoms with agarose concentrations of 0.5% and 1% and also by imaging the Young's modulus of retinal and choroidal tissues within a porcine eye ball ex vivo. The approach opens up opportunities to combine medical ultrasound imaging and SW-OCE for high-resolution localized quantitative assessment of tissue biomechanical property. PMID:26512505

  18. A cylindrical-section ultrasound phased-array applicator for hyperthermia cancer therapy.

    Ebbini, E S; Umemura, S I; Ibbini, M; Cain, C A

    1988-01-01

    A phased-array applicator geometry for deep localized hyperthermia is presented. The array consists of rectangular transducer elements forming a section of a cylinder that conforms to the body portals in the abdominal and pelvic regions. Focusing and scanning properties of the cylindrical-section array are investigated in homogeneous lossy media using appropriate computer simulations. The characteristic focus of this array is shown to be spatially limited in both transverse and longitudinal directions with intensity gain values suitable for deep hyperthermia applications. The ability of the cylindrical-section phased array to generate multiple foci using the field conjugation method is examined. The effect of the grating lobes on the power deposition pattern of the scanned field is shown to be minimal. Steady-state temperature distributions are simulated using a three-dimensional thermal model of the normal tissue layers surrounding a tumor of typical volume. The advantages and the limitations of this array configuration are discussed. PMID:18290188

  19. Focusing of high intensity ultrasound through the rib cage using a therapeutic random phased array

    Bobkova, Svetlana; Gavrilov, Leonid; Khokhlova, Vera; Shaw, Adam; Hand, Jeffrey; ,

    2010-01-01

    A method for focusing high intensity ultrasound through a rib cage that aims to minimize heating of the ribs whilst maintaining high intensities at the focus (or foci) is proposed and tested theoretically and experimentally. Two approaches, one based on geometric acoustics and the other accounting for diffraction effects associated with propagation through the rib cage, are investigated theoretically for idealized source conditions. It is shown that for an idealized radiator the diffraction a...

  20. Development of Endoscopic Ultrasound Radial Arrays%环形内窥镜超声换能器的研制

    陈燕; 周丹; 林国豪; 吴锦川; 戴吉岩; 罗豪甦; 陈王丽华

    2014-01-01

    本论文报道了当前环形内窥镜超声换能器的两种不同的制备方法以及其性能的表征。方法一为先采用切割薄片高性能压电PMN-PT单晶和其1~3复合材料制备平面阵列,然后将平面阵列卷曲成圆环形阵列。所制备的128阵元PMN-PT单晶阵列具有较宽带宽达78%,64阵元PMN-PT单晶/环氧1~3复合阵列带宽高达102%。方法二为旋转切割法,通过直接对带有匹配层和背衬材料的压电陶瓷管进行切割,制作不同尺寸及频率的环形超声内窥镜阵列。%We report the fabrication and characterization of endoscopic ultrasound radial arrays transducers for medical imaging by two different methods. The ifrst approach is cal ed wrapping method, high-performance PMN-PT single crystal and PMN-PT/epoxy 1-3 composite plates are used as active elements. After bonded with backing and matching layers and being cut into arrays, transducers are wrapped across a metal tube to form the radial arrays. The bandwidth of the 128-element PMN-PT single crystal radial array and 64-element PMN-PT/epoxy 1-3 composite radial array transducers can achieved 78%and 102%, respectively. In the second method, the PZT tube was selected to fabricate the 50-element 14 MHz and 100-element 3 MHz radial arrays by a rotate-and-dice method. The results show that these two methods are feasible to fabricate radial arrays for endoscopic applications.

  1. Ultrasound pulse-echo measurements on rough surfaces with linear array transducers

    Sjøj, Sidsel M. N.; Blanco, Esther N.; Wilhjelm, Jens E.;

    2012-01-01

    The echo from planar surfaces with rms roughness, Rq, in the range from 0-155 μm was measured with a clinical linear array transducer at different angles of incidence at 6 MHz and 12 MHz. The echo-pulse from the surfaces was isolated with an equal sized window and the power of the echo-pulse was ...

  2. Volumetric Ultrasound Imaging with Row-Column Addressed 2-D Arrays Using Spatial Matched Filter Beamforming

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann;

    2015-01-01

    . However, the achievable spatial resolution and contrast of the B-mode images in Delay and Sum (DAS) beamforming are limited by the aperture size and by the operating frequency. This paper, investigates Spatial Matched Filter (SMF) beamforming on row-column addressed 2-D arrays to increase spatial...

  3. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Phased arrays, ultrasonic imaging and nonlinear acoustics

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2003/2004. After a short introduction a review of beam forming fundamentals required for proper understanding phased array operation is included. The factors that determine lateral resolution during ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids are analyzed and results of simulations modelling contact inspection of copper are presented. In the second chapter an improved synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) technique is introduced. The proposed SAI technique is characterized by an enhanced lateral resolution compared with the previously proposed extended synthetic aperture focusing technique (ESAFT). The enhancement of imaging performance is achieved due to more realistic assumption concerning the probability density function of scatterers in the region of interest. The proposed technique takes the form of a two-step algorithm using the result obtained in the first step as a prior for the second step. Final chapter contains summary of our recent experimental and theoretical research on nonlinear ultrasonics of unbounded interfaces. A new theoretical model for rough interfaces is developed, and the experimental results from the copper specimens that mimic contact cracks of different types are presented. Derivation of the theory and selected measurement results are given in appendix

  4. Inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel by means of ultrasound. Phased arrays, ultrasonic imaging and nonlinear acoustics

    Stepinski, Tadeusz (ed.); Ping Wu; Wennerstroem, Erik [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Signals and Systems

    2004-09-01

    This report contains the research results concerning advanced ultrasound for the inspection of copper canisters for spent nuclear fuel obtained at Signals and Systems, Uppsala University in years 2003/2004. After a short introduction a review of beam forming fundamentals required for proper understanding phased array operation is included. The factors that determine lateral resolution during ultrasonic imaging of flaws in solids are analyzed and results of simulations modelling contact inspection of copper are presented. In the second chapter an improved synthetic aperture imaging (SAI) technique is introduced. The proposed SAI technique is characterized by an enhanced lateral resolution compared with the previously proposed extended synthetic aperture focusing technique (ESAFT). The enhancement of imaging performance is achieved due to more realistic assumption concerning the probability density function of scatterers in the region of interest. The proposed technique takes the form of a two-step algorithm using the result obtained in the first step as a prior for the second step. Final chapter contains summary of our recent experimental and theoretical research on nonlinear ultrasonics of unbounded interfaces. A new theoretical model for rough interfaces is developed, and the experimental results from the copper specimens that mimic contact cracks of different types are presented. Derivation of the theory and selected measurement results are given in appendix.

  5. Pre-clinical testing of a phased array ultrasound system for MRI-guided noninvasive surgery of the brain-A primate study

    MRI-guided and monitored focused ultrasound thermal surgery of brain through intact skull was tested in three rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of skull heating in an animal model with a head shape similar to that of a human. The ultrasound beam was generated by a 512 channel phased array system (Exablate[reg] 3000, InSightec, Haifa, Israel) that was integrated within a 1.5-T MR-scanner. The skin was pre-cooled by degassed temperature controlled water circulating between the array surface and the skin. Skull surface temperature was measured with invasive thermocouple probes. The results showed that by applying surface cooling the skin and skull surface can be protected, and that the brain surface temperature becomes the limiting factor. The MRI thermometry was shown to be useful in detecting the tissue temperature distribution next to the bone, and it should be used to monitor the brain surface temperature. The acoustic intensity values during the 20 s sonications were adequate for thermal ablation in the human brain provided that surface cooling is used

  6. Pre-clinical testing of a phased array ultrasound system for MRI-guided noninvasive surgery of the brain-A primate study

    Hynynen, Kullervo [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: kullervo@bwh.harvard.edu; McDannold, Nathan [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Clement, Greg [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Jolesz, Ferenc A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Zadicario, Eyal [InSightec, Inc., Haifa (Israel); Killiany, Ron [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Moore, Tara [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Rosen, Douglas [Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)

    2006-08-15

    MRI-guided and monitored focused ultrasound thermal surgery of brain through intact skull was tested in three rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to determine the amount of skull heating in an animal model with a head shape similar to that of a human. The ultrasound beam was generated by a 512 channel phased array system (Exablate[reg] 3000, InSightec, Haifa, Israel) that was integrated within a 1.5-T MR-scanner. The skin was pre-cooled by degassed temperature controlled water circulating between the array surface and the skin. Skull surface temperature was measured with invasive thermocouple probes. The results showed that by applying surface cooling the skin and skull surface can be protected, and that the brain surface temperature becomes the limiting factor. The MRI thermometry was shown to be useful in detecting the tissue temperature distribution next to the bone, and it should be used to monitor the brain surface temperature. The acoustic intensity values during the 20 s sonications were adequate for thermal ablation in the human brain provided that surface cooling is used.

  7. 3D ultrasound imaging performance of a row-column addressed 2D array transducer: a simulation study

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares the imaging performance of a 128+128 element row-column addressed array with a fully addressed 1616 2D array. The comparison is made via simulations of the point spread function with Field II. Both arrays have lambda-pitch, a center frequency of 3:5MHz and use 256 active...

  8. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.:3-D Synthetic Aperture Imaging and Row-column Addressing of 2-D Transducer Arrays

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinic...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of colors to show the speed and direction of blood ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound ... limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ... page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; ...

  13. Lateral mode coupling to reduce the electrical impedance of small elements required for high power ultrasound therapy phased arrays

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Yin, Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    A method that uses lateral coupling to reduce the electrical impedance of small transducer elements in generating ultrasound waves was tested. Cylindrical, radially-polled transducer elements were driven at their length resonance frequency. Computer simulation and experimental studies showed that the electrical impedance of the transducer element could be controlled by the cylinder wall thickness, while the operation frequency was determined by the cylinder length. Acoustic intensity (average...

  14. Annular and Cylindrical Phased Array Geometries for Transrectal High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) using PZT and Piezocomposite Materials

    Seip, Ralf; Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy; Frizzell, Leon; Warren, Gary; Smith, Nadine; Saleh, Khaldon; Gerber, Gene; Shung, Kirk; Guo, Hongkai; Sanghvi, Narendra T.

    2005-03-01

    This paper presents engineering progress and the latest in-vitro and in-vivo results obtained with a 4.0 MHz, 20 element, PZT annular transrectal HIFU array and several 4.0 MHz, 211 element, PZT and piezocomposite cylindrical transrectal HIFU arrays for the treatment of prostate cancer. The geometries of both arrays were designed and analyzed to steer the HIFU beams to the desired sites in the prostate volume using multi-channel electronic drivers, with the intent to increase treatment efficiency and reliability for the next generation of HIFU systems. The annular array is able to focus in depth from 25 mm to 50 mm, generate total acoustic powers in excess of 60W, and has been integrated into a modified Sonablate®500 HIFU system capable of controlling such an applicator through custom treatment planning and execution software. Both PZT- and piezocomposite cylindrical arrays were constructed and their characteristics were compared for the transrectal applications. These arrays have been installed into appropriate transducer housings, and have undergone characterization tests to determine their total acoustic power output, focusing range (in depth and laterally), focus quality, efficiency, and comparison tests to determine the material and technology of choice (PZT or piezocomposite) for intra-cavity HIFU applications. Array descriptions, characterization results, in-vitro and in-vivo results, and an overview of their intended use through the application software is shown.

  15. The role of acoustic nonlinearity in tissue heating behind a rib cage using a high-intensity focused ultrasound phased array

    Yuldashev, Petr V.; Shmeleva, Svetlana M.; Ilyin, Sergey A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Gavrilov, Leonid R.; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate theoretically the effects of nonlinear propagation in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field produced by a therapeutic phased array and the resultant heating of tissue behind a rib cage. Three configurations of focusing were simulated: in water, in water with ribs in the beam path and in water with ribs backed by a layer of soft tissue. The Westervelt equation was used to model the nonlinear HIFU field, and a 1 MHz phased array consisting of 254 circular elements was used as a boundary condition to the model. The temperature rise in tissue was modelled using the bioheat equation, and thermally necrosed volumes were calculated using the thermal dose formulation. The shapes of lesions predicted by the modelling were compared with those previously obtained in in vitro experiments at low-power sonications. Intensity levels at the face of the array elements that corresponded to the formation of high-amplitude shock fronts in the focal region were determined as 10 W cm-2 in the free field in water and 40 W cm-2 in the presence of ribs. It was shown that exposures with shocks provided a substantial increase in tissue heating, and its better spatial localization in the main focal region only. The relative effects of overheating ribs and splitting of the focus due to the periodic structure of the ribs were therefore reduced. These results suggest that utilizing nonlinear propagation and shock formation effects can be beneficial for inducing confined HIFU lesions when irradiating through obstructions such as ribs. Design of compact therapeutic arrays to provide maximum power outputs with lower intensity levels at the elements is necessary to achieve shock wave regimes for clinically relevant sonication depths in tissue.

  16. Advantage of annular focus generation by sector-vortex array in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    Jimbo, Hayato; Takagi, Ryo; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive method for cancer treatment. One of the disadvantages of this method is that it has a long total treatment time because of the smallness of the treatment volume by a single exposure. To solve this problem, we have proposed a method of cavitation-enhanced heating, which utilized the heat generated by oscillating the cavitation bubbles, in combination with the method of lateral enlargement of a HIFU focal zone to minimize the surface volume ratio. In a previous study, focal spot scanning at multiple points was employed for the enlargement. This method involves nonlinear propagation and absorption due to the high spatial-peak temporal-peak (SPTP) intensity in addition to the cavitation-enhanced heating. However, it is difficult to predict the size and position of the coagulation volume because they are significantly affected by the nonlinear parameters of the tissue. In this study, a sector vortex method was employed to directly synthesize an annular focal pattern. Since this method can keep the SPTP intensity at a manageably low level, nonlinear propagation and absorption can be minimized. Experimental results demonstrate that the coagulation was generated only in the region where both the cavitation cloud and the heating ultrasound were matched. The proposed method will make the cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment more accurate and predictable.

  17. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of ... What are the limitations of Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? Obstetric ultrasound cannot identify all fetal abnormalities. Consequently, when ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... exam may be part of a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound is a special ultrasound technique that ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients are more ... content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Images ...

  20. Ultrasound-assisted synthesis and visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity of Fe-incorporated TiO2 nanotube array photocatalysts

    Highlights: ► Fe–TiO2NTs were prepared by an ultrasound-assisted impregnating-calcination method. ► The absorption of TiO2NTs in visible light region was enhanced by incorporating Fe. ► Fe–TiO2NTs exhibited the enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity. ► Fe–TiO2NTs photocatalyst is promising for visible light degradation of wastewater. - Abstract: Fe incorporated TiO2 nanotube arrays (Fe–TiO2NTs) were prepared by an ultrasound-assisted impregnating-calcination method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) indicated that α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were deposited into the TiO2 nanotubes, and in the mean time, some Fe3+ ions were doped into TiO2 lattice. The absorption of Fe–TiO2NTs in the visible light region increased with the increase of Fe content. The photocatalytic activity of Fe–TiO2NTs was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The results demonstrated that the Fe–TiO2NTs exhibited significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity compared with pure TiO2NTs. Photoluminescence (PL) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analyses further confirmed that the increased photocatalytic activity of the Fe–TiO2NTs was attributed to an enhanced separation and transfer of photogenerated charge carriers.

  1. Reliability considerations of NDT by probability of detection (POD). Determination using ultrasound phased array. Results from a project in frame of the German nuclear safety research program

    Reliable assessment procedures are an important aspect of maintenance concepts. Non-destructive testing (NDT) methods are an essential part of a variety of maintenance plans. Fracture mechanical assessments require knowledge of flaw dimensions, loads and material parameters. NDT methods are able to acquire information on all of these areas. However, it has to be considered that the level of detail information depends on the case investigated and therefore on the applicable methods. Reliability aspects of NDT methods are of importance if quantitative information is required. Different design concepts e.g. the damage tolerance approach in aerospace already include reliability criteria of NDT methods applied in maintenance plans. NDT is also an essential part during construction and maintenance of nuclear power plants. In Germany, type and extent of inspection are specified in Safety Standards of the Nuclear Safety Standards Commission (KTA). Only certified inspections are allowed in the nuclear industry. The qualification of NDT is carried out in form of performance demonstrations of the inspection teams and the equipment, witnessed by an authorized inspector. The results of these tests are mainly statements regarding the detection capabilities of certain artificial flaws. In other countries, e.g. the U.S., additional blind tests on test blocks with hidden and unknown flaws may be required, in which a certain percentage of these flaws has to be detected. The knowledge of the probability of detection (POD) curves of specific flaws in specific testing conditions is often not present. This paper shows the results of a research project designed for POD determination of ultrasound phased array inspections of real and artificial cracks. The continuative objective of this project was to generate quantitative POD results. The distribution of the crack sizes of the specimens and the inspection planning is discussed, and results of the ultrasound inspections are presented. In

  2. Circumferential lesion formation around the pulmonary veins in the left atrium with focused ultrasound using a 2D-array endoesophageal device: a numerical study

    Pichardo, Samuel; Hynynen, Kullervo [Imaging Research-Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Room C713, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-08-21

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most frequently sustained cardiac arrhythmia affecting humans. The electrical isolation by ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs) in the left atrium (LA) of the heart has been proven as an effective cure of AF. The ablation consists mainly in the formation of a localized circumferential thermal coagulation of the cardiac tissue surrounding the PVs. In the present numerical study, the feasibility of producing the required circumferential lesion with an endoesophageal ultrasound probe is investigated. The probe operates at 1 MHz and consists of a 2D array with enough elements (114 x 20) to steer the acoustic field electronically in a volume comparable to the LA. Realistic anatomical conditions of the thorax were considered from the segmentation of histological images of the thorax. The cardiac muscle and the blood-filled cavities in the heart were identified and considered in the sound propagation and thermal models. The influence of different conditions of the thermal sinking in the LA chamber was also studied. The circumferential ablation of the PVs was achieved by the sum of individual lesions induced with the proposed device. Different scenarios of lesion formation were considered where ultrasound exposures (1, 2, 5 and 10 s) were combined with maximal peak temperatures (60, 70 and 80 {sup 0}C). The results of this numerical study allowed identifying the limits and best conditions for controlled lesion formation in the LA using the proposed device. A controlled situation for the lesion formation surrounding the PVs was obtained when the targets were located within a distance from the device in the range of 26 {+-} 7 mm. When combined with a maximal temperature of 70 {sup 0}C and an exposure time between 5 and 10 s, this distance ensured preservation of the esophageal structures, controlled lesion formation and delivery of an acoustic intensity at the transducer surface that is compatible with existing materials. With a peak

  3. Intravascular Ultrasound

    ... Nuclear Ventriculography Optical Coherence Tomography Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Stress Echocardiography Transesophageal Echocardiography Intravascular Ultrasound | Share Intravascular ultrasound ( ...

  4. Three dimensional (3d) transverse oscillation vector velocity ultrasound imaging

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (300) includes a transducer array (302) with a two- dimensional array of transducer elements configured to transmit an ultrasound signal and receive echoes, transmit circuitry (304) configured to control the transducer array to transmit the ultrasound signal so as to...... the same received set of two dimensional echoes form part of the imaging system...

  5. Micromachined silicon parallel acoustic delay lines as time-delayed ultrasound detector array for real-time photoacoustic tomography

    Cho, Y.; Chang, C.-C.; Wang, L. V.; Zou, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the development of a new 16-channel parallel acoustic delay line (PADL) array for real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The PADLs were directly fabricated from single-crystalline silicon substrates using deep reactive ion etching. Compared with other acoustic delay lines (e.g., optical fibers), the micromachined silicon PADLs offer higher acoustic transmission efficiency, smaller form factor, easier assembly, and mass production capability. To demonstrate its real-time photoacoustic imaging capability, the silicon PADL array was interfaced with one single-element ultrasonic transducer followed by one channel of data acquisition electronics to receive 16 channels of photoacoustic signals simultaneously. A PAT image of an optically-absorbing target embedded in an optically-scattering phantom was reconstructed, which matched well with the actual size of the imaged target. Because the silicon PADL array allows a signal-to-channel reduction ratio of 16:1, it could significantly simplify the design and construction of ultrasonic receivers for real-time PAT.

  6. Py3DFreeHandUS: A PURE PYTHON LIBRARY FOR 3D VOXEL-ARRAY RECONSTRUCTION BY USING 3D FREEHAND ULTRASOUND

    Monari, Davide; Cenni, Francesco; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION and AIM 3D Freehand ultrasound (3DUS) is a technique that combines ultrasound images and position + orientation sensors (POS) with the aim to reconstruct large 3D anatomical parts. However, the few existing applications for applying this technique have at least one of the following disadvantages: i) not open-source; ii) only supporting data streams from a limited number of ultrasound or POS devices; iii) they are written in low-level languages such as C++, making rapid develop...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and organs ... of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries fallopian tubes bladder Pelvic ultrasound exams ... to view the endometrium , the lining of the uterus, and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also provides a ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ... Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are ... Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  12. Assessment of coronary vasomotion by intracoronary ultrasound

    Dupouy, Patrick J.; Dubois-Rande, Jean Luc; Pelle, Gabriel; Gallot, Dominique; Geschwind, Herbert J.

    1993-06-01

    Recently, new intravascular ultrasound devices for intracoronary use became available. The aim of the study was to evaluate the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound for the assessment of coronary artery vasomotion and endothelial function in patients with atherosclerosis. Twenty patients with luminal irregularities on coronary angiogram and a high cholesterol level (287 +/- 19 mg/dl) (group 1) and 6 patients with angiographically smooth arteries and a minimally elevated cholesterol level (197 +/- 12 mg/dl) (group 2) were studied. A mechanical intravascular ultrasound probe (4.3 French, 30 MHz, Cardiovascular Imaging Systems) was placed into the proximal segment of the coronary artery. Off-line measurements of the lumen area and calculation of mean intimal thickness indice was performed using digitized ultrasound images. Endothelial function was studied during a sympathetic stimulation by a cold pressor test and after intracoronary administration of papaverine and linsidomine. Mean intimal thickness was higher in group 1 than in group 2 (1.52 +/- 0.64 mm vs. 0.18 +/- 0.08 mm, p < 0.001). Linsidomine infusion induced a significant vasodilating effect in both groups (p < 0.001).

  13. Ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography using energy-scaled amplitude ratios

    Chen, Ting; Shin, Junseob; Huang, Lianjie

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound attenuation of breast tumors is related to their types and pathological states, and can be used to detect and characterize breast cancer. Particularly, ultrasound scattering attenuation can infer the margin properties of breast tumors. Ultrasound attenuation tomography quantitatively reconstructs the attenuation properties of the breast. Our synthetic-aperture breast ultrasound tomography system with two parallel transducer arrays records both ultrasound reflection and transmission signals. We develop an ultrasound attenuation tomography method using ultrasound energy-scaled amplitude decays of ultrasound transmission signals and conduct ultrasound attenuation tomography using a known sound-speed model. We apply our ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography method to a breast phantom dataset, and compare the ultrasound attenuation tomography results with conventional beamforming ultrasound images obtained using reflection signals. We show that ultrasound transmission attenuation tomography complements beamforming images in identifying breast lesions.

  14. A multivariate study of the performance of an ultrasound-assisted madder dyes extraction and characterization by liquid chromatography-photodiode array detection

    Cuoco, Guillaume; Mathe, Carole; Archier, Paul; Chemat, Farid; Vieillescazes, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    An extraction method of madder (Rubia tinctorum) roots dyes is established and optimized to obtain the original chemical composition. A central composite design (CCD) was developed to specify the importance of the three major factors studied (time, temperature and solvent composition) affecting the ultrasound-assisted extraction of this matrix. A preliminary granulometric study of madder roots is realized in the aim to determine the optimal particles size corresponding to the best ultrasound ...

  15. Simulation study of the effects of near- and far-field heating during focused ultrasound uterine fibroid ablation using an electronically focused phased array: A theoretical analysis of patient safety

    Purpose: Assess the feasibility of using large-aperture, flat ultrasonic transducer arrays with 6500 small elements operating at 500 kHz without the use of any mechanical components for the thermal coagulation of uterine fibroids. This study examines the benefits and detriments of using a frequency that is significantly lower than that used in clinical systems (1–1.5 MHz). Methods: Ultrasound simulations were performed using the anatomies of five fibroid patients derived from 3D MRI. Using electronic steering solely, the ultrasound focus from a flat, 6500-element phased array was translated around the volume of the fibroids in various patterns to assess the feasibility of completing full treatments from fixed physical locations. Successive temperature maps were generated by numerically solving the bioheat equation. Using a thermal dose model, the bioeffects of these simulations were quantified and analyzed. Results: The simulations indicate that such an array could be used to perform fibroid treatments to 18 EM43 at an average rate of 90 ± 20 cm3/h without physically moving the transducer array. On average, the maximum near-field thermal dose for each patient was below 4 EM43. Fibroid tissue could be treated as close as 40 mm to the spine without reaching temperatures expected to cause pain or damage. Conclusions: Fibroids were successfully targeted and treated from a single transducer position to acceptable extents and without causing damage in the near- or far-field. Compared to clinical systems, treatment rates were good. The proposed treatment paradigm is a promising alternative to existing systems and warrants further investigation

  16. Simulation study of the effects of near- and far-field heating during focused ultrasound uterine fibroid ablation using an electronically focused phased array: A theoretical analysis of patient safety

    Ellens, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.ellens@utoronto.ca; Hynynen, Kullervo [Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Assess the feasibility of using large-aperture, flat ultrasonic transducer arrays with 6500 small elements operating at 500 kHz without the use of any mechanical components for the thermal coagulation of uterine fibroids. This study examines the benefits and detriments of using a frequency that is significantly lower than that used in clinical systems (1–1.5 MHz). Methods: Ultrasound simulations were performed using the anatomies of five fibroid patients derived from 3D MRI. Using electronic steering solely, the ultrasound focus from a flat, 6500-element phased array was translated around the volume of the fibroids in various patterns to assess the feasibility of completing full treatments from fixed physical locations. Successive temperature maps were generated by numerically solving the bioheat equation. Using a thermal dose model, the bioeffects of these simulations were quantified and analyzed. Results: The simulations indicate that such an array could be used to perform fibroid treatments to 18 EM{sub 43} at an average rate of 90 ± 20 cm{sup 3}/h without physically moving the transducer array. On average, the maximum near-field thermal dose for each patient was below 4 EM{sub 43}. Fibroid tissue could be treated as close as 40 mm to the spine without reaching temperatures expected to cause pain or damage. Conclusions: Fibroids were successfully targeted and treated from a single transducer position to acceptable extents and without causing damage in the near- or far-field. Compared to clinical systems, treatment rates were good. The proposed treatment paradigm is a promising alternative to existing systems and warrants further investigation.

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... in the lower abdomen and pelvis. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), ... physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal , ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... is used to evaluate the: bladder seminal vesicles prostate Transrectal ultrasound, a special study usually done to view the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ultrasound transducer into ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... bladder seminal vesicles prostate Transrectal ultrasound, a special study usually done to view the prostate gland, involves ... time to the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal , endovaginal ) ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Prostate Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. Three- ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and ... women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of a pelvic ultrasound examination. ...

  10. Obstetric Ultrasound

    1988-01-01

    This article addresses the current indications for an obstetric ultrasound and describes the findings that it is reasonable to expect when reading an ultrasound report. The authors discuss several common obstetrical problems focussing the attention on the usefulness of the imaging information. Finally, they provide a glimpse into the future direction of obstetric ultrasound by discussing vaginal scanning, Doppler assessment of fetal blood flow, and routine ultrasound in pregnancy.

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  12. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    ... is the procedure performed? Head Ultrasound A head ultrasound is performed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at the infant's bedside. The infant is positioned lying face-up. A clear, water-based gel is applied ...

  13. Ultrasound-modulated optical microscopy for ex-vivo imaging of scattering biological tissue

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical microscopy (UOM) based on a long-cavity confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer (CFPI) [J.Biomed.Opt. 13(5), 0504046, (2008)] is used for real time detection of multiply scattered light modulated by high frequency (30 MHz) ultrasound pulses propagating in an optically strongly scattering medium. In this article, we use this microscope to study the dependence of ultrasound-modulated optical signals on the optical absorption of objects embedded about 3 mm deep in tissue mimicking phantoms. These results demonstrate that the dependence is nearly linear. Most importantly, we imaged blood vasculature and melanin in highly scattering tissue samples from a mouse and a rat. Thus UOM can be used to study the morphology of blood vasculature and blood-associated functional parameters, such as oxygen saturation.

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal , endovaginal ) ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures ... limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    ... page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... either side or on occasion placed in a face down position to improve the quality ... (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on ...

  18. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    ... examination table or a swivel chair. For other ultrasound exams, the patient is positioned lying face-up or face-down on an examination table. The radiologist or sonographer may ask you to move the extremity being examined or may ... ultrasound studies of infants and children are performed with ...

  19. Ultrasound imaging using coded signals

    Misaridis, Athanasios

    Modulated (or coded) excitation signals can potentially improve the quality and increase the frame rate in medical ultrasound scanners. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate systematically the applicability of modulated signals in medical ultrasound imaging and to suggest appropriate...... excitation signal. Although a gain in signal-to-noise ratio of about 20 dB is theoretically possible for the time-bandwidth product available in ultrasound, it is shown that the effects of transducer weighting and tissue attenuation reduce the maximum gain at 10 dB for robust compression with low sidelobes...... described. Application of coded excitation in array imaging is evaluated through simulations in Field II. The low degree of the orthogonality among coded signals for ultrasound systems is first discussed, and the effect of mismatched filtering in the cross-correlation properties of the signals is evaluated...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... the examination process. To ensure a smooth experience, it often helps to explain the procedure to the ... on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging ... the device used to examine the patient), as well as the type of body structure and composition ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves into the ... ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... risks associated with x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries in planes that ... physicians with expertise in several radiologic areas. Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... stable or changes over time. top of page Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles or ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, ... the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ...

  12. Hip Ultrasound

    ... Infant ultrasound can be used to check the hips for developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), which in infants can range from a shallow cup (bony acetabular dysplasia), to complete dislocation with the ball of the ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs ... or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without even the minimal risks associated with x- ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, ... technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the ...

  17. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    ... tube immediately next to a testicle that collects sperm) and scrotum. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does ... tube immediately next to a testis that collects sperm made by the testicle) and scrotum. This study ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound ... evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without even the minimal risks ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... between the transducer and the skin that can block the sound waves from passing into your body. ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to best travel ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... associated with x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... by: Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during ... and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without even the minimal ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child ... time to the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without even the minimal ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... to the child prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation ...

  7. Hybrid Beamforming and Steering With Reconfigurable Arrays

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Thomenius, Kai E.; Fisher, Rayette; Carson, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Reconfigurable arrays offer an advantage over traditional ultrasound arrays because of their flexibility in channel selection. To improve ultrasound beamforming and coverage through beam steering, we propose a hybrid beamforming technique to elongate the depth of focus of transmit beams and a method of element selection that improves steering capabilities that take advantage of array reconfigurability using annular rings. A local minimization technique to optimize the hybrid aperture is discu...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  9. Ultrasound-assisted matrix solid phase dispersive extraction for the simultaneous analysis of β-lactams (four penicillins and eight cephalosporins) in milk by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection.

    Karageorgou, Eftichia G; Samanidou, Victoria F; Papadoyannis, Ioannis N

    2012-10-01

    The application of ultrasound-assisted matrix solid phase dispersive extraction for the confirmatory analysis of 12 β-lactam antibiotics in milk by high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection has been proposed herein. Four penicillins (cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, oxacillin, and amoxicillin) and eight cephalosporins (cefaclor, cefadroxil, ceftiofur, cefuroxime, cefoperazone, cefazolin, cephalexin, and cefotaxime) are effectively extracted using a mixed sorbent of Quick Easy Cheap Effective Rugged Safe technique and OASIS HLB providing a matrix free from any endogenous interference. Examined analytes were well resolved on an Inertsil ODS-3 analytical column with a mobile phase of CH(3)COONH(4) (0.05 M) and acetonitrile delivered under a gradient program. 1,7-Dimethyl-xanthine was used as internal standard. The method was validated meeting the European Legislation determining linearity, selectivity, stability, decision limit, detection capability, accuracy, precision, and ruggedness according to the Youden approach. Recoveries of all antibiotics rated from 85.0 to 115.7%, while RSD values were <12.7%. Finally, the method was successfully applied to milk samples purchased from local market. PMID:22941669

  10. Therapeutic ultrasound

    Crum, Lawrence A [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, 1013 NE 40th Street, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105 (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  11. Therapeutic ultrasound

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  12. Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements at the Heel

    Daugschies, M.; Brixen, K.; Hermann, P.;

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound can be used to predict osteoporotic fracture risk, but its ability to monitor therapy is unclear possibly because of its limited precision. We developed a quantitative ultrasound device (foot ultrasound scanner) that measures the speed of sound at the heel...... with the aim of minimizing common error sources like the position and penetration angle of the ultrasound beam, as well as the soft tissue temperature. To achieve these objectives, we used a receiver array, mechanics to adjust the beam direction and a foot temperature sensor. In a group of 60 volunteers, short......-term precision was evaluated for the foot ultrasound scanner and a commercial device (Achilles Insight, GE Medical, Fairfield, CT, USA). In a subgroup of 20 subjects, mid-term precision (1-mo follow-up) was obtained. Compared with measurement of the speed of sound with the Achilles Insight, measurement...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... masses such as ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ... not be used for any purpose other than this referral.

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... to the child prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. top ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist ... your side, facing away from the examiner, with your knees and hips slightly ... page What will I experience during and after the procedure? ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... sometimes seen in infections top of page How should I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound ... a cause of pelvic pain, the sonogram itself should not be painful or significantly increase your discomfort. ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis ... imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on June 12, 2015 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes ... - Prostate Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis About this Site ...

  20. In-situ Attenuation Corrections for Radiation Force Measurements of High Frequency Ultrasound With a Conical Target.

    Fick, Steven E; Ruggles, Dorea

    2006-01-01

    Radiation force balance (RFB) measurements of time-averaged, spatially-integrated ultrasound power transmitted into a reflectionless water load are based on measurements of the power received by the RFB target. When conical targets are used to intercept the output of collimated, circularly symmetric ultrasound sources operating at frequencies above a few megahertz, the correction for in-situ attenuation is significant, and differs significantly from predictions for idealized circumstances. Empirical attenuation correction factors for a 45° (half-angle) absorptive conical RFB target have been determined for 24 frequencies covering the 5 MHz to 30 MHz range. They agree well with previously unpublished attenuation calibration factors determined in 1994 for a similar target. PMID:27274946

  1. Harmonic ultrasound imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamforming

    2012-01-01

    A method includes generating an ultrasound image based on the harmonic components in the received echoes using multi-stage beam forming and data generated therefrom. An ultrasound imaging system (100, 200) includes a transducer array (108) including a plurality of transducer elements configured t...... ultrasound imaging system further includes a synthetic aperture processor (128), including a second beam former (130) configured to process the stored intermediate scan lines, based on a synthetic aperture algorithm, generating a focused image....

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ... not stain or discolor clothing. In some ultrasound studies, the transducer is attached to a probe and ...

  4. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the abdomen ... limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  6. Ultrasound Imaging. Chapter 13

    In the conventional method of ultrasonography, images are acquired in reflection, or pulse echo, mode. An array of small piezoelectric elements transmits a focused pulse along a specified line of sight known as a scan line. Echoes returning from the tissue are received by the same array, focused via the delay-and-sum beam forming process reviewed in Section 13.2, and demodulated to obtain the magnitude, or envelope, of the echo signal. The scanner measures the arrival time of the echoes relative to the time the pulse was transmitted and maps the arrival time to the distance from the array, using an assumed speed of sound. The earliest ultrasound systems would display the result of a single pulse acquisition in 1-D A-mode (amplitude mode) format by plotting echo magnitude as a function of distance. A 2-D or 3-D B-mode (brightness mode) image is acquired by performing a large number of pulse echo acquisitions, incrementally increasing the scan line direction between each pulse echo operation, to sweep out a 2-D or 3-D field of view (FOV). The term B-mode imaging reflects the fact that the echo magnitude from each point in the FOV is mapped to the grey level, or brightness, of the corresponding pixel in the image

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  8. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  9. Signal Processing in Medical Ultrasound B-mode Imaging

    Ultrasonic imaging is the most widely used modality among modern imaging device for medical diagnosis and the system performance has been improved dramatically since early 90's due to the rapid advances in DSP performance and VLSI technology that made it possible to employ more sophisticated algorithms. This paper describes 'main stream' digital signal processing functions along with the associated implementation considerations in modern medical ultrasound imaging systems. Topics covered include signal processing methods for resolution improvement, ultrasound imaging system architectures, roles and necessity of the applications of DSP and VLSI technology in the development of the medical ultrasound imaging systems, and array signal processing techniques for ultrasound focusing

  10. Hippocampal culture stimulus with 4-megahertz ultrasound

    Muratore, Robert; LaManna, Justine K.; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Morrison, Barclay, III

    2012-10-01

    Among current modalities, ultrasound uniquely offers both millisecond and millimeter accuracy in noninvasively stimulating brain tissue. In addition, by sweeping the ultrasound beam within the refractory period of the neuronal tissue, ultrasonic neuromodulation can be adapted to target extended or multiply connected regions with quasi-simultaneity. Towards the development of this safe brain stimulus technique, the response of rat hippocampal cultures to ultrasound was investigated. Hippocampal slices, 0.4-mm thick, were obtained from 8-day old Sprague Dawley rats and cultured for 6 days. The in vitro cultures were exposed to multiple 100-ms 4.04-MHz ultrasound pulses from a 42-mm diameter, 90-mm spherical cap transducer. Peak pressure ranged from 0 through about 77 kPa. Responses in the form of electrical potentials from a sixty channel electrode array were digitized and recorded. The DG and CA1 regions of the hippocampus exhibited similar ultrasonically-evoked field potentials.

  11. Ultrasound and Therapy

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  12. Clinical ultrasound physics

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Hefny, Ashraf F; Corr, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the basic physics of ultrasound is essential for acute care physicians. Medical ultrasound machines generate and receive ultrasound waves. Brightness mode (B mode) is the basic mode that is usually used. Ultrasound waves are emitted from piezoelectric crystals of the ultrasound transducer. Depending on the acoustic impedance of different materials, which depends on their density, different grades of white and black images are produced. There are different methods that can contro...

  13. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  14. Non-linear Ultrasound Imaging

    Du, Yigang

    The theory for modeling non-linear acoustic propagation is addressed in the dissertation. The solutions to both the linear and non-linear wave equations have been found by an angular spectrum approach (ASA), in which an analytical expression can be derived. This makes the calculation complete...... without iteration steps. The ASA is implemented in combination with Field II and extended to simulate the pulsed ultrasound fields. The simulated results from a linear array transducer are made by the ASA based on Field II, and by a released non-linear simulation program- Abersim, respectively. The...... calculation speed of the ASA is increased approximately by a factor of 140. For the second harmonic point spread function the error of the full width is 1.5% at -6 dB and 6.4% at -12 dB compared to Abersim. To further investigate the linear and non-linear ultrasound fields, hydrophone measurements are...

  15. Volumetric Flow Measurement Using an Implantable CMUT Array.

    Mengli Wang; Jingkuang Chen

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes volumetric-flow velocity measurement using an implantable capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) array. The array is comprised of multiple-concentric CMUT rings for ultrasound transmission and an outmost annular CMUT array for ultrasound reception. Microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) fabrication technology allows reception CMUT on this flowmeter to be implemented with a different membrane thickness and gap height than that of transmission CMUTs, optimizing the performance of these two different kinds of devices. The silicon substrate of this 2-mm-diameter CMUT ring array was bulk micromachined to approximately 80 to 100 μm thick, minimizing tissue disruption. The blood-flow velocity was detected using pulse ultrasound Doppler by comparing the demodulated echo ultrasound with the incident ultrasound. The demodulated ultrasound signal was sampled by a pulse delayed in time domain from the transmitted burst, which corresponds to detecting the signal at a specific distance. The flow tube/vessel diameter was detected through the time-flight delay difference from near and far wall reflections, which was measured from the ultrasound pulse echo. The angle between the ultrasound beam and the flow was found by using the cross-correlation from consecutive ultrasound echoes. Artificial blood flowing through three different polymer tubes was experimented with, while keeping the same volumetric flow rate. The discrepancy in flow measurement results between this CMUT meter and a calibrated laser Doppler flowmeter is less than 5%. PMID:23851472

  16. Fundamentals of ultrasonic phased arrays

    Schmerr, Lester W

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail the physical and mathematical foundations of ultrasonic phased array measurements.?The book uses linear systems theory to develop a comprehensive model of the signals and images that can be formed with phased arrays. Engineers working in the field of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) will find in this approach a wealth of information on how to design, optimize and interpret ultrasonic inspections with phased arrays. The fundamentals and models described in the book will also be of significant interest to other fields, including the medical ultrasound and

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  19. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series To use the sharing features on ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... General Ultrasound Videos related to General Ultrasound About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the ... following illness. Ultrasound is used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... again. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    ... The ultrasound gel does not stain or discolor clothing. In some ultrasound studies, the transducer is attached to a probe and inserted into a natural opening in the body. These exams include: Transesophageal ...

  4. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...... and removes the need to integrate custom made electronics into the probe. A downside of row-column addressing 2-D arrays is the creation of secondary temporal lobes, or ghost echoes, in the point spread function. In the second part of the scientific contributions, row-column addressing of 2-D arrays...... was investigated. An analysis of how the ghost echoes can be attenuated was presented.Attenuating the ghost echoes were shown to be achieved by minimizing the first derivative of the apodization function. In the literature, a circular symmetric apodization function was proposed. A new apodization layout...

  5. Modeling of ultrasound transducers

    Bæk, David

    This Ph.D. dissertation addresses ultrasound transducer modeling for medical ultrasound imaging and combines the modeling with the ultrasound simulation program Field II. The project firstly presents two new models for spatial impulse responses (SIR)s to a rectangular elevation focused transducer...

  6. Harmonic Intravascular Ultrasound

    M.E. Frijlink (Martijn)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractMedical ultrasound is a popular imaging modality in cardiology. Harmonic Imaging is a technique that has been shown to increase the image quality of diagnostic ultrasound at frequencies below 10 MHz. However, Intravascular Ultrasound, which is a technique to acoustically investigate arte

  7. Broadband miniature optical ultrasound probe for high resolution vascular tissue imaging.

    Colchester, R. J.; Zhang, E. Z.; Mosse, C. A.; Beard, P.C.; Papakonstantinou, I.; Desjardins, A. E.

    2015-01-01

    An all-optical ultrasound probe for vascular tissue imaging was developed. Ultrasound was generated by pulsed laser illumination of a functionalized carbon nanotube composite coating on the end face of an optical fiber. Ultrasound was detected with a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity on the end face of an adjacent optical fiber. The probe diameter was < 0.84 mm and had an ultrasound bandwidth of ~20 MHz. The probe was translated across the tissue sample to create a virtual linear array of ultrasound tr...

  8. Neonatal cranial ultrasound: current perspectives

    Franco A

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Arie Franco, Kristopher Neal Lewis Department of Radiology, Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA Abstract: Ultrasound is the most common imaging tool used in the neonatal intensive care unit. It is portable, readily available, and can be used at bedside. It is the least expensive cross sectional imaging modality and the safest imaging device used in the pediatric population due to its lack of ionizing radiation. There are well established indications for cranial ultrasound in many neonatal patient groups including preterm infants and term infants with birth asphyxia, seizures, congenital infections, etc. Cranial ultrasound is performed with basic grayscale imaging, using a linear array or sector transducer via the anterior fontanel in the coronal and sagittal planes. Additional images can be obtained through the posterior fontanel in preterm newborns. The mastoid fontanel can be used for assessment of the posterior fossa. Doppler images may be obtained for screening of the vascular structures. The normal sonographic neonatal cranial anatomy and normal variants are discussed. The most common pathological findings in preterm newborns, such as germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage and periventricular leukomalacia, are described as well as congenital abnormalities such as holoprosencephaly and agenesis of the corpus callosum. New advances in sonographic equipment enable high-resolution and three-dimensional images, which facilitate obtaining very accurate measurements of various anatomic structures such as the ventricles, the corpus callosum, and the cerebellar vermis. Limited studies have been performed to predict that longitudinal measurements of these anatomic structures might predict the clinical outcome of high-risk preterm newborns. Hemodynamic Doppler studies may offer the potential for early intervention and treatment to counter the hazards of developmental delay and a moribund clinical outcome

  9. [Ultrasound and color Doppler in nephrology. Physical and technical principles].

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Sonography is an imaging technique that generates tomographic images using ultrasound. The sound constitutes mechanical energy transmitted in a medium by pressure waves. Sound waves with frequencies greater than 20 kHz are called ultrasounds. Diagnostic ultrasounds use frequencies from 1 to 20 MHz. Ultrasound equipment is composed of a scanner, an image monitor, and different transducers that transform acoustic energy into electrical signals and electrical energy into acoustic energy (piezoelectric effect). The spatial resolution defines the minimum distance between two reflectors or echogenic regions that can be imaged as separate reflectors. The spatial resolution is mainly determined by the array design (linear, curved and sectorial) and by the operative system of the transducer. Modern ultrasound machines are very sophisticated medical devices that often support many transducers, imaging modes and display devices. The scan converter memory is the device in which images are formed and then presented to the monitor and to the hard copy devices. PMID:22388909

  10. Obstetric ultrasound simulation.

    Nitsche, Joshua F; Brost, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Obstetric ultrasound is becoming an increasingly important part of the practice of maternal-fetal medicine. Thus, it is important to develop rigorous and effective training curricula for obstetrics and gynecology residents and maternal-fetal medicine fellows. Traditionally, this training has come almost entirely from exposure to ultrasound in the clinical setting. However, with the increased complexity of modern ultrasound and advent of duty-hour restrictions, a purely clinical training model is no longer viable. With the advent of high-fidelity obstetric ultrasound simulators, a significant amount of training can occur in a non-clinical setting which allows learners to obtain significant skill prior to their first patient ultrasound encounter and obtain proficiency in a shorter period of time. In this manuscript we discuss the available obstetric ultrasound simulators and ways to construct a comprehensive ultrasound training curricula to meet the increasing demands of modern maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:23721777

  11. Angular Spectrum Simulation of Pulsed Ultrasound Fields

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    The optimization of non-linear ultrasound imaging should in a first step be based on simulation, as this makes parameter studies considerably easier than making transducer prototypes. Such a simulation program should be capable of simulating non-linear pulsed fields for arbitrary transducer...... geometries for any kind of focusing and apodization. The Angular Spectrum Approach (ASA) is capable of simulating monochromatic non-linear acoustic wave propagation. However, for ultrasound imaging the time response of each specific point in space is required, and a pulsed ASA simulation with multi temporal...... frequencies must be performed. Combining it with Field II, the generation of non-linear simulation for any geometry with any excitation array transducer becomes feasible. The purpose of this paper is to make a general pulsed simulation software using the modified ASA. Linear and phased array transducers are...

  12. TU-A-9A-06: Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Skin Cancer in High-Frequency Ultrasound Images: Initial Comparison with Histology

    Gao, Y [Univ. Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Fishman, K [Sensus Healthcare, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Yang, X [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Liu, T [Emory Univ, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In skin-cancer radiotherapy, the assessment of skin lesion is challenging, particularly with important features such as the depth and width hard to determine. The aim of this study is to develop interative segmentation method to delineate tumor boundary using high-frequency ultrasound images and to correlate the segmentation results with the histopathological tumor dimensions. Methods: We analyzed 6 patients who comprised a total of 10 skin lesions involving the face, scalp, and hand. The patient’s various skin lesions were scanned using a high-frequency ultrasound system (Episcan, LONGPORT, INC., PA, U.S.A), with a 30-MHz single-element transducer. The lateral resolution was 14.6 micron and the axial resolution was 3.85 micron for the ultrasound image. Semiautomatic image segmentation was performed to extract the cancer region, using a robust statistics driven active contour algorithm. The corresponding histology images were also obtained after tumor resection and served as the reference standards in this study. Results: Eight out of the 10 lesions are successfully segmented. The ultrasound tumor delineation correlates well with the histology assessment, in all the measurements such as depth, size, and shape. The depths measured by the ultrasound have an average of 9.3% difference comparing with that in the histology images. The remaining 2 cases suffered from the situation of mismatching between pathology and ultrasound images. Conclusion: High-frequency ultrasound is a noninvasive, accurate and easy-accessible modality to image skin cancer. Our segmentation method, combined with high-frequency ultrasound technology, provides a promising tool to estimate the extent of the tumor to guide the radiotherapy procedure and monitor treatment response.

  13. TU-A-9A-06: Semi-Automatic Segmentation of Skin Cancer in High-Frequency Ultrasound Images: Initial Comparison with Histology

    Purpose: In skin-cancer radiotherapy, the assessment of skin lesion is challenging, particularly with important features such as the depth and width hard to determine. The aim of this study is to develop interative segmentation method to delineate tumor boundary using high-frequency ultrasound images and to correlate the segmentation results with the histopathological tumor dimensions. Methods: We analyzed 6 patients who comprised a total of 10 skin lesions involving the face, scalp, and hand. The patient’s various skin lesions were scanned using a high-frequency ultrasound system (Episcan, LONGPORT, INC., PA, U.S.A), with a 30-MHz single-element transducer. The lateral resolution was 14.6 micron and the axial resolution was 3.85 micron for the ultrasound image. Semiautomatic image segmentation was performed to extract the cancer region, using a robust statistics driven active contour algorithm. The corresponding histology images were also obtained after tumor resection and served as the reference standards in this study. Results: Eight out of the 10 lesions are successfully segmented. The ultrasound tumor delineation correlates well with the histology assessment, in all the measurements such as depth, size, and shape. The depths measured by the ultrasound have an average of 9.3% difference comparing with that in the histology images. The remaining 2 cases suffered from the situation of mismatching between pathology and ultrasound images. Conclusion: High-frequency ultrasound is a noninvasive, accurate and easy-accessible modality to image skin cancer. Our segmentation method, combined with high-frequency ultrasound technology, provides a promising tool to estimate the extent of the tumor to guide the radiotherapy procedure and monitor treatment response

  14. Ultrasound imaging probe with sigma-delta beamformer and apodization therein

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound transducer probe (104) includes a transducer array (108) of elements ( 1 10) that emit an ultrasound signal and receive analog echo signals produced in response thereto and a beamformer (1 12), housed by the probe, that converts the analog echo signals to digital signals, applies de...

  15. Use of ultrasound in the management of thyroid cancer.

    Lew, John I; Solorzano, Carmen C

    2010-01-01

    The use of ultrasound for thyroid cancer has evolved dramatically over the last few decades. Since the late 1960s, ultrasound has become essential in the examination of the thyroid gland with the increased availability of high-frequency linear array transducers and computer-enhanced imaging capabilities of modern day portable ultrasound equipment in a clinic- or office-based setting. As a noninvasive, rapid, and easily reproducible imaging study, ultrasound has been demonstrated to have a broadened utility beyond the simple confirmation of thyroid nodules and their sizes. Recently, office-based ultrasound has become an integral part of clinical practice, where it has demonstrated overwhelming benefits to patients being evaluated and treated for thyroid cancer. Ultrasound has become useful in the qualitative characterization of thyroid nodules based on benign or malignant features. On the basis of such classifications and the relative risk for thyroid malignancy, the need for ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration, preoperative and intraoperative staging, lymph node mapping, and the extent of surgery can subsequently be determined. Furthermore, ultrasound has additional value in the surveillance of patients treated for thyroid cancer. PMID:20215358

  16. Space-based Aperture Array For Ultra-Long Wavelength Radio Astronomy

    Rajan, Raj Thilak; Bentum, Mark; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Belien, Frederik; Arts, Michel; Saks, Noah; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen the rise of various radio astronomy arrays, particularly for low-frequency observations below 100MHz. These developments have been primarily driven by interesting and fundamental scientific questions, such as studying the dark ages and epoch of re-ionization, by detecting the highly red-shifted 21cm line emission. However, Earth-based radio astronomy below frequencies of 30MHz is severely restricted due to man-made interference, ionospheric distortion and almost complete non-transparency of the ionosphere below 10MHz. Therefore, this narrow spectral band remains possibly the last unexplored frequency range in radio astronomy. A straightforward solution to study the universe at these frequencies is to deploy a space-based antenna array far away from Earths' ionosphere. Various studies in the past were principally limited by technology and computing resources, however current processing and communication trends indicate otherwise. We briefly present the achievable science cases, and dis...

  17. Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy An ultrasound-guided breast biopsy uses sound waves ... Guided Breast Biopsy? What is Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy? Lumps or abnormalities in the breast are often ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ... pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse- ...

  19. Medical ultrasound imaging

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy are...... shown. Both systems using linear and non-linear propagation of ultrasound are described. The blood velocity can also be non-invasively visualized using ultrasound and the basic signal processing for doing this is introduced. Examples for spectral velocity estimation, color flow maging and the new vector...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  1. Simulation of post-ADC digital beamforming for large aperture array radars

    Johansson, G.; Borg, J.; Johansson, J.; Lundberg Nordenvaad, M.; Wannberg, G.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents simulations and methods developed to investigate the feasibility of using a Fractional-Sample-Delay (FSD) system in the planned EISCAT_3D incoherent scatter radar. Key requirements include a frequency-independent beam direction over a 30 MHz band centered around 220 MHz, with correct reconstruction of pulse lengths down to 200 ns. The clock jitter from sample to sample must be extremely low for the integer sample delays. The FSD must also be able to delay the 30 MHz wide signal band by 1/1024th of a sample without introducing phase shifts, and it must operate entirely in baseband. An extensive simulation system based on mathematical models has been developed, with inclusion of performance-degrading aspects such as noise, timing error, and bandwidth. Finite Impulse Response (FIR) filters in the baseband of a band-pass-sampled signal have been used to apply true time delay beamforming. It has been confirmed that such use is both possible and well behaved. The target beam-pointing accuracy of 0.06° is achievable using optimized FIR filters with lengths of 36 taps and an 18 bit coefficient resolution. Even though the minimum fractional delay step necessary for beamforming is ˜13.1 ps, the maximum sampling timing error allowed in the array is found to be σ ≤ 120 ps if the errors are close to statistically independent.

  2. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability. (fast track communication)

  3. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    ... page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... either side or on occasion placed in a face down position to improve the quality ... (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on ...

  4. Compensated Row-Column Ultrasound Imaging System Using Fisher Tippett Multilayered Conditional Random Field Model

    Ibrahim Ben Daya; Albert I H Chen; Mohammad Javad Shafiee; Alexander Wong; John T. W. Yeow

    2015-01-01

    3-D ultrasound imaging offers unique opportunities in the field of non destructive testing that cannot be easily found in A-mode and B-mode images. To acquire a 3-D ultrasound image without a mechanically moving transducer, a 2-D array can be used. The row column technique is preferred over a fully addressed 2-D array as it requires a significantly lower number of interconnections. Recent advances in 3-D row-column ultrasound imaging systems were largely focused on sensor design. However, the...

  5. Adaptive Receive and Transmit Apodization for Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Austeng, Andreas; Synnevåg, Johan-Fredrik;

    2009-01-01

    emission images before summation. The method is investigated using simulated SA ultrasound data obtained using Field II. Data of 13 point targets distributed at depths from 40 mm to 70 mm, and a 5.5 MHz, 64-element linear array transducer have been used. The investigation has shown that the introduction of...

  6. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S;

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various...... of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role....

  7. Electronic hardware design for ultrasound Transient Elastography

    Anand Sneh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Transient Elastography, an emerging technique in Medical Ultrasonography has wide spread application in detection of malignant tumors. This non invasive method uses low frequency waves orthogonal to the direction of propagation of ultrasound waves. Piezoelectric crystals in ultrasound probe are excited using high voltage Pulsar which converts digital pulses into high voltages pulses. The pulse parameters are programmed using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA. The circuit has separate crystals for transmission, receptioneliminating high voltage multiplexer and TR switch. The receiver section uses integrated circuit having low noise amplifier, time gain compensation, anti aliasing filter & analog to digital convertor and processed in FPGA. Both FPGAs are controlled by microcontroller. Since all channels are received simultaneously, a large data rate transmission through Ethernet interface for real time data interfacing and image processing is required. The speed of the waves travelling in the orthogonal direction can be measured using motion modeling.

  8. Ultrasound transducer assembly and method for manufacturing an ultrasound transducer assembly

    Dekker, R.; Henneken, V.A.; Louwerse, M.C.; Raganato, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to an ultrasound transducer assembly (10), in particular for intravascular ultrasound systems. The ultrasound transducer assembly comprises at least one silicon substrate element (30) including an ultrasound transducer element (14) for emitting and receiving ultrasound

  9. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... deeper into the body. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ... children or adults). For visualizing internal structure of bones or certain joints, other imaging modalities such as ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles or ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  14. Ultrasound Modulated Bioluminescence Tomography

    Bal, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to reconstruct the density of a luminescent source in a highly-scattering medium from ultrasound modulated optical measurements. Our approach is based on the solution to a hybrid inverse source problem for the diffusion equation.

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... between the transducer and the skin that can block the sound waves from passing into your body. ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  16. Space-based aperture array for ultra-long wavelength radio astronomy

    Rajan, Raj Thilak; Boonstra, Albert-Jan; Bentum, Mark; Klein-Wolt, Marc; Belien, Frederik; Arts, Michel; Saks, Noah; van der Veen, Alle-Jan

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has seen the advent of various radio astronomy arrays, particularly for low-frequency observations below 100 MHz. These developments have been primarily driven by interesting and fundamental scientific questions, such as studying the dark ages and epoch of re-ionization, by detecting the highly red-shifted 21 cm line emission. However, Earth-based radio astronomy observations at frequencies below 30 MHz are severely restricted due to man-made interference, ionospheric distortion and almost complete non-transparency of the ionosphere below 10 MHz. Therefore, this narrow spectral band remains possibly the last unexplored frequency range in radio astronomy. A straightforward solution to study the universe at these frequencies is to deploy a space-based antenna array far away from Earths' ionosphere. In the past, such space-based radio astronomy studies were principally limited by technology and computing resources, however current processing and communication trends indicate otherwise. Furthermore, successful space-based missions which mapped the sky in this frequency regime, such as the lunar orbiter RAE-2, were restricted by very poor spatial resolution. Recently concluded studies, such as DARIS (Disturbuted Aperture Array for Radio Astronomy In Space) have shown the ready feasibility of a 9 satellite constellation using off the shelf components. The aim of this article is to discuss the current trends and technologies towards the feasibility of a space-based aperture array for astronomical observations in the Ultra-Long Wavelength (ULW) regime of greater than 10 m i.e., below 30 MHz. We briefly present the achievable science cases, and discuss the system design for selected scenarios such as extra-galactic surveys. An extensive discussion is presented on various sub-systems of the potential satellite array, such as radio astronomical antenna design, the on-board signal processing, communication architectures and joint space-time estimation of the

  17. Silicon photonic micro-ring resonators to sense strain and ultrasound

    Westerveld, W.J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrated that photonic micro-ring resonators can be used in micro-machined ultrasound microphones. This might cause a breakthrough in array transducers for ultrasonography; first because optical multiplexing allows array interrogation via one optical fiber and second because the silicon-on-in

  18. Integrated Interventional Devices For Real Time 3D Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    Smith, Stephen W.; Lee, Warren; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Pua, Eric C.; Light, Edward D.

    2006-05-01

    Two recent advances have expanded the potential of medical ultrasound: the introduction of real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging with catheter, transesophageal and laparoscopic probes and the development of interventional ultrasound therapeutic systems for focused ultrasound surgery, ablation and ultrasound enhanced drug delivery. This work describes devices combining both technologies. A series of transducer probes have been designed, fabricated and tested including: 1) a 12 French side scanning catheter incorporating a 64 element matrix array for imaging at 5MHz and a piston ablation transducer operating at 10 MHz. 2) a 14 Fr forward-scanning catheter integrating a 112 element 2-D array for imaging at 5 MHz encircled by an ablation annulus operating at 10 MHz. Finite element modeling was then used to simulate catheter annular and linear phased array transducers for ablation. 3) Linear phased array transducers were built to confirm the finite element analysis at 4 and 8 MHz including a mechanically focused 86 element 9 MHz array which transmits an ISPTA of 29.3 W/cm2 and creates a lesion in 2 minutes. 4) 2-D arrays of 504 channels operating at 5 MHz have been developed for transesophageal and laparascopic 3D imaging as well as therapeutic heating. All the devices image the heart anatomy including atria, valves, septa and en face views of the pulmonary veins.

  19. Ultrasound beamforming using compressed data.

    Li, Yen-Feng; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    The rapid advancements in electronics technologies have made software-based beamformers for ultrasound array imaging feasible, thus facilitating the rapid development of high-performance and potentially low-cost systems. However, one challenge to realizing a fully software-based system is transferring data from the analog front end to the software back end at rates of up to a few gigabits per second. This study investigated the use of data compression to reduce the data transfer requirements and optimize the associated trade-off with beamforming quality. JPEG and JPEG2000 compression techniques were adopted. The acoustic data of a line phantom were acquired with a 128-channel array transducer at a center frequency of 3.5 MHz, and the acoustic data of a cyst phantom were acquired with a 64-channel array transducer at a center frequency of 3.33 MHz. The receive-channel data associated with each transmit event are separated into 8 × 8 blocks and several tiles before JPEG and JPEG2000 data compression is applied, respectively. In one scheme, the compression was applied to raw RF data, while in another only the amplitude of baseband data was compressed. The maximum compression ratio of RF data compression to produce an average error of lower than 5 dB was 15 with JPEG compression and 20 with JPEG2000 compression. The image quality is higher with baseband amplitude data compression than with RF data compression; although the maximum overall compression ratio (compared with the original RF data size), which was limited by the data size of uncompressed phase data, was lower than 12, the average error in this case was lower than 1 dB when the compression ratio was lower than 8. PMID:22434817

  20. Clinical Utility of Endoscopic Ultrasound in Solid Pancreatic Mass Lesions Deemed Resectable by Computer Tomography

    Mark A Virtue

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Appropriate surgical exploration and resection of pancreatic carcinoma depends on accurate preoperative evaluation. Objective Determine the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound in predicting the need for surgical exploration in patients with solid pancreatic masses deemed by computer tomography to be resectable without venous grafting (absence of distant metastatic disease or major vascular involvement. Patients All patients between March 2000 and November 2003 with focal pancreatic mass lesions deemed to be surgically resectable by computer tomography. Fortynine patients participated (29 males, 20 females; age range: 40-86 years. Intervention Preoperative linear-array endoscopic ultrasound. Main outcome measure Surgical pathology compared to computer tomography and endoscopic ultrasound results. Results Out of the 49 patients, 33 (67.3% had pancreatic neoplasms and 16 (32.7% had chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound correctly diagnosed all 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound correctly identified 18 (54.5% of those with neoplasms as having unresectable disease while 6 (18.2% patients were appropriately identified as resectable by endoscopic ultrasound. The remaining 9 patients (27.3% were deemed resectable by endoscopic ultrasound, but were unresectable at the time of surgery. None of the patients were falsely designated as unresectable by endoscopic ultrasound. Conclusion Endoscopic ultrasound is an important compliment to computed tomography in predicting resectability and in avoiding nontherapeutic laparotomy of solid pancreatic neoplasms. Moreover, endoscopic ultrasound classification did not discourage surgery of resectable pancreatic masses.

  1. Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsy uses imaging ... Biopsy? What is Ultrasound- and MRI-guided Prostate Biopsy? Ultrasound- and MRI-guided prostate biopsies are performed ...

  2. Assessment of the Kinetic Trajectory of the Median Nerve in the Wrist by High-Frequency Ultrasound

    Yi-Hsun Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is typically diagnosed by physical examination or nerve conduction measurements. With these diagnostics however it is difficult to obtain anatomical information in the carpal tunnel. To further improve the diagnosis of CTS, an attempt using 30 MHz high-frequency ultrasound to noninvasively detect the local anatomical structures and the kinetic trajectory of the median nerve (MN in the wrist was explored. Measurements were performed on the right wrist of 14 asymptomatic volunteers. The kinetic trajectory of the MN corresponding to flexion (from 0° to 90° and extension (from 90° to 0° movements of the fingers were detected by a cross correlation-based motion tracking technique. The average displacements of the MN according to finger movements were measured to be 3.74 and 2.04 mm for male and female subjects, respectively. Moreover, the kinetic trajectory of the MN in both the ulnar-palmar and total directions generally follows a sigmoidal curve tendency. This study has verified that the use of high-frequency ultrasound imaging and a motion tracking technique to sensitively detect the displacement and kinetic trajectory of the MN for the assessment of CTS patients is feasible.

  3. Combined ultrasound and MR imaging to guide focused ultrasound therapies in the brain

    Several emerging therapies with potential for use in the brain, harness effects produced by acoustic cavitation—the interaction between ultrasound and microbubbles either generated during sonication or introduced into the vasculature. Systems developed for transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) thermal ablation can enable their clinical translation, but methods for real-time monitoring and control are currently lacking. Acoustic emissions produced during sonication can provide information about the location, strength and type of the microbubble oscillations within the ultrasound field, and they can be mapped in real-time using passive imaging approaches. Here, we tested whether such mapping can be achieved transcranially within a clinical brain MRgFUS system. We integrated an ultrasound imaging array into the hemisphere transducer of the MRgFUS device. Passive cavitation maps were obtained during sonications combined with a circulating microbubble agent at 20 targets in the cingulate cortex in three macaques. The maps were compared with MRI-evident tissue effects. The system successfully mapped microbubble activity during both stable and inertial cavitation, which was correlated with MRI-evident transient blood–brain barrier disruption and vascular damage, respectively. The location of this activity was coincident with the resulting tissue changes within the expected resolution limits of the system. While preliminary, these data clearly demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to construct maps of stable and inertial cavitation transcranially, in a large animal model, and under clinically relevant conditions. Further, these results suggest that this hybrid ultrasound/MRI approach can provide comprehensive guidance for targeted drug delivery via blood–brain barrier disruption and other emerging ultrasound treatments, facilitating their clinical translation. We anticipate that it will also prove to be an important research tool that

  4. Ultrasound attenuation computed tomography assessment of PAGAT gel dose

    Ultrasound has been previously investigated as an alternative readout method for irradiated polymer gel dosimeters, with authors reporting varying dose responses. We extend previous work utilizing a new computed tomography ultrasound scanner comprising of two identical 5 MHz, 128-element linear-array ultrasound transducers, co-axially aligned and submerged in water as a coupling agent, with rotational of the gel dosimeter between the transducers facilitated by a robotic arm. We have investigated the dose-dependence of both ultrasound bulk attenuation and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) for the PAGAT gel dosimeter. The ultrasound bulk attenuation dose sensitivity was found to be 1.46  ±  0.04 dB m −1 Gy −1, being in agreement with previously published results for PAG and MAGIC gels. BUA was also found to be dose dependent and was measured to be 0.024  ±  0.003 dB MHz −1 Gy −1; the advantage of BUA being its insensitivity to frequency-independent attenuation mechanisms including reflection and refraction, thereby minimizing image reconstruction artefacts. (note)

  5. Synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound imaging: design, simulation, and experimental evaluation.

    Zhang, Haichong K; Cheng, Alexis; Bottenus, Nick; Guo, Xiaoyu; Trahey, Gregg E; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonography is a widely used imaging modality to visualize anatomical structures due to its low cost and ease of use; however, it is challenging to acquire acceptable image quality in deep tissue. Synthetic aperture (SA) is a technique used to increase image resolution by synthesizing information from multiple subapertures, but the resolution improvement is limited by the physical size of the array transducer. With a large F-number, it is difficult to achieve high resolution in deep regions without extending the effective aperture size. We propose a method to extend the available aperture size for SA-called synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging-by sweeping an ultrasound transducer while tracking its orientation and location. Tracking information of the ultrasound probe is used to synthesize the signals received at different positions. Considering the practical implementation, we estimated the effect of tracking and ultrasound calibration error to the quality of the final beamformed image through simulation. In addition, to experimentally validate this approach, a 6 degree-of-freedom robot arm was used as a mechanical tracker to hold an ultrasound transducer and to apply in-plane lateral translational motion. Results indicate that STRATUS imaging with robotic tracking has the potential to improve ultrasound image quality. PMID:27088108

  6. Integrated medical school ultrasound: development of an ultrasound vertical curriculum

    Bahner, David P.; Eric J Adkins; Hughes, Daralee; Barrie, Michael; Boulger, Creagh T; Royall, Nelson A

    2013-01-01

    Background Physician-performed focused ultrasonography is a rapidly growing field with numerous clinical applications. Focused ultrasound is a clinically useful tool with relevant applications across most specialties. Ultrasound technology has outpaced the education, necessitating an early introduction to the technology within the medical education system. There are many challenges to integrating ultrasound into medical education including identifying appropriately trained faculty, access to ...

  7. AMUM LECTURE: Therapeutic ultrasound

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help identify the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  12. Ultrasound Diagnostics of Liver Cancer

    Schukina О.Е.

    2014-01-01

    The literature review presents opportunities of the contemporary ultrasound technologies in diagnostics of liver cancer; diagnostic criteria have been determined; the accuracy degree of the ultrasound method in grey-scale and Doppler imaging have been also revealed.

  13. Array tomography: imaging stained arrays.

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time-consuming and require some practice to perfect. In this protocol, tissue arrays are imaged using conventional wide-field fluorescence microscopy. Images can be captured manually or, with the appropriate software and hardware, the process can be automated. PMID:21041399

  14. Array tomography: production of arrays.

    Micheva, Kristina D; O'Rourke, Nancy; Busse, Brad; Smith, Stephen J

    2010-11-01

    Array tomography is a volumetric microscopy method based on physical serial sectioning. Ultrathin sections of a plastic-embedded tissue are cut using an ultramicrotome, bonded in an ordered array to a glass coverslip, stained as desired, and imaged. The resulting two-dimensional image tiles can then be reconstructed computationally into three-dimensional volume images for visualization and quantitative analysis. The minimal thickness of individual sections permits high-quality rapid staining and imaging, whereas the array format allows reliable and convenient section handling, staining, and automated imaging. Also, the physical stability of the arrays permits images to be acquired and registered from repeated cycles of staining, imaging, and stain elution, as well as from imaging using multiple modalities (e.g., fluorescence and electron microscopy). Array tomography makes it possible to visualize and quantify previously inaccessible features of tissue structure and molecular architecture. However, careful preparation of the tissue is essential for successful array tomography; these steps can be time consuming and require some practice to perfect. This protocol describes the sectioning of embedded tissues and the mounting of the serial arrays. The procedures require some familiarity with the techniques used for ultramicrotome sectioning for electron microscopy. PMID:21041397

  15. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke;

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring a...... SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...... short imaging sequences, whereby both the correct velocity magnitude and angle can be estimated. A number of examples of both phantom and in-vivo SA images will be presented measured by the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS to demonstrate the many benefits of SA imaging....

  16. Ultrasound cleaning of microfilters

    Hald, Jens; Bjørnø, Irina; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to develop, design, and manufacture a high-power ultrasound transducer module to be used for preventing the blocking of plastic-based microfilters by organic materials, and possibly to prolong the lifetime of the filters in industry using the cavitation on the surface...... design suitable for cleaning of microfilters without damaging the filter structure. The filter surface was studied using an optical microscope before and after the experiment. When high-power ultrasound (max. 75 W/cm2) was applied to the surface of some microfilters, no visible damage was found, while...... others filters were damaged. The results of the laboratory experiments formed background for the final design of an ultrasound transducer module for use by foodstuff filtration plants. [This work was financed by the EU Project WAMBIO PL96-3257 (FAIR Programme).]...

  17. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  18. Recent advances in medical ultrasound

    Crum, Lawrence

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound has become one of the most widely used imaging modalities in medicine; yet, before ultrasound-imaging systems became available, high intensity ultrasound was used as early as the 1950s to ablate regions in the brains of human patients. Recently, a variety of novel applications of ultrasound have been developed that include site-specific and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, histotripsy, tissue regeneration, and bloodless surgery, among many others. This lecture will review several new applications of therapeutic ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors.

  19. Ultrasound of renal transplantation

    Baxter, G.M

    2001-10-01

    The most effective primary treatment of chronic renal failure is renal transplantation. A significant improvement in lifestyle and family life in conjunction with it being an extremely cost-effective procedure has resulted in an intense monitoring and imaging programme to help ensure a successful outcome. Ultrasound, both grey-scale and colour-flow Doppler, are useful monitoring techniques when interpreted in the clinical context, and in the delineation of peri-transplant collections, some of which can be drained under ultrasound guidance. After the early post-operative period it can also be utilized in the diagnosis of chronic vascular complications including transplant artery stenosis and arteriovenous fistula, although it is of limited use in the diagnosis of chronic rejection. This article will discuss the role of ultrasound in all its guises and how its efficacy in both the early transplant period in the monitoring of graft dysfunction and in the detection of the more chronic conditions including transplant artery stenosis and arteriovenous fistulae. A more limited role for ultrasound also exists in the long-term follow-up of patients and to aid the detection of complications including susceptibility to malignancy. Baxter, G.M. (2001)

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  1. Recursive ultrasound imaging

    2000-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for recursive ultrasound imaging is presented. The method uses a Synthetic Transmit Aperture, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created at every pulse emission. In receive, parallel beam forming is implemented. The beam formed RF data is added to the previously...

  2. Deconvolution of ultrasound images

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1992-01-01

    Based on physical models, it is indicated that the received pressure field in ultrasound B-mode images can be described by a convolution between a tissue reflection signal and the emitted pressure field. This result is used in a description of current image formation and in formulating a new...

  3. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    ... ultrasound when they suspect a problem called developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) . DDH is a hip deformity that can ... THIS TOPIC X-Ray Exam: Leg Length Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip X-Ray Exam: Hip Contact Us Print Resources ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... that allows the physician to see and evaluate blood flow through arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Full Text Available ... is commonly called an “echocardiogram” or “echo” for short. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to ... not an ideal imaging technique for air-filled bowel or organs obscured by the bowel. In most ...

  6. Tracked ultrasound elastography (TRUE)

    Foroughi, Pezhman

    Medical ultrasound research has experienced a renaissance in the past decade leading to innovations in flow mapping, elasticity and thermal imaging, measurement of optical properties, beamforming, and image enhancement. In this thesis, we focus on ultrasound elastography, an emerging imaging modality with great potential to become a part of several ultrasound diagnostic applications. Elastography images the stiffness of soft tissue by applying a mechanical stimulus and estimating the disturbance created by this stimulus. In freehand elastography, soft tissue is palpated by hand using the ultrasound transducer. The elastography image is generated by comparing the pre- and post-compression images to form a displacement map which is then differentiated to produce the final strain map. To achieve the best result in freehand elastography, the sonographer must compress and decompress the tissue uniformly in a specific direction with adequate compression. This can be a difficult task even for trained users. A small rotational or out-of-plane motion in the collected ultrasound frames can render them unusable for elastography. This has made freehand elastography highly qualitative and user-dependent. We tackle this issue by incorporating the extra information from a position sensor attached to the ultrasound transducer. Our aim is to show that the localization information of ultrasound images may be utilized to improve the quality and reliability of freehand elastography. For this purpose, we have developed a frame selection scheme that finds pairs of images with optimal compression and minimal lateral and out-of-plane displacement. Relying on the localization information, our algorithm merges multiple strain images computed from the selected frame pairs. This method is applicable to both 2D and 3D elastography. Our 3D elastography does not require for the transducer to be held still during the acquisition of each volume. Instead, the sonographer freely palpates the tissue

  7. Synthetic Receive Beamforming and Image Acquisition Capabilities Using an 8 x 128 1.75D Array

    Fernandez, Anna T.; Gammelmark, Kim; Dahl, Jeremy J.;

    2003-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be improved with higher order arrays through elevation dynamic focusing in future, higher channel count systems. However, modifications to current system hardware could yield increased imaging depth-of-field with 1.75D arrays (arrays with individually addressable elements...

  8. Ultrasound Imaging Using Diffraction Tomography in a Cylindrical Geometry

    Chambers, D H; Littrup, P

    2002-01-24

    Tomographic images of tissue phantoms and a sample of breast tissue have been produced from an acoustic synthetic array system for frequencies near 500 kHz. The images for sound speed and attenuation show millimeter resolution and demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining high-resolution tomographic images with frequencies that can deeply penetrate tissue. The image reconstruction method is based on the Born approximation to acoustic scattering and is a simplified version of a method previously used by Andre (Andre, et. al., Int. J. Imaging Systems and Technology, Vol 8, No. 1, 1997) for a circular acoustic array system. The images have comparable resolution to conventional ultrasound images at much higher frequencies (3-5 MHz) but with lower speckle noise. This shows the potential of low frequency, deeply penetrating, ultrasound for high-resolution quantitative imaging.

  9. Flat HIFU transducer with a sawtooth-shaped ultrasound radiation face

    Son, Keon-Ho; Cho, Young-Ki; Kim, Dae-Seung; Kim, Myung-Deok; Kang, Kook-Jin

    2013-10-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducers are spherically-curved in order to obtain a high intensity gain of the converged ultrasound energy at the geometrical focus. Ultrasound imaging devices monitor the procedure of HIFU treatment in ultrasound-guided HIFU systems where the image probe is positioned at the apex of the HIFU transducer, which has a spherical surface. However, the remote image probe's location yields a poor image quality compared to that obtained using conventional ultrasound imaging where the image probe is in direct contact with the surface. A phased array HIFU transducer with a new structure is suggested to overcome this limitation. The centers of the array elements are distributed over the flat surface of the transducer. However, the elements are tilted to form a geometrical focus, like a transducer with a spherically-curved surface, to obtain a high focal gain. The cross-section of the ultrasound radiation face of the transducer resembles the teeth of a saw. The acoustic field emitted from this transducer was simulated in order to design and produce the transducer. The simulation was compared with the measured sound field to verify that the transducer was correctly manufactured and designed; subsequently, the acoustic power was measured, and ultrasound images were obtained through the installation of an image probe on the transducer, which confirmed the application of this transducer to HIFU treatment.

  10. Integrated transrectal probe for translational ultrasound-photoacoustic imaging

    Bell, Kevan L.; Harrison, Tyler; Usmani, Nawaid; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-03-01

    A compact photoacoustic transrectal probe is constructed for improved imaging in brachytherapy treatment. A 192 element 5 MHz linear transducer array is mounted inside a small 3D printed casing along with an array of optical fibers. The device is fed by a pump laser and tunable NIR-optical parametric oscillator with data collected by a Verasonics ultrasound platform. This assembly demonstrates improved imaging of brachytherapy seeds in phantoms with depths up to 5 cm. The tuneable excitation in combination with standard US integration provides adjustable contrast between the brachytherapy seeds, blood filled tubes and background tissue.